The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00090

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text

THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
Jewish floridian
<^ M OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13 NUMBER 33
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23,1987
PRICE 40 CENTS
' ftWSftocftM
At UN
Arab Move Against Israel
Quashed By Large Margin
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General
Assembly voted 88-39 to reject
an Arab-sponsored move to
deny Israel its credentials.
There were 10 abstentions and
21 countries were absent The
margin of defeat was the
largest ever for the Arabs in
their early attempt to expel
Israel from the world
organization.
This year it took the form of
an eight-word amendment to a
resolution before the General
Assembly to accept collective-
ly the credentials of 115 UN
member states. The Arabs pro-
posed the phrase, "except with
regard to the credentials of
Israel," but the move was
overwhelmingly rejected.
Israeli diplomats, while very
much satisfied with the out-
come, expressed disappoint-
ment that the Soviet Union
continued to support the Arab
attempt to oust Israel. Israel
had specifically requested the
USSR change its position at a
meeting here between the
Israeli Ambassador to the UN,
Binyamin Netanyahu, and the
Soviet UN envoy, Alexander
Belongov.
Two Communist bloc coun-
Continued on Page 14
Avner Yaniv
Haim Snaked
Stephen R. Silberfarb
International Analysts To
Address Mideast Conference
Morse Campaign
Community Goal
Set At $4 Million
Three international analysts
will address the issues in the
Middle East, specifically the
conflicts faced by Israel today,
at the Mid-East Leadership
ternational analysts will give
our community an update on
these issues which have par-
ticular significance for us as
Americans, Jews and for the
Conference on Sunday, Nov. 8, State of Israel," Dr. Rattinger
9 a.m., at Temple Judea.
A $4,000,000 goal has been
established by the Community
Capital Campaign Committee
for the expansion of the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center of the Jewish Home for
the Aged of Palm Beach
County.
The goal was announced at'a
recent Campaign Committee
meeting and received the full
and enthusiastic support of
committee members.
"The needs of the elderly in
our Jewish community are
overwhelming. The demand
for long-term health care is
evidenced by the long waiting
list for admission to the Morse
[Geriatric Center. Therefore,
construction must begin im-
mediately on new and expand-
ed facilities," jointly stated
Community Co-Chairmen Alan
Gordon, Barbara Green and
I Myron Nickman.
"In order to realize the vi-
I sion of a comprehensive, state
I of the art geriatric center,
substantial dollars must be
raised. We look to the entire
Jewish community for its sup-
port in this effort," concluded
the Co-Chairmen.
$12.5 million has been raised
to date through the generosity
of many leaders in the com-
munity. It is anticipated that
an additional $1.5 million will
be raised in the Leadership
and Major Gift phases of the
drive.
The campaign goal of $4
million in the Community
phase will enable the Center to
reach its overall goal of $18
Continued on Page 10
"Israel at 40 Middle Age
Conflicts" will feature Avner
Yaniv, Professor of Political
Science, University of Haifa;
Professor Haim Shaked,
Visiting Professor of Middle
East Studies Institute, Univer-
sity of Miami; and Steven
Silberfarb, registered lobbyist
and legislative liaison for the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC).
The announcement of the
speakers was made by Dr.
Mark Rattinger, Chairman of
the Israel-Mideast Task Force
of the Community Relations
Council of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County.
"As Israel celebrates her 40th
anniversary, she continues to
be embroiled in conflicts affec-
ting her existence and political
stability. I am pleased that
these three distinguished in-
said.
Professor Yaniv will address
"Conflicts on the Road to
Peace" which will include the
peace process and Soviet
strategy. Professor Shaked in
his remarks concerning
"Conflicts From Within and
Without," will speak about im-
plications of the Pollard Case,
the Iran-Iraq War, and Jewish
pluralism. Mr. Silberfarb will
give us the latest information
on "Conflict on Capitol Hill -
A Behind the Scenes Look."
The three speakers will
engage in a dialogue and will
entertain questions.
Avnir Yaniv was born on
Mount Scopus, Jerusalem, in
1942. He attended school in
Israel and served in an elite
paratroop unit of the Israel
Defense Force. Since com-
pleting his doctorate at Ox-
ford, he has been Professor at
the Department of Political
Science at the University of
Haifa. Dr. Yaniv also has held
appointments as Senior Con-
sultant to the IDF General
Staff, lecturer at the Israeli
National Defense College, and
a visiting scholar at many
other universities throughout
the world. He is the author of
Dilemmas of Security, Deter-
rence Without The Bomb, and
Syria Under Assad.
Professor Haim Shaked,
born in Tel Aviv in 1939, was
educated at the Hebrew
University and received his
PhD degree from the School of
Oriental and African Studies
at the University of London.
He then joined Tel Aviv
University where he was Dean
of the Shiloah Center for Mid-
dle Eastern and African
Studies. On sabbatical leave,
he served as Interim Director
of the Center for Advanced In-
ternational Studies at the
University of Miami where he
developed the center into a
Graduate School of Interna-
Continued on Page 10
Federation/UJA Campaign
Women's B&P Campaign
Inside
Demographic Study...
page 3
Women's Division
President's Coffee...
page 3
Random Thoughts by
Muriel Levitt... page 5
The Jews of Argentina
...page6
Bosenthsl
The growth of the Business
and Professional Women's
Group of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach has mushroom-
ed over the past few years, ac-
cording to Ingrid Rosen thai,
Chairperson of the B and P
Women's Campaign.
"As a result of the women's
increased awareness and
responsibility towards the
needs of their fellow Jews, we
have become an integral part
of the Women's Division
Federation-United Jewish Ap-
d Campaign. This year we
m i to exceed our past efforts
and demonstrate that business
and professional women are
CoatiiMd m Pag* 12
Boynton Beach Council
The growth of the Jewish
population in Boynton Beach is
a challenge for the Boynton
Beach Council as it spearheads
the 1988 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Campaign in 12
affiliates in Boynton Beach
(excluding Hunters Run and
Indian Spring who conduct
their own Campaigns).
"Our Campaign did very
well last year as more and
more Jews are moving into
this area. We must redouble
our efforts this year to reach
out to all our new residents
and inform them of the needs
of Jews locally, in Israel, and
worldwide," stated Jerome
CMtiBMd ob Pag* 12
Gross


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Attorneys Contribute To
Success of
JCCampus Campaign
"We are delighted to add this
distinguished firm to our
growing list of business and
professional supporters. With
this contribution, they have
demonstrated their commit-
ment to the growth of the
Jewish community of the Palm
Beaches. We welcome other
business and professional
firms to join with Lewis,
Vegosen, Rosenbach and Fit-
zgerald in this community
building enterprise."
Mr. Vegosen and Mr. Rosen-
bach have chosen to dedicate
the Music Room in the new
Jewish Community Center to
be located on the Jewish Com-
munity Campus on Military
Trail and 12th Street. The
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
will also be housed on this site.
The law firm was established
14 years ago at the same time
that the Jewish Community
Center opened its doors. The
partners continue to be active
in civic and Jewish communal
affairs.
For more information, con-
tact Marjorie Scott, JCCam-
pus Campaign Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Dean Vegosen
Dean Vegosen and Dean
Rosenbach, Managing Part-
ners of the firm of Lewis,
Vegosen, Rosenbach and Fit-
zgerald, Attorneys-At-Law,
have made a significant con-
tribution in the name of their
firm to the Jewish Community
Campus Capital Campaign.
The announcement was
made by Gilbert Messing,
Chairman of the $12.5 million
fund raising drive, who said,
Some of the members of the Campaign
Committee for the Century Village 1988
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-
United Jewish Appeal Campaign met
recently at the Federation office to finalize
plans for the Century Village Campaign
Ki?koff. The Yiddish Culture Group of Cen-
tury Village will play host on Tuesday, Oct.
27, 10 a.m., at the Century Village
Auditorium. Cantor Norman Brody of Tem-
ple Beth El will be featured in a program of
Yiddish, Israeli, English, and cantorial
selections. Participating in the Campaign
Committee meeting are (left to right)
Shirley Piltch, area coordinator for Nor-
wich; Hank Grossman, Sam Wadler, and
Nat Cohen, Co-Chairmen of the CV Cam-
paign; Manny Appelbaum, area coordinator
for Wellington; and Dr. Lester Silverman,
Federation Campaign Associate.
vWvXvXv:*:*:^^
Jewish Community Campus
Building A Community
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Wacks have chosen to
dedicate a Drinking Fountain in the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Lampert have chosen to
dedicate the Auditorium Entrance Doors in the
Theatre Arts Wing of the Jewish Community
Center.
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Zeide have chosen to
dedicate the Nature Center of the Jewish Com-
munity Campus.
Lewis Vegosen Rosenbach and Fitzgerald P.A.,
have chosen to dedicate the Music Room in the
Cultural Wing of the Jewish Community Center.
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Shugarman have chosen to
dedicate a Sculpture in the Auditorium Lobby of
the Theatre Arts Wing of the Jewish Community
Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Brenner have chosen to
dedicate the Childrens' Museum in the Child
Development Center of the Jewish Community
Center.
Rabbi Reuven Kimelman, Chief Program
Associate of the National Center for Learn-
ing and Leadership, recently presented the
inaugural program ot the Meyer B. Siskin
Memorial Institute for Community Leader-
ship to the Board of Directors of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. The
same program, "Tzedakah Is Not Charity,"
was repeated for three other groups of
select community leaders. The next pro-
gram, "Who Is A Jew?", with Rabbi
Steven Greenberg, Program Associate at
CLAL, will be given Nov. 3-4. The series of
programs is being offered by the Federa-
tion's Human Resource Development Com-
mittee through the auspices of CLAL.
WE'RE BREAKING THE NEWS!
We're breaking ground!
NOVEMBER 22nd
JEWISH COMMUNITY CAMPUS
Israel Population
Is 4.375 Million
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
population of Israel is
estimated at 4,375,000 of
whom 3,590,000 are Jews, ac-
cording to figures released by
the Central Bureau of
Statistics.
The total population was up
by 1.4 percent since
September 1986 and the
Jewish population increased
by 1.1 percent. There were
nearly 100,000 births
registered during the last
Hebrew calendar year, three
quarters of them Jewish .
About 12,000 new immigrants
arrived during the year, com-
pared to 9,200 the previous
year.
According to the Bureau,
nearly two million Israelis
45 percent live in 11 cities of
100,000 population or more.
Jerusalem is the largest with a
population of about 477,000
persons, followed by Tel Aviv
with 318,000 and Haifa with
223,000. The populations of
both of the latter two cities
have been declining.
Century Village
Jewish Federation
Of Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Campaign
Century Village is proud of its continuing prestigious
role in the UJA Campaign. With 4,000 contributors, we
have set the standard for other large condominium
areas.
WE NEED YOUR HELP to contact 3,000 unit owners in
CV, especially in Bedford, Camden, Kent, Waltham,
Windsor and Salisbury.
Our Century Village UJA Campaign Committee
Gertrude Bimback, Joe Weiner. Jack Appelbaum, Max Lubech, Aba
T22?m2? B#m,,tn- Lou Parlman. Jack Stern. Sol Margolle,
Eddie Starr. May LaVlna, Bamay Cohan, Bob Cahn, Lou Schaffrank,
Joe Don, Shirley Pilch, Joe Fuaa, Tlllie Backer, Sarah and Jacob
Nueabaum. Bertha Goldman, Colaman Sussman, Ada Columbua,
efT* >.[.""' V,c,or *"**, Mantrad Hammelburger, Ida Barton,
Elsie Shmukler, Manny Appelbaum.
I WILL HELP. Call me. ._________
(name)
(phone)
Please return to: Sam Wadler, Hank Grossman, and
Nat Cohen, Co-Chairmen
CV United Jewish Appeal
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
832-2120


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Length of Residence in 5-9 Years ^k Palm Beach County 0-4 Years
^ | 30% | 24%

\ ^^^SSm 20+ Years 8% \ 25% 111111^ 10-14 Years""-----------^15-19 Years 13%
Women's Division
New Educational Forum
To Be Previewed
At Presidents' Coffee
From The Demographic Study
Palm Beaches Differ From
Other Communities
(Continued from last week)
When Jewish people move to
the Palm Beaches (Boynton
Beach to Jupiter/Tequesta),
they come with every intention
of staying which makes this
community quite different
from 15 other comparison
cities. This finding and others
contained in a summary report
of the Demographic Study
undertaken by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County were presented to the
Federation's Board of Direc-
tors this past week-end during
a Board Retreat.
"By studying the summary
report, we are learning that
we have a diverse community
which is not like any other
Jewish population," stated
Stanley Brenner, Chairman of
the Demographic Study Com-
mittee. "Federation, along
with its agencies, synagogues,
and other organizations, will
be studying these findings in
detail over the next year so
that it can begin the process of
prioritizing the areas which
will demand our attention in
the coming years."
The study found that 88 per-
cent of the Jewish population
of the Palm Beaches lave no
plans to move over the next
three years. This was followed
by St. Paul (86 percent),
Cleveland (84 percent), Miami
(70 percent), and Washington
D.C. (45 percent), the lowest
rate in the study.
Conversely, only 2 percent
of the Jewisn population of the
Palm Beaches expect to move
out of the metropolitan area
within the next three years.
This is the lowest of any com-
parison city. Ranking closest
are Miami and Minneapolis
with 5 percent. On the other
end of the scale, Baltimore
Jewish residents are most like-
ly to move out of the
metropolitan area (3 percent)
with Cleveland falling in the
Middle with 7 percent.
This characteristic of the
Jewish population in the Palm
Beaches may be influenced by
the fact that a considerable
number of persons have spent
part of the year in Palm Beach
County prior to settling here
permanently, according to Dr.
Ira Sheskin, Associate Pro-
fessor of Geography at the
University of Miami and Direc-
tor of the Demographic Study.
"In addition, the high percen-
tage of elderly implies a low
percentage of expected moves,
since many moves are
engendered by a change in job
or family size," he said.
Respondents were asked
whether they consider
themselves Orthodox, Conser-
vative, Reform, or "Just
Jewish.'' This is a
philosophical definition, and
fEOfi
1988 CAMPAIGN
MAJOR EVENTS
^0ACVAC
OCTOBER
Oct. 27 Century Village Campaign Kickof f
NOVEMBER
Nov. 12 Banyan Springs Wine and Cheese Reception
Nov. 15 Campaign Leadership Institute
Nov. 16 Women's Division B&P Campaign Event
DECEMBER
Dec. 6 Boynton Beach Campaign Breakfast
Dec. 12 MAJOR GIFTS EVENT
Dec. 20 Village Roy ale on the Green Breakfast
not one that is necessarily bas-
ed upon synagogue member-
ship. The Palm Beaches tie
with San Francisco and
Washington D.C. with only 3
percent identifying themselves
as Orthodox. Cleveland has 9
percent, New York 13 percent,
and Baltimore with 20 percent
has the highest number of Or-
thodox Jews.
To maintain a flourishing Or-
thodox community, certain
types of support institutions
are needed. "A community
with Orthodox synagogues, a
mikvah, plentiful kosher but-
chers and kosher eating
establishments serves as a
magnet for observant Jews.
These are not found in any
great numbers in the Palm
Beaches as yet. Additionally, a
second generation Jewish
population, of which this com-
munity is comprised, is
feneraUy not Orthodox," Dr.
heskin explained.
The level of religious obser-
vance for the Jewish Dopula-
Continued on Page 12
Debby Brass
The Presidents of all the
Jewish women's organizations
in the Palm Beaches will be the
first to hear about the new
Educational Forum being
presented this year by the
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
In making the annoucement,
Debby Brass, Chairman of the
coffee, said, "We look forward
to welcoming all the
Presidents for 'coffee and
bagels' on Thursday, Nov. 12,
10 a.m. at the Lowe's
Auditorium, Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center, 4847 Fred
Gladstone Drive, West Palm
Beach. At this time we will
preview our exciting plans
about this year's two-part
Educational Forum."
Mrs. Brass was appointed to
this position by Deborah
Schwarzberg, Education Vice
President, who said, "Having
worked in many organizations
throughout the Jewish com-
munity in addition to Women's
Division, Debby is well
qualified to bring together the
leadership of this community's
Jewish women's organiza-
tions. As she has shown in the
past, education is also very im-
portant to her. Therefore, we
are pleased that she is com-
bining Her many talents to
chair this day."
Debby Brass, a former Co-
Chairman of the Women's
Division Jewish Women's Day
Assembly, is a member of the
Board of Directors of the
Jewish Community Center.
She has been very active in the
Jewish community. She ia a
former President of Bat
Gurion Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah and is active on the
Angel of Mercy Luncheon
Committee. Mrs. Brass is a
past member of the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School and of the
Florida Central Region of
Hadassah. She has been in-
volved with Women's Division
for many years and served as
Secretary of the Board of
Directors as well as having
worked with the Jewish
Women's Assembly.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Stoller, Women's
Division Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Archaeological
Find
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
huge earthen ware vessel from
the period of the First Temple
was excavated at Ophel, just
below the Temple Mount here
by a team of Hebrew Universi-
ty archaeologists headed by
Eilat Mazer.
BUILDING A COMMUNITY... A PLACE FOR US
THESE PEOPLE ARE HELPING TO BUILD
The Jewish Community Campus
HOME OF THE
Jewish Community Center *
Jewish Family And Children's Service
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Is Your Name Here???
Partial Listing
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Brass
Mr. Sidney Faber
Mr. Arthur Fillbrunn
Dr. and Mrs. Roger Freilich
Mr. Stanford Goldwater
Betty Haaa
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Jonas
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Miller
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Singer
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Steinberg
Lewie Vegosen Rosenbach
& Fitzgerald P.A.
PLUS DOZENS MORE CARING PEOPLE WHOSE NAMES
WILL APPEAR IN THE WEEKS TO COME
Don't Be Left Out!
Call the JCCampus Campaign Office, 832-2120\
* Known as YW-YMH A's in many communities.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friclitfr, October 23, 1987
Open Up the Nazi Archives
The United States should take an active
role in supporting Israel's bid to open the
United Nations' Archives on Nazi War
Crimes.
Already, a clear majority of those nations
which participated in a decision after World
War II to keep the contents secret has
declared it no longer opposes their
disclosure.
Israel's ambassador to the UN, Benjamin
Netanyahu, points out disturbing events
around the globe denying the extent of the
Holocaust, contending even in a London
play that Shoah was a joint conspiracy of the
Nazis and Zionists.
Nothing can be lost by opening the files. In
the past 40 years, the files have been used to
try only three accused Nazi criminals for
criminal war acts.
Equally as important as potential prosecu-
tion of some Nazis who may still be alive and
unpunished is the documentation to the
world of the systematic destruction of Euro-
pean Jewry.
We can learn the final disposition of entire
Jewish communities seized by the Nazis, ob-
tain new details on the death camps in-
cluding lists of staff members of the Ger-
mans who tortured and imprisoned the six
million.
The Secretary General of the UN has con-
vened a meeting to discuss the opening of
the Archives. He should not give serious
consideration to a suggestion that they be
made available to nations such as Israel, but
that the contents cannot be published.
While the possibility of finding more
specific information on Kurt Waldheim is
sum, there is much to be uncovered in these
records which were maintained even as the
Holocaust continued until the end of the
war.
America should take the lead in champion-
ing this fight.
An Old Alliance Worts Again
With the rejection of Judge Robert Bork
assured, this is an appropriate time to ex-
amine the revival of the alliance which pro-
vided the margin in the bitter fight on Presi-
dent Reagan's nominee for the Supreme
Court.
The overwhelming number of Jewish,
Black, labor and women's organizations
which actively opposed the Bork nomination
formed the most unified effort since the
height of the civil rights movement a
quarter of a century ago.
It is significant that Judge Bork's pro-
testations that the right of privacy is not
guaranteed by the Constitution tipped the
balance against him.
Because of that issue alone, the coalition
which aligned against his confirmation was
justified. Also important to bring to the
debate were Bork's judicial decisions and
writings which in almost every case tilted
strongly against the rights of individuals.
Typically, right-wing proponents of Bork
are assailing what they see as an unholy war
on the part of their traditional targets the
American Civil Liberties Union, the AFL-
CIO, the NAACP and the National
Organization for Women (NOW).
They do not single out Jewish groups for
the same condemnation, because they no
longer are considered an automatic ally of
what they term the liberal pressure lobby.
Once again, Florida's U.S. Senators
Lawton Chiles and Bob Graham lined up on
the proper side. They opposed the Bork
nomination on the basis of nis view that only
limited protection for individual liberties
and freedom can -be found in the
Constitution.
They rejected Judge Bork's contention
that judicial restraint was mandated by the
"original intent" of our Founding Fathers.
Let'a unite and mzrck\ j
onjeritfalem/^y
On one point, we agree with Judge Bork.
He deserves a final yea-or-nay vote from the
Senate. And so do the American people.
Repeal the Service Tax
The Florida legislature acted with proper
speed in plugging the loophole in recent law
which permitted citizens to carry firearms,
openly displayed.
Hopefully, legislators acted quickly
enough to negate a Dodge City image being
added to the picture of drug war shootouts
which the name "Miami" symbolizes to so
many nationwide.
But why the delay in discarding the ill-
advised tax on such services as advertising
which daily adds to the toll of cancelled con-
ventions and irrevocably lost millions to our
state?
Surely, the legislature and Governor Bob
Martinez can sense the outrage of the public
at large about the services tax.
It is unfortunate that it is taking so long to
implement the public weal and wishes.
America In The Gulf:
Where Does Israel Fit In?
By JOSEPH ALPHER
By agreeing to reflag
Kuwaiti tankers and escort
them through Persian Gulf
waters with U.S. Navy ships,
the United States embarked
upon a complex adventure,
and with doubtful partners:
the ail-too willing Russians,
the reticent Gulf Arabs, and
the essentially indifferent in-
dustrial states of Western
Europe and Japan. Where, if
at all, does Israel fit in?
It was during the Carter ad-
ministration that America,
alarmed by events in
Afghanistan, Iran, and the
Horn of Africa, established a
regional command to oversee
American interests in the Gulf
region. This was done primari-
ly for the strategic purpose of
deterring or countering Soviet
military offensive moves into
the region. The prospect of
Soviet strategic gains at
America's expense has been
the main American worry
regarding the Gulf since Kho-
meini's rise to power in
January 1979; certainly since
the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq
war in September 1980. In-
deed, it was this very concern
that prompted National
Security Advisor Robert
McFarlane and his team to at-
tempt to cultivate elements in
the Iranian leadership that
ostensibly shared U.S. fears of
Soviet encroachment: the
fiasco known today as
Irangate.
Now the American regional
command, known as CENT-
COM, finds itself facing off
against, not the USSR, but
Iran. Instead of risking
American lives to protect the
Gulf with its vital oil
reserves from Soviet en-
croachment, it is risking them
against Iran. And while the
defense of freedom of naviga-
Commentary
tion is an honorable task, this
is being done at a time when oil
from sources outside the Gulf
is so plentiful that America's
allies are plainly uninterested
in supporting the American ef-
fort. Finally, the entire opera-
tion appears to have been
cleverly orchestrated by a
neutral Gulf Arab state,
Kuwait, in order to advance its
essentially understandable,
even admirable, goal of bring-
ing an end to the Gulf war. In
so doing Kuwait has been en-
couraged by both pro-Soviet
Iraq and pro-American Saudi
Arabia.
To add irony upon irony,
America's anti-Soviet force in
the Gulf now also finds itself
collaborating in an anti-
Iranian role with none other
than the Soviet Union; the
Kuwaitis have arranged for
both superpowers to escort
their tankers. Of course, there
is some historical precedent
for this situation: during
World Wars I and II, the
Soviet Union and the western
powers collaborated to deal
with the challenge of Iran
whose strategic location, then
as now, made it an asset not to
be ignored.
It is against this backdrop
that the Reagan administra-
tion would like Israel to relax
its opposition to the supply of
sophisticated American arms
to Saudi Arabia. That opposi-
tion is ably represented by
AIPAC the pro-Israel lobby
and by a large number of
Continued on Page 5
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Friday, October 23,1987
Volume 13
30TISHRI5748
Number 33


