The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00085

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text


THE VOICE OP
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OP
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
"Jewish flor idian
VOLUME 13 NUMBER 27
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,1967
PRICE 40 CENTS
< f*4
Hess Buried In Secret
Members of Temple Judea joyously hold ceremonies
hands as they encircle their newly con- page 11.
structed synagogue at dedication
held Aug. 23. See article
Israel Cancels Lavi Jet
Israel's Cabinet voted 12-11,
with one abstention, Sunday to
cancel the Lavi warplane. This
followed a tense national
debate over the jet which was
considered by many to be the
best of its kind but whose ac-
celerating costs many feared
would strain Israel's fragile
economy.
The Reagan administration
had urged the scrapping of the
U.S.-financed project. The
vote will likely influence the
high-technology industry in
Israel and the nature of
U.S.-Israeli strategic coopera-
tion in the future.
The Cabinet accepted the
proposal of Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres to scuttle the
Lavi project after he used his
political leverage within his
Labor Party. Although Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
his Likud bloc ministers sup-
ported the project, he did not
invoke party discipline to in-
fluence the vote.
Peres saw the Lavi as a
doomed venture and submitted
a plan for Israel to cut its
losses.
Peres' plan calls for the
Israel Aircraft Industies (IAI),
and the myriad smaller con-
Inside
Community Invited to JCC
Opon House,
Sign Dedication ... page 2
Papal Novelties... paga 4
Update... Opinion by
Toby F. Wllk... paga 5
Project Renewal... page 7
Chaplain Aidaa Gear Up
For High Holidays...
page 9
tractors involved in the Lavi
project, to become involved in-
stead in the development and
production of a new genera-
tion F-16.
The U.S. Defense Depart-
ment proposed such Israeli in-
volvement in 1986, in the
course of its ongoing efforts to
persuade Israeli policymakers
to forgo the Lavi. Washington
feels the Lavi is too costly for
Israel to undertake without
seriously prejudicing other
vital defense needs. Pentagon
officials, and Israeli Air Force
experts, believe the present
generation F-16 can fulfill the
needs designed to be covered
by the Lavi.
Peres' plans would assume
U.S. consent to convert to
Shekels and use in Israel a fur-
ther $100 million of the U.S.
military aid package ($1.8
billion annually) for the
Lavi-^000 Project.
Washington has indicated in
the past that it would agree to
this.
In effect, the Lavi 2000 idea
would mean Israeli participa-
tion in American plans for an
ATF or Advanced Tactical
Fighter, viewed by U.S. plan-
ners as the leap forward soon
imminent in warplane design
and technology.
By referring to Lavi 2000,
Peres apparently hoped to woo
some of the Ministers who had
backed continuation of the pre-
sent Lavi project. Peres
himself had become convinced,
during weeks of intense con-
sultations with Defense and
Finance Ministry officials, that
the present project is not
Continued on Page 7
MUNICH -(JTA)- Rudolf
Hess, Hitler's deputy, was
buried Monday (Aug. 24) in
secret at an unknown location.
German Radio said the federal
government ordered his im-
mediate burial to prevent nor-
ther neo-Nazi demonstrations
and efforts to try to turn the
former Spandau prisoner into
"some sort of martyr."
The Mayor of Wunsiedel,
Hess' home town where the
burial was scheduled to take
place Wednesday afternoon,
said that Hess has not been
buried anywhere in or near the
city.
IT IS NOT known whether
Hess' widow, Lisa, 87, attend-
ed the ceremony. His son,
Wolf-Ruediger, 50, is still in
the intensive care unit of a
Munich hospital after suffer-
ing a stroke Saturday evening
at his Munich home.
Hess died in Berlin's four-
power Spandau Prison for war
criminals where he had been
Continued on Page 14
JCCampus
YoungttProfessional
Cabinet Formed
In an special effort to reach
out to young professionals in
this community and involve
them in building the new
Jewish Community Campus, a
Young Professional Cabinet is
in the process of being formed
under the direction of Arnold
Lampert, Community Cam-
paign Chairman.
The announcement was
made by Gilbert S. Messing,
Chairman of the JCCampus
Capital Campaign. "It is most
significant that Arnold will be
heading this core group of
young professionals who have
already made their commit-
ment of $5,000 to $50,000 to
our fund raising drive. He has
a wonderful track record of
organizing successful cam-
paigns and we welcome his
participation," stated Mr.
Messing.
The JCCampus will be built
on a site at Military Trail and
12th Street in West Pahn
Beach and will house the
Jewish Community Center,
Arnold L. Lampert
the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, and the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
The first meeting of the
cabinet will be held on Sept.
15, Mr. Lampert announced.
Continued on Page 12

Supporters of the Jewish Community Campus Capital Campaign respond to a toast to the early suc-
cess of the campaign at a Champagne Dessert Party held recently. For article and additional photos,
see page 2.
s/'


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Victor Duke Memorial
Tribute Fund
Honor Roll
Many people have made donations in memory of community
leader Victor Duke to the Jewish Community Center to be
located on the new Jewish Community Campus on Military Trail
and 12th Street. The JCCampus will also house the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County and the Jewish Family and
Children's Service.
The late Mr. Duke was a member of the Board of Directors
of the Jewish Community Center and very active in the cam-
paign to raise $12.5 million to build the new facility.
*Due to space restrictions, the following is only a partial list
of contributors. Additional donors will be recognized in weeks to
come.
Mrs. Jeanette Allen
Mr. and Mrs. Sid Ayers
Mr. Sidney Beitscher
Mrs. Edith Berger
Ms. Gertrude Birnback
B'nai B'rith Council,
District No. 5
Mr. and Mrs. M.L. Brody
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Buck
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Edelstein
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Farber
Mr. Joseph and Mr. Richard
Fi'ingold
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Fisherman
Ms. Libby Frankel
Mr and Mrs. Herman H. Ginsberg
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Gold
Miss Hilda Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gordon
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Gottlieb
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Hertzberg
Mr. William Horn
Mrs. Tilda Jacobson
Ms. Ruth Klein
Contributions may be sent to the Jewish Community Cam-
pus Capital Campaign, 501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401, earmarked for the Victor Duke
Memorial Tribute Fund. For more information, contact Marjone
Scott, JCCampus Capital Campaign Director, at 832-2120.
Dr. and Mrs. Seymour H. Livingston
Mr. and Mrs. Simon Magnus
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oxer
Mrs. Sally Plaxe
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome P. Polin
Mrs. Etta Ress
Mr. William Romer
Ms. Ethel Rosenthal
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Sakren
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schaevitz
Mr. Harry Shapiro
Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Solomon
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Steer
Ms. Augusta H. Steinhardt and
Dr. Rosalind S. Frim
Mr. and Mrs. George Sterling
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Vozick
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wadler
Mr. and Mrs. Zygmunt Weber
Mrs. Frances and Lenore
Weinstein
Ms. Eleanor Weinstock
Correction
In the last issue of the Jewish Floridian, Lillian Gold was
inadvertently not identified in a photograph appearing on
the front page. She appeared to the far nght in the
photograph of community leaders visiting Hod Hasharon.
y,
"TO INSURE
OUR FUTURE"
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
DINNER DANCE
In Support Off
The Jewish Community Campus
Capital Campaign
OCTOBER 17
$5,000 minimum commitment
i
4.
I
-
WE'RE BREAKING THE NEWS!
We're breaking ground!
NOVEMBER 22nd
JEWISH COMMUNITY CAMPUS
JCCampus
JCC Open House, Sign Dedication
To Be Fun For Entire Family
The entire community has
been invited to an Open House
at the Jewish Community
Center during which special
ceremonies will be held to
dedicate the new JCC sign an-
nouncing the planned move to
the site on the Jewish Com-
munity Campus. The event
will be held on Sunday, Sept.
20, 5-7 p.m., at the JCC, 700
Spencer Drive, West Palm
Beach.
The announcement was
made by Linda Zwickel, Chair-
man of the event, who said,
"This will be a wonderful op-
portunity for the community
to see a sampling of the ex-
cellent programs that we now
offer. At the same time, people
will become aware of the
limitations of our present
facilities and how the new JCC
building will give us the oppor-
tunity to provide additional ac-
tivities and services so
necessary for our growing
Jewish community."
In addition to the chance to
become acquainted with the
programs of each department,
the afternoon's events will in-
clude ethnic refreshments
(including hot dogs and
felafel), entertainment and ac-
tivities for children and adults,
and tours of the JCC Pre-
School. The sign dedication
ceremony will begin at 6 p.m.
"We hope to see families,
young children, seniors, teen-
agers, singles, and young
adults come celebrate this ex-
citing day as we go forward in
building ... a place for us, "
stated Zelda Pincourt-Mason,
President of the JCC. "This
Open House and Sign Dedica-
tion is a significant step in our
efforts to raise the funds
necessary to build a JCCampus
that will serve as the central
location for Jewish activities in
the Palm Beaches."
The JCCampus will be
located on a site at Military
Trail and 12th Street in West
Palm Beach. In addition to the
JCC, it will house the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
and the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County. A small
sign raising ceremony at this
site will take place prior to the
major celebration at the JCC.
For more information, con-
tact Marjorie Scott, JCCam-
pus Campaign Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Enjoying the breeze on the terrace of the
Biltmore Beach Club are (left to right)
Gilbert Messing, Campus Campaign Chair-
man; Arnold Lampert, Campus Community
Campaign Chairman; Zelda Pincourt
Mason, President, Jewish Community
Center; Michael and Margot Brozost,
Chairpersons of the Champagne Party;
Steven Kaplansky, Executive Director,
Jewish Community Center, and his wife,
Denise; Jeffrey Klein, Executive Director,
Jewish Federation; Alec Engelstein, Chair-
man, Campus Corporation Building
Committee.
Early JCCampus Supporters Thanked
An overflow crowd received
the thanks of the Jewish Com-
munity Campus Capital Cam-
paign leadership for their early
and enthusiastic support at a
Champagne Dessert Party,
held at the Biltmore Beach
Club on Saturday, Aug. 22. A
welcome to the community
was extended to Steven
Kaplansky, new Executive
Director of the Jewish Com-
munity Center, and his wife
Denise.
The evening was chaired by
Michael and Margot Brozost,
who were among the first to
show their support for the new
facility. The program included
remarks by Mr. Brozost and
Zelda Pincourt Mason, Presi-
dent of the Jewish Community
Center, who introduced Mr.
Kaplansky. He outlined the
Center's plans for the future
and showed the tape, "... a
place for us," which
demonstrates the scope of
what will be offered on the
new JCCampus.
Jeffrey Klein, Executive
Director of the Jewish Federa-
tion, of Palm Beach County,
explained that the support
of the total community is
needed for this shared dream
to-become a realitynexf vcir.
Gilbert Messing, Campus Cam- about ways in which everyone
paign Chairman, and Arnold can become involved, and Rab-
Lampert, Campus Community bi Steven Westman gave the
Campaign Chairman, spoke benediction.
Michael Brozost leaving the podium after welcoming guests
to the party-he co-chared with hte wifrMaYgUTT" *'' '


