The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00094

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
h Jewish floridian
^^ M OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13 NUMBER 3/
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20,198/
PRICE 40 CENTS
Jeane Kirkpatrick To Address GA
Jeane Kirkpatrick
Hussein
Dr. Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
former United States Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions, will join two prominent
former Soviet refuseniks, Ida
Nudel and Vladimir Slepak, as
featured speakers at the 56th
General Assembly of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations.
Kirkpatrick will address the
assembly in Miami while Nudel
and Slepak will be broadcast
via satellite live from Israel, on
Saturday evening, Nov. 21, at
the Fountainebleau Hotel in
Miami Beach, FL
Appointed United States
Permanent Representative to
the United Nations by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan in
January 1981, Kirkpatrick was
the first woman to serve as the
United States' chief UN
representative. She also serv-
ed as a member of President
Reagan's Cabinet.
After serving one of the
longest terms of any UN am-
bassador, Kirkpatrick resign-
ed her position in January
1985 and returned to private
life to teach, write and lecture.
A recipient of The Presiden-
tial Medal of Freedom, the na-
tion's highest civilian award,
Kirkpatrick is widely regarded
as having one of the strongest
voices and keenest minds the
United States has ever en-
joyed in a UN ambassador. She
continues to speak out on
behalf of foreign policy objec-
tives, has lecturea on political
and international issues at
many conferences and forums
and is currently writing a book
and a weekly syndicated
newspaper column on interna-
tional affairs.
Attending the GA from the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County are: Erwin H.
and Shirley Blonder, Lynne
Ehrlich, Ronni Epstein,
Emanuel and Nathalie
Goldberg, Debbie Hammer,
Helen Hoffman, Steven and
Denise Kaplansky, Jeffrey L.
Continued on Page 2
Federation-UJA Campaign
Major Gifts To Set Standard
Double-Talks Peace
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) King
Hussein of Jordan has
reportedly signaled Israel not
to take seriously hard-line
remarks he is making at the
Arab summit in Amman, the
Israeli news media reported.
Hussein, in his speech at the
opening of the summit Sun-
day, (Nov. 8) is reported to
have exhorted the Arab states
for unity against Iran and
Israel, both of which he claim-
ed had designs on Arab
territory.
But according to Hadashot,
Hussein sent a message to
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres through a middleman
recently, pledging to honor the
arrangements they agreed to
at a meeting in London last
April. He stressed that he in-
tends to continue to work to
advance negotiations between
Jordan and Israel under the
auspices of an international
conference, Hadashot
reported.
The newspaper said circles
close to Peres believe Hus-
sein's signals are in earnest
and that the results of the
Arab summit will not affect
the agreements they reached.
The assessment of the Foreign
Ministry here is that even if
the king makes statements
critical of Israeli policy on the
peace process and in the ad-
ministered territories, he does
not intend to disavow
agreements reached so far on
the peace process.
Haaretz reported that Hus-
sein told British Foreign
Secretary Sir Geoffrey Howe
at a meeting in Amman earlier
this month that the Arab sum-
mit would not change his stand
on the issue of an international
conference and would not
cause him to renege on his
agreements with Peres.
Sources in Jerusalem quoted
by Haaretz believe that during
the summit, Hussein will be
forced to "tow the line" of the
Arab consensus and to express
Continued on Page 6
The Major Gifts giving
category sets a standard for
the entire community for ex-
cellence and responsible com-
mitment to the 1988 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United'Jewish Appeal
Campaign, according to Alan
Shulman, Major Girts Chair-
man. A black tie dinner for
Major Gifts contributors of
$25,000 or more to the 1988
Campaign will be held on Sun-
day, Dec. 13, at a private home
in Palm Beach. Israel's Am-
bassador to the United States,
the Honorable Moshe Arad,
will be the guest speaker.
Mr. Shulman, who was nam-
ed to this key position by
Jeanne Levy, General Chair of
the 1988 Federation-UJA
Campaign, said, "The quality
and size of the major con-
tributors' response to the
needs of the Jewish communi-
ty both overseas and at home
determine the success of a
community's Campaign.
Leadership gifts set the tone
and level of giving for the
Campaign throughout the
community to insure that suffi-
cient funds will be available for
human service needs in Israel
Alan Shulman
and overseas as well as pro-
viding the necessary dollars
for local beneficiary agencies
and other worthwhile projects
here in our own community."
Mrs. Levy noted that Mr.
Shulman brings many years of
dedicated service to the task
and heads a most crucial area
of the Campaign. "As an ac-
tive leader of international
Jewry as well as in our own
community, Alan's expertise
and dedication will bring our
fund raising drive to a new
level of commitment. I am
pleased that he will be at the
forefront of our community's
efforts to elevate the quality of
life for Jews everywhere."
Alan Shulman is a member
of the Board of Directors of
United Israel Appeal and a
former National Vice Chair-
man of United Jewish Appeal.
He sits on the Board of Direc-
tors of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
and is a former member of the
Board of Directors of the
Council of Jewish Federations.
A former President of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and General
Chairman of the Federation-
UJA Campaign, Mr. Shulman
currently sits on the Federa-
tion's Board of Directors as
well as on the Board of
Trustees of the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center.
For more information, con-
tact Douglas Kleiner, Cam-
paign Director, at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Inside
Jewish Education Task
Force Formed... page 3
Skinhead Violence In
Germany... Page 5
Young Adults... page 8
From The Demographic
Study.. -page 13
National Soviet Jewry Leader
To Speak At Community Plea
Jerry Goodman
A leading national expert in the
field of Soviet Jewry will address the
Community Plea For Soviet Jewry on
Thursday, Dec. 10,7:30 p.m., at Tem-
ple Israel. Jerry Goodman, Executive
Director of the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry, is at the forefront of
the latest developments regarding
the plight of Soviet Jews, according
to Sandra Goldberg, Co-Chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Task Force of the
Community Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
"We are honored to have such a
distinguished, knowledgeable na-
tional leader speak to our community.
I heard him address a rally in
December and conduct a leadership
seminar in Israel in March. He knows
what's happening with our Soviet
brothers and sisters on a daily basis.
It will be especially exciting to learn
what transpired at the Washington
Summit Dec. 7 on behalf of Soviet
Jewry as he will be coming to our
community right after the Reagan-
Gorbachev meeting," Mrs. Goldberg
said.
Co-Chairman Terry Rapaport add-
ed. "The new openness policy,
Continued oa Page 8


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987

i
Victor Duke
Memorial Tribute Fund
Honor Roll
Many people have made donations in memory of com-
munity leader Victor Duke to the Jewish Community
Center to be located on the new Jewish Community Cam-
pus on Military Trail and 12th Street. The JCCampus will
also house the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
and the Jewish Family and Children's Service.
The late Mr. Duke was a member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Jewish Community Center and very active in the
campaign to raise $12.5 million to build the new facility.
Due to space restrictions, thefoUoumg is only a partial
list of contributions. Additional donors will be recognized
in weeks to come.
Andover K Condo Association
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Hilton
Mr. and Mrs. David Hoffman
Mr. and Mrs. Solomon Kopman
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Levine
Massachusetts Social Club
Mr. and Mrs. Mannie Padorzer
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Roth
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Schaeffer
Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Sherman
Contributions may be sent to the Jewish Community
Campus Capital Campaign, 501 South Flagler Drive, Suite
305, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, earmarked for the Vic-
tor Duke Memorial Tribute Fund. For more information,
contact Marjorie Scott, JCCampus Capital Campaign
Director, at 832-2120.
JCCampus
Prominent Jewish community leader H. Irwin Levy (left) and
Gilbert S. Messing, Chairman of the Jewish Community Cam-
pos Capital Campaign, will host a Major Gifts Cocktail Party
Nov. 30,4:30 p.m., at the home of Judy and Gilbert Messing in
Palm Beach. The event closes the campaign year for 1987. The
JCCampus, which will serve as the central focus for Jewish
activities in the Palm Beaches, will be located on Military
Trail and 12th Street. It will house the Jewish Community
Center, the Jewish Family and Children's Service, and the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Construction is
slated to begin in the Spring.
fEDcV
1988 CAMPAIGN
MAJOR EVENTS

DECEMBER
Dec. 6 Boynton Beach Campaign Breakfast
Dec. 13 MAJOR GIFTS EVENT
Dec. 20 Village Royale on the Green Breakfast
JANUARY
Jan. 13 Fountains Special Gifts Cocktail Party
Jan. 14 Leadership Dinner
Jan. 20 Women's Division Lion of Judah
Jan. 24 Fountains Golf Tournament/Luncheon
Jan. 28 Hunters Run Pacesetters Event
Noted Authority On Israel To Address
Campaign Kick-Off For Greenbrier
Kenneth J. Schwartz, a
noted authority on Israel, will
be the featured speaker at the
annual Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Kick-Off
Brunch for Greenbrier in Cen-
tury Village. The event will be
held on Sunday, Nov. 22,10:30
a.m., at pool side.
Nat Cohen, Chairman of the
Century Village Campaign, en-
courages all the residents of
Greenbrier to come and hear
this dynamic speaker. "Mr.
Schwartz is a member of the
UJA Regional Cabinet, and
will update us on events effec-
ting Jewry nationally and
abroad. In the past, residents
of Greenbrier have set the
pace for the fund raising drive
in Century Village and we in-
vite them this year to join with
us for this kick-off to learn
about the latest developments
about Israel as well as our local
Jewish community. There will
be no solicitation," stated Mr.
Cohen.
Kenneth Schwartz is a
former UJA National Vice
Chairman and National Chair-
man of Region Five. His in-
volvement in the Jewish com-
munity is extensive. Mrs.
Schwartz is a former member
of the Board of Directors,
Worker Training Chairman,
and Missions Chairman for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. He is a past member of
the Campaign Steering Com-
mittee and Pacesetter Com-
mittee of the Combined Jewish
Kirk pat rick
Continued from Page 1
and Carla Klein, Douglas
Kleiner, Zelda and Allen
Mason, Mark Mendel, Marvin
and Sandra Rosen, Dr. Elliot
Schwartz, Susan Schwartz,
Paul Shapiro, Rabbi Alan
Sherman, Phillip and Leah
Siskin, Barbara Steinberg,
Faye Stoller and Rabbi Steven
Westman.
Appeal-Israel Emergency p0r more information, con-
Fund. He also served as Presi- tact Dr. Lester Silverman,
dent of Temple Sinai of North Campaign Associate, at the
Dade. Federation office, 832-2120.
Groundbreaking November 22
Clearing the land for the Jewish Community Campus marks
the first step toward construction. Work began this week to
prepare the 28 acre site at Military Trail and 12th St. in West
Palm Beach. Construction is scheduled to begin by early sum-
mer 1988.
Jewish Federation
Of Palm Beach County
1988
Campaign Incentives
Program
BUILDING A COMMUNITY ... A PLACE FOR US
THESE PEOPLE ARE HELPING TO BUILD
The Jewish Community Campus
f
HOMEOFTHE
Jewish Community Center*
Jewish Family And Children's Service
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
#"
Is Your Name
Partial Listing
Mr. and Mrs. William Arkin
Gloria Belgard
Ms. Ellen Bovarnick
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Fisher
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Flah
Anne Fuss
Drs. Peter Sherman, Ronald Koch and Sharon Ross
Stella Gabe
Mr. Charles Green
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Risick
Dr. Robert Rubin
Faye Stoller
PLUS DOZENS MORE CARING PEOPLE WHOSE NAMES
WILL APPEAR IN THE WEEKS TO COME
Don't Be Left Out!
Call the JCCampus Campaign Office, 832-2120
Known as YWYMHA'e In many communities.


FT

Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Ftoridwui
Beach County Page 3
Future Goals of Jewish Education In The
Palm Beaches To Be Addressed
By Newly Formed Task Force
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County recognizes
that Jewish identity is
strengthened by quality
Jewish education. To meet this
challenge, the Federation has
established a Task Force on
Jewish Education under the
auspices of its Planning and
Allocations Committee.
Erwin H. Blonder, President
the task force. Seated alongside her are task force member of the Jewish Federation of
Judy Rosenberg and Mark Mendel, Federation Staff Palm Beach County, has nam-
Associate. ed Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman to
Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman (center), Chairman of the Task
Force on Jewish Education, conducts the initial meeting of
chair this critical task force.
"Elizabeth is not only an ac-
tive leader of the Jewish com-
munity, but her keen interest
in Jewish education has led her
to serve with distinction as
past Chairman of Federation's
Jewish Education Committee.
I am delighted that she will be
heading this vital effort which
will review the current scope
of Jewish educational pro-
grams and services in the com-
munity, analyze community
needs, and recommend
creative solutions to meet
those needs," Mr. Blonder
stated.
The task force, which met
recently to discuss the scope
and goals of the mission, is
comprised of professional
educators, rabbis, and lay
leaders from throughout the
community. As its work pro-
gresses, the task force will be
Continued on Page 12
During Summit
Sharansky Urges Jews To Participate In March On Washington
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Natan Sharansky urged
American Jews not to forget,
in their joy at the emigration
of well-known refuseniks, like
himself, that nearly 400,000
Jews are still being denied the
right to leave the Soviet
Union.
Speaking to the Washington
Board of Rabbis at a luncheon
meeting, the former Soviet
Prisoner of Conscience urged
Jews to participate in
"historic" numbers in a march
on Washington, Dec. 6 when
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev comes to Washington
Join with other members of the Jewish community of
the Palm Beaches to fly to Washington, D.C. on Sun-
day, Dec. 6, for the historic mass inobilization in sup-
port of freedom for Soviet Jews during the summit bet-
ween President Reagan and Soviet leader Gorbachev.
For more information, contact Mark Mendel, Staff
Associate, at the Federation office, 8S2-2120.
with
for a summit meeting
President Reagan.
Every Jew must be made to
understand that "this moment
is historical" in that every Jew
by "acting himself can change
the fate of the Jews of the
Soviet Union," Sharansky
said.
He explained that by a
massive turnout, the Jewish
community will demonstrate
to Gorbachev that to achieve
his goals he must improve
human rights conditions in the
USSR and allow massive
Jewish emigration.
While Gorbachev is perceiv-
ed as more "liberal" than his
predecessors, it is his regime
that passed a new immigration
law that makes it "much more
difficult, if not impossible" for
most Jews to emgirate,
Sharansky said. He added it is
also under Gorbachev that for
the first time in Soviet history
grassroots anti-Semitic groups
have been allowed to appear in
the Soviet Union.
At the same time, Sharansky
stressed Gorbachev
understands the necessity to
improve the Soviet economy,
and that in order to achieve
this he must achieve
agreements with the West
that will lead to the acquiring
from the West technology and
credit.
Gorbachev is trying to
achieve this through a "public
relations" campaign in which
he gives up little, Sharansky
said. He said that a massive
turn-out by Jews and others
will convince him that he must
do more.
As an illustration, Sharan-
sky said he was speaking to the
editorial board of the
Baltimore Sun meeting and
told the editors that they
should expect some well-
known refuseniks to be releas-
ed because of the meeting bet-
ween Secretary of State
Continued on Page 15
CAN SHE COUNT ON YOU?
Help ensure the quality
of life for our elderly.
Support the Expansion
of the
JOSEPH L. MORSE
GERIATRIC CENTER
of the Jewish Home for the Aged
of Palm Beach County
To make your pledge contact the
Center's Office of Development at
471-5111
'Pledges may be paid over a three to five year period