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Random Thoughts
By MURIEL LEVITT
I was raised with a true
depression mentality. Having
grown up during the 1930's
when a dollar was mighty
tight, I quickly learned the
value of a buck, and how to run
a household on almost nothing.
The qualified professor who
taught me all this was none
other than my clever mother.
No Jewish housewife ever ac-
complished more, produced
tastier meichles, and enter-
tained larger groups on less
money. She was truly a
domestic miracle maker.
The undeniable basis for all
the above was one Bronx
homemaker's search for
bargains. This was no passing
fancy but rather an all-
consuming desire to get more
During a recent meeting of
the Holocaust Survivors of
the Palm Beaches, President
Ed Lefkowitz announced
that the group is dedicating
their entire fund raising ef-
forts over the next five years
to the Jewish Community
Campus Capital Campaign.
They will dedicate the
Holocaust Memorial/Ar-
chives which will be located
on the JCCampus on Military
Trail and 12th Street. In ad-
dition, they will donate the
bulk of their current treasury
to the $12.5 million fund rais-
ing drive. The announcement
was made after a presenta-
tion by Rabbi Alan Sherman,
Chaplain and Community
Relations Director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, and Marjorie
Scott, Director of the
JCCampus Capital
Campaign.
than your money's worth when
you went shopping. How many
of you remember Orchard
Street in Manhattan or
Bathgate Avenue in the
Bronx? In those days, pushcart
heaven was the mecca for
smart bargain hunters. Come
to think of it, even all-rightniks
made safari to the hinterlands
seeking extraordinary values.
I remember mother buying a
pretty china cup and saucer off
a pushcart for ten cents. She
loved the set and every time
she used it she would say, "I
could kick myself for not buy-
ing more!" We kids always
referred to it as the "kick
myself' cup. Haven't you had
the experience yourself ...
finding a bargain, being afraid
it was too good to be true, not
buying enough, and then kick-
ing yourself For being so dense.
The necessity for frugality
certainly was prevalent in
mother's kitchen. After
Pesach we ate matzos for mon-
ths and choked on macaroons
like forever because these
items were always reduced
after the holiday. One summer
my mother bought a bushel of
"touched" peaches. We ate
compote, peach pie, peach
cake, and peach jam until we
were all peached out. But
economy was the by-word in
most Jewish homes during the
long depression
Very often bargains were
not really bargains when the
stuff turned out to be damaged
or seconds. The customer
needed four eyes to scrutinize
New Air Force Chief
Takes Command
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Maj.
Gen. Avihu Bin-Nun, a
Harvard-educated flying ace
credited with downing a
Soviet-piloted MIG over Egypt
17 years ago, took command of
the Israel Air Force in
ceremonies at an Air Force
base in southern Israel.
He succeeded Maj. Gen.
Amos Lapidot who is retiring
after 34 years in the military,
the last five as Air Force com-
mander. Bin-Nun, 48, married
with five children, was born in
Israel. He received a
Continued on Page 13
the merchandise and be cer-
tain that everything was as
represented. A tradesman had
to be a pretty slippery
character to put one over on a
sharp Jewish housewife.
My father's true aim in life
was to make my mother hap-
py. On one of his trips to the
East Bronx he bought her ten
quarts of strawberries for ten
cents a quart. She was in her
glory, cooking and baking
away while boasting to the
neighbors about her marvelous
bargain. In order to cash in on
this bonanza, they too went to
Bathgate Avenue. Lo and
behold, the ten cent strawber-
ries really cost 40 cents which
they were loathe to pay.
Daddy's big lie was really a
small fib to give mother per-
sonal pleasure because he
knew that getting a fabulous
buy kept her delighted for
days.
And are we so very dif-
ferent? Don't you kvell when
you get something you con-
sider a steal? Doesn't it warm
the hartz when you can tell
your friends that you've saved
a bunch on a clever purchase?
Isn't bargain hunting the
name of the game when you
stroll through a mall on a
chmarneh afternoon? We are
all shvesters in the same shop-
ping sorority.
Speaking of malls, I have a
theory that today's shopping
mall is a direct lineal descen-
dant of Bathgate Avenue and
Orchard Street. Instead of
pushcarts there are classy lit-
tle boutiques. Instead of heavi-
ly accented vendors, there are
trendy frenchies. Instead of
hot dog wagons, there are
posh gourmet eateries. As for
nonest-to-goodness money sav-
ing values, I am sad to say they
are almost part of the past. We
pay heavily for those carpeted
floors, that muted music and
the comfy air conditioning. I
guess it's all in the name of
progress and sophistication.
As for me, I'd sure like to
stroll once more among the
noisy crowds, eating an ear of
buttered hot corn, sniffing all
the divine smells, and shlepp-
ing my shopping bag filled
with cheapo purchases. It may
never, ever happen again, but
I can dream, can't I?
America In The Gulf
Continued from Page 4
senators and congressmen
who support Israel. Lately it
has also been fueled by a sense
in Washington that the Saudis
and their Gulf allies are less
than cooperative when it
comes to helping the U.S. help
them. Even pro-Saudi ad-
vocates had to note the Saudi
Air Force's reluctance to give
chase to the Iraqi attack jet
that crippled the USS Stark,
and the Saudi regime's refusal
to grant the U.S. basing
rights. The Reagan ad-
ministration argues that
enhanced arms supplies to the
Saudis would better enable
this American ally to protect
the Gulf, and might thereby
obviate the need for pro-
western Arab states to turn to
the Soviet Union. Israel, as a
strategic ally of the U.S., is
asked to show greater
understanding for this
American need.
Yet, given the recent series
of events in the Gulf, and in
view of the fact that even Con-
gress is demanding a greater
show of goodwill on the part of
the Gulf Arabs, isn't Israel
also justified in asking that the
Kuwaitis, and Saudis make
some small gesture to en-
courage Arab moderation in
the Arab-Israel conflict? Could
not the Saudis, for example,
show more support for the Jor-
danian peace initiative? Or
stop paying the PLO protec-
tion money? Or cease pro-
viding financial support for
Syria until it mends its pro-
Soviet, pro-Iranian and pro-
terrorist ways? Washington
would do well to exploit the
current plight of its friends in
the Gulf to encourage them to
send positive signals to Israel
rather than to complain that
Israel is foiling the Amerian
design to supply them more
weapons.
If Irangate demonstrated
the bankruptcy of American
(and Israeli) strategic thinking
regarding Iran, the current
situation in the Gulf appears to
show that the fuzzy underpinn-
ings of Irangate continue to
distort American strategic
thinking regarding the entire
Gulf question. Israel and its
supporters are justified in
pointing out the Israel's real
value as a strategic ally of the
U.S. has been well manifested
by the dubious and confused
actions of America's Arab
friends in the Gulf.
ISRAEL SCENE
Actress Liv I llmann holds up an Ida Nudel T-shirt on the
newly dedicated Liv I llmann Terrace at the Jerusalem
Cinematheque, where Ullmann's latest film "Moscow
Farewell," based on Soviet refusenik Nudel's life was
screened, "I have made many films but very few have been so
important to me," said I llmann. On the right of the picture is
liana Friedman, Ida Nudel's sister, who is an official of
Na'amat in Israel.
Chinese Scientists
May Reciprocate Visits
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Scientists in China are intense-
ly interested in Israeli science
and may be coming to Israel in
the not too distant future to in-
vestigate it at first hand, Haifa
University mathematics Prof.
Jonathan Golan said here
recently on his return from a
visit to the People's Republic
of China.
is well known to the Chinese
and their books and research
papers are to be found in every
university there, Golan said.
He said he was invited by the
Popular University in Beijing
one of 17 in China's capital
and traveled as an in-
dividual, not a group membei
to attend a conference there.
Israelis in various fields who
have gone to China traveled as
The work of Israeli scientists Continued on Page 10
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
k-
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MOSAIC Sunday, Oct. 25,11 a
5 with host Barbara Gordon Green.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Oct. 25, 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340
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Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, Oct. 25, 11 p.m. -
Monday-Wednesday Oct. 25-28, 2 p.m. WVCG 1080
AM This two hour national Jewish entertainment show
features Jewish music, comedy, and news.
'Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
October 24
Federation Leadership Development Program 8 p.m.
Federation Vanguard Mission through Nov. 4.
October 25
Congregation Aitz Chaim 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth El -
Seminar "Human Sexuality" 11:30 a.m. Jewish Com-
munity Center "Daddy and Me" (Keren Orr Pre-School)
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood 10 a.m.
October 26
Federation Women's Division Business and Profes-
sional Campaign Worker Training 5:30 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Women-Boynton Beach 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth
Zion Men's Club 12:45 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women-
Menorah board -10 a.m. Women's American ORT-Mid
Palm -1 p.m. Jewish Community Center No School Holi-
day Program Brandeis University Women's Committee -
Study Group -1 p.m. Federation Building Committee -
7-10 p.m.
October 27
Hadassah-Tikvah Epcot through Oct. 29 Na'Amat USA-
Sharon board -10 a.m. Temple Beth Torah Men's Club -
board 8 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group-Century Village -10
a.m. Federation Century Village Campaign Kickoff
Federation Human Resource Development 7:30 p.m.
October 28
UJA Women's Division Annual Fall Leadership Mission
Federation Board of Directors 8 p.m. Hadassah-
Shalom board 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT-Lake
Worth West 12:30 p.m. Hadassah-Lee Vassii 12:30
p.m. Women's American ORT-No. Palm Beach County
region 9:30 a.m. National Council of Jewish Women-
Palm Beach Jewish Heritage Tour 9 a.m. Na'Amat
USA-Golda Meir 15th Birthday Luncheon noon Yiddish
Culture Group-Cresthaven 1 p.m. Federation -
Women's Division Business and Professional Steering
Committee 5:30-7:30 p.m.
October 29
Na'Amat USA-Palm Beach Council S.E. meeting Miami
Beach Federation Women's Division Outreach Cof-
fee with Temple Beth David Sisterhood 8 p.m.
Federation Jewish Education Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Federation Mid East Task Force Meeting 12:30 p.m.
October 30
Temple Beth El Scholar in Residence Federation -
October 31
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The Jews Of Argentina:
Not Strangers In The Land
By AVIVA CANTOR
(Part One In A Series)
BUENOS AIRES (JTA)
With the dawn of
democracy in Argentina, this
country's Jews have plunged
into a struggle to work out a
question they have not actively
discussed in the past half-
century: how involved should
Jews be as a community with
the general society and its
pressing concerns?
And, in trying to determine
the degree of their involve-
ment with Argentine society,
Jews are also engaged in a
debate on a related and equally
controversial issue: what kind
of communal structure is most
appropriate for their relation-
ship with the general society:
monolithic or pluralistic;
speaking with one voice (as it
has done officially until recent-
ly) or many?
The flashpoint for this
debate is an issue that has
engaged all Argentineans
since the 1983 elections that
brought Raul Alfonsin and his
Radical Civic Union Party to
office after the nightmare of
terror under the eight-year
junta rule ended: How
"invested" should they be in
the new democracy, given the
fact that all elected govern-
ments of the past 50 years
have been overthrown by
coups? How much support
should they lend to it, and now
should this support be
expressed?
Amalia Saionx de Polack,
president of Argentine WIZO
and vice president of the
DAIA (Delegation de Asocia-
ciones Israelitas Argentinas),
the officially recognized
political umbrella organization
for Argentine Jewry, told a
delegation of North American
Jewish journalists and com-
munal leaders who recently
visited the country under the
auspices of Aerolinas Argen-
tinas (the government airline)
that "For the first time,
Argentina is trying to imple-
ment a democratic system.
The country is a social
laboratory. People who come
from the roots of a Spanish-
Catholic-Indian system (which
did not tolerate) a lot of dif-
ferent opinions are trying to
grow up and be a democratic
country."
Background Of The Debate
The debate on how far to go
in support of the new
democracy takes place against
the backdrop of political
developments that appear to
place it at risk. These include
the dissatisfaction of the arm-
ed forces with the trials of of-
ficers who perpetrated human
rights atrocities during the
reign of terror, and the
pressure the military has plac-'
ed on the government to be
done with such trials; and
Argentina's severe economic
crisis.
Both of these elements go
hand in hand, because an
unresolved economic crisis
could destabilize the regime to
the point where the armed
forces would have the support
of some sectors of the public
for taking over, as has happen-
ed so many times in the past.
A 36-year-old man who said
he had lived only one-sixth of
his life under democracy told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy at a Latin American Jewish
Congress meeting with the
North American delegation
that "the entire community is
very shaky. No one knows
what will happen next month."
Argentine Jews, in interviews
with JTA, spoke of ||a per-
vasive sense of unease," and of
feeling nervous, fearful and
"psychologically depressed."
While all Argentineans live
with this sword of Damocles
hanging over them, Jews
especially feel its presence
consciously and acutely. While
the junta did not touch any
Jewish institutions during its
reign, many Jews remember
all too well that Jews con-
stituted a disproportionate
number of the estimated
30,000 desaparecidos (people
who were "disappeared" and
are presumed murdered), and
that Jews who disappeared or
who were imprisoned were
subjected to worse mistreat-
ment than non-Jews.
A Contentious Issue
The question Jews are strug-
gling with, therefore, is not
whether to support the new
democracy which the over-
whelming majority do but
how far to go in expressing
their support. The continuum
of opinion ranges from that of
the leaders of DAIA, which is
careful and cautious whenever
a communal response is called
for, to the vibrant Hebraica
community center, which
takes out newspaper ads in
support of democracy and
human rights and whose
members march with those of
the Conservative Comunidad
Beth El and the small and mili-
tant Jewish Human Rights
Movement (JHRM) in public
demonstrations.
Given the wide range of opi-
nion in the community as to
how far to go in support of
democracy, the various Jewish
institutions in Argentina differ
sharply, as well, on the ques-
tion of pluralism inside the
community. While all parties
to the debate argue than their
approach lends itself best to
Continued on Page 17
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Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Some Refuseniks to Receive Visas
NEW YORK In September
several prominent and longtime
refuseniks in the Soviet Union
were told they had received per-
mission to emigrate.
The list, an impressive one, in-
cludes Yosif Begun, Viktor
Brailovsky, Vladimir Lifshitz,
Arkady Mai, Lev Sud and Semyon
Yantovsky. Information comes
from Israel Radio, the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry and the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
Also Vladimir Prestin, Boris
Kun, Evgenya Palanker, Emma
Landsman and Valery Lerner.
Begun, 55, a Moscow
mathematician, lost his job when
he first applied to emigrate in
1971. He is the best known of the
group of Clandestine teachers of
Hebrew and was sentenced to
more than three years in prison on
charges of anti-Soviet activities.
Begun was recently refused per-
mission once more to teach
Hebrew. He and his wife, Inna,
have a son, Boris.
In an interview with Israel
Radio, Begun said he was elated,
but at the same time "suffering"
over the fact that Ida Nudel and
many other refuseniks were still
trapped in the Soviet Union."We
have to work together" for their
A Controversial Water Project
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration
expressed its objections earlier
this month to supplying Israel
or Jewish settlements in the
West Bank with any water
found through a proposed drill-
ing project east of Bethlehem.
An American company,
Moriah Energy and
Technology Corp., of
Englewood, Colorado, plans to
drill for the water using un-
tried and expensive methods in
an effort to tap an
underground sea.
"We have expressed our
deep concern to the govern-
ment of Israel about the pro-
ject and have asked for more
information," State Depart-
ment deputy spokesperson
Phyllis Oakley said.
"As a general principle we
believe the resources of the
territory should be used for
the benefit of the Palestinian
inhabitants and should not be
removed from the territory."
Oakley added that "we
understand some portion of
the water would be channeled
to Israeli settlements in the oc-
cupied territory. Our position
on settlements is already on
Israel Fights
Drug Abuse
By Its Youth
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Education Ministry and the
police have joined forces to
combat one of the most urgent
problems confronting Israeli
society the prevention of
drug abuse by the country's
youth.
The Ministry and police an-
nounced after a meeting at na-
tional police headquarters in
Jerusalem the establishment
of a joint team to consolidate a
comprehensive education and
information policy on drug use
and to coordinate with the
various other authorities deal-
ing with the issue. The
meeting was attended by
Education Minister Yitzhak
Navon and Police Inspector-
General David Kraus and their
senior aides.
An estimated 15,000 persons
in Israel are totally addicted to
drugs and more than 150,000
are one-time, occasional or
constant users. Almost all
criminal offenders are drug
users and criminal acts to
finance the purchase of drugs
are increasing.
Continued on Page 16
the record."
The Administration has op-
posed the establishment of
Jewish settlements in the
West Bank, maintaining they
are unhelpful to the peace
process.
Moriah is headed by Gilman
Hill, a fundamentalist Chris-
tian who plans to finance the
project through investors from
the United States, presumably
fellow fundamentalists. He
was quoted in The Washington
Post as saying "this project
will be difficult to accomplish
without a major miracle of
God" and that he is engaged in
a religious pursuit to provide
water for the Holy Land.
The issue of water in the
thirsty region has been a major
bone of contention since Israel
took over the West Bank in
1967. West Bank Arabs have
charged that most of the water
is being diverted for use in
Israel of the Jewish
settlements.
The Moriah project is con-
troversial within the Israeli
government, but was approv-
ed on condition that priority
would be given to Arab needs.
release, he said in a live-broadcast
Shone conversation with Labor
[ember of Knesset Ora Namir,
who recently visited him in
Moscow as part of a delegation of
Israeli women to a women's
conference.
He said he did not yet known
when he would make aliyah, but
expected "to wind up my affairs in
Moscow and leave soon."
Begun's cousin in Brooklyn,
Chaim Tepper, said he didn't want
these releases to be considered
more than symbolic. "We want to
see an ongoing, continuous flow of
refuseniks being allowed to leave
the Soviet Union," he said.
Tepper was about to give New
York Gov. Mario Cuomo two
machzorim (prayer books for the
High Holy Days) to take with him
on his upcoming trip to the USSR.
The machzorim are word-for-
mouth translations from Hebrew
to English. "We want to have a
similar book printed from Hebrew
to Russian for continuing educa-
tion of those Jews who remain
behind. That's what Begun
wants," said Tepper.
Brailovsky, 52, a Moscow
cyberneticist, first applied for an
exit visa in October 1972. His first
refusal was in January 1973. He
was arrested in November 1980,
charged with defaming the Soviet
state and sentenced to five years'
internal exile. He was released in
March 1984. His wife, Irina, will
reportedly accompany him, along
with their son, Leonid, 26; his
wife, Elena; and their 2-month-old
son, David.
Sud, 30, and his wife, Ala, 31, of
Moscow, were first refused in
August 1985. Ala is the sister of
Yuri Shtern, spokesman of the
Soviet Jewry Information and
Education Center in Jerusalem.
They have a daughter, Maryam, 7.
Lev, a musician, and Ala, a com-
puter programmer, are observant
Jews.
Lifshitz, 46, of Leningrad was
also notified Monday, according to
the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry. Lifshitz was first refused
Jan. 1, 1981. A systems analyst
and mathematician, he lost his job
as head of the division of economic
forecasting at the All-Union
Scientific Research Institute for
the Jewelry Industry.
He was arrested Jan. 8, 1986,
after staging several hunger
strikes. A Hebrew teacher and
cultural activist in Leningrad, Lif-
shitz was sentenced March 19,
1986, to three years in prison for
anti-Soviet slander, based on let-
ters he had written to friends in
the West, as well as to then Israeli
Prime Minister Shimon Peres and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Women's Division Holds Board Retreat
The Evolution Of Jewish Women'
The Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County recently held a Board Retreat entitled "The
Evolution of Jewish Women" at the Bear Lakes Country
Club. Ruth Wilensky (seated, left) served as Chairman of the
day and Marcia Shapiro (seated, right) is Leadership
Development Vice President. Standing (left to right) are
Sheila Engelstein, Campaign Vice President; guest speaker
Barbara Steinberg, Director of the Jewish Community Day
School, who presented "Jewish Women in the Bible and
Jewish Women Today"; Carol Greenbaum, President; and
guest speaker Carol Effrat, Florida Regional Director of
United Jewish Appeal, who addressed "The Role of Jewish
Women of Today And Tomorrow in our Evolving Society."
Not pictured is guest speaker Dr. Elliot Schwartz, Interim
Director of Jewish Education, Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, who spoke about "An Historical Perspective
of the Role Jewish Women Played in History."
Members of the Executive Committee of
Women's Division are (seated, left to right)
Deborah Schwarcberg, Education Vice
President; and Carol Greenbaum, Presi-
dent. Standing (left to right) are Marcia
Shapiro, Leadership Development Vice
President; Berenice Rogers, member-at-
large; Susan Wolf-Schwartz, Administra-
tion Vice President; Adele Simon,
Nominating Chairman; Sandra Rosen,
Outreach Vice President; Sheila Engels-
tein, Campaign Vice President; and Mollie
Fitterman, immediate past President. Not
pictured are Barbara Sommers, Business
and Professional Vice President; Zelda Pin-
court Mason, member-at-large; and Alice
Zipkin, Secretary.
Carole Koeppel and Dina Marber, UJA Program Marcy Marcus and Sheryl Davidoff
Coordinator
Sylvia Berman and Jackie Eder
(Seated) Marva Perrin, (standing, left to right) Marilyn Lampert and
Doris Singer
Dorothy Adler, Jeanne Glasser, and Esther G
Gruber