\
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of PaJm Beach County Page 3
Does Glasnost Include Everyone But Jews?
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) To
what extent does glasnost
reach the Jews of the Soviet
Union? News out of Moscow
presents a disparate picture of
Soviet government openness.
Frequent stories of relaxation
of restrictions on demonstra-
tions are countered by reports
by Soviet Jewry activists and
recent Soviet Jewish emigres
that Jews are still being
harassed, and in fact even
more so than ever.
Specifically, a large
demonstration by Crimean
Tatars demanding repatriation
to their homeland went un-
challenged for four days two
weeks ago, and a notable con-
cert by American rock star Bil-
ly Joel made waves when the
audience broke into an un-
precedented frenzy of dancing
in the aisles and loud mer-
rymaking previously not per-
mitted in the Soviet Union.
Concertgoers themselves were
reportedly astonished by the
absence of usual Soviet restric-
tions on their behavior.
These reports of what ap-
pear to be large breaks with
the traditional Soviet security
tightness and threat of arrest
are countered by reports that
Jews demonstrating for
emigration or even trying to
teach Hebrew are being
repressed as usual.
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ) reported
that former Prisoner of Cons-
cience Iosif Begun, freed in
February, has been again
denied the right to teach
Hebrew the "crime" for
which he was imprisoned. Yet
early this year, the Soviets
claimed that restrictions had
been lifted on the teaching of
Hebrew, and Adolph
Shayevich, the "official" rabbi
of the Choral Synagogue in
Moscow, said during a New
York visit that Hebrew
teaching would henceforth be
permitted.
The Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry (SSSJ) reported
that seven-year refusenik
Sergei Getchkov, in the 19th
day of a hunger strike, along
with other Jews who sup-
ported him were beaten by
about 70 "hooligans" perceiv-
ed to be KGB call-ups who
shouted anti-Semitic slogans
as the Jews demonstrated at
the Lenin Library in Moscow.
Police told the Jews that they
could not maintain order and
that they should therefore go
home. The Jews, however, re-
mained, and "were then at-
tacked by the bystanders, who
are evidently connected with
the KGB," the SSSJ said.
SSSJ national coordinator
Glenn Richter said that par-
ticipants in a public memorial
June 10 for the late cancer pa-
tient refusenik Yuri Shpeiz-
man were arrested and some
of them fined. (Shpeizman died
of a heart attack May 10 upon
arrival in Vienna without see-
ing his daughter or grand-
children in Israel.)
Richter said: "Certainly to-
day, under glasnost, there
have been more demonstra-
tions and there have been
several demonstrations
without harassment. But the
problem is that the form may
have slightly changed, but the
substance, which is 'nyet,' has
not. Today, 90 percent of
Soviet Jews cannot even apply
to emigrate. One can certainly
understand how clever the
Soviet glasnost campaign has
been regarding Jews."
In June, when a state-
sanctioned Russian Yiddish
musical theater troupe toured
North America, Richter and
some others demonstrated
quietly outside the Symphony
Space theater in Manhattan
where the Jewish Cameo
Music Theatre was perform-
ing. Richter requested an in-
terview with the Soviets film-
ing the crowd outside "in the
name of glasnost," and they
apparently complied
somewhat, Richter said,
because Jews in the Soviet
Union saw him on television,
he told JTA.
However, the interview was
edited, he said, cutting out
much of the sound portion in
which Richter "thanked Soviet
TV for permitting me to speak
and very carefully describe in
non-confrontational language
why we were out there. The
announcer simply said I was
part of the Zionist agitators."
Several Soviet emigres who
have been asked in various in-
stances what glasnost means
for the Jews did not even know
the word, which is not part of
the common working-class
vocabulary. Grigory Geishis, a
26-year-old former Prisoner of
Conscience from Leningrad
who arrived in Israel in June
with his family and who was at
the NCSJ press conference,
said, "It's very difficult for us
to understand, because it's a
Western word."
He said that there is much
public anti-Semitism in the
Continued on Page 10
Jewish Community CampusBuilding A Community
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Abramson have
chosen to dedicate Classroom Alef in the
Child Development Center of the Jewish
Community Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Bank have chosen to
dedicate Classroom Bet in the Child
Development Center of the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bassine have
chosen to dedicate the Fine Arts Studio in
the Jewish Community Center.
The Leonard and Sophie Davis Founda-
tion will dedicate the Teen/Youth Wing of
the Jewish Community Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Hokin have chosen
to dedicate the Lobby Exhibit Area of the
Jewish Community Center.
Mrs. Helen Lande and family have chosen
to dedicate the Galil Program Room in the
Cultural Wing of the Jewish Community
Center.
Miss Esther Levy has chosen to dedicate
the Main Entrance Doors of the Jewish
Community Center. '
Dr. and Mrs. Philip Paston have chosen
to dedicate a Community Conference
Meeting Room in the Conference Center of
the Jewish Community Center.
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rabb have chosen
to dedicate the Reception Area of the
Jewish Community Center.
BUILDING A COMMUNITY... A PLACE FOR US
THESE PEOPLE ARE HELPING TO BUILD
The Jewish Community Campus
*
Partial Listing
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Balas
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bassine
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Berry
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bierenbaum
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Brass
Mrs. Sarah Bresnick
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Burger
Mr. and Mrs. David Dickson
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Dwoskin
Mr. Stanley Ellenbogen
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Epstein
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Erenrich
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Frogel
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Gales
Mr. and Mrs. Abe Gelb
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Gladstone
HOMEOFTHE
Jewish Community Center *
Jewish Family And Children's Service
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Is Your Name Here???
Mr. Harvey Goldberg
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Gottlieb
Ms. Sabina Gottschalk
Mr. Murray Green
Mr. Henry Grossman
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hertz
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Hokin
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Kaplansky
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Keiser
Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Kotzen
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Krischer
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Lawrence
Mr. Shepard Lesser
Mrs. Miriam Levinson
Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Leviton
Mrs. Rose Lord
$
Mr. Lloyd Lloyds
Mr. and Mrs. Philip May
Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel Newmark
Mrs. Gerta Pomerantz
Mr. Jay A. Rosen
Drs. Rosa, Sherman, Koch
Mr. Robert Satter
Ms. Susan Schwartz
Dr. and Mrs. Richard Schwartz
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Shapiro,
Dorothy Shapiro and Family
Mr. and Mrs. Morris L. Stein
Mr. and Mrs. David Stoller
Mrs. Sim ma Sulzer
Ms. Barbara Wunsh
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Zipkin
PLUS DOZENS MORE CARING PEOPLE WHOSE NAMES
WILL APPEAR IN THE WEEKS TO COME
Dont Be Left Out!
Call the JCCampus Campaign Office, 832-2120
Known at YW-YMH A's In many communities.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Information Versus Truth
Reagan Administration briefers gave the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee an odd
view of the Arab-Israeli military balance at a re-
cent closed door session. According to several
sources, the briefers who came armed with
the usual graphs and slides said that not only
did Israel hold a military edge over its potential
Arab enemies, but that the advantage was grow-
ing in Israel's favor. Unfortunately, what at
first sounded like good news to anyone concern-
ed about the security of an outmanned, outgunn-
ed American ally in the volatile Middle East
became, on closer scrutiny, worrisome.
Problems started with the "extrapolation
fallacy," to paraphrase one source. By taking
bits of information such as Israel's assumed
qualitative edge in military technology and
projecting them into the future as trends, Ad-
ministration analysts will find the Israel
Defense Forces always on top. But at what point
do changes in the field, such as Syria's acquisi-
tion first of Soviet SCUD-B missiles, then of
SS-21 missiles, then chemical weapons
capabilities, and now of top-of-the line MiG-29
fighter planes blunt or even cancel those trends?
Extrapolation which saw the Shah of Iran
likely to retain power less than two years before
his ouster cannot tell.
Perhaps worse, intelligence data apparently
were being made to serve an existing political
policy, selling arms to the Arabs. A second
source said that the real purpose of the briefing
seemed to be to prepare Capitol Hill for weapons
deals likely to be announced next month. But
from the Bay of Pigs through declarations of
early victory in Vietnam to the Iranian-arms-for-
hostages deal, post-war examples abound of the
danger of bending intelligence information to fit
f>reconceived policies. Israel's military position
eaves it with almost no room for error.
Politically-motivated "analysis-by-
extrapolation' especially by its one major ally
poses a very real threat.
In fact, to maintain the military edge presum-
ed to exist, Israel needs a new close-air-support
fighter but agonized over finding funds for
the Lavi project. It needs to replace its squadron
of three aging submarines, to modernize its fleet
of missile and patrol boats, to continue
upgrading its armor, to put more resources into
training and procurement and a dozen other
areas. Israel somehow must keep pace with
Arab states which have bought tens of billions of
dollars worth of advanced weaponry from both
the communist bloc and Western nations in re-
cent years, years in which it was cutting defense
spending to support economic reform.
As we have noted previously, at some point
quantity can overwhelm quality. And Arab ar-
mies which enjoy a great quantitative edge
have been making qualitative improvements as
well. To rely, as Administration briefers pur-
portedly did, on intangibles such as the "flex-
ibility" of Israeli commanders and the superiori-
ty of Israeli training cannot be acceptable in
Jerusalem. It should not be in Washington.
The Administration often has pledged to main-
tain Israel's military-technological edge over
any likely combination of potential enemies. But
the recent Senate briefing raises questions as to
how that pledge is understood.
Arms Sales Planned
The House Appropriations Foreign Opera-
tions Subcommittee last month approved $3
billion in all-grant aid for Israel as well as
several other pro-Israel amendments.
Assistant Secretary of State Richard Murphy
told another House panel that the Administra-
tion plans to notify Congress in September that
it will proceed with the sale of sophisticated
arms to Saudi Arabia including 1,600
Maverick-D missiles. Capitol Hill sources reveal
that the Saudi arms package will also include 12
F-15 fighter planes, Bradley fighting vehicles,
F-15 electronics upgrades, M-60 battle-tank
upgrades and artillery support equipment. Con-
gress strongly opposed the sale of these items to
the Saudis when it was proposed earlier this
year.
The House foreign aid appropriations bill con-
tains amendments prohibiting the sale of anti-
tank shells containing depleted uranium
penetrator components to any country except
NATO members and major non-NATO allies.
Another amendment reiterates Congressional
opposition to "advanced aircraft, and new air
defense weapons systems" to Jordan in the
absence of Jordan's direct participation in the
peace process with Israel.
The subcommittee also provided full funding
for the Lavi aircraft $450 million including
$300 million to be spent in Israel as well as
money for joint U.S.-Israeli development pro-
jects in the third world and for refugee settle-
ment in Israel. Israel can use up to $300 million
of the Lavi funds "for the Lavi program or for
an advanced fighter aircraft of United States
design, if agreed to by Israel and the United
States, or for other advanced weapons systems
if requested by Israel."
However, at a separate hearing, Murphy
stressed the Administration's concern with the
Lavi project and the effect it could have on the
Israeli defense budget and the over-all economy.
He claimed that "we and the Government of
Israel agree that the Lavi cannot be funded
within the levels of our security assistance pro-
gram without eliminating other important pro-
jects." In response to Rep. Benjamin Gilman's
(R., N.Y.) questioning, Murphy told the House
Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe and
the Middle East that the Administration will
support Israel's decision on the future of the
Lavi. However, he added that "we are looking at
co-production possibilities on sales of U.S.
planes."
Rep. Tom Lantos (D., Calif.) also questioned
Murphy on the Administration's position on the
closure of the PLO offices in the United States.
Murphy reportedly has been urging Congress
privately not to close the offices, but he remain-
ed noncommittal in his public response. He said
"international law and constitutional issues"
might play a key role in a decision to close the
offices. (Near East Report)
(Editor's Note: The Israeli Cabinet voted
Sunday to scuttle the Lavi jet project.)
Papal Novelties
Jewish Entrepreneurs At The Forefront
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
USPS 089030 ISSN 8750-5061
Combining "Our Voice'' and Federation Reporter
FREDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNI EPSTEIN LOUISE ROSS
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor Newt Coordinator Assistant News Coordinator
Published Weekly October through Mid May Bi-Weekly balance ot year
Second Class Postage Paid at West Palm Beach
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POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
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Advertising Director Steel Lesser, Phone SM 1652
Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Inc. Officers President.
Erwin H Blonder, Vice Presidents. Barry S Berg. Alec Engelatein. Lionel Grnenbaum. Marva Perrin.
Marvin S Rosen: Treasurer. Helen G. Hoffman: Assistant Treasurer. Gilbert S Messing. Secretary,
Leah Siskin. Assistant Secrete Bernard Plisskin Submit material to Ronni Epstein, Director of
Public Relations. 501 South Fla <. West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Jewish Floridian Goes not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $4 Annual (2-Year Minimum $7 50), or by membership Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County. 501 S Flagler Dr, West Palm Beach. Fla 33401 Phone 832 2120
Friday, September 4. 1987 10 ELUL 5747
Volume 13 Number 27
By EDWIN BLACK
In anticipation of the Pope's
visit, the country has been
deluged by novelties
everything from a papal lawn
sprinkler to $2 papal rings
sporting large red lips that
"kiss you back." Many
Catholics are reacting with
good humor. Others, especially
those in the organized church,
are deeply offended. Ironical-
ly, Jewish entrepreneurs are
at the forefront of the papal
novelty business this at a
time when leaders from both
communities are trying to con-
tain tensions between the two
groups. Should this en-
trepreneurship be a question
of straight economics, or
special ethics?
Some of the entrepreneurs
suspected from the outset that
they were engaged in
something offensive to
Catholics. Robert Lebow of
Huntingdon Woods, a suburb
of Detroit, is the 34-year old
creatoi of the $55 "Let us
Spray" papal lawn sprinkler,
probably the most publicized
papal novelty. Lebow con-
fesses, "When we started, I
thought we'd be in hot water."
At first he even declined an in^
terview request from the
because, "we didn't want any
hate calls or firebombs."
Eventually, Lebow acceded
to the interview request, the
wire services ran with it, and
by now the figurine has even
been featured on Johnny Car-
son. Yet Lebow is concerned
about charges of insensitivity.
His sister designs Holocaust
displays, and he's related to
Holocaust survivors. "I would
never do anything to be insen-
sitive, and I don't believe this
("Let us Spray") is
blasphemous or vile. Each is
handmade and I'm proud."
Danny Geisler, 32, of San
Antonio, a non-practicing
Jewish artist whose grand-
parents fled Germany for
America, created two pro-
ducts: a paper miter emblazon-
ed with a picture of the Alamo,
and a gaudy "papal ring" top-
ped by luscious ruby lips that
"kiss you back." Paul Laub of
Monterey, Calif., who is
shomer shabbot, has amassed a
variety of novelties. Among
the most popular: a $1 parch-
ment certificate featuring the
Pope and Clint with the in-
scription "Thou Hast Made Mv
Day." '
The question is at whose ex-
lCllt ICTIUMl II '/III iiic _____ -i_. .. ,
Detroit News religion editor P^36 ,9 t,lls $_&& h"r
and whose religion is being
slighted in the process?
The Catholic League for
Religious and Civil Rights, a
staunch first amendment and
inter-religious liberty advocate
akin to the Anti-Defamation
League, decries the sprinkler
as "insensitive and demeaning
to the position Catholics give
to the Pope as Vicar of
Christ," declares Father Virgil
Blum, president of the
Milwaukee-based organiza-
tion. "As for the (papal) ring,"
he adds, "that is simply
offensive."
Jewish leaders agree.
Synagogue Council of America
spokesman Gunther
Lawrence, who has been
directly involved in the Jewish
response to the pope's visit,
condemned the novelties as
"offensive, unnecessary, and
an insult to one of the major
faiths of the world. One can
disagree with the Pope on
issues, but that is different
from mocking him," insists
Lawrence.
"Absolutely trivializes and
cheapens the Pope's visit,
which is supposed to be a high
moral experience," declares
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, inter-
Continued on Page IS
>
___


