The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00109

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
^ m OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Volume 14 Number 33
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1988
forfModwt
Price 40 Cents
Gerda Klein To Address
WD Campaign Event
The Business and Profes-
sional Women's Group Cam-
paign is underway and will
hold its Campaign Event on
Monday, November 7 at 6 p.m.
B&P women are invited to
attend a $150 minimum gift
dinner at the Brazilian Court
Hotel in Palm Beach, featur-
ing guest speaker, Gerda
Klein. A special pre-event
reception will be held at 5:30
p.m., with Gerda Klein, to
honor the B&P women who
have made a minimum cam-
paign gift of $1200. Following
the pre-event reception, Mrs.
Klein, a distinguished author,
journalist, historian and lec-
turer, will address the women.
"Gerda Klein has visited this
community before and is a
highly moving and motivating
speaker," said Angela Lam-
pert, B&P Women's Campaign
Chair. "We're very pleased to
welcome her back for our cam-
paign event."
Ms. Klein's writings, lec-
tures and personal acounts of
her life have inspired women
throughout the years to
become more involved in Jew-
ish communal life. Her first
book, All But My Life, is an
autobiography, hailed by crit-
ics in the U.S. and abroad as
one of the most beautiful and
moving documents to come out
of WWII.
Since then she has written
several more books, including
her most recent one, A
Passion For Sharing, a
fascinating and compassionate
biography of Edith Rosenwald
Stern, a philanthropist who
fought for civil rights and the
growth of the arts and
education.
Utilizing pen and podium,
Inside
JF&CS Featured:
Mosaic Enters
25th Season
.............................Page 2
Help Is On The Way
Teacher's Center
Opens
.............................Page 2
A Political Split:
Jews Rally For Both
Parties
.......................Page 8&9
Further Campaign
Analysis
...........................Page 10
Gerda Klein
Mrs. Klein has devoted her life
to the preservation of human
rights and dignity. All of her
work is marked by a focus on
the positive and uplifting
aspects of the human condi-
tion. She has received much
recognition and numerous
awards for her work.
"Mrs. Klein is a special
speaker for the B&P women,"
Mrs. Lampert explained. "We
all need to be reminded of how
vital each individual is to the
Jewish people and how much
each person can do by streng-
thening and deepening their
own commitment. Gerda Klein
is a refreshing example of
that."
The 1988/89 B&P Women's
Campaign Committee consists
of the $5,000 Minimum Golda
Meir Task Force with commit-
tee members: Helen Hoffman,
Marva Perrin, Dr. Norma J.
Schulman and Dr. Elizabeth
Shulman; Robin Weinberger,
$1200 Minimum Pre-Event
Reception Committee Chair,
and committee members: Les-
lie Adams, Betsy Miller, Leah
Siskin and Barbara Sommers;
Marjorie Berg, $365 Minimum
Campaign Event Committee
Chair, and committee
members: Marci Adler, Sonia
Kay; Mim Levinson, $150
Minimum Campaign Event
Committee Chair, and
committee members: Roxanne
Axelrod, Kari Ellison, Esther
Kosowski, Beth Levinson,
Ilene Narbut, Olivia Tartakow,
Jayne Weinberg, Elaine
Weber and Eileen Zimkind;
and Amy Pearlman, Super
Sunday Chair.
"This year we hope to pro-
vide B&P women with more
education on where their cam-
paign dollars are going," Mrs.
Lampert explained. "I really
believe in what we're doing
and hope we can educate and
motivate more women to
develop their individual com-
mitment."
Mrs. Lampert has lived in
Palm Beach County for almost
six years. She has been
involved in the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women as a
trainer and President of the
Flagler Evening Section as
well as a member of national
committees. This is her second
year as a member of the Fed-
eration Board of Directors. In
addition to her other activities
in the Jewish community, Mrs.
Lampert is active in the
Comunity Relations Council of
the Jewish Federation, Human
Resources Development, the
Young Adult Division and was
a Co-Chair of Super Sunday
last year.
For more information on the
November 7th Campaign
Event, please contact Faye
Nelson, Women's Division Dir-
ector, Jewish Federation, 832-
2120.
GREGORY PECK AT MASADA CONCERT American
actor Gregory Peck addresses an audience of about 4,000
people before the start of an Israeli Philharmonic festive
performance conducted at the foothills ofMasada near the
Dead Sea. The concert was the last of the festivities marking
Israel's UOth anniversary. (APIWide World Photo.)
Pentagon Permits
Wearing Of Yarmulkes
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
U.S. Defense Secretary Frank
Carlucci rescinded a Pentagon
directive that would have
allowed military officers to bar
the wearing of visible religious
garb "under unique circum-
stances, such as basic and ini-
tial military skills and specialty
training."
The original directive was
issued Feb. 3, to help imple-
ment a bill signed into law a
few weeks earlier that pro-
tected, among other things,
the right of Orthodox Jews in
the military to wear "neat and
conservative" yarmulkes, as
long as they do not interfere in
Continued on Page 8
Soviet Emigration
Highest Since 1980
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union continued to rise
last month, reaching the high-
est level since April 1980,
when 2,469 Jews left the
USSR.
A total of 2,051 Soviet Jews
were allowed to emigrate last
month, 190 of whom, or 9.3
percent, went to Israel, the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported Thursday.
The September figure re-
presents 18.5 percent rise over
the August total and brings
emigration for the year so far
to 11,238 Soviet Jews, the
National Conference said.
That would make 1988 the
highest Soviet Jewish emigra-
tion year since 1980, when
21,471 Jews were permitted to
leave. Emigration this year
more than 12 times the total
for 1986.
Most Jews leaving the Soviet
Union on Israeli visas are still
passing through Vienna,
where tiie va&i majority decide
to emigrate to countries other
than Israel. Only 76 Soviet
Jews decided last month to fly
directly to Israel by way of
Bucharest, Romania.
The Israeli Cabinet decided
in June that Soviet Jews leav-
ing on Israeli visas must come
to Israel through Bucharest.
But the direct flight policy has
not yet been implemented.
In addition to Soviet Jews,
320 non-Jews were allowed to
emigrate last month on Israeli
visas, at the Soviet Union's
request.
Shmuel Ben-Zvi, secretary-
general of the Israel Public
Council, also reported that of
2,300 refusenik families in the
USSR, 500 have been waiting
is already more than 10 years
for exit permits, and 1,600
have been waiting between
five and 10 years. Another 200
families have been waiting
fewer than five years.
(JTA COrrmpondtnt Hugh Orgel i>i
7'c/ Aviv contributed to tint rtport)
j


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Mosaic Enters WD B&p Campaign Committee
25th Season
On October 22nd, Mosaic,
the Federation sponsored
weekly television program
aired Sunday mornings at 11,
will enter its 25th season on
WPTV Channel 5. The
program will highlight and
demonstrate a variety of
services offered by the Jewish
Family & Children's Service,
an agency of the Jewish
Federation.
Host Barbara Gordon-Green
will explore three JF&CS ser-
vices: the Alzheimer Disease
Initiative, which recruits and
trains volunteers to assist fam-
ilies who have Alzheimer
patients in their homes; The
Link To Life Program, which
provides home monitoring for
seniors who may need emer-
gency medical help; and Elder
Connection, a service offered
to adult children living out of
the area who are concerned
about their elderly parents.
The program, which was
shot on location, will include
David Schwartz, President of
the Jewish Family & Chil-
dren's Service; Neil Newstein,
Executive Director of
the JF&CS; Gail Schwartz,
Link To Life Representative;
Vivian Kelly, MSW, Family
and Marital Therapist; Sharon
Cohen, Gerontology Social
Worker; and Barbara Arter,
Project Coordinator of Alz-
heimer's Disease Initiative
Program.
"The Jewish Federation is
very fortunate to have the
close, long-standing relation-
ship we have had with Channel
5," said Federation President
Alec Engelstein. "We are
especially grateful to General
Manager William J. Brooks for
his sincere and consistent
interest in our program. We
hope to be on the air for
another 25 years and will con-
tinue to strive for the finest
programming possible, featur-
ing a variety of interesting
issues and services affecting
both the Jewish and overall
communities."
U.S. Immunity
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan administration
has granted a limited form of
diplomatic immunity to
roughly 50 officials in Israel's
military procurement mission
in New York.
State Department spokes-
woman Phyllis Oakley
announced that from now on,
the United States will consider
the 250-person mission as an
a "annex to the Israeli Consu-
ls late" in New York.
After Hours
YAD Holds Business
Executives Forum
Pictured above are members of the 1988/89 B&P Women's
Campaign Committee. Sitting (l-r) are Marjorie Berg, $865
Category Chair; Barbara Sommers, Ingrid Rosenthal, Vice
President B&P Women's Group; Kari Ellison and Angela
Lampert, Campaign Chair. Standing (l-r) are Mim
Levinson, $150 Category Chair; Amy Pearlman, Super
Sunday Chair; Beth Levinson, Marci Adler, Guest Speaker
Gail Newman, Miami B&P Campaign Chair, Olivia
Tartakow, Elaine Weber and Jayne Weinberg. Additional
Campaign committee members not pictured are: Robin
Weinberger, $1200 Pre-Event Reception Chair; Leslie
Adams, Roxanne Axelrod, Helen Hoffman, Soni Kay,
Esther Kosowski, Betsy Miller, Ilene Narbut, Marva
Perrin, Dr. Norma Shulman, Dr. Elizabeth Shulman, Leah
Siskin, Eileen Zimkind.
Teacher's Will Find
Materials, Aid At
New Center
A teacher's work is never
done, but if there is a place to
go for materials and assis-
tance, then the endless work is
made easier.
The long-awaited commun-
ity Teacher's Center will open
its doors on Tuesday, Novem-
ber 1, 1988, at the Jewish
Community Day School, 5801
Parker Avenue in West Palm
Beach.
Sponsored by the Education
Department of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, the Center will pro-
vide a multi-faceted facility
enabling teachers and com-
munity leaders to prepare pos-
ters, games and lesson plans
for the classroom as well as
instructional manuals.
Ruth Levow, Director of the
Center, will be available to
assist visitors in selecting
laminating materials and
copying educational materials.
Art and Crafts Specialist,
Linda Chazin, will also staff
the Center.
During the week of Novem-
ber 1st, the Center will have
an Open House featuring
demonstrations and teacher
workshops on puppetry and
arts and crafts. Kits contain-
ing Chanukah materials for
the classroom will be given to
each visitor.
The Center will be open on
Mondays, Tuesdays and Wed-
nesdays from 4-7 p.m. and
Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. The Center site will also
serve as the focal point for a
series of teacher in-service
courses and for an outreach
program which will bring
materials and workshop lead-
ers to the schools in our consti-
tuency. The Media Center,
with its large assortment of
video-tapes, slides and film-
strips, will continue to be
housed in the Federation build-
ing until larger facilities are
available.
Bankers hours have been
extended for Young Adult
Division Business & Execu-
tives on Thursday, October 27.
Herschel Rosenthal, President
of Flagler Federal Savings &
Loan, has invited the Young
Adult Division to hold its
second Business & Executive
Forum at the new Flagler Fed-
eral on the corner of Palm
Beach Lakes Blvd. and Con-
gress Avenue 6-8 p.m. Mr.
Rosenthal will also give the
Forum attendees an update on
the savings & loan industry
and S. Florida business.
"This will be one of the many
Business & Executive Forums
sponsored by local busi-
nesses," said Howard Levy,
Event Chairperson. "It's a
great benefit to both the spon-
soring businesses and the
Young Adult Division," Levy
explained. "It allows us to
increase our program, find
interesting locations for our
events, and the sponsor gains
a lot of exposure through their
community involvement with
us."
Guest speaker and BEF
sponsor, Mr. Rosenthal first
joined Flagler Federal in 1956
and became President in 1976.
He serves on the U.S.
League's Legislative Commit-
tee for 1988 and is a U.S.
League Insurance Group
Board Member, Chairman of
the Audit Committee, Director
of the University of Miami
Alumni Association School of
Business, and Director of the
University of Miami General
Miami Alumni Board. Rosen-
thal is also past member of the
Thrift Institution Advisory
Council to the Federal Reserve
Board of Governors.
Jacqueline Ipp, Chair of the
Business Networking Commit-
tee, appointed Howard Levy
to chair the BEF as his first
Young Adult Division event.
He is a member of the Busi-
ness Networking Committee.
Levy has lived in this commun-
ity for six years and just
started his own CPA company.
He is the president of the East
Coast Chapter of the Florida
Institute of CPAs and is a Unit
Chairman for the Professional
Division of the United Way. A
graduate of the University of
Maryland, Levy is married and
has two children.
The Business Networking
Committee consists of Donna
Zeide Kener, Morris Kener,
Howard Levy, Michael Lif-
shitz, Charlotte Morpurgo,
Peter Morpurgo, Jamie Muss-
macher, Amy Pearlman, Har-
ris Rosen, Olivia Tartakow,
Harvey White and Jack.
Schram.
The BEF offers cocktails
and hors d'oeuvres and a busi-
ness card drawing with a spe-
cial door prize. The Forum is
an opportunity for members of
the Jewish Business and Pro-
fessional community to meet
and interact with each other.
It is sponsored by the Young
Adult Division to encourage
further participation in the
Jewish Federation, to develop
new business opportunities
and to increase awareness of
Jewish and business related
topics.
ca
-
ACTIVITIES
COORDINATOR
Searching for a special outgoing person to
work with the elderly. Past experience
desired. Degree in Recreational Therapy pre-
ferred.
Send resume or call Susan Fleischer:
Jewish Family & Children's Service
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite #104
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
407-684-1991
50th Anniversary of Kristallnacht
A Community Wide Observance
Wednesday, November 9, 1988
7:30 p.m.