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
The Opposite Perspective:
Americans and Germans From The Other Side
By WOLFGANG BOKGMANN
Stuttgarter Zeitung
Threepeople that have made
recent German history and il-
lustrate the changes it has
gone through are Adolf Hitler,
Konrad Adenauer and Willy
Brandt.-
They all have one thing in
common: they have been nam-
ed Time magazine's Man of the
Year: Hitler in 1938, Adenauer
in 1953 and Brandt in 1970.
This changing face is one
aspect of a book by
Philadelphia Professor Frank
Trommler.
Many might have an initial
attitude of skepticism when
they realize that this huge
tome (698 pages) is a long str-
ing of lectures delivered at the
university to commemorate
the landing of the first 13
families who left Krefeld for
the new land in 1683.
The collection, called
Amerika und die Deutschen,
attempts a stock-taking of this
300-year old relationship.
Despite whatever reservations
people may have, the book is
worth reading.
The actual result of the lec-
tures, which at first seem to be
randomly thrown together, is
staggering. This carefully
edited and illustrated book
reveals itself as probably uni-
que, an extraordinarily multi-
faceted compilation of con-
tributions to American-
Germany history. Practically
every contribution illuminates
a special aspect or opens new
insights.
Whoever is prepared to
make the effort to read the
short articles will get a colorful
impression of America and its
German immigrants. The
volume is much more than a
mere history book. It
highlights lines of develop-
ment which reach up to the
present day.
The last three centuries have
seen the arrival of millions of
Germans in America. They left
Editor's Note: While the
following perspective was writ-
ten for a German reading au-
dience, its content has value for
Americans and, especially,
American Jews. We offer it
here as an unusual view.
because of economic hardship,
religious intolerance or
political persecution.
In the second half of the 19th
century a quarter of the
population of Chicago was
German. Between 1820 and
1980 seven million went to
America. Every fourth
American can claim German
ancestry, even when only five
percent of the grandchildren
of German grandparents can
speak German.
There is no doubt that Ger-
mans have made important
contributions to the develop-
ment of this multi-ethnic conti-
nent. German beer for in-
stance, which is pulled cold in a
watered down version of the
original serves as a well known
example.
However despite their
numbers, the Germans have
never played an important role
in politics. Even the German
language, which has been kept
alive, often by considerable ef-
fort, has over the centuries
lost its power. This was the
price paid for being
assimilated, which many Ger-
mans as well as other na-
tionalities, willingly paid or
were forced to pay. Mean-
while, beginning at turn of this
century, America developed a
fear of foreign influence. This
has given rise to the view that
America has reached its
capacity for taking in and
assimilating new currents of
immigrants. Though despite
everything she still remains a
relatively tolerant country to
emigrate to.
Examples of intoleration,
such as anti-German feeling
.-**
BEERSHEVA Sobbing women in a funeral
procession for Israeli Shin Bet security agent
Victor Arajwan mourn his death. Arajwan
AP/Wide World Photo
and four Palestinian guerillas were killed in a
clash between Shin Bet agents and terrorists.
He was buried in (he Negev capital.
during the first world war,
which made it dangerous to
speak German, and the intern-
ment of Japanese immigrants
during the second, belong to
the darker side of the
American immigration
experience.
But such examples which
took place against a
background of world war, have
remained the exception rather
than the rule. The attitude of
many Germans remains to this
day somewhat ambivalent.
Hitler, for example, regarded
Americans as simpletons
perhaps such a statement
could be expected from a man
like him.
But negative views were
prevalent also among more
respectable people. The great
German poet Heinrich Heine
said, "Their religion is the ex-
ploitation of the world and
money is their god."
Even Sigmund Freud, who
was honored by Americans,
gruffly said "America is a
mistake, undoubtedly a gigan-
tic one, but nevertheless a
mistake."
This goes to show that even
highly educated men were also
prepared to accept prevailing
cliches.
Many Americans have dif-
ficulty coming to terms with
the "Krauts." But this is more
understandable when one con-
siders the size of the country
and the fact that it has enough
problems on its plate without
having to think about
Germany.
Today America and Ger-
many are connected by a
rather distant relationship.
The evidence shows that there
have always been ups and
downs.
But current works from
Wolfram Hanrieder and Fritz
Stern it has been elaborately
worked out, that the interests
of the superpower America
Continued on Page 10
Israeli Electoral Reform:
After 40 Years Of Wandering In The Political Desert
By DR. ALON BEN-MEIR
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
The continuing disagree-
ment over the proposed inter-
national Mideast peace con-
ference is but one manifesta-
tion of Israel's current and un-
fortunate political paralysis. It
results from the attempt by
two men and two parties
to govern together despite be-
ing ideologically and politically
incompatible. When they do
agree, when compromise is
achieved, it is usually at the ex-
pense of Israel's national
interest.
Admittedly, in its present
form the Israeli government
has achieved a remarkable
degree of economic stability;
however, the cost of preserv-
ing this 39-month-old "mar-
riage of convenience" between
Likud and Labor has been both
paralysis on major political
issues and recurrent,
debilitating internal conflict
within the government. The
arrangement has clearly run
its course.
Many observers of the
Israeli political scene argue
that new elections could solve
the country's present political
crisis. Unfortunately, Israel's
political malaise transcends
the identity of the current
government leaders. It is
embedded in the political
system itself.
As long as elections in Israel
are essentially tests of party
strength and not judgments
on individual candidates a
new election can result only in
the situation in which no one
party is able to command a ma-
jority (or even a near-majority)
in the Knesset (where consent
of at least 61 members out of
120 is required to form a
government). This is the elec-
toral arena where bold
reforms must be undertaken.
Political parties in Israel,
such as Likud and Labor,
serve more than just an elec-
toral function; they are a way
of life. Often, the job security
and welfare of a party member
depends directly on the party
and its national network of of-
fices and welfare services.
While the popularity of smaller
parties may change from one
election to another, Likud,
Labor and the religious parties
continue to enjoy the general
support of their respective
constituencies.
Yet, it is the smaller, and
often newer, parties that con-
tinue to hold the balance of
power in the Knesset. During
each election cycle, new par-
ties claiming to have the
answer to Israel's ills grab an
important piece of the elec-
toral pie. Why? Because only
one 120th of the total popular
vote (less than one percent) is
needed to qualify for a seat in
the Knesset.
This system has the merit of
being very democratic, but it
does create a Knesset in
perpetual uproar, and more
often than not gives the very
small parties degres of power
highly disproportionate their
electoral or parliamentary
numbers.
When the Likud party came
to power in 1977, it was com-
pelled like Labor before it
to form a coalition government
with the religious parties (who
join any government as long as
their religious concerns are
met). The 1984 elections
created even more political in-
stability: Both Likud and
Labor emerged from the elec-
tion in a virtual dead heat and
neither was able to deal effec-
tively with Israel's rapidly
deteriorating economy.
Coalition governments func-
tion well only when they can
act with a genuine unity of
purpose. But this is a rarity in
the world today, and Israel's
coalition governments over
the last 40 years have certainly
been no exception. This state
of affairs puts Israel's entire
national well-being in jeopar-
dy. The time has indeed come
for a bold political initiative to
rectify this alarming situation.
The leaders of both Likud
and Labor must together call
for political reform legislation
that can provide the nation
with a strong, democratic
government that will enjoy a
real mandate from the elec-
toral. Israel must have a
government that can act swift-
ly, intelligently and
courageously in the face of the
political dynamics of the Mid-
dle East.
There are a number of more
effective electoral systems
that Israel can look to in
Continued on Page 10

-


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Americans and Germans From the Other Side
Continued from Page 9
and the medium-sized power of
West Germany have diverged
widely even if strong bonds
still bind the two together.
77t attitude of many
Germans remains to
this day somewhat
ambivalent. Hitler,
for example, regarded
Americans as
simpletons. Perhaps
such a statement
could be expected
from a man like him.
According to Hanrieder, the
recent dispute over the
medium-range missiles showed
that the consensus about the
character and intensity of the
Soviet threat is no longer
there.
Hanrieder described aptly
the nature of the German
paradox. The West Germans,
he said, "seem simultaneously
to be afraid tJTat the
Americans might use atomic
weapons and also that they
might not."
Fritz Stern points out that
the German destiny is directly
linked to the German-Russian
relationship in a manner which
many Americans don't
understand.
At the same time it's true to
say, as Frank Trommler, sym-
pathetically put it: The new na-
tional or European conception
of itself is developing out of a
distancing of itself from
America but not to Russia.
America's closeness deter-
mines its distance.
Whoever would like to know
more about what Americans
think about Germans, and isn't
afraid of taking up a heavy
academic text, will find highly
unflattering findings in a com-
pilation called Amerikaner
uber Deutschland und die
Deutschen, by the Tubingen
researchers Kurt Stapf,
Wolfgang Stroebe and Klaus
Jonas.
They investigated the views
of American students on Ger-
many and found that Germans
are not all too popular. Both
West and East Germans are
rated in the bottom third on an
international popularity scale.
Those interviewed admitted
that the Germans worked
hard, were efficient and family
orientated. But on the other
hand they tended to lack pas-
sion, be not open in attitudes
and to lack a zest for life.
Certainly the authors found
it not very flattering to have
West Germans placed next to
the Russians, the Poles and the
East Germans as the people
with the leastjoi* de vivre.
Whether American students
are representative of
American public opinion in
general remains an open ques-
tion. But such opinions are a
cause for worry, even if they
do not happen to agree with
one's own experience.
Many political observers
have become afraid that
America could turn away from
Europe and towards the
Pacific Basin. In view of the
still close relationship between
Germany and the U.S.A., that
might appear to be a
somewhat rash judgement.
The fact is that the make-up of
the immigrants has changed.
And that could play a decisive
role in determining where
American interests are.
This is pointed out in Donata
Elschenbroich's new, in parts
very subjective book, Eine Na-
tion von Einwandem.
To date 84 percent of recent
immigrants have come from
South America and Asia. In
the sixties 62 percent came
from Europe. This trend can
only weaken the European
component in the U.S.
The authoress, who is
employed at the German In-
stitute for Youth in Munich,
gives America a good report
card for the way it treats its
immigrants.
At the same time she takes
into account discrimination,
especially against ethnic
minorities. But she goes on to
point out the successful efforts
which have been made for
their legal and political
assimilation.
Even in Reagan's America,
the quota system has been by
no means abolished as an
emergency measure to
alleviate the disadvantages of
minorities.
Donata Elschenbroich com-
pares the self confidence of the
U.S. with the "against our
will" mentality of West Ger-
mans towards immigration.
What it means to be an im-
migrant in Germany is not so
clear. In her book she says that
American mainstream society
is more flexible. German
mainstream society is more
flexible. German mainstream
society in comparison, is as
rigid as concrete.
One may be in disagreement
with her opinion about West
German attitudes to im-
migrants. But one would have
to agree with her that
American behavior towards
the newly arrived has many
positive characteristics.
Many Germans have
themselves profited from the
U.S. attitude to immigration.
That's not to say that
American attitudes have
always been the best.
Professor David Wyman,
lecturer in history at the
university of Massachusetts,
deals in his book, Das uner-
wunschte Volk, with a dark
episode in American immigra-
tion history.
The author, who is a staunch
friend of Israel, has written
with bitterness about America
and the destruction of Euro-
pean Jews.
He has devastatingly con-
demned the Roosevelt govern-
ment for not helping the Jews
against the pilfering of the
Nazis. America he said, "was
the traditional land of the
persecuted and repressed. But
we let the Nazi murderers
have their way." Wyman
maintains that several hun-
dred thousand could have sur-
vived if the government hadn't
shown negligence and
carelessness in their handling
$4 Million Goal Set
Continued from Page 1
million for the construction of
a 160-bed nursing care
pavilion, an adult day care
center, a short-term rehabilita-
tion unit and a home health
care agency.
Several divisions and con-
dominium campaigns are
organized and actively
soliciting gifts. Members of the
Community Campaign Com-
mittee are Steve and Ruth
Abramson, Sol and Sylvia Ber-
man, Gil and Bea Bloch, Jackie
Eder, Ruthe Eppler, Murray
and Betty Green, Barbara Lil-
shitz, Robert and Cynnie List,
Bernard Plisskin, Lester and
Helen Sodowick, Irv and Flo
Stuart, Herman Stall, Sam
Wadler, and Mort and Anne
Weiss.
To make your pledge to the
Capital Campaign for the ex-
pansion of the Center, (which
may be paid over a three to
five year period), please con-
tact the Center's office of
Development 471-5111, or any
of the above noted committee
members.
International Analysts
To Address
Mideast Conference
Continued from Page 1
was asked by the University of
Miami to set up and serve as
Director of its Middle East
Studies Institute. His field of
academic specialization is the
modern history and politics of
the Middle East, with special
emphasis on Islam as a
political force. He has
authored and edited several
books and numerous articles.
Stephen Silberfarb, as one of
AIPAC's six registered lob-
byists, works with senators,
representatives and congres-
sional staff. Prior to joining
AIPAC in 1984, Mr. Silberfarb
worked for Representative
Michael Barnes (D-MD) and on
numerous state and federal
election campaigns. He has
authored many articles on the
Middle East and is a frequent
contributor to the Near East
Report. Mr. Silberfarb is a
graduate of the University of
Maryland. He lived in Israel
for five years and is fluent in
Hebrew.
The cost of the entire pro-
gram, including a Kosher lun-
cheon, is $15. To reserve
space, mail a check payable to
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-Community
Relations Council, 501 So.
Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401. For
more information, contact
Rabbi Alan Sherman, CRC
Director, at the Federation of-
fice, 832-2120.
of the matter. The author has
pointed out the negligence of
American Jews too.
In his book he says that the
Holocaust was certainly a
Jewish tragedy. But, also a
Christian tragedy for Western
civilization. People were
murdered while others just
looked on. Wyman closes his
stirring book, which makes use
of new sources, on a sarcastic
note. The European Jews he
writes, "were neither
Americans or Englishmen. It
was tough luck for them that
they were not only foreigners
but Jews of all people."
Even this episode is part of
American immigration
history. A part of history,
about which the Germans have
the least right to point an ac-
cusing finger.
Electoral Reform
May Salvage Split
Continued from Page 9
fashioning political reform, for
example, those in Scandinavia,
Britain and the United States.
In particular, the European
systems encourage the forma-
tion of strong, viable govern-
ing coalitions without
discouraging smaller parties
from participating in the
system. Israel should consider
the following proposal.
There shall be two elec-
tions a party primary in
which the country would vote
as a single constituency (as at
present), and a general elec-
tion in which the country
would be divided into 120
single-member districts.
In the party election, each
voter would cast a ballot for a
party and for its leadership.
The ballot would list the can-
didates for leadership; such
candidates may be chosen by
the parties, or may file
independently.
Only parties obtaining at
least 5 percent of the total
votes cast in the primary
would be permitted to present
a candidate in the districts in
the general election. There
would be no residency require-
ment for candidates in the
general election.
It is assumed that party
leaders chosen in the primary
election would become can-
didates for the office of Prime
Minister; however, they would
remain eligible only if they also
were elected in the district in
which they chose to stand in
the general election. A party
that lost its leader in the
general election would choose
a replacement from the list it
presented in the primary.
As in the present system,
the party commanding a ma-
jority would form the
government.
In the Knesset, members
would be released from party
discipline if the first vote on
any issue was inconclusive;
thereafter they may vote
their conscience.
These or similar reforms
would permit the smaller par-
ties to test their national ap-
peal in the primary, then en-
courage them to seek alliances
for the general election if they
fall below the 5 percent
threshold. Above all, the
single-member district rule
would move the country closer
to viable governing majorities
without also (as in the case of
Britain) discouraging either
the major opposition party or
smaller regional or local
parties.
It may well be that a can-
didate such as Meir Kahane of
Kach would be elected under
the new rules, but that could
hardly be counted a loss to
Israeli democracy. And the
gain would be the encouraging
of present or future parties to
seek broader, more represen-
tative constituencies based on
the issues of national concern.
Premier Shamir and Foreign
Minister Peres now have an
historic opportunity to join
hands and push for these or
similar political reforms.
Likud and Labor command
sufficient votes in the Knesset
to pass such legislation.
After 40 years of wandering
in the political desert, a new
post-statehood generation in
Israel must now challenge old
self-serving dogma. They must
demand from their leadership
a new political order that will
strengthen Israel internally
and enhance its image and
credibility throughout the
world.
Israel's political and
economic security as well as
the prospect for an overall
Middle East settlement may
depend on how this issue is
addressed.
Dr. Alon Ben-Meir is a
political scientist, author and
lecturer specializing in
Mideast and Jewish affairs.
Chinese Scientists
May Reciprocate Visits
Continued from Page 5
a group until now.
Golan said he used his Israeli
passport even though China
has never officially recognized
Israel, and received a warm
welcome.
"They are very interested in
Israeli science. They know
there is more scientific output
from Israel than there is from
all of China. I was accepted
very warmly. They are very in-
terested in plugging into the
international scientific net-
work," Golan said.
He said he thought that
Chinese scientists would begin
coming to Israel in a year or
two. "They are all interested
but are also somewhat hesitant
about being the first to ask for
a Chinese exit visa to come to
Israel," he said.
Golan said he and his
Chinese colleagues talked very
little of politics. "They are not
that interested in politics. The
Middle East problem is very
far from their thoughts or in-
terests. Their attitudes toward
us and our regional problems is
like ours toward Campuchea,
which does interest them," he
said.