r
Women's Division Outreach
Vice President Makes New Women
In Community Welcome
Having moved to this community a little over two years
ago from Detroit, Sandra Rosen found that her involve-
ment with the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County made her feel right at home. Now,
as Outreach Vice President for the second year, she is
reaching out to new women in the community to introduce
them to Women's Division. Several coffees in different
locations throughout the county, from Atlantis to Palm
Beach Gardens, will be held to inform women about
Women's Division, the Jewish Federation, and its four
beneficiary agencies the Jewish Community Center, the
Jewish Family and Children's Service, the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, and the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center.
Over the past two years, in addition to serving on the
Board of Directors of Women's Division, Mrs. Rosen co-
chaired the 1987 annual Jewish Community Day School
Dinner Dance. This year she has taken on the momentous
task of co-chairing the school's ad journal. Hadassah is also
very important to Mrs. Rosen who is a life member. Last
year she served as Vice President of Bat Gurion Chapter
and currently she is the group's Financial Secretary.
Jewish Singles To Attend
Weekend Conference
The Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches
and Levis JCC of Boca Raton
are sponsoring a Singles
Weekend Conference to be
held Friday, Nov. 6 through
Sunday, Nov. 8, at the new
beachfront resort, Holiday Inn
on Sjnger Island.
The conference theme is
"Let's Get Together" and ac-
cording to Ann Colavecchio,
Conference Coordinator, "The
program will exemplify the
theme in different ways in-
tellectually, socially and
spiritually."
Ten workshops will be led by
experts and will involve par-
ticipant interaction. The time-
ly topics include: "The Science
of Solicitation"; "Non-Verbal
Communication How You
Are Perceived"; "The Sexual-
ly Fulfilled Single"; "Massage
Therapy"; "Stress Manage-
ment'f; "Assert Yourself!";
"The Challenge of Being
Jewish and Single"; "Making
It in the Material World";
"Life Beyond Jewish Guilt."
New JDC
Executive Named
Alberto Senderey, a well-
known educator from Argen-
tina, has been named Director
of JDC-Israel. He succeeds
Michael Schneider who will
become JDC's next Executive
Vice President. Senderey's ap-
pointment was announced by
Ralph I. Goldman, Executive
Vice President of the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee.
Social activities include
volleyball on the beach,
snorkeling, swimming, wind
surfing, beach games, and a
gala semi-formal dance.
There will be a Friday night
Shabbat Service, dinner and
oneg, followed by a late night
sing-a-long on the beach.
Ms. Colavecchio states that
"The conference is open to
people ages 25-55, from out of
town as well as Palm Beach
County. We have organized a
complete get-away weekend
for as reasonable a fee as
possible." People interested in
reservations and further infor-
mation should contact her at
the Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches, (305)
689-7700, or by writing to the
JCC, 700 Spencer Dr., West
Palm Beach, FL 33409.
Deadline for reservations is
Oct. 1, 1987.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Discover Your Personality Type At B&P
Women's Group's First Dinner Program
An opportunity to discover
how personality type impacts
on the choice's women make
will be provided at this year's
first Business and Professional
Women's Group program
meeting of the Women's Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County. The
dinner program will be held on
Wednesday, Sept. 16,6 p.m, at
the Hyatt Palm Beaches, 630
Clearwater Park Road, West
Palm Beach.
Barbara Sommers, Vice
President of the B&P Group,
recently announced that Nina
Brookner Silverman, has been
appointed Chairperson of Pro-
gramming. "We are looking
forward to a year filled with
excellent programs under
Nina's direction. The opening
meeting will kickoff our season
with an exciting and
fascinating concept
discovering one's 'true type,' "
stated Mrs. Sommers.
Mrs. Silverman has named
Dr. Deborah Lubell and Peggy
involvements, Ms. Horvath
directed several of the Women
Leadership Awards pro-
ni
grams and serves as a board
member of the United Way.
Update .
By TOBY F. WILK
The Jewish Education Ser-
vice of North America has
adapted a Boy Scouts of
America program that will
strengthen the Jewish identity
Nina Brookner Silverman
has been active with the
Business and Professional
Women's Group for the last
several years. She continues
this year as a member of the
B&P Steering Committee.
Mrs. Silverman is Chief Dieti-
tian at Doctors Hospital and is
a member of the Executive
Women of the Palm Beaches
and the Palm Beach District
Dietetic Association.
Cost for the kosher dinner
and program is $20. For addi-
tional information, contact
Faye Stoller, Women's Divi-
sion Director, at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Opinion
angry protests from Orthodox
Jerusalem residents, nas
vanished from the wall of the
Bank of Hapoalim building.
The painting, depicting figures
of angels in a formalized
Morpurgo to cochair this in- of Jewish children The youth J55 Byzantine icons, was
.tial program. They jointly an- program is called Tiger Clubs mien h> many people for a
nounced that Jan Horvath.
President of MCM Directions,
Inc., will be the guest speaker.
"Ms. Horvath will present the
Meyers-Briggs Personality
Type Indicator which is a
highly reliable instrument for
measuring preferences and
determining one's personality
type. According to Ms. Hor-
vath, it will give us practical
insight into the role one's per-
sonality plays in career
choices, relationships, team
building, communication,
management, learning and
decision making," stated Dr.
Lubell.
Ms. Morpurgo added, "We
are confident that this pro-
gram will be exceptional as
Jan Horvath is a dynamic in-
dividual who has had signifi-
cant experiences in govern-
mental operations, promo-
tional campaigns, event pro-
duction and market research,
and has facilitated many
workshops using interpersonal
communication techniques
such as the one she will be
presenting.."
Jan Horvath, along with her
partner Pat Pepper Schwab,
formed MCM Directions, Inc.
in 1986. Previously she was
the Director of the Depart-
ment of Resource Coordina-
tion at the South Florida
Water Management District.
Among her many community
and is for first grade boys who
meet in small groups monthly.
The boys take turns hosting
sessions with the assistance of
an adult. Special meetings are
planned to celebrate religious
holidays. Boys can earn the
Maccabee Award, an educa-
tional challenge that en-
courages youngsters to learn
more about Jewish holidays,
terms, heroes and symbols.
These Tiger Clubs provide an
ideal informal setting to sup-
plement Jewish education
programs.
A painting which aroused
figure of Jesus. In an attempt
to appease the Orthodox, the
huge painting was lifted by a
crane to make a "correction."
The artist added a small
Magen David. Clearly, the
alteration was not sufficient
because the angels have simply
flown off altogether since
then.
Two Jews retained their
seats in the Australian general
election recently when Bob
Hawke was returned to power.
Both men are strong sud-
Continued on Page 8
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Otzma
Participant Leaves For Year in Israel
For the last several months,
the chance to live and work in
Israel under the auspices of
Otzma is all that Laura Klein
has been talking and hearing
about. And late last month her
dream began to take shape as
she left for this early leader-
ship program bridging Israel
and North American Jewry.
As she made her final
preparations before her depar-
ture, she said, "I just can't
wait to get there. I know it will
be really meaningful because
of all the people I'll meet and
the cultures I'll be exposed to.
I know the work I'll be doing
will be very fulfilling."
Ms. Klein was chosen by the
Otzma Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County under the chair-
manship of Milton Gold to par-
ticipate in this program
representing this Federation.
She has received a fellowship
to cover her living expenses
and a stipend during the year
in Israel. Ms. Klein, and other
young people from around the
country, began a year of ser-
vice that will include spending
time on a kibbutz, working
closely with Israeli families liv-
ing in the Arava region on
agricultural programs, pro-
viding tutoring and instruction
at Youth Aliyah villages and
performing a variety of
volunteer duties at Project
Renewal neighborhoods.
Ms. Klein became interested
in Israel through her college
roommate who had lived and
studied in the Jewish
homeland for a year. And
through correspondence with
a friend who was in Israel with
Otzma, she developed a desire
to be part of this program.
However, ever since Ms.
Klein could remember, she
wanted to be a lawyer. She
v
V
Laura Klein
never waivered from this
determination. However, after
graduating from the Universi-
ty of Michigan with a major in
English, and spending months
filling out law school applica-
tions, taking the entrance ex-
am, and finally being accepted,
she found herself ambivalent
about accepting a place in a
law school for September. "It
was not that I had changed my
mind about law school; instead
I had realized that I would not
be happy until I had achieved a
more immediate goal of mine:
I wanted to live and work in
Israel for a year," she
explained.
How do her parents feel
about her decision? "I have
nothing but good feelings
about her going," stated Larry
Klein of North Palm Beach.
Not overly concerned about
her safety in the Middle East,
he said, "Her mother and I are
confident that those who are
taking care of her will do their
best to keep her safe."
Otzma is specifically design-
ed for Jewish men and women
between the ages of 18-24 and
is sponsored in North America
by local Federations and the
Council of Jewish Federations,
and in Israel by the Jewish
Agency, with the cooperation
of the American Zionist Youth
Foundation and the World
Zionist Organization. The
planning and monitoring body
in Israel is the Israeli Forum, a
group of high achievers
representing the full spectrum
of life in Israel who volunteer
their time because they believe
strongly in strengthening the
personal ties between Israel
and North American Jewry.
County Commissioner Dorothy Wilken (right) presented a
resolution commending the late Victor Duke for his service to
the community to his widow, Hannah Duke (center) at a re-
cent County Commissioners meeting. With them are (left to
right) Pauline Roisman, sister of Hannah Duke; Harry
Bilawsky, past president of the Century Village Democratic
Club; Mrs. Duke; and Ben Roisman, Mr. Duke's brother-in-
law.
Commission Honors Late Victor Duke
Murray Schneier has been ap-
pointed Southeast Regional
Director for the American
ORT Federation, announced
Donald H. Klein, AOF ex-
ecutive Vice President.
Schneier is former Executive
Director of the Jewish
Federation of Portland,
Oreg. and of the Federation
of Jewish Agencies of Atlan-
tic County in New Jersey. As
Southeast Regional Director,
Schneier will be primarily
responsible for implementing
and expanding AOF pro-
grams throughout Georgia,
South Carolina and Florida.
@
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, Sept. 6 and 13, 9 a.m. re-run -
WPTV Channel 5 with host Barbara Gordon Green.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Sept. 6 and 13, 7:30 a.m. -
WPBR 1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The
Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
TRADITION TIME Monday-Wednesday Sept. 7-9,
14-16 2 p.m., and Sunday, Sept. 6 and 13, 11 p.m.
WVCG 1080 AM This two hour national Jewish enter-
tainment show features Jewish music, comedy, and news.
PARSON TO PARSON Sunday, Sept. 4, 6:45 a.m. -
WEAT 85 AM and 104.3 FM Hebrew melodies by Can-
tor Hyman Lifshin featuring Kol Nidre.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
September 6
Hadassah-Florida/Atlantic Region board 9:30 a.m.
Golden Lakes Temple Sisterhood board 10 a.m.
September 7
Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board 9:30 a.m.
B'nai B'rith-Lake Worth No. 3016 board 3 p.m.
Brandeis University Women's Committee-Boynton Beach -
board 1 p.m.
September 8
Federation Leadership Development Committee 8
p.m. Hadassah-Lee Vassil board 9:30 a.m. B'nai
B'rith Women-Masada board 7 p.m. Hadassah
Henrietta Szold board 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women-
Menorah 1 p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood 8 p.m.
Na'Amat USA-Sharon 11:30 a.m. Jewish Community
Center Fall Program Session Begins
September 9
UJA 40th Anniversary Mission through Sept. 18 Federa-
tion Leadership Development Parlor Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT-No. Palm Beach County Region
- board 9:30 a.m. Hadassah-West Boynton board 9:30
a.m. United Order of True Sisters Social Program
Federation Midrasha opening session 7 p.m. Federa-
tion Women's Division Education Series Committee
Meeting 10 a.m. Federation Demographic Study
Meeting 7:30 p.m.
September 10
Hadassah-Rishona board 9:30 a.m. Na'Amat USA-
Palm Beach Council 10 a.m. Federation Community
Relations Council Meeting Noon Federation Jewish
The Palm Beach County-
Board of County Commis-
sioners recently honored the
late Victor Duke with a resolu-
tion sponsored by Dorothy
Wilken, Commissioner,
District 4, commending his
many humanitarian contribu-
tions to the County.
Commissioner Wilken
presented Resolution No. C-87
to Hannah, widow of Victor
Duke, after reading the com-
mendation to the gathering in
the County Commissioner
chambers. In accepting the
Resolution, duly executed by
members of the Board, Han-
nah Duke thanked the Com-
mission for honoring her hus-
band's memory, and gracious-
ly said "I wish in turn to thank
the County through the Corn-
Education Meeting 7:30 p.m.
September 11
Jewish Community Center Shabbat Picnic/Dinner
September 13
CJF Board and Committee meetings through March 15,
1988 UJA 40th Anniversary Mission II Hadassah-
Florida/Atlantic Region 9:30 a.m. Treasure Coast
Jewish Center Cocktail Partv 6 p.m. Federation -
Midrasha Workshop 10-3 p.m. at Jewish Community
Day School
September 14
B'nai B'rith Women-Boynton Beach noon Hadassah-
Kadimah board 10 a.m. Temple Beth Torah board -
7:30 p.m. Women's American ORT-Palm Beach board -
9:45 a.m. Women's American ORT-Lake Worth West -
board 9:30 a.m. Na'Amat USA-Theodore Herzl board -
10 a.m. Women's American ORT-Lakes of Poinciana -
12:30 p.m. Jewish Community Day School board 7:45
p.m. Women's American ORT-Mid Palm board -1 p.m.
United Order of True Sisters board 10:30 a.m. and
regular meeting 1 p.m. Hadassah-Aviva board 1 p.m.
Treasure Coast Jewish Center board 7:30 p.m.
Federation Women's Division Business and Profes-
sional Campaign Meeting 5:30 p.m.
September 15
B'nai B'rith-Lucerne Lakes Trip to St. Augustine through
Sept. 17 Congregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood -1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women-Sholom noon Hadassah-Henrietta
Szold 1 p.m. Temple Israel board 7:30 p.m.
American Jewish Congress board 12:30 p.m. Temple
Beth Torah board 8 p.m. Federation Chaplaincy
Meeting 2 p.m. Women's American ORT-West Palm -1
p.m. Federation Women's Division Business and Pro-
fessional Campaign Assignment 5:30 p.m. Federation
Human Resource Committee Meeting 7:30 p.m.
September 16
Federation Women's Division Business and Profes-
sional Program 6 p.m. Hadassah-Lee Vassil 12:30
p.m. Hadassah-Shalom -12:30 p.m. National Council of
Jewish Women-Palm Beach board -10 a.m. Temple Beth
Torah Sisterhood board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith-Lake
Worth Lodge No. 3016 7:30 p.m. -Na'Amat USA-Golda
Meir -12:30 p.m. Federation Executive Committee 4
p.m.
September 17
National Council of Jewish Women-Okeechobee 12:30
p.m. Federation Leadership Development Parlor
Meeting 7:30 p.m. National Council of Jewish Women-
Flagler Evening 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women-Masada -
luncheon/card party noon Hadassah-Chai board 10
a.m. and regular meeting noon
For further information call the Jewish Federation office
882-2120.


Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Project Renewal
Church Members To Dedicate Room
In Community Center In Israel
By LOUISE ROSS
He not only preaches inter-
faith understanding, he does
something about it. Rev.
William Ilnisky never heard
about Hod Hasharon until it
was suggested that he visit
Palm Beach County's Project
Renewal neighborhood during
his trip to Israel this past July.
During his tour of this
distressed area with a group of
12 of his church members from
Calvary Temple in West Palm
Beach, an idea which
originated at the church's
USA/Israel celebration last
November began to take
shape.
For the last three years they
have produced a spectacular
evening of Israeli singing and
dancing featuring several
Jewish and Christian guest
speakers to promote interfaith
understanding and a link bet-
ween church members in West
Palm Beach and Israel.
Originally held at the church,
attendance has swelled and
this past year, the increasingly
ambitious undertaking has
been staged at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches.
Last year, in an effort to
make this annual event more
meaningful and long lasting
for members of the church, a
fundraising drive was started
with the goal of doing
something tangible for Israel.
After seeing this summer what
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County has accomplish-
ed in conjunction with the
residents of Giora and Gil
Amal, the two underprivileged
neighborhoods of Hod
Hasharon, and the State of
Israel, a decision was made
after consultation with the
Federation to dedicate a room
Rev. Ilnisky at the
USA/Israel Celebration last
year.
in the Beit Ha'am (Community
Center), presently under con-
struction in Gil Amal.
"We will present this project
at USA/Israel in the Fall," ex-
plained Rev. Ilnisky. "Many
non-Jews have an interest in
Israel and if they have an op-
portunity to make an invest-
ment in Israel, they will be
happy to do so."
In the past, the congregation
has planted several hundred
trees in a park in Israel. "Now
we feel it is the time to
redirect our efforts into
(directly helping) people," he
added.
Rev. Ilnisky is very impress-
ed with this community's at-
tempt to bring Giora and Gil
Amal "out of the poverty level.
The Palm Beach County Com-
munity has every reason to be
proud of what they have done.
Project Renewal is one of the
most humanitarian concepts
trying to develop a self-help
community. The residents had
little opportunity in the coun-
tries they came from and now
they have tremendous
possibilities before them," he
said.
He particularly noted the
clean playgrounds and improv-
ed housing, along with the
Rev. William Ilnisky (right, foreground), pastor of Calvary
Temple, and his wife, Esther, (center) visit with Elizabeth
Homans (left), Project Renewal Community Representative,
in Hod Hasharon, Israel, at the site of the new Community
Center under construction. His church members will be
undertaking a fund raising drive to dedicate a room in the
new Center in Gil Amal, a distressed neighborhood of Hod
Hasharon.
Jeanne and Irwin Levy Day
Care Center and the Michael
C. Burrows Early Childhood
Development Center where
children were receiving
necessary early instruction in
basic skills.
Rev. Ilnisky was inspired by
the handicrafts made by the
senior citizens, including art-
work and tapestries. So much
so that he proposed to the
residents of Hod Hasharon a
joint venture with USA/Israel
where he hopes to display
many of the items.
Many people who traveled
with him to Israel had never
been there before. "I tell peo-
ple that there is a mystique
about the land of Israel that
grips you. I help them to feel
these areas, not just see them.
We did enough of the basic
tourist things, but then we
took the side roads through
villages and talked with the
people," Rev. Ilnisky explain-
ed. According to him, every
person that went came home
saying they'll never be the
same.
And thanks to people like
Rev. Ilnisky, his church
members, and the Jewish com-
munity of the Palm Beaches,
Hod Hasharon will never be
the same either.
Midrasha
College Credit Offered For Select Courses
For the first time in its
history, Midrasha-Judaica
High School will not only be of-
fering a varied curriculum of
Judaic studies for high school
students but will be giving
seniors the option of earning
college credit for two of the
courses in this year's
curriculum.
In an unprecedented ar-
rangement with the Midrasha
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County which oversees the
weekly school, Palm Beach
Junior College (PBJC) will
award high school seniors
three semester hours upon
satisfactory completion of each
course.
The courses chosen for this
initial program are "Drama
Workshop' with instructor
Pamela Leven and "Roots:
The Story of the American
Jewish Community From Your
Great Grandparents To You!"
with Kari Ellison. "Drama
Workshop" is designed to give
students a chance to learn
basic dramatic techniques in a
workshop-type setting. They
will engage in readings,
monologues and presentation
of plays and skits at various oc-
casions during the year. Ms.
Leven is also on the faculty at
PBJC.
"Roots" will deal with the
Eastern European Jewish im-
migrants and the American
Jewish community that
developed in response to their
needs. Mrs. Ellison, who has
taught at Midrasha for several
year*, is Director of Hillel Ac-
tivitfes for Florida Atlantic
University.
....
Students have the option of
signing up for one or both
courses. In order to receive
college credit from PBJC
towards admission in most col-
leges, a student must take
these courses for the fall and
spring semesters to meet the
required 45 class hours.
Moreover, a fee of $73.50 must
be paid to the' junior college
upon registration. (This is in
addition to the regular
Midrasha tuition.)
PBJC requires a minimum of
15 students requesting college
credit to be enrolled in each
course. Permitting eleventh
graders to take these courses
for college credit is under
consideration.
According to Dean Rosen-
bach, Chairman of the
Midrasha Committee, PBJC
was very receptive to this col-
lege level program. "A similar
relationship had been worked
out with Broward Community
College and Miami-Dade Com-
munity College with the Cen-
tral College and Miami-Dade
Community College with the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education in Miami so when
we presented our proposal to
do the same thing here, it was
well received," he said.
A recent survey of Midrasha
students who will be enrolling
as seniors this year indicates
that there is much interest in
this new opportunity. "We are
pleased that the students see
the merit of enjoying one or
two hours of Jewish study each
Wednesday evening and at the
MIDRASHA JUDAICA HI6H SCHOOL
A COMMUNITY PROGRAM OF JEWISH EDUCATION
FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
SPONSORED BY
JEWISH FEDERATION OF
PALM BEACH COUNTY
501 S. Flagkr Driv*
W*st Palm B*ach. FLA 33401
--------AN OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC PROGRAM WHICH
BUIIDS AND REINFORCES JEWISH SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE
AND IDENTITY.
--------CREDITS TOWARDS COLLEGE ADMISSION BY PBJC FOR
SELECTED COURSES
---------SOCIAL PERIODS FOR ACTIVITIES. REFRESHMENT AND
GOOD FELLOWSHIP
---------AN ARTS AND DRAMATICS PROGRAM FOR THE
CREATIVE
---------A STAFF OF OUTSTANDING TEACHERS AND YOUTH
LEADERS
MEETING EVERY WEDNESDAY EVENING FROM 6:30 to 9:IS PM
AT THI JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
5801 Parlcr Avtnu*
W*t Palm B*ach
RESISTED ROW ST CALL ISC I3J-21W SPEWRC Of SCHOOL Stftart* 9. 1M7 '
PR ELUOT S. SCHWARTZ, DIRECTOR
same time receiving college
credit," Mr. Rosenbach stated.
Initial discussions to explore
the possibility of this type of
program were held with Dr.
Edward Eissey, President of
PBJC, Dr. Patricia Dyer, Vice
President of Academic Af-
fairs, and John Townsend,
Coordinator in the Division of
Continuing Education. In a let-
ter sent by Mr. Townsend con-
firmating the cooperative ar-
rangement, he said, "I am
delighted to see the developing
relationship between Palm
Beach Junior College and the
Midrasha Judaica High School.
The entire community will
benefit from this association.
This represents a new stage in
the growth of the college's role
in Palm Beach County."
The opening day for
Midrasha's fall semester is
Wednesday, Sept. 9. Registra-
tion begins at 6 p.m., with
classes starting at 6:30 p.m.
Enrollment in the college
credit courses will be accepted
at that time. No registrations
will be accepted after Sept. 16.
For more information or to
register early, contact Dr.
Elliot Schwartz, interim
Jewish Education Director, at
the Federation office,
832-2120.
Lavi Jet
Continued from Page 1
viable without a massive in-
crease of the tax burden on the
Israeli public.
At presstime it was reported
that Minister without portfolio
Moshe Arens indicated that he
intended to resign in protest
because he did not want to "ac-
cept responsibility" for the
Cabinet decision.
TEMPLE SINAI
A Reform Congregation
2475 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delray Beach, FL 33445
Rabbi Samuel Silver, DD
Cantor Elaine Shapiro
HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
TICKETS ARE NOW AVAILABLE
For information on tickets or membership, please call
276-6161 I
T MwnbwUAHC