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
Refugees, Justice And Peace
One of Israel's greatest successes and one
of its greatest failures are linked, according
to its UN Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu. And together, success and
failure have permitted the case of the
Palestinian Arabs and their refugee
minority to masquerade as the crux of the
Arab-Israeli conflict.
The success was the absorption of more
than 600,000 of the 850,000 Jewish refugees
who fled from Arab countries in the years
immediately after the 1948 War of In-
dependence. The failure was in not focusing
world attention on this success while the
Arabs simultaneously converted the plight
of Palestinian Arabs (the total of 590,000 is
often used, but some believe even that
number was inflated) into the world's only
perpetual refugee problem.
Israel came to be seen as the dispossessor,
despite the fact that Jews left behind in
Arab lands an estimated $11 billion worth of
property five times that abandoned by
Palestinian Arabs. Thus, Israel's legitimacy
could be questioned and Arab refusal to
make peace could be validated.
To correct the historical record and
thereby to help set the stage for genuine
compromise and peace the World
Organization of Jews from Arab Countries
(WOJAC) held its third international con-
ference in Washington late last month. WO-
JAC met in London in 1975 and Paris in
1983.
Even inside Israel, the organization has
run into trouble. Chairman Leon Tamman
recalled Golda Meir's insistence that there
were no Jewish refugees, only immigrants
making aiiyah. Before this gathering some
in the Foreign Ministry opposed the idea,
fearing it could disturb delicate Middle East
diplomacy, he said.
But Foreign Minister Shimon Peres over-
ruled them, and sounded a warning in the
Knesset about the remnant Jewish com-
munities still trapped in Syria, North Yemen
and elsewhere. In any case, Tamman said,
"it is not a question of (Arab-Israeli) conflict,
. but a lack of awareness of the barbaric treat-
ment" suffered by Jews from Arab lands.
"We want justice and nothing else."
Netanyahu told the delegates that while
Jews "spent our energies on making known
the calamity in Europe ... and the salvation
of Jews of the Soviet Union ... we did not
devote equal energy to this cause." He
argued that the saga of Jews from Arab
countries who emigrated to Israel is "enor-
mously powerful," especially compared to
the conscious decision of Arab nations to
leave the Palestinian Arab refugees "to
fester and rot" in camps as anti-Israeli
symbols.
Bat Ye'or, author of The Dhimmi: Jews
and Christians Under Islam, touched on the
real crux of the Arab-Israeli conflict: the
Arab-Islamic belief "that Jews (and Chris-
tians) cannot be a sovereign people in the
Middle East..."
Underlying everything, she stressed, is
-JT^
the concept of jihad, still operative in the
Middle East. It not only means an Islamic
war, but also forms "part of a comprehen-
sive religious system which regulates the
relations between the Islamic community
and the non-Muslim peoples. Jihad is the
normal and permanent state of war between
the Muslim and non-Muslim territory."
Bat Ye'or called on Muslims to "examine
their own history of imperialism, oppression
and injustice" and on Arab intellectuals and
moderates to forsake the concept of jihad.
The first victims of failure to do so will not
be Israel, Arab Christians or the West, but
the Arab moderates themselves, she said.
Seymour Maxwell Finger, former senior
adviser to the U.S. Permanent Represen-
tative to the UN, pointed to numerous major
population exchanges in this century, in-
cluding Greeks and Turks, Hindus and
Moslems on the Indian subcontinent, and
ethnic Germans from Russia and Poland.
Only the Palestinian Arabs have gone into
the second and third generation of refugee
status, Finger said.
Near East Report
Tarantutas Receive Long-Awaited Visas
the
Jewish floridian
Of Palm Beach County
USPS 089030 ISSN 8750-5061
Combining "Our Voice" and "Federation Reporter"
FHEOK SMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCHET RONNI EPSTEIN LOUISE ROSS
Editor and Publisher Enecuiive Editor New* Coordinator Aaalatant New* Coordinator
Published Meekly October through Mid May Bi Weekly balance ol year
Second Clan Postage Paid at West Palm Beach
Additional Mailing Office*
PALM BEACH OFFICE
501 S f lagier Or. West Palm Beach. Fla. 33401 Phone 832-2120
Mam Office Plant: 120N.E.8thSt .Miami. FL33101 Phone. 1-373-4805
POSTMASTER: Sand addr. change* to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
Advertising Director: Mad Lesser. Phone SM 1M2
Combined Jewish Appeal Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc. Officers President
Erwm H Blonder. Vice Presidents. Barry S Berg, Alec Engelstem, Lionel Qreenbaum. Marva Perrin.
Mervin S Rosen Treasurer. Helen G Hoffman. Assistant Treasurer Gilbert S Messing: Secretary
Leah Siskin Assistant Secretary. Bernard Plisakin Submit material to Ronni Epstein. Director ol
Public Relations 501 South Flagler Or. West Palm Beach. FL 31401
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kaahruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area (4 Annual (2 rear Minimum 17 SO), or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagler Or. Weal Palm Beach. Fla. 33401 Phone 832 2120
Friday, November 20,1987
Volume 13
28HESHVAN574S
Number 37
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Aba
and Ida Taratuta, at 14 years Len-
ingrad's reportedly longest-
awaiting refuseniks, received per-
mission to immigrate to Israel.
This latest development was
reported by Lynn Singer, ex-
ecutive director of the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry. The news about the
Taratutas was also announced by
the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
The Taratutas, both born in
August 1930, first applied to
emigrate in May 1973, and were
refused that August for reasons of
"secrecy.' Both had to give up
their jobs: Aba's in applied
mathematics, Ida's as a translator
of scientific material at the Len-
ingrad Pedagogical Institute.
According to Singer, Aba
became the "support system and
one of the leading exponents of
aiiyah in Leningrad, known
throughout the repatriation move-
ment." In 1977, militiamen inter-
rupted his unofficial math seminar
for Jews and demanded to see the
participants' identification.
The couple's son, Mikhail
(Misha), a talented artist, was
denied entrance to a Leningrad
university in 1970, despite an ex-
emplary academic record at the
secondary school level. But in
August of this year, he was allow-
ed to immigrate to Israel. Last
month, he visited the United
States to work on his parents'
behalf.
The National Conference hailed
news of the Taratutas' impending
freedom. Noting that Aba was
"vilified in the Soviet press as a
'Zionist conspirator' because he
and his wife sought to immigrate
to Israel," the organization said.
"We hope that many others will
soon be given permission to
emigrate."
Singer also reported that Viktor
Fulmakht, a six-year refusenik,
received permission to emigrate
despite a "final refusal" in
December 1982, on the grounds of
"secrecy," along with his wife,
Maya.
However, their decision to leave
is colored by another recent
refusal for their daughter,
Miriam, who was turned down
along with her husband, Misha
Bialy, and their infant son.
There are now three genera-
tions of Bialys in refusal Misha,
his son and his parents, Leonid
and Judith. Judith Ratner Bialy's
ailing 82-year-old mother, Ktziya
Ratner, a Soviet emigre living in
Rehovot, Israel, has traveled ex-
tensively as a representative of
the Mothers for Freedom.
This week also saw more
refusals for long-term refuseniks
Benjamin Chamy of Moscow, who
suffers from cancer and heart
disease, and whose daughter, An-
na Blank, and brother, Leon, live
in Needham, Mass.; Mark Terlit-
sky, also of Moscow, whose
brother, Leonard, now living in
New York, visited him and their
ailing mother in September and
chased down all reported
authorities to ask for permission
for his family.
These were cases supposedly be-
ing reviewed by the new Soviet re-
examination committee.
On Nov. 2, 62 refuseniks sent a
telegram to Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev and to Andrei
Gromyko, Communist Presidium
chairman and former foreign
minister.
The group's members stressed
that they had been waiting six
months for answers to their latest
emigration requests and that
emigration authorities had reneg-
ed on one official's promise to res-
pond to the requests by Oct. 30.
Readers Write
Care At Morse Appreciated
EDITOR:
Oct. 29 was a happy day at
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. A Halloween party
and a birthday party for
residents born in October
brought fun, laughter, and en-
joyment to everyone.
As volunteers, my wife and I
the life of the Morse. This year
we residents' October birth-
day party had a special mean-
ing for us. The oldest celebrant
V[58?ur mother- the year
old Honev Darvas. She is my
wife's mother but I call her my
mother-in-love.
We are grateful for the care
that is given to the residents of
the Morse. The spirit of
cooperation by all the ex-
ecutives, the staff, and the
volunteers make it possible
that with the medical care, the
activities programs, the
religious services, lectures,
sing-along sessions, etc, the
residents find a caring home.
DENNIS WILLINGER
West Palm Beach


mm

Friday, November 0, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
'Skinheads In Germany'
Neo-Nazism and Hooliganism
By IRMGARD
PIORKOWSKI-WUHR
Skinheads first appeared in
West Germany at the end of
the 1970s. Since then, they
have come to be associated
with extreme right-wing
movements.
There has been a noticeable
increase in the number of in-
cidents of various type in-
cluding crime by neo-Nazis
since 1974. Since 1979, there
has been an increase in overt
anti-Semitism.
After an initial rush, the
membership of the various
skinhead movements
stagnated at about 1,500 hard
core activists.
"We're coming slowly but
we're coming hard," was the
catchcry with the double
meaning taken from a song
which appeared at the funeral
of Rudolf Hess in the Bavarian
town of Wunsiedel earlier this
year extremists waved Nazi
flags and yelled out for
"Revenge for Hess."
The death of Hess did not
rekindle neo-Nazi feelings, but
it brought the movement into
the spotlight and the glare of
the international press. Many
brought Nazi banners to the
funeral, knowing they would
Behind The Scenes:
be photographed.
If you believe the statistics,
youth is not so susceptible to
neo-Nazi ideas and extreme
right-wing methods. That is
true as far as it goes. Tradi-
tional neo-Nazi groups have lit-
tle appeal among the young.
Only about one percent of 15-
to 24 years olds are members
of such groups or feel they
belong; three percent say the
groups are "quite good."
These were the results of a
study sponsored by Shell in
1981. This has not changed
much. Wilhelm Heitmeyer, a
Continued on Page 17
Cross our path at your peril. Skinhead violence at neo-Nazi party
rally.
UN Report Further Indicts Waldheim
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS -
(WUP) Brian Urquhart, a
Britisher and one who had
served as a political adviser of
every Secretary-General since
the founding of the World
Organization, has termed his
former boss, Kurt Waldheim, a
"duplicitous megomaniac"
who has done immense
damage to the United Nations
and to those who have devoted
their lives to it."
This revelation comes from
one of the most distinguished
Under-Secretary-Generals the
UN has ever had. It is probably
the most damaging against the
former Austrian Nazi that has
come out. It highlights an in-
terview appearing in the cur-
rent issue of the Diplomatic
World Bulletin, edited by
Richard A. Holman and Jack
Barnes, which serves the UN
and international community.
Declares the publication:
"Brian Urquhart, who is
perhaps better qualified than
most to evaluate the five men
who have led the organization,
having worked for all of them
since he joined the UN straight
out of British military uniform
in 1945, bluntly calls
Waldheim a living lie for hav-
ing prevaricated about his
World War II service as an of-
ficer in Hitler's army."
Currently a Resident
Scholar of the Ford Founda-
tion, "Urquhart," the UN
bulletin notes, "lets his hair
down about the now President
of Austria and many other per-
sonalities in a fascinating
book. 'A Life in Peace ana
This cartoon was made by the Hungarian-
American cartoonist and author, Emery
Kelen, during Kurt Waldheim's first term as
UN Seeretary-GeneraL
War.' In his remarks about the
fourth Secretary-General, Ur-
quhart acknowledges that, like
virtually everyone in the
Secretariat, he was persuaded
by Waldheim's story that he
was wounded on the Soviet
Front in late 1941, invalided
out and spent the rest of the
war poring over his law books.
"When from time to time
there were unsubstantiated
stories or allegations about his
past," Urquhart states
"Waldheim invariably and
strongly reaffirmed this story;
but, his former aide em-
phasizes that "it is now clear
that Waldheim lied for almost
40 years about his war record,
presumably believing that the
truth would stand in the way
of his relentless pursuit of
public position and office." Ur-
quhart dismisses him as "an
energetic, ambitious
mediocrity."
The former British Under-
Secretary-General has some
harsh criticism for the Perma-
nent members of the Security
Council for having failed to
check the War Crimes Com-
mission files now to be open-
ed for broader access to
researchers, scholars and
press or their own records
"to discover if there was
anything unsuitable or ques-
tionable in this German Army
officer's past."
As this column has previous-
ly noted, there are some
historians who hold that the
Soviets who had strongly
supported the Austrian
against his strongest oppo-
nent, Ambassador Max Jakob-
son of Finland, a Jew and
Diamond City Deputy Mayor:
Cautious Patience For Peace Process
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
YITSCHAK BEN-GAD,
born in Tripoli, Libya and now
the deputy mayor of Netanya,
Israel's coastal "Diamond Ci-
ty," has a Hebrew word for
anyone who may be growing
impatient about the fluidity of
the Middle East peace process.
'Savlanut!'
'Patiencel"'
he urges.
Ben-Gad says patience may
be needed because the Israeli
coalition government that is
almost divided 50-50 about
how to approach the peace pro-
cess, may not change even
with new elections in Israel in
November 1988.
Ben-Gad, speaking to The
Jewish Floridian during a re-
cent stop in Miami, has spent
the last month in the United
States giving some 50 lectures
coast-to-coast on the Middle
East.
He also spent part of his
American visit boosting
tourism in his city, rich in the
diamond industry, that sits on
the Mediterranean Sea. And
he came as a representative of
WOJAC (World Organization
of Jews from Arab Countries).
Ben-Gad's father was the
chief rabbi of the Jewish com-
munity of Tripoli. When Ben-
Gad was 11, his family made
aliyah to Israel.
As a delegate of WOJAC,
Ben-Gad says, "We came to
Washington to let the
American people know our
rights were not respected, our
property was confiscated and
we suf^red misery and
humiliation and beating and
execution. We are calling on
the world to compensate Arab
Continued on Page 17
certainly some Yugoslavs and
even a few Americans, were
not ignorant of his Nazi war-
time record.
Author Brian Urquhart, who
had distinguished himself as
an officer during the allied in-
vasion of Germany and who
had vainly warned the British
against an aborted parachute
landing in Holland that turned
into a tragedy for the allies,
says that Waldheim had wor-
ried a lot about his public im-
age. "He was too anxious to be
given credit and tended to be
too accessible to the media .
His manner sometimes seemed
ingratiating, and he tried too
hard with too little to say. He
occasionally lost his temper
with journalists, with
disastrous results ..."
With the UN War Crimes
Files opened, the world will
learn for the first time the
complete facts relating to Kurt
Waldheim's World War II ac-
tivities in file 724.
Moreover, as Dr. Harris
Schoenberg, Director of the
UN Affairs, International
Council of B'nai B'rith, points
out, "the open files could pro-
ve an embarrassment to
governments that have relied
for support upon or employed
accused war criminals in sen-
sitive positions. The thorough
examination of these files," he
insists, "is vital for understan-
ding the past, punishing the
guilty, and deterring anyone
who would currently consider
genocide..."
It is up to the present
Secretary-General to an-
Continued on Pafe 18
Yitschak Ben-Gad


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
e
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 22, 11 a.m. WPTV Chan-
nel 5 with host Barbara Gordon Green.
L' CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 22, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, Nov. 22, 11 p.m. -
Monday-Wednesday Nov. 23-25, 2 p.m. WVCG 1080
AM This two hour national Jewish entertainment show
features Jewish music, comedy and news.
LENA MY CHILDREN Monday, Nov. 23, 9 p.m. -
WPTV Channel 5. F
'Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 20
Council of Jewish Federations, General Assembly,
Miami 6:30 p.m., Through Nov. 22 B'nai B'rith Women-
Masada, Luncheon/Card Party, noon Women's American
ORT, West Palm, board, 9:30 a.m. Na'Amat USA-Golda
Meir, Oneg Shabbat at Congregation Anshei Sholom, 8
p.m. Federation, Midrasha Shabbaton at Palm Beach
Hilton, Through Nov. 22
November 21
Council of Jewish Federations, General Assembly,
Miami, Through Nov. 22 Women's American ORT-Lake
Worth West, 7 day cruise Temple Beth Torah, Youth
Group Dance, 7:30 p.m. Federation, Midrasha Shab-
baton at Palm Beach Hilton, Through Nov. 22
November 22
Council of Jewish Federations, General Assembly,
Miami Congregation Aitz Chaim, board, 9:30 a.m. Tem-
ple Beth Zion Men's Club, 12:45 p.m. Golden Lakes Tem-
ple Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Temple Beth David, Chanukah
Bazaar Jewish Community Campus "Groundbreaking" 1
p.m. Women's American ORT-West Palm, Flea Market
Federation, Midrasha Shabbaton at Palm Beach Hilton
Federation, Greenbrier Campaign Kick-off Brunch,
10:30 a.m.
November 23
Women's American ORT-Lake Worth West, 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women-Boynton Beach, board, 9:30 a.m.
B'nai B'rith Women-Menorah, board, 10 a.m. Women's
American ORT-Mid Palm, 1 p.m. Women's American
ORT-Palm Beach, Homecoming Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.
American Jewish Congress, Cruise through Nov. 27
Brandeis University Women's Committee-Boynton Beach,
Study Group, 1 p.m. Federation, Young Adult Division
Board, 7:30 p.m. Morse Geriatric Center, Board of
Trustees meeting, 4 p.m. B'nai B'rith-Royal Palm Beach,
3 p.m. Federation, Camp Shalom Meeting, 7 p.m.
November 24
Federation, Board of Directors, 4 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women-Masada, 1 p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood,
board, 8 p.m. Na'Amat USA-Sharon, board, 10 a.m.
Yiddish Culture Group-Century Village, 10 a.m.
November 25
Hadassah-Shalom, board, 9:30 a.m. Women's American
ORT-North Palm Beach County Region, 9:30 a.m.
Hadassah-Tikvah, Weekend through Nov. 29 Jewish
Community Center, No School Holiday Program
November 26
Thanksgiving B'nai B'rith-Lucerne Lakes, Weekend at
Doral Beach Na'Amat USA-Theodore Herd, Trip to St.
Augustine through Nov. 28 Temple Beth El, Special
thanksgiving Service, 9 a.m. Hadassah-A viva, Weekend
at Naples.
For more information call the Jewish Federation
8S2-2120.
1 S R A E L 8 u ri 1 Q 0 E
C O U M T R Y i N M S
* m m