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
The children stood on line to get their faces painted by the clowns.
(Left to right) Robert Abrams, Co-Chair of the Barbecue, the Rothenberg
family, Danielle, Esther, Mark, Lawrence, and Joshua, the Cohen family,
Robert, Steven, and Laura, and Joan Tochner, Co-Chair of the Barbecue.
JCDS Holds Eleventh Annual BBQ
On Sunday, Oct. 4, the
Jewish Community Day School
held their 11th Annual
Barbecue. The event was a
tremendous success as atten-
dance records and ticket sales
records were both broken,
stated Robert Abrams,
Barbecue Co-Chairman.
Over 400 people ate all the
hamburgers and hot dogs they
could handle, played softball
and volleyball, decorated the
Sukkah, and enjoyed the
clowns. The parents of
kindergarten through 3rd
grades defeated the 4th
through 8th grade parents in
an exciting game of softball.
Climaxing the day was the
drawing for the grand prizes.
The winners were: 3rd prize of
$750 went to Esther and
Lawrence Rothenberg; 2nd
prize of $1,500 went to Jody
Bersin (sold by Steve and Lin-
da Cohen); and 1st prize of
$5,000 went to the grand-
daughter of Buddie Brenner.
Walters Optimistic About Efforts To
Rescind 1975 UN Resolution
BY YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Vernon Walters, the United
States Ambassador to the
United Nations, expressed op-
timism Monday night (Oct. 6)
that the efforts to rescind the
1975 UN General Assembly
resolution equating Zionism
with racism will eventually be
successful. But he made it
clear that more time is needed
to achieve this goal.
Speaking with reporters at
the Pierre Hotel, where he was
attending the annual dinner of
the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, Walters said: "I
don't believe that we can res-
cind that infamous resolution
today but we are certainly
on our way." He likened the
resolution to apartheid,
stating: "This is a form of
apartheid by itself."
Walters said that he sent
this year, as he did last year, a
letter to UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar protesting the anti-
Zionist resolution and deman-
ding that it be abolished. In his
speech before the UN General
Assembly President Reagan
sharply denounced the
resolution.
Israeli diplomats at the UN
told the JTA that although
many countries which voted in
1975 for the resolution would
vote against it today, there is
still no majority among UN
members to rescind the
resolution.
The annual award of the Ap-
peal of Conscience Foundation
was presented during the din-
ner by Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
president of the Foundation,
to Dr. Rong Yiren, chairper-
son of the China International
Trust and Investment Cor-
poration, and American
businessman Arthur Ross.
Le Pen's Popularity Plummets
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
popularity of Jean Marie Le
Pen, leader of the extreme
rightwing National Front,
plummeted by 60 percent ac-
cording to a poll published in
Le Figaro apparently in reac-
tion to his public expression of
doubt that the Nazi gas
chambers ever existed and his
denigration of the Holocaust
as a "mere detail" in the
history of World War II.
The poll, conducted by the
highly reliable Sofres
organization for Le Figaro,
showed Le Pen's favorable
rating at 10 percent, down
from 17 percent in the latest
previous poll. Another poll,
conducted by the weekly USD,
found that only eight percent
of the population wanted Le
Pen to "play a political role in
France," compared to 12 per-
cent in an earlier poll.
Prime Minister Jacques
Chirac strongly condemned Le
Pen's remarks, which were
broadcast in a Radio Luxem-
bourg interview last month. It
was "horrible to listen to such
things," said Chirac, the first
French leader to speak out
publicly on the matter. He urg-
ed French schools to continue
to teach the history of World
War II and the tragedy of the
Holocaust.
Chirac's condemnation of Le
Pen indicated he has given up
any plans he might have had
for a political alliance with the
National Front in the
Presidential elections next spr-
ing. Observers here have
speculated in recent weeks
that Chirac and his center-
right RPR party was undecid-
ed on the matter.
Public opinion polls have in-
dicated that Chirac will need
the vote of the extreme right if
he is to carry the election. The
other principal center-right
Presidential hopeful, Raymond
Barre, has not commented on
Le Pen's remarks. But in view
of Chirac's highly publicized
statement, Barre, it is believ-
ed, will be forced to take a
public stand.
Le Pen, for his part, shrugg-
ed off the poll findings. He ac-
cused the poll takers of bias
and implied their findings
were weighted against him.
Last Friday, the National
Front's 33 Deputies boycotted
the ceremonial opening of the
National Assembly which
began with a minute of silence
in honor of "all victims of the
Nazi Holocaust." The National
Front said it acted in protest
against accusations of anti-
Semitism levelled against it by
the Assembly's President Jac-
ques Chaban Delmas.
The French Jewish com-
munity responded to Le Pen
by crowding the synagogues
for Yom Kippur services. Com-
munity spokesmen said every
synagogue had standing room
only and hundreds of worship-
pers had to follow the services
from the sidewalks outside.
Meanwhile, Israel's Am-
bassador to France, Ovadia
Soffer, commented on reports
that Le Pen wants to visit
Israel. In an interview with Le
Figaro, Soffer said, "Israel is a
free and democratic country
and if he wants to visit he will
not be denied entry but no one,
no one in official circles, will
agree to meet with him."
Energetic food servers on shift No. 2 included (left to right)
Floryn Needle, Linda Cohen, Marva Perrin, Linda Sommers.
China-Israel Trade In Offing
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two-
way trade between Israel and
the People's Republic of China
appears to have been advanced
at several meetings held here
recently between visiting
Chinese businessmen and
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon, Yediot
Achronot reported Monday
(Oct. 5).
Sharon decided to change
existing policy by allowing the
import of goods from China.
Israel already exports various
items to China. Sharon con-
firmed the report but would
not say what those items are.
The visitors asked him to allow
large-scale imports of Chinese
goods but Sharon insisted that
any imports must be "on
reciprocal basis," the paper
reported.
Some Israeli products are
shipped directly to China in
vessels sailing from Eilat.
Others are sent via Hong
Kong. A Hong Kong
businessman in Israel recently
expressed interest in impor-
ting clothing, particularly
bathing suits.
One result of his visit is an
"Israel Week" to be held in
Hong Kong. Some of the items
displayed there may well end
up in China, Yediot Achronot
said.
TMB
THANKSGIVING WEEK-END SPECIAL
Nov. 25 to Nov. 30
Any 5 Days 4 Nights
tiqp* P^r person
IOO double occ.
Any 4 Days-3 Nights
I* per person
double occ.
Plus Tax A Gratuities
INCLUDES
REMODELED ACCOMMODATIONS
2 Glitt Kosher Mills Daily 3 on the Sabbath
Dally Social Activities Full Tlmi Social Director
Live Entertainment in our STARLI6HT Night Club
Personal Refrigerator ft Color TV in All Rooms
Poolslde Chilli Lounges Olympic Swimming Pool
Privite Fenced in Beach
*Oceanfront Accomodatlons
Add 12 Dally Pir person
..
CALL: 1-531-1271
Under m tupwvtaton erf
Rabbi JoMph N. Kauftnan


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Business & Professional Women's Campaign
Continued from Page 1
wholeheartedly fulfilling the
commandment of tzedakah,"
stated Mrs. Rosen thai.
Mrs. Rosenthal has been ap-
pointed as the overall
Chairperson of the B and P
Women's Campaign by Sheila
Engelstein, Women's Division
Campaign Vice President. In
turn, Mrs. Rosenthal has ask-
ed three Chairpersons of
various Campaign categories
to work closely with her.
Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman
has been appointed Chairper-
son of the $5,000 Minimum
Golda Meir Task Force Com-
mittee; Angela Gallicchio as
Chairperson of the $1,200
Minimum Pre-Event Recep-
tion Committee; and Robin S.
Weinberger as Chairperson of
the $150 Minimum Campaign
Event Committee.
In commenting on the an-
nouncements, Mrs. Engelstein
said, "These four women have
been instrumental in
establishing the Campaign as a
viable vehicle for business and
professional women's giving.
With their Co-Chairpersons
and committees, they will be
reaching out to an ever in-
creasing number of B and P
women in our community to in-
vite them to participate in
helping Jews locally, in Israel,
and around the world."
Robin Weinberger announc-
ed that a Special Dinner and
Program in support of the
B and P Women s Group Cam-
paign is being held on Monday,
Nov. 16, 6 p.m., at the Ex-
ecutive Club, 515 North
Flagler Drive, West Palm
Beach. There is a $150
minimum commitment to the
1988 Women's Division Cam-
paign for attendance at this
event.
Serving as Co-Chairpersons
with Ms. Weinberger are Carol
Shubs and Reva Steinberg.
Members of the committee are
Patti Abramson, Marci Adler.
Roxanne Axelrod, Robin Bern-
stein, Esther Kosowski, Mim
Levinson, Elizabeth Mirkin,
Charlotte Morpurgo, Olivia
Tartakow, Renee Tucker, and
Susan Wolf-Schwartz.
A $1,200 Minimum Commit-
ment Pre-Event Cocktail
Increased Awareness, Responsibility Spur Success
Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman
Reception held prior to the
Special Dinner and Program
will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the
home of Dr. Elizabeth S.
Shulman in Palm Beach, an-
nounced Angela Gallicchio,
Chairperson.
Serving as Co-Chairpersons
for this event are Penny Beers
and Barbara Steinberg. Com-
prising the committee are
Leslie Adams, Marjorie Berg,
Susan Katzenberg, and Ellen
Ram pell.
Working with Dr. Shulman
on the $5,000 Golda Meir Task
Force Committee are Helen
Hoffman, Amy Jonas, Marva
Perrin, and Dr. Norma
Schulman.
Angela Gallicchio
Amy Pearlman and Mimi
Stein are Co-Chairpersons of
the Super Sunday Committee
which will involve B and P
women in the community-wide
phonathon in March. They will
also take an active role in the
upcoming Campaign event.
Ingrid Rosenthal chaired the
B and P Campaign Event for
the last two years. She is a
member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board of Directors and
the Campaign Cabinet. Mrs.
Rosenthal is a CPA and is com-
ptroller with the law firm of
Rosenthal and Findler. She is
a member of the Florida and
American Institutes of CPAs,
and the Jewish Community
Robin S. Weinberger
Center.
Dr. Elizabeth S. Shulman
was Chairperson of the
B and P Campaign last year.
She has been a member of the
Executive Committee of the
Board of Directors of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County for four years
and has sat on the Board since
1979. She has served as
Women's Division Vice Presi-
dent for Leadership Develop-
ment and Chairperson of many
Federation programs and com-
mittees. She is a member of
National UJA BandP
Women's Council.
Angela Gallicchio, a member
of the Women's Division Cam-
paign Cabinet, chaired the
BandP Super Sunday effort
last year having chaired Super
Sunday for Women's Division
the previous year. Ms. Gallic-
chio serves on the Board of
Directors of Federation as well
as on the Boards of Young
Adult Division and Women's
Division. She is a member of
Federation's Human Resource
Development Committee and
the Community Relations
Council. Ms. Gallicchio is
President of the Flagler Even-
ing Section of the National
Council of Jewish Women and
professionally is a financial
consultant with Flagler
Securities.
Robin Weinberger is a
member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board of Directors and
Campaign Cabinet. For the
past few years, she has worked
on the B and P Campaign
Committee and served as Pro-
gram Chairperson for B and P
last year. Additionally, she is
active with the Executive
Women of the Palm Beaches
and Technion 2000. Ms.
Weinberger sells insurance
and is a financial planner with
Connecticut Mutual Life In-
surance Company.
For more information, con-
tact Faye Stoller, Women's
Division Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Boynton Beach Council
Challenged By Population Growth
Continued from Page 1
Gross, Chairman of the Boyn-
ton Beach Council.
Mr. Gross has been ap-
pointed for the second con-
secutive year as Chairman by
Jeanne Levy, General Chair of
the 1988 Federation-UJA
Campaign. "Under Jerry's
dedicated leadership, the
Boynton Beach Council
brought the message of the
Campaign to an increasing
number of Boynton Beach
residents. I am confident that
this year's effort will involve
more and more people and
help our Campaign reach new
heights," stated Mrs. Levy.
The Chairmen of the various
communities which comprise
the Boynton Beach Council are
David and Jessica Bernstein,
Limetree; Benjamin and
Sarita Ettinger, Greentree;
Israel "Andy" and Sylvia
Cohen, Banyan Springs; Nick
and Lillian Linovits, Joseph
and Ida Linsenberg,
Leisureville; Al Moskowitz and
William Wertheim, Village
Royale on the Green; Jay
Ossen, Parkwalk; Bernard
Rubin, Bent Tree East;
Herbert and Miriam Weiss,
Palm Chase; and Henry and
Edie Tevelin, Mirror Lakes.
"Our first event will be a
Wine and Cheese Party for the
residents of Banyan Springs.
It will be held on Nov. 12, at
Lord and Taylor in the Boyn-
ton Beach Mall," stated Mr.
Gross. "Events for the other
communities will be announc-
ed at a later date."
Jerome Gross originated the
idea of the Boynton Beach
Council and co-chaired it last
year with Sidney Brodsky.
Previously he served as Chair-
man of the Bent Tree
Federation-UJA Campaign
and served on the Boynton
Beach Happening Committee.
Mr. Gross is a former Board
member of the Central Conser-
vative Synagogue, and is a
member of B'nai B'rith and
Jewish War Veterans. He is
President of Bent Tree Villa
West Condo Association.
For more information, con-
tact Frances Witt, Boynton
Beach Assistant Director, at
the Boynton Beach branch of-
fice, 737-0746.
The Palm Beaches Differ From Other Communities
Continued from Page 3
tion of the Palm Beaches is
low, the study found. It has
a relatively low rate for
such observances as attend-
ing a^ Passover Seder and
for lighting Chanukah candles.
"The latter case is explainable
by the fact that only 10 per-
cent of households in the Palm
Beach study area contain
children," stated Dr. Sheskin.
Only 75 percent of
respondents in the Palm
Beaches attend a Passover
Seder as opposed to 89 percent
in Miami, 87 percent in New
York, and 86 percent in
Baltimore. As for lighting
Chanukah candles, 67 percent
of the Jewish population in the
Palm Beaches follow this prac-
tice whereas 77 percent do in
Miami, and 78 percent in New
York.
Only 13 percent of the Jews
in the Palm Beaches keep a
kosher home, which is the
lowest rate for comparable
cities, except for Chicago at 11
percent. Twenty-five percent
of New Yorkers keep kosher in
the home while Rochester at
34 percent has the greatest
percentage. (The study in
Baltimore did not measure this
practice.) "These religious
practice statistics are surpris-
ing given the large elderly
population of the Palm
Beaches," Dr. Sheskin said.
Respondents were asked
how frequently they currently
attend synagogue services.
The results show that Jews in
the Palm Beach County study
area are both more and less
likely to attend services than
are Jews in the nine com-
parison communities. Thirty-
two percent of residents of the
Palm Beaches never attend
services compared to 30 per-
cent in New York, 24 percent
in Miami, and 10 percent in
Baltimore.
Thirty-one percent of the
Jewish population of the Palm
Beaches attend services often
(once a month or more) while
21 percent in New York, 18
percent in Baltimore, and 17
percent in Miami attend ser-
vices often. The high figure for
those attending services often
in the Palm Beaches may be in-
fluenced by the large number
of elderly retirees who have
the time to attend more fre-
quently, the study indicated.
The number of intermar-
riages, involving marriage to
someone not born Jewish, is
low in the Palm Beaches (13
percent) as compared to other
communities. Denver tops the
list with 37 percent, followed
by Baltimore at 22 percent.
Only two cities, New York (10
percent) and Miami (8 percent)
have a lower intermarriage
rate than the Palm Beaches.
About one-third of the mar-
riages under the age of 50 in
the Palm Beaches involve
someone not born Jewish
whereas 3-5 percent of mar-
riages over the age of 50 are
intermarriages. As a result of
this community's large elderly
population, the overall rate is
lower. It is interesting to note
that in 30 percent of the mar-
riages involving someone not
born Jewish, conversion to
Judaism has occurred.
The study has shown that
Israel plays an important role
in the lives of many residents
of the Palm Beaches. While 56
percent of households have
had one or more persons visit
Israel, 45 percent of all per-
sons in surveyed households
have visited Israel. This last
figure is the highest of any of
the 11 comparison cities, ex-
cept Miami, with which it is
tied. Cleveland has 38 percent,
New York 37 percent,
Baltimore 36 percent, and St.
Louis at the lowest with 27
percent.
"With an older Jewish
whole, wealthier Jewish
population in the Palm
Beaches, there is a greater op-
portunity to visit Israel," Dr.
Sheskin said.
The differences between the
Jewish community of the Palm
Beaches and other comparison
cities is significant. "We must
study these findings and ac-
cept them as challenges to
building a vibrant future for
our Jewish community," Mr.
Brenner concluded.
?r*