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
YAD
To Usher In Jewish New Year With Gala
Young adults from
throughout the Palm Beaches
will usher in 5748 with their
first spcial event of the
1987-88 season. A Jewish New
Year's Gala will be held at The
Breakers Beach Club, Palm
Beach, on Saturday evening,
Sept. 19, 8 p.m., sponsored by
the Young Adult Division of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
The announcement was
made by Mindy Freeman and
Howard Kaslow, newly ap-
pointed YAD Social Commit-
tee Co-Chairmen. Noting the
excellent attendance at last
year's inaugural Jewish New
Year's party, Mr. Kaslow said,
"Our committee has been busy
planning an even more spec-
tacular event this year. We
have chosen The Breakers to
be able to accommodate many
more young adults, ages 22-40,
in elegant surroundings.
Every effort is being made to
begin the New Year and our
Young Adult Division's social
programming on a grand
scale."
The Co-Chairmen have ap-
pointed committee member
Susan Ramus to chair the
event. "We are pleased that
Susan, who is very creative
and an excellent party plan-
ner, has accepted the
chairmanship."
Ms. Ramus indicated that
she and the committee were
excited about the plans for the
evening. "For the first time,
we will have live music provid-
ed by one of the area's top
bands. There will be hors
d'oeuvres, dessert, and a cash
bar. We want young adults to
have a marvelous time
greeting old friends and
meeting new ones as they
welcome 5748."
Susan Ramus attended last
year's New Year's party and
has become active with YAD
Freeman And Kaslow Head
YAD Social Committee
Tony Lampert, Vice President for Programming, Young
Adult Division, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County,
has announced the re-appointment of Mindy Freeman and
Howard Kaslow as Co-Chairmen of the division's Social
Committee.
In making the announcement, Mr. Lampert said, "Our
last year's social programs attracted an ever increasing
number of young adults from throughout our community
thanks to the dedicated efforts of Howard and Mindy.
Therefore, I am delighted that they have accepted the Co-
Chair men ship once again."
In a joint statement, Ms. Freeman and Mr. Kaslow said,
"The success of the VAD social events in the past spur us
on to plan even more exciting ones this year to reach out to
more and more young adults in our community. We hope to
see a record turn out for our first event, the Jewish New
Year's Gala to be held Sept. 19, 8 p.m., at The Breakers
Beach Club, Palm Beach (see separate article this page)."
Mindy Freeman became active with YAD in Richmond,
Va. prior to moving to the Palm Beaches three years ago.
She continued her involvement here for the last two years.
A graduate of the Federation's Young Leadership Develop-
ment program, Ms. Freeman has attended two national
Young Leadership conferences in Washington, D.C. She is
a 5th grade teacher at Eisenhoweer Elementary School in
Palm Beach Gardens and is working on her Master's in
Computer Education.
Howard Kaslow has been active with YAD since its in-
ception two years ago and currently is a member of its
Board of Directors. In addition he has been a Super Sunday
volunteer. He is an account executive with the stock
brokerage firm of Gruntal and Company in Palm Beach.
this year. A native of West
Palm Beach, Ms. Ramus is a
stock broker and financial
planner. She is an artist who
cites interior decorating and
party planning as her
avocations.
Members of the Social Com-
mittee are Bonnie Barbanel,
David Bronstein, Eric
Crawford, Linda Diamond,
Gary Greene, Joyce Lampert,
Sharon Lerner, Terri Lubin,
Dan Schimelman, and Debbie
Stern.
Cost of the evening is $25
per person. Reservations must
be made by Sept. 11 by sen-
ding a check to the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, 501 So. Flager Drive,
Suite 305, West Palm Beach,
FL 33401. For more informa-
tion, contact Mark Mendel,
YAD Director, at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Update
Opinion
Continued from Page 5
porters of Israel and other
Jewish causes.
In response to a request
from the Simon Wiesenthal
Center for a new investigation
on Raoul Wallenberg, Soviet
Ambassador Yevstfafyev
acknowledged that
Wallenberg had been involved
"in commendable acts" in
1944 in Budapest, and promis-
ed to transmit the Center's
humanitarian request to
Moscow.
Gorbachev will finally agree
to a summit in ishington
with President Reagan. Last
year, Gorbachev revealed his
fear of Jewish demonstrations
by agreeing to meet only in
Iceland on Yom Kippur. This
year, we must show him his
fear was justified. We must
not be silenced by the release
of a few hostage Jews. The
fate of 400,000 Soviet Jews is
in our hands. Each one of -us
must strengthen our deter-
mination to set them free.
Lend a hand! "Grab an oar!"
Can we count on you? We cer-
tainly hope so!
Josef Borszeki, now a frail
65-year-old, was left per-
manently disabled by Nazi
bullets when he rescued more
than 300 Jews in Budapest, in
1945. He was living alone in
Sussex, England, when his
situation was revealed in the
London Jewish press. A
generous benefactor, moved
by his story, pledged 100
Pounds (sterling) a week for as
long as Borszeki needs the
money. The anonymous donor,
an Austrian Jewish survivor
whose family were murdered
in Sobibor said: "Had there
been some Borszekis in Vien-
na, things might have been
different."
Imagine a road sweeper pic-
tured on a stamp! Well, that's
exactly whom you'll see on a
new stamp launched in Israel
to mark a "clean environ-
ment" campaign now in pro-
gress. The stamp's humorous
design .tackles a serious issue.
The Israeli Post Office has also
issued three stamps to mark
the World Dog Show which
took place this year in Israel.
The stamps depict dogs
originating in Israel. Amateur
radio operators were honored
with the issue of a stamp show-
ing different call signs across
the world map. Israel's
Amateur Radio Association
has about 900 members with
about 700 holding transmitter
licenses.
Mindy Freeman (left to right) and Howard Kaslow, Co-
Chairmen of the Social Committee, discuss the New Year's
Gala with Susan Ramus, event Chairman, at the committee's
August meeting.
Members of YAD's Social Committee meet to finalize plans
for the upcoming Jewish New Year's Gala. (Left to right) are
Linda Diamond, Joyce Lampert, Dani Fisher, Dan
Schimelman, Dave Bronstein, Terri Lubin, Eric Crawford,
and Bonnie Barbanel.
Six Gush Settlements Abandoned
TEL AVIV (JTA) Six Gush Emunim settlements in the
West Bank have been abandoned, Al Hamishmar reported Fri-
day. Gush Emunim comprises Orthodox Jewish settlers.
THE NEWSPAPER reported that a correspondent who
visited the Har Bracha settlement near Nablus on Wednesday
found locked buildings and a pile of two-month-old unclaimed
mail. After an hour of wandering, he encountered a lone woman
settler from one of the four families still at the site out of 34.
"It's sad to see this place empty," she said.
Uri Elitzur, a member of the Amana Gush Emunim settle-
ment organization, said a social crisis had caused the families to
leave. He admitted that five other settlements are in a similar
situation.
Temple Beth David
4657 Hood Road
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418
... the conservative congregation
of the Northern Palm Beaches ...
Services
Friday evening 8:00 p.m.
Saturday morning 10:00 a.m.
Educational Programs
Pre-School
Hebrew School
Adult Education
Information brochure
available. Call:
694-2350.
Temple Beth David i, an affiUaU of the United Synagogue ofAmenm
You and your family are welcome
to loin us for
High Holy Day Services
Royal Poinciana Playhouse
PALM BEACH
For ticket information
Ca//. 694-2350.
William Marder
Rabbi
Eart-J. Backoff
Cantor


Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Chaplain Aides
Bringing The Outside World In
Dedicated to bringing a
Jewish atmosphere to 28 nurs-
ing and retirement homes
throughout the Palm Beaches,
the Chaplain Aides of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County are once again
preparing to conduct High
Holiday services for residents.
Spearheading their efforts
for the second consecutive
year is Jeanne Glasser who has
been named by Federation
President Erwin H. Blonder to
chair this group whose
members also visit unaffiliated
Jewish patients in hospitals.
Sylvia Berger has been re-
appointed to co-chair.
According to Mr. Blonder,
Mrs. Glasser and Mrs. Berger
have done a superb job ad-
ministering the Chaplain
Aides. "Through Jeanne and
Sylvia's caring and devotion to
our elderly, they set an exam-
ple for the other dedicated
aides who provide this much
needed service."
However, they are the first
ones to say, "We get more out
of our efforts than we give to
others." According to Mrs.
Glasser, all the aides are ex-
tremely enthusiastic and
establish personal relation-
ships with those whom they
visit. "This one-on-one aspect
is very important," she said.
Planning' for the High
Holidays is underway.
Chaplain Aides have been
assigned to each of the nursing
and retirement homes current-
ly participating in the
program.
In addition to leading ser-
vices at holidays, the Chaplain
Aides provide a Shabbat at-
mosphere every Friday after-
noon for the residents. "We
bring the outside world in,"
declared Mrs. Glasser. The
residents greet us with over-
whelming enthusiasm. They
can't wait for Friday after-
noon to arrive."
Mrs. Glasser noted that the
Chaplain Aides' goal is to ob-
tain maximum participation
from the residents. To this
end, they bring challah and
wine with them to make the
Shabbat more meaningful.
"The men chant the Kiddush
over the wine and the women
'bench licht' (light the candles).
At one of the homes a 92 year
old man prepares a song for us
each time and doesn't miss a
word."
Whenever Mrs. Berger
enters the nursing home which
she visits regularly, she
"kvells" from seeing the look
on the residents' faces. "We
are received with such
warmth," she explains. At the
end of the service, Mrs. Berger
likes to play tapes of Yiddish
and popular songs recorded by
Cantor Norman Brody of Tem-
ple Beth El. "They just love it.
When the cantor sings 'Yid-
dishe Mama,' there is not a dry
eye in the place."
The success of the Chaplain
Aides program can be
measured not only in the
delight of the residents and the
expansion of visitation and
services to more and more
area nursing and retirement
homes each year, but in the
commitment of over 75 aides
to the program. "All our aides
continue in the program each
year. The only fallout we get is
if someone moves away or, un-
fortunately, becomes ill," Mrs.
Glasser asserted.
The singular requirement
for participation in the pro-
gram is a sincere desire to
relate to another human being,
according to Mrs. Glasser.
"We provide training at our
monthly meetings and also
take our new recruits to nurs-
ing homes to familiarize them
with what we do. Those who
have the ability to lead a ser-
vice, do so. If not, there are
many other things a volunteer
can do." She stresses that the
most important thing is to
develop relationships with the
people.
Jeanne Glasser has been in-
volved with Chaplain Aides
since its inception and helped
lead services at Darcy Hall
Nursing Home before the pro-
gram was formally organized
under the auspices of the
Federation. She is a member
of the Soviet Jewry Task
Force of the Community Rela-
tions Council of Federation
and a Board member of
Women's Division, Common
Cause, Aviva Hadassah, and
Temple Beth El Sisterhood.
Sylvia Berger has been a
member of the Chaplain Aides
for the last six years, and
began leading services with
her husband, Sidney, two
years ago. She also is a
member of the Soviet Jewry
Task Force and has been since
it was formed. Mrs. Berger is
active with the Poinciana !
Chapter of ORT and Olam
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
OF PALM BEACH
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
AT
TEMPLE EMANU-EL IN PALM BEACH
ROSHHASHANAH
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
YOM KIPPUR
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3
Services Conducted by
Rabbi Joel Chazln Cantor David Feuer
Ritual Director Arthur Rosenwasser
Temple Emanu-EI Is s Conservative Synagogue and Invites the unaffiliated of the
Palm Beaches to Join it in membership and worship.
FOR INFORMATION REGARDING TICKETS OR MEMBERSHIP
Please Telephone: 832-0804 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Write: 190 N. County Road, Palm Beach, FL 33480
Richard A. Lynn, M.D., President
Jeanne Glasser
Chapter of B'nai B'rith
Women. She was the honoree
at the BBWs "Gift of Love"
Luncheon.
For those who would find
Sylvia Berger
this work meaningful and are
interested in becoming a
member of the Chaplain Aides
program, contact Rabbi Alan
Sherman, Chaplain, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Victor Duke Honored

Continued from Page 6
missioners for enriching my
life and Victor's."
Mr. Harry Bilawsky, a friend
of Victor Duke, and partici-
pant in many of the organiza-
tions in which Victor was ac-
tive, spoke on behalf of the
Century Village Democratic
Club. He enumerated some of
the many organizations in
which Victor was a participant
and officer.
Mr. Bilawsky concluded with
the announcement that as a
tribute to Victor Duke's
memory and acknowledge-
ment of his many services to
the Jewish community, the
Victor Duke Memorial Tribute
Fund has been established to
dedicate a part of the new JCC
on the Jewish Community
Campus in his memory. Con-
tributions may be sent to the
Jewish Community Campus
Capital Campaign, 501 So.
Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401, ear-
marked for the Victor Duke
Memorial Tribute Fund.
SAVE THE DATE
JOSEPH L MORSE
GERIATRIC CENTER
3rd ANNUAL GALA AFFAIR
SUNDAY EVENING,
DECEMBER 20,1987
BREAKERS, PALM BEACH
Boynton Beach Jewish Center
Beth Kodesh
501 N.E. 26th Avenue, Boynton Beach, FL. 33435
A Conservative Synagogue
JOIN US FOR
HIQH HOLY DAY SERVICES
CONDUCTED BY:
RABBI LEON B. FINK
CANTOR ABRAHAM KOSTER
ROSH HASHONAH Sept. 23-24-25
YOM KIPPUR Oct. 23
Ylekor Services Oct. 3,11 a.m.
SEATS AVAILABLE, CALL:
586-9428 736-2288 734-3858


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Does Glasnost Include Everyone But Jews?
Parent Association volunteer, Jane Platzek, lends a helping
hand in the lunchroom as kindergarten student, Steven
Simon, asks for assistance.
JCDS
Opening Day Sees
Record Enrollment
The Jewish Community Day
School of Palm Beach County
opened its doors to begin the
1987-88 school year with a
record 220 students in grades
kindergarten through eight.
Barbara Steinberg, Executive
Director, observed, 'I am very
pleased with the first day of
school. All the children and
teachers are excited about the
new year." With almost 50
new students, the children en-
joyed seeing old friends and
making new friends.
This year the JCDS will have
two full kindergartens and two
first grades. In addition, the
enrollment in grades 2, 3, 4, 5,
and 6 is sufficient to employ
two teachers for language arts
and mathematics. Mrs.
Steinberg explained, "When
the enrollment exceeds 20 in a
grade, the language arts and
math are taught by two
teachers. This gives us a
greater capacity to provide
each child with the individual
attention that he or she needs,
and allows us to group children
according to their abilities and
needs."
Observed one new student,
"So far I like my teachers and
the kids in my class." For a
first day of school, who could
ask for more!
News Briefs
VANUNU'S BROTHER TO ASK BRITAIN
FOR POLITICAL ASYLUM
TEL AVIV Meir Vananu, brother of Mordechai Vanunu
whose trial began Monday, Aug. 31 in Israel on charges of sell-
ing the State's nuclear secrets to a British newspaper, will ask
Britain for political asylum, according to a Jerusalem Post
report.
"I have no desire to set foot in Israel for many years," Meir
Vanunu told the Post's London correspondent.
Meir has attempted to drum up support for his brother
abroad. This week, Vanunu said he plans to visit Paris to meet
with the "council for the defense" group set up there to work on
behalf of his brother. He said he will also visit Italy where a
magistrate has launched an investigation into reports that the
Mossad illegally spirited Mordechai out of Italy.
Meir claims an attractive female Mossad agent lured his
brother from London to Italy, drugged him and brought him
against his will to Israel aboard an Israeli vessel.
Moderchai, a former technician at the Dimona nuclear facili-
ty, had emigrated to Australia and converted to Christianity
when he sold to The Times of London a detailed account
(including pictures) of an allegedly secret facility at Dimona for
the production of nuclear weapons.
NEW LICENSING TEST FOR DOCTORS
MAY KEEP SOVIET JEWS FROM ISRAEL
TEL AVIV A group of Soviet Jewish physicians is recon-
sidering plans to immigrate to Israel due to a new Israeli law re-
quiring all new-immigrant doctors to undergo professional tests
before being licenced to practice medicine in this country.
Ephraim Feinblum, chairman of the Association of Im-
migrants from the Soviet Union in Israel, said he received this
news over the phone from Soviet Jewish activists in Moscow.
"This amendment will have disastrous consequences for aliya,"
he said.
The Health Ministry said some recent immigrant doctors
have shown a low professional level, so the tests are necessary.
Since 1971, about 3,700 doctors from Eastern Europe have settl-
ed in Israel, according to Feinblum.

