The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00075

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
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THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTV
"Jewish floridian
.^T JjP OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13-NUMBER 18
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MAY 1,1987
PRICE 35 CENTS
FrMUKOM
Tensions Remain High In West Bank
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Curfews, mass arrests and the
closure of Arab campuses
restored order in the West
Bank over the Passover holi-
day. But tensions continued to
run high after a week of
violence in which Jewish set-
tlers rampaged through Arab
villages destroying property
and burning fields in retalia-
tion for the fire-bombing of a
car which killed an Israeli
woman and severely burned
her husband, three children
and a young friend riding with
them. The victim, Ofra Moses,
35, of Alfe-Menashe was
buried Sunday, April 12. Set-
tlers from Alphe-Menashe
erected a memorial at the site
of the attack, between the
Arab town of Kalkilya and
Habla village, and established
a vigil there. They were visibly
hostile to Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin who visited the
site to try to calm spirits and
answer their charges that
security forces were not pro-
tecting Jewish settlers on the
roads.
CURFEWS WERE
clamped on a refugee camp in
the Arab town of Tulkarem
and on the nearby town of
Anabta where Arab youths has
stoned Israeli vehicles.
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Dr. Schulman To Chair
25th Annual Meeting
Erwin Blonder, President of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, has announced
the appointment of Dr. Norma
Schulman as Chairman of the
Federation's 25th Annual
Meeting. The event will be
held on Sunday, May 31, 7
p.m., at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches, 630 Clearwater Park
Road, West Palm Beach.
In addition to the presenta-
tion and installation of Officers
and Board Members of the
Federation and Women's Divi-
sion, this year's meeting will
honor I. Edward "Bim" Adler,
former Executive Director of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County. He will be
presented with the George B.
Golden Community Service
Award at the Annual Meeting.
Dr. Schulman, who has been
actively involved with the
Federation and Women's Divi-
sion for a number of years,
said, "I am looking forward to
joining with other members of
the community for this special
event the culmination of the
1987 Federation year, the in-
stallation of new Officers,
the honoring of an outstanding
person, "Bim" Adler, and
celebrating Federation's 25
years of service to the Jewish
community."
Dr. Schulman, a member of
the Women's Division Board
of Directors, participated in
the Women's Division Cameo
Business and Professional
Women's Mission to Israel in
1982. She is a member of the
Women's Division Business
=Insidezn
Cherna Goldort's Exit Visa
Turned Down... page 2
Reflect ions on Yom
Ha'Atzmaut... page 3
Update... Opinion by
TobyF.Wilk ...page 6
Israel Looks Ahead...
Beginning a Five Part
Series... page 13
Dr. Norma Schulman
and Professional Women's
Networking Steering Commit-
tee. Dr. Schulman sits on the
Federation's Board of Direc-
tors and has served on the
Long-Range Planning and
Demographic Study
Committees.
Dr. Schulman is presently on
the staff of the Humana
Hospital of the Palm Beaches
and in full time private
psychotherapy practice. She is
a member of the Executive
Board of Crisis Line and Presi-
dent of the Palm Beach Coun-
ty Chapter of the Florida
Psychological Association.
A frequent speaker at Plann-
ed Parenthood programs, Dr.
Schulman has served as a
supervisor for a program for
pregnant teen-age girls. She is
a regular instructor for Crisis
Line volunteer training classes
and a faculty member of the
Florida Societv for Clinical
Continued on Page 10
Israel Independence Day
Celebrations
In honor of Israel Independence Day, Monday, May 4,
area religious schools, the Jewish Community Day
School, and the Karen-Orr Pre-School of the Jewish
Community Center will be holding celebrations.
Most synagogue religious schools will commemorate
the holiday on Sunday, May 3, with various activities.
The Jewish Community Day School will begin their
celebration on May 4 with a special flag raising follow-
ed by singing, folk-dancing, and a parade around the
school grounds with each child waving an Israeli flag.
The children who attend the JCC Pre-School will also
participate in a parade on May 4. In addition,, they will
make "Israeli" fruit salad which will be served at a
picnic lunch that day.
To add to the festivity of the celebrations, the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County has made
available the Israeli flags for the use of the children.
Curfews on Kalkilya and Habla
were lifted. But Bir Zeit
University near Ramallah was
ordered closed for four months
following a confrontation in
which security forces killed
one Arab student and wound-
ed two others.
Najah University in Nablus
was also closed as was a nurses
school in Ramallah. More than
100 Arabs were arrested in a
police dragnet of the territory.
Nine were placed in ad-
ministrative detention for six
months which means they can
be held without formal charges
filed against them.
Among them is Feisal Hus-
seini, 45, head of the Arab
Studies Society in East
Jerusalem whom the
authorities claim is a leading
supporter of the Palestine
Liberation Organization and
responsible for recent unrest
in the territory.
THE SETTLERS are using
the latest terrorist attack to
press their political demands.
Rabin was confronted by a
large sign urging the im-
mediate deportation of ter-
rorists released from jail in a
prisoner exchange two years
ago, expansion of Jewish set-
tlements in the territory and a
commission of inquiry to in-
vestigate security ar-
rangements there.
"Today, in the area of
Judaea and Samaria and Gaza
there are more Israeli soldiers
than all along the border with
Lebanon," he told the settlers.
He insisted that security
measures were quite adequate.
He drew catcalls and angry
shouts when he reminded the
settlers that living in the ter-
ritories involved certain risks.
The settlers declared they
were living there with the full
consent of the government and
it was the duty of the State to
protect them. Rabin said they
were protected and said there
were more victims of terrorist
attacks in Israel proper than in
the administered territories.
MORE SHOUTS of derision
Continued on Page 9
USSR Cancels Consular Level
Delegation Visit To Israel
PARIS (JTA) The
Soviet Union has canceled a
visit to Israel by a consular
level delegation, Soviet Depu-
ty Foreign Minister Vladimir
Petrovsky reportedly told a
press conference in Kuwati
Sunday (April 19). He also rul-
ed out re-establishment of
diplomatic relations with
Israel, broken by Moscow in
1967.
Petrovsky said the consular
mission was to have discussed
Soviet property in Israel and
related matters but "we have
decided to cancel the visit"
because Israel made propagan-
da use of it.
He said there would be no
resumption of diplomatic ties
"until Israel announces its
Continued on Page 2
NOTICE
With this issue, the Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
will begin publishing bi-monthly through the summer months.
The next publication will be dated May 15, 1987.


I

I
I
"0
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Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Update On Cherna Goldort
Community Refusenik Denied Exit Visa Again
By SANDRA GOLDBERG
Community Refusenik Cher-
na Goldort of Novosibirsk.
Russia, a 56 year-old widow, in
ill health, who has been yearn-
ing to be reunited with her two
daughters in Israel, has once
again been refused an exit visa
to Israel. What is the reason in
these days of so-called
'glasnost'?
"Secrecy!" Secrecy due
to her alledged access in the
past to State secrets when,
prior to 1971, she worked at a
classified institution, AN-
NICHT in the town of Biysk,
where anyone who worked or
lived in the town was con-
sidered "security'. even the
janitor.
According to the new 1986
Soviet Immigration Law, first
degree relatives may emigrate
for family reunification within
an established time frame.
Cherna Goldort falls under this
law. The case of Cherna
Goldort is a striking example
of the Soviet Union not only
violating basic human rights
(for it is obvious that a mother
has the right to live with her
children and grandchildren),
but also of violating its own
legislation. In October, 1985,
while on visit in Paris General
Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev
said secrecy in the USSR ex-
ists for not more than 5-10
years. It has been 17 years for
Cherna Goldort! Hardly could
she be considered a legitimate
national "security" risk!
(When Cherna Goldort left her
position in 1971, she was told
that she had to wait five
years).
Mother's Day, May 10 is im-
minent. Our Soviet Jewry
Task Force urges each and
every one of us to write to
Soviet officials and ask: Why
Can't Cherna Goldort of
Novosibirsk be with her
daughters this Mother's Day?
Why isn't she allowed to hug
her grandchildren, whom she
Shin Bet Appears To Be
Involved In New Scandal
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Shin Bet, Israel's internal
security service, appears to be
implicated in a new scandal in-
volving the possible fabrica-
tion of evidence that sent an
Israel Defense Force officer to
prison for treason six years
ago.
Tight censorship spawned
rumor and speculation in the
media until recently when MK
Mordechai Virshubsky of the
Shinui Party appealed to the
Defense Minister and Minister
of Justice to "clear the air."
As a result, the cover of
secrecy was lifted partially but
the information which emerg-
ed in the media was vague and
had the effect only of increas-
ing speculation.
PREMIER Yitzhak Shamir,
in his first public comment on
the affair, told Israel Radio
that the political echelons were
in no way involved or im-
plicated. He said those persons
alleged to be connected should
be investigated by the courts.
"There is no intention to cover
anything up," he said.
The IDF officer convicted of
treason, espionage and pass-
ing military information to the
enemy was indentified publicly
for the first time. He is former
Lt. Azzat Nafsu from the Cir-
cassian village of Karf Kamma
who was sentenced in 1980 to
18 years in prison and reduced
in rank to private.
Also mentioned in the case
was Yossi Ginnosar, a former
senior Shin Bet operative, one
of three who received a
Presidential pardon last year
in connection with the murder
of two captured Arab bus hi-
jackers by Shin Bet agents in
1984. None of the three was
ever formally charged or tried,
and, according to legal ex-
perts, the pardon was
acknowledgement of guilt in
the killings and subsequent at-
tempted cover-up.
THE CONNECTION bet-
ween Ginnosar and Nafsu is
not known. Nafsu, whose case
was kept secret until now,
maintains his innocence and
contends he was convicted by a
military court on the basis of
manufactured evidence. Last
year, a military court of ap-
peals upheld his conviction.
But six months ago, the
Knesset amended the law to
allow soldiers to carry their ap-
peals beyond the military
justice system. Nafsu has since
appealed to the Supreme
Court.
The Shin Bet has been im-
plicated on the basis of publish-
ed reports that Ginnosar told
investigators in the bus hi-
jackers' case that Shin Bet
routinely fabricated evidence
to protect itself. He was
quoted as saying this was
"standard procedure." Ap-
parently it was Shin Bet
evidence which helped convict
Nafsu.
Shin Bet also is reported to
have proposed that Nafsu be
granted a Presidential pardon
and released from prison in
order to forestall his appeal to
the Supreme Court. Justice
Minister Avraham Sharir said
that the appeal should be
pressed with full confidence in
the legal system and its ability
to see that justice is done. The
IDF also wants Nafsu's appeal
to be heard, though in closed
session. The Circassians are a
Moslem minority from the
Caucusus who fled the Czarist
regime in the late 19th Cen-
tury to settle in territories of
the Ottoman empire, including
Palestine. Only 1,200 of them
live in Israel.
They are full citizens, fierce-
ly patriotic and, apart from the
Druze who are indigenous to
the region, are the only
Moslems permitted to serve in
the IDF.
USSR Cancels
Delegation Visit
Continued from Pafe 1
withdrawal from all occupied
Arab countries and announces
its agreement to an interna-
tional peace conference."
(Reports from Jerusalem
said Israel had no knowledge
that the consular visit was
canceled.)
Cherna Goldort
has never seen? Jherna has
not seen daughter, Irina, since
1975 and daughter, Galina,
since 1979! Let us celebrate
this Mother's day with a
United Community Write-A-
Thon on behalf of our Com-
munity Refusenik, Cherna
Goldort!
Government and Congres-
sional leaders both in the
House and in the Senate are
actively working on Chema's
behail', as well as people in
England, Italy, Canada and
Israel. Richard Schifter, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for
Human Rights and
Humanitarian Affair?, who
travelled with Secretary of
State Shultz. Rep. Dan Mica
and House Speaker, Jim
Wright, as well as Britain s
Prime Minister, Margaret
Thatcher, were all alerted to
Cherna's plight before their
recent visits to the SoviH
Union.
The International Commit-
tee for the Freedom of Cherna
Goldort is in formation.
Members thus far include: Am-
bassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
Nobel prize laureate Elie
Wiesel, Sen. Lawton Chiles,
Sen. John F. Kerry, Rep. Dan
Mica, Rep. Tom Lewis, Rep.
Barney Frank, Rep. Nicholas
Mavroules, Reverend Frank
Elklor, Grand Rabbi Levi
Horowitz, Dean William
Schwartz of Boston University
School of Law, Benjamin
Meed, president of the
American Gathering/Federa-
tion of Jewish Holocaust Sur
vivors and Sonia Weitz.
Please do YOUR Share ...
participate in a community
write-in: Ask Why Can't
Cherna Goldort of Novosibirsk
be with her daughters and
grandchildren like all other
mothers are this Mother's day?
Write to Russian officials:
Mr. Mikhail Gorbachev,
Sec. Gen. of the Communist
Party
The Kremlin
Moscow, RSFSR; USSR
The Honorable Uri Dubinin
Ambassador Embasssy of the
USSR
1 Andrei Sakharov Plaza
Washington, DC 20036
Sandra Goldberg, a member
of the Soviet Jewry Task Force
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, is founder
of the International Committee
for the Freedom of Cherna
Goldort.
Jewish Women In The Women's
Movement: A Perspective
HELEN HOFFMAN
Community Activist and Civil Rights Law Specialist
Women's Division
Business & Professional Women's Group
Invite all women In the community to an
v.
OPEN DINNER PROGRAM MEETING
on Wednesday evening, May 6
6:00-9:00 p.m.
Networking 5:30 p.m.
GOVERNOR'S CLUB, PHILLIPS POINT
777 South Flagler Drive
West Pslm Beach
$25 per person includes
Dinner, Program, and
Valet Parking
- -
R.S.V.P. by April 30
Women's Division
Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County
office, 8322120