|V*
,d&*
10"
#2
For information
and reservations
call your travel agent or call
1 800 KJB HTLS
c^XF" In NY call (212)697 5116
Kibbutz Hotefc. Suite 620. 60 fc 42nd Sire*. New YonV NY 10165
Morse
Ollove and Plisskin Co-Chair
Lands Of The President Campaign
Morris Ollove and Bernard
Plisskin have been appointed
co-chairmen of the Lands of
the President campaign on
behalf of the capital expansion
of the Morse Geriatric Center.
Under their leadership,
residents of the Lands of the
President in West Palm Beach
will be contacted for a gift to
the capital campaign of the
Center. This is part of the
overall community phase of
the drive which has as its goal
$4 million.
Mr. Ollove was an active
leader in the Bangor, Maine
Jewish community where he
served as chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal drive,
chairman of the Bonds for
Israel and trustee of the
Bangor Jewish Community
Center.
A resident of the Lands of
the President for the past 15
years, Mr. Ollove has been in-
Morris Ollove
volved with the local Federa-
tion/UJA campaign as well as
his own condominium
association.
Bernard Plisskin, a Foun-
ding Trustee of the Morse
Geriatric Center, has been a
community leader in the Palm
Beaches for many years. His
involvement with the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/UJA drives, most
Bernard Plisskin
recently as Associate Cam-
paign Chairman, has earned
him distinction as a leading
member of the Jewish
community.
A special Campaign dinner
for Lands of the President
residents, chaired by Mr.
Ollove and Mr. Plisskin, will be
held at the Morse Geriatric
Center on Sunday, Nov. 22.
Ignore Remarks At Arab Summit
Continued from Page 1
support for the Soviet-Syrian
idea that the Arab-Israeli
dispute should be settled not
through direct talks but rather
at an international conference
with the participation of the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council.
Haaretz said it is believed
Hussein will pay this price in
exchange for passage of a
meaningful resolution on the
war in the Persian Gulf.
Meanwhile, a senior official
at the British Foreign Office
reportedly told the Israeli am-
bassador in London, Yehuda
Avner, that Hussein has
criticized the Reagan ad-
ministration for failing to
work aggressively enough to
prevent a stalemate in the
peace process.
Peres stated here Friday
that "there is definitely a
chance for an international
(conference opening, perhaps
more than there was before."
He said that "from Jordan's
point of view, there is no
chance of direct negotiations
without an opening.
A violent demonstration in
the West Bank that greeted
the summit opening in Am-
man, points to sharp divisions
between pro-Jordanian
Palestinians and die-hard sup-
porters of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Both camps had circulated
petitions to be conveyed to the
Arab leaders at the summit.
According to some soures, the
pro-Jordanian petition has
already reached Amman. It is
said to emphasize the common
destiny of both banks of the
Jordan River, Jordan's
decisive role in a solution of
the Palestinian problem and
the need for a political
federative solution between
Jordan and a Palestian entity.
It declares, however, that
the PLO is the legitimate
representative of the Palest-
nian people.
The other petition, signed by
scores of PLO supporters and
figures identified with the Left
in the administered territories,
was published in East
Jerusalem Arabic newspapers
identified with the PLO.
It calls for the establishment
of an independent Palestinian
state under PLO leadership
and condemns any attempt to
deny the PLO's status as the
sole representative of the
Palestinian people.
The published document fur-
thermore censures the "divi-
sion of authority" between
Israel and Jordan for ad-
ministration of the territories.
It denounces the Jordanian
five-year plan to improve liv-
ing conditions in the ter-
ritories as a plot to create an
alternative leadership to the
PLO. It also sharply condemns
the United States.
British Foreign Secretary
Skips Celebration
Of Balfour Declaration
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A
celebratory luncheon here
marking the 70th anniversary
of the Balfour Declaration
took place without representa-
tion from the British
government.
Foreign Secretary Sir Geof-
frey Howe declined to attend,
and the British Zionist Federa-
tion, which organized the func-
tion, had not invited anyone
else from the Foreign Office.
The luncheon, held at the
National Liberal Club, was at-
tended by Lord Arthur
Balfour, great-nephew and
namesake of the famous
Foreign Secretary Arthur
James Balfour. On Nov. 2,
1917, he sent a 118-word letter
to Lord Walter Rothschild pro-
mising a Jewish national home
in Palestine.
Rothschild's great-nephew,
Jacob Rothschild, was chair-
man of the commemorative
gathering in the club's Lloyd
George Room, named for
David Lloyd George, who was
Britain's prime minister when
the Balfour Declaration was
issued.
The event was largely kv.
TurC2 byihe media- ww r
l he Guardian. Its predecessor,
The Manchester Guardian,
played a major role in securing
the declaration.
The Manchester Guardian's
editor, C.P. Scott, introduced
Dr. Chaim Weismann, the
leading British Zionist, to
George. And two of its jour-
nalists, Herbert Sidebotham
and Harry Sacher, were
among the founders of the
Manchester-based British
Palestine Committee, which
beginning in 1916 campaigned
for a British pledge to the
Zionists and the incorporation
of Palestine into the British
Empire once it was captured
from the Turks.
On Monday, the Guardian
reprinted the leading article
from its predecessor's Nov. 9,
1917 edition, welcoming Bri-
tain's decision in favor of a
Jewish national home in
Palestine. However, the Guar-
dian seemed embarrassed by
those activities.
The Guardian has often been
critical of Israel and sym-
pathetic to the Arab cause dur-
ing thepast 30 years, and it
marked the anniversary with
an article blaming the failure
of Britain and the Jews to
honor the rights of the Palesti-
nian Arabs as pledged in the
BaJfour Declaration.


Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
UN
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) United Nations
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar announced
earlier this month the opening
of files on more than 40,000
suspected Nazi war criminals
to governments and scholars.
His annoucement was im-
mediately hailed by Israel,
long a proponent of the open-
ing, as "an historic and
courageous decision."
Perez de Cuellar said in a
statement read by his
spokesman that the decision
followed consultations with
the 17 former members of the
U.N. War Crimes Commission
(WCC) between Sept. 22 and
Oct. 30, 1987 regarding wider
access to the archives.
The files of the long defunct
WCC had been accessible only
to the governments of the
United Nations member
states. The files are currently
located in the U.N. archives in
Manhattan.
The secretary general an-
nounced that "under the new
rules and procedures now ap-
proved, the charge files and
the related papers will be
available to governments for
official research into, and in-
vestigation and prosecution of,
war crimes.
"Access for governments
has been broadened. Not only
may governments continue to
request information on specific
individuals, but they now may
ask for access for general
research."
The secretary general fur-
ther decided that the files "will
also be opened for bona fide
research by individuals into
the history and work of the
United Nations War Crimes
Commission and into war
crimes."
Israeli diplomats here said
that the decision to open the
files was "a major diplomatic
victory for Israel." Israel has
repeatedly demanded since
1986 that the files be opened to
public scrutiny.
At first, Australia was the
only one of the 17 members of
the defunct WCC to support
Israel's request. But gradual-
ly, and due in part to Israel's Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's
persistent efforts, all 17 states ambassador to the United Na-
accepted the Israeli position. trans, declared that with the
opening of the files to scholars
wJv? former members of the and researchers "a new
WCC are Australia, Belgium, chapter in Holocaust research
Britain, Canada, China,
Czechoslovakia, Denmark,
France, Greece, India, Luxem-
bourg, Netherlands, New
Zealand, Norway, Poland, and
the United States.
In a news conference follow-
ing the announcement,
is beginning today."
Netanyahu added that open-
ing the files would enable the
prosecution of war criminals
still at large. "I hope that
many governments will act
now to bring war criminals to
justice," he said.
The Israeli envoy said that
his government was satisfied
with the secretary general's
decision because Israel's major
demands have been met.
Nazi hunter Beate Klarsfeld
joined Netanyahu at his news
conference. She called on the
Syrian government to ex-
tradite Nazi war criminal Alois
Brunner, who has been living
in Damascus since the late
1950s. Brunner was Adolf
Eichmann's deputy in the 88
and was personally responsible
for the deportation and execu-
tion of hundreds of thousands
of Jews and non-Jews alike.
Holtzman Rips Canada's War Crimes Law
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) A
leader in the effort to deport
Nazi war criminals from the
United States was critical of
Canada's new war crimes law
for seeking to prosecute
She appraised Canada's new
war crimes law during an in-
ternational human rights con-
ference, "Nuremberg 40
Years Later: The Struggle
Against Injustice in Our
Time," that opened earlier this
suspected war criminals rather month at the McGill University
Ambassador Talks Peace
Ten years after President
Sadat's historic flight to
Jerusalem, "the collective will
of the Arab world is clearly in
favor of peace with Israel,' ac-
cording to Egypt's am-
bassador to Washington,
Abdel Raouf El Reedy.
In an address to ARZA, the
Association of Reform Zionists
of America, at the national
convention of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions this week, Ambassador
El Reedy said that the mood in
the Arab world now was
"enough is enough" and that
"it is time to leave the past
behind us and strike a historic
compromise that would end
the status quo of hostility and
establish a new relationship
between the Arabs and the
Israelis."
Fear of Khomeini a Factor?
The Egyptian envoy, who
was part of President Sadat's
team at the Camp David peace
talks with Israel, hinted that
fear of the spread of Islamic
fundamentalism was a key fac-
tor in current Arab thinking
toward Israel making peace
with Israel presumably more
desirable than surrender to
Khomeini fanaticism.
"Two sets of forces are
working at cross-purposes in
the Middle East,'1 El Reedy
said. "One force is working to
resolve existing conflicts in ac-
cordance with the accepted in-
ternational consensus. The
other force rejects peace and is
bent upon the violent over-
throw of the present system.
"It is this latter force that
seeks to win the support of
members of the young genera-
tion by exploiting their
dissatisfaction and frustra-
tion," he told the ARZA
leaders.
The Egyptian envoy, who
expressed warm appreciation
to ARZA's president, Rabbi
Charles Kroloff, for the invita-
tion extended to him and
who was received cordially by
the Reform Jewish leaders
said the "new relationship" he
envisioned would be based on
"mutual coexistence and
mutual recognition, with the
respect, mutual security and
fruits of peace shared by both
sides."
than deport them and then for
not establishing a national
authority to prosecute them.
"In choosing not to deport,
but instead to prosecute,
Canada may simply compound
the original wrong (to allow
war criminals to find haven
within its borders)," said
Kings County (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
District Attorney Elizabeth
Holtzman.
Law School here.
As a U.S. representative (D.,
N.Y.) in the 1970s, Holtzman
sponsored legislation that
established the Office of
Special Investigation (OSI) of
the U.S. Department of
Justice, which has spurred the
deportation of 19 Nazi war
criminals from the United
States.
The Canadian law came into
effect when it received royal
assent on Sept. 16. It allows
the prosecution in Canadian
courts of suspected Nazi war
criminals living in Canada,
even if their crimes were com-
mitted elsewhere.
"In case where there is
enough evidence for extradi-
tion or deportation," she said,
"but not enough to warrant
prosecution, the 'Canadian
solution' policy would preclude
deportation and the Nazi war
criminals would remain in
Canada."
She contended that the law
Continued on Page 20
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
Young Adult Mission Committee Actively
Recruiting For Mission To Israel
A meeting to actively recruit
single and married young
adults, ages 22-40, for a Young
Adult Mission to Israel was
held recently to formulate
plans for the coming months.
The mission, sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will take place
June 12-22, 1988.
"We welcome other in-
terested young adults to join
with us and learn about this
exciting, once in a lifetime op-
portunity to travel to Israel
during its 40th anniversary.
I'm sure they will then be so
enthusiastic that they will
reach out to their friends and
encourage them to go on the
mission also," stated Martin
List, Co-Chairman of the
Young Adult Mission.
Karen List, and Soni and
Jim Kay are co-chairing the
mission with Mr. List.
"Visiting Israel on a mission
gives us an insider's view of
our Jewish state. Not only will
we tour the historical and
religiously significant sites,
but we will be meeting with
government and military of-
ficials as well as high tech in-
dustry representatives to be
briefed about the latest
developments affecting
Israel," stated Mr. List.
The Co-Chairmen encourag-
ed young adults to learn more
about this mission which will
also focus on the variety of op-
portunities available for the
holiday traveler to Israel.
"We'll have an exciting raft
trip on the Jordan River and a
jeep tour of the Galilee," Mr.
List said.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Leadership
Development Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Attending a planning meeting for the
Young Adult Mission to Israel June 12-22
are (seated, left to right) Angela Gallicchio;
and Co-Chairmen Karen List, Martin List,
and Soni Kay. Standing (left to right) are
Debbie Hays, Michael Lifshitz, Tony
Lampert, Patti Lampert, Dr. Mark Rat-
tinger, Sandy Lifshitz, Laurie Detkin,
Lynn Waltuch, and Co-Chairman Jim Kay.
Business Executives Forum
Holds Successful Network Event
Over 100 business and pro-
fessional young adults recently
had an opportunity to network
with their contemporaries at
this year's opening Business
Executives Forum held at the
Executive Club in West Palm
Beach. Sponsored by the
Young Adult Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, the BEF is
beginning its second year for
members of the Jewish
business and professional com-
munity, ages 22-40, to meet
and interact with one another.
Named as Co-Chairmen for
the second consecutive year
are Bruce Alexander and
David Shapiro. Serving as Co-
Chairman with Mr. Alexander
and Mr. Shapiro is Jacqueline
Ipp who encourages other
young adults to take advan-
tage of this business network-
ing opportunity.
"I am very excited by our
regular business card ex-
change get-togethers. People I
meet say, 'If I had only
known ..." This year we hope
to reach a larger segment of
the population to inform them
about our group so others will
not miss this wonderful oppor-
tunity," stated Mrs. Ipp.
Mr. Alexander noted that, as
in the past, representatives of
the business and professional
community will be invited to
speak at the forums. "We have
had excellent response to our
speakers and will continue to
ask experts in various fields to
address our group."
Mr. Shapiro continued say-
Soviet Jewry Leader
Continued from Page 1
glasnost, in
the Soviet Union indicates a
more liberal emigration policy.
and the small increase in
numbers as well as the highly-
Eublicized release of refusenik
(aders would seem to validate
this view. However, the reality
is that there are still serious
obstacles to increasing the
flow of Soviet Jewish emigra-
tion. We must do everything
we can to make sure that these
current gains will not close off
future possibilities. The first
step is learning about the cur-
rent situation and I urge
members of our community to
hear Jerry Goodman bring us
the latest information."
Jerry Goodman was ap-
pointed founding Executive
Director of NCSJ in
September 1971, after prior
service as European Affairs
Director of the American
Jewish Committee. His in-
volvement on behalf of Soviet
Jewry is extensive. Mr. Good-
man served as national coor-
dinator of the ad hoc American
Jewish Conference on Soviet
Jewry. An organizer of the Se-
cond International Conference
on Soviet Jewry in Brussels in
1976, and the Third Interna-
tional Conference in
Jerusalem in 1983, he is cur-
rently a member of the
Presidium of the World Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
As Executive Director of
NCSJ, Mr. Goodman has main-
tained close relations with the
State Department and other
Cabinet level departments;
worked with various em-
bassies to the Ambassadorial
level; testified before Congres-
sional committees; and
directed policy analysis.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
ing, "The Young Adult Divi-
sion initiated the Business Ex-
ecutives Forums to encourage
further participation in Jewish
Federation and enhance the
Jewish community through the
development of new business
opportunities and an
awareness of Jewish and
business related topics. We
have had an excellent response
and look forward to another
successful year."
Bruce Alexander, a member
of the Young Adult Division
Board of the Associated
active in the general communi-
ty. He is on the Executive
Bord of the Associated
General Contractors of
America, Florida East Coast
Chapter and is a member of
the Academy of Florida Trial
Laywers. An attorney with
Boose, Casey, Ciklin, Lubitz,
Martens, McBane, and Ocon-
nell, Mr. Alexander specializes
in construction law.
Jacqueline Ipp has been in-
volved with the Young Adult
Division for the past year and
now sits on its Board of Direc-
tors. Mrs. Ipp is a stock broker
with Graystone-Nash and is a
CPA. She is a member of the
Florida Institute of CPA's and
the American Institute of
CPA's. Mrs. Ipp is also a
member of the National
Women's Business Network,
Inc.
David Shapiro has been a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Young Adult Divi-
sion for two years. He has
been appointed to the Federa-
tion's Planning and Alloca-
tions Committee and is a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Jewish Community
Day School. Mr. Shapiro is the
owner of Hazelle, a women's
apparel store in West Palm
Beach.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Young
Adult Division Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
BEF Co-Chairmen Bruce Alexander, Jacqueline Ipp, and
David Shapiro welcomed guests to the first Business Ex-
ecutives Forum for the 1987-88 season on Nov. 2.
Enid Ascher, Marta Martin, Amy Pearlman, and
Howard Dardashti
Carol Spector, Ilene Lampert, and Lynne Waltuch