Continued from Page 3
USSR now, mentioning
Pamyat, the "Memory Socie-
ty," which openly makes anti-
Jewish statements and which
recently met with a high
Soviet official. "Pamyat's pre-
Revolutionary roots have
brought out some of the most
anti-Semitic elements,"
Geishis said. He added that on
April 21 Hitler's birthday -
80 tombstones were destroyed
at the Leningrad Jewish
Cemetery.
He recalled his brother-in-
law, who was rejected as a can-
didate for the Leningrad
Medical School in a derogatory
letter which referred to him as
"Abramovich," a patronym in-
dicating he was a child of the
Jewish forefather, Abraham.
Geishis underlined that Jews
were frequently turned down
by universities in the Soviet
Union, the reason that most
Soviet Jews are graduates of
various "institutes" which
educate to a level considerably
lower than the universities.
Inna Levin Yakhot of Beer-
sheva, sister of Vladimir
Prestin of Moscow, a 17-year
refusenik, and daughter of Lea
Prestina-Akkerman, a 10-year
1 refusenik, addressed the press
conference as representative
of a recently-formed group,
Let Our Parents Go. Yakhot,
whose father, Naum Akker-
man, died in 1985 without ever
seeing his daughter again, lost
her 17-year-old son in an
automobile accident in Israel
at about the same time.
Yakhot made a plea for her ail-
ing mother, whom she has not
seen in 14 years, and who is
denied emigration by the
Soviets because of her late
husband's "classified work."
"How could a human mind
explain such a torment of an
old woman who has lost her
husband and her grandson
within a few days and is denied
spending the rest of her life
with her daughter?" Yakhot
asked.
Then, Asya Ploshchanskaya,
one of the Mothers for
Freedom who visited the U.S.
last year to plead for the
emigration of her daughter,
Natasha Rozenshtein, and her
family, returned to repeat her
plea.
Ploshchanskaya watched
with the group as a new video
of the Mothers for Freedom
made by IPCSJ, with the
assistance of the World Zionist
Organization and the Israel
Broadcast Authority, was
shown. As Ploshchanskaya
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watched herself on screen,
showing pictures of her
daughter and son-in-law and
the grandchildren she has
never seen, she wept anew,
and again while watching
herself crying at Ben-Gurion
Airport when Aleksander
Kushneyev, from whom his
mother had been separated for
14 years, arrived to a large and
emotional welcome.
Ploshchanskaya appraised
glasnost as follows: "Before
(Soviet leader Mikhail) Gor-
bachev, it was impossible to
read in the media any negative
aspect of Soviet life. Glasnost
is for Soviet people. It was
never like that before. They
even speak about the 'great lie
in history.' If it continues this
way, I think it will be good.
But our problem is that
glasnost does not relate to the
Jews."
The videotape narrative
relates that there is an "anti-
Semitic propaganda flood into
and out of the Soviet Union.
Experts say there is a correla-
tion between the struggle of
the refuseniks and that of this
flood."
Chaim Chesler, IPCSJ direc-
tor, said that constant but
quiet diplomatic pressure has
reaped its own small reward,
in that 60 of the children of the
Mothers for Freedom have
been reunited with their
mothers since the group's visit
last year.
But he also had a fantastic,
and unsettling, story to tell
about one of these separated
families in which the mother
was dying of cancer in Moscow
and her daughter in Israel was
seeking every venue to obtain
reunification with her mother
before her death.
In February, Chesler went
to Vienna with the daughter,
Kuchina, to plead with the
Austrians and others to in-
tercede with the Soviets to
allow her a visa to visit her
mother before her death.
Although many times they
seemed to be on the verge of a
breakthrough, it finally ap-
peared that nothing could be
done. When the two of them
returned to Israel, they receiv-
ed a telegram at the airport
saying that the daughter's visa
to visit her mother had been
granted. Within hours, her
mother had an exit visa.
Before they could make a
move to travel, another
telegram arrived to say that
the mother had died. "That,"
said Chesler, "is glasnost."
State Dep't. Denies U.S. Will
Sell $1 Billion in Arms to Saudis
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Departement denied
reports Monday that it has
decided to plan a $1 billion
arms sale to Saudi Arabia ear-
ly next month.
"There have been no new
developments and there is no
current active consideration of
this issue," said State Depart-
ment spokeswoman Phyllis
Oakley. "There is no hidden
agenda, there will be no sur-
prises on this issue. As we pro-
ceed I can assure you that the
Administration will consult
fully with the Congress."
But Oakley said the Ad-
ministration has already
stated that it will resubmit an
arms sales to Saudi Arabia
"when it considers it
appropriate."
OAKLEY was responding to
a question about a Washington
Post article which stated that
the Administration, in light of
recent developments in the
Persian Gulf, is planning to
submit the Saudi arms
package to Congress when it
convenes Sept. 9. The article
said the Administration will
argue that a strong Saudi
Arabia could be an effective
deterrent to the Iranians in the
region.
The $1 billion arms package
reportedly would include the
1,600 Maverick anti-tank
missiles whose sale was
withdrawn in June in face of a
Congressional override. The
sale would also include 12 to 15
F-15 fighter planes valued at
$500 million and im-
provements to weapons
already in the Saudi arsenal.
Sources have said there is
nothing new in the Ad-
ministration intention to
resubmit the arms sale.
CONGRESSIONAL opposi-
tion to the $360 million
Maverick sale increased after
Saudi Arabia failed to come to
the assistance of the U.S.
missile frigate Stark attacked
last in May by an Iraqi jet in
the Persian Gulf. The anger
grew when the Saudis balked
at assisting the 11 Kuwaiti
ships to be flagged as
American in the Gulf.
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Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Temple Judea
Dedication Ceremonies Mark Six Year Effort
!
By LOUISE ROSS
Before entering their new
^emple on Aug. 23, hundreds
}f members of Temple Judea
loined hands in a circ e of unity
ind marched around the out-
side of their new bui ding dur-
ng dedication ceremonies
relebrating the culmination of
|pix years of hard work.
In her welcoming address
lifter the mezuzah was affixed
the temple doorpost by
iosalee and Bob Savel. Presi-
dent Helaine Kahn said, "Six
tears ago a handful of people
[ivorking together started with
ligh spiritual and ethical
,-alues. We have not lost sight
nf those goals." She went on to
?ite several members who
|were instrumental in building
the congregation which now
lumbers over 250 families.
Bill Meyer, a founder of the
|:emple and an honorary board
lember, saluted the members
/ho gave of their time and
hioney to build the temple.
f'You v/ere exhuberant in
creating something that
/asn't there before," he said.
Rabbi Joel Levine, spiritual
deader of the congregation, led
|the members and guests in a
ledication prayer. Cantor
,nne Newman chanted
lashkiveynu and led the con-
regation in Shehechiyanu.
Congressman Tom Lewis
irought greetings to the con-
gregation and wished them
/ell just as he had done at the
temple's groundbreaking last
^ear. Dr. Richard Shugarman,
member at-large of the
Jnion of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC)
southeast Council Regional
Joard, and Paul Frank,
JAHC's South Florida
federation President, wished
the congregation 'mazel tov'
>n behalf of the national
teform organization.
Temple Judea is located at
100 Chillingworth Drive in
&Vest Palm Beach. Member-
ship is intergenerational in
lature with the congregation
providing spiritual programs
Tor every age, from infants and
foddlers to senior citizens.
Wedding
Sewstein-lawrence
Lisa Kim Newstein,
laughter of Neil and Gail
lewstein of West Palm Beach,
Ind Michael Anthony
(.awrence, son of Gerald and
Iary Lawrence, Virginia
leach, Virginia, were married
in August 23 in Virginia
leach. The bride, a graduate
|f the University of Virginia is
Program Analyst at The
Navy Regional Data Automa-
tion Center. The groom,
raduated from Old Dominion
Jniversity and is employed as
Program Analyst with the
Navy Regional Data Automa-
ton Center. The couple will
Hside in Virginia Beach.
Israelis Welcomed
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
r Israel's eight Special Olym-
lians were officially welcomed
|J City Hall here by Mayor
p "son (mode as they returned
rom international competition
1 South Bend, Ind.
**'
Manny and Mary Davis were among several members who
were honored at the dedication. They were instrumental in
providing music for the synagogue and are major con-
tributors to building Temple Judea.

Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Tel Aviv Unit No. 5354 will meet on Thursday, Sept. 10,
1 p.m., Temple Beth Sholom, 314 North "A'f St., Lake
Worth. Harry Epstein will moderate the program, "Views
From The Floor."
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Palm Beach Lodge No. 221 will hold their first meeting
of the season on Friday, Sept. 11, 12:30 p.m., at the
American Savings Bank (near the Okeechobee entrance to
Century Village). Tickets for "The King and I," at the
Jupiter Theatre Oct. 14 matinee are available. A
Thanksgiving trip to Tampa Nov. 25, 26, 27 is planned.
HADASSAH
Open Board Meeting of the Aviva-Lake Worth Chapter
will be held on Monday, Sept. 14, 1 p.m., at the Greenacres
Public Library, 6135 Lake Worth Rd. All are invited to
attend.
Chai Chapter of Lake Worth will hold their opening
meeting in the Social Hall of the Challenger Country Club
on Thursday, Sept. 17, at noon. Refreshments will be serv-
ed at 1:30 p.m. Muriel Levitt will present a program on
"Yiddishkeit and Jewish Nostalgia."
Cypress Lakes-Leisureville Chapter invites you to at-
tend their first meeting of the season to be held Wednes-
day, Sept. 30, 12:30 p.m. at American S & L, West Gate,
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. Program will feature
a book review to be given by Helen Nussbaum entitled
"Horowitz and Mrs. Washington," by author Henry
Benker. Mini-lunch will be served. For more information
call Bea Siller.
The Lee Vassil Chapter will have their first meeting of
the new season on Tuesday, Sept. 15, at Temple Beth
Sholom, 315 "A" St., Lake Worth, at 12:30 p.m.
There will be refreshments and many surprises,
husbands and friends are always welcomed. For informa-
tion call Elsie Grandis.
Shalom W. Palm Beach Chapter holds their opening
meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 16,12:30 p.m., at Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom. Helen Nussbaum, president, will
report on the Hadassah National Convention held in July in
Baltimore. All are welcome.
Tikvah Chapter will meet Sept. 21,1 p.m., at Congrega-
tion Anshei Sholom. Jennie Schuman will report on the
Hadassah Convention.
Yovel-West Palm Beach Chapter announces:
Thursday, Sept. 10: Matinee of La Cage Aux Folles,
Miami Theatre of Performing Arts. Show and transporta-
tion included. Bus leaves from Carteret Bank at noon.
Rabbi Joel Levine, spiritual leader of Temple Judea, leads the
congregation on a march around their new synagogue. Join-
ing him are Founding President Barbara Chane (left) and
Cantor Anne Newman (right), who led the singing.
Thursday, Sept. 17: First membership meeting of season,
at noon. Surprise speaker. Everyone is invited.
Due to High Holy days, the October meeting date has
been changed to Thursday, Oct. 29. Watch for further
details.
Coming events:
Nov. 26-29: Thanksgiving weekend at Tarleton Hotel,
Miami Beach.
Dec. 17-20: Weekend at newly refurbished Regency Spa,
Miami Beach
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
OF THE UNITED STATES
Post 501 will hold their initial Breakfast Meeting of the
season on Sunday, Sept. 6 at Aitz Chaim Synagogue on
Haverhill Road, just north of Okeechobee Blvd., W. Palm
Beach.
The featured guest speaker will be Detective Sam Golds-
tein, a 10 year member of the Crime Prevention Unit of the
Palm Beach County Sheriffs Department whose topic will
be "Scams and Bunco Artists."
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Everyone is invited to the opening meeting of the new
season on Sunday, Sept. 13, 1 p.m., at the Community
Meeting Room of the Beach Federal Bank, 4524 Gun Club
Road, West Palm Beach. Collation is served prior to the
meeting. Guest speaker will be Ray Liberti, Florida State
Representative. He will discuss the Malpractice Issue.
There will also be a discussion on the Palm Beach Junior
College bond issue. For information on the chapter
meetings contact Sid Levine, 2557 Emory Drive West,
Villa C, West Palm Beach 33415.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
West Palm Beach Chapter coming events:
Tuesday, Sept. 15, at 12:30 p.m. The first regular chapter
meeting of the new year at the Century Village clubhouse.
Tuesday, Oct. 20. Luncheon and card party at Lee's
Family Chinese Restaurant, 1979 S. Military Trail
(Richway Plaza).
Sunday, Nov. 1. Cruise on the M/V Viking Princess.
Sunday, Nov. 8. Flea Market at First Union Bank, 4900
Okeechobee Blvd. (across from Publix Market), 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. Rain date, Nov. 15.
Tuesday, Nov. 10. Paid-up membership luncheon at Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom at 1 p.m.
Thursday to Sunday, Dec. 10-13. Weekend at the Lido
Spa.
Saturday, Dec. 19. Luncheon and matinee at Burt
Reynolds Jupiter Theatre. "Mame."
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
The first meeting of the season will take place on Tues-
day, Sept. 8, 1 p.m., at Congregation Aitz Chaim, West
Palm Beach. The guest speaker will be Rabbi Alan R. Sher-
man, Chaplain and Community Relations Director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. Refreshments
will be served.


::::x:v:::::::::::v:::v:x


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4.J987
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, funded by
Gulf stream Area Agency on Aging, provides a variety of ser-
vices to persons 60 years or older, along with interesting and
entertaining educational and recreational programs. All
senior activities are conducted in compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act.
KOSHER MEALS
Monday through Friday,
older adults gather at the JCC
for a kosher lunch, and a varie-
ty of activities. Lectures,
films, celebrations, games,
card playing and nutritional
education are some of the pro-
grams offered at the Center.
Watermelon feasts, special
dessert treats, contests are
also planned. Transportation
is available. Reservations are
required. Call Lillian at
689-7703. No fee is required
but contributions are
requested.
KOSHER MEAL
ACTIVITIES
JCC movie of the week.
Come to the JCC every
Wednesday, for lunch, pop-
corn, drinks and an old time
film. See your favorite movie
along with a hot, delicious
meal. This will start at 10:30
a.m.
ONGOING PROGRAMS
Monday, Sept. 7: Holiday
Labor Day
Tuesday, Sept. 8: Geriatric
Crisis with Lynn Snowden
Wednesday, Sept. 9: Movie
of the week
Thursday, Sept. 10: Florida
Power and Light
Understanding your bill
Friday, Sept. 11: Lou Young
performs on the violin
JCCampus
Continued from Page 1
"I am excited to be working
with such a group of commit-
ted young professionals. We
are continuing to contact those
highly talented men and
women who believe that the
JCCampus is vital to our com-
munity's growth and are will-
ing to give both their time and
financial support," he said.
"After our initial session,
members of the cabinet will be
meeting with their friends and
colleagues, holding educa-
tional meetings at their homes,
and disseminating information
about why this community so
desperately needs the new
JCCampus facilities," Mr.
Klaperman Elected
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman of
New York has been elected
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, which
comprises the rabbinic and
congregational branches of
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform Judaism. He succeeds
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard of
Miami. Klaperman is past
president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, an Or-
thodox organization.
Lampert stated.
In endorsing the Young
Leadership Cabinet, Mr. Mess-
ing said, "The enthusiastic
participation of this group will
bring us much closer to our
$12.5 million goal. Even more
important, hundreds of young
families who will enjoy and
benefit from the new buildings
will have the opportunity to
take part in making our com-
munity's dream a reality."
Arnold Lampert has held
numerous leadership positions
both locally and nationally. He
is a past General Chairman of
the 1985 and 1986 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaigns and since then has
served as an Associate Cam-
paign Chairman. He has serv-
ed as Vice President of
Federation and currently sits
on the Executive Committee.
A former member of the
Federation's Budget and
Allocation Committee, he has
served on the national UJA
Budget and Allocation Com-
mittee, as well.
For more information, con-
tact Marjorie Scott, JCCam-
pus Campaign Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
feftMLrUCOK'KO***