A Musical Program of Memory and Hope Featuring:
THE SIX DAYS OF DESTRUCTION
By: Elie Wiesel & Albert H. Friedlander
Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach
Sponsored By:
THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL
JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
AND
THE PALM BEACH COUNTY BOARD OF RABBIS
Tich is an available through local Synagogues
ami th, Holocaust Survivors of the Palm Beaches


Project Renewal Expanding
New Department Formed
To Encompass Growth
Rosh Hashanah, known as
Yom T'ruah the day of the
sounding of the Shofar the
Shofar calls us to renew our
commitment to improving life
for Jews throughout the
world. One way the Jewish
Agency's commitment to this
goal has been sounded is by
Project Renewal.
This year, Project Renewal
was enlarged and has become
the new Department of Pro-
ject Renewal and Develop-
ment. As of this June, the
professional leadership of this
new and expanded department
falls to Yaacov Friedman.
"Friedman is one of the new
Baal T'kiot Shofar Blowers
of the revitalized Jewish
Agency, sounding the ever
closer ties linking Israeli and
Diaspora Jews," stated UIA's
Chairman, Henry Taub, of
Englewood, New Jersey.
A sabra, Yaacov Friedman
grew up in a workers' housing
project near Haifa. His father
was in charge of maintenance
at a local school. Friedman
earned a degree in Agronomy
and a Master's degree in Econ-
omics and began his career in
the field of agricultural and
economic planning.
After the Yom Kippur War,
44
Friedman decided to commit
himself to improving Israeli
society. The opportunity pre-
sented itself when Shimon
Ravid, then Director-General
of the Settlement Department,
offered him a position as
Director of Planning and
Development for the Northern
Region. Friedman has
remained with the Jewish
Agency in various executive
positions until his current
appointment to the Depart-
ment of Project Renewal and
Development.
In accordance with the
Board of Governors' decision
at its February 1988 meetings,
this new department incorpor-
ates the activities of the fol-
lowing bodies: the Project
Renewal Department, the
Israel Education Fund (con-
struction division), the Unit for
Special Projects for the Galil
and the Negev, the Israeli
branch of the Youth and
Hechalutz Department of the
World Zionist Organization,
the Social Programs section of
Amigur, and the training pro-
grams for the development of
community leadership.
Friedman believes that his
department requires rational
restructuring, mainly due to
its enlarged budget and
Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Israel Aid to Territories
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Israel will continue to work for the
economic development of the territories it administers, despite
the violence of the Palestinian uprising, an Israeli official told an
international panel here.
Ayraham Milo, minister-counselor of Israel to the United
Nations in Geneva, addressed the board meeting of the United
Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
"The basic services will continue to be provided by the civil
administration," Milo said.
increased responsibilities.
Among the most important
programs he would like to see
evaluated and improved upon
are educational and social pro-
grams, Project Renewal, and
the Israel Education Fund. By
applying Project Renewal's
successful model of urban
renewal to other problems of
social development, he would
like to see the department
become the vanguard of a revi-
talized Jewish Agency.
According to Friedman, the
following goals are a top prior-
ity for the department:
to implement the Jewish
Agency Assembly's resolution
calling for focusing future
social and educational activi-
ties in the Galil and the Negev.
to create an innovative
infrastructure for twinning
Diaspora communities to
Israeli communities, thereby
strengthening the Diaspora-
Israel partnership.
"Rosh Hashanah is an espe-
cially good time to focus on
helping Jews," stated Henry
Taub, "What better time is
there to announce the appoint-
ment of a man who will work
to help improve the lives of
Israelis?"
The Ties That Bind"
B&P Men Leave For Israel
The ties that bind Jews to
Israel, that have kept the
Jewish nation intact for
thousands of years, are the
same that have inspired
today's secular Jews to work
for the unity of the Jewish
people at the sacrifice of their
own time and money.
Nothing deepens those ties
more than a visit to the source,
to the country that grabs a
Jew's heart as he flies over the
sandy deserts, vistas of green
countryside and bodies of
ancient waters on his way to
landing in Eretz Yisrael.
On Saturday, Oct. 22, the
Vanguard Mission, ten Palm
Beach County leaders from the
Business & Professional Men's
Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion, will arrive in Israel for
nine days of countryside tours,
meetings with Israeli leaders,
briefings on current issues and
visits to Federation funded
projects.
Participants in the Mission
are Robert Abrams, Barry
Berg, co-chair, Dr. Robert
Green, co-chair, Leonard
Hanser, Joel Koeppel, Dr. Paul
Liebman, Mike Platner, Henry
Saiontz, Ron Schram, and Jen
Zane.
"The major purpose of this
mission is to help groom the
future leadership of the Jewish
community in Palm Beach
County," said Barry Berg, Co-
Chair. "Participants were
selected based on their
previous level or commitment
to the community of their
demonstrated desire to
become more active." This will
be the second year the
Business and Professional
Men's Division is sending a
Vanguard Mission to Israel.
Dr. Robert Green, Mission
co-chair, was primarily
involved in the Anti-
Defamation League before he
was selected to participate in
last year's mission. "I had just
never been involved in Federa-
tion," he explained. "But
going to Israel really opened
my eyes. It was a wonderful
trip and it strengthened my
commitment to the Jewish
community." This year, Dr.
Green, who has lived in Palm
Beach County all his life and
watched the Jewish commun-
ity grow from infancy, is a
member of the Board of the
Federation and is leading this
year's Vanguard Mission.
The mission will take partici-
pants to an air base in the
Negev, to the Lebanese bor-
der, on a tour of the Golan and
a visit to Gush Etzion. The
men will meet some of Israel's
National Council VIP
Dadie Perlov, executive dir-
ector of the National Council
of Jewish Women (NCJW), has
been chosen by the Ladies'
Home Journal as one of Amer-
ica's 100 most important
women. Perlov was selected
for her administration of
NCJW, a national women's
volunteer organization of
100,000 members, which
focuses on priorities of chil-
dren and youth, women's
issues, Israel, Jewish life,
aging, and Constitutional
rights. Perlov, who previously
By LORISCHULMAN
political and business leaders
and visit various museums,
memorial sites and projects
funded by American dollars.
Segments of the trip will be
filmed and broadcast on local
TV station Channel 5. In an
unprecedented trip to the
Middle East, WPTV is sending
a film crew to accompany the
Federation group and to film a
five-part series on Israeli
lifestyles, called "The Ties
That Bind."
The crew will also be inter-
viewing mission participants
and covering different sites
they visit. The series will be
aired during the WPTV eve-
ning news, November 7-11.
"We're looking for a very
human view of the different
Jewish, Arab and Christian
lifestyles in Israel" said Kerry
Deems, Field Producer of the
Israel series. "We don't want
to bring home any network
photos. We plan to supplement
the news by examining how
the conflicts impact different
families there and how they
affect every aspect of family
life," she said.
The Channel 5 crew will
include Ms. Deems; Denise
Jakows, Anchor/Reporter; Ed
Roos, Technical Assistant; and
Wilfred Ardley, Photo-
grapher.
was executive director of the
NY Library Association, is a
leader in the field of associa-
tion management. A Certified
Association Executive (CAE),
she was named 1980 Execu-
tive of the Year by the New
York State Association of Con-
vention Bureaus.
GERIATRIC
SPECIALIST
Exciting full time position for an experienced
professional. Work closely with the elderly,
their families and the community. Person
should have a degree in Social Work or
Behavioral Sciences.
Send resume or call Susan Fleischer:
Jewish Family & Children's Service
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite #104
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
407-684-1991
Day School Election Results
The Jewish Community Day School of Palm Beach County
recently elected officers for the school's Knesset, or Student
Government. They are: (I tor, 1st row) Eric Ray, Treasurer; Raft
Cohen, Commissioner of Elections; Marshall Rosenbach, Secret-
ary; Abie Schwarzberg, Vice President; Rachel Klein, President.
Pictured behind the officers are the Knesset advisors, teacher
Peggy Leznoff, Executive Director Dr. Nissim M. EVoaz, Admin-
istrative Secretary Susan Lord. The Knesset actively functions as
the body representing the interests, ideas and suggestions of the
students to the administration. Along with the presidents of 4th,
5th, 6th, 7th and 8th grades, the Knesset plans school spirit,
fundraising, and school and community service activities. They
help in the distribution ofChallah on Fridays and coordinate the
collection and allocation of Tzedakah. The JCDS is the only
Jewish day school serving northern and central Palm Beach
County and has over 285 students in grades K-8.
Century Village Campaign Kickoff
November 15. 1988
Century Village Clubhouse
lO a.m.
Featuring
Rabbi Richard Rocklin
of Lake Worth Jewish Center
Aharon Doron, Major General (Ret.)
and Special Israeli Consultant to
Florida Region of United Jewish Appeal
and
Cantorial Music Ely
Cantor David Feuer of Temple Emanu-EI
For more information, contact Dr. Lester Silverman.
Campaign Associate. Jewish Federation. 832-2120


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Viewpoint
Upgraded Status
On the heels of the warming relations
between Hungary and Israel, it is indeed
welcome news that diplomatic channels with
Poland and the Jewish State are widening, as
well.
When Israel Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
paid his official visit to the United Nations, he
met privately with his Polish counterpart,
Tadeusz Olechowski. The results of that con-
ference may be seen in the upgraded status of
each country's mission in Warsaw and Tel
Aviv.
Instead of being sheltered under the
umbrella of a Dutch aegis, the countries will
take the mutually coordinated steps that
reflect a matured relationship.
It is a long way in miles and tortured history
since Auschwitz, Birkenau and Majdanek. A
more recent strain is linked directly to the Six
Day War, when as did most of Eastern
EuropePoland cuts its diplomatic ties to
Israel in 1967.
Now, as the world grows increasingly
smaller and economic, political and cultural
networks interlock more tightly, the import of
this move multiplies.
Abba Eban, only recently cut from the
Labor slate, has been tapped as his nation's
emissary to several of the Soviet bloc's coun-
tries in an effort to advance the diplomatic
thaw.
That appointment is appropriate and the
strategy is significant.
First Monday
In October, etc.
The first Monday in October saw the open-
ing session of the Supreme Court. What the
court's calendar will see bodes well for the
nation's conservatives.
Since the appointment and approval of
Justice Anthony Kennedy, there is a definitive
swing to the right predicted on issues on this
country's social agenda.
When cases to be determined come before
the court in the areas of civil rights quotas,
Sabbath observances and church/state
abridgement, Jews would be wise to measure
the movement to the right.
While Ronald Reagan is a lame-duck presi-
dent, his influence will be felt long past Jan. 20
when a new administration will be inaugurat-
ed.
It would be wise, therefore, to look to this
election year's candidates and realize that
their potential reach goes beyond the grasp of
the White House. This year's elected presi-
dent will be the ghost hovering over future
Supreme Court decisions.
the
Christianity's Historic Obligation
By RABBI
MARC H. TANENBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) For
those who have doubts about
the "practical" value of posi-
tive Jewish-Christian rela-
tions, it would be instructive to
study the critical role played
by philo-Semitism in the crea-
tion of the State of Israel.
In his comprehensive book,
"History of Israel," Professor
Howard Sachar observed that
when Dr. Chaim Weizmann
was desperately seeking to win
the support of Great Britain as
"the protectorate over a Jew-
ish homeland," he found his
greatest response among Brit-
ish Protestant evangelicals.
There was, Sachar writes,
"a mystical veneration with
which many devout Anglo-
Saxon (or Welsh or Scottish)
Protestants regarded the Old
Testament traditions, the Chil-
dren of Israel, and particularly
the Holy Land itself."
These believing Christians
included such central personal-
ities as Prime Minister Lloyd
George; Foreign Secretary
Lord Balfour (who wrote the
final version of the famed
Declaration); Jan Christian
Smuts, a Cabinet member of
South Africa; and Lord Pal-
merston.
Lloyd George wrote that in
his first meeting with Weiz-
mann in December 1914, his-
toric sites in Palestine were
mentioned that were "more
familiar to me than those of
the Western front."
These men, states Sachar,
"felt deeply Christianity's his-
toric obligation to the Jews,"
and that among other rea-
sons resulted in the Balfour
Declaration and the mandate
for a Jewish National Home in
Palestine.
In analogous ways, that
Bible-based philo-Semitism
exists widely among millions
of American Christians who
support Israel, with all her
present difficulties. The Jew-
ish-Christian dialogue is the
surest force that nurtures
these positive feelings toward
Jews and Israel.
Hunt Family; Philosophy and Genealogy
Jewish floridian
o> Palm Beach County
USPS 069030 ISSN 87505061
Combining Our Voice and Federation Reporter
FREOK SHOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET LORI SCHULMAN
Editor and Publisher Eiecutive Editor Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid May BiWeekly balance ol year
Second Class Postage Paid at West Palm Beach
Additional Mailing Ollices
PALM BEACH OFFICE
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Main Office a Plant 120NE6thSt Miami. FL 33101 Phone 13734605
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Advertising Director: Steel Lesser Phone SM-1S52
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation ol Palm Beach County Inc
Officers President. Alec Engelstein Vice Presidents. Barry S Berg, Arnold L. Lampert. Gilbert S
Messing. Marvin S Rosen, Mortimer Weiss Treasurer, Helen G Hoffman; Aaaistant Treasurer. Mark
F. Levy. Secretary. Leah Siskin. Assistant Secretary, Barbara Gordon Green Submit material to Lori
Schuiman. Assistant News Coordinator
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RA1ES Local Area $4 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7 50). or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beacn County. 501 S Flagler Or. West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Friday, October 21, 1988 10 CHESHVAN 5749
Volume 14 Number 33
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
The fabulous Hunt family,
wealthiest in Texas, is back in
the news again this time in
the courts.
Earlier news about them is
remembered from the 1950s,
when Haroldson Lafayette
Hunt, the family patriarch who
struck oil so deep that his daily
income was estimated at vari-
ous times to run from $200,000
to $1 million a day, was a
point-man for Joe McCarthy.
One device the senior Hunt
employed was publishing and
giving wide distribution to
"Facts Forum." Despite its
claim for accuracy, that hate
sheet became a conduit for
such notorious anti-Semites as
Joe Kamp, Merwin Hart and
Allen Zoll. (In those days, the
U.S. attorney general listed
Zoll's outfit, American Patri-
ots Inc. as a fascist organiza-
tion.)