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Special Interview
Waiting for A Constitution
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Part One
Of A Two-Part Series)
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
srael has begun a year-long
slebration of its 40th anniver-
iry with a special emphasis
in the Declaration of In-
lependence proclaimed when
[he Jewish State was
Istablished.
But one major promise of the
)eclaration has not yet been
jalized a constitution.
"The promise of the Declara-
ion of Independence should be
ilfilled with a constitution for
srael in order to safeguard
ie humanistic and democratic
[alues upon which Zionism
vas founded and to provide
1 with an efficient govern-
lent which will enable us to
ce the very difficult pro-
ahead," said Uriel
eichman, dean of the Tel
Lviv University Law Faculty,
n an interview with the
lewish Telegraphic Agency
lere.
Reichman and three of his
jUeagues at the law school
lave drafted a proposed con
btitution which includes a Bill
if Rights and wide changes in
government of Israel. He
ud the draft was written
sr consultation with con-
stitutional scholars and
political scientists in Israel,
i United States and Western
Europe.
Since the proposed constitu-
tion was released at Tel Aviv
University last August, there
ias been "an explosion of
Israeli opinion" in favor of a
constitution, Reichman said.
Israelis have volunteered to
tupport the campaign for a
Constitution and a committee
has been formed to press the
rovernment to act. "People
kave shown up in my office to
[upport the campaign" and
|onate funds, Reichman said.
He said Israeli newspapers
offered free advertising
sace, a major ad agency is
|ndertaking the campaign free
' charge and buses carry free
Is urging a constitution.
New Air Force
Chief Takes
Command
Continued from Page 5
>achelor's degree from Tel
"iViv University and a
laster's degree in business
1 ministration from Harvard.
Ie also attended courses at
ie U.S. Air Force senior staff
^ollege.
Bin-Nun's encounter with a
jviet-built MIG flown by a
tussian pilot occurred over
ie Suez Canal in 1970, during
ie war of attrition with
Sgypt. Bin-Nun takes corn-
id of the Air Force at a
ime of stringent budget cuts
w the entire Israel Defense
force, including the govern-
ment's recent cancellation of
ie Lavi fighterplane project
>r economic reasons.
Bin-Nun himself opposed the
*vi, arguing that it absorbed
ids needed for other vital
weapons systems.
Support has also come from
business and financial leaders,
and the mayors of 30 cities
throughout Israel have issued
a proclamation urging the
Knesset to act, Reichman said.
President Chaim Herzog in
his Rosh Hashanah message
also lent his-support. "This is
the time to hold a thorough,
non-political national discus-
sion, to be based on a new na-
tional consent, on the issue of
formulation of a constitution
for Israel," Herzog said.
He defined such a constitu-
tion as one "which will anchor
the fundamentals of living in
tiie State and will strengthen
Israel's democracy, a constitu-
tion which will mirror our
qualities of unity and uni-
queness as a nation, which will
be based on the Declaration of
Independence, as well as on
the realities of life in Israel
after 40 years of sovereignty."
Reichman said he has received
support from Knesset
members of all parties.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
praised the effort of the law
professors and said Israel was
mature" enough now to have
a constitution.
While Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres has not made
any public statements yet,
Reichman, who is scheduled to
meet with him, said he believes
Peres will also support the
effort.
Reichman said he knows
there are many difficulties
ahead, but he believes that this
is the "opportune moment,
providing that the public
pressure will be kept on very
strongly" and the issue can be
kept non-partisan.
"We are trying hard to
finalize the matter before the
end of May 1988," when the
next election campaign for the
Knesset is scheduled to begin,
Reichman said.
He said he would like to see
representatives of all the par-
ties meet in a closed conven-
tion to approve the constitu-
tion and submit it to the
Knesset. Although it is not re-
quired, Reichman believes that
if the Knesset approves a con-
stitution it should be submitted
to a referendum so that all
Israelis can take part in
creating a new "social
covenant."
Richman said that he and his
colleagues engaged in their ef-
fort because of a fear that the
current situation endangers
Israel's democratic structure
and the humanistic values on
which Zionism was
established.
That is why a "Bill of
Rights" was considered man-
datory. "The most sacred
human rights can be amended
by a simple majority of the
Knesset," he said.
He noted particularly the
religious laws which are sub-
ject to pressure from the small
religious parties needed to
form a government by Labor
and Likud. He said the rightw-
ing political element might
find they need the support of
Rabbi Meir Kahane to form a
government and adopt a law to
impose a curfew on Israeli
Arabs, or the left wing might
need the Communists and
agree to nationalize major
industries.
"In order to preserve in-
dividual freedom, the State
should be run for the benefit of
its citizens rather than the
politicians," Reichman said.
The proposed Bill of Rights
would preserve religous
freedom, but it would also pro-
tect secular Israelis, allowing
civil marriage, divorce and
burial, Reichman said. But, he
stressed, there would be no
"wall of separation" as in the
U.S. Constitution, and the
State would still support
religious services.
Reichman rejected the long-
held common view that David
Ben Gurion, Israel's first
Prime Miister, did not push for
a constitution because of the
religious issue. He noted that
the National Religious Party
was ready to support a con-
stitution in 1949-50 and that
one of its leaders would have
chaired the committee draf-
ting the document.
"Ben Gurion simply did not
want a stituation in which his
hands would be tied by a bin-
ding document," Reichman
said.
In addition to the guarantee
contained in other democratic
constitutions, Reichman said
the proposed Bill of Rights
would also contain the right of
citizens to a humane standard
of living. He explained that in
the Jewish tradition of each
Jew being responsible for the
other, citizens who were starv-
ing or homeless would have a
claim on the government.
Reichman said he did not feel
that Israel could end up with a
constitution in which Israelis
would lose some of the rights
they now have. This is the con-
cern of many in the U.S., in-
cluding the Jewish community,
about the proposals for a con-
stitutional convention to force
an amendment requiring a
balanced budget.
While there is always the
danger of this happening,
Reichman conceded, he
believes the Bill of Rights is
too ingrained in the American
tradition for this to happen in
the U.S., and polls have shown
that two-thirds of Israelis
want their country to be a
Western-style democracy.
OMtU'lf
riHrMlmwmM
Where keeping Kosher Is a delicious tradition.
' ^
,.


,- f
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Frankfurt Ghetto:
Plan To Rebuild Will Bury Past And Conscience
*

By
WILFRIED F. SCHOELLER
Suddeutsche Zeitung
A decision by Frankfurt
council to build a municipal
center over the ruins of part of
the old Jewish ghetto has
unleashed a bitter dispute.
The city's mayor, Wolfram
Bruck, heads the Christian
Democratic-dominated council
that made the decision to
build. A year ago, Bruck wrote
in a book that "historic
monuments are nothing other
than primary sources of
history. They are not stored in
archives or museum pieces per
se; their immovable place for
all time is where they original-
ly stood."
Not surprisingly, Bruck has
been doing all he can to disown
the statement.
His decision to go ahead on
Borneplatz and build has
unleashed a storm of protest
no less tempestuous than the
dispute three years ago over
the production of a Fassbinder
play criticized as anti-Semitic.
The opposition, far irom be-
ing party based, is growing by
the day.
The conservation lobby says
the ruins are the most impor-
tant testimony of past Jewish
life in Germany and, as such,
are indispensable.
True enough, little is left of
the Jewish past. After the
November 1938 pogroms, 280
synagogues were burnt to the
ground, including the
Borneplatz synagogue, and a
further 76 destroyed in other
ways.
The ruins excavation has
brought to light are unques-
tionably important, differing
from Christian ruins, of which
there are plenty.
The council has ruled out a
pause for thought and is deter-
mined to keep to the construc-
tion schedule. The main walls
for an administrative block are
already under construction
and earthmoving equipment is
at work on the adjacent ex-
cavation site.
After several hasty and ill-
conceived proposals Mayor
Bruck has outlined to Hilmar
Hoffmann, head of the
municipal arts department, a
fresh compromise he says is
final. There is to be no further
discussion on the subject.
It is the fifth compromise,
and in principle no different
from the others in envisaging
the preservation of a few
fragments to be arranged in a
museum display.
The only new ideas are a few
extra foundations to be includ-
ed and a few worlds of descrip-
tion for the museum site to be
incorporated in the service
center.
The latest plan provides for
the preservation of five of the
16 foundations. They are all
that is left of houses that once
were known as the Ram, the
Lamb, the Stone House, the
Sparrowhawk and the Her-
mitage, or Hot Baths.
Jewish ritual baths are to be
preserved, as are the founda-
tions of what is thought to
have been a former hospital.
Three of the ruins show
what cramped quarters the
The Judengasse in Frankfurt, depicting
Jews being massacred in 1614 The Ger-
man Tribune
Jews lived in. One is to in-
dicate the living standards of a
richer ghetto dweller, the last,
as a former Talmud school, to
testify to religious life in the
Frankfurt ghetto.
This is the city's plan for
preserving and presenting the
past of the second-largest
Jewish community in Ger-
many, formerly a center of
Jewry in Western Europe.
The site covers an area of
500 square meters, with
museum facilities taking up
the same amount of space
again.
This plan has been criticized
as a cynical, Philistine gesture.
The archaeological testimony
is to be largely destroyed and
in its place visitors will be
shown a model of the former
ghetto about 10 ft. long incor-
porating the latest technical
ploys and also available on a
video cassette.
There is every justification
in criticizing this concept as a
waste disposal center for
unpleasant reminders of
history.
Hesse Prime Minister
Walter Wallmann came to the
assistance of his fellow-
Christian Democrat and suc-
cessor as mayor of Frankfurt
at a CDU gathering. But what
he had to say failed to improve
matters.
He said there had been no
direct link between the
Frankfurt ghetto and
Auschwitz which no-one had
suggested in the first place.
His aim was to demystify the
finds and to make them
available to the general public.
He would do better to read
more widely. Das Labyrinth, a
1789 description of the ghetto
by Danish traveller Jens Bag-
gesen, published by C.H. Beck,
Munich, 1986, tells a lurid tale:
"Visualize a group of several
thousand men dressed in rags,
several thousand half-naked
women and several thousand
stark naked children crushed
and cramped together in a
single narrow alleyway.
"What an appalling picture
of misery! What a wailing and
gnashing of teeth! What a
pestilential smell of warm liv-
ing, lifeless and dead riff-raff!"
Is one not reminded of condi-
tions in concentration camp
barracks? For obscure
reasons, Wallmann came up
with a view on the origins of
Nazi racial policy.
Christian anti-Semitism, he
said, was not to blame for
Auschwitz. It was, "and I say
so hesitantly and diffidently,
the wrong road this country
has taken since the
Enlightenment."
He might just as well have
branded Moses Mendelssohn
and Lessing, Borne and Heine
Christian and Jewish cham-
pions of tolerance.
Wallmann would like to put
out the light shed by the site.
He feels the Borneplatz finds
must be seen as separate and
distinct from the German peo-
ple's guilt in connection with
the crimes committed between
1933 and 1945.
The remains of the ghetto,
he says, are no cause for
shame. Such attempts to ease
the burden of history are hard
to reconcile with the history of
Continued on Page 15
Minute Of Silence Law Challenged
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Supreme Court heard
arguments last week on
whether a 1987 New Jersey
law requiring a minute of
silence in public schools "for
private contemplation and in-
trospection' violated the First
Amendment prohibition on the
establishment of religion.
The case, Karcher v. May, is
an appeal of a decision by the
Third U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals upholding a 1985 deci-
sion by the Federal District
Court in New Jersey that the
law was unconstitutional.
Norman Cantor, a Trenton,
New Jersey lawyer, represen-
ting Jeffrey May, a New
Jersey teacher, who along with
several parents and students
challenged the law, argued
that discussion in the New
Jersey Legislature during the
debate on the bill
demonstrated that supporters
wanted the legislation as a way
to foster prayer in the
classrooms.
Cantor said teachers could
use the minute of silence to in-
fluence students to pray, par-
ticularly in the lower grades
where pupils would not
understand the meaning of
"contemplation and
introspection."
But Rex Lee, representing
Alan Karcher, former Speaker
of the New Jersey Assembly.
said the minute of silence was
a "legitimate secular" act
designed to quiet down
students as the school day
began.
He said the law to set aside
the minute was mandatory on-
ly for principals and teachers,
not students, who could use it,
or not use it, in any way they
wanted.
The law reads:
"Principals and teachers in
each public elementary and
secondary school of each
school district in this state
shall permit students to
observe a one-minute period of
silence to be used solely at the
discretion of the individual stu-
dent, before the opening of ex-
ercises of each school day for
quiet and private contempla-
tion and introspection."
While the Supreme Court in
1985 ruled unconstitutional an
Alabama law providing for a
minute of silence for "medita-
tion and voluntary prayer,"
the Court may decide the
latest case on the technical
grounds that Karcher did not
have the "standing" to file the
appeal.
The Reagan Administration
has filed a brief declaring that
while it believes the law is con-
stitutional, the appeal should
be dismissed because Karcher
has no jurisdiction.
The law was adopted in
December 1982, when the
Democratic-controlled
Assembly overrode a veto by
Gov. Thomas Kean, a
Republican. May immediately
filed a suit challenging the law
in January 1983.
When neither Kean nor his
attorney general would defend
the suit, Karcher decided to
defend it in his capacity as
Speaker. But about the time
the Court of Appeals gave its
decision in 1985, the
Republican took over the
Assmebly, and the new
speaker, Charles Hardwick,
asked that his name, which had
been substituted for Karcher's
on the appeal to the Supreme
Court, be withdrawn.
Karcher filed an appeal and
Lee maintained Tuesday that
he could do so since he was still
a member of the Legislature.
Should the court reject the
appeal on the ground that Kar-
cher has no legal right to ap-
peal, the lower court decision
would stand and the New
Jersey law would be stricken
from the books.
If the court decides Karcher
has the right to appeal and
deals with the constitutional
establishment of religion issue,
some observers believe it
would result in a 4-4 spit, since
the court is short one justice.
This too would uphold the
Court of Appeals decision.
However, since half of the
states have "minute of
silence" laws the issue is ex-
pected to come up again before
the Supreme Court.
Arab Move Against Israel Squashed
Continued from Page 1
tries, Poland and Hungary,
which recently established
low-level diplomatic relations
with Israel, were among the
absentees. The People's
Republic of China abstained,
as it has in past years.
The behavior of Jordan was
something of a mystery. Jor-
dan and Egypt were the only
Arab League members that
did not add their signatures to
those of 19 Arab countries and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization on a letter to UN
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar protesting
Israel's membership in the
UN. Nevertheless, Jordan ap-
peared on the list of sponsors
of the expulsion amendment,
apparently having come under
severe pressure from the Arab
League.
At the time of the vote,
however, the Jordanian
delegation was absent from
the roll call, leading Israeli
diplomats to express cautious
hope that Jordan may yet cast
a vote against Israel's ouster
from the UN.


L^-..

Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 16
Plan To Build Over Borneplatz And
Bury Past And Conscience
Continued from Page 14
i
the Frankfurt ghetto since
1462.
A single street 300 meters
long, for centuries it was one
of the places where Jews were
abused and humiliated before
the Nazis "perfected" the
technique.
The prehistory of Jewish
persecution in the Third Reich
is very much in evidence in the
Frankfurt ghetto, even though
it may have been opened in the
era of bourgeois emancipation.
Unless the signs are totally
misleading, Mayor Bruck is
not going to be dissuaded on
any historical or moral
grounds whatever from soon
giving the go-ahead to clear
the site for construction.
Grotesque and disgraceful
Evelyn Blum has been again
appointed Chairman of the
Women's Division of Palm
Beach County State of Israel
Bonds. The announcement
was made at the North
American Israel Bond
Leadership Conference
recently held in Montreal,
Canada, attended by more
than 400 Jewish leaders
representing 56 major com-
munities in the U.S. and
Canada. Mrs. Blum announc-
ed several upcoming projects
including the Golda Meir
Club Tea on Tuesday, Nov. 10
and a special "Sneak
Preview" Fashion Show on
Wednesday, Dec 2. These
events are leading up to the
gala Israel Bonds Interna-
tional Premiere Fashion
Show at the Breakers Hotel
on Wednesday, Dec. 16. A
kickoff brunch for volunteers
of the 1987 Fashion Show is
scheduled for Oct. 19.
scenes have already occurred,
such as when young Jews, who
together with other
demonstrators, staged a six-
day sit-in on the site to prevent
its destruction, were expelled
from the former ghetto for
disturbing the peace.
Some of them had
demonstrated to prevent the
performance of Fassbinder's
play. Then their protest was
applauded. Now they are
branded as criminals. Which
only goes to show how readily
the Frankfurt city council
measures non-violent
resistance by dual standards.
The affair, which is by no
means yet over, has already
shown that a debate of such
extraordinary historical and
moral volatility cannot be
governed solely by the majori-
Big Bird Is
Raised In Israel
BEERSHEVA, Israel -
Could the ostrich replace the
camel as the symbol of the
desert? The big bird is being
raised commercially by Ben-
Gurion University scientists
who confirm that it is a
lucrative source of income for
Negev settlers.
Health-conscious gourmets
say the meat tastes better than
chicken and is richer in protein
while lower in calories and
cholesterol. The export of
ostrich meat to European
restaurants has proven
popular. Moreover, a one-egg
omelette feeds 20 people.
Hides used for designer shoes,
bags and western cowboy
boots, bring $500 per skin.
Research data is being
studied carefully by U.S.
farmers and ranchers in 30
states who, faced with declin-
ing prices of cattle and
agricultural products, have
begun to raise the big birds
which bring as much as
$10,000 for a pair of healthy
breeders.
Tourists Up On
Israeli Gold Coast
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Tourism to Israel was up 25
percent during the first eight
months of 1987 compared to
tile same period in 1986, the
Ministry of Immigration and
Absorption reported. The rise
was three percent compared to
1985 which was Israel's record
tourist year.
th
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community of Palm Beach County Professional and
confidential help is available for:
Problems of the aging
Consultation and
evaluation services
Vocational Guidance

Marital counseling
Parent-child conllicts
Personal problems
Elder Support Network
684-1991
Moderate fees are charged in family and individual counseling o
those who can pay. (Pees are based on income and family .
The Jewish Family and Childr ns Services is a beneficiary agency oi
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
ty in the city council.
Officials in charge of historic
monuments cannot claim to
have behaved brilliantly
either. The head of excava-
tions concealed a conflict of in-
terest that in any other con-
text would automatically have
disqualified him.
As the man in charge of the
dig he must be in a position to
arrive at independent deci-
sions and be subject solely to
the dictates of his conscience.
Yet as curator of the
Frankfurt museum of pre-
history and early history he is
subject to instructions by
Mayor Bruck.
The delegation of respon-
sibility to an expert from fur-
ther afield would dispel the
massive mistrust he now faces,
especially as he has turned a
deaf ear to the justified public
desire for detailed
information.
You can forfeit your authori-
by working solely behind
e scenes as an archaeologist
and merely advising the
administration.
A fresh monument has now
been erected around the
disputed site: a corrugated
iron wall round three sides of
the site to conceal the earth-
moving equipment, construc-
tion workers and ar-
chaeologists from the in-
quisitve glances of passers-by.
This wall is designed mainly
to prevent the public from see-
ing what is done (or left un-
done) on Borneplatz. It is also,
figuratively speaking, a three-
sided set of blinkers the city
authorities have decided to
wear.
Bulldozing the finds apart
from a few vestiges for
museum use is no way to win
the discussion. It has long
ceased to be a matter of mere
presentation of archaeological
finds. The sense of history and
morality of recollection are
now involved.
The ruined landscape as
unearthed has a sensual quali-
ty and an aura that are bound
to be extinguished when reduc-
ed to diminutive, museum
dimensions.
The meager, broken stones
of foundations and walls must
not be reduced to remains of
cultural history and hidden
away in an administrative
building. The historical status
of the site and its importance
for our collective memory
must not be decided at the
party-political level.
In Borne's childhood, in the
days of the French Revolution,
about 500 people vegetated in
the 50 meters of ghetto now
uncovered beneath the
asphalt.
This is a site on which we can
visualize better than anywhere
else a part of history that
eludes us. As Baggesen wrote
in 1789:
"Here in this dark, narrow,
dirty, stinking and virtually
closed alley where they live
one can study the statistics of
an entire nation.
"Those who have walked
along it and failed, heedless of
the nudges, trickery and
unpleasantness, to feel sorry
for their seven thousand
cramped and oppressed fellow-
humans, those who are not
moved by this cameo to feel
sorry for the condition of all
others suffering in more or
less the same appalling way
can only be said to lack
something in their minds or
their hearts."
Borneplatz, a name that will
become meaningless once the
service center is built, is a sym-
bol of failure to come to terms
with this history.
The Jews who were able,
decades after Baggesen visited
the ghetto, to leave it sought
to integrate. They failed and
were the losers; but so are we.
The struggle to preserve
such memories must not be
lost to a municipal administra-
tion that, in Baggesen's
words, is either heartless or
mindless.
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
The Norman J. Kapner Legal Unit, Palm Beach County
announces a joint dinner meeting on Monday, Oct. 26, 6
p.m. Social Hour, 6:45 p.m. Dinner, at Airport Hilton,
Australian Ave., West Palm Beach, featuring Pat Clark,
Executive Director of Klanwatch. Ms. Clark will be speak-
ing on recent legal action taken against the Ku
Klux Klan including the landmark decision Donald v.
United Klans of America which resulted in a $7,000,000
verdict against the Klan organization. This case attained
nationwide publicity as it was featured in People Magazine,
on 20/20 and West 57th Street.
The B'yachad Chapter No. 5144, Youth Organization
(BBYO) got off to a start with a Rosh Hashanah party!
Held on Saturday, Sept. 26, the program attracted over 20
Jewish teens from the Palm Beach Gardens area. In keep-
ing with Jewish tradition, apples and honey were served
along with other refreshments. The group also conducted
several icebreakers and other activities to help those pre-
sent meet each other. One of the highlights was making
and eating caramel-covered apples.
The program was planned by Tammy Bleiman, the
chapter's Programming Vice President. The chapter's co-
Presidents are Barry Mark and Dana Silverstein.
B'yachad is a chapter of the B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion, the oldest and largest Jewish youth group in the
world. Centered in Palm Beach Gardens, B'yachad is now
entering the sixth year of existence and continues to be one
of the outstanding chapters in Gold Coast Council. The
Adult Adviser is Steve Snow also of Palm Beach Gardens.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Join Boynton Beach Chapter for a Luncheon and Card
Party on Thursday, Oct. 29 at noon at the Boynton Beach
Snuff el Board Court, 145 SE 2nd Ave., Boynton Beach.
Donation $6.50.
HADASSAH
Florida Atlantic Region presents "Hello Hadassah Sun-
day 'Kickoff Picnic" on Sunday, Nov. 1, at 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. at Dreher Park, Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach.
Bring your lunch beverages provided no charge
entertainment.
Carol Roberts, Palm Beach County Commissioner, has
issued a proclamation declaring the month of November
1987 as Hadassah Membership Month in Palm Beach
County.
The Lee Vassil Chapter will meet Tuesday, Oct. 27 at
Temple Beth Sholom 315 "A" Street, Lake Worth, at 12:30
p.m.
A report on the Hadassah Convention will be given. The
theme will be "Cherish The Past Chart The Future"
starring Sara Klein, Goldie Bernstein and Dr. Anna Harris.
The Lee Vassil Singers will also be part of the program.
Refreshments will be served, guests are welcomed.
Tikvah Chapter is having a Card Party and Brunch on
Oct. 25, 10:30 a.m.
NA'AMAT
Theodore Herzl Club will hold their paid up membership
luncheon on Thursday, Nov. 5, 1 p.m. at the Lake Worth
Shuffleboard Curts, 1121 Lucerne Ave. Speaker from the
Royal Palm Savings Bank.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Okeechobee Chapter will hold their monthly meeting on
Tuesday, Nov. 10, at 12:30 p.m. at the home of Julia Karp.
Guest speaker Maureen Money, Senior Self Director of
Mary Kay Cosmetics, will give a demonstration on "Make-
up for the Mature Woman."
YIDDISH CULTURE GROUP
A program dedicated to the Jewish Federation/United
Jewish Appeal will be presented on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 10
a.m. There will be no solicitation.
Erwin H. Blonder, President of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County will speak briefly, as well as Sam
Wadler and Nathan Cohen. A film entitled "Then As Now,
Now as Then" will be shown, with Eddie Cantor, George
Jessel, Edward G. Robinson, etc.
Cantor Norman Brody of Temple Beth El, concert artist
and opera singer, will perform.
*t