iTiiU.'.,
Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Hornblass On Israeli Prisons:
Arab Prisoners Treated Well
By PATRICIA GOLAN
The president of the Interna-
tional Association of Jewish
Lawyers and Jurists says he is
"tremendously impressed" by
the way convicted Arab ter-
rorists are treated in Israeli
prisons.
Recently returned from a
trip to Israel, association presi-
dent Jerome Hornblass, a New
York State Supreme Court
judge, stated that although
there has been some tighten-
ing of conditions since his last
fact-finding mission in 1985,
Arab prisoners were treated
with the "utmost humanity"
and accorded extensive
privileges.
Hornblass, an Orthodox Jew
who was elected president of
the association last spring, ex-
plained that he visits prisons
on each of his trips to Israel to
see how prisoners are being
treated. "You can judge a
society by how it treats its
prisoners those on the
lowest rungs of society," he
remarked. "It is important for
me as a Jew to know how
prisoners in Israel are
treated."
Hornblass reported that con-
ditions have changed
somewhat since his 1985 visit.
"Prisoners no longer have ac-
cess to one another as in the
past." he said. "The Israeli
Organizations
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter is having their regular meeting on
Wednesday, Nov. 25 at the American Savings Bank,
Westgate, Century Village, at 12:30 p.m.
Entertainment and collation to follow.
A Chanukah gala week-end will be held at the Saxony
Hotel, Miami Beach, four days and three nights from Fri-
day, Dec. 18 to Monday, Dec. 21.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY NATIONAL
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
The Palm Beach East Chapter announced their study
group program for the 1987-88 season. Included will be
literature, music and art appreciation, world news, cinema,
history, etc. All members and non-members are invited to
meet the study group leaders on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 10
a.m. at the Palm Hotel (formerly The Hyatt), West Palm
Beach
HADASSAH
Cypress Lakes-Leisureville Chapter's regular meeting
will be held on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 12:30 p.m. at American
Savings and Loan, West Gate, Okeechobee Blvd., West
Palm Beach. A Chanukah celebration program will be
presented.
Coming event: March 9 through 12 Savannah Spree
Deluxe Motorcoach Southern Heritage Tour.
Tamar Royal Palm Beach Chapter will present a
musical review Razz-Ma-Jazz, featuring James Michael and
the Company of four girls and four boys on Saturday night,
Dec. 5 at the Crestwood Community Middle School, Royal
Palm Beach. Donation is $8 per person. Tickets will be sold
at the door, if available.
Thursday, Dec. 3 Yovel Study Group will meet at the
Royal Palm Bank (Drexel Square) at 10 a.m. Discussion of
Rabbi Abba Hillel Silver from the Hadassah book "An
American Zionist Tapestry," will take place.
Sunday, Dec. 6 the group sponsors a Flea Market/Bazaar
at the Atlantic Federal Savings Bank in the Village Market
Place (NW Cor. Haverhill and Okeechobee) from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Rain Date: Dec. 13. New and slightly new bargains.
NA'AMAT USA
The Theodore Herzl Club meet Dec. 3, 1 p.m. at the
Lake Worth City Hall, Commissioner's Room, 1st floor for
a Chanukah celebration.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
There will be a regular meeting of the Lake Worth West
Chapter on Monday, Nov. 23 at the Country Squire Motel
on Lake Worth Road and the Turnpike at 12:30 p.m. There
will be a guest speaker and a mini-lunch will be served.
The next meeting of the Mid-Palm Chapter will be held
on Monday, Nov. 23, 1 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, Lake
Worth. Dr. R. Alsofrom will speak on "Why Women
Should Rule The World."
Okeechobee Chapter in Royal Palm Beach will hold
their monthly meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 12:30 p.m. at
the home of Jennie Pallor in the Trails. Guest speaker will
be Stanley Shotz, Chairman of the Anti-Defamation
League Committee of the Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith. He will present his video program entitled
"The Gathering Storm Hatred goes Public."
Annual Rummage Sale will be held on Sunday, Dec. 6,
"Under the Trees on Southern Blvd. just west of Royal
Palm Beach Blvd. Hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
authorities learned this access
was being used to learn ter-
rorist methods."
Describing the Israeli prison
in Nablus on the West Bank,
Hornblass explained that
prisoners in cells within a cell
block no longer have access to
one another through open
gates. The prisoners had used
the access to establish a prison
hierarchy, he added and
during his previous visits, he
had to go through this hierar-
chy in order to speak to
prisoners.
The warden, Hornblass said,
allowed him to speak to
whomever he wished. No
prisoner, he said, complained
about any sort of brutality. In
the past, prisoners had criticiz-
ed the quality of food, but this
time their complaints were
mainly about the lack of access
to one another, Hornblass
said.
Prisoners are allowed to
write and receive letters, hold
daily religious services,
receive newspapers and listen
to the radio stations of their
choice. Hornblass noted that
every cell has a television set,
and that the prisoners are
served the same food given to
the Israeli army.
There are twice weekly
visitations. The prisoners,
Hornblass said, speak to
visitors through a mesh parti-
tion, rather than a glass wall,
as is the case in most prisons.
"It is actually incredible,"
declared Hornblass, "that
these people, who have been
convicted of the most serious
crimes against the state, are
treated so well."
The judge said that he had
planned to visit members of
the Jewish underground serv-
ing time in Israeli prisons, but
had been unable to because of
his busy schedule which includ-
ed meetings with heads of
Jewish lawyers' organizations
from all over the world.
Interviewed in Hebrew on
Israeli television, Hornblass
was asked only about MK Meir
Kahane, which he said surpris-
ed him. "This is one of the
main interests in Israel," he
said. "Should Kahane be stoD-
ped from tal'ing, should he be
allowed to kr ep his seat in the
Knesset, or be thrown out?"
"My answer," Hornblass
continued, "was very clear as
an American, but not so clear,
perhaps, if I were living in
Israel. Freedom of speech is a
cherished, sanctified concept
except if a person endangers
the well-being of the people.
The standard test for this in
America is yelling 'fire!' in a
crowded theater when there is
no fire. The Israelis have to
decide if what Kahane is say-
ing is jeopardizing the people."
"From the Jewish point of
view," Hornblass commented,
"if someone is doing
something to hurt the Jewish
people, he is not entitled to any
rights. "I don't know whether
what Kahane is doing is
deliberately destructive to the
Jewish people, or whether he
is merely expressing a minori-
ty opinion."
Volunteer Recognized
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ann Bialkin of New York has
received the Israel Ministry of
Labor and Social Affairs
award for voluntarism on
behalf of Elem/Youth in
Distress, a program fighting
teen-age delinquency in Israel.
Bialkin is president of Elem
and a former professional
social worker.
YOUR
ACCOUNTANT
KNOWS
BEST!
Is 1987 a good year to make a gift to the
Jewish Federation's Endowment Fund?
Your accountant will probably answer with an
emphatic YES. He knows what advantages are
available to you under the current tax laws.
You and the community can benefit from
your contribution to the Federation's
Endowment Fund.
For more information on how your gift can:
...provide you with income for life
...allow you to recommend future
distributions to charities
...perpetuate your annual gift to the
Federation/UJA campaign
contact:
Edward Baker
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, Florida 33401
(305) 832-2J20
N


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
*/&&&* 4
Answering questions during a panal discus-
sion after their individual presentations are
(left to right) Dr. Bernard Schechterman,
Professor at the University of Miami;
*:-W
Stephen R. Silberfarb, Legislative Liaison
for AIPAC; and Professor Avner Yaniv,
University of Haifa.
Mideast Leadership Conference
Chances For War, Peace In Mideast Low
By LOUISE ROSS
The prospects for war in the
Mideast are low, but so are
those for peace, according to
an academician at the Univer-
sity of Haifa. Political science
Professor Avner Yaniv told an
audience of over 150 communi-
ty members who attended the
Mideast Leadership Con-
ference on Nov. 8 at Temple
Judea that "there are impor-
tant changes which have been
taking place in the Middle East
today.
"The United States is now
involved in the Persian Gulf
War and Shimon Peres has
been struggling with Yitzchak
Shamir to use an international
peace conference as an um-
brella for bilateral negotia-
tions with Jordan," he said.
Analyzing what these latest
developments mean to Israel's
future, Professor Yaniv drew
a comparison of the Middle
East in 1977-78 and at present
to illustrate that much pro-
gress has been made in the last
ten years. He noted that the
peace treaty signed with
Egypt in the late 1970's was a
breakthrough in the Middle
East tensions, although at that
time the outcome was ques-
tionable. "It was a great risk.
We were at the brink, of
peace, but it was not at all
guaranteed." Professor Yaniv
sees peace with Egypt today
as a "stable reality" although
he cautions that trouble
elsewhere may force Egypt to
break the peace.
Another problem for Israel
in 1977 was the strength and
centrality of the Paletine
Liberation Organization which
operated with autonomy in
South Lebanon. "The PLO
was a major player on the Mid-
dle East scene and could not be
ignored," he said. Today, the
PLO is out of Lebanon, the on-
ly place where they could
organize themselves freely.
However, the PLO is a
negative factor in its influence
with the West Bank Arabs.
"The PLO is building political
assets and may be in the posi-
tion to veto any agreements
between Israel and the West
Bank and/or Israel and Jor-
dan." Although the PLO has
lost it's power base in
Lebanon, it is "not to be writ-
ten off," Professor Yaniv
warned.
In relation to its Arab
neighbors, Israel is in a much
more advantageous position
now than it was in 1979, he
said. "The bottom line for
Israel is that the risk of war is
smaller now than in the past,"
but conversely this does not
necessarily mean that the pro-
spects for peace are
strengthened.
The conference was spon-
sored by the Israel-Mideast
Task Force of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Dr. Mark Rat-
tinger, Chairman of the task
force, introduced the day's
program saying that although
Israel is not in immediate
danger, there are other con-
flicts that she has to deal with
as she celebrates her 40th an-
niversary of statehood.
This was the first com-
munitywide event held in the
newly dedicated building of
Temple Judea. Rabbi Joel
Levine, spiritual leader of the
congregation as well as Chair-
man of the Community Rela-
tions Council, welcomed those
in attendance. Federation
President Erwin H. Blonder
introduced Professor Yaniv.
Workshops following the
opening session featured
Stephen R. Silberfarb,
Legislative Liaison for
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee, and Dr. Bernard
Schechterman, political
science Professor at the
University of Miami. Mr.
Silberfarb noted that "for-
tunately" there was little con-
flict on Capitol Hill and'that
legislators were generally
favorable to Israel. However,
"there is a tremendous pro-
Dr. Mark Rattinger, Chair-
man of the Israel-Mideast
Task Force of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, introduces the
program.
blem with the budget deficit."
Israel is getting $36 billion a
year in grants and assistance,
but the challenge is to continue
that level each year in face of
the United State's budget
crisis, he said.
Dr. Schechterman declared
that the Iran-Iraq War is a
major crisis for world politics.
He outlined the background of
the conflict and said, "In 1979,
the U.S. lacked (air and sea)
capabilities to intervene in the
Persian Gulf." When Presi-
dent Reagan was elected, the
overall climate of opinion was
not to commit troops to other
places in the world.
Nevertheless, the Reagan -
administration ultimately did
go into the Persian Gulf but
with a gap in its conventional
military capabilities due to
Rabbi Joel Levine, spiritual
leader of Temple Judea and
Chairman of the Community
Relations Council, welcomes
those in attendance.
Caspar Weinberger's
startegem, Dr. Schechterman
said. "The Defense Secretary
wanted to close the window of
vulnerability (nuclear gap) by
spending trillions of dollars on
high technology while starving
our conventional capabilities."
He feels that Weinberger
resigned because this coun-
try's budget crisis would
preclude Weinberger from
getting his second five-year
trillion dollar budget.
After a spirited panel discus-
sion by the guest speakers
following lunch, Dr. Rattinger
expressed his gratitude for
their stimulating presentation
of a great deal of information
on the Middle East. "This has
been the best Mideast Con-
ference to date," he said.
Syrian (Bears) Make Aliyah
Over 150 members of the community par-
ticipate in the opening session of the
Mideast Leadership Conference held last
week at Temple Judea.
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Two
offspring of a Syrian with the
familiar name Assad left here
for Israel this week after
departure ceremonies attend-
ed by the Israeli ambassador to
Switzerland David Rivlin, and
members of the Bern Jewish
community.
The "olim," named Dubi and
Bema, have homes waiting for
them in Jerusalem, at the
Biblical Zoo. They are young
bears, presented to President
Chaim Herzog of Israel when
he visited Bern last April. At
the time, they were newborns,
too young to travel.
The father bear was born in
Syria which probably accounts
for his name, which he shares
with Syrian President Hafez
Assad. For some reason that
fact embarrassed the presi-
Chairman Named
CHICAGO (JTA) Allan
Goldman of Los Angeles has
begun serving as chairman of
the board of trustees of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, the organiza-
tion of North American
Reform congregations. He suc-
ceeds Charles Rothschild Jr. of
Teaneck, N.J. UAHC also has
presented its Irving J. Fain
meritorious award for
synagogue social action pro-
gramming to 22 U.S. Reform
synagogues.
Award Received
TRENTON, N.J. (JTA) -
Irv Pepper of Charlotte, N.C
has received the third annuai
B nai B'nth International Al
Oomer Award for outstanding
service. *
dent of the Bern Jewish com-
munity, who managed to keep
it out of the press unitl now.
@
SoottnnBe(l[
andacannw
ft*^ L Jk
Isn't thei
you
A10-MINUTE
Ft. Lau
BocaF
Miami
Ft. Pier
Callonweefcen,
Rales hsIWaboN


Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
TEL AVIV (JTA) At
deadline, mystery compound-
ed by confusion surrounds the
40-foot yacht Silco and its
passengers, hijacked at sea
recently off the Gaza coast, ap-
parently by terrorists of the
dissident Abu Nidal faction of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The 17-ton vessel and its
eight passengers six adults
and two children were
brought to Moslem West
Beirut. At a news conference
there, a spokesman for the
Abu Nidal gang, Walid Khal-
ed, claimed that some of the
passengers carried Israeli
passports and described the
children as Hebrew-speaking.
The names of the adults
were released. A thorough
check of the Israel Interior
Ministry's computer index of
identity cards failed to match
any of the names with Israeli
citizens. Israelis must have ID
cards to obtain passports.
A preliminary check of
visitors and tourists failed to
come up with the names. The
Ports Authority and the
various marinas in Israel con-
firmed that the Silco had not
called at ah Israeli port,
though it might have been en
route to Israel when seized.
Khaled said at his news con-
ference that the episode was
"a slap for the Zionized king of
Amman," a reference to King
Hussein of Jordan, and for the
"Zionized leaders" par-
ticipating in the Arab summit
conference now taking place in
Amman.
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin said that the
seizure of the yacht was clear-
ly timed to coincide with the
'Hijacking' Compounded By Confusion
Arab summit and planned to
draw attention to the Abu
Nidal faction. He said that if it
was hijacked, as claimed, it
was not in Israeli territorial
waters, which the terrorists
dare not approach for fear of
Israel's navy.
Nevertheless, the time has
come for the world to realize
there are terrorist organiza-
tions trying to sabotage even
the slightest positive move-
ment in the Middle East,
Rabin said.
He said Israel is in contact
with the governments of
France and Belgium, whose
nationals were said to be
among the hijacked
passengers.
The names released by the
Abu Nidal spokesman are Fer-
nand Houtekins, 40; Em-
manuel Houtekins, 42; Valerie
Emmanuel Houtekins, 16;
Laurent Emmanuel
Houtekins, 17; Godlieve Kets;
and Jacqueline Valente, 30,
described as a French
possibly Katz and their
children, Valerie and Laurent,
are Belgian citizens, but are
believed to live in Lyon,
France.
French officials said the four
the registration number and
ownership quoted by the Abu
Nidal group.
In Geneva, Michelle Mercier,
a spokeswoman for the Inter-
national Committee of the Red
fssrtmj^s^ &$d aX^
national.
In Paris, French authorities
said they had no information
neither Israel nor any other
government has asked the
ICRC to intervene on behalf of
the hijacked passengers. The
ICRC acts only on the requests
of the parties involved, she
explained.
The JTA approached the
ICRC because Abu Nidal'g
spokesman said that ICRC
Lyon or anywhere else in
France. They have not been
able to trace a French woman
named Valente.
French naval authorities
said the Silco is not registered
in France, but is on record as
about any of the passengers, having put into Cannes in the
But the Belgian Interior summer of 1985. Port officials
Ministry confirmed that Em- in Cannes said a vessel named
manuel Houtekins; his wife, Silco was registered there an- o<,u
Godlieve, 48 born Kets three years ago, but not under delegates would be given per-
mission to visit the
m -------passengers, apparently being
mf,mt^^ ne,d hostage.
Mf-9 ^L k n
*>>* .1 w*T S? far the h'Jackers have
r? fk\^ 1"made no demands for their
release and return of the
yacht.
The Abu Nidal gang has a
heinous record of perpetrating
assassinations, kidnappings
and terrorist attacks, mainly
outside the Middle East. It
was responsible for the at-
tempted murder of the Israeli
ambassador to Britain, Shlomo
Argov, on a London street in
1982, the massacre at the
Istanbul synagogue last year,
the assassination of PLO
moderate Issam Sartawi in
Lisbon and the simultaneous
machine-gun and grenade at-
tacks on passengers at the
Rome and Vienna airports two
years ago.
The fact that it dare hold a
news conference in Beirut was
seen in Israel as an indication
that the organization has
become stronger. Hitherto, it
has acted clandestinely.
tiFr&SSil 6'y^r;?Ui tf^rmghired of pipn Arabian stallion at the 8th annual show
the King Sohmon Stables of Ben-Gurion of the Israel Arabian Horse SocietvhJdh,
University of the Negev, has been chosen cham- Rishon L 'Zion V
Jlo, Everyone!
here someone special
you'd like to call:
JUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
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Southern Bell
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^naciion |0 aha, fang on^np, comoanm
*r*>'>-lo-perion. com, hottl gueet. calling card, coltoct caM. caiM charo^ to arnltw number, or to lima and cfwrg* cata Raws subpci change Daytima ram am
higher Rale* do not reflect applicable tadaral.
This Is Southern Bell!
and local taw* Appkea to Intra-LXW long cManc* call only
v >


*-


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
Palm Beaches To Address
Future Goals of Jewish Education
Continued from Page 3
looking to key lay leaders and
professional educators in the
Palm Beaches for their insight
and perspectives to build a
consensus in its recommenda-
tions for long range planning
for Jewish education locally.
"We have an opportunity for
a lot of creativity in trying to
meet the pressing needs for
Jewish education in our com-
munity," stated Dr. Shulman.
"Only with a careful analysis
of our present needs and
trends can we hope to meet
our responsibility in the
future. There is certainly a
consensus that a healthy
Jewish identity rests on a
foundation of a solid Jewish
education."
Dr. Shulman indicated that
the community is undertaking
this examination of its Jewish
education at a timely moment.
"A special Jewish Agency sub-
committee on Jewish educa-
tion is addressing these same
issues not only on a local and
national basis but interna-
tionally. We anticipate that
our study will take two years.
The analysis of the facts we
gather will be followed by a
sensitive and intense dialogue
before any recommendations
are made," Dr. Shulman said.
Dr. Elizabeth Shulman is a
member of United Jewish Ap-
peal's National Business and
Professional Women's Coun-
cil. She has been a member of
the Executive Committee of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County for four years
and has sat on the Board since
1979. Dr. Shulman is a
member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board of Directors and of
its Campaign Cabinet and is
chairing the Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Group
Golda Meir Task Force this
year. In 1986 she chaired the
overall B and P Campaign.
Her contributions to the work
of the Campaign Cabinet have
won her recognition as a
highly esteemed ten-year
veteran.
Dr. Shulman has served as
Co-Chair of Federation's
Leadership Development pro-
gram and as a member of
several committees. She is a
past member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Family
and Children's Service.
Dr. Shulman is a
psychologist in private prac-
tice in West Palm Beach.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
Task force members listen to a presentation of the findings about Jewish
education from the Federation's recently completed Demographic Study.
The scope of the task force's project and the goals of the mission were
discussed with the members.
New Links Between Japan And Ben-Gurion University
BEERSHEVA, Israel -
Joint research projects will
begin soon between Japan and
Ben-Gurion University of the
Desert.
The establishment of an
association of Friends of Ben-
Gurion University was an-
nounced here today by Prof.
Hideo Itokawa. one of the
founders of Japan's
aeronautical industry and head
of the Systems Research In-
stitute in Tokyo, who will
serve as president of the new
organization.
Prof. Itokawa first visited
Ben-Gurion University this
past summer as the head of a
mission of 30 Japanese in-
dustrialists. Impressed by the
scientific work being done at
the University which serves
Israel's semi-arid south, and
by the potential for
biotechnological and industrial
cooperation with Japan, he
returned this week with a
delegation of Japanese
businessmen to announce the
creation of the first BGU
Friends Association in the
Eastern hemisphere.
The group will mobilize
Canada To
Seek Soviet
funds in Japan for bi-lateral University and Japanese in- take agricultural research ef- quality f ,ife in. Third World
projects with Ben-Gurion stitutions and also will under- forts aimed at improving the ari" zone countries.
Help
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Canada has begun negotia-
tions with the Soviet Union
and the government of Poland,
Romania, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, West Ger-
many and Israel to allow Cana-
dian legal teams to search for
evidence in the cases of 20
definite war crimes suspects
and 200 probable suspects
residing in Canada.
Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn announced the
development last week in an
address to an international
human rights conference that
opened at McGill University
Law School here.
KEEPS CEREAL
FRESHER LONGER
KEEPS CEREAL
CRISP LONGER
PROVIDES AIR TIGHT
STORAGE
m> atMMi ram cammmm
Where keeping Kosher Is a delicious tradition.


Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Fioridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Importance of a Jewish Education
{HotrnttotOi mtfi ChiUrwi Qjnwntfy LMng at Hum)
Important
Very Important 13%
Very Unimportant 11%
Unimportant
'Exodus' Orphans
To Reunite
40 Years Later
From The Demographic Study
When asked how they viewed the impor-
tance of Jewish education, 50 percent of
households in the Palm Beaches (from Boyn-
ton Beach to Jupiter/Tequesta) with children
currently living at home said it was "very im-
portant' or "important" to them. However,
this leaves the other half of the Jewish
population of the Palm Beaches indicating
that Jewish education is "unimportant" or
"very unimportant" to them. This lack of in-
terest in Jewish education presents a clear
challenge for this community to enhance
Jewish education so that its value becomes
clear, according to Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman,
Reagan Pledges
To Denounce UN
Anti-Zionism
Resolution
NEW YORK (JTA) -
president Reagan has vowed
0 "continue to denounce" the
J.N. General Assembly resolu-
lon of 1975 equating Zionism
Jith racism "until it is
Repealed."
The president made the
fledge in an Oct. 28 letter to
ilorris Abram, chairman of
he Conference of Presidents
If Major American Jewish
Organizations. It was in reply
l> a letter Abram sent to the
resident on Sept. 22 thanking
Im for denouncing the anti-
lionism resolution in the
burse of his speech to the
IN. General Assembly on
eptember 21.
r'You are right that this ad-
linistration has repeatedly
ndemned the 'Zionism is
Icism' resolution," the presi-
Vnt wrote in his letter,
loreover, we will continue to
Enounce that resolution until
1 is repealed. It may not be
an enough for you or me, but
hen the United Nations
?hts the wrong that it
Immitted."
leagan's letter concluded:
the meantime, I know that
i count on your support, as
can count on mine, to fight
inst any and all attempts to
legitimize the State of
si."
ie "Zionism in racism"
>lution was adopted by the
Jneral Assembly on Nov. 10,
'5. Major Jewish groups and
fanizations have announced,
the eve of the 12th anniver-
of the resolution, that
fy are undertaking major
ipaigns to denounce it and
[bilize world public opinion
>repare the grounds for its
eal.
Chairman of the Task Force on Jewish
Education of the Planning and Allocations
Committee of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. Fifty-five percent of the 106
children living in 79 households surveyed for
the Demographic Study receive no Jewish
education, whereas 11 percent have attended
a Jewish day school, and 34 percent an after
school Jewish education program. It is
necessary to keep in mind tnat some of the
children in the sample are under school age
and may be enrolled in the future, yet these
results certainly reflect the opinions on the
chart above.
Samuel Rothberg has set out
to locate members of a group
of children he met 40 years
earlier on their arrival in the
future State of Israel.
On August 21, 1947, a
British prison ship bringing
500 Jewish orphans of the
Holocaust from a detention
camp in Cyprus arrived at
Haifa port. Rothberg, visiting
British Mandatory Palestine
on behalf of the United Jewish
Appeal, was at the dock to
greet the orphans. Sam
Rothberg was then chairman
of "Big Gifts UJA."
Four decades later,
Rothberg came across
photographs of the dockside
encounter among his papers
and decided to find out what
had become of the children.
A happy reunion in Tel Aviv
with a half dozen of the or
phans, now grandparents
themselves, resulted after
Israeli newspapers reprinted
40-year-old photos of Rothberg
and the children.
Now, Rothberg and his new-
ly reunited friends have set
their sights on a larger reunion
and are trying to find the hun-
dreds of other orphans who ar-
rived August 21, 1947. Infor-
mation can be sent to
Rothberg at Post Office Box
6056, Jerusalem 91060, Israel.
*
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
~>
USA-Israel Hooray!
Church Pledges $10,000 For Project Renewal
By LOUISE ROSS
Thanking G-d for allowing us
to reach this day when Jews
and Christians join in an inter-
faith celebration for Israel,
Rabbi Yechiel Ekstein recited
the "Schecheyanu" prayer
before an audience of 500 at
the fourth annual USA/Israel
held Nov. 9 at the Palms
Hotel, West Palm Beach.
In a frank message of what it
means to be a Jew, the presi-
dent of the Holyland
Fellowship of Christians and
Jews said that Christians must
understand "that Jews are
shaped by our historical past
and that we are linked with the
Jewish community
worldwide."
The Orthodox rabbi explain-
ed that the experience of the
Holocaust and Israel "color
our perspective on everything
in life. The rebirth of the State
of Israel out of the ashes of the
Holocust reassured us that G-d
has not abandoned his people."
He added that Israel reflects
the Jewish people's collective
will to survive. Those who help
us are our friends."
He implored the Christians
in the audience to "be patient
with us as we learn who you
are. I ask you to walk with us."
In a continuing effort to
build these understandings
and relationships between the
Jewish and Christian com-
munities, Calvary Temple,
under the leadership of Rev.
William llnisky, has produced
this evening of singing, danc-
ing, and reaching out to each
other. Rev. llnisky invited his
(Left to right) Rev. Jamie Buckingham, Mrs. Buckingham, Esther llnisky, Rev. William ll-
nisky, and Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein join with other participants in the USA/Israel celebration
to sing "Let There Be Love Among Us."
guests to enjoy themselves
which they did, clapping and
swaying to the lively Israeli
singing of Eileen Jacobs ac-
companied by the dance
troupe, Calvary Temple
Praisers.
Last year Rev. llnisky, in-
augurated a fund raising pro-
ject for Christians at the
UJA/Israel celebration to col-
lect money for Israel.
Although the church has been
planting trees in Israel on an
ongoing basis, Rev. llnisky
wanted a more personal rela-
tionship with the people of
Israel. This past summer he
and members of his church
visited Hod Hasharon, this
community's Project Renewal
neighborhood in Israel. Upon
his return, he consulted with
Jeffrey L. Klein, Executive
Director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
and they agreed that
dedicating a room in the Beit
Ha'am (Community Center) in
Hod Hasharon was the perfect
project for his church.
At the interfaith celebration,
Rev. llnisky announced that
the church was pledging
$10,000 to Project Renewal
over the next two years. Guest
speaker Elizabeth Homans,
this community's represen-
tative for Project Renewal in
Hod Hasharon, explained that
Project Renewal was started
ten years ago to rehabilitate
depressed neighborhoods in
Israel through a partnership
among the residents, the
government of Israel, and
communities in the diaspora.
"Project Renewal has provid-
ed a window for the 3,500
residents of Hod Hasharon,"
she said. They now are beginn-
ing to enter the mainstream of
Israeli life through remarkable
improvements in their quality
of life due to this people-to-
people program.
Rev. Jamie Buckingham, an
author and pastor of an inter-
denominational church in
Elizabeth Homans, this com-
munity's Project Renewal
coordinator in Hod
Hasharon, Israel, passionate-
ly describes the people-to-
people program to which
Calvary Temple has pledged
$10,000 over the next two
years.
Melbourne, addressed the
Jews in the audience from a
Christian perspective. "A true
follower of Jesus Christ has no
choice but to love his Jewish
brothers and sisters," he said.
"Israel is the answer to the
Biblical prophecy. If we don't
realize that when the bell tolls
for Israel, it tolls for the
United States, then we are
fools."
The evening was concluded,
as in past years, by a joining of
hands as everyone sang "Let
There Be Love Shared Among
Us."
Stronger Diaspora-Israel Ties Priority Of New Advisor To Peres
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) The
new special advisor on
diaspora Jewish affairs to
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres contends "there is an
urgent need to strengthen the
ties between Israel and the
diaspora" because "the
diaspora is distancing itself
from Israel."
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
Rabbi Mordechai Piron the
chief rabbi of Zurich appointed
last month by Peres, said: "My
first aim is to unite the Jewish
people and accentuate the
Jewish consensus. My second
priority is to fight the alarmist
growth of assimilation." which
he sees as "becoming a na-
tional calamity."
He said he believed both pro-
blems could be solved "if the
Jews of the world rally around
Israel as their spiritual
center."
Diaspora Jewry must be
assured of always finding an
attentive ear in Israel, and
Israel must consider the opi-
nions and ideas of the
diaspora, he contended.
Toward that end he has pro-
posed the creation of a special
forum of leadng Jewish per-
sonalities from diaspora coun-
tries, including North and
South America, to meet with
and advise Peres and to ex-
change ideas.
He said Israeli Minister of
Religious Affairs Zevulun
Hammer has backed this in-
itiative and that his ministry
has assured its financing.
Piron will go to Israel next
month to set it in motion.
Furthermore, the rabbi
stressed the need in Israel to
avoid polarization among its
religious factions and deplored
the growth of extremism.
"The spirit of Judaism is the
unity of all Jews. We must
make an effort to find a con-
sensus which will draw each
person to Judaism," he said.
The Vienna-born Piron serv-
ed as a chaplain with the Israel
Defense Force from 1948 to
1972, retiring as chief chaplain
with the rank of general.
Statute Of Limitation Exempts
Nazi Killer From Trial
LUDWIGSBURG, West
Germany (JTA) A former
SS guard deported from the
United States last month to
stand trial in West Germany is
now a free man.
A trial has been ruled out for
Reinhold Kulle, a former SS
guard, because the statute of
limitations has elapsed in his
case, according to Alfred
Streim, chief prosecutor of the
Nazi War Crimes Prosecution
Center here, the World Jewish
Congress reported.
Kulle was deported on Oct.
26 for lying about his Nazi past
when he was granted entrv in-
to the United States in 1957.
His deportation capped a five-
year legal effort by the U.S.
Department capped a five-year
legal effort by the U.S.
Department of Justice's Office
of Special Investigations
(OSI).
The OSI investigation
resulted in a deportation order
by the United States Immigra-
tion Court in Chicago in 1984.
The ruling was upheld by the
United States Court of Ap-
peals for the Seventh Circuit
in August. The Supreme Court
refused to hear Kulle's final
appeal.
South Florida To Host
International Kosher Foods
And Jewish Life Expo
The OSI investigation deter-
mined that Kulle volunteered
for service in the Waffen-SS in
1940. From 1942-45 he served
as a guard and leader of
guards in the SS Totenkopf
(Death's Head) battlion at the
Grosse-Rosen concentration
camp in Silesia. He par-
ticipated in various forms of
atrocities including the super-
vision of slave laborers.
Kulle, a German citizen, has
relatives in Lahr, a city in
southwest Germany. His pre-
sent where abouts are
unknown.
The promoters of the Inter-
national Kosher Foods and
Jewish Life Expo are calling it
"the biggest Kosher Party
ever held in South Florida*
and it very well may be, with
over 50,000 people expected to
attend the event which will be
held in the Miami Beach Con-
vention Center Dec. 4-7.
It's a sequel to the Expo held
this past March in the Javits
Convention Center in New
York with 42,000 attendees
and 15,000 people turned away
for lack of room.
The promise of Kosher food
tasting, from sophisticated
wines to delectable chocolates,
plus aisles of beautiful bouti-
que items with a Jewish flavor
will be among the prime au-
dience draws. A special
feature of this Expo is that
everything displayed will be
available for sale, including
hundreds of food and gift
items never before seen in
South Florida.
General admission tickets
are available at $6. Group
tickets (minimum 30) are $4
each. Ticket orders can be sent
to Infl. Kosher Food Expo,
4400 N. Federal Highway,
Boca Raton, FL 33431.
L '


JCC Senior Jamboree
'Fantastic Success'
Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Ida Alter, Chairperson of the
Sunday Senior Jamboree,
recently held at the Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches, said that the
event was a "fantastic success.
Most of the 160 people who at-
tended thought so too."
The Jamboree was spon-
sored by the JCC's Com-
prehensive Senior Service
Center.
First came the hot kosher
lunch, then the festivities,
which were paced by the music
of Nat Lewis and his Band.
Mr. Lewis, a musician for
more than 60 years and a
graduate of the Vincent Lopez
Orchestra, delighted the
crowd with his songs and tap
dance. He was accompanied by
Murray Schwartz on the
guitar, Burton Sapinoff on the
drums, Nat Lewis on the steel
guitar, and Ida Alter played
the piano.
Century Village's Merry
Minstrals rendered a melody
of songs and Gladys Volat
charmed the audience with
several selections, as did Dr.
Ed Sherman, the Chairperson
said.
Mrs. Alter announced that
the Center will have another
Super Sunday on Nov. 22, to
celebrate the official ground-
breaking of the new Jewish
Community Campus.
I
m. *, V
Enthusiastic crowd enjoys the dancing at the JCC Senior Jamboree.
Sharansky Urges Jews To Participate In March On Washington
Continued from Page 3
George Shultz and Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze and the upcom-
ing summit. He added that no
sooner did he finish, almost on
cue, he received a telephone
call that several refuseniks, in-
cluding Iosif Begun and Viktor
Brailovsky, had been granted
exit visas.
Sharansky said that the
"Jew on the street" knowns
only the well-known activists,
and when they are allowed to
emigrate he tends to believe
that the struggle is over,
forgetting the thousands of
others still refused permission.
Asked if there is not an anger
that some will use the rally to
oppose the summit and
detente, Sharansky replied
that the purpose is to
demonstrate that no agree-
ment can be made in a
"vacuum," that human rights
and Jewish emigration are an
"integral part of detente."
When a rabbi suggested that
the demonstration should in-
clude the arrest of rabbis in
front of the Soviet Embassy,
Sharansky quipped that as an
Israeli he cannot advise
Americans to break their coun-
try's laws.
Turning serious, he argued
that arrests will not have any
influence on Gorbachev, only a
massive turnout of people
would show him the power of
I the Jewish community.
Sharanksy indicated little
faith that Jewish culture and
religion would be allowed to
flourish in the Soviet Union.
I He said the announced plans to
I open a kosher restaurant in
1 Moscow or to allow a few
young Jews to study at
lyeshivas abroad in order to
[become rabbis were mere
Ipublic relations gimmicks.
IWhile not opposed to this,
[Sharansky said the Soviets
zannot allow Judaism to
lourish because they do not
allow the Christian religion to
Vive.
"Those (Jews) who are really
Interested in Jewish culture,
Jewish literature and Jewish
Na'Amat Canada
TORONTO (JTA) At a
eportedly merry and slick 8th
nennial convention here,
fioneer Women of Canada
loted to change its name to
7aamat Canada. The sister
rganization in the United
Itates recently change its
ie to Na'amat USA.
religion, they are people who
have, in fact, decided they and
their children should leave this
country (USSR)," he said. He
said Soviet Jews who have
decided to assimilate are not
interested in Judaism. He said still carry identity cards that
while the Soviet government they are Jews, since the
wants assimilation, Jews must Kremlin does not trust them.
There is no better time
to enjoy the wonders of
Walt Disney World*
only 3 miles from your door!
s Fal I fling!