Yom Ha'Atzmaut:
One Rabbi's Perspective
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
By RABBI STEVEN KUSHNER other. That place is Jerusalem.
There is only one place
where a person can really ap-
Sreciate Israel Independence
ay. It is the place where
Abraham and Isaac were freed
from their date with destiny,
the spot that David declared
the vertex of the Jewish
universe. It is the city whose
name implies a vision of peace
)yeroo-8halom) and (shalaym),
a city that has known more
war and bloodshed than any
It was the spring of 1973. I
was standing on King George
Street actually, I was on top
of a car on King George
Street. The sun was brilliant.
The sidewalks were jammed
with exuberant people. Tanks
and howitzers passed by in
much the same way that
liberating armies have parad-
ed through countless cities, in
countless countries, for
countless centuries. But this
was not an army of liberation.
I was standing less than a mile
from the Old City and I was
not prepared for such a
demonstration of militarism.
In the suburbs of Detroit,
where I grew up, Indepedence
Day meant eating popcorn and
hot dogs while watching the
nighttime sky between Canada
and the United States light up
with artificial lightning as
dazzling as the rainbow.
Parades were made up of mar-
ching bands and baton
Continued on Page 20
Letter From Hod Hasharon
Mayor Eliyahu Shimoni and
Elizabeth Homans welcome
Jeanne Levy.
Shalom,
The handshake of welcome
extended from Hod Hasharon
Mayor Eliyahu Shimoni to Er-
win Blonder, President,
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County; Shirlee
Blonder, Women's Division
Board of Directors and Com-
munity Relations Council
member; Jeanne Levy,
General Chairman of the 1987
Federation-UJA Campaign;
and Irwin Levy, an active com-
munity leader, member of the
Board of Governors of the
Jewish Agency, and a National
UJA Vice Chairman, took on a
special meaning as he welcom-
ed them not as visitors, but as
Honorary Residents of the
Project Renewal
Neighborhoods of Giora and
Gil Amal. They have led the
way for 50 other Palm Beach
County residents to proudly
take their place with their
"neighbors" who have come
from many areas in North
Africa and Asia Morocco,
Iraq, Iran, Yemen and Turkey.
The long-time residents of
the neighborhoods arrived in
the early 1950's and were plac-
ed in immigrant camps as
quickly as possible, but not
always to the advantage of the
weary travelers. Of prime im-
portance to the State of Israel
was security the reason for
the transit immigrant camps
being placed on the outer
edges of Hod Hasharon, Gil
Amal to the East and Giora to
the West.
For the new residents of
Hod Hasharon, the
neighborhoods of Gil Amal and
Giora are quite a contrast to
the well-kept, manicured areas
in Palm Beach. Both
neighborhoods were
geographically isolated from
the center of town and until
the inception of Project
Renewal lacked even the most
fundamental services such as
Mayor Shimoni presents a small gift from the people of Hod
Hasharon to their friends in Palm Beach County. Accepting
the banner are Shirlee and Erwin Blonder.
Announcement
To The Community
The 1988 slate of officers for the Women's Division of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County appeared
in the March 20, 1987 issue of the Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County.
According to a recent change in the bylaws, Women's
Division has converted from an appointed Board of
Directors to an elected Board. Members of the Women's
Division Campaign Cabinet, however, will still be ap-
pointed by the Campaign Vice President. They will also
serve on the Women's Division Board of Directors and
are still in the process of being selected.
The terms of the bylaws state, "The twenty-four
directors shall be elected by the membership. Twelve
members shall be elected annually each for a two-year
term. No director may be eligible to serve more than two
consecutive terms. For the first year only, 12 members
shall be elected for a two-year term and 12 elected for a
one-year term.
Listed below are the names of those being nominated
as members for the 1988 Women's Division Board of
Directors:
1 YEAR TERM
Leah Berk
Sylvia Berman
Jerry Freedman
Hinda Greenspoon
Either Gruber
Carole Koeppel
Dorothy Lud wig
Marc v Marcus
Lee Mazer
Judy Messing
Eileen Nick man
Leah Siskin
2 YEAR TERM
Sheryl Davidoff
Jeanne Glaaaer
Helen Hoffman
Carole Klein
Sonia Koff
Cynnie List
Zelda Pincourt Mason
Berenice Rogers
Doris Singer
Esther Szmukler
Ruth Wilensky
Alice Zipkin
In accordance with the bylaws, additional nomina-
tions may be submitted in writing to the secretary by
any member of the Women's Division at least 14 days
prior to the May 31st Annual Meeting provided any such
written nomination shall be endorsed by at least 25
members of the Women's Division and that the written
consent of the nominee shall be obtained.
Respectfully submitted by the Nominating Commit-
tee: Adele Simon, chair; Angela Gallicchio, Corky
Ribakoff, Marilyn Lam pert, Shirley Leibow and Zelda
Pincourt-Mason.
transportation, telephones or
regular garbage collection. It
is possible to say that these
neighborhoods were losers
with the many neglected,
abandoned houses lining the
unpaved, pot-hole-ridden
streets, dusty in summer and
mud filled in winter. When
possible, residents moved on
and left behind the very old
and less fortunate to fend for
themselves.
Due to the confidence, com-
mitment and concern of the
Palm Beach area community,
Project Renewal has been able
to not only stop the deteriora-
tion of the neighborhood, but
has provided the means for the
residents to become actively
involved in planning their
future which includes staying
in the neighborhoods.
It is possible to see the
changes in the neighborhood
with the neatly-paved streets,
attractive gardens, and the
numerous renovation of
homes. The construction in
Giora of the Jeanne and Irwin
Levy Day Care Center and the
Michael Burrows Early
Childhood Enrichment Center
as well as the Gene and Corky
Ribakoff Elderly Center in Gil
Amal has provided the
physical facilities for pro-
grams, treatment, and therapy
that truly make the difference
in the lives of the residents
from birth to the senior years.
Honorary Residents join the
ranks of long-time residents in
developing neighborhood ac-
tivities for all ages. Active,
concerned men and women
serve on the various commit-
tees of Education, Early
Childhood and Senior Ac-
tivities. Wanting to be involv-
ed has become the accepted
method from volunteering
in the kindergartens to neighborhood committee
developing a chess group for meeting and planning for the
youngsters age 8-18. Several next event for the residents
evenings a week finds the Continued on Page 5
Celebrate Israel's 40th Anniversary
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County-United Jewish Appeal
Unique Mission To Israel and Bucharest
October 18-28,1987
A Once In A Lifetime Opportunity To Have A Unique Insider's View Of
Israel Through Dialogue With Leaders In The Fields Of Government,
Education, and Industry.
In Bucharest, Visit The Remnants Of A Once Flourishing Jewish
Community.
For More Information, Contact Lynne Ehrlich,
At The Federation Office, 832-2120.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Volunteering For Israel
base has a different volunteers so far, 650 later
Like most good ideas, it was
simple. And its success has
been invaluable.
In the fall of 1982, with
many Israeli reservists still on
active duty as part of the war
in Lebanon, crops on some
northern kibbutzim and
moshavim went unharvested.
Gen. Aharon Davidi, who had
been commander of Israel's
special forces in the 1967 Six-
Day War, discussed with a few
friends the idea of recruiting
short-term volunteers to help.
Soon 650 Americans were
working in the fields and even
assisting with guard duty.
After that initial success,
Davidi suggested to the army
that using volunteers from
overseas to supplement Israel
Defense Forces (IDF) civilian
reservists be made a perma-
nent program. Since then
10,00 people, including 4,500
Americans, have worked on
military bases across the coun-
try through Volunteers for
Israel.
During the day volunteers
load fuel drums, clean and
lubricate armored vehicles,
paint naval vessels, package
spare parts, work in kitchens
or do any of the other chores
necessary for military
preparedness. Their uniforms
identify them as civilian
volunteers. Unlike some of the
program's first participants,
they do not handle weapons or
pull guard duty.
At night volunteers study
Hebrew, hear lectures from a
teacher or professor on
reserve duty, or leave their
bases for a trip to town
when one is nearby. Weekends
include both Shabbat and a se-
cond day off for organized
tours throughout the country.
A fringe benefit, according
to staffer Clark Evenchik, is
that participants' round-trip
tickets are subsidized and are
good for six months. So after
completing their stints at an
IDF base, volunteers still have
more than five months which
they can spend in an academic
program, on a kibbutz or in
other ways.
Seamon Glass, an ex-Marine,
former professional boxer,
merchant seaman, public
school employee and now
writer, learned of Volunteers
from a lawyer in his hometown
of Santa Monica, Calif. The
lawyer, Glass said, "heard of it
through word-of-mouth and
had gone three or four times.
He ended up going a fifth time,
and I met him over there."
A sturdy 61, Glass was
assigned to a Negev Desert
supply depot cleaning,
stacking and distributing
50-gallon fuel drums at a
warehouse. "It was a workout,
but not back-breaking. But
they take care to make sure no
one is over their head."
The program recruits people
from 18 to 65 years of age. In
addition to college students
who can earn credit for a four-
week stint and senior
citizens, volunteers have in-
cluded professors, retired U.S.
diplomats, antique dealers
"you name it and we've had
it," Evenchik said.
Justice Delayed
One year ago the Office of Special Investigations (OSI) of
the Justice Department recommended to Attorney General
Edwin Meese that Austrian President Kurt Waldheim be
placed on a "watch list" and barred from the United States
for his wartime involvement in a German army unit which
committed atrocities against Yugoslav partisans and con-
ducted mass deportations of Jews. To date, Meese has fail-
ed to make a decision on Waldheim. OSI recently reiterated
its original recommendation to Meese in a second, 200-page
memorandum detailing Waldheim's wartime activities.
Last week, in response to a question from Near East
Report, Meese attributed the long delay in reaching a deci-
sion to the presentation of "new evidence" by Waldheim's
attorneys: he declined to reveal the nature of that evidence.
He denied that the United States has agreed to postpone a
decision on Waldheim in exchange for a promise that the
Austrian President would not travel to the United States.
But, Meese added, a decision on Waldheim will "ultimate-
ly" be made. This is a far cry from assurances made to Con-
gress last year that the Attorney General would proceed
"expeditiously" on the matter.
Waldheim made his choices. He chose to lie about his
wartime record time and time again. He chose to remain a
candidate for Austrian president despite his past and
without regard for his responsibility as a national symbol.
Attorney General Meese should now make his choice; he
should bar Kurt Waldheim from the United States.
(Near East Report)
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beach County
USPS 069030 ISSN 87604061
Combining "Our Vokse" and "Fadaatlon Report*"
FREOK SHOCMtT SUZANNE SHOCHET RONNIEPSTEIN LOUISE ROSS
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Published Waafcly OcloMr through Mid May Bi Weekly Balance01 yea'
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Combined Jewish Appeal-Jewieh Federation ol Palm Beach County. Inc., Officers President.
Erwln H. Blonder, Vice Presidents, Lionel Greene-sum, Arnold L Lampert, Marva Pernn. Alvin
Wiiensky, Treasurer. Barry 8. Berg Secretary. Helen G. Hoffman. Submit material to Ronnl Epstein,
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Jewish C|nrtdlan does not guarantee Kaahruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATcS: Local Area $4 Annual (2-Year Minimum $7 50), or by memberehlp Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, 501 8 Flagler Or Weal Palm Beach, Fla. 33401 Phone 832-2120
Sharon Becker, 19, a Brown
University student, and her
Volunteers group worked at a
large base near Tel Aviv last
winter. "There was a new
storage warehouse, and we
had to re-do the inventory."
Because her group did not
sleep on base but commuted by
bus from Jaffa, "we had access
to Tel Aviv at night," Becker
said. "I know that volunteers
at other (more remote) bases
spent more time there and got
to know the Israelis better. A
college group in Eilat even got
invited to some of the (resort)
hotels. Each group at each
experience. .
She plans another stint in
Volunteers next year either
before or after a semester at
an Israeli university. Mean-
while, to those of her friends
who might be interested in the
program, "I really pitch for
Although designed to ease
Israel's manpower squeeze
and to promote solidarity bet-
ween Israelis and diaspora
Jews, Volunteers has had
some other welcome side-
effects. At IDF bases on which
participants serve, their en-
thusiasm has affected the
regular personnel and efficien-
cy has climbed, Evenchik
reported. And of the 10,000
made aliyah, moving to Israel
permanently.
Interest in Volunteers for
Israel has surged, drawing
participants not only from the
Unitecf States but also Canada,
Mexico, Costa Rica, Argen-
tina, South Africa, England
and France. Previously run by
volunteers, the program itself
now has two fulltime staffers,
with more planned. Recruit-
ment will be expanded soon to
Switzerland and Belgium. For
more information, contact
Volunteers for Israel, 40
Worth St., Suite 710, New
York, New York, 10013.
E.R.
(Near East Report)
For Their Own Sake
If the phrase "Middle East
peace process" seems abstract
right now, then "international
conference" must sound
positively ethereal.
During Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir's
U.S. trip in February,
Secretary of State George
Shultz said that Washington
while still leery of a conference
nevertheless was consider-
ing the idea as a way to get
Jordan to enter direct negotia-
tions with Israel. (That is
basically the position of Israeli
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres; Shamir, on the other
hand, fears a Geneva-style
gathering will open the door to
Arab radicals backed by
Moscow.)
On the recent Washington
visit of Jordanian Prime
Minister Zaid al-Rifai, Shultz
again said the possibility of a
conference should be examin-
ed. "But the objective is not an
international conference. The
objective isn't even direct
negotiations. The objective is
peace in the region. We have
to think our way through to a
setting of bilateral negotia-
tions so that they'll be
fruitful."
Rifai stated that "our com-
mon objective is peace," but
insisted on a conference "with
an on-going role and not just a
photo opportunity, not a mere
device as an excuse or pretext
for direct negotiations."
In fact, direct negotiations
between Arab parties and
Israel are an end in
themselves: They imply
recognition and legitimacy for
both sides, something the
Arabs except for Egypt
have withheld from Israel for
almost 40 years. While the
Secretary is right in that peace
is the ultimate goal, it is im-
possible to conceive of
reaching a lasting peace, based
on mutual compromise,
without direct, bilateral talks.
Shultz's assertion that "the
way you get there is through
bilateral, direct negotiations,"
remains more important than
any Administration malleabili-
ty over the idea of an interna-
tional conference.
Rifai wanted "a major role
for the PLO to play in the con-
ference," said that Jordan and
Syria "are coordinating our
position very closely," and
asserted that "the Soviet
Union has to be present." This
means that Washington and
Amman are not harmonizing
views, despite the Prime
Minister's professed optimism.
Of course, Jordan's public
position and private hopes may
differ. King Hussein may value
diplomatic activity for its own
sake, as a way to win points in
the Arab world and in the
West. But can he really want
to escort Yasir Arafat to an in-
ternational conference,
thereby helping to legitimize
the PLO at a time when Jor-
dan is conducting a subterra-
nean battle with it for in-
fluence over Palestinian Arabs
not just on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip but in the East
Bank of Jordan itself?
Interestingly, Rifai did not
sound like a man in a hurry.
Although he said time was not
on the side of peace, and called
for an early opening of the con-
ference, he added that "it's
almost impossible to put a time
frame on when the conference
will be convened indeed, if it
will be convened."
If, indeed.
(Near East Report)
COL Up
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
cost of living index rose by 1.3
percent during March, the
Central Bureau of Statistics
announced last week. Finance
Ministry circles were pleased
with the increase, lower than
they had feared. They express-
ed hopes that the annual infla-
tionary rate this year would be
lower than last year's relative-
ly low rate of just over 20
percent.
Friday, May 1, 1987
Volume 13
2IYAR5747
Number 18
Monday, May 4,7:30 p.m.
A Special Forum On
The Church/State Dilemma:
The Challenge Of The Future"
Alabama Decision on Secular Humanism
The Role of Religion in Public School Education
Censorship
GUEST PANEL
BARRY UNQER, attorney National Chairman,
Church/State Commission, National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
TOM MILLS, superintendent Palm Beach County
School District
Temple Israel
1901 N. Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach
Sponsored by the Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of
ofaj^ISwoCmT' C-COnv#nor F,a,tr Ev0nmo ^'on, National Council



'
Debunking Forecasts Of
An Arab Majority In Israel
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5





By GERSHON GREENBAUM
JERUSALEM I'm sure
you ve heard by now that the
Arabs are going to become a
majority in Israel. Meir
Kahane has been warning us of
this for years. If there was any
lingering doubt, however, that
is over with: A Newsweek
story last year predicted a
half-Arab Israel quite soon.
There's only one problem:
It's not true. Those who think
that the Jews will be
demographically swamped by
Arabs because of their giant
families are a decade behind
the times.
The big news today is that
Arab fertility is dropping like
wild among Israeli Arabs.
They're simply having a lot
fewer children these days. And
this fact has made virtually
every prediction regarding the
future balance between Arabs
and Jews outdated.
A demography report sub-
mitted to the Israeli govern-
ment several months ago had
to asterix its estimate of
Israeli Arabs for the year
2000, admitting that it now
seems exaggerated. Even the
lower total in the 1985-86
Israel Statistical yearbook is
too high. It does figure that
Israeli Arabs will have fewer
kids. But it starts with a fertili-
ty number years outdated. To-
day's rate is already almost a
child and a half lower.
WHAT DOES ALL THIS
MEAN? Israel today, without
the territories, is about 83 per-
cent Jewish and 17 percent
Arab. Using data from 10
years ago, demographers
predicted that the Jewish part
could fall to 75 percent in a few
decades. But now, with plum-
meting Arab fertility, there is
little reason to question
estimates that three decades
from now almost eight out of
every 10 people will be Jewish
in an Israel without the ter-
ritories. Sorry, Rabbi Kahane.
Maybe you'll find another
issue.
Were demographers caught
sleeping on the Arab fertility
drop? Not exactly. This pat-
tern of a surge in the number
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
* MOSAIC Sunday, May 3, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel 5
with host Barbara Gordon Green. Pre-empted. May 10 9
a.m. Beate Klarsfeld. '
L'CHAYIM Sunday, May 3 and 10, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340 AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, May 7 and 14
1:15 p.m. WLIZ 1340 AM A summary of news and
commentary on contemporary issues.
JERUSLAEM: WITHIN THESE WALLS Thursday
May 14, 9 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 This special
documents the history and the people of the ancient walled
city of Jerusalem.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach -
County.
Community Calendar
Mayl
Jewish Federation Interfaith Breakfast Hyatt Hotel -
8:30 a.m.
May 3
Hadassah Florida Atlantic Region Spring Conference
through May 5 Hadassah Aliya Spring Conference
through May 5 Jewish War Veterans No. 501 9:30 a.m.
\fov A
Israel Independence Day (Yom Ha'Atzmaut) Jewish
Community Day School board 7:45 p.m. Congregation
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board -9:45 a.m. Women's
American ORT Lakes of Poinciana 12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Royal board 9:30 a.m.
Women's American ORT Mid-Palm board 1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit board 10 a.m. Hadassah -
West Boynton 12:30 p.m. Temple Judea Board of
Trustees Jewish Federation "Church/State Dilemma"
at Temple Israel 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Ex-
ecutive Committee Meeting 4 p.m.
May 5
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village -10 a.m. Jewish
Federation Jewish Educators Council meeting at
Jewish Community Day School noon Jewish Federa-
tion Budget Review Meeting 4 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Shalom board 9:30 a.m.
May 6
Jewish Federation Women's Division Business and
Professional Program 6 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Olam noon Lake Worth Jewish Center Sisterhood -
board 10 a.m. Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1
p.m. Jewish Community Center board 8 p.m.
of children followed by a roller
coaster decline is well known
to them. It happened for the
Ashkenazi Jews, for instance,
which helps explain why my
father was one of nine children
but I was one of two kids (and
a dog). It happened to Jews
from Moslem countries a surge
and then wham down to
about the Israeli Jewish
average. Now it's happening
to Israeli Arabs. Demographer
Dov Friedlander thinks the
Israeli Arab rate will drop to
the Jewish fertility level in a
mere 15 vears.
Following Israel's Arabs,
who will be next on the fertili-
ty roller coaster drop? The
Arabs of the territories.
Demographic developments
there have been lagging abut a
decade or so behind Arabs in
Israel proper. But with the
rapid pace of change under
Israeli administration, it will
happen.
Has a fertility drop in the
territories already begun? Ap-
Continued on Page 8
Irwin Levy (right, foreground) discusses the construction of
the Gene and Corky Ribakoff Elderly Center on the site in Gil
Amal with Rafi Amichai, Regional Director of Project
Renewal.
Letter From Hod Hasharon
Continued from Page 3
such as holiday celebrations or
the welcoming of partners
from Florida.
Employment ranges from
the fruit packing plant
workers to positions of super-
vision in local factories. Many
have started businesses of
American Jewish Committee Learned Hand Human
Relations Award Dinner at Palm Beach Airport Hilton.
May 7
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee board -
10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav 1 p.m. Na'amat
USA Theodore Herzl 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 -
board -1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit golf tournament
and dinner -11 a.m. National Council of Jewish Women -
Flagler Evening board 8 p.m. Na'amat USA Council -
board -10 a.m. Jewish Federation Young Adult Divi-
sion 6 p.m.
May 8
Free Sons of Israel board 10:30 a.m.
May 9
Temple Israel Dinner/Dance 7:30 p.m.
May 10
Mother's Day
Temple Judea Men's Club.
May 11
Women's American ORT Royal -12:30 p.m. Jewish War
Veterans No. 705 8 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Palm Beach 9:45 a.m. Hadassah Tikvah board -1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach noon United
Order of True Sisters board -10 a.m. and regular meeting
-1 p.m. Hadassah A viva board -10:30 a.m. and regular
meeting noon Women's American ORT West Bend
Meed board 10 a.m. Jewish Federation Budget
Review Meeting 4 p.m.
May 12
Jewish Federation Young Adult Division 7:15 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village 10 a.m.
Hadassah Lee Vassil board Hadassah Henrietta Szold
- board -1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav board 9:30
a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood board -10:30 a.m.
Na'amat USA Ezrat noon Women's American ORT -
West Palm Beach installation meeting 12:30 p.m.
Na'amat USA -Theodore Herzl board 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 2939 -1 p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood 8
p.m.
May 13
Jewish Federation Women's Division Awards Meeting
11:30 a.m. Lake Worth Jewish Center Sisterhood -12:30
p.m. B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit 7:30 p.m. Women's
American ORT Lake Worth West board 9:30 a.m.
Hadassah Shalom board B'nai B'rith No. 3196 board -
7 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m
Women's American ORT Palm Beach County Region ex-
ecutive committee Hadassah West Boynton board -
9:30 a.m. Temple Judea Sisterhood board Weizmann
Science Forum 5 p.m. Jewish Federation Soviet
Jewry Task Force noon.
May 14
Women's American ORT Haverhill board 1 p.m.
Hadassah Bat Gurion donor luncheon Hadassah Aliya
- board 10 a.m. Hadassah Z'Hava 12:30 p.m.
Women's League for Israel -1 p.m. Na'amat USA Coun-
cil 9:30 a.m. American Jewish Congress 12:30 p.m.
For more information call the Jewish Federation office,
8S2-2120.
their own, from garages to
construction. A large number
of women are among the work-
ing force in the fields of
teaching, nursing, and local
shops.
Seniors have found new pur-
pose in their lives through par-
ticipation in the morning ac-
tivities of the Senior Center.
Twice a week, a special re-
habilitation program for the
handicapped is provided in the
center with a physical
therapist giving individual
care and therapy.
Youngsters find "OPEN
DOORS*' to a better education
and social life. After-school ac-
tivities are geared for ad-
vancement in school and
developing friendships.
Available to them is a wide
variety of activities including
ceramics, handicrafts, karate
and chess. One of the favorite
activities of girls and boys
alike is the weekly folk dancing
class.
"It has always been a
pleasure to welcome our part-
ners from Florida to Hod
Hasharon," says Mayor
Shimoni. "But now, as
Honorary residents, they are
truly a part of our town and
family." Ydor Almagar and
Shimon Asaroff, neighborhood
committee chairmen of Gil
Amal and Giora respectively
sum up the feelings of their
residents, "We are happy to
know that we can give our
partners a home in Israel that
they can be proud of."
Sincerely,
ELIZABETH HOMANS
Project Renewal Community
Representative
Hod Hasharon, Israel