-
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
r
--
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Prophets For Profit
The Comprehensive Senior Service Center, through a
Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, pro-
vides a variety of services to persons 60 years or older,
along with interesting and entertaining, educational
and recreational programs. All senior activities are con-
ducted in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights
Act.
The Jewish Community Center, 700 Spencer Drive, in
West Palm Beach, is an active place for all seniors. Hot
kosher meals are served every day and programs and ac-
tivities will be scheduled throughout the summer.
*
KOSHER MEALS
Monday through Friday,
older adults gather at the JCC
to enjoy kosher lunches and a
variety of activities. In-
teresting lectures, films,
celebrations, games, card play-
ing and nutritional education
are some of the programs of-
fered at the Center.
Watermelon feasts, special
dessert treats contests are also
planned. Summer is a great
time at the JCC. Transporta-
tion is available. Reservations
are required. Call Lillian at
689-7700. No fee is required
but contributions are
requested.
ONGOING PROGRAMS
Monday, Oct. 26 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Oct. 27 Speaker:
Helen Gold
Wednesday, Oct. 28 The
JCC goes to the Movies
Thursday, Oct. 29 -
Speaker: Mary Byekon of
Summit
Friday, Oct. 30 Speaker:
Fred Esienger. Topic: An
American in Israel
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Homebound persons 60
years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults. Call Carol for informa-
tion at 689-7700.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation, who must go
to treatment centers, doctors'
offices, hospitals and nursing
homes to visit spouses, social
service agencies and nutrition
centers. There is no fee for this
service, but participants are
encouraged to make a con-
tribution each time. Reserva-
tions must be made at least 48
hours in advance. For more in-
formation and/or reservations,
please call 689-7700 and ask
for Helen or Libby in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
ADULT EDUCATION
CLASSES
The Jewish Community
Center is proud to offer classes
Provided by Palm Beach
unior College and Palm
Beach County School Board-
Adult Education. This year,
both agencies are requiring
fees for these classes along
with pre-registration. The
schedule is as follows:
Palm Beach School Board-
Adult Education Classes
"The Gangs Weigh" -
Tuesdays, at 1:30 p.m.
"Changing Aging At-
titudes" Tuesdays, at 1:30
p.m.
"Exercise and Life Styles"
Wednesdays, at 10 a.m.
NOVEMBER PROGRAMS
"Lee Vassil Choral Group"
Wednesday, Nov. 11,
1:30-2:30 p.m. Colossal variety
program including show tunes,
nostalgia, Israeli music and a
tribute to the country's 200th
anniversary.
"Enjoying Retirement in
Palm Beach County" -
Thursday, Nov. 12, 1:30-2:30
p.m. sponsored by Barnett
Bank. Gift bag for every one
attending. Lecture slides, door
prizes, refreshments.
OTHER CLASSES
and AcnvrnEs
"Arts and Crafts" Mon-
days, at 1-3 p.m.
"Timely Topics" Mon-
days, Lunch at 1:15 followed
by Timely Topics at 2 p.m.
"Health and Reflexology"
Tuesdays, at 10:30 a.m.
"Second Tuesday Council"
Second Tuesday of each
month at 2 p.m.
"Bridge Instruction"
Basic Building and Play.
Wednesday, at 1:30 p.m.
"Speakers Club" -
Thursdays, at 10 a.m., next
meeting will be held on Oct.
22.
"Fun with Yiddish" -
Thursdays, at 10 a.m.
THURSDAY
AFTERNOON
POTPOURRI
"Thursday Filmfest" -
Thursday, Nov. 5, at 1:30 p.m.
Featured Film: Neal Simon's
Brighton Beach Memoirs.
"Prime Time Singles" -
Thursday, Oct. 22 at 1:30 p.m.
First meeting of new season.
Make new plans. Meet old
friends refreshments.
"Thursday Monthly Book
Review" Beginning Thurs-
day, Oct. 29.
"Writers Workahop" -
Friday, at 9:30 a.m.
NEW PROGRAM "JCC
Thespians" Everyone can
be a star. Join us and have fun.
Discover unsuspected talents.
Theatre group will meet once a
week and will be directed by
Marjorie Drier.
"Action Line" By ap-
pointment only! On Wednes-
day afternoon, the JCC will be
offering Legal and accounting
services.
"Trips, Card Party Lun-
cheon" JCC Lido Spa Trip!
- Sunday, Nov. 15 four
days, three nights. Transpor-
tation and gratuities included
in cost.
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
More than 60 years after its
creation by such early
American Zionist leaders as
Louis Brandeis and Felix War-
burg, PEC Israel Economic
Corporation continues to
benefit both Israel's economy
and investors in the holding
company.
PEC recently announced
substantial increases in earn-
ings for the first half and se-
cond quarter of 1987. For the
first six months of this year,
earnings were $4,721,949, or
64 cents per share a gain of
113 percent from the same
period last year.
(In 1986, earnings for the
first six months were
$2,177,050 or 30 cents per
share; net income for all of
that year was 60 cents per
share.)
For the quarter ending June
30, 1987, PEC's net income
was $2,713,183, or 37 cents
per share, up from $1,639,759,
or 23 cents per share in the
same period during 1986.
An American company in-
corporated in Maine in 1926
(as Palestine Economic Cor-
poration), PEC was founded as
a means of fostering economic
development in tile Yishuv
(Jewish community in
Palestine). "The philosophy of
the founders was that support
of Israel should not only be
donations, but also making
sound economic investments,"
PEC president Joseph
Ciechanover told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency.
"Current results justify our
faith in the basic soundness of
Israel's economy. It was an
outstanding achievement for
Israel to reduce its inflation
rate from 500 percent in 1985
to less than 16 percent so far
this year. PEC's continued
rise in profits reflects improve-
ment in the net income of most
of the company's affiliates and
a substantial increase in net
gain on sales of investments.
Traded on the American
Stock Exchange under the
symbol "IEC," PEC
organizes, finances and par-
ticipates in the management of
widely diversified businesses
located in Israel or affiliated
with Israeli enterprise.
The two largest
Israel Fights
Drug Abuse
Continued from Page 7
But the main factor that has
increased national awareness
of the dangers of drug use is
the risk of Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS),
an invariably fatal condition
which can be contracted by the
use of contaminated needles to
inject drugs.
Drug addicts were described
at the meeting as the slaves of
the 20th century. The police
complained that the courts
have been too lenient in the
punishment meted out to drug
offenders, thereby weakening
the deterrent factor. The
police charged there is insuffi-
cient cooperation between
school principals and law en-
forcement authorites in the
prevention of drug use and
treatment for users.
shareholders are IDB Develop-
ment Corporation Ltd. (a
member of the IDB
Bankholding Group in Israel),
which owns 80 percent of the
shares, and companies con-
trolled by Edmund de
Rothschild, which hold 12 per-
cent. The other eight percent
is owned by American in-
dividuals and institutions.
Among PEC's current equi-
ty holdings are affiliated com-
panies and wholly-owned sub-'
sidiaries in such fields as high
technology and scientific
research, heavy and light in-
dustry, shipping and
marketing, finance and bank-
ing, and real estate and
development.
Some of PEC's affiliations,
such as Property and Building
Corporation, one of the largest
real estate holding companies
in Israel, and General
Engineers, exclusive
distributor and agent in Israel
for General Electric Company,
predate the State of Israel.
Other PEC affiliates in
Israel include Israel Can Com-
pany, Klil Industries
(aluminum extrusions), Mul-T-
Lock (security equipment),
Tambour Paints, Elron Elec-
tronic Industries, Scitex Cor-
poration (computer imaging),
El-Yam Ships, Ofran Drive
Yourself (rental cars) and
Super-Sol supermarkets.
The only PEC investment
outside of Israel is Israel Dis-
count Bank of New York, of
which PEC has 18 percent of
the shares. The bank, PEC's
main affiliate and largest in-
vestment, is the 15th largest
commercial bank in New York
State, in terms of deposits.
Assets on June 30, 1987 were
$3.8 billion. PEC president
Ciechanover is also president
of the bank.
"PEC only invests in com-
panies in which it can par-
ticipate in the management,"
Ciechanover said. "We have
initiated hundreds of com-
panies, helped them get
started, brought them to
maturity, and then, at the
right time, sold our holdings.
Our holdings are constantly
turning over, as we sell them
and acquire new ones. We
make sound economic in-
vestments, and are so diver-
sified we can show a
reasonable profit."
Through its sister company
in Israel, Discount Investment
Corporation, PEC maintains
financial and administrative
expertise to supervise the
operation of its affiliated com-
panies there. Experience with
its diversified affiliates also
helps PEC to evaluate new and
promising business oppor-
tunities in Israel.
The results today reflect
both the foresight of Brandeis
and Warburg and
Ciechanover's current obser-
vation: A sound investment in
Israel can profit both the coun-
try's economy and the
investor.
JCC News
SINGLES (25-55)
Participate in a Seaside Weekend from Friday, Nov. 6
through Sunday, Nov. 8 at the new resort Holiday Inn on
Singer Island. Join together for Shabbat Services, gourmet
food, choice of workshops relative to singles, Health Club,
beach and pool facilities plus a Gala Saturday Night Dance.
To attend only the dance, or for information regarding the
weekend, call Ann.
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
Get together at Gary's place (near the Palm Beach Mall)
on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 9 p.m. to celebrate Octoberfest. Br-
ing your favorite exotic beer or ? and "Grin and Beer It" at
this seasonal event. Call for directions. Donation: JCC
members $1, non-members $3.
Meet at Amy's home on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 6:30 p.m. to
plan for future "happenings." Bring your ideas and
creativity new members are always welcome. After-
wards we'll go out for a nibble together. Call for location
and directions.
YOUNG SINGLES
On Saturday, Oct. 31 at 8:30 p.m., get together at a
member's home for a costume party. Open bar, munchies
and music. Fee: JCC members $4, non-members $6.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Get together Sunday, Oct. 25 at 9:30 a.m. for a scenic
bike ride. Meet in front of the Royal Poinciana Playhouse in
Palm Beach (just over the Flagler Bridge on the south
side). Bike rentals are available nearby. Non bikers can join
the group for brunch at Wags (Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
west of 1-95). Donation: $1 plus own fare.
Meet at the Center on Tuesday, Oct. 27 at 7:30 p.m. to
plan events for the upcoming holiday season. Afterwards,
we'll go out for a bite to eat together.
Get together on Wednesday, Oct. 28 from 5-7 p.m. for
the Happy Hour at Ben's Steakhouse (Congress Ave. 1 bl.
so. of 10th Ave. No.) in Lake Worth. Donation: $1 plus own
fare.
Get together Saturday, Oct. 31 at 8:30 p.m. at a
member's home for a Costume and Dessert Party. Dress in
a favorite costume, and bring a favorite dessert. Donation:
JCC members $2, non-members $3 PLUS A DESSERT.
>* .


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
CHEESE FOR ALL REASONS
Cheese from Norway Jarlsberg, Nokkelost and Gjetost
has been dubbed cheese for all reasons because of its ver-
satility and universal appeal.
The good news is that elegant, tasty fare can also be
relatively light. While certainly not "diet" dishes per se,
the following recipes should please the palate and leave
guests feeling comfortable afterwards.
Norwegian cheese also fits into Americans newly
discovered love of "grazing." Lots of nutritionists think it's
a terrific idea so long as you chose healthy fare. The
salads, enriched in taste and texture by a pair of adaptable
Norwegian cheeses, certainly qualify on that count. For the
most part, they require little effort to prepare and elevate
grazing to an art.
JARLSBERG PARTY SWIRL
1 loaf frozen bread dough
1 cup shredded Jarlsberg cheese
V cup chopped pitted black olives
lk cup minced green pepper
A Tsp. chili powder
lk Tsp. garlic salt
Melted butter or margarine
Place bread dough in greased shallow bowl. Cover,
defrost and let rise until doubled, according to package
directions.
In bowl combine cheese, olives, pepper, chili powder and
garlic salt. Blend well.
Divide dough into thirds. On lightly floured board, roll
each into 15x3-inch rectangles. Brush with melted butter.
Reserving V4 cup cheese mixture for topping, sprinkle re-
maining cheese mixture over dough. Roll each up jelly-roll
fashion, to make 3 rolls 15 inches long. Braid together.
Pinch ends to seal and tuck under. Place on ungreased bak-
ing sheet.
Bake at 375 F for 25 minutes. Sprinkle reserved cheese
down center of bread. Bake 5 minutes longer. Serve warm.
Makes one large loaf.
JARLSBERG BROCCOLI SLAW
2 cups shredded broccoli stems
1 cup broccoli florets
1 cup cubed Jarlsberg cheese
1 cup shredded carrot
1 small purple onion, cut in strips
Vz cup chopped walnuts
V cup raisins
2/3 cup bottled creamy Italian dressing
Crisp salad greens (optional)
In bowl, combine first 7 ingredients. Add dressing and
toss to blend. If desired, serve on crisp greens. (Mixture
may be served immediately or refrigerated several hours to
overnight, to further blend flavors.) Makes 6 to 8 servings.
Of course, what's a more natural combination than bread
and cheese.
SCALLPED POTATOES NOKKELOST
1 cup chopped leek
V< cup (Vz stick) butter or margarine
'/ cup unsifted all-purpose flour
IV2 Tsps. salt
1/8 Tsp. pepper
2 cups milk (whole, low-fat or skimmed)
8 cups sliced red-skinned potatoes unpeeled
2 cups shredded Nokkelost cheese
% cup bread crumbs
4 Tbsps. melted butter or margarine
In saucepan, cook leeks in Mi cup butter until tender. Add
flour, salt and pepper. Gradually add milk. Cook, stirring
until thickened.
In 2-quart buttered baking dish, arrange half of the
potatoes, half sauce and half the cheese mixture. Repeat
layering.
Bake, covered, at 375 F for 45 minutes. Uncover. Blend
bread crumbs and remaining butter. Sprinkle around edge
of casserole. Bake 15 minutes longer. Makes 8 servings.
WINTER GARDEN SALAD
2 cups broccoli florets
2 cups cauloflowerets
1 Pkg- (10 oz.) kidney beans, drained
1 medium red pepper, cut in strips
1 small purple onion, sliced and separated into rings
1 cup bottled Caesar salad dressing
V cup chopped parsley
Vz Tsp. crushed (or 2 Tsps. fresh) basil
IV2 cups cubed Jarlsberg cheese
4 endive, cut into circles _._ __,
1/3 cup toasted pignoli (pine) nuts (or equivalent blanched,
slivered amonds)
Crisp salad greens
In bowl, combine first 6 ingredients. Add dressing
parsley and basil. Toss to blend. Cover and refrigerate until
ready to use.
Just before serving, add cheese, endive and nuts. Spoon
onto crisp greens. Makes 8 servings.
The Jews Of Argentina
Continued from Page 6
the Jewish survival, the dif-
ferent groups have different
hierarchies of worries.
The older DAIA leaders and
their supporters worry
primarily about what would
happen physically to the
Jewish community if it backed
democracy to the hilt and then
it was overthrown. Said
Polack at the meeting with the
American Jewish delegation.
"We mustn't give opinions
that might be used against the
community. We don't have the
security that in three, four
months, the political scenery
won't have changed." The im-
pression from the remarks of
Polacks and other DAIA
leaders was that there was a
kind of "border" for their sup-
port of democracy, beyond
which they would not go.
Asked about this, Herman
Schiller, president of the
JHRM and editor of the con-
troversial and outspoken
Spanish-Jewish weekly Nueva
Presencia, told JTA that "that
border is that they are prepar-
ing for the return of the junta.
If they thought the junta
wouldn't return, there would
not be such a border."
Schiller and other ycung and
liberal elements in the com-
munity worry as well, about
what would happen to Jewish
life if democracy were over-
thrown. Rabbi Baruj Plavnick,
who took over the pulpit of
JHRM founder Rabbi Marshall
Meyer at the Conservative
Comunidad Beth-El, said
"Under the junta, there was
no creativity, we were a dying
community. If there's no
democracy, the Jewish com-
munity is finished."
Worried About The Jewish
Youth
They also worry about what
will happen to the community
if Jewish youth who seek to be
involved in Argentine life and
its concerns, including
democracy and human rights,
do not see the community ac-
tively dealing with these
issues. With assimilation being
rampant, their question is, can
we put our communal life in
jeopardy by losing our youth
through default? Said Paul
Warsawsky, an attorney ac-
tive in human rights causes:
"Jewish youth want to par-
ticipate more in general life.
The community may be unable
or unwilling to enter into an
engagement with current pro-
blems, but this is not the case
with Jewish youth," many of
whom drop out of the com-
munity because it does not ad-
dress the issues they are con-
cerned with.
Filmmaker Aida Bortnik,
who wrote the film script for
the Oscar-winning "The Of-
ficial Story," which dealt sen-
sitively with the aftermath of
the reign of terror, told JTA
how she "began to know I am
a Jew" when death threats
forced her into exile in Spain in
1976. Feeling herself "part of
Argentina but also very much
a Jew," Bortnik is active in
Alfonsin's Radical Party.
She said that when she and
her non-Jewish husband
visited Israel in 1984, where
they were deeply moved by
meeting Jews "who came to
build the dream" and former
ghetto resistance fighters, she
was asked repeatedly why
Argentine Jews are "so com-
promised with the Radical Par-
ty and democracy. I was told
this is dangerous and could be
a bad influence if things go
bad. But I feel we have no
other way." She continued:
"In exile, I experienced and
learned what kind of life I
want for myself and those
after me, and the responsibili-
ty of being an intellectual to
be in the middle of what's hap-
pening. I learned that if we
don't fight for elemental
rights, we can't have a
democracy."
The Mosaic At The T:
New York Gets New Theater
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK The Mosaic
Theater has developed an in-
augural schedule of original
theater addressing timeless
social aspects of Judaism in-
cluding history, identity and
poetry and music it hopes is
worthy of its namesake.
This "theater with adven-
ture," as its artistic director,
Michael Posnick, describes it,
"deals with Jewish ideas and
aspects that haven't appeared
on stage in a long time ...
Jewish myths, heroes .
streams of Jewish life that are
daring and cannot be
politicized."
Operating from a crowded
fourth floor office with three
paper-laden desks, The Mosaic
Theater replaces the American
Jewish Theater, which has
relocated downtown after
seven years at the 92nd Street
Y cultural and educational
center. The Mosaic Theater
will perform six productions in
a 110-seat Y theater.
Posnick, who will direct two
of them, has directed theater
for two decades at the Yale
Repertory Theater, the
Manhattan Theater Club, the
National Theater of the Deaf,
Playwrights Horizons, the
Long Wharf Theater and the
O'Neill Theater Center, and
has taught at the Yale Drama
School and Hunter College.
He helped to organize the
First International Conference
and Festival of Jewish Theater
in 1982 in Tel Aviv, staged the
New York Chamber Sym-
phony production of the
Brecht-Weill "Mahogany
Songspiel" in the 1985-86
season at the Y and has been a
theater consultant for the Na-
tional Foundation for Jewish
Culture.
Posnick said he was pleased
when Omus Hirshbein, direc-
tor of the Y's Performing Arts
Department, asked him to join
the Mosaic project. "I was
grateful for the opportunity to
bring together the two very
powerful aspects of my life, '
Posnick explained. "I have the
impulse to explore what it
means to bear the identity of
being a Jew, so the plays apply
to me."
The productions, which run
at intervals to July 10, "can
serve as a bridge between ex-
ploring one's own identity as a
Jew as a being who lives in
America," Posnick said. "But
they may just engender more
questions."
Kicking off the season, the
San Francisco-based A Travel-
ing Jewish Theater will ex-
plore issues of contemporary
Jewish identity with music,
humor, puppetry and dramatic
images in "Berlin, Jerusalem
and the Moon." The theater
group called on Posnick to
direct this New York premiere
of the production, which
recently drew praise at Israeli
and European festivals.
A more controversial pro-
duction, "Acts of Faith," will
follow. Set in a hijacked jet
bound for the United States
from Israel, the play, a world
premiere by Marilyn Felt,
centers on the relationship bet-
ween a 35-year-old American
Jewish divorcee and a young
Shiite hijacker. The woman is
faced with the opportunity to
save the life of the hijacker as
he begins choking. Posnick
hopes the dilemma will
generate discussion and pro-
voke thought.
Continuing with the em-
phasis on enriching Jewish
culture is the third piece, "An
Evening of Jewish Story
Theater." Paul Sills will pre-
sent a musical journey through
Jewish folktales from around
the world. The stories, based
on those from Howard
Schwartz's books "Elijah's
Violin" and "Miriam's Tam-
bourine," hold a mirror to a
Jewish home "to explore this
unique Jewish world in order
to discover its universality,"
Posnick said.
Addressing a more historical
theme, the fourth play,
"Rosenfeld's War" by Gus
Weill and directed by Posnick,
is a documentary drama based
on transcripts from the 1939
Congressional hearings on a
bill that would have extended
the existing immigration
quotas to allow 20,000 children
from Germany to enter the
United States. President
Roosevelt rejected the bill.
Posnick explained that "the
purpose of the play is not to
point a finger at a dead person
or remourn the Holocaust. The
goal is to generate a new kind
of listening. When people hear
the words of almost 50 years
ago, they should recognize
that those same words are be-
ing spoken in different parts of
the world and to different peo-
ple today."
On May 15, the last day of
the performance of
"Rosenfeld's War," a public
symposium entitled "From
Shoah to Sanctuary" will ex-
amine American response to
the Holocaust and current im-
migration issues.
.--