JUXBooWw*ffr???L
nssMBStMaftf**"
BOAflOW/UXHOTft

HIGH HOLY DAYS $349
QPPT 23-OCT. 4 p* person
12DAYSI11HHSHTS J^T
X
-*Sss
jACOaS.Ow"*-**^
Monday, Sept. 14: Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Sept. 15: "Exer-
cises with Sophie"
Wednesday, Sept. 16: Movie
of the week
Thursday, Sept. 17: Original
readings by Estelle Baumann
Friday, Sept. 18: Dr. Elliot
Schwartz presents a special
holiday program celebrating
Rosh Hoshanah and Yom
Kippur
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Homebound persons 60
years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults. Call Carol for informa-
tion at 689-7703.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in designated area for persons
60 years of age or over who do
not use public transportation,
who must go to treatment
centers, doctor's offices,
hospitals and nursing homes to
visit spouses, social service
agencies and nutrition centers.
There is no fee for this service
but participants are encourag-
ed to make a contribution each
time. Reservations must be
made at least 48 hours in ad-
vance. For more information
and/or reservations, call
689-7703 and ask for Helen or
Norma in the Transportation
Department, between 9 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Timely Topics. Mondays at
2 p.m. Reservations can be
made for lunch prior to the
program (at 1:15 p.m.) by call-
ing 689-7703.
Coping with Alzheimers at
home. This is a class for
caregivers of Alzheimer pa-
tients to relieve uncertainties,
anguish and isolation of
caregivers, by teaching coping
skills, disseminating scientific
and medical information and
alleviating stress. Instructor,
Ruth Janko, MS in counseling
psychology. This class will be
held on Thursdays, at 9:30
a.m.
JCC CANASTARAMA
AND LUNCH
Lunch is served, followed by
Canastarama every Wednes-
day. There are prizes and
refreshments. Reservations
are required and persons at-
tending should arrive by 11:30
a.m. No fee for lunch. Con-
tributions are requested.
Please call Ruth for your
reservations, at 689-7703.
BEGINNERS CANASTA
Learn how to play Canasta.
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. Cost:
Members, $1; non-members,
$1.50. Call Ruth for reserva-
tions at 689-7703.
THE STORY OF
THE CONTEMPORARY
JEWS
From 1900 To The Present
A lecture discussion
presented by Rabbi Morton
Kanter.
Wednesday, Sept. 9 at 1:30
p.m. "Times that Bind" Jews
together. Understanding the
events that impacted upon and
effected our religion, our
history and our sense of
destiny.
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 1:30
p.m.; "The Shape of Things to
Come." Where are the ex-
periences and events of this
past century leading us? What
will be the nature of the Jewish
experience in the year 2000?
Call Ruth" to register,
689-7703. No fee. Contributors
welcome.
ACTION LINE
A new service designed for
your special needs! If you have
problems with insurance
forms, home bills, your
checkbook, taxes or legal
items, call for an appointment
with Herb Kirsch finances,
Edie Reiter Insurance, or
Minna Sonnenshine of Legal
Aid.
VOLUNTEER
NEWS AND VIEWS
Become part of a great team
of people. Call Carol and make
an appointment with her to
discuss how to become involv-
ed. We are looking for retired
professionals who are ready'
for a rewarding experience.
Develop a class in arts and
crafts, begin a choral group,
and orchestra, or form a JCC
Garden Club.
JCC LIBRARY
Did you know that the JCC
Senior Center has a beautiful
collection of books and paper-
backs? Large print books are
also available.
WISH LIST
VCR.
Projector (16MM) and
Screen.
Gardening Equipment
Horticulturist and persons
interested in gardening.
SECOND TUESDAY
COUNCIL
A group of dedicated active
people plan trips, luncheons
and fun fund raising activities.
JCC News
ALL SINGLES
On Friday, Sept. 11, starting at 4:30 p.m. single parent
families, couples and families in the Jewish community are
invited to Camp Shalom (Belvedere Road one mile west of
the Turnpike) to join together for the Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches Annual Shabbat Picnic. Shab-
bat will be welcomed in a relaxed country setting. Bring a
picnic dinner. Challah, wine, beverage and dessert will be
provided. The schedule includes swimming from 4:30-6:30
f>.m; a scavenger hunt and games from 6-6:30 p.m.; candle
ighting and dinner at 6:30 p.m., followed by singing and a
campfire (if weather permits).
On Friday, Sept. 18 at 10 p.m. attend a special Singles
Service at Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach. Oneg Shabbat will follow services.
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
On Saturday, Sept. 5, 8:30 p.m., get together at a
member's home in Jupiter for a Wine and Cheese Tasting
Party. Bring your favorite bottle of wine. A prize will be
awarded to the winning selection. Donation: $2 plus a bot-
tle of wine. For additional information and directions call
Ann at the Center, 689-7700, between 1-3 p.m.
On Wednesday, Sept. 9, 6:30 p.m., meet at TGIF's on
Village Blvd. for dinner and then to Verdes Tropicana
Bowling Lanes to begin bowling at 9 p.m.
ON Saturday, Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m., gather at a member's
home in Jupiter for Pot Luck Dinner, International Style.
Use imagination and whip up something exotic (or cheat
and stop by the French Bakery, Chinese Restaurant or
Cuban Diner for take-out). Donation: $2 plus something
delicious.
Get together on Sunday, Sept. 13,11:30 a.m., for brunch
at Shooters (Federal Highway in Boynton Beach Vk mile
South of Hypoluxo Road). Afterwards swim or just enjoy at
the pool and beach right there.
Get together Wednesday, Sept. 16, 6:45 p.m., at the
Cinema 'N Drafthouse (Congress Ave., just north of 10th
Ave. No.) for both the show and the company. Snacks and
beverages are served and prices are reasonable. Donation:
$1 plus own fare.
SINGLES GROUP (30's and 40's)
On Thursday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., meet at Strebs (Military
Trail, south of Northlake Blvd.) for dinner specials.
SINGLES (30-59)
Get together at the JCC on Thursday evening, Sept. 17,
7:30 p.m., for a lively and stimulating discussion. Be
prepared to learn some new means of gaining insight into
yourself and others. Snacks and beverages will be served.
Donation: JCC members $1, non-memmbers $2.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
On Wednesday, Sept. 9, 57 p.m., gather at Studebaker's
(Congress Ave. and Forest Hill Blvd.) for Happy Hour. Ap-
propriate dress is required. Donation: $1 plus own fare and
a small entrance few.
On Sunday, Sept. 13,3 p.m., meet at Garden Lanes (East
of 1-95 on Northlake Blvd.) for bowling. Plan to go to din-
ner afterwards. If joining the group just for dinner, be at
the alley at 4:30 p.m. to find out where.
Get together Tuesday, Sept. 15, 6 p.m. at Cobblestones
(45th St. and Congress) for dinner. Afterwards, try your
luck at Jai Alai (45th St., west of Australian) which has just
reopened for the season. Meet at the gift shop if not eating
dinner with the group. Free admission to ladies on
Tuesday.
*


r
i

Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Pdm Beach County Page 13
i
Papal Novelties
Jewish Entrepreneurs At The Forefront
Continued from Page 4
national director of the
American Jewish Committee,
who has just completed con-
sultations at the Vatican.
Question: is this a business
Jewish entrepreneurs should
be engaged in? There is no cor-
rect answer. But long ago
Judaic tradition established
that Jews could ethically traf-
fic in Christian religious com-
merce. The papal novelty
business is in the main not an
issue of Christian religious
commerce. The key issue is
religious sensitivity. Should
Jews, a group especially sen-
sitive to derisive religious
humor, avoid such enterprises
as a function of Jewish values.
Rabbi Tanenbaum answers,
"This is not a business Jews
should be in. Somewhere there
has to be some judgment and
sensitivity. Think about how
we would feel if something
very important to us is ex-
ploited outside the community.
"Jews know what it means
to suffer this kind of afflic-
tion," Rabbi Tanenbaum con-
tinues. "The Gemorrah
teaches us that if you have suf-
fered from an affliction, surely
you should then not inflict that
same suffering on someone
else."
But ADL officials, such as
national director Abe Foxman,
are adamant that although
"papal sprinklers are in bad
taste, who manufacture them
whether Jew, Shintoist or
Catholic is irrelevant. It's a
free country with a free enter-
prise system."
Thus far, the issue of Jewish
entrepreneurship has not been
an issue. Lebow reports only
three irate phone calls, all on
the first day of publicity. But
only one of them was par-
ticularly bothersome. A lady
called and asked if his next
sprinkler would be an
"Auschwitz oven sprinkler."
Condemning such attacks,
Rabbi Tanenbaum responds,
"You have to expect that such
novelties could elicit some very
miserable reactions. Given all
the anger between the two
communites about the Pope
and Waldheim, if someone
decides to exploit this, it could
be very messy." Lebow in fact
took a cue and immediately ad-
ded sprinklers in the images of
Moses and Tammy Bakker.
"We did that to balance things
so no one would accuse us of
being anti-Catholic," explains
Lebow. "And really, we
received a very good response
from the Catholic community
itself." J
But Paul Laub has another
answer for those who criticize
him: "Opinions are like rec-
tums everybody has at least
one." He appends that he
wouldn't withdraw his pro-
ducts even if the Holy Father
himself asked him in writing.
It would be a mistake to
believe that Catholics aren't
engaged in some of the same
enterprise. Jay Berman of
Detroit's Archdiocese reports,
r,'knw some little old
catholic ladies making buttons
with the Pope wearing a
2aS Tiger's baseball hat
W1'n the inscription, 'bless you
7>ys It seems you scratch
America and you find an
entrepreneur."
Quite right. Lebow's partner
in the sprinkler business,
Peter Gahan, 24, is Catholic.
So is Dennis Poplin, Danny
Geisler's partner in the San
Antonio papal ring project.
Moreover, papal novelties
can be marketed tastefully.
Becky Bamber, a member of
suburban Chicago's Jewish
community, has created the
Pope Scope periscope for
motorcade crowds. "We were
committed from the beginning
to providing a quality product
consistent with what the
church wanted," avers
Bamber. Before finalizing her
plans, she consulted several ar-
chdiocesan groups. Gaudy
retailing was rejected in favor
of direct sales along the parade
routes. "Yet Pope Scopes will
not be hawked," Becky insists.
"They will be made available
in special booths, but in a
tasteful manner." Bamber is
the only papal novelty maker
donating to the Papal Visit
Fund five percent off the
top. Church sources, expressly
forbidden to endorse any
novelties, confirm however
that Pope Scopes are the
closet to acceptable.
Even irreverent en-
trepreneurs such as Paul Laub
have shown they know how to
market a tasteful product.
Among Laub's inventory is a
sedate papal photo album
decorated with a respectful
picture of John Paul that
would appeal to any good
Catholic. "Problem is, they
don't sell the t-shirts do,"
comments Laub.
But it would be a mistake to
believe the Almighty Buck is
the sole guiding spirit. Some
entrepreneurs are motivated
by pure hostility. For example,
Danny Geisler, maker of what
most sources identify as the
most outrageous novelty the
papal ring with ruby red lips
confesses he is trying to
"make a statement against a
bad pope." Geisler objects to
papal policies against women,
gays and his embrace of such
disgraced world leaders as
Chilean strongman Auguste
Pinochet and Kurt Waldheim.
"Insensitivity," says
Geisler, "that's the whole
point. I'd much rather get flak
for insensitivity than for sim-
ple entrepreneurship. If he
(John Paul) was a good pope,
we would not be doing these
things, which are degrading.
This ring is pretty vulgar
stuff." Even a product as sim-
ple as a miter emblazoned with
the image of the Alamo was
conceived in hostility. "Our
idea was what could the Pope
see during his motorcade that
would make him feel bad
these silly hats."
But Geisler says being
Jewish should not restrain
such hostility. "I'd feel this
way about this Pope even if I
were Swahili," remarks
Geisler. "Being Jewish has
nothing to do with it."
Rabbi Tanenbaum of the
American Jewish Committee
reiterates, "Indeed, being
Jewish has nothing to do with
it. But I repeat: such things
can be exploited. It's hostilities
like these that keep organiza-
tions like ours in business."
Edwin Black'8 weekly syn-
dicated column is published by
Jewish newspapers in 50 cities
throughout the United States
and Canada.
copyright 1987
International Features
High Holiday Appeals
Set For Israel Bonds
Many synagogues in the
Palm Beaches will participate
in the annual Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur Appeals for
State of Israel Bonds during
High Holiday services this
year, it has been announced by
Rabbi Leon B. Fink of the
Boynton Beach Jewish
Center/Beth Kodish.
In his announcement, Rabbi
Fink urged every Jewish fami-
ly in the area to respond to this
year's holiday Bond appeal
which will commemorate the
20th anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem dur-
ing the Six-Day War of 1967.
The participating congrega-
tions will be joining some 1,100
synagogues across the United
States and Canada in a
massive campaign to continue
the increases in High Holy Day
Israel Bond subscriptions
which have been recorded dur-
ing the past five years.
Rabbi Fink reported that
special emphasis is being plac-
ed this year by Rabbis and
other synagogue leaders who
will be conducting Bond Ap-
peals on the new Individual
Variable Rate Issue (IVRI)
Bond, a $5,000 minimum
Israel security which pays a
competitive interest rate.
IVRI Bond interest is a base
rate of 5 percent plus half the
difference to the average
prime rate as determined by
three major U.S. banks. The
IVRI Bond is available in
denominations of $2,000 for
IRA accounts only.
Since the inception of the
Israel Bond campaign in 1951,
High Holy Day Bond Appeals
in North American
synagogues have been a major
source of low-cost loan funds
for Israel and have made possi-
ble the remarkable growth in
the nation's economy.
Historian Awaits
Panel's Approval
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) A
prominent Belgian historian
awaits government approval
to serve on an international
commission of inquiry into the
World War II activities of
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim.
Jean Van Welkenhuysen,
director of the Research
Center on World War II here,
has been asked to participate
on the Austrian-sponsored
commission as a private
citizen. Nevertheless, as a civil
servant, he sought as a
courtesy the backing of the
Education Ministry.
Pope Refused To
Baptize Jewish Child
After Holocaust
<
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
personal story of an American
Jewish man who as a child dur-
ing the Holocaust was hidden
by a Polish Catholic couple
demonstrates a respect for
Judaism by the young priest
who became Pope John Paul
II.
In an account of the saving
of little Shachne Hiller, record-
ed in "Hasidic Tales of the
Holocaust" (Avon Books,
N.Y., 1982), Hiller, renamed
Stanley Berger, told
author/editor Yaffa Eliach
that in 1946 a newly ordained
priest named Karol Wojtyla
refused to baptize him a
Catholic despite a request by
the woman who had cared for
him as her own.
BERGER TOLD Eliach that
through a letter from the
woman in Poland who had sav-
ed him, he learned that she,
Mrs. Yachowitch, had ap-
proached "a newly-ordained
parish priest who had a reputa-
tion for being wise and
trustworthy" to convert him
"as a true Christian and
devout Catholic" after she
knew for certain that his
parents had died in the
crematoria.
The priest refused after ask-
ing what was the wish of the
boys' parents in entrusting
him to their Christian friends.
Yachowitch acknowledged
that his parents, in face of
their almost certain death, re-
quested that their son be rais-
ed as a Jew, to which Father
Wojtyla replied that "it would
be unfair to baptize the child
while there was still hope that
the relatives of the child might
take him."

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I


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Adam Schneider Mitchell Wunsh Emily Sloop
Jordan Tartakow
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
ADAM SCHNEIDER
Adam Schneider, son of
Robert and Bettyann
Schneider of Palm Beach
Gardens will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Sept. 5 at Temple
Beth David. Rabbi William
Marder will officiate.
Adam is a 7th grade student
at Howell L. Watkins Junior
High School. He enjoys
fishing, skateboarding, tennis,
baseball and bicycling. Family
members and friends sharing
the simcha are his sister, Lisa,
Robert and Marion Sultzer
from Miami, Philip and Leila
Sultzer from New York, and
great aunt Elizabeth Mindrich
from New York.
MITCHELL WUNSH
Mitchell Kane Wunsh, son of
Dr. Peter Wunsh and Mrs.
Barbara Wunsh will become a
Bar Mitzvah when he is called
to the Torah on Saturday,
Sept. 5 at Temple Beth El,
West Palm Beach. Mitchell
will also lead services on Fri-
day, Sept. 4, Rabbi Alan Cohen
will officiate with Cantor Nor-
man Brody. Mitchell is a
graduate of the Louis Barrish
Religious School at Temple
Beth El where he was awarded
a scholarship to attend
Midrasha which he will start
this fall.
Mitchell is an 8th grade stu-
dent at Roosevelt Jr. High
School where he is a member
of the Jr. National Honor
Society and is listed in the
Who's Who of Jr. High School
students.
He is a member of Kadima at
Temple Beth El and Young
Judaea, a Hadassah sponsored
youth zionist organization.
Mitchell attends Camp Judaea

Would you like to sponsor a Shabbat or Holiday
kiddish for the residents of the Morse Geriatric
Center?
For further information contact the Office of
Development, 471-5111, Ext. 195.
rnplC the Liberal-Reform ^S
B 61 h Congregation of Wellington
JjT f 's\ r* "l V-\ and the West Communities
Invites you to worship with us for the
HIGH HOLY DAYS, 5748
in our beautiful new home
900 Big Blue Trace, Wellington
ROSH HASHANA EVE: Wed., Sept. 23 KOL MORE: Fri., Oct. 2
ROSH HASHANA: Thurt., Stpt. 24 YOM KIPPUR: Sat., Oct. 3
Fri., Sept. 25
R*X Stvn R WJmn. C*nlof EMot Ronbutn, nd our mgnrfK*nt
Chow arxJ instrumental** wi conduct warm, traditional. y*t innovative
and inspirational Mrvic CHILDREN S SERVICES AND SUPERVISED
INFANT AND CHILD CARE WILL BE PROVIDED
For membership Information and
For Non-Member Ticket Information,
Call the Temple Office: 793-2700 /
Shirt our prill as 9$ ink* in trM Ntw Ymt in our awt-lmpklng
Mr/,
L'SHANAH TOVAH TIKATEYVU!
May you and youra be inscribed tof a good and happy New Year!
Temple
Beth
Torah
793-2700
in North Carolina. He is in-
terested in all sports, especial-
ly enjoys tennis.
Mitchell will be sharing his
Bar Mitzvah with Grigory
Aizelman of Ukraine, USSR in
a twinning ceremony as he
confirms his belief in Judaism
and the freedom he has to live
as a Jew in America.
Helping to celebrate are
older sisters, Beth Michele and
Wendy Ellen, grandparents
Ethel and Harry Levy of
Cresthaven, Ceil Wunsh from
New York, and many other
members of the family and
dear friends.
EMILY SLOOP
On Saturday, Sept. 12, at
Temple Beth David, Emily
Kate Sloop will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah. Of-
ficiating will be Rabbi William
Marder and Cantor Earl
Rackoff. Emily is the daughter
of Anne and Ronald Sloop and
sister of Jessica Sloop of Palm
Beach Gardens.
Emily is an eighth grader at
Howell Watkins Junior High
School where she is a member
of the Junior National Honor
Society. Emily is on the staff
of the school newspaper and
also a cheerleader. Favorite
outside activities include
Kadima, dancing, tap dancing,
and roller skating.
Joining Emily for this joyous
occasion will be her Grand-
parents, Herbert and Diana
Zimkind of Boynton Beach, as
well as many friends and
relatives, both local and from
all over the country.
JORDAN TARTAKOW
Jordan Scott Tartakow will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, Sept. 12,
at Temple Beth El, West Palm
Beach. Officiating at the ser-
vice will be Rabbi Alan L.
Cohen and Cantor Norman
Brody.
Jordan is an eighth grade
student at the Jewish Com-
munity Day School where he
has attended since
kindergarten. An honor roll
student, Jordan was chosen to
be a member of the Junior Na-
tional Honor Society. He en-
joys tennis, softball, basketball
and football and is a member
of Young Judaea and Kadima.
Jordan will symbolically
share his Bar Mitzvah with
Vladislav Kuznetsov of
Moscow, USSR who has been
denied his heritage.
Jordan is the son of Dr. Den-
nis J. Tartakow of Juno Beach
and Mr. and Mrs. Jay Epstein
of Wellington.
Sharing the simcha with Jor-
dan will be his brother Gregg,
his grandparents Mr. and Mrs.
WillNewins of New York, Mr.
Lewis Acker of West Palm
Beach, Mr. and Mrs. George
Epstein of Cleveland, Ohio,
and many friends and relatives
from all over the country.
Candle lighting Time
Sept. 4-7:19 p.m.
Sept. 11-7:12 p.m.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER-BETH KODESH: 501
N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428. Rabbi
Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Roster. Monday 8:30 a.m.; Thurs-
day 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
For times of evening services please call the Temple office.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. Services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder. Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royai /aim Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m. Rabbi
Morris Pickholz. Cantor Andrew Beck.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Mailing Address: 6085
Parkwalk Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33437. Phone 736-7687.
Cantor Alex Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.;
Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 29%, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Benjamin Shull. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 N. Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and 7:30 p.m. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Oscar
Werner.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1390 SW Dorchester
Street, P.O. Box 857146, Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night
services 8 p.m., Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 335-7620.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m. Student Rabbi Elaine Zechter.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address: *
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro. Cantor Stuart
Pittle. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: 100 S. Chillingworth Dr., West Palm Beach,
FL 33409. Rabbi Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Phone
471-1526.