Of the three Hunt brothers
Nelson. William and Lamar
now in difficulty with the
law, Nelson appears as the
patriarch's scion most devoted
to his daddy's political philoso-
phy.
The contribution he made to
the John Birch Society was
said to be the largest ever
received by that outfit which
depicted President Eisen-
hower as "a dedicated, consci-
ous agent of the Communist
conspiracy."
Nelson's buddies these days
include the Rev. Pat Robert-
son, an early candidate for
president, and the Rev. Jerry
Falwell, who once called for
the Christianization of Amer-
ica, then bit his tongue and
told the 1,200 rabbis compris-
ing his audience he was sorry
he said it.
Twenty-five years ago, Nel-
son was in on the discovery of
a huge oil field in Libya, but
that bonanza subsequently fell
into the hands of Moammar
Gadhafi via confiscation.
When the value of oil dipped,
Nelson and William Hunt
redirected their talent for
amassing wealth. They envi-
sioned great opportunities in
acquiring silver. The history of
their romance with that pre-
cious metal provides the back-
drop for their tribulations in
court.
As they traveled the silver
brick road, they fashioned a
plan to market bonds backed
by $3.5 billion in silver bullion.
This scheme intrigued Sheik
Mohammad al-Amoudi and
Prince Faisal, who joined
hands with the Texas moguls.
This stratagem soured when
Wall Street frowned on it and
the silver market began to sag.
Among the big losers in the
silver debacle was Minpeco, a
Peruvian minerals marketing
company. That business enter-
prise was awarded damages of
$134 million in late August
when a federal jury in New
York concluded that Nelson,
Lamar and Herbert Hunt had
conspired to corner the silver
market eight years ago.
Still able to engage top law-
yers, the Hunts have indicated
they plan to appeal that costly
verdict.
As stage hands change
scenes on this drama, it seems
only fair to single out one
offspring among the 13 chil-
dren fathered by H.L. Hunt,
who gambled his way into a
story-book fortune.
The reference here is to Car-
oline Hunt Schoellkopf, whose
business enterprises -
entrusted to the hands of capa-
ble, honest managers help to I
account for her designation as I
the world's wealthiest woman.
She is generous with pro I
6ono activities, has served as a I
board member of Planned Par I
enthood and as a director of I
the Kennedy Center in Wash-1
ington.
While engaged in JheS,fI
activities, she has kept nerseii|
at a distance from the oil ana|
silver adventures of ner|
brothers.


Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
NEWS BRIEFS
Ethiopian Jews Move
To Unify Families
JERUSALEM (JTA) In a measure of unity, 15 leaders
of the Ethiopian community met with the former Israeli
ambassador to Ethiopia, representatives from the World
Union of Jewish Students and other top Jewish activists to
generate a petition for reunification of separated Ethiopian
families.
A committee for the cause plans to motivate Israeli and
Diaspora Jewry into becoming more vocal in the family
reunification campaign.
About 1,500 children are separated from their parents;
many husbands left behind wives; and brothers and sisters
have been split. Most of the 10,000 Ethiopian Jews still in
Ethiopia are women, children and the elderly and infirm.
"We implore the government of Ethiopia to heed the
biblical supplication: Let my people go."
Those interested in distributing the petition and gather-
ing signatures can contact: Committee for Family Reunifi-
cation, P.O.B. 7914, Jerusalem.
Hotline Promotes
Israeli Tourism
NEW YORK (JTA) A toll-free Israel travel hot line,
providing timely information on tourism resources and
special events in Israel, has been installed by the National
Committee for Tourism to Israel as part of its nationwide
campaign to increase American Jewish travel to Israel.
The Committee for Tourism, which functions under the
auspices of the Conference of Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations in conjunction with the Israel
Ministry of Tourism and El Al Airlines, will regularly
update the hotline: 1-800-TRAVL40.
Rabbis Asked To Speak
On AIDS
WASHINGTON (JTA) October is National AIDS
Awareness and Prevention Month, and the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human Services has been asking clergy
to include in their religious services this month a message
about the deadly condition and how to control its spread.
In a letter being sent to rabbinical organizations and
other clerical groups, department officials and Surgeon
General Dr. C. Everett Koop include some suggestions for
the messages.
They range from detailed discussion of the myths
surrounding AIDS and the estimated million and a half
Americans who have already been infected by its virus, to a
simple recommendation that congregants call the Public
Health Service's National AIDS Hotline (1-800-342-AIDS)
for further information.
Rabbis who would like to take part in the campaign and
wish to receive a five-page fact sheet about AIDS are asked
to call the Public Health Service's Office of Communica-
tions at (202) 245-6867.
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Arabs Try To Strip Israel's Credentials
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The Arab group at the
United Nations will try for the
seventh straight year to oust
Israel from the world organi-
zation, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency learned recently.
According to diplomatic
sources, the group decided
several days ago to introduce a
resolution to reject Israel's
credentials when the U.S. Gen-
eral Assembly is asked to
approve the credentials of all
member states.
This is an annual formality,
expected to take place this
year around Oct. 15.
The Arabs have repeatedly
failed to deny Israel its place in
the General Assembly, but the
margin of support for their
moves has steadily decreased
year by year.
Their declining support
raised speculation that they
might abandon their attempt
to reject Israel this year.
But according to sources,
the extremist Arab countries
notably Libya, Syria and
Iraq prevailed, despite the
embarrassment of defeat
which seems virtually certain.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Hillel Growing In South Florida Biology Of Aging At Weizmann Symposium
K '<
<%
^urwin
The Hillels in Broward and
Palm Beach counties are hav-
ing an extraordinary Fall
semester and still growing.
Hundreds of Jewish college stu-
dents have signed up and are
attending the variety of pro-
grams offered. Some of the Sep-
tember offerings included soft-
ball and volleyball, an Eat and
Learn Luncheon Series, Shab-
bat dinner, house parties and
the start of a leadership cabinet
working on Social
Service, A.I.P.A.C, United
Jewish Appeal and other com-
mittees. There is something for
everyone in Hillel. The schools
being served included all Brow-
ard Community Campuses,
Palm Beach Community Col-
lege, Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity and the College of Boca
Raton. For more information
and a monthly calendar of
events, please call Kari Ellison
at S9S-S510. All college age peo-
ple are invited.
REHOVOT, Israel. Many of
the acute problems of
advanced age such as
immune deficiency, osteoporo-
sis, dementia, depression and
hormonal disturbances will
be explored at the Second
International Serling Sympo-
sium on the Biology of Aging
this week at the Weizmann
Institute of Science in Reho-
vot.
"The Symposium will serve
a dual purpose," explains
Weizmann Institute Professor
Emeritus David Dannon, for-
mer president of the Interna-
tional Association of Geronto-
logy. "It will provide scientists
engaged in basic research with
valuable feedback from doc-
tors who work with old people
and conversely, it will allow
the physicians to question sci-
entists engaged in frontline
research. Experimental
research in the biology of
aging has mushroomed in
Israel and around the world
significant new treatments are
expected to move from labs to
clinics in the near future."
Over 100 highly specialized
experts from Israel and
around the world are partici-
pating in the gathering.
Prof. Amiela Globerson,
incumbent of the Brady Chair
of Cancer Research and head
of the Meller Center for the
Biology of Aging at the Weiz-
mann Institute, organized the
symposium which is named for
David Serling a longtime
supporter of the center.
Jewish Leaders Parlay With G A Head
Discuss Anti-Israel and Anti-Jewish Positions
AIPACExec.
Denounces
AdDistortion
An advertisment placed by
the New York State
Republican Party in several
Jewish weekly newspapers
comparing the GOP and Demo-
cratic party platforms on the
Middle East "misleads" voters
and distorts the position of the
pro-Israel lobby, charged Tho-
mas Dine, executive director
of the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee (AIPAC).
Dine, who in a letter called
on the weeklies to reject such
ads in the future, also asserted
that the piece did Vice Presi-
dent George Bush's campaign
"a disservice" by twisting
"deserved praise" for the
Republican platform.
He noted that the ad "quotes
me in a way that distorts the
intended meaning of my state-
ment" praising the Republican
platform's Middle East sec-
tion.
The ad compares the Repub-
lican and Democratic plat-
forms on eight points regard-
ing U.S. Middle East policy
and Soviet Jewry. It ends with
a quote from Dine that the
Republican platform is "the
best ever by either party."
In his letter Dine stressed
that he was not "recommend-
ing the Republican presiden-
tial candidate as stronger on
Israel than the Democratic
candidate. The truth is that I
have not made any such state-
ment of preference and do not
intend to do so, because both
candidates have taken very
strong positions in support of
the U.S.-Israel relationship
and Israel's role as the corner-
stone to U.S. policy in the
Middle East."
He noted that the GOP plat-
form "is indeed excellent on
the Middle East, but added
that "a comparison of the two
candidates solely on the basis
of platforms is highly mislead-
ing." For a full evaluation of
the candidates, voters must
look beyond party platforms
and ads to the candidates'
actions in office, speeches,
Eosition papers and advisors,
ine said. He added that both
Bush and Dukakis have strong
positions in favor of U.S.-
Israel relations, with Dukakis'
record being "the opposite" of
that implied in the New York
ads.
Reprinted with permission from the
Near East Report.
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
A delegation of Jewish lead-
ers met here with the presi-
dent of the General Assembly,
Argentine Foreign Minister
Dante Caputo.
The delegation of B'nai
B'rith leaders was headed by
the organization's president,
Seymour Reich.
Morris Abram, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations, and Malcolm
Hoenlein, the conference's
executive director, also partici-
pated in the 45-minute meet-
ing.
The Jewish leaders dis-
cussed with Caputo several
anti-Israel and anti-Jewish
positions at the United
Nations.
They protested the 1975
General Assembly resolution
equating Zionism with racism,
the yearly attempts by the
Arabs to oust Israel from the
world organization, and the
sharp anti-Israel language last
August in Geneva during the
deliberation of the U.N.
Subcommission on the
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Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Against Polio
Israel To Inoculate Country
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Health Ministry announced
that the entire population of
Israel will be reinoculated
against polio.
The ministry said at an even-
ing news conference that it
was acting on the recommen-
dations of three international
polio experts, who proposed
that both the Salk and Sabin
vaccines be administered for
maximum protection.
It said sufficient vaccine is
available.
The experts were invited
here by the Health Ministry to
assess the anti-polio measures
taken since an outbreak was
detected in several regions of
the country last month.
They are Professor Joseph
Melnick of Houston. Professor
Walter Orlstein of the Center
for Disease Control in Atlanta,
and Professor M. Rey of the
World Health Organization, a
U.N. agency.
The Salk vaccine, containing
dead virus, is administered by
injection. The Sabin, which
consists of live weakened
virus, is taken orally.
The experts believe that a
combination of both will induce
natural immunity and that it
should be provided on a
national basis.
In that respect, they differed
with the Health Ministry,
which had confined its vaccina-
tion campaign to the Hadera
and Lod-Ramla regions where
the polio virus was discovered
in sewage.
The ministry announced that
the campaign had been
extended to the Rehovot and
Acre areas, where contamin-
ated sewage was also found.
Melnick has been observing
polio in Israel for more than 30
years. He brought the first
batch of Salk vaccine here in a
suitcase in the late 1950s.
The recent polio outbreak
never reached epidemic pro-
portions, with no more than
eight confirmed cases.
Technion Key To Israel's Satellite Launch
Glasses were raised and con-
gratulations extended all
'round at Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology in
Haifa at news of the successful
launching of Israel's first sat-
ellite, Offeq-1 (Horizon-1), on
Monday, Sept. 19.
Nearly all of the leaders of
the satellite project, conducted
at Israel Aircraft Industries
(IAI), are Technion graduates.
Also working directly on the
project with IAI and the Israel
Space Agency (ISA) is a con-
tingent of engineers at the
Technion's Asher Space
Research Institute and the
Faculty of Aeronautical Engi-
neering.
The launch was designed to
demonstrate the capacity to
orbit a satellite and to check
the functional ability of its
subsystems in a space environ-
ment. Technion-trained per-
sonnel, who make up approxi-
mately 70 percent of IAI engi-
neers, were involved with such
aspects as structure design,
rocket propulsion, controls,
communications, remote sens-
ing and environmental testing.
According to Professor
Daniel Weihs, Dean of Tech-
nion's Faculty of Aeronautical
Engineering, the next Israeli
satellite will carry a major
scientific experiment. He said
that a national competition is
underway to decide whether
the experiment will be in
astronomy, earth sensing,
biology or lasers. Several pro-
jects devised at the Asher
Space Research Institute are
in the running.
"Now that the capacity to
launch a satellite has been
proven," Prof. Weihs said, "it
is hoped that the Amos Com-
munications Satellite, the next
satellite scheduled for launch-
ing, will be sent into space
before 1992."
The research goals of the
ISA and IAI are to place Israel
among the community of
nations in space satellite
%
illbDont
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Send yow name jiuI addica for th:
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research, and to conduct such
research for peaceful purposes
and technological develop-
ment; to establish Israel's
scientific capability at the new
frontier of space; and to
demonstrate the maturity and
sophistication of space-related
equipment built by Israeli
industry.
Offeq-1 is octogonal in
shape, measures about seven-
and-half feet in length and
weighs about 340 lbs.
On March 7 and 8 of this
year, a conference of aero-
space scientists and policy-
makers from Europe, the
United States and Israel met
at Technion to discuss Israel's
civil space program and the
niche it could fill in commercial
space exploitation. The confer-
ence, which drew more than
150 people, was sponsored by
the Norman and Helen Asher
Space Research Institute and
the Samuel Neaman Institute
for Advanced Studies in Sci-
ence and Technology at Tech-
nion.
Prof. Yuval Neeman, Chair-
man of the ISA, lauded the
Technion at the conference for
continuing its space research
because "the end products will
be very important for Israel."