-
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
N.Y. Law Change To Protect
Critically Dl Observant Jews
1
o
swrpto
^BBAT SHALo*
BEN GALLOB
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Changes in New York State
medical and hospital pro-
cedures, which could involve
life-and-death decisions for
observant Jews, are in the pro-
cess of becoming law or having
the face of law.
The changes involve
withholding cardiopulmonary
resuscitation (CPR) from
stricken patients and the
related issue of criteria for
determination of death. The
changes are in part the pro-
ducts of an intense months-
long struggle in Albany, the
state capital, by the Agudath
Israel of America, a national
Orthodox organization.
The revisions, designed to
protect tiie rights of observant
Jews, were made part of two
bills. One set guidelnes for doc-
tors in issuing "Do Not
Resuscitate" (DNR) orders;
the other was meant to meet
Orthodox objections to the pre-
sent definition of death based
on "irreversible cessation of
all functions of the entire
brain, including brain stem,"
according to David Zweibel,
Agudath Israel's director of
Office of Governmental Af-
fairs and its General Counsel.
A DNR order is an instruc-
tion placed in the medical
chart of a patient to withhold
CPR.
The two bills were approved
by the Assembly and State
Senate Gov. Mario Cuomo
signed only the DNR measure
during the first week in
August, to become effective
next April. However, he took
no action on the Definition of
Death bill, apparently because
his Task Force on Law and
Life, after listening to
testimony on the bills, ap-
parently favored the DNR
measure but was negative to
the proposed changes in the
definition of death. Zweibel
testified on both.
Zweibel explained, in his
testimony that Agudath Israel
protested the concept in that
bill of "unlimited individual
autonomy" because that con-
cept gave the stricken patient
an absolute right to decline
CPR, in the event of car-
diopulmonary arrest, even
when expectation of recovery
by the patient was "positive.'
He testified that, "as
evidenced by laws against
suicide, society has a substan-
tial interest in the preserva-
tion of human life an in-
terest so substantial that it
outweighs an individual's
choice that for him (or her) life
is no longer worth living."
He told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
must be added "a limitation on
the individual's right to decline
life-sustaining (CPR)
treatment."
He told the JTA that "we
think a society which permits
suicide is a society which
devalues the sanctity of human
life" and that the autonomy
concept retained in the DNR
law "comes close to it."
A second Aguda objection,
which Zweibel said was needed
by the legislators, was that the
measure did not protect the
religious rights of an in- beliefs, the hospital would be
capacitated person who re- "required reasonably to ac-
quires a surrogate to commodate" those beliefs
communicate. Zweibel said.
A surrogate is defined in the
new law as a relative; or an in-
dividual specifically chosen by
the patient; or, when no such
person is present, a "close
friend" familiar with the pa-
tient's religious beliefs. A sur-
rogate's decision can be
challenged by the patient's
family.
In the absence of a sur-
rogate, doctors would be
authorized to withhold CPR if
they considered it "medically
futile," or when a court ap-
proved a DNR on the basis of
the patient's "known wishes"
or on "a finding of the pa-
tient's best wishes."
In place of the apparently
defunct Definition of Death
measure, the State Depart-
ment of Health prepared new
regulations to accommodate
beliefs of patients who have
religious objections to the con-
cept of "irreversible cessation
of all functions of the entire
brain." On that basis, doctors
could withhold CPR from a pa-
tient defined as brain-dead,
Zweibel said.
The new regulations require
hospitals, prior to a final deter-
mination of "brain death," to
make reasonable efforts to
notify the patient's next of kin,
or a close friend, that such a
finding was imminent. If the
relative or friend indicated
that medical reliance on the
"brain death" criterion would
offend the patient's religious
Many, though not all,
Halachic authorities, hold that
death occurs when there is ir-
reversible cessation of
breathing, cardiac activity and
brain activity. Some
authorities consider cessation
of breathing the most reliable
indicator of death.
Zweibel said the issue before
the legislation was not the dif-
ferences among Jewish
authorities over criteria of
death, but rather as he
testified at various hearings
"we simply ask that society
not impose its secular views"
on definition of death "upon
particular religious
communities."
He told the Assembly Health
Committee that the death
definition revision had the sup-
port of a broad spectrum of the
Jewish community, including
the National Jewish Commis-
sion on Law and Public Affairs
(COLPA), which helped draft
the measures, and other
Jewish groups.
The new death definition
resolutions were published in
the New York State Register,
providing a 30-day period for
public comment. Since there
has been no negative comment
about the brain death amend-
ment for observant Jews, the
regulations become as binding
as statutory law, upon health
committee actions.
IDF Divided
On 'Purity Of Weapons'
TEL AVTV A fierce
debate has broken out in the
top echelons of the Israeli Ar-
my over the controversial
policy known as "purity of
weapons."
The policy, which has been
unofficially observed by the
Army for many years,
stipulates that Israeli soldiers
should risk their lives rather
than accidentally endanger
enemy civilians. It also man-
dates that Israel refrain from
bombing terrorist targets
located close to civilian areas.
The policy first sparked
public criticism during the
Lebanon War, when Israeli
troops were ordered to go
from house to house hunting
terrorists, which resulted in a
high casualty toll.
Israel's bombing raids on
PLO targets in Sidon have
sparked a new debate on the
subject. Some civilians were
accidentally killed in the raid,
prompting Major-General
Moshe Bar Kochba to complain
that the raid should not have
been carried out.
Gen. Bar Kochba's un-
precedented public criticism of
the Army's action has in-
furiated Chief of Staff Dan
Shomron, who has defended
the raid as a necessary strike
against an important PLO ter-
rorist headquarters.
Writing in the daily
Ha'aretz, military affairs cor-
respondent Ze'ev Schiff
defended Bar Kochba's
criticism of the raid. Although
the raid "was successful from
the purely operational point of
view" in that it "succeeded in
thwarting a terrorist attack
(on Israel)," Schiff wrote, it
was nevertheless "immoral"
to strike at PLO sites in
civilian areas.
Schiff claimed that many
Israeli Army officers endorse
the "purity of weapons" con-
cept, "and that is the reason
why Israel does not respond
immediately with heavy shell-
ings of the Shi'ite villages
whenever a katyusha rocket is
launched at the Galilee."
Israeli Jets
Hit Bekaa
BEIRUT A one-story
building used by the Marxist
Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine was
destroyed by a weekend Israeli
air strike against PLO bases in
the Bekaa region of eastern
Lebanon.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.; Thurs-
day 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder. Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m. Rabbi
Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew Beck.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing Address: 6085
Parkwalk Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33437. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Benjamin Shull. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. HaverhiU Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night
services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 335-7620.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m. Student Rabbi Elaine Zechter.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
34982. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 S. Chillingworth Dr., West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.

m


Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Synagogue News
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Shabbat service on Friday,
Oct. 23 will be conducted by
Rabbi Howard Shapiro. His
sermon will be: The Where,
The How and The Who, Part I.
Cantor Stuart Pittle will lead
the congregation in songs.
Service will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited. During
the service childcare is
provided.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Temple will be holding in-
tergenerational Sabbath Mor-
ning Services every Saturday
at 10:30 a.m. in the Bakst
Family Chapel of the new
synagogue.
This intimate service in-
volves adults and children in a
spiritual experience of prayer,
music, and study. The Service
has been planned by Rabbi Joel
Levine to encourage families
to attend synagogue more
often and to experience the
beauty and joy of Shabbat.
Candle lighting Time j
j ^^, Oct. 23 6:26 p.m. j
L
In November, adult classes
and tutorials will follow Ser-
vices, providing a full morning
of Shabbat spiritual activities.
For more information about
the temple, call or visit the
Bakst Family Chapel every
Saturday morning at 10:30
a.m.
Rabbi Frank Sundheim,
UHAC Southeast Regional
Director will install the Of-
ficers and Board Members of
temple during Sabbath Ser-
vices, Friday, Oct. 23 at 8 p.m.
1,483 Iranian Jews
Immigrated To
West Via Austria
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) In
the first eight months of 1987,
1.483 Jews from Iran im-
migrated to the West through
Austria, according to Austrian
Foreign Minister Alois Mock.
In a press conference here,
Mock disclosed that a total of
5,188 Iranian Jews im-
migrated via Austria between
July 1, 1983 until August of
this year.
Mock stressed that his
government is proceeding
"without asking too many
questions of the Iranian
refugees and without publiciz-
ing individual cases" in order
not to endanger the flow of
Jewish immigrants from Iran
in the future and the remain-
ing relatives of those Jews who
were able to leave Iran. "It is
Austria's consistent policy to
help people in danger,
wherever they are and who
ever they are," Mock stated.
There are presently about
30,000 Jews in Iran and it is
believed that most of them
would emigrate to Israel and
other countries in the West if
they were allowed to do so by
the Iranian authorities.
The Austrian official, who
also serves as his country's
vice chancellor, said Jewish
emigration from the Soviet
Union has increased con-
Israelis
Optimistic
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
majority of Israelis believe the
Hebrew calender year just
ended was better than the
ious year and are op-
timistic about the future, ac-
ting to the results of a poll
n at Rosh Hashanah and
published in Haaretz Friday.
siderably, with 5,003 Soviet
Jews being granted exit visas
in the first eight months of
1987, compared to a total of
901 persons in 1986. He
pointed out that a total of
272,622 Soviet Jews passed
through Austria between 1958
and August 1987 on their way
to Israel or other countries.
"Austria continues to be
committed to giving free
choice as to where they want
to eventually settle down,"
Mock declared, adding,
"Austria will continue to act as
a country of first asylum for
refugees from all parts of the
world."
Rabbi Sundheim's visit to
Temple Judea is part of the
congregation's dedicatory
year of activities. Officers to
be installed include, Helaine
Kahn, President; Rosalee
Savel, Preston Mighdoll, and
Daniel Bakst, Vice Presidents;
C. Lorraine Hoffinger,
Secretary; and Gail Schwartz,
Treasurer. Members of the
Board of Trustees include Jack
Ainbender, Beth Chavin
Baker, Bud Gerson, Judge Ed-
ward Fine, Barbra Kaplan,
Marjorie Lesser, Dr. Schuyler
Metlis, Dr. Jack Frisch, Bar-
bara Schwartz, Stephanie
Wolmer, and Ann Young.
Honorary Board Members in-
clude Jerome Skalka, Mel
Levy, William Meyer, and Bill
Rothstein. Steve Berger is im-
mediate Past President. Bar-
bara Chane is founding
President.
Rabbi Joel Levine and Can-
tor Anne Newman will of-
ficiate at services. Following
the installation, Rabbi Sun-
dheim will be the guest
speaker.
Following services, the con-
gregation is invited to an oneg
shabbat sponsored by the
Board of Trustees. Childcare
will be available during
services.
For more information, call
the office.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB
The Sisterhood will hold
their regular monthly meeting
on Monday, Oct. 26, at noon.
Esther Pickholz will review
"Eleni" by Nicholas Gage.
Area Deaths
COHEN
Jack, 79, of Lake Worth. Menorah Gardens
and Funeral Chapels, West Palm Beach.
FEINSTEIN
Hilda, 81, of West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
FORMAN
Elsie, 72, of Century Village. West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
FRANK
Fred. 82. Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home.
West Palm Beach.
GOLDBERT
Joseph, 70, Atlantis. Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
GREENBERGER
Joseph, 87, of Golden Lakes. West Palm
H.Mch Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
HYMAN
Miriam. 72, of West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
KAVKEW1TZ
I. ins, 89. of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
KIMMELMAN
Ida, 75, of Century Village. West Palm
rdian Funeral Home,
I aim Beach.
I FIBOWITZ
Ruth, 72, ,'lm
h Kiv.tmiIi Guardian hmaral H
MORRIS
Kv.'lvn. ( Pall
I'aim Beach
RINGEL
Margaret, infant daughter of Theresa and
Nathan Ringel, of Jupiter. Levitt-Weinstein
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
ROOGOW
Solomon A., 81, of Century Village West
Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
RUBIN
Mitzi. 81. of Lake Worth. Riverside Guar-
dian Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SCHRAGER
Diana P., 45, of Lake Worth. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SOLOMON
Joseph, 98, of Jupiter. Levitt-Weinstein
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
STEIN
David, 85, of Boyntun Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
WEISS
George F., 78. of Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
WEITZMAN
88, of West Palm Beach. Gravisuic
> today at Menorah Garden.- I
Palm B.
WELSH
I II.. 87, of Century Village. West Palm
Menorah Gardens and Funeral
t h..|.. ,:m Beach.
WORTH
"aim Beach. Rival >duui
Home, Watt Palm Beach.
ZICHLDH
Guam Plan Chap
Palm X
Bar Mitzvah
STEPHEN SCHIFF
Stephen Seth Schiff, son of
Suellen and Robert Schiff of
Lake Clarke Shores, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, October
31, at Temple Israel. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will officiate.
Stephen is an eighth grade
student in Roosevelt Junior
High School, where he is a
member of the baseball team,
and president of the Varsity
"R'( Club. He attends
Midrasha.
Stephen will be twinned with
David Kasperovsky of Molda-
vian, Russia, who was denied
his freedom to be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah.
His brother, Ian, family
members and friends, will
share the simcha.
Stephen Schiff
New Israel Dental
School Dedicated
Alpha Omega, the Interna-
tional Jewish Dental Fraterni-
ty, recently celebrated the of-
ficial opening of the
Goldschleger School of Dental
Medicine at the Tel Aviv
University. This dental school
is one of only two in Israel. The
other one, The Hadassah
School of Dental Medicine,
was founded by Alpha Omega
in 1953 at The Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem.
Hopefully, the new Tel Aviv
dental school will help to
alleviate the great lack of den-
tal treatment in Israel's under-
privileged areas. The school's
students will serve after
graduation for three years in
dental clinics of the Kupat
Holim, the Israeli Health
Organization.
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
Join The Synagogue
Of Your Choice
... because vital Jewish institutions
build strong Jewish communities.
HEARX) ISRAJ'X:
'J')).]- 1.0RJ) OUR GO] l
ISDN)- 1.0RJ)
THE ON) X LORD

7:30 PM NOV. 9TH
PALMS HOTEL
(fommrt* Tht Hytlll
Your Complete Night of Enjoyment
Compliments of Calvary Temple
For more information call
832-8479