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Update ... Opinion
By TOBY F. WILK
Actor Chaim Topol, at a
Youth Aliya rally of 200 young
Jews in London, said young
Jews should go to Israel volun-
tarily to make a contribution
to the nation's democracy.
"You don't have to sneak in
like the pioneers did," he told
them. Israel should not be
regarded as a "shelter in case
something happens some place
in the world and Jews need a
shelter for rescue," Topol
related how his Polish parents
attempted to enter Palestine
illegally on three different oc-
casions, and that in 1935, they
arrived to the tune of gun-
shots. His father, a Hagana
member, helped to smuggle
Jews into the country despite
the British seige.
A delegation from Hebrew
Union College was recently
received by King Juan Carlos
of Spain, in the royal palace in
Madrid. The delegation toured
Spain to study Jewish heritage
there. President Gottschalk of
the Reform Seminary said:
"Our sadness resides in the
knowledge that so few of our
people are now here as sur-
vivors of past periods of in-
tolerance." The delegation
were witnesses of the golden
age of Jewish life in Spain. The
royal reception received wide
coverage in the Spanish press.
The lives of Soviet Jews
must not be sacrificed because
of our failure to counter Gor-
bachev's new onslaught of
public relations. The true
measure of Soviet human
rights must remain the
numbers of individuals allowed
to emigrate, and permitting
those Jews who remain in the
USSR to live as Jews and free-
ly practice their religion and
learn of their exemplary
heritage.
At a recent dinner in-
augurating a UJA Federation
campaign, Louis Nizer, the
noted attorney, told a story of
the early days of Israel's na-
tionhood when everybody had
to stand on endless lines for
food. One day, a man got so
angry, he left the line saying
he was going to shoot Ben-
Gurion. One half hour later,
the man came back. "What
happened?-' they asked him.
"There was a line," the man
said.
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Several innovative programs
have been incorporated into
Israel's educational curriculum
in order to foster an apprecia-
tion for democratic values, the
right to hold different opinions
and develop more positive
Jewish and Zionist identities.
In Israel, many children came
from countries of Eastern
Europe or the Arab Middle-
East, and do not always take
for granted the democratic
principles so central to Israel.
In helping students to shape
their values, they realize, also,
that Judaism is more than a
religion. It is a civilization.
Israel's President Chaim
Herzog believes Israel is the
most exposed country in the
world. He noted "for example,
who cares about Afghanistan
anymore; there is no public
consciousness about the Iran-
Iraq war despite three million
casualties. At the same time, if
stones are thrown in Judea
and Samaria, it gets front-
page headlines throughout the
world because we have an
open society. We have a great
deal to be proud of. The overall
picture is one of a highly moral
country. We have not aban-
doned the moral values which
we gave to the world."
Most of us possess a craving
for sweets and chocolates
despite dentists' warnings that
sugar is an' enemy of teeth.
Now, a team of scientists from
Hebrew University-Hadassah
Dental School and the Hebrew
Univ. School of Pharmacy
have come up with a solution
to the sweet tooth problem
Glycyrrhizin, the natural
sweetener found in liquorice.
Glycyrrhizin is 50 times
sweeter than sugar but does
not have the same harmful ef-
fects on teeth. It actually helps
to prevent the formation of
plaque.
For the moment, Israel is
the land of milk only. There is
no honey, and, for the first
time in the country's history,
the sweet substance has had to
be imported. Parasites which
arrived in Israel from the Far
East two years ago damaged
many hives and reduced the
country's bee population. Also,
last year's dry weather caused
fewer flowers to bloom. So,
last year's honey harvest was
lower than average and had
practically no reserves left.
The Egyptian Journalists'
Association voted to reaffirm a
1983 Resolution calling for a
boycott of Israeli journalists
and newspapers. The Resolu-
tion also said that disciplinary
measures would be taken
against Egyptian journalists
who violated the ban.
Passover is a joyous family
celebration of freedom. But,
when the Haggadah was read
by Israel's war orphans, they
were asking a fifth question:
"Why is my father not here to
answer my questions?" For
these children and their
widowed mothers, the
Passover story of martyrdom
and sacrifice is not just sym-
bolic. Many of us do our share.
But some shares are greater
than others: some are called
upon to contribute the
greatest share of all their
lives. These are the young
Israeli soldiers who sacrificed
their hopes and dreams. They
died defending the freedom
and dignity of Jews
everywhere.
The Jewish community in
Lebanon which numbered
10,000 in 1948, is now reduced
to less than 100. They face
complete annihilation, accor-
ding to a report at a UN
Human Rights Commission.
The objective of extremist fac-
tions in Lebanon is the exter-
mination of this remnant of
Lebanon's Jewish community.
Some have been taken
hostage, and others have been
kidnapped. One body was
returned by the kidnappers
showing multiple traces of tor-
ture and mutilation.
"I felt the pulse of history
every minute of the day," said
Professor Gabriel Barkay, the
Israeli archaeologist who
recently uncovered what ex-
perts believe to be one of the
richest finds ever unearthed in
Jerusalem. They are now on
display at the Israel Museum
and draw large crowds anxious
to see a tableau of the daily life
of their ancestors. One of the
scrolls contained an amulet
with the traditional Priestly
benediction (Num. 6:24-26),
the text of which is found in
every Jewish prayer book.
This find is believed to be in-
disputable proof that at least a
portion of the Bible was
already written and well-
known during the late First
Temple Period. Professor
Barkay was particularly mov-
ed to find the same verses our
people have been uttering in
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the same City for 2,600 years.
Jack Lemmon loves Israeli
military headgear and, while in
Israel, asked a friend to get
him a couple of the distinctive
berets worn by Israeli soldiers.
Shortly after, an officer of the
Ministry of Defense arrived
backstage at the theatre in Tel
Aviv where Lemmon was per-
forming, and presented the ac-
tor with seven berets
representing the various
military corps in Israel. The
gift went right to Lemmon's
head!
A State for Palestinian
Arabs already exists. It is call-
ed Jordan. A State for Palesti-
nian Jews already exists. It is
called Israel. It is worth
remembering that the British
Mandate over Palestine includ-
ed both sides of the River
Jordan.
An unusual shipment of 50
pairs of assorted protective
gloves were dispatched by a
British Committee for Soviet
Jews to a Moscow Refusenik
now at a labor camp in Siberia.
The young Refusenik has a one
year-old baby, and is a profes-
sional Cellist and teaches
Hebrew. He is serving a three
year sentence for possession of
drugs which were planted in
his suitcase while on holiday.
He is being forced to do heavy
work using steel wool, and is
not being given protective
clothing. His career as a Cellist
is in jeopardy.
Israeli avocados, oranges
and other fruit can be found in
many European super-
markets, but Israel has found
another way to break into the
European Economic Com-
munity's market bulls'
semen. Holland has approved
importation of Israeli bulls'
semen to inseminate dairy
cows artificially. Italy and
West Germany have also ex-
pressed interest. After years
of testing, Israeli
veterinarians pronounced the
semen safe from diseases.
Since 1978, the Cattle
Breeder's Association of Israel
has exported semen to China,
Indonesia and Tanzania. One
of Israel's most popular bulls
was Yaniv-651. He sired 7729
highly prolific milk-producing
daughters and 438 male calves
which were 17 Lbs. above
average weight when they
were one year old. Trusty
Yaniv-651 died, but his legacy
lives on in special tanks cooled
with liquid Nitrogen. More
than 9,000 doses of his semen
survive enough to father
whole herds in Holland.
Hebrew University
students, striking because of a
Continued on Page 14
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Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
1
Education Workshop Receives High Marks
Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish Education Direc-
tor of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, discusses Jewish history with the
participants.
Teachers listen intently and take notes as Rabbi Alan L.
Cohen of Temple Beth El conducts a workshop on the Jewish
life cycle for public school teachers and principals. The event
was sponsored by the Jewish Education Department of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Jewish holidays was the subject of the third workshop taught
by Dr. Elliot Schwartz, Associate in the Jewish Education
Department.
By LOUISE ROSS
"Outstanding" and "above
average" were the grades
given by public school teachers
and principals to a workshop
held recently on "Understan-
ding Our Jewish Students
Through Their Culture." Nine-
ty educators attended
representing 57 public schools
throughout the county.
Conducted under the
auspices of the Education
Department of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County with the cooperation of
Dr. Joseph Orr, Associate
Superintendent for Instruc-
tion, Palm Beach County
Public Schools, the workshop
Assad:
provided the educators with
basic information about
Judaism to assist them in be-
ing sensitive to the needs of
their Jewish students.
Comments included:
"Excellent presentation to
help educators outside of
Judaism understand better the
support necessary for children
of Jewish beliefs."
"Gave me some basics
needed so desparately in an
area where there are so many
Jewish people. A little
knowledge goes a long way
towards understanding
differences."
"Excellent. All three
speakers were terrific and
knew their material and how
to present it."
The presenters included
Rabbi Alan L. Cohen of Tem-
ple Beth El who discussed the
Jewish life cycle, Jewish
Education Director Ann Lynn
Lipton who gave the highlights
of Jewish history, and Jewish
Education Associate Dr. Elliot
Schwartz who explained the
Jewish holidays to the par-
ticipants. A question and
answer period followed led by
Rabbi Alan Sherman of the
Jewish Federation.
Rabbi Cohen, who felt that
the workshop served an impor-
tant purpose, summed up the
Participants browse through an exhibit of Judaica to get a
close-up view of items found in a Jewish home.
frustations of many of the
educators with the fact that
the workshop was only
scheduled for two hours and
had to cover a vast subject.
"This was an excellent start
and I hope it can be expanded
upon. However, everyone in-
volved found that the time con-
straint limited the interaction
and response of the teachers."
Ms. Lipton said, "This
workshop is a tangible exam-
ple of the positive response the
School Board has towards it
Jewish constituents and it was
a big step forward in sensitiz-
ing our community educators.
The School Board has invited
us to continue these programs
and we welcome the
opportunity."
Tough Words, Tough Times
On the anniversary of the
Ba'ath revolution in Syria,
President Hafez Assad told a
Damascus University audience
that "we have a date for
liberation (of the Golan
Heights)." Since Israeli forces
defeated the Syrian army in
eastern Lebanon in 1982,
Assad has spent much of his
country's resources equipping
his army to prepare for this ob-
jective and to achieve
"strategic parity" with Israel.
But now, despite Assad's
bellicose rhetoric, Syria's
preoccupation with its own
political, economic and
military problems might
reduce the threat to Israel, at
least in the near future. Accor-
ding to one authoritative
Israeli analysis recently
reviewed in the Jerusalem
Post, war with Syria is "highly
improbable" in 1987.
The Syrian economy has now
fallen on hard times, forcing
the government to reduce
defense spending. Economic
difficulties have added fuel to
popular resentment of Syria's
support for Iran, a non-Arab
country, in its war with Iraq.
The Israeli analysis asserts
that dissension has percolated
up to the highest echelons of
the Assad government,
fostered, in part, by continuing
rumors of the President's fail-
ing health and the inevitable
struggle to succeed him. This
report contends that Syria's
political and economic outlook
will continue to deteriorate in
1987.
Assad's position has been
complicated further by sen-
ding troops into west Beirut,
according to knowledgeable
sources. The Syrian army has
not received many of the
sophisticated weapons promis-
ed by the Soviets and has had
difficulty integrating those ar-
maments that have been
delivered. Last month Syria
began to decommission
elements of its armored force
on the Golan and it put several
active army units on reserve
status. The Israeli study
asserts that the country's in-
volvement in Lebanon has
worsened both the operational
Continued on Page 11
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
JCC Seniors Hold Seder
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, funded by
(iulfstream Area Agency on Aging, provides a variety of ser-
vices to persons 60 years or older, along with interesting and
entertaining educational and recreational programs. All
senior activities are conducted in compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
of the Jewish Community
Center is designed to keep per-
sons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious, nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by our registered
Dietician along with varied
programs. Volunteers and
staff are helpful and gracious.
Diners enjoy meeting and
eating together each day.
There is no fee, but contribu-
tions are requested. Reserva-
tions must be made, so please
call either Carol or Lillian at
689-7703.
Monday, May 4 Games
with Fred Bauman.
Tuesday, May 5 Discus-
sion Group.
Wednesday, May 6 Exer-
cises (Chair) and Health
Education with Shirley
Sheriff.
Thursday, May 7 Current
Events.
Friday, May 8 Shabbat
Service.
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults.
Persons who need meals for
a short period of time, until
their health returns, should
call the JCC at 689-7703 for in-
formation. There are no set
fees for meals in this program
but we ask each one to make
weekly contributions.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons sixty years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation who must go to
treatment centers, doctor's of-
fices, hospitals and nursing
homes to visit spouses, social
service agencies and nutrition
centers. We service the han-
dicapped in our special lift
vehicle. There is no fee for this
service but participants are en-
couraged to contribute their
fair share. Reservations must
be made at least 48 hours in
advance. For more informa-
tion and/or reservations,
please call 689-7703 and ask
for Helen or Norma in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
EXTRA EXTRA
EXTRA
Transportation to the JCC
Kosher Meal Program is
available for people in
Cresthaven, Lakeside Village,
Southwest Palm Beach and
Lake Worth area and Boyn-
ton. Call 471-9558 for
transportation and 689-7703
for a reservation for a Hot
Kosher LuncH.
The Schoo. Joard of Palm
Beach Couaty Adult and
Community Education
Classes: The School Board
provides instructors at the
Jewish Community Center.
Weight Control. Mondays
at 1:45 p.m.
Exercise and Health
Education. Wednesdays at 11
a.m.
Speak Out. Wednesdays at
1:15 p.m.
Palm Beach Junior College
of Continuing Education
North Campus: Provides in-
structors at the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Coping with Alzheimer's at
Home. Thursdays at 9:30 a.m.
and 1:30 p.m.
Improve Your Memory.
Ruth Janko, MS Instructor,
Fridays at 2 p.m. New class
begins May 8 and participants
may register that day. This is
an eight week class especially
structured to help you with
special memory techniques.
New people may not enroll
after the second sessions.
Learn what memory is, how to
keep it and improve it.
OTHER CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series. Wednesdays at 1:30
p.m.
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Home Financial Manage-
ment. First and third
Wednesdays every month at
1:30 p.m. By appointment.
Health Insurance. Third
Thursday of each month. Call
for appointment or
information.
Timely Topics. Mondays at
2 p.m. Any member who
wishes to attend luncheon
before the meeting (at 1:15
p.m.) may do so by signing up
the week before or calling
Ruth at 689-7703 for
reservations.
"The JCC Senior Seder was
a great success," stated Jean
Rubin, Comprehensive Senior
Service Center Director. Dr.
Elliot Schwartz, Associate of
the Department of Education
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County conducted
a service for 110 persons dur-
ing the regular kosher meal
program on Monday, April 13.
Since everyone could not be
seated in the dining room, two
other rooms were linked
together by closed circuit TV.
A special Passover informa-
tional sheet written by Dr.
Schwartz was given to each
person and an explanation of
the rituals of Passover in-
cluding foods and procedures
was explained before the
Seder began. Each participant
had his own Seder plate and a
traditional Haggadah contain-
ing holiday songs and readings
was used. Sidney Berger and
Victor Duke, Co-Chairmen of
the JCC Senior Committee at-
tended. Mr. Berger presented
the invocation and Sylvia
Berger chanted the blessing
over the candles. Dr. Schwartz
presented Kiddush and pro-
ceeded with the service. Adam
Fox, Jewish Day School stu-
dent, recited the "Four
Questions."
Volunteers worked for days
before as well as the day of the
Seder, preparing plates, set-
ting tables and serving. "The
Seder could not have been ac-
complished without them,"
stated Mrs. Rubin.
All homebound persons
received Passover parcels as a
result of holiday contributions
from individuals and organiza-
tions, along with specially
prepared Passover meals
throughout the week.
Morris Shapiro provided in-
formation and direction and
validated the kitchen for
Passover 5747. "Passover will
long be remembered by all who
participated, thanks to Dr.
Elliot Schwartz, our dedicated
volunteers, and staff," stated
Mrs. Rubin.
A second Seder was held at
the JCC Kosher Meal program
in Delray Beach at Congrega-
tion Anshei Emuna. Passover
meals were served the rest of
the week for seniors to be
together during the holiday
season.
Debunking Forecasts Of An
Arab Majority in Israel
Continued from Page 5
parently it has, according to
demographer Friedlander, but
not much is known abut it.
However shocking this might
sound for such a crucially im-
portant issue, it appears that
there have been no reliable
statistics on Arab fertility in
the territories for the last
decade. But it is reasonable to
assume that the decline has
begun and that it will pick up
steam in the next two decades.
This is the true significance
of the fertility drop of Israeli
Arabs. The drop is happening
faster and sharper than
anyone predicted. If
something similar happens in
the territories, then current
predictions about the propor-
tion of Jews and Arabs in an
Israel with the territories can
be thrown to the wind.
Today, with the territories,
Israel is about 63 percent
Jewish and 37 percent Arab.
What will it be three decades
from now? My guess is that in
30 years close to six out of
every 10 people will be Jews in
an Israel with the territories.
So we were all evidently
fooled. The surge in Arab
fertility was not a permanent
affair, but a temporary one.
Even without a major new im-
migration of Jews, Israel's
demographic future will pro-
bably not be radically different
than the present. Without the
territories, about eight out of
10 will be Jewish. With the ter-
ritories, around six out of 10.
Either way, a Jewish majority.
Gershon Greenbaum studies
demographics at the Institute
of Contemporary Jewry in
Jerusalem.
W
Dr. Elliot Schwartz conducts the JCC Comprehensive Senior
Service Center Seder as Adam Fox recites the Four
Questions.
JCC News
YOUNG SINGLES (20'S AND 30'S)
On Saturday evening, May 2, at 7:30 p.m. meet at the
Center to carpool to Sunfest. Join us for a great time filled
with music, art, fun and food.
Gather at Club 10 in the Airport Hilton on Saturday, May
9 at 9 p.m. If your birthday is in May, or you just likei to
celebrate birthdays, be sure to join us for this event. We
will have our own section of the lounge so look for the
balloons. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
Meet at a member's home on Tuesday, May 12 at 7:30
p.m. for a fun evening. Bring your favorite board game and
ice cream topping and we will create our own sundaes.
Donation: $2.
Meet Thursday, May 14, 7 p.m., to enjoy a casual outdoor
dinner in the tropical setting of Two Georges Harbor Hut
in Boynton Beach. For directions and additional informa-
tion call the Center.
SINGLES (30'S AND 40'S)
Meet Wednesday, May 6, 6:45 p.m., at the Cinema 'N
Drafthouse (Congress Ave. and 10th ave. No.) to enjoy an
evening at this unique movie house.
Meet Tuesday, May 12 at 7 p.m. at the Samurai Japanese
Steak and Seafood Restaurant (Military Trail and
Okeechobee Blvd., in the Pine Tree Plaza).
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-59)
Gather together Thursday, May 7 from 5-7 p.m. at
Chauncy's for Happy Hour in this relaxed atmosphere. Join
us for drinks, a great buffet and an opportunity to socialize
with friends old and new. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
I *
Get together Tuesday, May 12 from 5-7 p.m. at Ben's
Steakhouse (Congress Ave., one block south of 10 Ave. No.,
Lake Worth) for the Happy Hour. Plan to stay for dancing
to a live band at 8 p.m. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
PRIME TIME SINGLES (60 AND OVER)
On Thursday, May 7, 7 p.m., get together at the JCC to
plan for upcoming events and hear a special guest speaker.
Donation: JCC members $1, non-members $1.25.
For more information, contact the JCC at 689-7700.
Israel Helps France
France requested Israeli
assistance last September
when a series of terrorist
bomb blasts shook Paris, kill-
ing 11 and wounding over 150
(Reuter, April 6). According to
Israel's Police Minister Haim
Bar-Lev, France and Israel ex-
changed intelligence on ter-
rorism on a daily basis.
Meanwhile Libya has at-
tempted to support anti-
American and anti-French
revolutionary groups in the
Caribbean (Associated Press,
April 6). U.S. officials have
confirmed Jamaican press
reports that the Libyans have
provided money to radicals
and encouraged them to com-
mit terrorist acts.
(Near East Report)