"It will be just one more gift
from the Technion to the
nation," he said..
SHOWING HIS SUPPORT. A Likud supporter, wearing
a campaign hat, kisses Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir's
hand during Shamir's campaign tour in Kfar Sava. A
security guard, center, keeps a close watch. (AIP Wide
World Photo.)
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Reagan Lays
Cornerstone
OfU.S.
Holocaust
Museum
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan dedicated
the cornerstone of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Museum
recently with a denunciation of
anti-Semitism and a vow that
"the Jewish people will never
stand alone against tyranny."
"The Jewish people were on
this earth at the time of the
pyramids," Reagan told the
several hundred persons
attending the dedication cere-
mony, held under a tent on the
site of the future museum,
near the Washington Monu-
ment.
"Those structures are still
standing and the Jews are still
here. We must make sure that
when the tall towers of our
biggest cities have crumbled,"
the president said, "the Jewish
people will still be on this
earth."
Former President Jimmy
Carter, in a message to the
ceremony, said the museum is
a promise that "never again
will the world stand silent,
never again will the world look
the other way or fail to act in
time to prevent this terrible
crime of genocide."
He reminded the audience
that he had created the Presi-
dent's Commission on the Hol-
ocaust in 1979, which even-
tually led to the decision to
create the museum.
He said he was "looking for-
ward" to joining Reagan and
his successor at the ceremony
when the museum opens in
late 1990. The museum is on
land donated by the federal
government, but the $170 mil-
lion needed for construction
and exhibits is being raised
privately.
Harvey Meyerhoff of Balti-
more, chairman of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council,
said funds are coming in, rang-
ing from the pennies of school
children to large donations of
$1 million or more from 19
individuals, families and foun-
dations.
Pentagon Permits
Yarmulkes
Continued from Page 1
the performance of military
duties.
Rep. Stephen Solarz (D-
N.Y.) and Sen. Frank Lauten-
berg (D-N.J.), who sponsored
the bills in Congress last year,
argued in a May 6 letter to
Carlucci that the directive
"would undermine, if not elim-
inate, the effect of the religi-
ous apparel amendment."
"Preventing an Orthodox
Jew from wearing a yarmulke
during initial military training
would represent severe blows
to his religious observance as
well as to his morale," they
told Carlucci.
Stephen Silbiger, Washing-
ton representative of the
American Jewish Congress,
called Carlucci's Sept. 29 move
"a victory for religious free-
dom."
For the'Duke'
. in this Corner
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Although perhaps more loosely knit, there is a growing
organized corps of staunch Jewish supporters for Democratic
presidential candidate Gov. Michael Dukakis.
Monte Friedkin, president of Friedkin Industries in Boca
Raton, says there are prominent national, state and South
Florida Jewish leaders working long volunteer hours to make for
a Dukakis victory.
"I'm a Democrat. I feel Dukakis will be a better friend to the
Jewish community vis-a-vis Israel," Friedkin said.
Last Wednesday, Friedkin and a small group of local partisan
Jews flew to New England for a private meeting with Dukakis.
"I will say that the major discussion was anti-Semitic problems
around the country," Friedkin said. "He (Dukakis) made certain
commitments that I won't repeat about how he would deal with
the Middle East."
While many Republicans are concerned about the role Jesse
Jackson has played in Democratic circles with his pro-PLO
posture, Friedkin dismisses Jackson as a concern to only a
minority of Jews, but not to those Friedkin considers better
informed.
Friedkin supports Dukakis' opposition to prayer-in-school and
supports Dukakis opposition of arms sales to nations such as
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.
Friedkin declined to say how much the organization has
contributed statewide but said that several individuals have
given over $100,000 to the Dukakis campaign.
Other South Florida Democrats are actively supporting
Dukakis on a variety of talking points.
Marvin Rosen, 48, an attorney with Greenberg, Traurig,
Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel, is chairman of the Dukakis
Finance Board of Directors.
Rosen, a volunteer who has met and traveled with the Dukakis
campaign said: "As people learn what the Reagan administra-
tion has done, (Bush's) riding on Reagan's tails will not be
advantageous.
"I think the Reagan administration has a lot of vulnerability,
has created an unprecedented deficit, they've dealt with (Pana-
manian leader Manuel) Noriega, they've sold arms for hostages
and, as the American public understands what the Reagan
administration has done, there will not be a coat-tail effect."
Judy Kutun, wife of former state Rep. Barry Kutun, a
volunteer on the Dukakis campaign, says she is a life-long
Democrat, but, "votes for the man first and the party second."
But she said, "I do want a change. That's why I want Michael
Dukakis in." She and her husband have sponsored condominium
breakfasts and Barry Kutun is a member of the Dukakis
National Campaign fund.
"I feel much more confident in his (Dukakis') leadership and
that he's going to do more for Israel. I think he's 100 percent in
support of Israel. I think he's the most moral, most intelligent
and most caring candidate that's running for president."
Elaine Silverstein, a principal in the Beber Silverstein adver-
tising and a Dukakis volunteer, agrees with Kutun.
"Far more important than a particular position on an issue, I
think is the integrity and the intelligence of the man who is going
to be president of the U.S.," Silverstein said. "The president
does not run the government singlehandedly."
Silverstein questions the choice of Indiana junior Sen. Dan
Quayle as Bush's running mate adding, "I think that more than
the threat of having Dan Quayle as president of the U.S. is the
question of George Bush's judgment in selecting Dan Quayle.
Either he wants to be surrounded by mediocrity or he sold out to
the radical right."
Jews are split, on many issues and voting from the wallet is
certainly one, says Silverstein. "What we're experiencing is a
real contradiction," she observed. "On one hand is the enormous
deficit; on the other hand things have been pretty good. I think
like (Democratic vice-presidential candidate Lloyd) Bentsem'The
Republicans have been writing 'hot checks.' "
And while some people do vote their wallets, other people are
concerned with women's affairs and the homeless and the
elderly, Silverstein said.
Asked if she too would vote a straight Democratic ticket,
Silverstein again added that she "votes for the individual" then
added, "Of course, I haven't found a good Republican yet."
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A


Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Bush League
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Florida Jewish Cam-
paign Committee, Victory 88
bills itself as non-partisan, all
Jewish, and pro-Republican
from the presidential races on
down. The 30 local members
which formed this may have
already doled out an estimated
$200,000 to its Republican
favorites.
"We're a part of Victory 88,
a group designed to secure
support in the Jewish com-
munity designed to maxi-
mize voter turnout leading to a
victory for the Republican
ticket," said Mitch Dabach, 33,
executive director of the Flor-
ida Jewish Campaign Commit-
tee of Victory 88.
The group's state chairman
is Miamian Jay Kislak.
Issues likely to be stressed
include: U.S.-Israel relations,
free emigration for Soviet
Jewry, combatting anti-
Semitism and bigotry and ..
saving lives of Ethiopian Jews.
Dabach, says he hopes Jew-
ish voters who were tradition-
.of Voters
and vis-a-vis Israel."
Gayle Kesselman is a Palm
Beach psychiatrist who is
spending uncounted hours
volunteering for the Bush cam-
paign as a member of the Bush
Jewish committee.
Kesselman says the main
issue she is concerned about is
world peace. "My view of
Dukakis is he has little experi-
ence in foreign affairs and
from what I've heard his polic-
ies are not really policies
they are slogans. He has an
overly idealistic view of the
world and we found from his-
tory when you have people
ally Democratic, will convert.
While some members of the
Democratic team said they
may deviate and support bi-
f(artisan campaigns, Dabach at
east denies that is part of his
organization's plans.
"My group is supporting
Bush and the entire Republi-
can team," he said. "I think
the Republican party in its
domestic and international pol-
icies are more in line with
Jewish interests in our country
who have these views or are
too idealistic, there's often
been a war."
Developer and architect
Tibor Hollo, also on the Bush
Jewish committee as a volun-
teer says he is still disench-
anted with the former Carter
administration and the U.S.
image around the world during
that administration.
Asked if he didn't credit
Carter for Camp David, Hollo
said, "I don't think Camp
David was particularly
because of Carter's leadership.
"I feel the same people,
same administration and
organization, same-type of pol-
itical structure is in place with
Dukakis," Hollo said. "I think
there were a lot of deals made
in the primaries that I'm not
particularly fond of," declining
to elaborate.
On economic issues, Hollo
said, "I think I'm voting the
country's wallet. I was faced
with a 21 and a half (percent)
prime interest rate thanks to
the Carter Administration.
The current administration
brought it to a manageable
area of between seven and 10
percent."
Hollo, a native of Hungary,
who emigrated to the U.S.
from France, also said he has
seen the best employment
record of all-time in recent
years.
Stanley Tate, a Dade resi-
dent and statewide developer
is state co-chairman of the
Jewish coalition for Bush.
"Bush is a very, very strong
supporter of Israel and the
Republican party has histori-
cally been a strong supporter
of Israel."
Tate, too, expressed con-
cerns about a Jesse Jackson
posture in a Democratic White
House. "I think he represents
a great threat to Israel," Tate
said of Jackson, "and I believe
he will have a major influence
on Dukakis if Dukakis is
elected president."
Tate gave kudos to the
Bush/Reagan team on econo-
mic and international matters.
Yes, Tate concedes, he is wor-
ried about the deficit that has
accrued under the Reagan
administration. Yet, he says,
he was more concerned about
the inflation of the Carter
years.
But, Tate insists, Bush pre-
sents the "best all-around
package for Jewish voters."
"They (Democrats) are more
concerned that Bush will be
more Conservative and would
bring about a more Conserva-
tive administration in terms of
the Supreme Court and other
judicial appointments. The
only other two main differ-
ences have to do with the
abortion issue. I'm for the
abortion issue and I'm for
gun control."
One final issue: "There's
some major concern how to
finance the cost of the huge
social welfare programs that
Dukakis is supporting. And a
major concern is under the
Dukakis regime is you'd have a
substantial increase in income
taxes and a decrease in pro-
ductivity."
YouthToBeTriedAsAdult Charged With Shul Vandalism
NEW YORK (JTA) A
15-year-old youth, one of two
accused of vandalizing and
burning a Brooklyn synagogue
last month, will be tried as an
adult it was announced here
last week.
This means that the suspect,
Louis Franceschi, who has
been indicted by a grand jury,
will stand trial in state
Supreme Court, instead of
Family Court, where juveniles
are normally tried.
He also will face more severe
punishment if convicted.
Franceschi was arraigned in
Supreme Court. He is charged
with second-degree burglary,
second-degree criminal mis-
chief and first-degree reckless
endangerment, all felonies,
and with two misdemeanors.
Franceschi pleaded not
guilty and was ordered held on
$10,000 bail by Justice Richard
Goldberg.
The indictment charges that
on the night of Sept. 16, dur-
ing the period between Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur,
Franceschi and a companion
broke into Congregation Rab-
binical Institute Sharai Torah,
an Orthodox synagogue in the
Midwood section of Brooklyn.
They spray-painted swasti-
kas and anti-Semitic graffiti,
removed the congregation's
Torahs from the ark and set
them on fire.
Franceschi's 11-year-old
companion was not identified
because of his age. His case
will be heard in Family Court.
If found guilty of the bur-
glary charge, Franceschi could
be sentenced to between 28
months and seven years in
prison.
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman, who
announced the indictment,
X3CCM
warned that "crimes of hatred
or bigotry of any kind must be
prosecuted to the fullest
extent of the law."
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Bush:----------------
On Human Rights
By GORDON B. ZACKS
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Twenty years ago, George
Bush served in Congress, rep-
resenting a mostly white con-
gressional district in Texas.
That year, the landmark Civil
Rights Act of 1968 came
before the House of Represen-
tatives.
Despite heavy pressure and
even hostile threats from his
constituents, George Bush
voted for passage of that legis-
lation, which guaranteed open
housing requirements across
the nation.
Explaining his vote, George
Bush emphasized how tragic it
would be for a black service-
man returning from Vietnam,
where he had been fighting for
the ideals of this country, to be
denied the right to buy or rent
the home of his choice.
A colleague of Bush's
described this as "typical
George Bush." He showed the
true mark of a leader he
made the right decision even
though it was unpopular at the
time.
George Bush's commitment
to human rights and equality
of opportunity didn't begin
with his race for the presi-
dency. It is fundamental to his
values, dating back to his early
days when he chaired the
United Negro College Fund
drive at Yale University.
George Bush has stood for
human decency and freedom
all his life. Many of you noticed
that Coretta Scott King, the
widow of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., was a guest of the
Bush family at the Republican
National Convention in New
Orleans.
Though Mrs. King will not
be campaigning for either can-
didate this year, she has a
longstanding and close rela-
tionship with George and Bar-
bara Bush.
But the right to live where
we want in this country
doesn't have any meaning for
Jews who want to leave the
Soviet Union.
George Bush was an integral
part of the administration that
made a discussion of human
rights the number one item on
the agenda of every U.S.-
Soviet summit.
Bush, who has met person-
ally with each of the last three
Soviet leaders, raised the issue
of Soviet Jews directly with
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorba-
chev during the Washington
summit.
E. Germany
Joins
Kristallnacht
BONN (JTA) East and
West Germany will each offi-
cially mark the 50th anniver-
sary of Kristallnacht next
month.
A representative of the
Communist East German gov-
ernment will march in a silent
parade in West Berlin on the
occasion, Heinz Galinski,
chairman of the West German
Jewish community, announced
here.
He said that West German
officials will attend an East
German commemoration.
On Dec. 6, 1987, the eve of
that meeting, 250,000 Jews
marched in Washington
demanding freedom for our
Jewish brethren.
George Bush found the time
to participate in this most his-
toric of occasions. Michael
Dukakis felt his time was bet-
ter spent on the campaign
trail.
Bush delivered a forceful
message to the Soviets and to
Gorbachev, who was already in
Washington at the time:
"Now Mr. Gorbachev has
embarked on a policy of gla-
snost, or openness. But open-
ness begins at the borders.