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Extremists Convicted Of Threats Against IRS Agents
*
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Five members of a rightwing
tax-protest group with links to
a violently anti-Semitic
organization were convicted in
Las Vegas of threatening the
lives of agents of the Internal
Revenue Service and a Nevada
state judge.
The five are members of the
Committee of the States, a
group affiliated with the Chris-
tian Identity movement, which
espouses the belief that the
Jews are the children of Satan
and which calls the United
States government "ZOG" -
"Zionist-Occupied Govern-
ment." The Committee was
formed in 1984 in Mariposa,
California.
Convictions in Federal
District Court in Las Vegas
were meted out to Rev.
William Potter Gale, who
heads the Ministry of Christ
Church in Mariposa and is
founder of the Identity move-
ment; Fortunate Parrino, an
assistant at the church;
Richard Van Hazel of Arizona;
and Patrick McCray and his
brother George McCray, of
Nevada. A sixth defendant,
Gary Dolfin of Nevada, plead-
ed guilty to lesser charges
after the trial began.
In addition, two others nam-
ed in the indictment, Angelo
Stefanelli and Susan Kieffer of
Nevada, pleaded guilty to
reduced charges and agreed to
cooperate with the
government.
Those convicted face possi-
ble maximum sentences of 34
years' imprisonment and fines
of $250,000, according to assis-
tant U.S. prosecuting attorney
Richard Pocker.
The trial was monitored by
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith in Los Angeles,
which has furnished informa-
tion on the case to law enforce-
ment agencies throughout the
country. Betsy Rosenthal,
ADL Western states civil
rights director, called the ver-
dict a "warning to extremists
that the American people will
not tolerate their threats of
physical harm to our officials
and government institutions."
The ADL had obtained
documents from the Commit-
tee's first meeting, among
which was a statement warn-
ing that any attempt to in-
terfere with the group by any
person or government agency
would "result in the death
penalty being imposed upon
conviction by said
Committee."
For many years, the ADL
has been monitoring Gale, who
This Heifer
Wasn't Cowed
TEL AVTV (JTA) A
heifer at Kibbutz Magan gave
birth to a two-headed calf on
Yom Kippur. The bovine in-
fant was suckling with both
mouths, leading one wag to
liken it to the tax collector.
The heads are joined at the
middle. The calf therefore has
two ears but four eyes and two
noses. The zoological oddity is
rare but not unknown.
Veterinarians say two-headed
unimalw usually die shortly
afterbirth.
has a solidly racist, anti-
Semitic resume. According to
Rosenthal, it was Gale who
first introduced Rev. Richard
Butler, leader of the Aryan
Nations-Church of Jesus
Christ Christian in Hayden
Lake, Idaho, to the Identity
movement.
In addition, Gale was long
viewed as a leader of the Posse
Comitatus, an organization of
loosely affiliated bands of arm-
ed vigilantes. The Posse gain-
ed national recognition in 1983
when one of its members, Gor-
don Kahl, was indicted for kill-
ing two U.S. marshalls and
later killed himself in a shoot-
out with police in Arkansas.
Gale, as a Posse evangelist,
supplied tapes for broadcast to
radio station KTTL-FM in
Dodge City, Kansas, in 1983.
He, along with James
Wickstrom, another Posse
evangelist, also spoke at at
least one meeting of local
farmers stricken by the in-
tense farm crisis and prone to
scape-goating Jews and others
in a conspiracy against them.
In his broadcasts, Gale
espoused violence while invok-
ing God's name, and urged the
collection of dossiers on
"every damn Jew rabbi in this
land, and every Anti-
Defamation League leader or
JDL leader in this land." He is
alleged to hold paramilitary
training operations, Rosenthal
said, adding that Gale had
written training manuals for
the Posse. She said he is
reportedly in poor health.
An assistant to prosecuting
attorney Pocker said that Gale
is currently free on bail,
although Rosenthal said the
prosecution had argued that
he, and the others, were
dangerous and should be
imprisoned.
Trials are still pending for
other affiliates of the Identity
movement, including 11 na-
tionwide leaders of the Aryan
Nations, who were indicted on
charges of sedition by a federal
grand jury in Fort Smith,
Arkansas, about a half year
ago and who are scheduled to
stand trial in federal court
there next year. Among that
group is Butler, who is cur-
rently free on $100,000 bail.
Also indicted for sedition
was Robert Miles, a leader of
the Aryan Nations and also in-
volved in other neo-Nazi ac-
tivities. Miles, who calls
himself a minister, was
originally convicted of burning
school buses during integra-
tion of schools in Michigan in
the 1960s, for which he served
jail time. Miles' trial is schedul-
ed for next year.
Other members of the Aryan
Nations were convicted in re-
cent months in Tucson,
Arizona, on charges of
counterfeiting and attempting
to pass counterfeit notes at a
state fair in Spokane,
Washington. Trials were
scheduled last week for Ed
Hawley and David Dorr, im-
plicated in the bombings of
several locations in Coeur
D'Alene, Idaho, in September
1986, including several federal
buildings and the home of a
Roman Catholic priest and
human rights leader. The
priest, Father Bill Wassmuth,
was home at the time of the
bombing and barely escaped
with his life.
In addition, a trial is schedul-
ed Oct. 26 in Denver for those
accused of the murder of
Jewish talk-show host Alan
Berg in 1984. The
perpetrators were members of
The Order, an offshoot group
of the Aryan Nations.
In July, the Aryan Nations
held its annual conclave in
Hayden Lake, which was,
Wassmuth told JTA, "much
more low-key and less attend-
ed" than in past years and
primarily focused on fund-
raising for the trials. "There
was much less rhetoric than
usual about taking over,"
Wassmuth said.
The Kootenai County Task
Force on Human Relations, a
grass-roots organization which
Wassmuth chairs, held a rally
as in the past two years to
counter the Aryan Nations
gathering, to which human
rights activists from
throughout the Northwest
traveled.


Full Text
Friday, October 23, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11

The children stood on line to get their faces painted by the clowns.
(Left to right) Robert Abrams, Co-Chair of the Barbecue, the Rothenberg
family, Danielle, Esther, Mark, Lawrence, and Joshua, the Cohen family,
Robert, Steven, and Laura, and Joan Tochner, Co-Chair of the Barbecue.
JCDS Holds Eleventh Annual BBQ
On Sunday, Oct. 4, the
Jewish Community Day School
held their 11th Annual
Barbecue. The event was a
tremendous success as atten-
dance records and ticket sales
records were both broken,
stated Robert Abrams,
Barbecue Co-Chairman.
Over 400 people ate all the
hamburgers and hot dogs they
could handle, played Softball
and volleyball, decorated the
Sukkah, and enjoyed the
clowns. The parents of
kindergarten through 3rd
grades defeated the 4th
through 8th grade parents in
an exciting game of softball.
Climaxing the day was the
drawing for the grand prizes.
The winners were: 3rd prize of
$750 went to Esther and
Lawrence Rothenberg; 2nd
prize of $1,500 went to Jody
Bersin (sold by Steve and Lin-
da Cohen); and 1st prize of
$5,000 went to the grand-
daughter of Buddie Brenner.
Walters Optimistic About Efforts To
Rescind 1975 UN Resolution
BY YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Vernon Walters, the United
States Ambassador to the
United Nations, expressed op-
timism Monday night (Oct. 6)
that the efforts to rescind the
1975 UN General Assembly
resolution equating Zionism
with racism will eventually be
successful. But he made it
clear that more time is needed
to achieve this goal.
Speaking with reporters at
the Pierre Hotel, where he was
attending the annual dinner of
the Appeal of Conscience
Foundation, Walters said: "I
don't believe that we can res-
cind that infamous resolution
today but we are certainly
on our way." He likened the
resolution to apartheid,
stating: "This is a form of
apartheid by itself."
Walters said that he sent
this year, as he did last year, a
letter to UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar protesting the anti-
Zionist resolution and deman-
ding that it be abolished. In his
speech before the UN General
Assembly President Reagan
sharply denounced the
resolution.
Israeli diplomats at the UN
told the JTA that although
many countries which voted in
1975 for the resolution would
vote against it today, there is
still no majority among UN
members to rescind the
resolution.
The annual award of the Ap-
peal of Conscience Foundation
was presented during the din-
ner by Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
president of the Foundation,
to Dr. Rong Yiren, chairper-
son of the China International
Trust and Investment Cor-
poration, and American
businessman Arthur Ross.
Le Pen's Popularity Plummets
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
popularity of Jean Marie Le
Pen, leader of the extreme
rightwing National Front,
plummeted by 60 percent ac-
cording to a poll published in
Le Figaro apparently in reac-
tion to his public expression of
doubt that the Nazi gas
chambers ever existed and his
denigration of the Holocaust
as a "mere detail" in the
history of World War II.
The poll, conducted by the
highly reliable Sofres
organization for Le Figaro,
showed Le Pen's favorable
rating at 10 percent, down
from 17 percent in the latest
previous poll. Another poll,
conducted by the weekly USD,
found that only eight percent
of the population wanted Le
Pen to "play a political role in
France," compared to 12 per-
cent in an earlier poll.
Prime Minister Jacques
Chirac strongly condemned Le
Pen's remarks, which were
broadcast in a Radio Luxem-
bourg interview last month. It
was "horrible to listen to such
things," said Chirac, the first
French leader to speak out
publicly on the matter. He urg-
ed French schools to continue
to teach the history of World
War II and the tragedy of the
Holocaust.
Chirac's condemnation of Le
Pen indicated he has given up
any plans he might have had
for a political alliance with the
National Front in the
Presidential elections next spr-
ing. Observers here have
speculated in recent weeks
that Chirac and his center-
right RPR party was undecid-
ed on the matter.
Public opinion polls have in-
dicated that Chirac will need
the vote of the extreme right if
he is to carry the election. The
other principal center-right
Presidential hopeful, Raymond
Barre, has not commented on
Le Pen's remarks. But in view
of Chirac's highly publicized
statement, Barre, it is believ-
ed, will be forced to take a
public stand.
Le Pen, for his part, shrugg-
ed off the poll findings. He ac-
cused the poll takers of bias
and implied their findings

Energetic food servers on shift No. 2 included (left to right)
Floryn Needle, Linda Cohen, Marva Perrin, Linda Sommers.
China-Israel Trade In Offing
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two-
way trade between Israel and
the People's Republic of China
appears to have been advanced
at several meetings held here
recently between visiting
Chinese businessmen and
Minister of Commerce and In-
dustry Ariel Sharon, Yediot
Achronot reported Monday
(Oct. 5).
Sharon decided to change
existing policy by allowing the
import of goods from China.
Israel already exports various
items to China. Sharon con-
firmed the report but would
not say what those items are.
The visitors asked him to allow
large-scale imports of Chinese
goods but Sharon insisted that
any imports must be "on
reciprocal basis," the paper
reported.
Some Israeli products are
shipped directly to China in
vessels sailing from Eilat.
Others are sent via Hong
Kong. A Hong Kong
businessman in Israel recently
expressed interest in impor-
ting clothing, particularly
bathing suits.
One result of his visit is an
"Israel Week" to be held in
Hong Kong. Some of the items
displayed there may well end
up in China, Yediot Achronot
said.
were weighted against him.
Last Friday, the National
Front's 33 Deputies boycotted
the ceremonial opening of the
National Assembly which
began with a minute of silence
in honor of "all victims of the
Nazi Holocaust." The National
Front said it acted in protest
against accusations of anti-
Semitism levelled against it by
the Assembly's President Jac-
ques Chaban Delmas.
The French Jewish com-
munity responded to Le Pen
by crowding the synagogues
for Yom Kippur services. Com-
munity spokesmen said every
synagogue had standing room
only and hundreds of worship-
pers had to follow the services
from the sidewalks outside.
Meanwhile, Israel's Am-
bassador to France, Ovadia
Soffer, commented on reports
that Le Pen wants to visit
Israel. In an interview with Le
Figaro, Soffer said, "Israel is a
free and democratic country
and if he wants to visit he will
not be denied entry but no one,
no one in official circles, will
agree to meet with him."
THe
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FILES


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, October 23, 1987
Americans and Germans From the Other Side
Continued from Page 9
and the medium-sized power of
West Germany have diverged
widely even if strong bonds
still bind the two together.
The attitude of many
Germans remains to
this day somewhat
ambivalent. Hitler,
for example, regarded
Americans as
simpletons. Perhaps
such a statement
could be expected
from a man like him.
According to Hanrieder, the
recent dispute over the
medium-range missiles showed
that the consensus about the
character and intensity of the
Soviet threat is no longer
there.
Hanrieder described aptly
the nature of the German
paradox. The West Germans,
he said, "seem simultaneously
to be afraid tlfat the
Americans might use atomic
weapons and also that they
might not."
Fritz Stern points out that
the German destiny is directly
linked to the German-Russian
relationship in a manner which
many Americans don't
understand.
At the same time it's true to
say, as Frank Trommler, sym-
pathetically put it: The new na-
tional or European conception
of itself is developing out of a
distancing of itself from
America but not to Russia.
America's closeness deter-
mines its distance.
Whoever would like to know
more about what Americans
think about Germans, and isn't
afraid of taking up a heavy
academic text, will find highly
unflattering findings in a com-
pilation called Amerikaner
uber Deutschland und die
Deutschen, by the Tubingen
researchers Kurt Stapf,
Wolfgang Stroebe and Klaus
Jonas.
They investigated the views
of American students on Ger-
many and found that Germans
are not all too popular. Both
West and East Germans are
rated in the bottom third on an
international popularity scale.
Those interviewed admitted
that the Germans worked
hard, were efficient and family
orientated. But on the other
hand they tended to lack pas-
sion, be not open in attitudes
and to lack a zest for life.
Certainly the authors found
it not very flattering to have
West Germans placed next to
the Russians, the Poles and the
East Germans as the people
with the least/ote de vivre.
Whether American students
are representative of
American public opinion in
general remains an open ques-
tion. But such opinions are a
cause for worry, even if they
do not happen to agree with
one's own experience.
Many political observers
have become afraid that
America could turn away from
Europe and towards the
Pacific Basin. In view of the
still close relationship between
Germany and the U.S.A., that
might appear to be a
somewhat rash judgement.
The fact is that the make-up of
the immigrants has changed.
And that could play a decisive
role in determining where
American interests are.
This is pointed out in Donata
Elschenbroich's new, in parts
very subjective book, Eine Na-
tion von Einwandern.
To date 84 percent of recent
immigrants have come from
South America and Asia. In
the sixties 62 percent came
from Europe. This trend can
only weaken the European
component in the U.S.
The authoress, who is
employed at the German In-
stitute for Youth in Munich,
gives America a good report
card for the way it treats its
immigrants.
At the same time she takes
into account discrimination,
especially against ethnic
minorities. But she goes on to
point out the successful efforts
which have been made for
their legal and political
assimilation.
Even in Reagan's America,
the quota system has been by
no means abolished as an
emergency measure to
alleviate the disadvantages of
minorities.
Donata Elschenbroich com-
pares the self confidence of the
U.S. with the "against our
will" mentality of West Ger-
mans towards immigration.
What it means to be an im-
migrant in Germany is not so
clear. In her book she says that
American mainstream society
is more flexible. German
mainstream society is more
flexible. German mainstream
society in comparison, is as
rigid as concrete.
One may be in disagreement
with her opinion about West
German attitudes to im-
migrants. But one would have
to agree with her that
American behavior towards
the newly arrived has many
positive characteristics.
Many Germans have
themselves profited from the
U.S. attitude to immigration.
That's not to say that
American attitudes have
always been the best.
Professor David Wyman,
lecturer in history at the
university of Massachusetts,
deals in his book, Das uner-
wunschte Volk, with a dark
episode in American immigra-
tion history.
The author, who is a staunch
friend of Israel, has written
with bitterness about America
and the destruction of Euro-
pean Jews.
He has devastatingly con-
demned the Roosevelt govern-
ment for not helping the Jews
against the pilfering of the
Nazis. America he said, "was
the traditional land of the
persecuted and repressed. But
we let the Nazi murderers
have their way." Wyman
maintains that several hun-
dred thousand could have sur-
vived if the government hadn't
shown negligence and
carelessness in their handling
$4 Million Goal Set
Continued from Page 1
million for the construction of
a 160-bed nursing care
pavilion, an adult day care
center, a short-term rehabilita-
tion unit and a home health
care agency.
Several divisions and con-
dominium campaigns are
organized and actively
soliciting gifts. Members of the
Community Campaign Com-
mittee are Steve and Ruth
Abramson, Sol and Sylvia Ber-
man, Gil and Bea Bloch, Jackie
Eder, Ruthe Eppler, Murray
and Betty Green, Barbara Lil-
shitz, Robert and Cynnie List,
Bernard Plisskin, Lester and
Helen Sodowick, Irv and Flo
Stuart, Herman Stall, Sam
Wadler, and Mort and Anne
Weiss.
To make your pledge to the
Capital Campaign for the ex-
pansion of the Center, (which
may be paid over a three to
five year period), please con-
tact the Center's office of
Development 471-5111, or any
of the above noted committee
members.
International Analysts
To Address
Mideast Conference
Continued from Page 1
was asked by the University of
Miami to set up and serve as
Director of its Middle East
Studies Institute. His field of
academic specialization is the
modern history and politics of
the Middle East, with special
emphasis on Islam as a
political force. He has
authored and edited several
books and numerous articles.
Stephen Silberfarb, as one of
AIPAC's six registered lob-
byists, works with senators,
representatives and congres-
sional staff. Prior to joining
AIPAC in 1984, Mr. Silberfarb
worked for Representative
Michael Barnes (D-MD) and on
numerous state and federal
election campaigns. He has
of the matter. The author has
pointed out the negligence of
American Jews too.
In his book he says that the
Holocaust was certainly a
Jewish tragedy. But, also a
Christian tragedy for Western
civilization. People were
murdered while others just
looked on. Wyman closes his
stirring book, which makes use
of new sources, on a sarcastic
authored many articles on the
Middle East and is a frequent
contributor to the Near East
Report. Mr. Silberfarb is a
graduate of the University of
Maryland. He lived in Israel
for five years and is fluent in
Hebrew.
The cost of the entire pro-
gram, including a Kosher lun-
cheon, is $15. To reserve
space, mail a check payable to
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-Community
Relations Council, 501 So.
Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401. For
more information, contact
Rabbi Alan Sherman, CRC
Director, at the Federation of-
fice, 832-2120.
note. The European Jews he
writes, "were neither
Americans or Englishmen. It
was tough luck for them that
they were not only foreigners
but Jews of all people."
Even this episode is part of
American immigration
history. A part of history,
about which the Germans have
the least right to point an ac-
cusing finger.
Electoral Reform
May Salvage Split
Continued from Page 9
fashioning political reform, for
example, those in Scandinavia,
Britain and the United States.
In particular, the European
systems encourage the forma-
tion of strong, viable govern-
ing coalitions without
discouraging smaller parties
from participating in the
system. Israel should consider
the following proposal.
There shall be two elec-
tions a party primary in
which the country would vote
as a single constituency (as at
present), and a general elec-
tion in which the country
would be divided into 120
single-member districts.
In the party election, each
voter would cast a ballot for a
party and for its leadership.
The ballot would list the can-
didates for leadership; such
candidates may be chosen by
the parties, or may file
independently.
Only parties obtaining at
least 5 percent of the total
votes cast in the primary
would be permitted to present
a candidate in the districts in
the general election. There
would be no residency require-
ment for candidates in the
general election.
It is assumed that party
leaders chosen in the primary
election would become can-
didates for the office of Prime
Minister; however, they would
remain eligible only if they also
were elected in the district in
which they chose to stand in
the general election. A party
that lost its leader in the
general election would choose
a replacement from the list it
presented in the primary.
As in the present system,
the party commanding a ma-
jority would form the
government.
In the Knesset, members
would be released from party
discipline if the first vote on
any issue was inconclusive;
thereafter they may vote
their conscience.
These or similar reforms
would permit the smaller par-
ties to test their national ap-
peal in the primary, then en-
courage them to seek alliances
for the general election if they
fall below the 5 percent
threshold. Above all, the
single-member district rule
would move the country closer
to viable governing majorities
without also (as in the case of
Britain) discouraging either
the major opposition party or
smaller regional or local
parties.
It may well be that a can-
didate such as Meir Kahane of
Kach would be elected under
the new rules, but that could
hardly be counted a loss to
Israeli democracy. And the
gain would be the encouraging
of present or future parties to
seek broader, more represen-
tative constituencies based on
the issues of national concern.
Premier Shamir and Foreign
Minister Peres now have an
historic opportunity to join
hands and push for these or
similar political reforms.
Likud and Labor command
sufficient votes in the Knesset
to pass such legislation.
After 40 years of wandering
in the political desert, a new
post-statehood generation in
Israel must now challenge old
self-serving dogma. They must
demand from their leadership
a new political order that will
strengthen Israel internally
and enhance its image and
credibility throughout the
world.
Israel's political and
economic security as well as
the prospect for an overall
Middle East settlement may
depend on how this issue is
addressed.
Dr. Alon Ben-Meir is a
political scientist, author and
lecturer specializing in
Mideast and Jewish affairs.
Chinese Scientists
May Reciprocate Visits
Continued from Page 5
a group until now.
Golan said he used his Israeli
passport even though China
has never officially recognized
Israel, and received a warm
welcome.
"They are very interested in
Israeli science. They know
there is more scientific output
from Israel than there is from
all of China. I was accepted
very warmly. They are very in-
terested in plugging into the
international scientific net-
work," Golan said.
He said he thought that
Chinese scientists would begin
coming to Israel in a year or
two. 'They are all interested
but are also somewhat hesitant
about being the first to ask for
a Chinese exit visa to come to
Israel," he said.
Golan said he and his
Chinese colleagues talked very
little of politics. "They are not
that interested in politics. The
Middle East problem is very
far from their thoughts or in-
terests. Their attitudes toward
us and our regional problems is
like ours toward Campuchea,
which does interest them," he
said.