Friday, May 1,1987/The Jewiah Ftoridin of Paiin Beach County Page 9
Morse Geriatric Center
Women's Auxiliary Holds 2nd Annual Luncheon
The Women's Auxiliary of
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center held its Second Annual
Luncheon and Fashion Show
at the Hyatt Palm Beaches on
Monday, March 30.
A capacity attendance of 500
women were shown the latest
spring fashion by Via Condotti
of North Palm Beach. Frances
Schnitt, Luncheon Chair-
woman, welcomed members of
the Auxiliary who supported
the event. A number of the
Center's residents were
welcomed and introduced as
well.
Following the fashion show,
drawings for special grand
prizes and door prizes were
held.
Highlighting the afternoon
was a presentation by Anita
Anton, a resident of the
Center, a recipient of the
"Volunteer of the Year"
award from the Florida
Association of Homes for the
Aging; and a beloved member
of the community. Mrs. Anton
brought the women to their
feet with her remarks.
Members of the Luncheon
Committee were Dale Nadel,
Luncheon Co-Chairwoman;
Esther Gruber, Reservation
Chairwoman; Jaqueline Eder,
Drawing Chairwoman; Lenore
Black and Honey Plisskin, In-
vitation Co-Chairwomen; and
Marilyn Zelnick, Centerpiece
Chairwoman.
The Women's Auxiliary was
formed in 1985 as a support
organization of the Morse
Geriatric Center. Through
membership drives, social
events and a tribute fund,
monies are raised to help meet
the special needs of the
Center s residents.
The Morse Geriatric Center
is a facility of the Jewish Home
for the Aged of Palm Beach
County and a beneficiary agen-
cy of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
I-i?&I!2r!i!55*,, ?^,J!fi^L*ori*,d,i^ ** 2-"?* &*% < *
and Frances Schnitt, Luncheon Co-Chairman.
dent, greets guest Dorothy Durchlagr.
Sodowick
r 1 *
w+
Jt\
** 1 *
-" % ~"~"x
iHhMMIBh ^iH l^^^lH
Blossom Cohen and Esther Molat
Ceil Rosen, Kitty Margolis, and Mimi Stern
Dorothy Rautbord
Statue Of Wallenberg To Be Erected In Budapest
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A life-
sized statue of Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish
diplomat, is to be erected in
Budapest, the city where he
saved up to 100,000 Hungarian
Jews from the Nazis and
where he was seized by
Stalin's agents as a suspected
spy-
Following a decision of the
Budapest Municipal Council,
reported in the Hungarian
Communist daily Nepszabad-
sag, it will be unveiled this
month in the capital's
fashionable Number Two
District on the Buda side of the
Danube River. The event will
form part of the program of
the European Executive
meeting of the World Jewish
Congress, from May 16-19 in
Budapest.
IMRE VARGA, one of
Hungary's leading sculptors
and a member of its Com-
munist Party's Central Com-
mittee, has produced the
youthful likeness of
Wallenberg whose fate, more
than four decades after his ab-
duction, still arouses
worldwide speculation and
overcasts relations between
the Soviet Union and his
native Sweden.
The city already has a small
street named after Wallenberg
on the opposite bank of the
Danube where many Jews
were sheltered from the Nazis
in Swedish protected
buildings. But the new statue
will nave additional
significance.
Four years after the war a
monument in Wallenberg's
honor was erected in
Budapest's Saint Stephen
Park by a grateful Jewish com-
munity. Standing 18 feet high,
it consisted of a naked man
wrestling with a snake. Its
plinth bore a medallion of
Wallenberg's head and a glow-
ing tribute to his actions.
HOWEVER, the night
before its official dedication on
April 17, 1949, it was remov-
ed, only to turn up later in
another part of Hungary,
stripped of the references to
Wallenberg.
In recent years, the
Hungarians have become
acutely conscious of the
similarities between this
episode and Wallenberg's own
disappearance.
This in turn will be powerful-
ly symbolized by the new
bronze statue of Wallenberg
which will stand facing a block
of pink Swedish granite on
which the scuptor has depicted
the original monument to him
and the original testimonial to
his actions.
Wallenberg, then aged 32,
Raoul Wallenberg
arrived in Budapest in July
1944 on a mission to save as
many Jews as possible from
being deported by the Nazis to
Auschwitz. Together with
other diplomatic represen-
tatives, such as the Swiss Con-
sul Carl Lutz, he issued protec-
tive passports to Hungarian
Jews and flew his country's
flag on buildings in which the
Jews were sheltered. On
January 17, 1945, Wallenberg
was taken under Soviet
"protection" and has never
been seen subsequently out-
side the Soviet Union. Accor-
ding to a Soviet statement
issued in 1957, he died of heart
failure in the Lubyanka Prison
on July 17, 1947. The Swedes
have never believed this and
continue to press for his
release he would now be 74
or a more convincing ex-
planation of his fate.
As recently as last July, the
Soviet Embassy in Stockholm
informed the Swedish govern-
ment that Wallenberg is dead.
It did so following inquiries by
Prime Minister Ingvar
Carlsson during a visit to
Moscow a few months earlier.
Tensions
Continued front Page 1
greeted Rabin's oblique
reference to hooliganism by
Jewish settlers against Arab
civilians and when he insisted
that law and order would be
maintained by the military
authorities. He warned the set-
tlers that weapons they are
allowed to carry were for per-
sonal protection only.
Settlers complained that talk
in the government about an in-
ternational conference for
Middle East peace only en-
couraged terrorism. Rabin told
them, "We are beginning to
blame ourselves rather than
the PLO."
The focus of tension shifted
to East Jerusalem when a
small group of Jews who call
themselves "The Temple
Mount Faithful" visited the
Temple Mount which is reserv-
ed exclusively for Moslem wor-
ship. They came under heavy
police protection. Local Arabs
were incensed and one was ar-
rested after shoving a police
officer. He was released later
when it was discovered that
the man is mentally disturbed.
Police, fearing a disturbance,
ordered the Jewish group back
behind the gates to the Temple
Mount area but later permit-
ted them to reenter the site
individually.
The Temple Mount contains
the Dome of the Rock and Al
Aksa Mosque, two of the
holiest shrines in Islam, and
has often been the scene of
confrontation between
religious Jews and Moslem
worshippers. Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem protested
angrily that allowing Jews to
enter the area was a needless
provocation. He was furious
with the police for not con-
sulting him beforehand.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Hunger Strike Leaves Refusenik Couple Weak And 111
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Soviet Jewry activists are con-
cerned with the health of
refusenik couple Lev and Inna
Elbert, who are on the hunger
strike in Moscow to convince
the Soviet authorities to allow
them to immigrate to Israel.
Because of the length of the
fast, which is not their first,
Inna is reportedly suffering
from liver damage and Lev is
extremely weak.
Three weeks ago he
reportedly had heart stoppage
and was advised by a doctor
not to attend the Passover
seder at Spaso House, the
residence of the U.S. Am-
bassador to Moscow, at which
Secretary of State George
Shultz was present and to
which the Elberts were in-
vited, according to both the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ) and the Union
of Councils for Soviet Jewry
(UCSJ).
LEV SPOKE with Pamela
Cohen, UCSJ president, in
Chicago, and Cohen told JTA
that he was so weak he could
not continue on the phone.
However, Elbert has said,
"The last weapons we have to
use are our own bodies."
Elbert was visited by a
delegation of Congressmen, in-
cluding Steny Hoyer (D., Md.),
who is chairman of the Com-
mission on Security and
Cooperation in Europe
(Helsinki Commission). The
Congressional delegation is in
Moscow for talks with Soviet
authorities.
Elbert told Cohen that the
Congressmen met with Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev, who
reportedly told them that "the
term of refusal was from five-
ten years." Asked how this
term could apply to specific
cases, Gorbachev is reported
to have answered that a
resolution of "broader issues"
between the U.S. and USSR
would lead to the resolution of
the Elberts' case.
PRIOR TO Passover, Elbert
received a call from Israeli
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres, and, according to
Cohen, he told Peres that he
would not end his hunger
strike until he had some "fac-
tual information" that the
Soviets were positively con-
sidering their case.
The Elberts appear commit-
ted to continuing the hunger
strike to the end. In a telegram
sent to Israel April 9, Elbert
wrote that the Soviet Ministry
of Foreign Affairs had inform-
ed them in a telephone conver-
sation of the "negative resolu-
tion" of their case, "not-
withstanding the fact that we
have submitted documents in-
dicating that we possess no
secrets."
Elbert, 36, is a construction
Shultz Asked To Demand Release of UN Info
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Commission on Social Ac-
tion of the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations
(UAHC) sent a telegram to
Secretary of State George
Shultz Monday urging him to
demand the release of informa-
tion on Nazi war criminals
from the United Nations.
The Reform Judaism group
authorized the telegram at a
"Consultation on Conscience"
which opened here Sunday
night to mark the 25th an-
niversary of the UAHC's
Religious Action Center here.
THE TELEGRAM, signed
by Harris Gilbert, chairman of
the commission, asked Shultz
to urge UN Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar to
allow public access to the UN
files on Nazi war criminals. De
Cuellar rejected last month a
similar request from Binyamin
Netanyahu, Israel's Am-
bassador to the UN.
"The War Crimes Commis-
sion, in giving these files to the
UN, never intended that the
records be hidden from the
UN," the telegram to Shultz
said. "The UN action in keep-
Michael Karon
Jason Wanuck
Bar Mitzvah
ADAM SCHRAGER
Adam Todd Schrager, son of
Alfred and Diana Schrager of
Lake Worth, was called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, April 25 at Temple
Beth Sholom, Lake Worth.
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
officiated.
Adam is a seventh grade stu-
dent at the Jewish Community
Day School. He is involved in
basketball, baseball and
Hebrew Speakers Club. Adam
enjoys fishing, surfing and
building models. He was twin-
ned with Roman Faingersh of
Moldavian, SSR, USSR.
MICHAEL KARON
Michael Karon, son of David
and Elaine Karon of Well-
ington, will celebrate his Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, May 2 at
Temple Beth Torah. Rabbi
Steven Westman and Cantor
Elliott Rosenbaum will
officiate.
Michael is a 7th grade stu-
dent at Crestwood Middle
School, where he is involved in
the marching band. He is a
member of the Temple Youth
Group and enjoys computers,
science, fiction and bowling.
JASON WANUCK
Jason Michael Wanuck, son
of Dr. and Mrs. Stuart
Wanuck of Palm Beach
Gardens will be called to the
Torah on Saturday, May 9 at
Temple Beth David. Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff will officiate.
Jason is a seventh grade stu-
dent at The Benjamin School,
where he is involved in a varie-
ty of sports including tennis
and basketball. He is also a
member of the high school
band and a Boy Scout with
Troop 150.
Jason will be twinning his
Bar Mitzvah with Isai
Khayamov of the Soviet
Union.
Family members sharing in
this occasion will include his
brother, Darryl; sister, Jenny;
grandparents, Bert and Helen
Hacker of West Palm Beach
and Dr. Martin and Esther
Wanuck of Hollywood.
ing them under lock and key
has no standing in law and no
moral justification. "We
respectfully urge you to de-
mand that the files be made
available to all scholars,
researchers and students."
Bolivia Given
Strong Protests
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two international Jewish
organizations have lodged
strong protests with the Boli-
vian government for granting
diplomatic status to the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion which has had an office in
La Paz since 1982.
Israel Singer, secretary
general of the World Jewish
Congress, and Seymour Reich,
international president of
B'nai B'rith, expressed shock,
concern and disappointment
over the move which they saw
as a dangerous precedent for
other Latin American coun-
tries. According to the WJC,
the Israel Embassy in La Paz
and the local Jewish communi-
ty have also objected
vehemently.
SINGER, in a telegram to
the Bolivian Ambassador, Fer-
nando Illanes de la Riva, said,
"Our protest in this regard
arises from the nature of the
PLO which has not renounced
terrorism and whose violent
history is all too well known."
Annual
Meeting
Continued from Pag* 1
Hypnosis training workshop.
Women's Division, who will
be installing their Officers and
Board Members at the Annual
Meeting, will hold a separate
"Appreciation Luncheon" for
all those who worked this past
year on their Campaign and
other programs. The event will
be held on Wednesday, May
13, noon, at the West Palm
Beach home of Sandra Rosen,
Outreach Vice President.
Cost of the 25th Annual
Meeting is $5 per person which
includes dessert. For reserva-
tions and/or more information,
contact Ronni Epstein, Direc-
tor of Communications, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.

engineer from Kiev. As a
private in the Soviet army bet-
ween 1973-75 he helped con-
struct a swimming pool in an
officers' club, and was charged
with knowing "state secrets"
when they first applied to
emigrate in 1976. They have
since applied to leave over 12
times.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday
9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8 am. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
For times of evening services please call the Temple office,
689-9430. _
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 am., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE TORAH: Lions Club, 3615 West Boynton Beach
Boulevard, Boynton Beach 33437. Phone 737-7687. Cantor Alex
Chapin. Sabbath Services Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:45 p.m.
REFORM

CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:16 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address- 5849
Okeechobee Blvd., No. 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33417. Phone
471-1526.