Let's see not five or six or 10
or 20 refuseniks released at a
time, but thousands, tens of
thousands all those who
want to go."
This year, former refusenik
Natan Sharansky paid tribute
to George Bush's efforts to
win freedom for Soviet Jews:
"You met Avital to the White
House and never stopped your
attempts to secure my release.
We are grateful for all you did
for us, and your contribution
to freedom of Soviet and Ethi-
opian Jews."
George Bush understands
that freedom and human
rights go hand-in-hand.
He understands that Amer-
ica cannot be serious about its
commitment to human rights
if America is weak or unwilling
to stand upa gainst totalitarian
tyranny.
Today, 2000 Soviet Jews are
leaving the USSR each month.
How will Mike Dukakis, a nov-
ice with no foreign policy or
defense experience, stand up
to the Soviets?
And if he attempts to do so,
will the Soviets take his pro-
nouncements seriously if his
administration proceeds to
weaken our nation's defenses?
America cannot affort sev-
eral years of on-the-job train-
ing for a Dukakis administra-
tion. The Soviet leadership
understands that George Bush
will demand that the Soviets
live up to the promises of
Helsinki.
A Bush administration will
support the Jackson-Vanik
amendement, which ties U.S.-
Soviet trade to free emigra-
tion, as a means of assuring
These companion columns are
a special feature reprinted
with permission from The
Washington Jewish Week.
that the Soviets comply with
previous agreements.
George Bush will not fall
into the trap of letting human
rights rhetoric be employed as
an excuse for Israel-bashing.
When Vice President Bush
was asked in a questionnaire in
the Des Moines Register about
so-called Israeli human rights
abuses, he responded:
"I recognize Israel's respon-
sibililty to restore law and
order. I am saddened by the
violence of these demonstra-
tions and the loss of life.
"We have urged Israel to
use non-lethal methods to deal
with the demonstrations, and I
am pleased Israel has decided
to use non-lethal methods of
riot control whenever possible.
"The Palestinians, on the
other hand, have the responsi-
bility not to engage in violence
and disorderly conduct."
It is easy to walk away from
your friends when they are in
danger or need your support.
It is most difficult, as George
Bush has shown, to stand fast
for principles whether it be
civil rights for blacks in this
country, or human rights for
Jews in the Soviet Union
when to say nothing would be
the politically-expedient
course.
Dukakis:
On Human Dignity
Gordon Zacks is chairman of the
Jewish Campaign Committee for Bush
and a co-chairman of the National
Jewish Coalition.
Jewish-German
Forum
The Jewish community of
Frankfurt, W. Germany, has
established a "literature
forum" with the aim of main-
taining contacts with leading
German-language authors.
The forum's first program fea-
tured readings by Siegfried
Lenz of excerpts from a new
novel expected to appear in
about two years. Literary
critic Marcel Reich-Ranicki
told the press that the forum
also hopes to hear from the
"facilitators" of literature,
such as publishers, editors,
stage directors and producers.
The political opinions expressed here are not necessarily those held by the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
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By HYMAN BOOKBINDER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
One year ago, speaking to the
City Club of Chicago, Michael
Dukakis summed up his deep
convictions on human rights in
a few simple words:
"Understand that nothing
justifies the theft of human
dinity. Nothing. Not left-wing
or right-wing politics. Not per-
sonal or economic or religious
differences."
One month ago, speaking to
B'nai B'rith, he translated
those convictions into a defini-
tion of our nation's responsibil-
ity:
"America's place is not with
the dictators. It is with govern-
ments that trust and respect
their own people. It is with
democratic nations that are
proud and strong and free. It
is with nations like Israel."
And only two weeks ago, he
let the Soviet Union know
exactly what they could expect
from a President Dukakis:
"I will challenge the Soviet
Union to live up to its obliga-
tions under the Helsinki
Accords to let Jews and
other minorities emigrate if
they wish, and let them wor-
ship freely and pass on their
heritage to their children if
they stay.
"It is not enough to dole out
a few visas, for human rights
are not bargaining chips; they
are the very foundation of
peace itself."
To be absolutely sure the
Soviets understood what these
words mean in practice, Gov.
Dukakis has declared that "a
Dukakis administration will
stand by Jackson-Vanik to
make sure those doors open
wide once and for all."
The Dukakis human rights
policy represents a continua-
tion of decades of Democratic
commitment. It was Eleanor
Roosevelt, in the Truman
administration, who gave
inspired leadership to the
adoption of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights.
The historic Jackson-Vanik
legislation was a Democratic
achievement, and over the
objections of the Nixon admin-
istration. The 1988 Demo-
cratic platform calls upon
America to "mandate human
rights, human dignity, and
human opportunity in every
country on earth."
Michael Dukakis's commit-
ment to international human
rights everywhere in South
Africa, in Eastern Europe, in
Central America goes
beyond party platforms or
campaign speeches.
Space permits only a few
illustrations of how his strong
personal involvement has
manifested itself especially in
areas of Jewish interest:
Recognizing that the Holo-
caust was the most heinous
crime against humanity in his-
tory, Dukakis, along with his
wife, Kitty, has identified with
Holocaust education,
remembrance activities, and
the building of a national
museum.
He was particularly out-
raged over the presence in the
Bush campaign of individuals
who even today deny the Holo-
caust took place, or who had
been involved in anti-Semitic
activities.
He has urged the Congress
to delay no longer in passing
implementing legislation to
complete action on Senate rati-
fication of the Genocide treaty.
The 37-year delay in ratifica-
tion had been due to resistance
primarily by Republican senat-
ors, some of whom even to this
day are blocking the imple-
menting legislation.
He has pledged full sup-
port to the Office of Special
Investigations in its efforts to
apprehend Nazi war criminals,
and to keep Kurt Waldheim on
the watch list.
Believing that the struggle
for human rights and against
anti-Semitism must start at
home, Dukakis urged and
signed into Massachusetts law
a religious vandalism statue
aimed at harassment and van-
dalism motivated by religious,
ethnic or racial intolerance.
Michael Dukakis knows too
that the words "human
rights" can be perverted and
abused.
The outstanding example is
the vicious UN Zionism-equals-
racism resolution, and he has
never stopped demanding its
repeal, as have 48 other gover-
nors. (Only Gov. John Sununu
Bush s campaign co-
chairman has refused to do
so.)
And Dukakis has protested
last month's inexcusable
action by the Reagan-Bush
administration in putting
Israel on trial for alleged viola-
tion of workers' rights!
The depth of the Dukakis
commitment to human rights
is best exemplified in his fre-
quent personal actions in seek-
ing and obtaining freedom for
Soviet Jewish refuseniks.
That personal, emotional
involvement, for example, was
impressively demonstrated at
the recent B'nai B'rith conven-
tion, when Dukakis introduced
the Fuchs-Rabinovich family.
"We will never forget the
long struggle of Michael,
Marina and Mishka," Dukakis
told the hushed audience.
"We will never forget the
joy in our hearts at Mishka's
long over-due bar mitzvah,
where Kitty was called to the
bimah for an aliyah."
Michael Dukakis knows in
his heart what human rights is
all about.
Footnote to last week's
praise to Bush for his role in
Operation Sheba: It just so
happens that a week earlier, I
myself had raised the issue in a
debate, and expressed appreci-
ation for this act of humanity.
But, with all respect, Gordy,
may I ask for some reciprocal
graciousness? Don't you agree
that if Walter Mondale or
Michael Dukakis had been
president at the time, his vice
President would have been no
;ss responsive to this cry for
help? A lovely recollection, but
an argument for preferring
Bush over Dukakis? Hardly.
Hyman Bookbinder, former Washing
ton representative of the American
Jewish Committee, is presently serving
as a special adviser to the Dukakis
''impaign on the Middle East, human
rights and the underprivileged.


Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Summer Camp For East Europe's Jews
By EDWARD SEROTTA
UJA Press Service
Secular fun includes soccer, sion g^p,, 0nl a few feet
HI pong' an.d Balaton away are the famous beaches
In Yugoslavia, they head for beaches are 10 minutes away. 0f the Adriatic. Young families
the sparkling coast of the Adri-
atic. In Hungary, they go to
the shores of Lake Balaton, or
in Romania, they have a choice
of two mountain resorts and a
The Hungarian camp has with children attend from mid-
become so successful that the to late-August, and in Septem-
JDC is looking to expand the ber, elderly Jews from
facility, and camp's popularity throughout Eastern Europe
is indicative of the renaissance attend.
Simchasr
Mazels &
.Mitzvahs
Morning prayers at the Jewish summer camp at Hungary's Lake Balaton, one of several Jewish
cawi?w in Eastern Europe supported by the United Jewish Appeal/Federation Campaign through
UJA Prest Service Photo/Edward Serotta
the JDC.
villa on the Black Sea. These
are the Jewish summer holiday
camps of Eastern Europe
which have just completed
their busiest years ever.
Supported by the American
Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee, which is funded
primarily by the United Jewish
Appeal/Federation Campaign
in the U.S., these summer
camps provide relaxing, ten-
day stints away from the heat
and bustle of the city. Jews are
brought together to enjoy
kosher food and optional religi-
ous instruction. Jewish chil-
dren from small towns have a
chance to socialize with other
Jews.
"We've had tremendous
success," said Rabbi
Landesman of Budapest,
"because we offer something
these kids often don't get at
home; the chance to practice
Judaism as fully as they wish.
Every morning if the boys
want to they put on tefillin,
and afterward, students from
the rabbinical school will sit
around with them and discuss
the Torah and Jewish history."
Congratulations to Sam
Wadler on his 80th birthday,
October 2, 1908. Wadler is a
Federation board member and
co-chair of the Century Village
Jewish Federation/UJA Cam-
paign.
Twelve-year-old Stacie
Lewis, granddaughter of Ida
G. Scheff of Dover B. in
Century Village, performed in
the role of "Scout1' in To Kill A
Mockingbird, in Bridgeport,
CT. She was Bat Mitzvahed on
October 22nd at Congregation
B'nai Israel in Bridgeport.
On September 16, 1988,
Morris and Pauline Wallach of
Boynton Beach celebrated
their 50th anniversary in
Atlanta, GA with their family,
who flew in from all over the
U.S. to be with them.
in Jewish activity among the
80,000 Jews. Currently, the
camp sees 400 children.
In Romania, where 21,000
Jews live (and over 1,000
depart annually to live in
Israel), there are two small
camps nestled deep in the Car-
pathian Mountains. Those who
work for the Federation and
help administer its social aid
programs for the needy (JDC
provides $4.5 million a year)
are invited to attend along
with children, who can sing in
the impromptu Jewish choirs,
hike on mountain trails, and
swim in icy mountain streams.
Jewish teenagers prefer the
beaches of the Black Sea, and
the Federation offers two
week holidays at its villa there.
The Yugoslovia Jewish com-
munity is nothing short of
remarkable: with only 5,000
Jews, they are passionate,
committed, and use their sum-
mer camp not only for them-
selves, but host Jewish fami-
lies from Bulgaria, Czechoslo-
vakia and East Germany as
well. Teenagers spend the first
half of August in Pirovac, and
attend seminars and discus-
Elaine Weber Designs Inc. a
creative services group in
Palm Beach County, has been
selected by the South Florida
chapter of The American Insti-
tute of Graphic Arts to receive
two "Awards of Excellence."
A logo design for "Chicken!
Chicken!" restaurant, and an
invitation for the Boca Raton
Museum of Art are included in
the AIGA exhibit currently on
display at the Miami-Dade
Public Library in downtown
Miami. Ms. Weber is a member
of the Jewish Federation
Women's Division Business
and Professional group.
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard S.
Bergman of Leisureville of
Cypress Lakes, West Palm
Beach, are proud to announce
that daughter-in-law Barbara
Bergman was elected to be the
first female President of Con-
gregation Beth Shalom in Clif-
ton Park, N.Y.
Activists Erect
Holocaust Memorial
VILNIUS, Soviet Union
(JTA) Activists Grigory
Alpernas and Georgy Belitsky
recently commemorated the
47th anniversary of the Nazis'
promulgation of anti-Jewish
laws by erecting a temporary
marker outside the home of
the Vilna Gaon, according to
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
Alpernas and Belitsky had
placed ads in the local press
announcing the commemora-
tion, estimating that only sev-
eral dozen Jews would show
up. But some 500 Jews and
non-Jews joined them in the
commemoration.
Their original request for
the memorial was denied, but
with the help of the Free Lith-
uanian Movement, they were
granted the temporary mark-
er, which includes inscriptions
in Yiddish and Russian, but
not Hebrew.
Vilnius refuseniks at the
commemoration gave the
activists photographs of wood
carvings, sculpted according
to folkloric tradition by an
artist known as Bunka, which
have been placed at sites of
Nazi massacres of Jews.
The commemoration
prompted one young Vilna res-
ident to write a letter pub-
lished in Komyaunimu Tiesa,
and reprinted in Sovietskaya
Molodyozh.
It said: "It is strange and
awkward to write a letter with
a request to mark the location
of a ghetto, and to erect a
monument to those killed. Do
we really have to ask for such
things?"
The letter continued that the
younger generation of Lithua-
nians have not been taught
that Vilnius had once been a
world-renowned center of
Jewish culture, or that a Jew-
ish Ghetto had existed there.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
KOSHER LUNCHES are
served Monday through Fri-
day at 11:15. The three loca-
tions are JCC in West Palm
Beach, 700 Spencer Drive;
JCC in Boynton Beach, 501
N.E. 26th Avenue; and JCC in
Delray Beach, 16189 Carter
Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations
required. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Dial-A-Ride at 689-6961.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION FOR
OCTOBER
IN WEST PALM BEACH
Thursday, Oct. 20 Jen-
nifer Taylor "Stress Man-
agement '
Friday, Oct. 21 Sabbath
services
Monday, Oct. 24 Bingo
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Oct. 25 Billie
Traub book review "Life of
Sarah Bernhardt"
Wednesday, Oct. 26 Lou
Young, violinist; also, Helen
Gold, Nutritionist
Thursday, Oct. 27 Dr.