For the price of a
hotel room, you can
enjoy all the comfort
and convenience of a
spacious, private,
2-bedroom town house
with full kitchen!
i


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
.
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, pro-
vides a variety of services to persons 60 years or older,
along with interesting and entertaining, educational
and recreational programs. All senior activities are con-
ducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights
Act.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and ac-
tivities will be scheduled throughout the summer.
KOSHER MEALS
Monday through Friday,
older adults gather at the JCC
to enjoy kosher lunches and a
variety of activities. In-
teresting lectures, films,
celebrations, games, card play-
ing and nutritional education
are some of the programs of-
fered at the Center. Transpor-
tation is available. Reserva-
tions are required. Call Lillian
at 689-7700. No fee is required
but contributions are
requested.
ONGOING PROGRAMS
Monday, Nov. 23 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Nov. 24
Speaker: Jessica Deuscella of
United Way TOPIC:
"Retirement"
Wednesday, Nov. 25 The
JCC goes to the Movies
Thursday, Nov. 26 Happy
Thanksgiving Closed
Friday, Nov. 27 L.Z. and
Company (Familiar songs
played and JCC's very own
secretary/vocalist will sing)
KOSHER
HOME DELIVERED
MEALS
Homebound persons 60
years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults. Call Carol for informa-
tion at 689-7700.
TWILIGHT MEALS
MAKE YOUR
RESERVATIONS
Hot Kosher Twilight
Meals!!! at the Jewish Com-
munity Center of the Palm
Beaches. Call Carol Fox for
reservations at 689-7700.
Every Wednesday and Thurs-
day at 4 p.m.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation, who must go
to treatment centers, doctors'
offices, hospitals and nursing
homes to visit spouses, social
service agencies and nutrition
centers. There is no fee for this
service, but participants are
encouraged to make a con-
tribution each time. Reserva-
tions must be made at least 48
hours in advance. For more in-
formation and/or reservations,
please call 689-7700 and ask
for Helen or Libby in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
SUNDAY
SENIOR SPECIAL
On Nov. 22, there will be a
celebration for the "Ground
Breaking" of the new JCC
building.
There will be a hot kosher
lunch, music, and surprises for
all at the JCC. There is no fee,
however, contributions are
requested.
For reservations, please call
Jo-Ann at 689-7700.
NEW PROGRAM
JCC Thespians Starting
Friday, Nov. 20 Ongoing. At
10 a.m. to noon at the JCC.
Book Week at the JCC -
Book Review. Friday, Dec. 4
at 1:30 p.m. a book review of
"Surviving the Seasons." The
review will be given by the
author, Fern Kupfner.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Increasing Your Memory
Power Tuesday, Jan. 5
through Feb. 9 at 10 a.m. to
noon. Instructor Ruth Janko.
This course is designed to
alleviate anxieties regarding
memory loss. Learn what
memory is, how it functions
and how to improve it. Paid
pre-registration by Dec. 22 to
JCC.
Health and Reflexelogy
Tuesdays, at 10:30 a.m.
Speakers Club Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
55 Alive Driving Mon-
days, Dec. 7 and Dec. 14, at 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. Safe Driving
Courses will be offered with
two four hour sessions.
Graduation card will entitle
bearer to a discount in their in-
surance. Coffee break and
kosher lunch available with
reservations. No fee for lunch
but contributions requested.
Instructor Betty Kramer. Fee:
$7 made payable to AARP -
Registration by Thursday,
Dec. 3. Send check to JCC,
Attn: Millicent Lakin.
CHANUKAH PARTY -
Dec. 16 at 1:30 p.m. Miss
Betty's Pre-School "Stars"
will present "A Chanakiyah
for Dinna." Chanukah
festivities and songs will beled
by Rabbi Steven R. Westman.
Decorations will be made by
the children. Holiday
refreshments will be served.
Donation: $1.
JCC CANASTARAMA
AND LUNCH
Do you play Canasta? Join
the many who are enioving an
afternoon of fun and friend-
ship every Thursday. Lunch is
served, followed by
Canastarama at 1 p.m. Sophia
and Maurice Langbort are
leading this delightful activity.
There are prizes, refreshments
and fun. Reservations are re-
quired and persons attending
should arrive by 11:30 a.m.
Make your tables and come to
the JCC Canastarama. No fee
for lunch.' Contributions are
requested. Please call Millicent
for your reservations at
689-7700.
Beginners Canasta Learn
how to play Canasta with
Maurice Langbort who will
teach persons to play on
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. Cost: $1
members, $1.50 non-members.
Please call Senior Department
at 689-7700 for reservations.
AT YOUR SERVICE
If you need any of the three
following services, please call
Jo-Ann at 689-7700 for an
appointment.
Health Insurance
Assistance Edie Reiter
assists persons to fill out in-
surance forms and answer
questions. Ms. Reiter is at the
Center on the third Thursday
of each month.
Legal Aid A represen-
tative from the Palm Beach
County Legal Aid Society is
available Thursdays to discuss
your legal needs (wills will not
be covered.)
Home Financial Manage-
ment How to reconcile your
checkbook, question about bill
payments and personal income
tax and an other questions
about simple personal home
financial problems. Herb
Kirsch, Consultant
Wednesdays.
TRIP CALENDAR
Thursday, Dec. 3: Trip to
Jai Alai Including Dinner
and Transportation. Prime
Time Singles but everyone is
welcome. Single men get free
entrance to game. Reserva-
tions are required, call Sally
478-9397 or Evelyn 686-6724.
Wednesday, Dec. 9: Does-
sant Escorted Tour of Norton
Museum. Lunch and
Transporation. Fee: JCC
member, $11, non-member
$12. Reservations are re-
quired. Please call Jo-Ann or
Millicent at 689-7700.
Sunday, Jan. 3: Sunday
Matinee Theatre party to Ac-
tors Rep. Theatre In-The-
Round "Gift of the Magi."
Including transportation.
Reservations are required.
Please call Jo-Ann or Millicent
at 689-7700.
Sunday, Feb. 14: Las Vegas
Style Show "To Hollywood
with Love" at the Newport
Pub, including dinner and
transportation. Reservations
are required. Please call Jo-
Ann or Millicent at 689-7700.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Large 2B/2B House. Adult Community. Walk
to New Lake Worth Cons. Synagogue. Loaded
w/Extras: Built-in Security System, Garage,
Washer, Dryer, 22 Ft. Refrig., Verticals, Fans,
Enc./porch, Much, Much More, a must see.
Immaculate;lmmediate Occupancy.
SACRIFICE at $91,500 (305) 4330365
JCC News
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
Get together at a member's home on Saturday, Nov. 21
at 9 p.m. to enjoy music, fun, Daquiri's, and good company.
Donation: JCC members $4, non-members $6. For location
and directions call Bev 697-2932, Judi 848-8087 or Gary
697-1774.
On Tuesday, Nov. 24 from 5-7 p.m., gather at Houlihan's
in the Palm Beach Mall to enjoy Happy Hour. Ask for the
JCC group at the door. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
SINGLES (30's and 40's)
On Tuesday, Nov. 24 at 7 p.m., gather at the JCC for
Game Night. Bring along favorite board or card game and
creativity too. Donation $1.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
An International Coffee and Game Night will be held at
the JCC (700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach) on Saturday,
Nov. 21 at 8:30 p.m. Spirited refreshments such as Irish
coffee will be served. Tables will be set up for Trivial Pur-
suit, Backgammon, etc. Bring favorite board or card game
for an evening of fun. Donation: $3. For additional informa-
tion call Arlene 622-6840, Helen 471-8107 or Marilyn
439-5524.
Meet Tuesday, Nov. 24 at 7:30 p.m. at the Center to plan
new and exciting events for the upcoming Winter season.
SINGLES 55 plus
Get together on Monday, Nov. 23 from 5-7 p.m. at
Rodney's Cafe (420 U.S. Hwy. No. 1, No. Palm Beach) for
Happy Hour. Join together for good company, special drink
prices and hors d'eouvres. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
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Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Diamond City Deputy Mayor
Offers Israeli Perspective
to go back to its pre-1967 negotiating autonomy of areas
borders. On the other hand, such as the West Bank. That
Ben-Gad says, the Arab-Israeli area would be neither part of
problem in the Middle East is Jordan nor annexed by Israel,
not an issue of land.
"All problems in the Middle
East are because of Arab
The Palestinian issue is not at the heart of the refusSl *?, ^Jar^\aef&t:\
problem .. The problem is the Arab refJal to M" iJ^tSSS
visibly shaken, Ben- accept Israel and I think Jews should stop
%? ^"'e^S^SiS WolAgizingfcyr being there!
Continued from Page 5-
Jews for all that."
about Palestinian rights. They
do not talk about the rights of
Jews. You cannot speak about
Palestinian rights without
speaking about Jewish
rights."
All of his family's property,
and their business, was con-
fiscated by Libyan authorities
before they left the country for
Israel, he says.
During his brief stop in
Miami, Ben-Gad announced
that he met with leaders of the
Cuban community to discuss
erecting a monument to Cuban
freedom fighter Jose Marti in
negotiations is for Israel to sit
down directly with Jordan.
While American officials are
making attempts to resolve
the deadlock, Israel's coalition
government at one point ap-
peared headed for a split and
calls for early elections seemed by any foreign country.
i^ue0^ ^ to re81Ve thC ,. MI think-" Ben-Gi adds,
0, "that the number of Arabs
bhamir is not one to change who agree in political solutions
his mind like some others," are above the number of Arabs
and economic aid. Several
Congressman have told The
Jewish Floridian in recent
months that there is an annual
struggle to maintain Israel's
slice of the foreign aid pie
which is the largest received
a military
Ben-Gad observes.
Because the split in Israeli
public opinion is almost equally
divided on the peace con-
Netanya. "We're discussing ference issue, it is unlikely that side nations in the peace pro-
ways to fulfill the idea," he either party, Labor or Likud, cess because they want Israel
would win a mandate in the
who believe in
confrontation."
BEN-GAD says Shamir is
opposed to the inclusion of out-
says.
NETANYA, a city of about
130,000 residents 20 miles
north of Tel Aviv, is similar to
South Florida not only in
climate but in the fact that
thousands of families make
their living in tourist-related
fields. Netanya has 30 hotels
and 4,000 hotel rooms and the
resort city is planning to add
another 4,000 rooms.
"We have night life on the
shore, beautiful night clubs,
shopping centers, a clean city,
warm people, reasonable
prices," he says.
"In Independence Square,
starting at eight at night and
going until two in the morning,
thousands of people pass
through the square. They sit in
the night air and sip drinks and
eat fakfel."
Ben-Gad studied in Bar-Ilan
University in Tel Aviv, major-
ing in Middle East studies. He
win a manaate in
next elections on this issue
alone, Ben-Gad predicts.
Ben-Gad, sharing what he
thinks may be surprising news
to Americans states: "There
are many people who believe
that the next government (in
Israel) should be a government
of national unity once again."
A strong supporter of Likud
himself, Ben-Gad says he
would favor his Likud Party
once again sharing power in
the Knesset with the Labor
Party. The unity government
has had many philosophical
disagreements but the fact is
that it has worked in many
areas including reducing
Israeli inflation from some 27
percent a month to one per-
cent a month.
"Peres and Shamir are dif-
ferent but are in the same
room and it is locked," Ben-
Gad reasons. "It is a wedding,
have Arab
and that didn't stop the Arabs
from attacking Israel. In 1967,
we didn't have the Golan
Heights, West Bank, Gaza
Strip.
"The Palestinian issue is not
at the heart or the foot of the
problem. The problem is the
Arab refusal to accept Israel
and I think Jews should stop
apologizing for being there.
"For the sake of peace (with
Egypt) we gave up the whole
Sinai. There are no people in
the world who love peace more
than the Jews. We want peace
with the Arabs. We've proved
we can fight and win."
Ben-Gad says he sees "no
other way to go" than to work
the Camp David peace accords
with Jordan, which is
he says.
JORDAN'S King Hussein
has so far refused to sit down
with Israel to discuss peace
prospects without the interna-
tional umbrella. Hussein,
political observers say, is con-
cerned about repercussions
such a move on his part would
have from Syria and the PLO
as well as on his own life.
Says Ben-Gad: "We achiev-
ed peace with Egypt without
Russia and China. If Hussein
really wants to negotiate
peace he should negotiate with
us personally."
Ben-Gad dismissed views
that Hussein may be rejecting
direct negotiations with Israel
for fear of his own life.
"Hussein is a man of several
souls. He's buried all his
enemies and he's still alive."
continued at Dropsie Universi- not of ,ove but of neces8lty-
i_ Il I 1 1 I > V* it t_l '* 4.1
ty in Philadelphia, where he
received his doctorate.
Although his lecture subjects
are broad-based, Ben-Gad says
he must have been asked
"about 200" questions regar-
ding the Middle East peace
issue during his visit to Miami.
Ben-Gad is an active
member and chairman of the
religious section of the Likud
Party led by Israel Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
Ben-Gad explains Israel's
coalition or unity government:
Because neither major party,
Likud nor Labor, could get a
public mandate in the last elec-
tion, the new brand of joint
government came about. The
Labor Party is led by Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres. Peres
and Shamir swapped titles
half-way through the election
term.
Shamir and Peres have been
bitterly divided this past year
over the method of negotiating
Yet, if Israel continues the
unity government, as Ben-Gad
predicts, Likud still "will
never" agree to an interna-
tional conference, he says.
"So," Ben-Gad says, show-
ing his party's hard line, "if
Peres wants a unity govern-
ment he must forget about the
international conference."
BEN-GAD suggests that
neither party, Likud or Labor,
could establish a stable
government in Israel with a
slight majority.
"When I left Israel, the polls
asking about the upcoming
election show that 41 members
would get elected to Likud and
45 to Labor."
Asked what might end the
deadlock over the Peres-
Shamir peace conference
views if not an election, Ben-
Gad offers the Hebrew word
for patience, "savlanut."
"I believe there are good
chances for comprehensive
peace with Jordan. Peres has Vaat T.c
said the only way to get Jordan P^ in ^ Ml to the negotiating >le is to ^^l^L^L8^^8
negotiating
meet at an international con-
ference that would include the
five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council. That would allow the
Soviet Union as well as
England, France and China to
have a say in the negotiations.
SHAMIR refuses to budge
in his opposition to the interna-
tional umbrella and says the
only way to have peace
coming to the realization there
is no military solution to the
conflict and Israel will be there
as long as there is a Middle
East," says Ben-Gad.
Ben-Gad's assessment of
Israel's military position
comes at a time when
members of the U.S. House
Appropriations Committee
managed to maintain Israel's
level of $3 billion in military
Germany Notes Youthful
Skinhead Neo-Nazis
Continued from Page 5-
lecturer at Bielefeld Universi-
ty reports in a current study
that the figures are much the
same.
But he does report a strong
trend among young people
towards the ideas normally
associated with the extreme
right. Of the 1,257
respondents, 57.2 percent
favor the death penalty for ter-
rorism, drug trafficking and
sex murder; 66.5 percent want
tougher punishments handed
out by the courts; 43.5 percent
agree with the slogan "Ger-
many for the Germans"; and
37.4 percent of 16- and
17-year-olds agree with the
slogan, "Out with the wogs."
skinhead "youth sub-culture"
would ever become closely in-
volved with the extreme right
of politics. It was considered
that skinheads were not
capable of becoming politically
involved. Yet now skinheads
acted as marshals at neo-Nazi
rallies.
Heitmeyer charged youth
work programs with not do-
ing enough to help. An "in-
sidious widening" of the pro-
blem had been ignored. Youth
centers were proud that they
remained spared from
hooligans like skinheads and
took this to be a sign of their
own special qualities.
He said the reality was that
social work was done with less
objectionable youths. The
All these are typical stances delinquents were ignored,
favored by the extreme right, aj^ Ignored were the "less
including skinheads.
"Germany, wake" and
"Jews out" cry skinheads.
They spray swastikas on their
bedroom walls. Right ex-
tremists hate anything
strange, hate foreigners and
things that are different. Puri-
ty is their aim. The basis of
their belief is that people are
bom unequal.
They believe in violence.
They refer to the daily "fight
for existence" and, in general,
reject democratic solutions to
social and political conflict.
Authoritarian and militant
ignored
socially conspicuous" like
youths who spent much of
their time in pin-ball parlours
or billiard salloons, went to
soccer matches on Saturdays
and sometimes displayed but-
tons proclaiming: "I'm proud
to be German."
After a recent Bundesliga
football match, three fans
started chanting "Heil Hitler"
and breaking into the Horst
Wessel song. They are now
spending a year behind bars.
The judge said in sentencing
them that "we must head off
this infection. We can't afford
modes of behavior are part of to let this sort of thing happen
their style.
In 1985, the Bonn Justice
Ministry warned that more
than a third of extreme right
wingers were violent. The very
word Getualt recalls the war
and the Nazis.
It also brings to mind the
more recent past such as in
1980 when a bomb went off in
Munich during the Oktoberfest
and a brawl with crude
weapons fought in Hanover in
1984. Heitmeyer refers to
xenophobia and to the less ob-
vious attitude of favoring
violence as a means of solving
conflict. He says these at-
titudes are not taken seriously
enough and points out that a
few years ago, it was never for
a moment believed that the
again in this country.
In the emotionally charged
atmosphere of football
stadiums, neo-Nazis often mix
with crowd in a deliberate ef-
fort to contact politically
susceptible fans, say police.
Neo-Nazi leader Michael
Kuhnen once said his best
recruiting grounds were
where skinheads and football
fans gathered.
But even in groups where
young people seek like-minded
people, recognition, security
and direction and where there
is no clear extreme-right
mood, there are certain na-
tionalistic and authoritarian
traits.
Togetherness and com-
radeship are again important
since the new conservatism
and new romanticism surfac-
ed. Boy scout-like activities
and a suggestion of campfire
atmosphere attract many who
are looking for new values
because the old values have
not, in their opinion, lived up
to expectations.
Some groups use this trend
to recruit and extreme-right-
wing oriented youth
magazines use the theme of en-
vironmental protection in an
effort again to make the term
Heimat modern along the lines
of "pure environment, pure
people."
One young woman from a
village in Lower Saxony said
in explanation of her earlier
fascination with neo-Nazis that
her desire for security and
recognition could have just as
easily led her to Bhagwan or
another of the sects.
She said she had no idea
about politics or the extreme
right, but Michael Kuhnen had
made a strong impression on
her. He was single-minded and
knew what he wanted. He of-
fered direction.
Youth needs a sense of direc-
tion but, because of the friabili-
ty of social continuity, it is
becoming more and more dif-
ficult to plot out direction.
Heitmeyer says his study
shows that the attraction of
the right had its roots not in
the ideology itself but in social
ideas.
Criminality illegal strikes,
unrest among youth, van-
dalism, even conscientious ob-
jection, citizens initiatives,
alcoholism, drug abuse and
also the rebellious attitude of
some people towards the state
are increasingly taken to be at-
tacks on democracy and ap-
peals for a "strong state."
The fear of being over-
whelmed by foreigners is not a
just talk in the bar. It is a sub-
ject talked about by mayors
and other politicians openly.
Heitmeyer is worried about
the dangers in education. He
Continued on Page 19
** ^