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Synagogue News
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday May 1, Temple
will celebrate religious school
recognition and awards. The
Shabbat Service will be con-
ducted by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro, Cantor Peter Taor-
mina will lead the congrega-
tion in songs.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited. During
the evening service child care
will be provided.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Teache* and Staff Apprecia-
tion S&bbath will highlight
May Family Services. Friday,
May 1 at 8 p.m. meeting at St.
Catherine's Cultural Center.
Rabbi Joel Levine and Cantor
Anne Newman will officiate.
Teachers will sit on the
pulpit and help conduct
Services.
During Services, Temple
President, Helaine Kahh will
provide a progress report on
the new synagogue nearing
completion at 100 North Chill-
ingworth Drive on Congress
Ave. between Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd. and Okeechobee
Road.
The congregation is invited
to an oneg shabbat following
Services sponsored by the
Sisterhood. For more informa-
tion, call the office.
TEMPLE
BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood will hold
their monthly meeting on
Wednesday, May 6. A musical
program will be presented and
refreshments will be served.
Coming events:
On Friday, May 8, members
of Sisterhood will conduct Sab-
bath Services.
May 12, a Luncheon/Card
Party at 12:30 p.m. with a
donation of $5.50 per person.
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Sisterhood will hold their
Board Meeting on Monday,
May 4, at 9:45 a.m., and its
season closing meeting on
Tuesday, May 19, at 1 p.m.
when they will be entertained
by Estelle Bauman's reading
of her original short humorous
stories, and songs by Dorothy
Surtshin, accompanied by
Tony Vaccaro.
Assad: Tough Words, Tough Times
Continued from Page 7
status and training levels of
the Syrian armed forces and
has had a demoralizing effect
on senior ranks of the army.
However, Moshe Maoz, an
Israeli authority on Syria,
warns that it may be
premature to discount the war
threat from Syria While
Assad has reduced his defense
budget, he has not diminished
the quality of the Syrian army.
Maoz contends thai one of
Assad's highest priorities is to
narrow Syria's technological
gap with Israel. He adds that
Assad told the January
meeting of the Islamic Con-
ference Organization in
Kuwait that his country would
counter Israel's purported
nuclear weapons capability.
Although Syria's current
"answer" is chemical warfare,
Maoz asserts that the Syrian
leader let it be known that
Damascus was interested in a
Israel's Trade
Deficit Up 73%
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's trade deficit increased
by 73 percent in the first
quarter January-March of
1987 compared with the cor-
responding period in 1986, ac-
cording to figures released by
the Central Bureau of
Statistics Sunday.
Imports increased by 24.6
percent against an 11.5 per-
cent increase of exports in the
three month period. As a
result, the average monthly
trade deficit increased 14 per-
cent compared to the last
quarter October-December
1986 and 50 percent com-
pared to the third quarter
July-September 1986.
The figures do not include
the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Area Deaths
BAKUN
Murray. 87. of Wat Palm Bm&. Menorah
Garden* and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach. ^^
MOLL
Nathan. 90. of Covered Bridge. Lake
Worth. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
SCHWARTZ
Betty, 79, of Lake Worth. Levitt-Weinstein
Guaranteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
SUKENICK
Row, of West Palm Beach. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels. West Palm
Beach
nuclear capability of its own.
Analysts familiar with Syria
flatly reject the notion that the
Syrians are actively pursuing a
nuclear weapons program. A
U.S. government official said
that the country's low level of
technological sophistication
would preclude the develop-
ment of atomic weapons.
Another well-informed source
added that Syrian interests
would be better served
developing its'existing
chemical warfare capability,
what he called "the poor man's
A-bomb."
In 1985 Syrian Defense
Minister Mustafa Tlas told the
Gulf newspaper A l-Ittihad that
the Soviet Union guaranteed
Damascus nuclear weapons if
Israel employed atomic
weapons against Syria. One
year later, Soviet officials
reportedly assured the Syrians
that they would assist with
military force including tac-
tical nuclear weapons if
Israeli troops crossed the
border into Syria.
Moscow has already provid-
ed the Syrians with numerical
advantages over Israel in
tanks, surface-to-air missiles
and armed helicopters. It has
supplied Syria with
sophisticated surface-to-
surface missile launchers
capable of hitting targets deep
within Israel. And more ad-
vanced hardware is in the
Moscow-Damascus pipeline.
"If Syria were to withdraw
quickly from Lebanon, they
could recoup some of the
economic, military and
political damage done," said
one defense analyst, adding,
"But that's Western thinking.
Assad doesn't think like that."
Although this source agrees
that mitigating factors seem to
preclude war "until the end of
the summer," he cautions that
Assad could launch an unex-
pected military campaign at
any time, despite the costs.
(Near East Report)
Pre-arrange now ...
because the grief
is enough to handle.
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Habimah Invited To Budapest
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Habimah, the Israel National
Theater, has been officially in-
vited to perform in Budapest,
and the Hungarian National
Theater will come to Israel
later for performances at the
Habimah Theater building.
The invitation to Habimah
was extended by the director
of the Hungarian Ministry of
Education's Cultural Affairs
Department to Habimah ar-
tistic director Omri Nitzan and
actor Avraham Ronai during
their visit to Hungary as the
guests of the Hungarian Na-
tional Theater earlier this
month.
The Israeli group will pro-
bably visit Hungary in
September or October, during
a Habimah tour of Europe dur-
ing which they will perform at
theatrical festivals in
Copenhagen, West Berlin and
Belgrade.
Omri said that while in
Budapest, they had met with
Mikhael Gloz, artistic director
of the Soviet Jewish Theater in
Moscow, who had expressed
the hope that his actors' group
would visit Israel shortly.
Sadat's Widow
Gets JNF Award
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jihan Sadat, widow of Egyp-
tian President Anwar Sadat
and visiting professor at the
University of South Carolina,
Columbia, recently received
here the Jewish National
Fund's first Peace Award of
the International Peace Park
Project. She also was
presented with JNF cer-
tificates for the planting of
trees in the park in the names
of her nine grandchildren.
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
Join The Synagogue
Of Your Choice
... because vital Jewish institutions
build strong Jewish communities.
Spring Season
Pre-Need Special
If
IMEM1E
including Perpetual Care
Act NOW ana save on these unbeatable pre-need prices!
Offer Available Through May 31,1987 Only
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
9321 Memorial Park Road
m Miles west of I-9S via Northiake Blvd. Exit
Cemeteries Funeral Chapels Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning
_______________________________*J


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
17 mg. "tar". 1.3 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette by FTC method.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING.- Cigarette
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide.
THE REFRESHEST

-


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Israel Looks Ahead
Missions Possible
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
(Part Two Of
A Five-Part Series)
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel is high-tech country. In
1974 it exported one percent
($800 million) of its high-tech
products. Within a decade it
was exporting 30 percent ($2
billion) annually. By 1990 that
proportion is expected to leap
by two-thirds.
In 1970 there were 3,000
engineers and applied scien-
tists. By last year there were
12,000. Israel is producing the
most advanced concepts in
technology and software.
Sophisticated science-based in-
dustries like Elscint, Tadiran,
Scitex, I scar and Elbit have
become household words.
These "Silicon Valley" com-
panies are generating and
regenerating communities
around them and putting
Israel on the world map of
technology and science.
At Israel's present rate of
technological and scientific
development, there is a shor-
tage oi technological people to
maintain the momentum. In
the next 10 years, Israel will
need 1,800 engineers but there
will be a shortfall of 400 to 500
annually. But Israel is not
standing still in the meantime.
New words and concepts are
emerging more rapidly than
they can become part of the
Hebrew lexicon. There is a
constant introduction of high-
tech and scientific terminology
such as microchips, fibertop
high speed data transmission
and distribution, computer-
based diagnostic medical imag-
ing, computerized electro-
optical systems, genetic
engineering, nuclear car-
diology, and nuclear magnetic
resonance (NMR) scanning.
A great deal of high-tech
products in industry, science
and medicine are manufac-
tured with defense technology
know-how. Civilian and
military technical
developments are by-products
of each other's needs. These
are interlinked and applied in
both sectors.
For example, industrial,
medical and print lasers, ther-
mal imaging and image-
intensification technologies
are targeted at both the
medical and military sectors.
An interlinked refinement of
some of these processes is the
NMR which gives remarkable
three-dimensional images of
what is happening inside the
human body, far beyond what
the X-ray and CAT scanner
can accomplish. Although
NMR has been around since
the 1940's, it was first applied
to medical imaging only five
years ago.
Israel is also a world leader
in factory automation and
computerization.
Sophisticated missile
technology is successfully be-
ing converted into labor-
saving robots that are finding
application in American gar-
ment plants. The robot feeds
pre-cut fabric bundles to semi-
automatic sewing and fusing
machines and assists in mak-
ing garment production com-
pletely automatic.
Computer-based imaging
systems were put to use in the
textile industry. By
automating the conversion of
color designs to magnetic
tapes for electronically con-
trolled knitting machines, the
elapsed time required for pat-
terned knitted goods was
slashed from several weeks to
minutes.
In the field of thermal imag-
ing, cameras are being
developed that can display a
TV picture of inanimate and
animate objects in the
darkness of the night, thick
haze, dust or fog. The
cameras, tested in the field
and battle, are beginning to be
used for civilian application in
surveillance, and ultimately
may be used in cancer
detection.
Along with these
developments, Israel has also
become a world leader in
agricultural breakthrough
such as drip irrigation,
breeding of new crop strains
which thrive on brackish or
saline water, crop cultivation
under platic sheets, and grow-
ing fruits and vegetables with
longer shelf life.
These innovations, and solar
ponds and solar-driven tur-
bines and generators, water
conservation, and desert
research and development,
have been introduced by Israel
into more than 100 countries,
including the United States.
Israeli methods of agriculture
and farming organized along
kibbutz lines were introduced
by Israelis in such diverse
countries as Japan, and in
Cuba in the early 1960's.
Special turbines combined
with solar ponds to generate
power in some of the world's
most desolate regions was
pioneered in Israel.
The process of "humaniz-
ing" the desert by tapping its
mineral resources and
underground springs, and the
exploitation of Dead Sea
minerals to manufacture fer-
tilizers and pesticides has also
brought Israel to the attention
of many developing countries
with large desert areas.
Among other countries,
Egypt and the People's
Republic of China have ex-
pressed great interest in stu-
dying the methods of desert
research developed by Israeli
scientists. In the near future,
efforts to make deserts
habitable will become more
pressing as populations grow
and have nowhere else to
reside except for the deserts.
All these developments have
enriched Israel's economy by
introducing revolutionary
techniques to increase produc-
tivity and to provide for expan-
ding domestic needs. It is
changing the nature of the
labor force in both industry
and agriculture by requiring
more and more technicians
and science-oriented workers.
It is providing a military edge
to the country's security
forces. It is helping millions of
people in developing nations.
And it is creating a world
market for Israeli products
and techniques.
Other changes are taking
place in social relations that
are equally profound and far-
reaching. The most radical
change taking place is the
revolt against the long ingrain-
ed "lo chashuv" (so be it, it
doesn't matter) syndrome
which has been the earmark of
Israeli bureaucrats (p'kidim)
and the myriad bureaucratic
fiefdoms that infest all levels
of life.
The anti-bureaucratic at-
titude is expressed in a de-
mand for "accountability," a
concept introduced into the
country by Project Renewal,
the vast undertaking by the
government and diaspora
Jewry to eliminate poverty
neighborhoods and to restore
"hatikvah" (hope) in the lives
of its residents.
The assault on Israel's
systemized bureaucracy is be-
ing led primarily by new im-
migrants from the United
States and the Soviet Union.
American immigrants, used to
corporate efficiency, are
askance at the wastefulness of
a bureaucratic system which
demeans and stultifies life.
Soviet Jews, who were entrap-
ped by their own
bureaucracies, rebel against
the Israeli version.
Israelis, who for all these
Continued on Page 14
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Page 14 j The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Amnesty Misses The Point
(Second of three articles)
By DAVID TWERSKY
Amnesty International's
(AI) report, Torture in the
Eighties, claimed that some
Palestinian Arabs have been
"hooded, handcuffed and forc-
ed to stand without moving."
It adds that there are a
"number" of reports, but does
not say how many, of Arab
suspects being beaten during
interrogation, and more
allegations of Arabs being
"harassed and intimidated" by
the Israel Defense Forces
(IDF).
Richard Reoch, AI's head of
press and publications,
responded lamely to NER's
suggestion that Israel's record
is much better than Amnesty's
portrait. He did not mention
that the same AI study which
reported detainees' and ex-
detainees' complaints also
noted that 17 of the Israeli
security officers thus charged
were found guilty and given
prison sentences of up to three
months or suspended
sentences of up to a year.
The fact that thousands of
daily contacts between Israeli
security officers and Palesti-
nian Arabs produced only
"dozens" of accusations of
brutality in a year and that,
of these, even AI admits that
17 resulted in conviction
speaks well of Israeli justice
and rather poorly of AI's at-
tention to detail.
In a letter to Amnesty dated
Jan. 31, 1985, then-State At-
torney General Yitzhak Zamir
dismissed Torture in the
Eighties for "totally fail(ing) to
offer an even-handed assess-
ment of Israel's treatment of
detainees." Zamir asked AI to
check with Israel's Justice
Minister before publishing
allegations of torture to no
avail.
Palestinian Arabs who feed
AI information often have
"personal and political motives
for exaggerating" and a cross-
check with the Justice
Minister might change the pre-
publication perspective.
(Among other things, West
Bankers routinely are denied
U.S. visas if they have been
convicted of PLO activities.)
Obtaining information from
prisoners about others still
Israel Looks Ahead
Continued from Page 13
decades had accepted the ex-
istence of p'kidim as a
necessary and unalterable way
of life, are also demanding an
end to an uncaring and insen-
sitive system with its maze of
paperwork and red tape which
requires that almost all daily
transactions be carried out in
quadruplicate, quintuplicate
and sextuplicate, and waiting
in endless, sometimes never
moving lines, to distribute the
paperwork to another pakid
who rules his or her own roost.
The anti-pakid attitude is
beginning to change the social
process in the country. No in-
stitution is immune to
criticism. The demand for ac-
countability is aimed at the
government, the army, postal
system, hospitals, industry,
unions, political parties and
Zionist organizations. The "lo
chashuv" syndrome is slowly
beginning to wither away or is
being swept aside. The dam
broke with the Bank Leumi
scandal earlier this year. It
lifted a veil on an entrenched
bureaucracy which answered
to no one but itself.
Israelis who decry advice
from afar and what they
sometimes refer to as "meddl-
ing" in their country's affairs
by Jewish representatives
from the United States, actual-
ly welcomed their decision to
move against a moribund
bureaucracy in the Jewish
Agency.
The move, which focused on
Agency chairman Leon Dulzin
who was caught up in the Bank
Leumi scandal, caught the im-
agination of many Israelis who
have had to deal with the
Agency's p'kidim. They watch-
ed the shake up, smiled
mischievously, shrugged their
shoulders and said, "Lo
chashuv," meaning, in this
case, it couldn't have happen-
ed soon enough.
There are many Israelis,
young and old, who want the
country to return to its
"chalutzic" (pioneering) spirit,
who want Israel to end its
decades-long policies of drif-
ting and haphazard planning:.
that it should implement the
Zionist principles that guided
the country's founders, to
return to its Jewish roots,
values and ethos. There is a
search for answers not gim-
micks about the kind of
society Israel should be. They
are seeking the raison d'etre of
Israel's existence, as a Jewish
State, not just a state.
"Israel has been created
mainly for a Jew like me," said
Menachem Perlmutter, head
of the Jewish Agency's rural
settlment department,
engineering division, in the
Negev, and a member of the
Board of the Ben Gurion
University of the Negev. "I am
a survivor of the Holocaust. I
have a number of my left arm.
I can't look back. If I look
back, what do I see? I see the
shadow of the gas chamber. I
see crematoriums. For me
there is only one answer:
Israel."
Perlmutter said he was 16
years old when he was taken to
Auschwitz. "Of a family of 53
persons, two remained my
brother and myself," he said.
"My dream was to be a free
and independent Jew who
would be able to build a family.
My generation has a beautiful
challenge, a chance to create a
home, a State. But we made a
mistake. We were trying so
hard to be Israelis that we
forgot that we were Jews. The
new generation has little
Jewish feeling."
This problem is haunting
many Israelis: while they
welcome the rapid pace of
super-industrialization, they
are concerned that it may pro-
duce a generation of
technocrats who will be
Israelis but not Jews. Israelis
are searching for new vistas,
for new encounters of the
chalutzic kind, for a way to
realize old hopes and old
dreams and to combine them
with new needs and new
realities. They are seeking a
new national agenda and many
point to the Negev and the
Galilee as the places in which
to renew the pioneering spirit.
(Next: Part Three)
operating in the field is literal-
ly a life-and-death issue for the
Israeli security services. As
then-Prime Minister Shimon
Peres told the Knesset, the
General Security Services
(Shin Bet) prevented five -ir
bombs from exploding on the
streets of Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem in 1985 alone,
thanks partly to information
from PLO detainees.
AI also is wrong on confes-
sions. It asserts that in Israel's
military courts "the confession
often constitutes the main
body of evidence" implying
that these are obtained under
duress. But Zamir pointed out
in his reply that "Israel's
courts require evidence in ad-
dition to a confession to find a
defendant guilty." This system
is "more favorable to the
defendant than English Com-
mon Law "
Unfortunately, AI com-
pounds its mistaken accusa-
tions against Israel with the
publication of its annual
human rights report card. The
1984 and 1985 annual reports
devote more pages to a study
of Israel's affairs than to any
of the authoritarian and
totalitarian states in the Arab
world and communist bloc.
Among the "abuses" recorded
is the detention of PLO
gunmen and Lebanese
"suspected of links with the
PLO' in the Ansar prison
camp when the IDF was heavi-
ly deployed in Lebanon.
Curiously, from 1977 to 1982,
AI did not include Lebanon in
its annual reports. But as soon
as Israel attacked the PLO
there, the country again
became worthy of AI's
attention.
The report also expressed
"concern" about the imprison-
ment of "selective conscien-
tious objectors" who refused
to serve in Lebanon. This is an
interesting subject but hardly
evidence of human rights
abuses especially in a coun-
try which depends on being
able to mobilize virtually the
entire adult male population
between 22 and 55 as its
military reserves.
The heaviest cor-
respondence between AI and
Israel centers on Palestinian
Arabs jailed or administrative-
ly detained or restricted
because of Iheir PLO links.
Amnesty views them as
"prisoners of conscience" ar-
rested for their ideas. This
distorted conclusion springs
from an erroneous premise
about terrorism.
(Next: Easy op Terrorism)
Twertky write* widely on
IsraeUrtiaXed topic*.
(Near Bart Report)
Cy Saltzman (left), recent honoree of the
Southgate Condo reception on behalf of State of
Israel Bonds, joined the Prime Ministers Club, the
honor society of purchasers of $25,000 or more in
Israel Bonds. The Prime Ministers Club was
established by the Israel Bond organization at the re-
quest of the late Prime Minister Golda Meir shortly
after the Yom Kippur War when Israel desperately
needed funds for the reconstruction of its economy.
Mr. Saltzman receives the Prime Ministers plaque
from Sidney Cohen, Chairman of the Con-
dominium Division of the Palm Beach County Israel
Bonds Organization.
Update
Continued from Page 6
proposed increase in tuition
fees, brought a calf, as a
member of their picket line,
outside the office of the
Finance Minister. The
students explained that the
bovine creature symbolized the
students' refusal to be regard-
ed as creatures to be milked in-
definitely. Israel's cows, in-
cidentally, have the largest
milk yields in the world.
One year after he was allow-
ed to emigrate, Illya Essas, a
Refusenik since 1973, address-
ed a meeting recently in
Dublin. A former mathemati-
cian, fluent in five languages,
Essas described how he
became a baal tshuva and
eventually, the head of the
Jewish religious revival move-
ment in Moscow. In the past
three years, 40 members of the
Irish Jewish community have
been to the USSR to make con-
tact with Refuseniks. Mr
Essas delivered aShabbat ser-
to a real fear of the Jewish con-
cept of freedom.
Israel's nomads, the
Bedouins, are becoming ur-
banized. Half a century ago,
they roamed from Jordan to
central Sinai, to the Mediterra-
nean. Today, they are concen-
trated in an area from Beer-
sheba to the Judean Desert.
Their black goat-hair tents are
being replaced by settlements
with stone houses, markets
and garages. Ninety-eight per-
cent of Bedouin children at-
tend school.
Veteran Zionists will recall
the war waged by Eliezer Ben-
Yehuda and other pioneers to
establish Hebrew as the
language of the renascent
Jewish nation, and to outlaw
Yiddish. For a long time, Yid-
dish was almost a secret
language in Israel, spoken in
Mea Shearim by anti-Zionist
mon at a Dublin Synagogue zealots who use Hebrew, the
the seats of which are labelled Ho,y language, only for
with the names of Refusniks. Players. Now that Hebrew is
at least one third of whom Mr.
Essas sadly noted were people
he knew well. Soviet opposi-
*?" Jewish education
within the USSR is largely due
Mayor To Be Honored For
Promoting Arab-Jewish Amity
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mayor Ibrahim Nimr Hussein
of the Israeli Arab town of
Shfaram will be honored for
his efforts to promote
understanding and good will
between Arabs and Jews.
He will receive a medal
awarded annually by the
Movement for a Better Israel,
a non-political group of about
1,200 of Jews and Arabs seek-
ing amity between the two
communities.
Hussein was recommended
for the award by the mayors of
Kiryat Bialik, Kiryat Ate and
Tivon who said their towns
had excellent relations with
Shfaram due largely to the
Arab mayor's efforts. Pro-
blems that arose between
them over the years were solv-
ed amicably through negotia-
tions "conducted in an at-
mosphere of goodwill," they
said.
Hussein was also cited for
his tolerance in dealing with
the minority Christian and
Druze communities in
Shfaram.
firmly established, a move-
ment has enthusiastic sup-
porters in 14 countries. Yid-
dish is now taught as a subject
in 27 secular High Schools in
Israel, including the famous
Rehavia Gymnasium in
Jerusalem's posh suburb,
Rehavia.
"India Today," published in
Delhi, reported that thousands
of tribesmen in North-East In-
dia have discarded their tradi-
tional tribal customs to rebuild
their lives along the Mosaic
and other halachic precepts.
Fueling the Jewish upsurge is
the conviction that all of the
approximately two million
Chin-kuki tribals are descen-
dants of the tribe of Manasseh,
one of the ten lost tribes of
Israel. These Jews "want
desperately" to be allowed to
emigrate to Israel.
Mwu.i.w-1.
M*