Diane Copeland, "Your Health
is your life"
Friday, Oct. 28 Mr. Nat
Stein Sabbath Services
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service for
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter takes persons to Nursing
Homes and Hospitals on Mon-
days and Fridays to visit loved
ones, to Day Care Centers and
to Jewish Community Center
programs, whenever possible.
Fee is $1.00 each one way trip.
Call Libby between 9:30 to
1:30 for information and reser-
vations. Persons needing
medical transportation
should call Dial-a-Ride 689-
6961.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Classes
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
High Blood Pressure &
Age Related Diseases A
four week highly informative
session given by Lois Link of
the Palm Beach County School
Board, Adult Education. Date:
Wednesday, already in session
at 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Fee:
$2.00 for complete series.
Your check is your reserva-
tion. Call Louise at 689-7700.
Wisdom of the Body
Already in session.
All About Cars An 8
week course on getting to
know your car. Learn how to
communicate with your
mechanic, how to save gas,
how to drive defensively, what
to do in emergency, etc. Dates:
Oct. 18, Oct. 25; Nov. 1, 8, 15,
22, 29 and Dec. 6. Given by
Paul Oblas, Palm Beach
County School Board Adult
Education. Time: 10 a.m. to
12. Fee: $4 for entire course.
Reservations requested. Call
Louise at 689-7700. Course to
be held at Jewish Community
Center.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Timely Topics: Date: Mon-
days ongoing following lunch.
Time: Lunch at 1:15 Pro-
gram at 2. A stimulating group
discussing an exciting variety
of topics including current
events. Those interested in
lunch, please call for reserva-
tions at 689-7700. Ask for Lil-
lian Senior Department.
Carl Martin is Oct. 24th Mod-
erator.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. For per-
sons who wish to practice the
art of public speaking a
great group.
Sun & Fun Day Cruise
Sponsored by The Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches. A trip to
nowhere with full cruise amen-
ities. Date: Thursday, Dec. 1,
1988; Sailing time: 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.; Place of Departure:
Bus departs for Port Ever-
glades, Ft. Lauderdale, at Car-
teret Bank in Century Village.
Bus returns to West Palm
Beach at 6 p.m.
Call Sabina, Chairperson of
Second Tuesday Council at
683-0852 or Blanche Silver,
Volunteer Travel Consultant,
evenings, 478-5450 for infor-
mation. Space limited. Your
check for $43.00 made out to
Jewish Community Center is
your reservation. Pre-
registration required by
November 15th.
You Name It, You Play It!
An afternoon of cards and
fun. Canasta, bridge, scrabble,
kaluki, mah jong, etc. Spon-
sored by 2nd Tuesday Council.
Refreshments served. Fee: $1
Canasta instruction by Maur-
ice Langbort. Fee for instruc-
tion: JCC Member $1, Non
Member $1.50. Make your own
tables. Date: Wednesdays at
1:30 p.m. RSVP Sophia at 689-
4806 or Sabina at 683-0852.
Intermediate Bridge with
Al Parsont Basic bidding
and play starting Wednesday,
Oct. 26, 1988 at 1:30 p.m. at
JCC. Fee: JCC Member $2.50
per session, Non-Member
$3.00 per session. Call Louise
at 689-7700.
JCC Thespians Popular
plays are being chosen for
rehearsal. Those interested in
becoming part of this theatre
group, please call Louise at
689-7700. Director: Carl Mar-
tin, former radio and stage
personality. Ongoing Fridays
starting from 10 to 12. No
fee, contributions requested.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
SHOWTIME FOR
CULTURAL CLUB
Tickets are available for
Caldwell Theatre "The Cham-
pionship Season." Tour
Leader: Sandra Werbel on
Wednesday, Nov. 16th for 2:15
matinee. Fee: $20 includes
transportation and ticket. Call
Louise at 689-7700 by Nov. 9.
Your check is your reserva-
tion. Location: Caldwell Thea-
tre at Boca Raton Mall.
Ann Norton Sculpture Gar-
dens Transportation avail-
able. Call Louise at 689-7700
for further information on
time, pick up point and fee.
Sandra Werbel, Tour Guide.
Date: Thursday, Oct. 27. Your
check is your reservation.
VOLUNTEER NEWS:
"Hi-Neighbor" the
new J.C.C. Mitzvah Corps is a
group of special persons reach-
ing out-keeping in touch with
our homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who are
enjoying doing Mitzvahs. Call
Ellie Newcorn at 689-7700.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Instructors for crocheting,
knitting, flower making and
arranging; dancers for our
Twilight Dining and Dancing;
group leaders for "Fun with
Yiddish." Wanted: Guitar
Instructor. Please call Frieda
at 689-7700.
We always need dedicated
volunteers to deliver meals to
our homebound. Call Carol at
689-7700.
PRIME TIME SINGLES
For information please call
Frieda at 689-7700 or Sally
Gurvitch at 478-9397 or Eve-
lyn Smith at 686-6727.
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
JCC News
700 Spencer Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
YOUNG SINGLES (20s and 30s)
Sunday, Oct. 23rd, 11 a.m. Meet for lunch at John G's
restaurant (north end of Lake Worth Pier) to enjoy this
famous eatery. At 1 p.m. we will gather under the clock to
hit the beach.
Monday, Oct. 24th, 7 p.m. Meet at the Center to plan
new and exciting events for the upcoming months. Bring
your ideas and join us.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Tuesday, Oct. 25th, 7:30 p.m. Meet at the Center to
plan events for the upcoming months. Bring your ideas and
creativity and join us.
For more information, please call the JCC, 689-7700.

o
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 22,11 a.m. WPTV Channel 5,
with host Barbara Gordon. Reruns. Mosaic begins its 25th
season with a special premiere featuring the Jewish Family
Children's Service.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Oct. 22, 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340
AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, Oct. 22, 3
p.m.-6 p.m. WPBR 1340 AM, with host Rabbi Leon Fink. A
Jewish talk show that features weekly guests and call-in
discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, Oct. 22, 11 p.m. Monday-
Wednesday, Oct. 24-26 WCVG 1080 AM This
two-hour Jewish entertainment show features Jewish
music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Mailman Refused To Deliver
Facing Discharge
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A mail car-
rier who faces dismissal for
refusing to deliver neo-Nazi
propaganda material is fight-
ing his case in a labor court in
the West German town of
Reutlingen.
Martin Hank of Tuebingen
has the backing of many of his
colleagues. They unfurled a
banner reading "No Nazi prop-
aganda with the postal ser-
vices" when his hearing
opened.
Hank had been ordered to
deliver propaganda material of
the neo-Nazi National Demo-
cratic Party to recipients in
Tuebingen.
He had anticipated this, and
several months earlier he had
asked his superior for special
leave to avoid doing it.
The leave was denied. When
Hank refused to deliver the
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The postal authorities say
they cannot tolerate a situa-
tion in which individual postal
workers decide what mail they
will deliver.
Take Your
Interest in
Israel
and Mind
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to Israel Into
a profitable partnership
with Ampal.
Ampal is an American company with
assets of more than $1.25 billion,
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Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Organizations
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
On Monday, Oct. 24, the
Lake Worth West Chapter will
hold its meeting at 12:30 p.m.
at the Country Squire Inn on
Lake Worth Road and the
Turnpike. Guest speaker will
be Jeffrey Hill of the Palm
Beach Savings Bank on Jog
Road who will give a talk on
different phases of banking,
investing and C.D.'s. Hus-
bands are welcome to attend.
Refreshments will be served.
Royal Chapter will hold its
annual rummage sale on Sun-
day, Nov. 13 at 7 a.m. This
year it will be held on the
grounds of the Fidelity Bank
off of Royal Palm Blvd.
West Palm Chapter will
meet Tuesday, Nov. 1, noon at
Congregation Anshei Sholom
for a paid up membership
luncheon. There will be a musi-
cal program.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Okeechobee Section will have
its next general membership
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 17,
12:30 p.m. at the American
Bank, West Gate, Century Vil-
lage. Henry Grossman will be
the guest speaker. His subject
is "How To Keep Fit."
HADASSAH
Aliya Lake Worth Chapter
will hold its paid up member-
ship meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 27, noon at Temple Beth
Sholom, 312 North "A"
Street, Lake Worth. Members
must make reservations.
Yovel Chapter Study Group
will continue discussion of
Jewish Ethics on Nov. 4, 10
a.m. at the Royal Palm Bank,
Drexel Plaza. Refreshments
will be served. Everyone is
welcome.
Coming Events: Nov. 13
Show at the Newport Hotel,
Miami Beach. One price
includes transportation, lunch,
shows and gratuities.
Nov. 17 Membership
meeting at noon at Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom. Ben
Gould will give an Israel
Update.
Nov. 24-27 Four days and
three nights at the Tarlton
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Nov. 30 Royal Palm Din-
ner Theatre, Boca Raton "La
Cage Aux Follies."
Dec. 5-8 Four days and
three nights at the Regency
Spa in Bal Harbour.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter regular
meeting and mini lunch
Thurs., Oct. 27 at Congrega-
tion Aitz Chaim, 12 p.m. Com-
ing Events Nov. 2-5
Regency Spa; Dec. 21 La
Cage Royal Palm Theater
(sold out); Jan. 4 Dream Girl
Burt Reynolds Dinner Thea-
ter; Feb. 26 Gigi Royal
Palm Dinner Theater; March
14 Donor Luncheon Poin-
ciana Club.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
The next meeting takes
place on Friday, Oct. 28 at the
American Savings Bank, near
the Century Village entrance.
Coffee and cake are served
prior to the meeting. A
speaker from the Jewish Fam-
ily & Children's Service will
discuss "Room Mates: Older
People Living Together."
B'NAI B'RITH
Lake Worth Chapter No.
S016, will kick off the 1988-89
season with a breakfast meet-
ing at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct.
23 to be held at the Poinciana
Country Club. All members of
the lodge and their guests are
invited to attend at no charge.
The Norman J. Kapner
Legal Unit have planned a
special meeting for Thursday,
Oct. 27 at Manero's Restau-
rant, West Palm Beach. The
special feature of the evening,
in keeping with the current
highly charged pre-election
atmosphere, will be a discus-
sion between James Fox Miller
and Tom Ervin, Jr., Florida
Bar President-Elect candi-
dates, on why each should
become the future president of
the Florida Bar Association.
Cocktails begin at 6 p.m. with
dinner at 6:30 p.m. All mem-
bers of the bar and their
friends, guests, and spouses
are invited.
Oct. 21 Brandeis University Women Lake Worth
Chapter, Trip to Bonnet House, Ft. Lauderdale and
luncheon.
Oct. 22 Federation, Leadership Development Pro-
gram, 8 p.m. American Technion Society, Cocktail
Reception, 7 p.m. Women's American ORT West Palm
Beach, Luncheon/Show Federation, Vanguard Mission
II to Israel, through 10/31.
Oct. 23 Jewish Community Day School, BBQ & Raffle,
1-4 p.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim, board, 9:30 a.m. -
American Technion Society, breakfast, 10 a.m., and Cock-
tail Reception, 7 p.m.
Oct. 24 Federation, Women's Division $365 Worker
Training Meeting, 10 a.m. Women's American ORT
Fountains, 9:30 a.m. American Technion Society, Lunch-
eon, noon, and Cocktail Reception, 7 p.m.
Oct. 25 City of Hope, Luncheon at The Royce Hotel -
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village, 10 a.m. -
Temple Beth El, Study Group, noon Temple Beth Zion,
board, 8 p.m. Temple Beth David, Executive Board, 8
p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil Federation, Public
Relations Committee, Noon Federation, Jewish Edu-
cation Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Federation, Young Adult
Division Minimum Gift Committee, 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 26 Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood, board, 7:30 p.m.
- Federation, Board of Directors, 4 p.m. Federation,
Women's Division, Campaign Cabinet Meeting, 10 a.m.
- Federation, Young Adult Division, Outreach Coffee,
7:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Temple Torah West Boynton, 7:30 p.m. -
Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood, board, 10 a.m. -
Hadassah Rishona, Study Group Women's American
ORT West Palm Beach, board, 9:30 a.m. Federation,
Young Adult Division, Business Executive Forum, 6-8
p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion, Paid Up Membership
Lunchon at The Hilton Hotel, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Temple
Beth El, Widows and Widowers Support Group 12:30
p.m. Na'Amat USA Palm Beach Council, Southeast
Area Seminar, 9 a.m. Jewish Community Center,
Executive Committee, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women
Masada, 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil, membership tea
- Federation, Israel Mid-East Task Force, noon. -
Federation, Women's Division "Wine & Cheese" Recep-
tion, at Lands of the President, 4 p.m.
For information contact the Federation office, 832-
2120.
43rd U.N. Providing Palestinian's Platform
The current 43rd session of
the U.N. General Assem-
bly is certain to provide a
concentrated focus for the
Palestinian Arab uprising's
global public relations cam-
paign.
A hint came in late August
and early September in Gen-
eva at the annual meeting of
the U.N. Sub-Commission on
Prevention of Discrimination
and Protection of Minorities.
The 26-member body, domi-
nated by the Soviet and third
world blocs, formally
denounced Israel in an inflam-
matory resolution certain to
find its way into the General
Assembly debates.
Israeli policy in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip was held
to be a "gross violation of
human rights" and "a crime
prejudicial to the peace and
security of humanity. ."
Included in the charges were
the murder of children, mass
asphyxia and the aborting of
pregnant women.
The sub-commission
endorsed a call for Palestinian
Arabs to resist "the Israeli
occupation by all means. ..."
Clearly, terrorism was not
excluded.
Endorsed too was the PLO
claim of the Palestinian right
"to return to their homeland
.. and the establishment of
their independent and sover-
eign State on their national
soil." It was hardly an appeal
for negotiations. Indeed, ear-
lier U.N. resolutions specifi-
cally denounced Camp David
and the Egyptian-Israeli
treaty.