i
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
ar/Bat Mitzvah

M%9r
^^^
r
w

^k
V Andrew Kleinman
ANDREW KLEINMAN
Andrew L. Kleinman, son of
Lee and Sherry Kleinman of
Wellington, was called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
November 14 at Temple Beth
Torah. Rabbi Steven West man
and Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum
officiated.
Andrew attends the 7th
grade at Crestwood Middle
School, where he is involved in
the tennis team. He enjoys ten-
nis, baseball, and building
radar controlled cars. He was
twinned with his Soviet twin,
Isia Khayamon of Derbent,
USSR, who was denied his
freedom to be called to the
Torah.
FELICIA RISICK
Felicia Risick, daughter of
Howard and Deborah Risick of
Palm Beach, will be called to
the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
November 28 at Temple Israel
in West Palm Beach. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will officiate,
as well as Rabbi Alton
Winters.
Felicia Risick
Felicia is a 7th grade student
at Palm Beach Public. She is
on the yearbook staff,
secretary of the school SADD
chapter, attends Midrasha,
and participates in the Kesher
class at Temple Israel. She is
interested in ballet, sports and
is a gymnast.
Sharing in this simcha will
be her great-aunt, Lois Seitz of
York, Pennsylvania.
MATTHEW SCHWEITZ
Matthew Jay Schweitz, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Schweitz
of West Palm Beach, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on November 21 at
Temple Beth El, West Palm
Beach. Rabbi Alan Cohen and
Cantor Norman Brody will
officiate.
Matthew is an 8th grade stu-
dent at Roosevelt Junior High.
He is a member of the National
Junior Honor Society, the
swim team and newspaper. He
attends Kadima and Midrasha
and enjoys drawing, swimm-
ing and tennis. Matthew will
Matthew Schweitz
be twinned with Robert
Khanukaev of the USSR, who
will be denied his freedom to
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah.
Family members and friends
sharing this occasion include
his sister, Jessica, and grand-
parents Reba and Bamet Lan-
dau and Nessie Schweitz.
ANDREA YOSINOFF
Andrea Yosinoff, daughter
of Richard and Linda Yosinoff
of Palm Beach Gardens will be
Bat Mitzvah on November 21
at Temple Israel. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will officiate.
Andrea is in the 8th grade at
Howell L. Watkins Junior
High. She is a member of the
National Junior Honor Society
and is on the school newspaper
staff. She is interested in
swimming and traveling.
Andrea will be twinned with
Natasha Rothstein of Kiev,
USSR, who was denied her
freedom to be called to the
Torah to be Bat Mitzvah.
Hebrew Union College Seeks
Artifacts Of American Jewish Life
A national search for Jewish
Americana from greeting
cards to fine art, from kitchen-
ware to ketubahs (wedding
contracts) is being con-
ducted by the Hebrew Union
College Skirball Museum's
recently launched Project
Americana.
Project Americana is an ef-
fort to locate, catalogue and
collect items which illustrate
the experience of Jews in
America on all levels:
domestic, educational, occupa-
tional, communal and spiritual.
As such, it is part of the pro-
cess of developing the Hebrew
Union College Cultural Center
for American Jewish Life
which will be built on a 15-acre
site midway between West Los
Angeles and the San Fernando
Valley.
"The Cultural Center will
serve as a national resource to
document and explore the
adventure, struggle and op-
portunity America has afford-
ed its religious and ethnic
groups," noted Dr. Uri D.
Herscher, executive vice-
president of the four-campus
college. "To make sense of the
future, we need to be aware of
the past, to reclaim the past.
That is why Project
Americana is so important."
Mark C. Levy, Project
Americana chairman, further
explained that "What we hope
to achieve, first and foremost.
is to get the message across
that materials from daily life
do matter in our study of the
American Jewish experience.
Each object has a story to tell,
and encountering the 'real
thing' does make a
difference."
The kinds of items being
sought run the gamut from
mementos of daily life to
historical artifacts, and from
folk art to ceremonial and fine
art. "The range of items we're
looking for is enormous, and
objects can be found
anywhere," said Project Coor-
dinator Lvnne Gilbert*. "We
found several times, including
a sign in Yiddish for High Holy
Day seats, in the crawl space
beneath a former synagogue.
We're asking the public to help
us by searching their 'attics' as
well as those of their communi-
ty organizations and
synagogues."
Among objects already
located are a 1920's ceramic
butter crock with the inscrip-
tion, "Mrs. Kaplan's Store, A
Good Place to Trade," a
tailor's shears, a set of "dog
tags" engraved with an "H
for Hebrew worn during
World War II by a member of
the Women's Army Corps, a
wooden case carved in Califor-
nia in 1870 for a shofar (a
ram's horn used during Jewish
High Holy Day services), a
1912 Rokeach kosher scouring
powder can, a stained-glass
folk art box, a sign engraved in
Yiddish advertising a steam
bath in New Mexico, New
Year's cards, and wedding
clothes along with mementos
of the people who wore them.
The Skirball Museum, cur-
rently located on the HUC
campus near downtown Los
Angeles, will relocate in a
much expanded facility within
the Cultural Center which is
expected to open in 1990. In
addition to the Skirball
Museum, the Hebrew Union
College Cultural Center for
American Jewish Life will in-
clude an auditorium and an
academic and conference
center.
Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion is
the nation's oldest institution
of higher Jewish studies. It
trains rabbis, cantors,
religious school educators,
Jewish communal workers and
graduate and post graduate
scholars at its four campuses
in Cincinnati, New York, Los
Angeles and Jerusalem.
UN Report
Continued from Page 5
nounce without delay that the
files on Waldheim and others
of his ilk are finally accessible
to the public, with only a
minimum of restrictions, if
any, so as to distance himself
from his predecessor of ill
repute and not become suspect
himself as an accessory after
the fact.


Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Roster. Monday 8:30 a.m.; Thurs-
day 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder. Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave.. West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m. Rabbi
Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing Address: 6085
Parkwalk Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33437. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Benjamin Shull. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night
services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 335-7620.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m. Student Rabbi Elaine Zechter.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 S. Chillingworth Dr.. West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.


Syn
ill
e News
TEMPLE
BETH DAVID
Sisterhood will hold their
Holiday Boutique, Bazaar and
Bake Sale on Sunday, Nov. 22
from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There
will be pancakes, bagels and
home baked goods for sale,
plus Judaica items, children's
educational toys, hand made
wood toys, plans, jewelry, etc.
For more information call the
temple office.
TEMPLE
BETH TORAH
The Junior Youth Group
is having a Saturday Night
Social on Nov. 21, 7:30 p.m. at
the temple. Kids from 6th, 7th
and 8th grades will par-
ticipate. Donation is $2. There
wil be a professional disc
jockey, refreshments, dancing
and prizes.
Friday,- November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
i Candle Lighting Time j
rs
3***^a Nov. 20 5:10 p.m,
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Shabbat service on Friday,
Nov. 20 will be the celebration
of Jewish Book Month. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will review a
new book by Anne Ralpla call-
ed, "Loving Kindness." An-
drea Yosinoff will chant the
kiddush in honor of her upcom-
ing Bat Mitzvah on Saturday
morning, at 10:30 a.m.
On the evening of
Thanksgivig, Wednesday,
Nov. 25 a Community
Thanksgiving Service will be
held at St. Ann's Roman
Catholic Church, located at
310 Olive Ave. in downtown
W. Palm Beach. Service will
start at 7:30 p.m. All of the
clergy from the different
synagogues and churches will
participate.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine will con-
tinue his series on "It's Good
To Be a Reform Jew" on Fri-
day evening, Nov. 20 at 8 p.m.
Cantor Anne Newman will
chant the liturgy.
Rabbi Levine will stress how
Reform Judaism today is af-
fected by the themes of
"Tradition and Change" and
"Unity in Diversity. Rabbi
Levine will also comment on
several proposals made by
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
President of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions during the UAHC Bien-
nial in Chicago.
Regular Saturday morning
services are conducted weekly
at 10:30 a.m. in the Bakst
Family Chapel.
MAS Announces Scholarship Awards
NEW YORK, NY HIAS
(Hebrew Immigration Aid
Society) is inviting applica-
tions for its 1988 Scholarship
Awards. In announcing the
awards, Dr. Arline Bronzaft,
Chair of the Scholarship Selec-
tion Committee, explained
that those eligible to apply for
the scholarship awards are
HIAS-assisted refugees and
their children who migrated to
the United States after 1977.
For the first time since they
were established 15 years ago,
the awards are intended
specifically for students who
plan to pursue post secondary
education. The 1988 HIAS
Scholarship stipends will
range from $500 to $2,500.
Applications and further in-
formation may be obtained by
writing to HIAS Scholarship
Awards, HIAS, 200 Park
Avenue South, New York, NY
10003. No phone calls will be
accepted. Completed applica-
tions should be returned to
HIAS, postmarked no later
than Jan. 15. Award winners
will be notified no later than
Feb. 22.
UN Officer 'Outraged' At Report
BY YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The head of the U.N.
Department of Public Informa-
tion (DPI), Therese Paquet-
Sevigny, said she is "outragg-
ed" by a New York Post report
that she supports a quota for
Jews hired by the United
Nations.
In a statement issued here
on her behalf by a U.N.
spokesman, the DPI director
said she rejects "any sugges-
tion that she endorses
religious or ethnic background
as a basis for hiring in her
department or in the United
Nations secretariat as a
whole."
The statement stressed that
National Reinvestment Day
Set For Israel Bonds
Sunday, Dec. 6 is the target
date for a nation-wide Israel
Bond "reinvestment" cam-
paign, it was announced by
David B. Hermelin, interna-
tional campaign chairman for
atate of Israel Bonds.
Under special provisions
authorized by the State of
Israel, more than one million
people who purchased Israel
Bonds in 1973 can reinvest
those securities towards the
purchase of new Israel Bonds
at their full appreciated value
upwards of one year prior to
maturity.
This special program per-
mits registered owners to fur-
ther Israel's economic develop-
ment by providing new bond
dollars at a time when Israel
will be celebrating its 40th
anniversary.
The local office (2300 Palm
Beach Lakes Blvd.) will be
open and staffed from 10 a.m.
t 2 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6 to
accommodate all who wish to
reinvest any bonds maturing
now through December 1988.
Rabbi Melvin Kieffer will
lead off the Friday Forum
Series Nov. 20,8p.m., during
services at Temple Emanu-El
in Palm Beach as part of the
temple's Adult Eduction Pro-
gram. His topic will be
RHear, O Israel'' 'Another
Look Into the Shema.'
in all instances of hiring,
Sevigny, who assumed her
post less than a year ago, "has
acted and will act in accor-
dance with the U.N. charter
and General Assembly resolu-
tions, which stipulate that hir-
ing shall be based on the
highest standards of efficien-
cy, competence and integrity,
with due regard being paid to
the importance of recruiting
the staff on as wide a
geographical basis as
possible.
The Post paraphrased her
Thursday as suggesting "there
should be a quota for Jews
hired by the U.N. whether
they come from Palestine or
from other nations."
Area Deaths
BASS
Nettie, 76, of Uke Worth. Riverside Guar-
dian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
GINSBURG
Harry, 83, of Lake Worth. Riverside Guar-
dian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
JACOBY
Dr. Ralph B.. 73, of Lake Worth. Riverside
Guardian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
KANTOR
Hyman, 80, of Century Village. West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan, West Palm Beach.
KEKTMAN
Jerry, 78. of Boynton Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
ROZENE
Jack I., 83, of Lake Worth. Service was held
in Connecticut.
SUGARMAN
Irving R., 82, of Boynton Beach. Riverside
Guardian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SWERLING
Ann, 78. of Lake Worth. Riverside Guardian
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
TEPPERMAN
Sadie, 101, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan. West
Palm Beach.
WILSON
Ida Jane. 92, of Lake Worth. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
L,
'Introduction To Judaism'
Classes To Begin Dec. 7
Rabbi Howard Shapiro,
President of the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis, has
announced that the nationally
acclaimed "Introduction to
Judaism" class, sponsored by
the Palm Beach County Board
of Rabbis, will be conducted on
Monday evenings from 7 until
9. The first of the 16 con-
secutive sessions will begin
Monday evening, Dec. 7. All
classes will meet in Temple
Beth David, 4657 Hood Road,
in Palm Beach Gardens.
The 16-week course is
designed to familiarize those
persons who are interested in
learning about Judaism and
who may be considering con-
version. Among the subjects to
be taught are Jewish holidays,
customs and ceremonies,
rituals and prayer, and Jewish
history. This particular course
has received national acclaim
because it is the only course of
its kind in the country receiv-
ing input from Orthodox, Con-
servative and Reform rabbis.
Teaching the course this
year is Rabbi Kal Levitan, a
graduate of both Yeshiva
University and the Jewish In-
stitute of Religion. He receiv-
ed the Doctor of Divinity
degree from the Hebrew
Union College. Rabbi Levitan
is a member of the Reform
Central Conference of
American Rabbis. For 30 years
he served as Chaplain in the
United States Air Force, and
is now a retired colonel. "Rab-
bi Levitan, known for his
warmth and wit, as well as his
wisdom, will bring his special
expertise to the 'Introduction
to Judaism' course," stated
Rabbi Shapiro.
Enrollment for the classes
must be made by referral from
a sponsoring rabbi. No
students will be registered
after the third session on Dec.
21. A fee of $100 will be
assessed to cover materials
and texts used in the course.
Those persons who are in-
terested in registering or seek-
ing additional information,
may call Rabbi Edward Cohn,
Secretary of the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis, at
793-3315.
Germany Notes Youthful
Skinhead Neo-Nazis
Continued from Page 17
says old-fashioned virtues such
as industriousness, sense of
duty, faith, discipline and
punctuality were again becom-
ing popular among German
parents. But these were the
very virtues which had become
discredited in the fascist era.
They could lead to an accep-
tance of violence.
Heitmeyer maintains that
the roots of right extremism
lie right within society and not,
as had long been thought, on
its periphery. He had found
these tendencies not only
among the socially disadvan-
taged such as the unemployed,
but also among self-assured
youths who had a more
assured view of the future,
who already had embarked on
careers, for example.
The case against skinheads
following the death of a
Turkish youth in Hamburg in
1986 showed that skinheads
can come from "respectable"
families. One of the charged
was the son of a senior
policeman.
Now the courts want to use
another father of a skinhead to
bring home the point to the
public. The son was battered to
death by his "comrades" in
Hanover in February. He was
15 when he made friends with
skinheads and got closer and
closer to them, said the father
in evidence.
He had spoken with his son
often in an effort to get him to
change his mind at first
unsuccessfully.
Eventually he was suc-
cessful. The boy, then aged 17
told the police about his former
comrades and died because
of it.
Mannheimer Morgen
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
Join The Synagogue
Of Your Choice
... because vital Jewish institutions
build strong Jewish communities.
1 I