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
No One Asks Hussein for Anything
By YEDIDYA ATLAS
Ever since the last break-up
between Jordan's King Hus-
sein and PLO leader Yasir
Arafat, Israel has once again
been inundated with calls for
her to demonstrate her good
faith in the peace process and
encourage Hussein to join it by
offering him inducements
(read: territory).
Oddly enough, no one ever
demands the same from Hus-
sein, that he show his good
faith in the peace process by
offering Israel inducements.
In fact, it seems to be forgot-
ten that it was Jordan that at-
tacked Israel in 1967, and not
the other way around. So, it
might be a bit more fair to lean
on the aggressor state, Jor-
dan, to make conciliatory
moves towards Israel.
WHAT TOO many Western
observers and policymakers
overlook is that historical
claims are the basis for the
ongoing conflict in this region.
Both Arab and Jew take
history seriously, and policies
are determined accordingly. If
this were not the case, the
Arabs would not take the pains
they do to discredit Israeli
claims to the Jewish historical
homeland.
But while the Jewish people
trace their origins and claims
to the Land of Israel back to
Abraham, Hussein's
antecedents in the area go
back only to the year 1921
when his grandfather Ab-
dullah was made emir of the
eastern part of the region.
The fact is that not only does
Jordan have no historical claim
to any territory held by Israel,
but Hussein would be hard-
pressed to prove the validity of
his own country's right to exist
on the area of land it currently
occupies (also known as "the
East Bank").
THAT BEING the case, the
Jordanian monarch has in-
credible diplomatic chutzpah to
lay claim to a region that even
some other Arab countries say
does not belong to him.
On June 30, 1920, British
Major General L.J. Bols,
military governor of Palestine,
relinquished his command to
Sir Herbert Samuel, the new
high commissioner. General
Bols formally issued a
"delivery note" to Sir Herbert
in which he had written the
following: "Handed over to Sir
Herbert Samuel, one
Palestine, complete."
"Complete" here referred
specifically to both sides of the
Jordan River, wherein was to
be established the Jewish na-
tional homeland. There was
not only international recogni-
tion (the League of Nations)
for this historical and biblical
reincarnation, but Arab accep-
tance of Jewish claims as well.
NONE OTHER than Hus-
sein's great uncle, the Emir
Faisal, called the Zionist
claims "moderate." He too
was referring to "one
Palestine, complete," i.e.: the
Land of Israel on both sides of
the Jordan.
It was only in 1921, that Ab-
dullah left liis home in the He-
jaz (today part of Saudi
Arabia), and invaded eastern
Palestine with a band of guer-
rillas either by pre-
arrangement or, at least, with
the connivance of the British.
On March 27, 1921, he met
with British Colonial
Secretary Winston Churchill
in Jerusalem.
There Abdullah was made an
emir, appointed to govern
eastern Palestine (78 percent
of the British Mandate for a
Jewish national homeland),
assigned two British advisers,
and awarded a substantial
No one ever
demands from
Hussein that he
show his good
faith in peace.
British subsidy. The then less
than 200,000 inhabitants of the
east bank were not consulted.
AT THE International
Zionist Congress in 1923,
there was a unanimous resolu-
tion protesting the high-
handed behavior of the British
and calling for Jewish settle-
ment on both sides of the Jor-
dan River. The resolution
signatories included the Revi-
sionists (Herut), Ahdut Avoda
(Labor), and Mapam.
In the same arbitrary man-
ner, in 1946, the British
created a country, called Tran-
sjordan, and made Abdullah its
king. In 1949, following the
capture and occupation of
Judea and Samaria by his
British-commanded Jordanian
Legion, Abdullah annexed the
territory and renamed his
country, the Hashemite
Kingdom of Jordan.
The annexation was
recognized by no country in
the world except for Ab-
dullah's British sponsor and
Pakistan. He was denounced
by his own Arab allies, and the
following year at the Arab
League Summit, a resolution
was presented jointly by Syria,
Lebanon, Egypt, and Saudi
Arabia to expel Jordan from
the Arab League for Ab-
KING HUSSEIN: Incredible diplomatic 'chutzpah.'
dullah's actions.
IN 1951, Abdullah was
assassinated by a Mufti-backed
gunman and succeeded by his
son Talal. When, in the same
year, the new king had to be
institutionalized in an insane
asylum he was succeeded by
his son, the 18-year-old Hus-
sein. This, then, is the royal
line and history of the
Hashemite Kingdom of
Jordan.
Yet despite all this, there are
those who adamantly insist
that it is Israel that should
coax Jordan to the peace table
and not the other way round.
Israel Scene
\
I
f