Afterwards, PLO foreign
affairs spokesman Farouk
Kaddoumi addressed a confer-
ence of non-governmental
organizations held in Geneva.
What is required to exert
effective pressure upon Israel,
he said, is an international
boycott of the Jewish state.
Precedent already exists. In
1983, the U.N. General Assem-
bly voted 86 to 20 to have all
member states "cease forth-
with, individually and collec-
tively, all dealings with Israel
in order totally to isolate her in
all fields."
The same resolution labelled
Israel not a "peace-loving
state" significant language
since Article IV of the U.N.
Charter specifies that only
"peace-loving states" are enti-
tled to membership. Grounds
for Israel's expulsion had been
laid.
Challenging Israel's creden-
tials would, however, have
explosive consequences. A
congressional resolution, ini-
tially drafted by Sen. Daniel
Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
and Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.)
specifies that if Israel is
"expelled, suspended, denied
its credentials or in any man-
ner denied its rights and privi-
leges," the United States
would withdraw from the Gen-
eral Assembly and withhold its
assessments.
Whether a more serious
challenge to Israel's status will
be mounted this year is uncer-
tain. After all, if successful, it
would plunge the U.N. into a
crisis. The annual vote to
accept or reject Israel's cre-
dentials is expected soon.
Verbal fireworks assaulting
Israel's policies and endorsing
the intifada will monopolize
much of the deliberations.
Should PLO Chairman Yasir
Arafat address the Assembly,
which he reportedly is consid-
ering, he will receive massive
support. Should the PLO pro-
claim an independent state, a
U.N. resolution of endorse-
ment can be expected.
Continued on Page 14
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
U.N.
Continued from Page 13
The voting pattern virtually
was predetermined on Sept.
11, at the annual meeting of
the foreign ministers of coun-
tries professing non-
alignment. The movement
represents 101 nations, the
bulk of U.N. membership.
Besides echoing Arafat's advo-
cacy of an independent Pales-
tinian state, the foreign minis-
ters formally proposed that
the U.N. take over "tempo-
rary supervision" of the West
Bank and Gaza Strip to protect
Palestinian Arabs from
Israeli "acts of terrorism and
atrocities."
Harsher anti-Israeli resolu-
tions and shrill rhetoric are
expected in the Assembly
chambers. Support will come
not only from the usual third
world and the Soviet bloc
nations, but also from West
European countries.
"It is going to be a very
difficult session for Israel, no
doublt," said a spokesman for
the Israeli U.N. delegration.
William Korey
Korey is director of research for the
International Council ofB 'nai B 'ritk.
Reprinted with permission from the
Near East Report.
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"^'inQATSUil L^
Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
^BBAT SHALq
At
Religious Directory
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH:501
NE 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Joel Chazin. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday
9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. and 6 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser!
Daily services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday
9 a.m. For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: 4550 Jog Road Lake
Worth. Phone 967-3600. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor
Abraham Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg. Cantor
Earl J. Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 10
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 No. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday evening, 8:15 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 NW Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Phone 996-3886. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Drive, Royal Palm Beach,
FL 33411. Phone 798-8888. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Stefan J. Weinberg.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday through Friday 9 a.m.
Rabbi Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew E. Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Cantor David Feuer. Sabbath services,
Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily 8:15 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing address: 9851D Mili-
tary Trail, Box 360091, Boynton Beach 33436. Phone 736-7687.
Rabbi Morris Silberman and Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath
Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart 33495. Phone
287-8833. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CHABAD HOUSE LUBAVITCH: 4623 Forest Hill Blvd.,
West Palm Beach, 108-3, 33415. Phone 641-6167. Rabbi Shlomo
Kzagui. Sabbath Services, Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Road, West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Phone
335-7620. Friday night services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30
a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 7:45 p.m.
Student Rabbi Peter Schaktman.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Boulevard, Vero Beach 32960. Mailing
address: P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Jay
R. Davis. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Phone 793-2700. Friday services 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10 a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor
Elliot Rosenbaum.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach
88407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 Chillingworth Drive, West Palm Beach.
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Ann
471-1526.
Anne Newman. Phone
Manhattan
Synagogue
Torched
By ANDREW SILOW CARR
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Vandals set fire to the
entrance of the Central Syna-
gogue in midtown Manhattan
one morning, last week, char-
ring a pair of newly refur-
bished doors which had been
unveiled only the day before in
honor of the synagogue's
150th anniversary.
Flammable liquid was
poured on the doors before
they were set on fire shortly
before 5 a.m., police said. No
messages or slogans were
found at the scene. Police have
deemed the fire "suspicious"
but are not yet investigating it
as a bias crime.
The fire struck as the
historic Reform temple pre-
pares to celebrate its founding
150 years ago this month,
according to Rabbi Stanley
David.
"One wonders whether this
person noted this development
and waited for (the doors) to be
completed," said David.
He said that in August,
swastikas were scratched on
the side of the building.
The attack follows by a
month the burning and
desecration of a Brooklyn
synagogue.
Our Editorial deadline
is as follows: All copy for
calendar items, syna-
gogue listings and
community or organiza-
tion news must arrive at
The Jewish Floridian 14
days before the date of
publication. We try to
publish as many press
releases as possible and
welcome any personal
news, such as wedding
and engagement
announcements, births
anniversaries, bar and
bat mitzvahs and
obituaries. This is a free
service to the community.
The Jewish Floridian
of Palm Beach County
welcomes comments
from our readers in the
form of Letters to the
Editor. All letters should
be typed, signed and
include an address and
phone number. The Flor-
idian reserves the right
to edit all letters for
length and grammar.
Writers may request
anonymity.
Keep us informed.
Has something
exciting happened in
your life? Did you or
someone you know
recently receive an
award, a promotion, a
new position? Has a
member of your family
graduated with honors or
just got engaged?
Let us know.
We are interested in
the lives of the members
of our community. Send
your typewritten infor-
mation to The Jewish
Floridian, 501 S. Flagler
Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, FL, 33401.
Syni
ill
eNews
TEMPLE BETH ZION
The Sisterhood is holding a
rummage sale on Sunday
morning, Oct. 30 in the park-
ing lot of Fidelity Bank, Royal
Palm Beach branch.
TEMPLE JUDEA
A rummage sale, sponsored
by Sisterhood, will be held
Sunday, Oct. 23, from 8 a.m. to
3 p.m., at Osowski's parking
lot, Military Trail and South-
ern Boulevard, West Palm
Beach.
Candle Lighting Time
9 Oct. 21 6:30 p.m.
Oct. 28 6:24 p.m.
French Not Aware
of Judaism's Roots
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A majority
of French citizens are ignorant
of the Old Testament and
therefore of the roots of
Judaism, according to the
results of a poll published in Le
Monde Tuesday.
But they do have "a keen
and in-depth understanding of
Christian subjects," the poll
revealed.
The survey, conducted by
the Ipsos organization for the
newspaper Le Monde and
Radio Luxembourg, found that
only 17 percent of those ques-
tioned knew that Moses "led
his people out of Egypt."
Only 17 percent knew that
Moses received the Ten Com-
mandments. Others ques-
tioned described him as a Jew-
ish leader, a prophet, and some
thought he was one of the 12
apostles.
Even less well known is
Abraham. Nine percent of the
respondents alternately
described him as "the chief of
the Jewish people," "the
father of the Hebrews" or "a
disciple of Jesus."
The most disliked character
in the Christian scriptures is
Judas, the poll found. He was
described by 55 percent of
practicing Catholics and 42
percent of a public cross-
section as "the man who
betrayed Christ and betrayed
God."
For 19 percent of those ques-
tioned, he was a symbol of
greed.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Another cliche
bites the dust.
Continental's Golden Traveler Passport. And 10% Senior Citizen Discounts.
No other airline offers more ways to save to more of the world.
Continental is retiring a lot of preconceived notions about discount travel programs. With money-saving offers that let you travel the way thafs best for you.
First, there's our new Golden Traveler Passport. Good for a full vear of virtually unlimited travel: Up to 24 round trips per year for travelers
62 years or older. To anywhere we fly in the continental U.S. Over 80 destinations across the U.S. It all starts at just $1299 for the domestic Passport.
At about $55 per round trip. Substantial savings. And for a little more you can add Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Or Hawaii. Or Europe.
Or the South Pacific. Or any combination. Your choice.
Or if you're more of an occasional traveler, and don't need a Passport, there's still a great way to save. We're also offering a flat, 10% discount if
you're 65 years or older on any published retail fare. Even Max$avers.
Get all the details by sending in the coupon below. Or call your travel agent or Continental at 1 -800-525-0280 a free brochure.
CONTINENTAL
Working to be your choice.
' 1988 Continental Airl.nes. Inc
YES. I love to travel. And I love to save money.
Send me all the details on your Golden Traveler
Passport and 10% senior discount.
Mail to: Continental Airlines
Golden Traveler Passport Program
PO Box 521635
Miami, Fla. 33152-1635
Name
-Vl.iTV,
&!i.
State
M.


Full Text
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Friday, October 21, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Organizations
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
On Monday, Oct. 24, the
Lake Worth West Chapter will
hold its meeting at 12:30 p.m.
at the Country Squire Inn on
Lake Worth Road and the
Turnpike. Guest speaker will
be Jeffrey Hill of the Palm
Beach Savings Bank on Jog
Road who will give a talk on
different phases of banking,
investing and C.D.'s. Hus-
bands are welcome to attend.
Refreshments will be served.
Royal Chapter will hold its
annual rummage sale on Sun-
day, Nov. 13 at 7 a.m. This
year it will be held on the
grounds of the Fidelity Bank
off of Royal Palm Blvd.
West Palm Chapter will
meet Tuesday, Nov. 1, noon at
Congregation Anshei Sholom
for a paid up membership
luncheon. There will be a musi-
cal program.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Okeechobee Section will have
its next general membership
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 17,
12:30 p.m. at the American
Bank, West Gate, Century Vil-
lage. Henry Grossman will be
the guest speaker. His subject
is "How To Keep Fit."
HADASSAH
Aliya Lake Worth Chapter
will hold its paid up member-
ship meeting on Thursday,
Oct. 27, noon at Temple Beth
Sholom, -312 North "A"
Street, Lake Worth. Members
must make reservations.
Yovel Chapter Study Group
will continue discussion of
Jewish Ethics on Nov. 4, 10
a.m. at the Royal Palm Bank,
Drexel Plaza. Refreshments
will be served. Everyone is
welcome.
Coming Events: Nov. 13
Show at the Newport Hotel,
Miami Beach. One price
includes transportation, lunch,
shows and gratuities.
Nov. 17 Membership
meeting at noon at Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom. Ben
Gould will give an Israel
Update.
Nov. 24-27 Four days and
three nights at the Tarlton
Hotel, Miami Beach.
Nov. 30 Royal Palm Din-
ner Theatre, Boca Raton "La
Cage Aux Follies."
Dec. 5-8 Four days and
three nights at the Regency
Spa in Bal Harbour.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter regular
meeting and mini lunch
Thurs., Oct. 27 at Congrega-
tion Aitz Chaim, 12 p.m. Com-
ing Events Nov. 2-5
Regency Spa; Dec. 21 La
Cage Royal Palm Theater
(sold out); Jan. 4 Dream Girl
Burt Reynolds Dinner Thea-
ter; Feb. 26 Gigi Royal
Palm Dinner Theater; March
14 Donor Luncheon Poin-
ciana Club.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
The next meeting takes
place on Friday, Oct. 28 at the
American Savings Bank, near
the Century Village entrance.
Coffee and cake are served
prior to the meeting. A
speaker from the Jewish Fam-
ily & Children's Service will
discuss "Room Mates: Older
People Living Together."
B'NAI B'RITH
Lake Worth Chapter No.
S016, will kick off the 1988-89
season with a breakfast meet-
ing at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct.
23 to be held at the Poinciana
Country Club. All members of
the lodge and their guests are
invited to attend at no charge.
The Norman J. Kapner
Legal Unit have planned a
special meeting for Thursday,
Oct. 27 at Manero's Restau-
rant, West Palm Beach. The
special feature of the evening,
in keeping with the current
highly charged pre-election
atmosphere, will be a discus-
sion between James Fox Miller
and Tom Ervin, Jr., Florida
Bar President-Elect candi-
dates, on why each should
become the future president of
the Florida Bar Association.
Cocktails begin at 6 p.m. with
dinner at 6:30 p.m. All mem-
bers of the bar and their
friends, guests, and spouses
are invited.
Community Calendar
Oct. 21 Brandeis University Women Lake Worth
Chapter, Trip to Bonnet House, Ft. Lauderdale and
luncheon.
Oct. 22 Federation, Leadership Development Pro-
gram, 8 p.m. American Technion Society, Cocktail
Reception, 7 p.m. Women's American ORT West Palm
Beach, Luncheon/Show Federation, Vanguard Mission
II to Israel, through 10/31.
Oct. 23 Jewish Community Day School, BBQ & Raffle,
1-4 p.m. Congregation Aitz Chaim, board, 9:30 a.m. -
American Technion Society, breakfast, 10 a.m., and Cock-
tail Reception, 7 p.m.
Oct. 24 Federation, Women's Division $365 Worker
Training Meeting, 10 a.m. Women's American ORT
Fountains, 9:30 a.m. American Technion Society, Lunch-
eon, noon, and Cocktail Reception, 7 p.m.
Oct. 25 City of Hope, Luncheon at The Royce Hotel -
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village, 10 a.m. -
Temple Beth El, Study Group, noon Temple Beth Zion,
board, 8 p.m. Temple Beth David, Executive Board, 8
p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil Federation, Public
Relations Committee, Noon Federation, Jewish Edu-
cation Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Federation, Young Adult
Division Minimum Gift Committee, 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 26 Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood, board, 7:30 p.m.
- Federation, Board of Directors, 4 p.m. Federation,
Women's Division, Campaign Cabinet Meeting, 10 a.m.
- Federation, Young Adult Division, Outreach Coffee,
7:30 p.m.