Syna
III
eNews
CONGREGATION
AITZ CHAIM
Congregation Aitz Chaim,
the only orthodox synagogue
in the Palm Beaches, has in-
stituted a shiur, study group of
Maimonidies, on Saturday
evenings, at 7:30 p.m. with
Rabbi Oscar Werner. Men,
women and children are
invited.
Call the office between 9
a.m.-noon, for High Holiday
ticket information.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
Sisterhood will hold its
board meeting on Monday,
Sept. 7, 9:45 a.m. and its
regular season opening
meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 15,
1 p.m.
BOYNTON BEACH
JEWISH CENTER
BETH KODESH
Sisterhood's first meeting
of the year will be Tuesday,
Sept. 8, at noon. Rabbi Leon
B. Fink will speak about the
importance and meaning of
the High Holy Days. There will
be a display of Holy Day food.
Refreshments will be served.
The meeting is open to all.
Sisterhood will sponsor a
Luncheon and Card Party at
Fon Shan on Hypoluxo and
Congress Avenue on Wednes-
day, Sept. 9, at noon. Door
Prizes! Early reservation
suggested.
Mark your calendar for Dec.
23 for the show "Funny Girl"
at the Royal Palm Dinner
Theatre.
And to an enjoyable
weekend at the Regency Spa
on March 16,17, and 19,1988.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Shabbat Service on Friday,
Sept. 4, 8 p.m., will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro. This will be the last of
the summer services. Cantor
Stuart Pittle will lead the con-
gregation in songs.
Services will be abbreviated
with discussions on contem-
porary topics and will be more
informal in form and in
content.
Shabbat Service on Friday,
Sept. 11, 8 p.m., will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro. His sermon will be a
book review: "Gone To
Soldiers" by Marge Piercy.
Herman Grant will celebrate
his second Bar Mitzvah. Can-
tor Stuart Pittle will lead the
congregation in songs.
10-Year Calm Ending Rabin
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Middle East is nearing the end
of a six-to-10-year period of
"relative calm," Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin said in
an address before graduates of
the Israel Defense Force Staff
and Command College
Thursday.
He noted that in the past few
years the threat of imminent
"war with the Arab armies had
been remote, but he added that
Israel has erred in predicting
the outbreak of war. He said
the State must "learn the
lesson and be attentive to
changes which may occur."
He added that unlike some
other armies, the IDF cannot
assume there will be no war in
the next few years.
In two weeks, Rabin is
scheduled to go on a four-day
official visit to West Germany,
where he will hold talks with
West German defense officials
and visit Holocaust sites. He
will be the first Israeli Defense
Minister to visit Germany.
Northern Command Maj.
Gen. Yossi Peled, a Holocaust
survivor, will accompany
Rabin.
Area Deaths
AD1N
Flora, 88, of Cresthaven Boulevard. West
Pain Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Hon e, West Palm Beach.
APFEL
Paulina G.. 76. of West Palm Beach.
Men rah Gardens and Funeral Chapels.
West Palm Beach.
BKRNSTEIN
Carl, 80. of Lake Worth. Levitt-Weinstein
Memorial Chapel.
BRAINSTEIN
Anna, of West Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Batch.
' HKKM ( IIIN
Sue ().. 80. of Palm Beach. Riverside Guar
dian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
CHESTLER
Shirley, 78, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Memorial Chapel.
DAVIDSON
David, 72. of Century Village, West Palm
Beach Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
weal Palm Beach.
FEINBERG
Pearl. 76. of Century Village. West Palm
Beach LevittWeinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
FOX
Virginia, of Palm Beach. LevittWeinstein
'uarsnteed Security Plan Chapel. West
Palm Beach.
KAPLAN
Abe go, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
( hapel, West Palm Beach.
K'PF.RMAN
"'. of West Palm Beach. Menorah
nd Funeral Chapels, West Palm
1 UASU8
^THER -:. of We.-i Fatal Btajofa.
Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Aitz Chaim
Welcomes First Spiritual Leader
For the first time in the
history of Congregation Aitz
Chaim. this community's only
Orthodox congregation now
has a full time spiritual leader.
Harry Turbiner, President
of the congregation, has an-
nounced that Rabbi Oscar
Werner has assumed the
pulpit and will be conducting
High Holiday services, as well
as regular services throughout
the year. "Our community is
most fortunate to receive a
man of such outstanding
backcround and experience,"
stated Mr. Turbiner.
Rabbi Werner has instituted
a "shiur," a study group which
will focus on Maimonidies, on
Saturday evenings, 7:30 p.m.
at the synagogue. "Everyone
is invited men, women, and
children," he emphasized.
He sees trying to reestablish
traditional Judaism in modern
form as a major goal for the
congregation. He also will be
reaching out to younger people
Rabbi Oscar Werner
through involving them in
discussion groups as well as
making them feel welcome at
services. "At our Friday even-
ing service, there were many
people in the 30-40 age
group," Rabbi Werner said.
Rabbi Werner comes to this
community after distinguished
service in both Kimberly and
Johannesburg, South Africa
for over 25 years. Born in
Hanover, Germany, he fled to
England before the start of
World War II. He began his
studies there and graduated
from the Yeshivah Talmudical
College in Liverpool. In 1951
he left for South Africa. For
the past 16 years, Rabbi
Werner has served as the
spiritual leader of the
Parkview Greenside Orthodox
Synagogue in Johannesburg.
He held many positions in
the community, both profes-
sional and as a volunteer. He
was the principal of the con-
gregation's Hebrew school,
mohel, chaplain of the mental
hospital, and honorary
chaplain to the Jewish
members of the South African
defense force. He also served
as Vice Chairman of the Rab-
binical Association of South
Africa.
'Tree Terrorism'
Prompts Massive JNF Campaign In Israel
MANN
Anne, 78, of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
MAZER
Lina. of West Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
dian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
MILLARD
Harold G 70. of Boynton Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
MILLMAN
John, 79, of Golden Lakes, West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels. Weat Palm Beach.
PACHMAN
Herbert, 76. of West Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
ROSEN
Hilda, 75. of Palm Beach Gardens. Riverside
Memorial Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SCHNEIDERMAN
Ira. 73. of Century Village. West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
SHANDLE
Harriet. 62, of Boynton Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach
SILBERFARD
Louis. 86, of Century Village. West Palm
Beach. LevittWeinstein Guaranteed
Security Plan Chapel. West Palm Beach.
SIRKES
Sam 84, of Century Village; West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
SZMI KI.F.R
Itka. 80, of North Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
WEISS
Waal Pain
tt'iiian.Uiin limrmtuwi -iacwav .*!*
West Palm Beach.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) A
wave of fires that has
devastated Jewish National
Fund forests in Israel this year
has prompted the JNF to
mount an all-out drive for im-
mediate financial help. The
JNF needs a minimum of $7
million: $2 million to replace
trees recently burnt and $5
million for fire-fighting equip-
ment urgently needed to
forestall future disasters.
Arson is strongly suspected
in about 25 percent of the
fires. The scope of this "tree
terrorism" is unprecedented,
Yugoslav News
Agency To Open
In Jerusalem
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Tanjug official Yugoslav news
agency will have a bureau in
Israel and its local represen-
tative, Miroslav Vishjie,
formerly head of its Cairo
bureau, said the establishment
of its office in Jerusalem
signals improved Yugoslav-
Israel relations.
"The fact that an official
news agency opens its bureau
in Israel speaks for itself.
After this, similar step-by-step
moves most probably will
follow," he told reporters. He
said he had chosen Jerusalem
as the center of his news
gathering and reporting ac-
tivities because ne suffers
from asthma.
Obituary
LITTKY
Max H.. 77, of Palm Beach, Fla. (formerly of
Birmingham, Mich.) died suddenly August
25 in London, England. He was a 50 year
member of the Michigan Bar Assoc.. and a
retired builder. Survived by his loving wife,
Miriam; son Marvin (Roberta) of Palm
Beach; daughter Barbara Sugerman
(Donald) of Bloomfield Hills. Mich.; brother
Dr. Herman of Encino. Calif: six grand-
children: Julie. Pamela and Joseph Littky;
I an i and ^dw* Swswwn. San
re held August 'l'1 at Riverside
MemorialI lawHan Funeral Home,
47U Okeach faae Wvd Weal Palm Beach.
striking at the very soul and
soil of Israel.
"JNF is opening an im-
mediate nationwide crusade to
people of all faiths to help
preserve the safety and in-
tegrity of our national
forests," Samuel Cohen, JNF
executive vice president, said
in an interview at JNF head-
quarters here.
JNF in Israel (Keren
Kayemeth L'Yisrael) recently
has organized an un-
precedented nationwide fire-
prevention campaign that will
include widespread educa-
tional efforts.
On July 29 alone, a day the
Israeli media said "will be
remembered as the worst
forest fire day in Israel in the
last decade," four different
fires near Jerusalem started
within a few hours of each
other, ravaging 1,150 acres of
forest that included 80,000
trees.
The JNF estimates the
damage for that one day's fires
alone at $2 million, making it
apparent that much more will
be needed to replace trees that
have been lost to fires since
January alone.
The four fires of July 20
disconnected Jerusalem's
western neighborhoods from
its electric supply for several
hours, and badly damaged
telephone posts as well as the
water-pumping system that
connects the Mediterranean
coast with Jerusalem.
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urges you to
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Of Your Choice
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build strong Jewish communities.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
East Berlin
-.*.
Gets Rabbi After Quarter-Century
NEW YORK (JTA) For
the first time in almost a
quarter-century, the small
Jewish community in East
Berlin will have a rabbi of its
own, the result of a four-year
effort spearheaded by the
American Jewish Committee.
Rabbi Isaac Neuman, a
65-year-old Auschwitz sur-
vivor from Champaign, 111.,
will leave for East Germany on
Sept. 10 to assume his post
and prepare for the High Holy
Days. As his first rabbinical ac-
tion, he will attend the Inter-
national Ecumenical Con-
ference in East Berlin on Sept.
13 as the official represen-
tative of the less than 600 re-
maining East German Jews.
The Reform rabbi, who is a
member of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council, will become
the only permanent American
rabbi ministering in all of the
East Bloc nations.
"I AM going because there
are Jews who are in need of
spiritual service in this place
out of which so much evil and
destruction once emanated,"
Hess Buried
Continued from Page 1
serving a life term. A British
military coroner had said the
93-year-old Hess died of
asphyxiation after choking
himself with an electric wire in
a suicide attempt.
The four-power Allied con-
trol over Spandau Prison is
scheduled to end when the
U.S. guard will march out. The
red brick fort will be razed to
prevent it from becoming a
neo-Nazi shrine.
The federal government
ordered Hess buried secretly
and without delay as neo-Nazi
demonstrations took place
throughout West Germany
over the weekend.
IN WUNSIEDEL alone, 75
neo-Nazis were arrested after
a crowd of several hundred
massed outside the cemetery
gates. Police said sym-
pathizers had come from as far
away as north Germany,
Bavaria and nearby
Nuremberg to attend a banned
demonstration. Police found
Nazi flags, armbands and Nazi
posters in some of the search-
ed cars.
After the news of Hess'
burial broke, local state and ci-
ty police increased patrols
near the city and cordoned it
off from the main highways.
Entrance into the cemetery
itself was banned and local of-
ficials confiscated flowers and
wreaths placed outside the
cemetery wall.
Many West German papers
Monday continued printing
lengthy reports, often in a
sympathetic tone, on Hess' life
and the 40 years he spent in
prison.
HESS' FORMER
Nuremberg trial lawyer,
Alfred Seidel, Monday accused
the four Western Allies of hav-
ing kept Hess in prison in spite
of his age and poor health.
Seidel, who gave a press con-
ference in Munich, said that
the Allied claim that it was the
Soviet Union which had vetoed
Hess' liberation "was only an
excuse taking refuge behind
the skirts of the Soviet Com-
munist Party."
said Neuman. "It is my joy to
try to rebuild and reconstruct
and provide for the needs of
this Jewish community."
He added: "What I hope to
bring is the information that
will help them understand the
oneness of the Jewish people,
their shared history and
experiences."
Eugene DuBow, director of
AJC's Community Services
Department, who has over-
seen this project since its con-
ception, noted that "the pro-
cess of having a permanent
rabbi placed in East Berlin to
help revive and rejuvenate the
Jewish population there took a
lot of time and energy on the
part of concerned individuals,
but we know that we have ac-
complished something in-
credibly worthwhile."
DuBow offered the following
chronology of events leading
to Neuman's appointment:
IN THE FALL of 1983, an
AJC leadership delegation to
Germany became the first
postwar American Jewish
group to visit East Berlin. The
president of the Jewish com-
munity there asked for AJC
help in obtaining kosher wine,
prayer shawls, German
language prayer books, and a
rabbi to conduct High Holy day
services. In early 1984, AJC
snipped the materials and ar-
ranged for a rabbi from
Chicago to go to the German
Democratic Republic (GDR) to
conduct services.
In the fall of 1985, an AJC
delegation returned to East
Berlin and was informed of the
overwhelmingly positive reac-
tion of the Jewish community
to the rabbi's visit. East Ger-
man Jewish community
leaders discussed the possibili-
ty of finding a more perma-
nent religious figure with the
delegation, in an effort to
maintain Jewish life and help
young people discover their
Jewishj heritage. After a long
searcl, AJC suggested
Neuman for the position.
In the summer of 1986, Rep.
William Lehman (D., Fla.)
heard about AJC's project and
offered his help. He, along
with AJC leaders, held several
meetings with U.S. State
Department officers and East
German officials.
IN JANUARY, 1987, the
State Secretary for Religious
Affairs of the GDR arranged
for Neuman, Lehman, DuBow,
and State Department officials
to go to East Berlin for
Passover to meet with leaders
of the Jewish community there
and to "firm up" Neuman's
appointment.
Defense Requests Recess
To Sept. 7 in Demjanjuk Case
JERUSALEM (JTA) The trial of John Demjanjuk
has recessed until Sept. 7 following a request by the
defense at the end of Wednesday's (Aug. 19) session.
Court President Dov Levin had announced some weeks
ago that the court would recess from Aug. 25 to Sept. 7
because of prior commitments on the part of the bench.
HOWEVER, he had refused to allow any extra time, in
addition to that week, for the defense to prepare its case.
Defense Counsels John Gill and Yoram Sheftel had
claimed that Mark O'Connor, the former head of the
defense team who was dismissed by the Demjanjuk family,
had left them unprepared.
On Wednesday, after the credibility of the two expert
witnesses for the defense was apparently shaken by pro-
secutor Michael Shaked, the defense appealed again for
more preparation time, and on this occasion the request
was granted.