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Background Analysis
Critical Future For Unity Government
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The national unity coalition
government, held together by
the political needs of its main
components, may collapse in
the weeks or months ahead.
Pundits have been predic-
ting its downfall almost from
the day it was formed in 1984.
But it has weathered
numerous crises brought on by
the fierce ideological dif-
ferences between Labor and
Likud. It passed a crucial test
last October when Shimon
Peres handed over the office of
Premier to Yitzhak Shamir.
The rotation of power agree-
ment between the two was
meticulously observed and im-
plemented with hardly a
ripple.
But now some of the most
knowledgeable political
observers believe the end is
near because Shamir wants it
so.
They say the 71-year-old
Likud leader is convinced it is
now opportune to break the
uneasy partnership with Labor
and go to the electorate for a
new mandate. Shamir is said
to believe such a move will
enhance his personal political
fortunes and those of his par-
ty. He thinks he has the issue
to win an early election and
the power to retain the leader-
ship of Likud.
He is aware, these observers
say, that his present advan-
tage could disappear if he
waits too long for showdown.
The next statutory elections
are scheduled for late in 1988
and much could happen by
then to weaken his position.
Shamir's personal and
political stock were
significantly strengthened at
the Herut Party convention on
April 1. He was elected
without opposition to head the
movement. His most serious
challenger. Deputy Premier
and Housing Minister David
Levy, was outmaneuvered and
forced to drop any immediate
efforts to replace Shamir.
That could change, and,
from Shamir's standpoint the
time lapse between the con-
vention and the next elections
must be minimal.
Shamir and his Likud col-
leagues also believe that the
issue of an international con-
ference for Middle East peace
is an ideal issue on which to
fight an election. A conference
poses the possibility of trading
territory for peace treaties.
Likud prefers to go to the
electorate with a territorial
issue rather than submit to an
examination of Likud's
domestic economic record dur-
ing the years when it headed
the government.
While Peres continues to
press vigorously for an inter-
national conference with
specific conditions for Soviet
and Palestinian participation
Likud sees a growing body
of public opinion in favor of a
hardline position on the ad-
ministered territories and the
Palestinians.
In an election campaign,
Likud would pillory Peres for
allegedly seeking to "sell out"
to the Soviets and Palestinians
by countenancing their par-
:ipation in the peace process.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization factions which
met in Algiers earlier this
month played into Likud hands
by pronouncing the 1985 ac-
cord between PLO chief Yasir
Arafat and King Hussein of
Jordan null and void; and by
attempting to entice the ex-
tremist terrorist groups head-
ed by George Habash and Naif
Hawatmeh to re-align with the
PLO with which they broke
years ago.
In addition, Israel's economy
is relatively stable at this time,
which reduces the need for
Likud to defend its past
economic record. A Likud
Minister, Moshe Nissim, heads
the Finance Ministry and he
has proven popular with the
public. All of this could change
drastically by 1988.
Accordingly, Shamir has
taken steps to precipitate a
new crisis with Labor which
this time may well be carried
to its logical conclusion the
need of the unity government.
In recent weeks, the
Premier has launched a bitter
and relentless personal attack
on Peres who as Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister has been
actively seeking support
abroad for an international
peace conference.
When Peres visited Spain
four weeks ago for that pur-
pose, among others, Shamir
publicly expressed the wish
that he would "not succeed."
While Peres was abroad,
Shamir denounced the idea as
"crazy," a position that would
result in Israel's isolation and
threaten its survival.
"Defeatism" and "lunacy"
were the terms he used to
describe Peres. While the two
men have feuded publicly in
the past, neither ever used
such extreme language. Com-
ing from the usually taciturn
Shamir, they seemed to
observers part of a contrived
strategy rather than an un-
characteristic loss of temper.
"When Yitzhak Shamir, who
is generally polite and reserv-
ed, calls Shimon Peres crazy,
there are two possible explana-
tions," Haaretz political cor-
respondent Yoel Markus wrote
last week. "Either it was a slip
of the tongue or he is
deliberately seeking to bring
down the unity government
and trigger early elections. I
have good reason to believe it
was the latter ..."
The day that article ap-
peared, Shamir and Peres met
privately for the first time in
more than a month, to discuss
their public row over an inter-
national conference and the
stalemate over the appoint-
ment of the next Israeli Am-
bassador to Washington.
No sooner had the meeting
ended when aides of the two
leaders proclaimed there was
no breakthrough, no rap-
prochement. Each man re-
mained entrenched in his posi-
tion. Peres vowed to pursue
the conference option and
Shamir blasted it anew.
The Ambassadorial appoint-
ment remains in limbo while
the incumbent envoy, Meir
Rosenne, his tour of duty soon
to expire, packs his bags.
Labor Ministers rallied
around their leader, declaring
they would "not permit"
Peres' peace-seeking mission
to be sabotaged by Shamir.
Likud Cabinet ministers
caucused and issued their own
statement which echoed
Shamir's ringing denouncia-
tion of an international forum.
Israel, at the moment
therefore, is pursuing two
foreign policies, mutually ex-
clusive. The question remains
how long this anomaly can con-
tinue before the government
breaks down.
Shamir responding to
reporters' questions late last
month, would not deny that
this was a clear possibility,
though he called it the "worst
possibility."
A telephone poll of Labor
Ministers by Haaretz elicited
the unanimous opinion that
Shamir's remarks showed that
the unity government has
reached the end of the road
because it is no longer possible
for Peres and Shamir to work
together.
Education Minister Yitzhak
Navon, a Laborite, said
Shamir's attacks on Peres
created a grave crisis. Never-
theless, associates of Peres in-
sisted that the Foreign
Minister does not want to
precipitate a crisis. But, they
added, he could no longer ig-
nore Shamir's inflammatory
language and would soon take
"appropriate steps."
Unrelated to the personal
battle between Peres and
Shamir but likely to affect the
politcal futures of both, is the
scandal of the Jonathan
Pollard spy case. The involve-
ment of Israel's top political
echelons with the American
Jew caught spying on the U.S.
for Israel and sentenced to life
imprisonment is under in-
vestigation by two panels.
Simultaneous but completely
separate is the probe being
conducted by the special in-
telligence subcommitee of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, under the
joint chairmanship of Laborite
Abba Eban and Likud's Eliahu
Ben-Elissar. Both panels are
operating in camera. When
they present their reports,
possibly some time in May,
both Peres and Shamir could
be badly discredited. Both
served as Premier during
various stages of Pollard's
activities.
Both deny any prior
knowledge of the affair. Mean-
while, a flood of speculation
and rumor swept over the
political community late last
month at the prospect that
Peres and Defense Miniser
Yitzhak Rabin may be replaced
by younger men as a result of
the Pollard affair.
There is no shortage of new
blood and political ambition in
Labor Party ranks. For the
moment, future contenders for
party leadership remain loyal
and diffident. But at the same
time they indicate that their
time could be approaching.
One candidate, Histadrut
Secretry General Yisrael
Kessar, summed up the situa-
tion when he told reporters
recently. "I do not expect a
succession struggle at this
time. There is no reason for a
leadership contest now, so for
the present I am doing nothing
in that direction."
Other hopefuls include
Minister of Economic Coor-
dination Gad Yaacobi, Energy
Minister Moshe Shahal,
former Health Minister
Mordechai Gur who now heads
Solel Boneh, the Histadrut
construction company, and
Minister-Without-Portfolio
Ezeer Weizman who recently
merged his Yahad Party with
Labor.
Weizman told reporters that
he considered himself suitable
to lead the Labor Party, ad-
ding, however, only in the
post-Peres era.
MK in Miami
Israel Can't Afford Coalition Split
By ELLEN ANN STERN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Israel coalition govern-
ment is deeply divided over the
issue of an international peace
conference in the Mideast, but
Israel, unlike any other nation,
cannot afford "the luxury" of
living without a coalition
government, said Avidov
Cohen, a member of the Likud
Party and Deputy Speaker of
the Knesset.
Cohen was in Miami last
week before joining two other
Knesset members on a two-
day visit to Honduras followed
by attendance at the Inter-
parliamentary Conference in
Nicaragua.
THE TWO main factions of
the coalition, Likud and Labor,
have been divided over the
idea of an international peace
conference, which Cohen says
he totally opposes.
"On our part, we see such a
conference as an Arab excuse
to evade direct negotiations
and recognize Israel. We think
that sovereign state can never
allow its fate to be decided by
strangers," Cohen said.
The key areas that might
eventually be subject for
negotiation as the possible site
for an autonomous Palestinian
national entity are the West
Bank and Gaza strip also
known by their biblical names,
Judea and Samaria. That area
was recently the site of
violence when a Molotov
cocktail was thrown into the
Avidov Cohen
ment. On the other hand, the
government must use very
hard force in order to sustain
order. People who are caught
should be expelled from the
country."
Addressing the tension bet-
ween the coalition partners,
Cohen predicted that it would
remain united at least until
next year. "I think so, and I
hope so," he added.
And if there were to be an
early election, Cohen predicts
that the outcome would be the
same, another coalition with
Labor and Likud as the domi-
nant partners.
"THE AIM of the Arab peo-
ple is to expel the Jewish peo-
ple into the sea. We need the
Israeli people in a coalition to
overcome the difficulties of the
state the economy and
defense problems."
The issue of the peace con-
ference has come out in bitter
verbal barbs that party leaders
car of an Israeli family, killing have thrown at each other, but
it has not come to the Knesset
for a formal vote. "I think and
a pregnant woman.
"SOME OF the Jewish
residents of Judea-Samaria
tried to retaliate. I am against
that," Cohen said. "I don't
think they should take the law
into their own hands. They
should leave it to the govern-
hope it will be turned down,
Cohen said. "If there is disap-
proval, maybe this thing will
bring the election nearer."
Israel should enter direct
negotiations with its Arab
neighbors in the same way
Israel and Egypt negotiated a
peace treaty, Cohen said.
"I THINK (Jordan's King)
Hussein would like very much
to talk to us," Cohen said.
"He's afraid. Arab leaders are
afraid of suffering the same
fate Sadat did," Cohen said of
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat, who was assassinated.
"They've got to take the
courage Sadat had and talk
together with us without
preconditions."
Asked about relations with
the Soviet Union, Cohen said
they are not warming. "Nor-
mal relations are warm. Now,
there are no relations at all.
When they say they will
release 100,000 Jews, then I
will call it relations."
One of the issues that Cohen
said the Israel delegation will
try to bring up for a vote at the
Nicaraguan conference is the
topic of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
"BUT YOU know an inter-
national conference would in-
clude many countries opposed
to Israel," Cohen said. "These
include the Soviet Union. We
know beforehand it (the vote
at the Nicaragua conference)
won't pass, but we'll hope to
arouse public opinion. Israel
and Jews all over the world
will not forsake their brothers
and will not hold peace talks
until those who wish to leave
the Soviet Union can come
home. Jews don't emigrate,
they come home."
Cohen said other issues that
will be discussed during the
Nicaraguan conference are the
Iran-Iraq War, the elimination
of tariffs and other barriers,
and the contribution of
parliaments to the world for an
international peace
Continued on Following; P|fe


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
PLO Making Inroads
In Latin America
Shomron became a lieutenant general in
the process.
Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron (right) took over as
the Israel Defense Force Chief of Staff
from retiring Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy.
Levy Retires
Shomron Is Israel's New Chief of Staff
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Supreme com-
mand of the Israel Defense Force chang-
ed hands last month when retiring Chief
of Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy turned over
his pennant and insignia of rank to his
successor, Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron, who
was promptly promoted to Lt. Gen. by
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
BOTH SENIOR officers received per-
sonal congratulations from President
Chaim Herzog, Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and Rabin. Shomron was received by an
honor guard at IDF general headquarters
and went to his office to chair his first
meeting of the IDF high command.
Levy drove to his home in Kibbutz Beth
Alfa where he donned civilian clothes
after 33 years in uniform. His immediate
plans are not known. He expects to go to
the U.S. for advanced university studies.
Shomron, 50, now Israel's 13th Chief of
Staff, was born in Kibbutz Ashdod
Yaacov in the Jordan Valley and began
his military career in 1956 as a
paratrooper.
HE COMMANDED an armored divi-
sion in Sinai during the Six-Day War,
later served as commander of the
southern front and in numerous staff jobs,
rising to Deputy Chief of Staff before his
appointment early this year to supreme
commander.
He is best known to the Israeli public as
the planner of "Operation Jonathan," the
long-range rescue of hostages from
Entebbe airport in Uganda on July 4,
1976.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion's increasing ties with
Peru have become a source of
controversy within President
Alan Garcia's administration,
according to "Latin American
Report," published by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith
The ADL also reported that
the PLO and its supporters are
continuing efforts toward
estabishing an office in Argen-
tina and gaining increased
stature in other Latin
American countries.
In making the report public,
Abraham Foxman, ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Af-
fairs Division, noted that
Bolivia has just upgraded the
status of the PLO mission in
La Paz. Foxman said he had
sent a telex to President Vic-
tor Paz Estenssoro expressing
"profound concern."
The telex said that "permit-
ting the PLO to expand great-
ly the number of its agents and
granting them privileges or-
dinarily reserved for diplomats
... poses a grave threat to
personal safely, public order,
stability and ultimately to
democratic institutions."
"Latin American Report,"
published by ADL's Jarkow In-
stitute for Latin America, is
written by Rabbi Morton
Rosen thai, director of the
ADL's Latin American Affairs
Department, and Martin
Schwartz, assistant director.
It provides information on
issues and events in Latin
America affecting Jewish com-
munities in the region and the
State of Israel. The ADL
report gave the following ex-
amples of differences emerg-
ing within the Peruvian
government's ruling APRA
Party over relations with the
PLO.
Violence Continues Along Israel's Northern Border
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israel Defense Force soldiers
were killed in an ambush by
terrorist infiltrators in Upper
Galilee early Sunday morning
(April 19). The three terrorists
were killed shortly afterwards
by an IDF patrol.
The dead soldiers were iden-
tified as Lt. Yoav Sharon,
whose funeral was held in
Haifa later Sunday, and Sgt.
Assaf Alon. The incident cap-
ped a weekend of violence
along Israel's northern border.
On Saturday morning, a con-
Second-year medical student Stuart Varon has already tasted
the sweet smell of scientific success. While doing research at
the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, the
young American confirmed the curative powers of garlic. He
wanted to verify an observation cited in the Talmud: "Garlic
kills parasites in the bowels." With David Mirelman, Besen-
Brender Professor of Microbiology and Parasitology, Varon
showed that allicin, the pungent active principle in garlic, is a
potent killer of dysentery amoeba in laboratory cultures.
tingent of about 60 heavily
armed guerrillas of the Iran-
backed Shiite extremist Hez-
bullah attacked a position man-
ned by the IDF and the allied
South Lebanon Army (SLA)
near Kantara village in the
south Lebanon security zone
10 kilometers from the Israel
border.
At least 18 of the attackers
were killed in a pitched battle
and four IDF soldiers were
slightly wounded. The attack
was apparently well planned,
employing mortars,
macnineguns, rocket-propelled
grenades, rifles, hand
greanades and bazookas. IDF
infantrymen counter-attacked,
supported by tanks and
helicopter gun ships.
Helicopters later strafed the
area north of the Litani River
where the Hezbullah terr-
rorists fled.
The ambush 24 hours later
was by terrorists of Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat's mainstream El
Fatah who apparently were on
a mission to take Israelis
hostage in exchange for the
release of Palestinian
prisoners. They managed to
cut through the border securi-
ty fence between Manera and
Yiftach villages in the Galilee
panhandle during the night.
When the cut was discovered
at daybreak, IDF infantry and
helicopters began a search of
regions where many Israeli
civilians were spending the
Passover holiday. The IDF suf-
fered its fatalities when a
squad came under fire at short
range from a concealed posi-
tion. Another patrol stormed
the position, wiping out the
terrorist gang.
Weapons found on their
bodies included pistols, hand
grenades, shoulder-launched
missiles and battle gear, along
with food and water. Also
found were leaflets with the
Fatah emblem demanding the
release of security prisoners.
The gang is believed to have
come from Sidon in south
Lebanon and probably
sheltered in Lebanese villages
before they entered Israel.
Mai. Gen. Yossi Peled, com-
mander of the northern front,
said the presence of Syrian
trops in Sidon, in support of
Lebanon army units, put
pressure on the south Lebanon
security zone. Hezbullah guer-
rillas, denied freedom of move-
ment in the north, were focuss-
ing on the security zone which
is manned largely by the SLA,
he said.
Reports from Lebanon said
Israeli artillery bombarded 14
villages north of the security
zone, causing a number of
casualties and heavy damage
to property.
While President Garcia
has made statements suppor-
ting the PLO, the president of
the Chamber of Deputies, Fer-
nando Leon de Vivero, is
quoted as saying, during an
APRA delegation's visit to
Israel, that the statements "do
not speak for all sectors of the
APRA Party."
Senator Javier Valle
Riestra, the leader of the Peru-
vian delegation to the United
Nations Human Rights Com-
mission in Geneva, delivered a
strongly anti-Israel speech
urging PLO participation in an
internatonal Middle East
peace conference and Israeli
withdrawal to its 1948
borders.
Susequently, APRA Party
Secretary general Luis
Negreiros assured the Israeli
Ambassador to Peru that the
Senator's remarks did not
reflect the sentiments of the
party or of the government.
And in January, leading Peru-
vian officials visited Israel and
met with Israeli leaders.
The report said that
Nicaraguan President Daniel
Ortega expressed Sandinista
"solidarity and firm support
for the noble struggle of the
Palestinian people' in a letter
to PLO chief Yasir Arafat,
which was broadcast over
Nicaraguan radio.
In Argentina, according to
the ADL, Zehdi Terzi, the PLO
representatigve to the UN,
told reporters that the PLO is
trying "to establish ...
bilateral and diplomatic rela-
tions with Argentina." In an
article in La Prensa, Terzi,
reported that PLO represen-
tatives have had "secret con-
tacts" with the military,
government officials, and
"heads of subversive groups."
Continued on Page 19
MK In Miami
Continued from Preceding Page
conlerence.
On the subject of inflation,
Cohen said the percentage has
dropped from 600 percent to
about 22 percent a year.
"ONLY A coalition between
the two big parties could
achieve that. That's why I see
the importance of this coali-
tion. Plan for economic expan-
sion should come from two
parties. To split would lead to
unrest. We cannot afford the
luxury of one party as you
have in the United States and
other countries.
"I think also that the Jewish
people in Israel need the
Jewish people outside of Israel
the same way as the Jewish
people living outside need
Israel. We must cooperate
together for the future and
safety of our future."
Cohen said he doesn't refer
to the existence of Jews out-
side of Israel as living in Galut
or diaspora. "Everyone living
outside is doing it on their own
free will."
He added that Israel is
"sorry that we invest much of
our riches in defending our
country. We should be glad if
we could invest more in
developing Israel and in help-
ing the neighboring countries
to develop. This can be done
only after peac. in the area.
And I think the Jews living
outside Israel can help us to
achieve these goals and
hopes."