Oct. 27 Temple Torah West Boynton, 7:30 p.m. -
Congregation Aitz Chaim Sisterhood, board, 10 a.m. -
Hadassah Rishona, Study Group Women's American
ORT West Palm Beach, board, 9:30 a.m. Federation,
Young Adult Division, Business Executive Forum, 6-8
p.m. Hadassah Bat Gurion, Paid Up Membership
Lunchon at The Hilton Hotel, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Temple
Beth El, Widows and Widowers Support Group 12:30
p.m. Na'Amat USA Palm Beach Council, Southeast
Area Seminar, 9 a.m. Jewish Community Center,
Executive Committee, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women
Masada, 1 p.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil, membership tea
- Federation, Israel Mid-East Task Force, noon. -
Federation, Women's Division "Wine & Cheese" Recep-
tion, at Lands of the President, 4 p.m.
For information contact the Federation office, 832-
2120.
43rd U.N. Providing Palestinian's Platform
The current 43rd session of
the U.N. General Assem-
bly is certain to provide a
concentrated focus for the
Palestinian Arab uprising's
global public relations cam-
paign.
A hint came in late August
and early September in Gen-
eva at the annual meeting of
the U.N. Sub-Commission on
Prevention of Discrimination
and Protection of Minorities.
The 26-member body, domi-
nated by the Soviet and third
world blocs, formally
denounced Israel in an inflam-
matory resolution certain to
find its way into the General
Assembly debates.
Israeli policy in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip was held
to be a "gross violation of
human rights" and "a crime
prejudicial to the peace and
security of humanity. ."
Included in the charges were
the murder of children, mass
asphyxia and the aborting of
pregnant women.
The sub-commission
endorsed a call for Palestinian
Arabs to resist "the Israeli
occupation by all means. ."
Clearly, terrorism was not
excluded.
Endorsed too was the PLO
claim of the Palestinian right
"to return to their homeland
. and the establishment of
their independent and sover-
eign State on their national
soil." It was hardly an appeal
for negotiations. Indeed, ear-
lier U.N. resolutions specifi-
cally denounced Camp David
and the Egyptian-Israeli
treaty.
Afterwards, PLO foreign
affairs spokesman Farouk
Kaddoumi addressed a confer-
ence of non-governmental
organizations held in Geneva.
What is required to exert
effective pressure upon Israel,
he said, is an international
boycott of the Jewish state.
Precedent already exists. In
1983, the U.N. General Assem-
bly voted 86 to 20 to have all
member states "cease forth-
with, individually and collec-
tively, all dealings with Israel
in order totally to isolate her in
all fields."
The same resolution labelled
Israel not a "peace-loving
state" significant language
since Article IV of the U.N.
Charter specifies that only
"peace-loving states" are enti-
tled to membership. Grounds
for Israel's expulsion had been
laid.
Challenging Israel's creden-
tials would, however, have
explosive consequences. A
congressional resolution, ini-
tially drafted by Sen. Daniel
Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.)
and Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.)
specifies that if Israel is
"expelled, suspended, denied
its credentials or in any man-
ner denied its rights and privi-
leges," the United States
would withdraw from the Gen-
eral Assembly and withhold its
assessments.
Whether a more serious
challenge to Israel's status will
be mounted this year is uncer-
tain. After all, if successful, it
would plunge the U.N. into a
crisis. The annual vote to
accept or reject Israel's cre-
dentials is expected soon.
Verbal fireworks assaulting
Israel's policies and endorsing
the intifada will monopolize
much of the deliberations.
Should PLO Chairman Yasir
Arafat address the Assembly,
which he reportedly is consid-
ering, he will receive massive
support. Should the PLO pro-
claim an independent state, a
U.N. resolution of endorse-
ment can be expected.
Continued on Page 14
J
Give a Little...
Help a Lot!
HELP US, PLEASE!
CLEAN YOUR CLOSETS TODAY. GIVE US YOUR DISCARDS
WERE TRYING DESPERATELY TO KEEP OUR DOORS OPEN,
AND OUR JEWISH HERITAGE ALIVE.
ONLY YOU
CAN HELP US!
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BETWEEN 4Mh AND BLUE NEKON
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 21, 1988
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title HI of the Older Americans Act,
provides a variety of services to persons 60 years or
older, along with interesting and entertaining, educa-
tional and recreational programs. All senior activities
are conducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil
Rights Act.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and
activities will be scheduled throughout the year.
KOSHER MEALS
KOSHER LUNCHES are
served Monday through Fri-
day at 11:15. The three loca-
tions are JCC in West Palm
Beach, 700 Spencer Drive;
JCC in Boynton Beach, 501
N.E. 26th Avenue; and JCC in
Delray Beach, 16189 Carter
Road.
Meet new friends while
enjoying delicious, nutritious
food along with planned activi-
ties everyday. Volunteers are
always needed. No fee is
required but contributions are
requested. Reservations
required. Call Carol in West
Palm Beach at 689-7700, Julia
in Boynton Beach at 582-7360,
or Nancy in Delray Beach at
495-0806. For transportation
call Dial-A-Ride at 689-6% 1.
HIGHLIGHTS OF
KOSHER LUNCH
CONNECTION FOR
OCTOBER
IN WEST PALM BEACH
Thursday, Oct. 20 Jen-
nifer Taylor "Stress Man-
agement '
Friday, Oct. 21 Sabbath
services
Monday, Oct. 24 Bingo
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Oct. 25 Billie
Traub book review "Life of
Sarah Bernhardt"
Wednesday, Oct. 26 Lou
Young, violinist; also, Helen
Gold, Nutritionist
Thursday, Oct. 27 Dr.
Diane Copeland, "Your Health
is your life"
Friday, Oct. 28 Mr. Nat
Stein Sabbath Services
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Are you homebound? Is your
neighbor homebound? Are you
unable to cook for yourself?
Have you just come home from
the hospital and have no way
to maintain your daily nutri-
tional requirements? The Jew-
ish Community Center's
Kosher Home Delivered Meals
Service is just for you!!!
This is a most essential ongo-
ing or short term service for
the homebound. No fee, but
contributions requested. For
Boynton Beach, Lake Worth
or West Palm Beach call Carol
at 689-7700. In Delray Beach,
call Nancy at 495-0806.
JCC
TRANSPORTATION
SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter takes persons to Nursing
Homes and Hospitals on Mon-
days and Fridays to visit loved
ones, to Day Care Centers and
to Jewish Community Center
programs, whenever possible.
Fee is $1.00 each one way trip.
Call Libby between 9:30 to
1:30 for information and reser-
vations. Persons needing
medical transportation
should call Dial-a-Ride 689-
6961.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Adult Education Classes
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter is proud to offer classes
provided by Palm Beach Com-
munity College and Palm
Beach County School Board
Adult Education. Fees are
required for these classes
along with registration. Call
Louise at 689-7700 for infor-
mation.
High Blood Pressure &
Age Related Diseases A
four week highly informative
session given by Lois Link of
the Palm Beach County School
Board, Adult Education. Date:
Wednesday, already in session
at 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Fee:
$2.00 for complete series.
Your check is your reserva-
tion. Call Louise at 689-7700.
Wisdom of the Body
Already in session.
All About Cars An 8
week course on getting to
know your car. Learn how to
communicate with your
mechanic, how to save gas,
how to drive defensively, what
to do in emergency, etc. Dates:
Oct. 18, Oct. 25; Nov. 1, 8, 15,
22, 29 and Dec. 6. Given by
Paul Oblas, Palm Beach
County School Board Adult
Education. Time: 10 a.m. to
12. Fee: $4 for entire course.
Reservations requested. Call
Louise at 689-7700. Course to
be held at Jewish Community
Center.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Timely Topics: Date: Mon-
days ongoing following lunch.
Time: Lunch at 1:15 Pro-
gram at 2. A stimulating group
discussing an exciting variety
of topics including current
events. Those interested in
lunch, please call for reserva-
tions at 689-7700. Ask for Lil-
lian Senior Department.
Carl Martin is Oct. 24th Mod-
erator.
Speakers Club Ongoing
Thursdays at 10 a.m. For per-
sons who wish to practice the
art of public speaking a
great group.
Sun & Fun Day Cruise
Sponsored by The Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches. A trip to
nowhere with full cruise amen-
ities. Date: Thursday, Dec. 1,
1988; Sailing time: 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.; Place of Departure:
Bus departs for Port Ever-
glades, Ft. Lauderdale, at Car-
teret Bank in Century Village.
Bus returns to West Palm
Beach at 6 p.m.
Call Sabina, Chairperson of
Second Tuesday Council at
683-0852 or Blanche Silver,
Volunteer Travel Consultant,
evenings, 478-5450 for infor-
mation. Space limited. Your
check for $43.00 made out to
Jewish Community Center is
your reservation. Pre-
registration required by
November 15th.
You Name It, You Play It!
An afternoon of cards and
fun. Canasta, bridge, scrabble,
kaluki, mah jong, etc. Spon-
sored by 2nd Tuesday Council.
Refreshments served. Fee: $1
Canasta instruction by Maur-
ice Langbort. Fee for instruc-
tion: JCC Member $1, Non
Member $1.50. Make your own
tables. Date: Wednesdays at
1:30 p.m. RSVP Sophia at 689-
4806 or Sabina at 683-0852.
Intermediate Bridge with
Al Parsont Basic bidding
and play starting Wednesday,
Oct. 26, 1988 at 1:30 p.m. at
JCC. Fee: JCC Member $2.50
per session, Non-Member
$3.00 per session. Call Louise
at 689-7700.
JCC Thespians Popular
plays are being chosen for
rehearsal. Those interested in
becoming part of this theatre
group, please call Louise at
689-7700. Director: Carl Mar-
tin, former radio and stage
personality. Ongoing Fridays
starting from 10 to 12. No
fee, contributions requested.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
CULTURAL CLUB NEWS
SHOWTIME FOR
CULTURAL CLUB
Tickets are available for
Caldwell Theatre "The Cham-
pionship Season." Tour
Leader: Sandra Werbel on
Wednesday, Nov. 16th for 2:15
matinee. Fee: $20 includes
transportation and ticket. Call
Louise at 689-7700 by Nov. 9.
Your check is your reserva-
tion. Location: Caldwell Thea-
tre at Boca Raton Mall.
Ann Norton Sculpture Gar-
dens Transportation avail-
able. Call Louise at 689-7700
for further information on
time, pick up point and fee.
Sandra Werbel, Tour Guide.
Date: Thursday, Oct. 27. Your
check is your reservation.
VOLUNTEER NEWS:
"Hi-Neighbor" the
new J.C.C. Mitzvah Corps is a
group of special persons reach-
ing out-keeping in touch with
our homebound and others in
need. Join this dedicated
group of persons who are
enjoying doing Mitzvahs. Call
Ellie Newcorn at 689-7700.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Instructors for crocheting,
knitting, flower making and
arranging; dancers for our
Twilight Dining and Dancing;
group leaders for "Fun with
Yiddish." Wanted: Guitar
Instructor. Please call Frieda
at 689-7700.
We always need dedicated
volunteers to deliver meals to
our homebound. Call Carol at
689-7700.
PRIME TIME SINGLES
For information please call
Frieda at 689-7700 or Sally
Gurvitch at 478-9397 or Eve-
lyn Smith at 686-6727.
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter provides by appointment:
Health Insurance Assistance
with Edie Reiter; Legal Aid by
Palm Beach County Legal Aid
Society; Home Financial Man-
agement with Herb Kirsh. Call
Louise for information at 689-
7700.
JCC News
700 Spencer Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
YOUNG SINGLES (20s and 30s)
Sunday, Oct. 23rd, 11 a.m. Meet for lunch at John G's
restaurant (north end of Lake Worth Pier) to enjoy this
famous eatery. At 1 p.m. we will gather under the clock to
hit the beach.
Monday, Oct. 24th, 7 p.m. Meet at the Center to plan
new and exciting events for the upcoming months. Bring
your ideas and join us.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Tuesday, Oct. 25th, 7:30 p.m. Meet at the Center to
plan events for the upcoming months. Bring your ideas and
creativity and join us.
For more information, please call the JCC, 689-7700.
O
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 22,11 a.m. WPTV Channel 5,
with host Barbara Gordon. Reruns. Mosaic begins its 25th
season with a special premiere featuring the Jewish Family
Children's Service.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Oct. 22, 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340
AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
THE RABBI LEON FINK SHOW Sunday, Oct. 22, 3
p.m.-6 p.m. WPBR 1340 AM, with host Rabbi Leon Fink. A
Jewish talk show that features weekly guests and call-in
discussions.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, Oct. 22, 11 p.m. Monday-
Wednesday, Oct. 24-26 WCVG 1080 AM This
two-hour Jewish entertainment show features Jewish
music, comedy, and news.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Mailman Refused To Deliver
Facing Discharge
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A mail car-
rier who faces dismissal for
refusing to deliver neo-Nazi
propaganda material is fight-
ing his case in a labor court in
the West German town of
Reutlingen.
Martin Hank of Tuebingen
has the backing of many of his
colleagues. They unfurled a
banner reading "No Nazi prop-
aganda with the postal ser-
vices" when his hearing
opened.
Hank had been ordered to
deliver propaganda material of
the neo-Nazi National Demo-
cratic Party to recipients in
Tuebingen.
He had anticipated this, and
several months earlier he had
asked his superior for special
leave to avoid doing it.
The leave was denied. When
Hank refused to deliver the
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NDP material,'he was disci-
plined and threatened with the
loss of his job.
The postal authorities say
they cannot tolerate a situa-
tion in which individual postal
workers decide what mail they
will deliver.
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to Israel into
a profitable partnership
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Ampal is an American company with
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If you are ambitious, serf-motivated,
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To receive more information about
becoming an Independent Ampal
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Jeff Feldman (212) 586-3232 or write
SMBSL
AMEFKAN BRAEL CORPORATION
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YOUR AMERICAN CORPORATE
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