.*


V
Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987

Holtzman Rips Canada's War Crimes Law
Continued from Page 7
is based on an incorrect
assumption that "Canada's
system of justice is better than
that, say, in France, Holland,
or West Germany."
The legislation stemmed
from the recommendations of
a commission headed by
Quebec Superior Court Justice
Jules Deschenes, after nearly
two years of investigation into
Nazi war criminals who found
haven in Canada, many even-
tually becoming Canadian
citizens.
Deschenes came up with a
list of 20 definite war crimes
suspects and 200 probable
suspects, all of whom could
face criminal prosecution.
Canadian Justice Minister Ray
Hnatyshyn, who played a ma-
jor role in gaining parliamen-
tary assent to Deschenes'
recommendations, told the
conference that all of the
suspects are under continuing
investigation.
Holtzman contrasted the
Canadian approach to that of
OSI, which tracks down war
criminals in the United States
and then seeks through the
courts to strip their citizenship
and deport them.
She regretted that the
Deschenes commission had op-
posed the creation of a similar
body. "I urge your govern-
ment to create a Canadian
OSI," she said.
"The ability to undertake ef-
fective investigations and
measures against Nazi war
criminals requires the develop-
ment of substantial historical
and investigative expertise,"
she explained.
"Such expertise can be built
up best by having a core of
people who deal with these
cases, learn the history and
share the knowledge acquired
by others."
The American prosecutor
also took the Deschenes report
to task for including "no
specific recommendations on
seeking evidence from coun-
tries in Eastern Europe, the
Soviet Union or Israel.'
Minister Backs
Death Penalty
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Sentiment has been mounting
for capital punishment in
Israel and Justice Minister
Avraham Sharir added his
voice in support of the death
penalty for "very serious
crimes."
He told reporters it should
apply not only to Arab ter-
rorists but to Jews convicted
of crimes such as rape and
murder or the kidnap-killing of
a child.
"I am under the impression
that the effect of the present
gunishment has eroded,"
harir said, referring to the
current maximum penalty for
crimes in Israel, life imprison-
ment. He stressed that the na-
tionality and religion of the cir-
minal was irrelevant.
Demands for capital punish-
ment rise every time a ter-
rorist commits murder. The
last person executed in Israel
was Nazi war criminal Adolf
Eichmann, who was hanged in
1961.
>
Wiesel characterized tne
Nuremberg trial of top Nazi
war criminals as "the triumph
of memory. We must all
remember what happened,
otherwise we lose our minds,"
he said.
He added that "those who
dare say today that the
Holocaust did not exist should
be put to shame and treated as
outcasts."
Wiesel, himself a Buchen-
wald survivor, also said,
"What we must realize from
Nuremberg is that neutrality
is wrong. There can be no such
thing as neutrality against
evil/'
He said that had the Nazi
victims known when they were
liberated that Allied leaders
has been aware of the victims'
fate during the war, "we could
have committed suicide out of
despair."
But Hnatyshyn announced
that Canada has in fact begun
negotiations with the Soviet
Union and the governments of
Poland, Romania, Hungary,
Czechoslovakia, West Ger-
many and Israel to allow Cana-
dian legal teams to search for
evidence in those countries on
the suspects under
investigation.
The justice minister dismiss-
ed charges that evidence from
the Soviet Union and Eastern
bloc countries would be
automatically tainted.
Nevertheless, Deschenes, a
participant in the conference,
said "I am impatient with the
slow pace of procedures since
my report was filed last
December."
Another participant, David
Matas, legal counsel to the
B'nai B'rith League of Human
Rights during the Deschenes
inquiry, said he didn't think
the government had any
ulterior motive for moving
slowly. "I don't think it is bad-
ly intended as much as badly
organized," he said.
The Ottawa Citizen
newspaper carried an inter-
view in which Pierre Elliott
Trudeau, prime minister of
Canada from 1968-79 and
1980-84, admitted that the
Liberal government he headed
had not done enough about
war criminals living in Canada.
He explained that there
were "other priorities" and
"even Israel has limits in its
pursuit" of Nazi war criminals.
Other participants in the
conference included Nobel
peace laureate Elie Wiesel;
French lawyer and Nazi-
hunter Serge Klarsfeld;
Stephan Lewis, Canadian am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions; and Harvard law pro-
fessor Alan Dershowitz.
Also Ram Jethmalani, a
lawyer and former member of
the Indian Parliament; Arthur
Chaskelson, South African
counsel for imprisoned civil
rights leader Nelson Mandela;
Gotsu Wolbe, a former
minister in the Ethiopian
government; and Chilean
human rights ativist Carmen
Quintana.
Prof. Irwin Cotler of McGill
University Law Faculty, who
has worked for years on the
issue of justice for Nazi war
criminals, was the main
organizer of the conference.
Wiesel gave the opening ad-
dress on tine occasion of the in-
auguration of the Raoul
Wallenberg Lectureship in
Human Rights at McGill, nam-
ed for the Swedish diplomat
who saved the lives of
thousands of Jews in Hungary
during the closing months of
World War II, only to be ar-
rested by the Soviet army in
1945. He has not been heard
from since.
JM
A


Full Text

Friday, November 20, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm BeaCh County Page 5

'Skinheads In Germany' ^
Neo-Nazism and Hooliganism |"- "
By IRMGARD
PIORKOWSKI-WUHR
Skinheads first appeared in
West Germany at the end of
the 1970s. Since then, they
have come to be associated
with extreme right-wing
movements.
There has been a noticeable
increase in the number of in-
cidents of various type in-
cluding crime by neo-Nazis
since 1974. Since 1979, there
has been an increase in overt
anti-Semitism.
After an initial rush, the
membership of the various
skinhead movements
stagnated at about 1,500 hard
core activists.
"We're coming slowly but
we're coming hard," was the
catchcry with the double
meaning taken from a song
which appeared at the funeral
of Rudolf Hess in the Bavarian
town of Wunsiedel earlier this
year extremists waved Nazi
flags and yelled out for
"Revenge for Hess."
The death of Hess did not
rekindle neo-Nazi feelings, but
it brought the movement into
the spotlight and the glare of
the international press. Many
brought Nazi banners to the
funeral, knowing they would
Behind The Scenes:
be photographed.
If vou believe the statistics,
youth is not so susceptible to
neo-Nazi ideas and extreme
right-wing methods. That is
true as far as it goes. Tradi-
tional neo-Nazi groups have lit-
tle appeal among the young.
Only about one percent of 15-
to 24 years olds are members
of such groups or feel they
belong; three percent say the
groups are "quite good."
These were the results of a
study sponsored by Shell in
1981. This has not changed
much. Wilhelm Heitmeyer, a
Continued on Page 17
Cross our path at your peril. Skinhead violence at neo-Nazi party
rally.
UN Report Further Indicts Waldheim
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS -
(WUP) Brian Urquhart, a
Britisher and one who had
served as a political adviser of
every Secretary-General since
the founding of the World
Organization, has termed his
former boss, Kurt Waldheim, a
"duplicitous megomaniac"
who has done immense
damage to the United Nations
and to those who have devoted
their lives to it."
This revelation comes from
one of the most distinguished
Under-Secretary-Generals the
UN has ever had. It is probably
the most damaging against the
former Austrian Nazi that has
come out. It highlights an in-
terview appearing in the cur-
rent issue of the Diplomatic
World Bulletin, edited by
Richard A. Holman and Jack
Barnes, which serves the UN
and international community.
Declares the publication:
"Brian Urquhart, who is
perhaps better qualified than
most to evaluate the five men
who have led the organization,
having worked for all of them
since he joined the UN straight
out of British military uniform
in 1945, bluntly calls
Waldheim a living lie for hav-
ing prevaricated about his
World War II service as an of-
ficer in Hitler's army."
Currentlv a Resident
Scholar of the Ford Founda-
tion, "Urquhart," the UN
bulletin notes, "lets his hair
down about the now President
of Austria and many other per-
sonalities in a fascinating
book. 'A Life in Peace and
jHfs^^fn^
This cartoon was made by the Hungarian-
American cartoonist ana author, Emery
Kelen, during Kurt Waldheim'8 first term as
UN Seeretary-GeneraL
War.' In his remarks about the
fourth Secretary-General, Ur-
quhart acknowledges that, like
virtually everyone in the
Secretariat, he was persuaded
by Waldheim's story that he
was wounded on the Soviet
Front in late 1941, invalided
out and spent the rest of the
war poring over his law books.
"When from time to time
there were unsubstantiated
stories or allegations about his
past," Urquhart states
"Waldheim invariably and
strongly reaffirmed this story;
but, his former aide em-
phasizes that "it is now clear
that Waldheim lied for almost
40 years about his war record,
presumably believing that the
truth would stand in the way
of his relentless pursuit of
public position and office." Ur-
quhart dismisses him as "an
energetic, ambitious
mediocrity."
The former British Under-
Secretary-General has some
harsh criticism for the Perma-
nent members of the Security
Council for having failed to
check the War Crimes Com-
mission files now to be open-
ed for broader access to
researchers, scholars and
press or their own records
"to discover if there was
anything unsuitable or ques-
tionable in this German Army
officer's past."
As this column has previous-
ly noted, there are some
historians who hold that the
Soviets who had strongly
supported the Austrian
against his strongest oppo-
nent, Ambassador Max Jakob-
son of Finland, a Jew and
Diamond City Deputy Mayor:
Cautious Patience For Peace Process
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
YITSCHAK BEN-GAD,
born in Tripoli, Libya and now
the deputy mayor of Netanya,
Israel's coastal "Diamond Ci-
ty," has a Hebrew word for
anyone who may be growing
impatient about the fluidity of
the Middle East peace process.
Savlanut!" he urges.
"Patience!"
Ben-Gad says patience may
be needed because the Israeli
coalition government that is
almost divided 50-50 about
how to approach the peace pro-
cess, may not change even
with new elections in Israel in
November 1988.
Ben-Gad, speaking to The
Jewish Floridian during a re-
cent stop in Miami, has spent
the last month in the United
States, giving some 50 lectures
coast-to-coast on the Middle
East.
He also spent part of his
American visit boosting
tourism in his city, rich in the
diamond industry, that sits on
the Mediterranean Sea. And
he came as a representative of
WOJAC (World Organization
of Jews from Arab Countries).
Ben-Gad's father was the
chief rabbi of the Jewish com-
munity of Tripoli. When Ben-
Gad was 11, his family made
aliyah to Israel.
As a delegate of WOJAC,
Ben-Gad says, "We came to
Washington to let the
American people know our
rights were not respected, our
property was confiscated and
we suffered misery and
humiliation and beating and
execution. We are calling on
the world to compensate Arab
Continued on Page 17
certainly some Yugoslavs and
even a few Americans, were
not ignorant of his Nazi war-
time record.
Author Brian Urquhart, who
had distinguished himself as
an officer during the allied in-
vasion of Germany and who
had vainly warned the British
against an aborted parachute
landing in Holland that turned
into a tragedy for the allies,
says that Waldheim had wor-
ried a lot about his public im-
age. "He was too anxious to be
given credit and tended to be
too accessible to the media .
His manner sometimes seemed
ingratiating, and he tried too
hard with too little to say. He
occasionally lost his temper
with journalists, with
disastrous results ..."
With the UN War Crimes
Files opened, the world will
learn for the first time the
complete facts relating to Kurt
Waldheim's World War II ac-
tivities in file 724.
Moreover, as Dr. Harris
Schoenberg, Director of the
UN Affairs, International
Council of B'nai B'rith, points
out, "the open files could pro-
ve an embarrassment to
governments that have relied
for support upon or employed
accused war criminals in sen-
sitive positions. The thorough
examination of these files," he
insists, "is vital for understan-
ding the past, punishing the
guilty, and deterring anyone
who would currently consider
genocide...
It is up to the present
Secretary-General to an-
Continued on Page 18
Yitschak Ben-Gad


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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 20, 1987
Refugees, Justice And Peace
One of Israel's greatest successes and one
of its greatest failures are linked, according
to its UN Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu. And together, success and
failure have permitted the case of the
Palestinian Arabs and their refugee
minority to masquerade as the crux of the
Arab-Israeli conflict.
The success was the absorption of more
than 600,000 of the 850,000 Jewish refugees
who fled from Arab countries in the years
immediately after the 1948 War of In-
dependence. The failure was in not focusing
world attention on this success while the
Arabs simultaneously converted the plight
of Palestinian Arabs (the total of 590,000 is
often used, but some believe even that
number was inflated) into the world's only
perpetual refugee problem.
Israel came to be seen as the dispossessor,
despite the fact that Jews left behind in
Arab lands an estimated $11 billion worth of
property five times that abandoned by
Palestinian Arabs. Thus, Israel's legitimacy
could be questioned and Arab refusal to
make peace could be validated.
To correct the historical record and
thereby to help set the stage for genuine
compromise and peace the World
Organization of Jews from Arab Countries
(WOJAC) held its third international con-
ference in Washington late last month. WO-
JAC met in London in 1975 and Paris in
1983.
Even inside Israel, the organization has
run into trouble. Chairman Leon Tamman
recalled Golda Meir's insistence that there
were no Jewish refugees, only immigrants
making aliyah. Before this gathering some
in the Foreign Ministry opposed the idea,
fearing it could disturb delicate Middle East
diplomacy, he said.
But Foreign Minister Shimon Peres over-
ruled them, and sounded a warning in the
Knesset about the remnant Jewish com-
munities still trapped in Syria, North Yemen
and elsewhere. In any case, Tamman said,
"it is not a question of (Arab-Israeli) conflict,
. but a lack of awareness of the barbaric treat-
ment" suffered by Jews from Arab lands.
"We want justice and nothing else."
Netanyahu told the delegates that while
Jews "spent our energies on making known
the calamity in Europe ... and the salvation
of Jews of the Soviet Union ... we did not
devote equal energy to this cause." He
argued that the saga of Jews from Arab
countries who emigrated to Israel is "enor-
mously powerful," especially compared to
the conscious decision of Arab nations to
leave the Palestinian Arab refugees "to
fester and rot" in camps as anti-Israeli
symbols.
Bat Ye'or, author of The Dhimmi: Jews
and Christians Under Islam,, touched on the
real crux of the Arab-Israeli conflict: the
Arab-Islamic belief "that Jews (and Chris-
tians) cannot be a sovereign people in the
Middle East..."
Underlying everything, she stressed, is
JT*v
the concept of jihad, still operative in the
Middle East. It not only means an Islamic
war, but also forms "part of a comprehen-
sive religious system which regulates the
relations between the Islamic community
and the non-Muslim peoples. Jihad is the
normal and permanent state of war between
the Muslim and non-Muslim territory."
Bat Ye'or called on Muslims to "examine
their own history of imperialism, oppression
and injustice" and on Arab intellectuals and
moderates to forsake the concept of jihad.
The first victims of failure to do so will not
be Israel, Arab Christians or the West, but
the Arab moderates themselves, she said.
Seymour Maxwell Finger, former senior
adviser to the U.S. Permanent Represen-
tative to the UN, pointed to numerous major
population exchanges in this century, in-
cluding Greeks and Turks, Hindus and
Moslems on the Indian subcontinent, and
ethnic Germans from Russia and Poland.
Only the Palestinian Arabs have gone into
the second and third generation of refugee
status, Finger said.
Near East Report
Tarantutas Receive Long-Awaited Visas
ike
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Friday, November 20,1987
Volume 13
28 HESHVAN 5748
Number 37
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Aba
and Ida Taratuta, at 14 years Len-
ingrad's reportedly longest-
awaiting refuseniks, received per-
mission to immigrate to Israel.
This latest development was
reported by Lynn Singer, ex-
ecutive director of the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry. The news about the
Taratutas was also announced by
the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
The Taratutas, both born in
August 1930, first applied to
emigrate in May 1973, and were
refused that August for reasons of
"secrecy." Both had to give up
their jobs: Aba's in applied
mathematics, Ida's as a translator
of scientific material at the Len-
ingrad Pedagogical Institute.
According to Singer, Aba
became the "support system and
one of the leading exponents of
aliyah in Leningrad, known
throughout the repatriation move-
ment" In 1977, militiamen inter-
rupted his unofficial math seminar
for Jews and demanded to see the
participants' identification.
The couple's son, Mikhail
(Miaha), a talented artist, was
denied entrance to a Leningrad
university in 1970, despite an ex-
emplary academic record at the
secondary school level. But in
August of this year, he was allow-
ed to immigrate to Israel. Last
month, he visited the United
States to work on his parents'
behalf.
The National Conference hailed
news of the Taratutas' impending
freedom. Noting that Aba was
"vilified in the Soviet press as a
'Zionist conspirator' because he
and his wife sought to immigrate
to Israel," the organization said.
"We hope that many others will
soon be given permission to
emigrate."
Singer also reported that Viktor
Pulmakht, a six-year refusenik,
received permission to emigrate
despite a "final refusal" in
December 1982, on the grounds of
"secrecy," along with his wife,
Maya.
However, their decision to leave
is colored by another recent
refusal for their daughter,
Miriam, who was turned down
along with her husband, Misha
Bialy, and their infant son.
There are now three genera-
tions of Bialys in refusal Misha,
his son and his parents, Leonid
and Judith. Judith Ratner Bialy's
ailing 82-year-old mother, Ktziya
Ratner, a Soviet emigre living in
Rehovot, Israel, has traveled ex-
tensively as a representative of
the Mothers for Freedom.
This week also saw more
refusals for long-term refuseniks
Benjamin Charny of Moscow, who
suffers from cancer and heart
disease, and whose daughter, An-
na Blank, and brother, Leon, live
in Needham, Mass.; Mark Terlit-
sky, also of Moscow, whose
brother, Leonard, now living in
New York, visited him and their
ailing mother in September and
chased down all reported
authorities to ask for permission
for his family.
These were cases supposedly be-
ing reviewed by the new Soviet re-
examination committee.
On Nov. 2, 62 refuseniks sent a
telegram to Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev and to Andrei
Gromyko, Communist Presidium
chairman and former foreign
minister.
The group's members stressed
that they had been waiting sue
months for answers to their latest
emigration requests and that
emigration authorities had reneg-
ed on one official's promise to res-
pond to the requests by Oct. 30.
Readers Write
Care At Morse Appreciated
EDITOR:
Oct. 29 was a happy day at
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. A Halloween party
and a birthday party for
residents born in October
brought fun, laughter, and en-
joyment to everyone.
As volunteers, my wife and I
observe many happy days in
the life of the Morse. This year
the residents' October birth-
day party had a special mean-
ing for us. The oldest celebrant
was our mother, the 99 year
old Honev Darvas. She is my
wife's mother but I call her my
mother-in-love.
We are grateful for the care
that is given to the residents of
the Morse. The spirit of
cooperation by all the ex-
ecutives, the staff, and the
volunteers make it possible
that with the medical care, the
activities programs, the
religious services, lectures,
sing-a-long sessions, etc, the
residents find a caring home.
DENNIS WILUNGEB
West Pal* Beach