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Friday, September 4, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13

Papal Novelties
Jewish Entrepreneurs At The Forefront
Continued from Page 4
national director of the
American Jewish Committee,
who has just completed con-
sultations at the Vatican.
Question: is this a business
Jewish entrepreneurs should
be engaged in: There is no cor-
rect answer. But long ago
Judaic tradition established
that Jews could ethically traf-
fic in Christian religious com-
merce. The papal novelty
business is in the main not an
issue of Christian religious
commerce. The key issue is
religious sensitivity. Should
Jews, a group especially sen-
sitive to derisive religious
humor, avoid such enterprises
as a function of Jewish values.
Rabbi Tanenbaum answers,
"This is not a business Jews
should be in. Somewhere there
has to be some judgment and
sensitivity. Think about how
we would feel if something
very important to us is ex-
ploited outside the community.
"Jews know what it means
to suffer this kind of afflic-
tion," Rabbi Tanenbaum con-
tinues. "The Gemorrah
teaches us that if you have suf-
fered from an affliction, surely
you should then not inflict that
same suffering on someone
else."
But ADL officials, such as
national director Abe Foxman,
are adamant that although
"papal sprinklers are in bad
taste, who manufacture them
- whether Jew, Shintoist or
Catholic is irrelevant. It's a
free country with a free enter-
prise system."
Thus far, the issue of Jewish
entrepreneurship has not been
an issue. Lebow reports only
three irate phone calls, all on
the first day of publicity. But
only one of them was par-
ticularly bothersome. A lady
called and asked if his next
sprinkler would be an
"Auschwitz oven sprinkler."
Condemning such attacks,
Rabbi Tanenbaum responds,
"You have to expect that such
novelties could elicit some very
miserable reactions. Given all
the anger between the two
communites about the Pope
and Waldheim, if someone
decides to exploit this, it could
be very messy." Lebow in fact
took a cue and immediately ad-
ded sprinklers in the images of
Moses and Tammy Bakker.
"We did that to balance things
so no one would accuse us of
being anti-Catholic," explains
Lebow. "And really, we
received a very good response
from the Catholic community
itself."
But Paul Laub has another
answer for those who criticize
him: "Opinions are like rec-
tums everybody has at least
one.' He appends that he
wouldn't withdraw his pro-
ducts even if the Holy Father
himself asked him in writing.
It would be a mistake to
believe that Catholics aren't
engaged in some of the same
enterprise. Jay Berman of
Detroit's Archdiocese reports,
r\,know some little old
^atnohc ladies making buttons
Pope
Quite right. Lebow's partner
in the sprinkler business,
Peter Gahan, 24, is Catholic.
So is Dennis Poplin, Danny
Geisler's partner in the San
Antonio papal ring project.
Moreover, papal novelties
can be marketed tastefully.
Becky Bamber, a member of
suburban Chicago's Jewish
community, has created the
Pope Scope periscope for
motorcade crowds. "We were
committed from the beginning
to providing a quality product
consistent with what the
church wanted," avers
Bamber. Before finalizing her
plans, she consulted several ar-
chdiocesan groups. Gaudy
retailing was rejected in favor
of direct sales along the parade
routes. "Yet Pope Scopes will
not be hawked," Becky insists.
"They will be made available
in special booths, but in a
tasteful manner." Bamber is
the only papal novelty maker
donating to the Papal Visit
Fund five percent off the
top. Church sources, expressly
forbidden to endorse any
novelties, confirm however
that Pope Scopes are the
closet to acceptable.
Even irreverent en-
trepreneurs such as Paul Laub
have shown they know how to
market a tasteful product.
Among Laub's inventory is a
sedate papal photo album
decorated with a respectful
picture of John Paul that
would appeal to any good
Catholic. "Problem is, they
don't sell the t-shirts do,
comments Laub.
But it would be a mistake to
believe the Almighty Buck is
the sole guiding spirit. Some
entrepreneurs are motivated
by pure hostility. For example,
Danny Geisler, maker of what
most sources identify as the
most outrageous novelty the
papal ring with ruby red lips
confesses he is trying to
"make a statement against a
bad pope." Geisler objects to
papal policies against women,
gays and his embrace of such
disgraced world leaders as
Chilean strongman Auguste
Pinochet and Kurt Waldheim.
"Insensitivity," says
Geisler, "that's the whole
point. I'd much rather get flak
for insensitivity than for sim-
ple entrepreneurship. If he
(John Paul) was a good pope,
we would not be doing these
things, which are degrading.
This ring is pretty vulgar
stuff." Even a product as sim-
ple as a miter emblazoned with
the image of the Alamo was
conceived in hostility. "Our
idea was what could the Pope
see during his motorcade that
would make him feel bad
these silly hats."
But Geisler says being
Jewish should not restrain
such hostility. "I'd feel this
way about this Pope even if I
were Swahili," remarks
Geisler. "Being Jewish has
nothing to do with it."
Rabbi Tanenbaum of the
American Jewish Committee
reiterates, "Indeed, being
Jewish has nothing to do with
it. But I repeat: such things
can be exploited. It's hostilities
like these that keep organiza-
tions like ours in business."
Edwin Black's weekly syn-
dicated column is published by
Jewish newspapers in 50 cities
throughout the United States
and Canada.
copyright 1987
International Features
High Holiday Appeals
Set For Israel Bonds
iuuc weanner a
ST!? Tiger's baseball hat
with the inscription, 'bless you
>'s- It seems you scratch
Aj>enca and you find
entrepreneur."
an
Many synagogues in the
Palm Beaches will participate
in the annual Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur Appeals for
State of Israel Bonds during
High Holiday services this
year, it has been announced by
Rabbi Leon B. Fink of the
Boynton Beach Jewish
Center/Beth Kodish.
In his announcement, Rabbi
Fink urged every Jewish fami-
ly in the area to respond to this
year's holiday Bond appeal
which will commemorate the
20th anniversary of the
reunification of Jerusalem dur-
ing the Six-Day War of 1967.
The participating congrega-
tions will be joining some 1,100
synagogues across the United
States and Canada in a
massive campaign to continue
the increases in High Holy Day
Israel Bond subscriptions
which have been recorded dur-
ing the past five years.
Rabbi Fink reported that
special emphasis is being plac-
ed this year by Rabbis and
other synagogue leaders who
will be conducting Bond Ap-
peals on the new Individual
Variable Rate Issue (IVRI)
Bond, a $5,000 minimum
Israel security which pays a
competitive interest rate.
IVRI Bond interest is a base
rate of 5 percent plus half the
difference to the average
prime rate as determined by
three major U.S. banks. The
IVRI Bond is available in
denominations of $2,000 for
IRA accounts only.
Since the inception of the
Israel Bond campaign in 1951,
High Holy Day Bond Appeals
in North American
synagogues have been a major
source of low-cost loan funds
for Israel and have made possi-
ble the remarkable growth in
the nation's economy.
Historian Awaits
Panel's Approval
By YOSSI LEMPKOWITZ
BRUSSELS (JTA) A
prominent Belgian historian
awaits government approval
to serve on an international
commission of inquiry into the
World War II activities of
Austrian President Kurt
Waldheim.
Jean Van Welkenhuysen,
director of the Research
Center on World War II here,
has been asked to participate
on the Austrian-sponsored
commission as a private
citizen. Nevertheless, as a civil
servant, he sought as a
courtesy the backing of the
Education Ministry.
Pope Refused To
Baptize Jewish Child
After Holocaust
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
personal story of an American
Jewish man who as a child dur-
ing the Holocaust was hidden
by a Polish Catholic couple
demonstrates a respect for
Judaism by the young priest
who became Pope John Paul
II.
In an account of the saving
of little Shachne Hiller, record-
ed in "Hasidic Tales of the
Holocaust" (Avon Books,
N.Y., 1982), Hiller, renamed
Stanley Berger, told
author/editor Yaffa Eliach
that in 1946 a newly ordained
priest named Karol Wojtyla
refused to baptize him a
Catholic despite a request by
the woman who had cared for
him as her own.
BERGER TOLD Eliach that
through a letter from the
woman in Poland who had sav-
ed him, he learned that she,
Mrs. Yachowitch, had ap-
proached "a newly-ordained
parish priest who had a reputa-
tion for being wise and
trustworthy" to convert him
"as a true Christian and
devout Catholic" after she
knew for certain that his
parents had died in the
crematoria.
The priest refused after ask-
ing what was the wish of the
boys' parents in entrusting
him to their Christian friends.
Yachowitch acknowledged
that his parents, in face of
their almost certain death, re-
quested that their son be rais-
ed as a Jew, to which Father
Wojtyla replied that "it would
be unfair to baptize the child
while there was still hope that
the relatives of the child might
take him."
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, September 4, 1987
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, funded by
Gulf stream Area Agency on Aging, provides a variety of ser-
vices to persons 60 years or older, along with interesting and
entertaining educational and recreational programs. All
senior activities are conducted in compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act.
KOSHER MEALS
Monday through Friday,
older adults gather at the JCC
for a kosher lunch, and a varie-
ty of activities. Lectures,
films, celebrations, games,
card playing and nutritional
education are some of the pro-
grams offered at the Center.
Watermelon feasts, special
dessert treats, contests are
also planned. Transportation
is available. Reservations are
required. Call Lillian at
689-7703. No fee is required
but contributions are
requested.
KOSHER MEAL
ACTIVITIES
JCC movie of the week.
Come to the JCC every
Wednesday, for lunch, pop-
corn, drinks and an old time
film. See your favorite movie
along with a hot, delicious
meal. This will start at 10:30
a.m.
ONGOING PROGRAMS
Monday, Sept. 7: Holiday
Labor Day
Tuesday, Sept. 8: Geriatric
Crisis with Lynn Snowden
Wednesday, Sept. 9: Movie
of the week
Thursday, Sept. 10: Florida
Power and Light
Understanding your bill
Friday, Sept. 11: Lou Young
performs on the violin
JCCampus
Continued from Page 1
"I am excited to be working
with such a group of commit-
ted young professionals. We
are continuing to contact those
highly talented men and
women who believe that the
JCCampus is vital to our com-
munity's growth and are will-
ing to give both their time and
financial support," he said.
"After our initial session,
members of the cabinet will be
meeting with their friends and
colleagues, holding educa-
tional meetings at their homes,
and disseminating information
about why this community so
desperately needs the new
JCCampus facilities," Mr.
Klaperman Elected
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Gilbert Klaperman of
New York has been elected
president of the Synagogue
Council of America, which
comprises the rabbinic and
congregational branches of
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform Judaism. He succeeds
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard of
Miami. Klaperman is past
president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, an Or-
thodox organization.
Lampert stated.
In endorsing the Young
Leadership Cabinet, Mr. Mess-
ing said, "The enthusiastic
participation of this group will
bring us much closer to our
$12.5 million goal. Even more
important, hundreds of young
families who will enjoy and
benefit from the new buildings
will have the opportunity to
take part in making our com-
munity's dream a reality."
Arnold Lampert has held
numerous leadership positions
both locally and nationally. He
is a past General Chairman of
the 1985 and 1986 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaigns and since then has
served as an Associate Cam-
paign Chairman. He has serv-
ed as Vice President of
Federation and currently sits
on the Executive Committee.
A former member of the
Federation's Budget and
Allocation Committee, he has
served on the national UJA
Budget and Allocation Com-
mittee, as well.
For more information, con-
tact Marjorie Scott, JCCam-
pus Campaign Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
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S
Monday, Sept. 14: Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Sept. 15: "Exer-
cises with Sophie"
Wednesday, Sept. 16: Movie
of the week
Thursday, Sept. 17: Original
readings by Estelle Baumann
Friday, Sept. 18: Dr. Elliot
Schwartz presents a special
holiday program celebrating
Rosh Hoshanah and Yom
Kippur
KOSHER HOME
DELIVERED MEALS
Homebound persons 60
years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults. Call Carol for informa-
tion at 689-7703.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in designated area for persons
60 years of age or over who do
not use public transportation,
who must go to treatment
centers, doctor's offices,
hospitals and nursing homes to
visit spouses, social service
agencies and nutrition centers.
There is no fee for this service
but participants are encourag-
ed to make a contribution each
time. Reservations must be
made at least 48 hours in ad-
vance. For more information
and/or reservations, call
689-7703 and ask for Helen or
Norma in the Transportation
Department, between 9 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Timely Topics. Mondays at
2 p.m. Reservations can be
made for lunch prior to the
program (at 1:15 p.m.) by call-
ing 689-7703.
Coping with Alzheimers at
home. This is a class for
caregivers of Alzheimer pa-
tients to relieve uncertainties,
anguish and isolation of
caregivers, by teaching coping
skills, disseminating scientific
and medical information and
alleviating stress. Instructor,
Ruth Janko, MS in counseling
psychology. This class will be
held on Thursdays, at 9:30
a.m.
JCC CANASTARAMA
AND LUNCH
Lunch is served, followed by
Canastarama every Wednes-
day. There are prizes and
refreshments. Reservations
are required and persons at-
tending should arrive by 11:30
a.m. No fee for lunch. Con-
tributions are requested.
Please call Ruth for your
reservations, at 689-7703.
BEGINNERS CANASTA
Learn how to play Canasta.
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. Cost:
Members, $1; non-members,
$1.50. Call Ruth for reserva-
tions at 689-7703.
THE STORY OF
THE CONTEMPORARY
JEWS
From 1900 To The Present
A lecture discussion
presented by Rabbi Morton
Kanter.
Wednesday, Sept. 9 at 1:30
p.m. "Times that Bind" Jews
together. Understanding the
events that impacted upon and
effected our religion, our
history and our sense of
destiny.
Wednesday, Sept. 16 at 1:30
p.m.; "The Shape of Things to
Come." Where are the ex-
periences and events of this
past century leading us? What
will be the nature of the Jewish
experience in the year 2000?
Call Ruth" to register,
689-7703. No fee. Contributors
welcome.
ACTION LINE
A new service designed for
your special needs! If you have
problems with insurance
forms, home bills, your
checkbook, taxes or legal
items, call for an appointment
with Herb Kirsch finances,
Edie Reiter Insurance, or
Minna Sonnenshine of Legal
Aid.
VOLUNTEER
NEWS AND VIEWS
Become part of a great team
of people. Call Carol and make
an appointment with her to
discuss how to become involv-
ed. We are looking for retired
professionals who are ready'
for a rewarding experience.
Develop a class in arts and
crafts, begin a choral group,
and orchestra, or form a JCC
Garden Club.
JCC LIBRARY
Did you know that the JCC
Senior Center has a beautiful
collection of books and paper-
backs? Large print books are
also available.
WISH LIST
VCR.
Projector (16MM) and
Screen.
Gardening Equipment
Horticulturist and persons
interested in gardening.
SECOND TUESDAY
COUNCIL
A group of dedicated active
people plan trips, luncheons
and fun fund raising activities.
JCC News
ALL SINGLES
On Friday, Sept. 11, starting at 4:30 p.m. single parent
families, couples and families in the Jewish community are
invited to Camp Shalom (Belvedere Road one mile west of
the Turnpike) to join together for the Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches Annual Shabbat Picnic. Shab-
bat will be welcomed in a relaxed country setting. Bring a
picnic dinner. Challah, wine, beverage and dessert will be
provided. The schedule includes swimming from 4:30-6:30
p.m; a scavenger hunt and games from 6-6:30 p.m.; candle
lighting and dinner at 6:30 p.m., followed by singing and a
campfire (if weather permits).
On Friday, Sept. 18 at 10 p.m. attend a special Singles
Service at Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach. Oneg Shabbat will follow services.
YOUNG SINGLES (20"s and 30's)
On Saturday, Sept. 5, 8:30 p.m., get together at a
member's home in Jupiter for a Wine and Cheese Tasting
Party. Bring your favorite bottle of wine. A prize will be
awarded to the winning selection. Donation: $2 plus a bot-
tle of wine. For additional information and directions call
Ann at the Center, 689-7700, between 1-3 p.m.
On Wednesday, Sept. 9, 6:30 p.m., meet at TGIF's on
Village Blvd. for dinner and then to Verdes Tropicana
Bowling Lanes to begin bowling at 9 p.m.
ON Saturday, Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m., gather at a member's
home in Jupiter for Pot Luck Dinner, International Style.
Use imagination and whip up something exotic (or cheat
and stop by the French Bakery, Chinese Restaurant or
Cuban Diner for take-out). Donation: $2 plus something
delicious.
Get together on Sunday, Sept. 13, 11:30 a.m., for brunch
at Shooters (Federal Highway in Boynton Beach \xk mile
South of Hypoluxo Road). Afterwards swim or just enjoy at
the pool and beach right there.
Get together Wednesday, Sept. 16, 6:45 p.m., at the
Cinema 'N Drafthouse (Congress Ave., just north of 10th
Ave. No.) for both the show and the company. Snacks and
beverages are served and prices are reasonable. Donation:
$1 plus own fare.
SINGLES GROUP (30's and 40's)
On Thursday, Sept. 10, 7 p.m., meet at Strebs (Military
Trail, south of Northlake Blvd.) for dinner specials.
SINGLES (30-59)
Get together at the JCC on Thursday evening, Sept. 17,
7:30 p.m., for a lively and stimulating discussion. Be
prepared to learn some new means of gaining insight into
yourself and others. Snacks and beverages will be served.
Donation: JCC members $1, non-memmbers $2.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
On Wednesday, Sept. 9, 57 p.m., gather at Studebaker's
(Congress Ave. and Forest Hill Blvd.) for Happy Hour. Ap-
propriate dress is required. Donation: $1 plus own fare and
a small entrance few.
On Sunday, Sept. 13, 3 p.m., meet at Garden Lanes (East
of 1-95 on Northlake Blvd.) for bowling. Plan to go to din-
ner afterwards. If joining the group just for dinner, be at
the alley at 4:30 p.m. to find out where.
Get together Tuesday, Sept. 15, 6 p.m. at Cobblestones
(45th St. and Congress) for dinner. Afterwards, try your
luck at Jai Alai (45th St., west of Australian) which has just
reopened for the season. Meet at the gift shop if not eating
dinner with the group. Free admission to ladies on
Tuesday.