>
1 f
/
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Background Report
Did Meese Plot Linnas' Freedom?
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Jewish Congress accus-
ed Attorney General Edwin
Meese of protecting Nazi war
criminals and impeding justice
for Karl Linnas, the Nazi war
criminal who came within
hours last month of
receiving political asylum in
Panama and escaping deporta-
tion to the Soviet Union to face
war crimes charges.
While virtually the entire
Jewish community was
celebrating Passover, Meese
decided to deport Linnas to
Panama after 16 other coun-
tries had rejected asylum bids
for the man found guilty in
absentia in the Soviet Union of
executing men, women and
children in a Tartu, Estonia,
camp during the Holocaust.
ELAN STEINBERG, WJC
executive director, said WJC
officials learned Monday (April
13), durog the Seder, of
Meese's intentions from
government sources. The
sources said Panama had
agreed on April 10, five days
earlier, to grant Linnas
asylum, but Meese did not act
on the invitation until the
Passover holiday began,
Steinberg said. Panama
withdrew the offer for asylum
Wednesday afternoon.
Had news of Meese's intend-
ed action not leaked out,
Steinberg said Linnas would
now be "vacationing" in a
free, safe haven in Panama,
where he would have disap-
peared and escaped justice
permanently.
"This was not a coincidence.
It was an attempt to catch the
Jewish community at a time
when it could not react,"
Steinberg said.
"Meese seems to show a
greater sensitivity for Nazis
than he does for their vic-
tims," he said.
THE WJC officials im-
mediately contacted represen-
tatives of Panama in the U.S.
the Ambassador, the UN Am-
bassador and the Panamanian
Consul General in New York.
The WJC also informed the
Linnas Deported To Russia,
Justice Has 'Triumphed' WJC
NEW YORK Karl Linnas
faces almost certain execution
in the Soviet Union, where he
arrived Tuesday, April 21. Lin-
nas, an accused Nazi war
criminal, was deported Mon-
day to the Soviet Union.
The Supreme Court refused
to block Linnas' deportation,
and a last-minute Justice
Department attempt to have
Panama accept Linnas failed.
Outside the courthouse, Lin-
nas' daughter continued to say
that "I'm going to try
everything I can to save my
father. He's been wrongly
deported to die. Hitler's and
Stalin's ghosts are probably
having a nice toast right now. '
ATTORNEY GENERAL
Edwin Meese refused to meet
with Linnas' daughter and
with the family attorney,
Larry Schilling. He authorized
the deportation to proceed.
A friend of the Linnas fami-
ly, Rein Olvert, of Queens,
N.Y., was in the boarding area
followng Linnas' daughter's
plea that he witness the
departure.
"It seems they wanted to
punish him through any means
possible. That's wrong,"Olvert
said. "I'm not saying he
shouldn't go on trial. If he did
what they say he did, he should
be punished."
"THERE REALLY is no
punishment that could ade-
quately be given out for the
crimes he and the others like
him committed," said Elan
Steinberg, World Jewish Con-
gress Executive Director.
"Justice has at last triumphed
over evil."
Jewish community of Panama
of the decision. On Tuesday,
April 14, Eli Rosenbaum, WJC
general counsel, Menachem
Rosensaft, chairman of the In-
ternational Network of
Children of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors, and Brooklyn
District Attorney Elizabeth
Holtzman, who authored
legislation for the deportation
of Nazi war criminals, left New
York for Washington to meet
the Panamanian officials.
The Panamanian represen-
tatives said they were acting
out of humanitarian reasons
and were not aware of the
significance of the case,
Steinberg said.
"Some 12,000 people died in
the Tartu camp were Linnas
was the camp commander.
Witnesses have testified that
Linnas would round up women
and children in mass pits and
shoot them in the head. Linnas
has more blood on his hands
than any other Nazi war
criminal in the United
States,"Steinberg said. "The
Panamanians were fooled and
deceived by those attempting
to help these war criminals.
When they were alerted to the
nature oi this person, they
reversed their decision within
a matter of hours."
Early Wednesday, April 15,
the Panamanian Embassy in
Washington announced the
plans for deportation would be
delayed until the case could be
further studied. Later in the
day, the Consul General in
New York issued a second
statement saying Linnas' re-
quest for asylum had been
denied.
"The Government of the
Republic of Panama echoes the
preoccupation of important
sectors of the Hebrew com-
munity and the rest of the
world that, as well as our coun-
try and our Government, re-
ject and condemn the crimes
committed by fascism," the
statement said.
With this, Panama became
the 17th country to refuse Lin-
nas asylum. And barring a
decision by Meese to deport
Linnas to the scene of his
alleged crimes in the Soviet
Union, that search will likely
continue.
MEESE'S MISSING
signature on the deportation
paperwork is the only thing
blocking the execution of a
Supreme Court order to
deport Linnas to the Soviet
Union. All appeals, except one
which is still pending, to
reverse the deportation order
have been denied.
Meese's decision to deport
Linnas to Panama met with
dissension from Justice
Department officials who in-
cluded Neal Sher, head of the
Office of Special Investiga-
tions which seeks and pro-
secutes Nazi war criminals in
this country, according to
press reports.
Sher and others in the
Justice Department have pur-
sued Linnas' prosecution and
deportation for some nine
years. He faced nine tribunals
before he was stripped of his
U.S. citizenship for lying about
his past to immigration of-
ficials when he entered the
country in the 1950s. He was
then ordered to be deported to
the Soviet Union. Linnas is
currently imprisoned in lower
Manhattan in an Immigration
and Naturalization Service
(INS) prison.
MEESE'S HANDLING of
Linnas' case is not the only
Edwin Meese
war crimes case which has met
with scathing criticisms within
the Jewish community. Meese
has dragged his feet for almost
a year now on the Justice
Department's recommenda-
tion that Austrian President
Kurt Waldheim be barred
from the U.S. because of his
Nazi affiliations during World
War II.
Steinberg called Meese's ac-
tions a "shocking pattern" of
impairing justice for Nazi war
criminals. "Nazi war criminals
have a great protector in the
name of Attorney General Ed-
win Meese," Steinberg said.
Holocaust Exhibit Will
Coincide With Trial
Of War Criminal Barbie
PARIS (JTA) The
Jewish community of Lyon is
mounting an extensive exhibi-
tion on the Holocaust to coin-
cide with the trial of Nazi war
criminal Klaus Barbie, the
"butcher of Lyon," which is
scheduled to open there on
May 11.
According to the organizers,
the exhibition is intended to re-
mind the public, the media and
the jurors of the Nazi era and
to refute denials of the
Holocaust which Barbie's
lawyers, Jacques Verges, may
resort to in his arguments for
the defense.
Mayor Francisque Colomb of
Lyon announced Saturday that
he would cooperate fully with
the organizers. They will be
allowed to erect a temporary
shelter close to the court. Con-
ferences and seminars will be
organized in connection with
the exhibition. There will also
be recorded testimonies to the
Holocaust, including that of
Simone Veil, former President
of the Parliament of Europe,
who is an Auschwitz survivor.
Barbie, who was taken into
French custody after expul-
sion from Bolivia in February
1983, has been charged with
war crimes and crimes against
humanity. As Gestapo chief in
Lyon during the Nazi occupa-
tion, he was responsible for the
deportation of French Jews,
including children, to death
camps and the murder of a
French resistance leader.
Jackson: Blacks and Jews Share 'Experience Of Oppression'
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Blacks and Jews share the
"experience of oppression"
and should pursue a common
agenda of change, including
support for affirmative action,
the Rev. Jesse Jackson told
delegates of the Religious Ac-
tion Center of Reform Judaism
on the final day of their con-
ference here recently.
"We know that, on the floor
of Congress and in the voting
booth, Jews and Blacks vote
very much alike. In Congress,
black members and Jewish
members work closely
together, fighting for
economic opportunity, for ur-
ban aid and for an end to
apartheid in South Africa. In
polling places and in public opi-
nion booths, blacks and Jews
demonstrate similar commit-
ment to the values of social
justice, civi' nghts and human
dignity."
Jackson, who is expected to
run for President in 1988,
named affirmative action as
one of the issues on the com-
mon agenda. He said that
although affirmative action
had been ruled constitutional
by the Supreme Court, the
Reagan Administration "con-
tinues to wage war against it."
Jackson's address was on
domestic issues, but he was
questioned on his views about
Israel. On the issue of Israel
breaking American sanctions
against selling arms to South
Africa, Jackson said "the
blood of South Africans is on
the hands of those who sell
arms. Israel must choose
whether it will relate to the
United States or to South
Africa."
Jackson also said he sup-
ported an international con-
ference for peace in the Middle
East that would include "all
the players," adding: "If we
search for reasons not to
relate, we will find them. If we
search for reasons to relate,
we will find them."
He sidestepped a question
about his link to Black Muslim
leader Louis Farrakhan whose
sermons are filled with anti-
Semitic rhetoric. "We're mak-
ing a mistake to make one per-
son the center of the agenda.
There are weighty issues of
jobs, peace and justice. I hope
we'll put them in their proper
perspective," he said.
Jackson himself was under
heavy fire from the American
Jewish community during the
1984 Presidential campaign
when, while running for the
Democratic Party nomination,
he referred to Jews as
"Hymies" and to New York
City as "Hymietown." He
subsequently apologized for
both slurs.
Arafat Tears Up Agreement With Hussein
ALGIERS Yasir Arafat
has torn up an agreement with
Jordan's King Hussein calling
for a joint peace approach to
Israel. Announcement of the
move, which observers here
saw as an Arafat gesture to
the hard-liners attending a
Palestinian conference in the
Algerian capital, came from
Khalil Wazir, deputy com-
mander of the Palestine
Liberation Organization and a
close Arafat aide.
At the same time, Wazir em-
phasized that Arafat refused
to yield to a second hard-
liners' demand, which was for
the PLO to cut all ties with
Egypt, the only Arab nation to
have a peace agreement with
Israel.
"THE AMMAN (Jordan)
agreement has been cancel-
ed," stated Wazir at the same
time that the PLO's executive
committee was meeting here
to discuss other military and
political moves aimed at en-
ding the bloody four-year feud
in the guerrilla movement.
Declared Wazir: "The rift is
over. I would say that 95 per-
cent of all the points of dif-
ference have been resolved."
Wazir, who is also known as
Abu Jihad, added that
"Although the PLO is scrapp-
ing the Amman accord, we
equally insist on maintaining
our brotherly ties with
Jordan."
NAYEF HAWATMEH,
head of the Marxist
Democratic Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, said
earlier that Arafat had
abrogated the agreement with
King Hussein during a
meeting with the leaders of
eight Palestinian factions.
"This is our present to the
Palestinian people and the
friends of Palestinians across
the world," Hawatmeh
declared.

_


Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Behind The Headlines
Anti-Semitism In Holland Growing
By JEFF ROSEN
Canadian Jewish News
Staff Writer
I TORONTO (JTA) While
kany people view Holland as a
[w-abiding country, its Jewish
ppulation is experiencing a
jrowing wave of anti-
jmitism, says a founder of
iat country's principal
fganization which fights anti-
jmitism.
iNathan Wijnperle,
kcretary-treasurer of Stiba
foundation for the Fight
gainst anti-Semitism), said
iring a recent visit to Toron-
that while anti-Semitism in
>lland has always existed
klow the surface, it began to
jrface after the 1973 Yom
fppur war when people
irted to blame Jews for the
rab oil embargo. To fight
is, Stiba came into existence.
'People should be aware of
lhat is going on with
discriminaton and anti- Among its members are Nazi -
Semitism,'* said Wijnperle, 61, hunter Simon Wiesenthal,
past president of Hillel Lodge. Yehuda Bauer, a professor at
B'nai B'rith, the largest lodge Hebrew University, three rab-
in Holland. Wijnperle is a sur- bis and Dutch professors,
vivor of Vught, one of three Beginning with a successful
concentration camps set up by campaign to have the Dutch
the Germans in Holland during government enact anti-boycott
World War II. For the past six
years he has worked as a
volunteer in the economic
department of the Israel Em-
bassy in The Hague.
Wijnperle explained that
Stiba is a volunteer organiza-
tion that "gathers and records
anti-Semitic incidents, assists
in bringing about and improv-
ing legislation against
discrimination and deals with
complaints about anti-
Semitism through the political
and judicial systems"
It operates with a board of
six members including Win-
jpele, and is assisted by an ad-
visory board of 15 members.
legislation during the Arab oil
crisis in 1973, Stiba has since
gone on and taken people to
court and had anti-Semitic
books confiscated. Winjperle
added that many of these
books were published in
Canada.
As well as fighting anti-
Semitism in the Dutch media,
Winjperle said Stiba keeps an
eye on educational publica-
tions. When an anti-Semitic
one was found recently in the
school system Stiba protested
and it was withdrawn.
Winjperle said that probably
the most serious problems at
the moment in religious anti-
Semitism. He said there are
certain sects of Catholics and
Protestants preaching anti-
Semitism and publishing anti-
Semitic brochures.
When Lucas and Jenny
Goeree, a Dutch couple belong-
ing to a Protestant sect, were
found to be publishing
thousands of anti-Semitic
brochures. Stiba took them to
court and they were convicted.
As a result, all their posses-
sions were confiscated and
they were forbidden from con-
tinuing to publish the offen-
ding material.
However, Winjperle said,
the couple managed to obtain
funding from an unknown
source and began publishing
and distributing 300,000
brochures in February. Stiba
has again brought the matter
to the attention of the public
Organizations
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
A Rummage Sale will take place Sunday, May 3, hours 9
a.m.-3 p.m. at Century Corners Shopping Center,
Okeechobee and Haverhill Roads. Offered will be clothing,
appliances, jewelry, bric-a-brac and miscellaneous.
On Wednesday, May 6, the group will run a Chai lun-
cheon and card party at the Hyatt House, Non-members
welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
Lucerne Lodge No. 3132 announces an exciting and
stimulating Israel Independence Day program for their
May 3. Sunday meeting at the Finnish Social Club Hall
Lehto Lane (off Melaleuca between Military and Kirk) at
9:30 a.m.
Original Dramatic Presentation by Ruth Turk; "Israel
Update" by Sid Klein; Cantor Elliot Rosenblatt Singer
of Israeli Songs. Guitarist and Israeli-type breakfast.
Tel Aviv Unit No. 5354 will hold their next meeting on
Monday, May 4, at 1 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, 314
North "A" St., Lake Worth. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
will be the guest speaker.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter No. 1496 meets Tuesday, May 12, at
12:30 p.m. at the American Savings Bank. Goldie Berns-
tein will present a program of songs. Refreshments.
Coming events:
May 10 Mother's Day cruise on the "Viking Princess."
Luncheon and Card Party at the "Oriental Express."
June 2 Father's Day Weekend trip to Homossassa Spr-
ings, Fla. A bus leaves every Saturday and Thursday for
games at the Seminole Village.
HADASSAH
Florida Atlantic Region will hold their Second Annual
Conference at the Royce Hotel in West Palm Beach, on
May 3, 4, and 5. The American-Zionist Affairs Plenary ses-
sion on Sunday at 8 p.m. will feature Albert G. Effrat,
Florida Director of AIPAC, Janet (Janie) Zolot, National
Hadassah Board Conference Advisor. The Plenary session
is open to the general public.
A viva Chapter will meet on Monday, May 11 at noon at
the Free Me&odist Church on Dillman Road off Jog Road.
The Board will meet at 10:30 a.m. The installation of the
1987-1988 slate will be officiated by Helen Smith, Vice
President of Florida Atlantic Region. Speaker of the day
will be Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin of the Lake Worth Jewish
Center. Refreshments will be served. All are welcome. On
Wednesday, May 13, a luncheon and card party will be held
at the Fountains South Clubhouse at noon.
Lee Vaaail Chapter will hold their last meeting of this
season, on Tuesday, May 19, at Temple Beth Sholom 316
"A" St., Lake Worth, at 12:30 p.m.
The program for the day will be the installation of of-
ficers, followed by the Lee Vassil Singers. Refreshments
will be served. Husbands and friends are always welcome.
Shalom West Palm Beach has scheduled a four day
Memorial Day weekend, May 29 to June 1, Tarleton Hotel,
(kosher), Miami Beach. Transportation is included. For full
information, contact Lillian Schack, Helen Nussbaum, or
Florence Siegel.
Yovel Chapter will hold a lunch and Board Meeting at
Iva's Eatery, Haverhill and Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm
Beach, on Thursday, May 14, at 11:30 a.m.
Coming event:
Thursday, May 21 at noon. Lunch and Installation of Of-
ficers for 1987-88 will be held at the Sheraton Inn, Palm
Beach Lakes Blvd., West Palm Beach.
The presidium to be installed will be Bernice Fink, Sylvia
Diamond, and Libby Dodge, as well as members of the ex-
ecutive board. Claire Braun is the installing officer.
DEBOARH HOSPITAL FOUNDATION
Coming events:
May 13-15 Epcot and Disneyworld De Luxe Trip
Dinners and Shows.
May 24-27 Memorial Day weekend, four days, three
nights.
NA'AMAT USA
PALM BEACH COUNCIL
A wonderful function, culminating this year's activities,
was attended by almost 500 members and guests at the
Eighth Annual Donor Luncheon of Na'amat USA Palm
Beach Council (formerly Pioneer Women).
The scene was the grand ballroom of the PGA Sheraton
Resort in Palm Beach Gardens on April 8.
The guests on the dais were introduced by Bea
Goldsmith, chairperson. Hatikvah and Star Spangled Ban-
ner were led by Blossom Cooper. Invocation was given by
Florence Kaufman, co-chairperson. A delicious luncheon
followed opening ceremonies.
Greetings were extended by Rae Hoff, President of
Na'amat USA Palm Beach Council. Florence M. Kaufman
introduced our guest, Yosi Teitelbaum, Sheliach and Ex-
ecutive Director of Hebraic Center, who spoke on the im-
portance of the work done by Na'amat in Israel.
Sylvia Snyder, Southeast Area Fund Raising Vice Presi-
dent, presented awards to members raising $500 and over.
Entertainment by Shirlee Baron, a master show woman
provided "The Best of Times" and was enjoyed by all.
The program was concluded with a drawing for door
prises.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter will hold their next meeting on May 14,
at noon, at Anshei Sholom Entertainment by Flori and
Ralph Loir, singer and instrumentalists. All are welcome.
Wednesday, May 18 Honor Roll Luncheon, 11:30 s.m.,
at the PGA Sheraton.
Thursday, May 21 Installation Luncheon at 11:30 a.m.
at the Rod and Gun Club.
Aug. 30 Twelve day cruise to Alaska on the Sitmar
Line.
On Tuesday, May 12, Installation of Officers of the West
Palm Beach Chapter will be held at the Congregation An-
shei Sholom, C.V. at 12:30 p.m.
There will be a very special musical program featuring
Andrea Berelman, who sang with the Palm Beach Opera
and the Gilbert and Sullivan Society. She will be accom-
panied by Mrs. Dorothy Goldberg a member of the Palm
Beach Piano Quartet and Director of the Yiddish Culture
Choral Group. Refreshments will be served.
prosecutor.
Winjperle said the
brochures state that "the Jews
can principally blame
themselves for what happened
to them during the Holocaust.
They killed Christ and pro-
claimed that his blood comes
onto us and our children. And
that is exactly what has hap-
pened to the Jews all through
the centuries."
To make such prosecutions
easier to obtain, Wijnperle
said Stiba is working with the
Dutch justice department to
change the law dealing with
anti-Semitism. While Dutch
law currently prohibits
discrimination and anti-
Semitism, there must be proof
that an offender committed
the crime deliberately. This is
often difficult to prove and
Stiba would like such of-
fenders prosecuted without
having to prove intent.
This working relationship
with the justice department
exists throughout the Dutch
government, Winjperle said.
While the government
recognizes and supports Stiba,
he said budgetary restraints
prevent it from offering
financial support.
The Jewish community is
sympathetic to Stiba's cause,
but only a "handful" of local
Jews actually contribute.
There are about 20,000 Jews
presently in Holland, com-
pared to the 125,000 who lived
there prior to the Holocaust.
"We're living on the edge of
the impossible," Wijnperle
said regarding Stiba's finan-
cial condition.
As well as maintaining good
contacts with the Dutch
government, Wijnperle said
Stiba has close connections
with Israeli governemnt of-
ficials and a "very good rela-
tionship" with the World
Jewish Congress and the
Simon Wiesenthal Center.
For more information on
Stiba write to POB 2009, 3000
C A Rotterdam The
Netherlands.
Inroads
Continued from Page 17
The ADL's report also cited
indications of continuing Li-
byan ties with extremists in
the region. The Libyan-backed
Movement of International
Revolutionary Committees
paid homage to Colombian
terrorist Jairo de Jesus Calvo
Ocampo, alias "Ernesto Ro-
jas," who was killed February
22 by the secret police in
Bogota.
Among other developments
noted in the report were a
Costa Rican court's authoriza-
tion of the extradition to the
Soviet Union of accused Nazi
war criminal Bohdan Koziy to
stand trial, and a Brazilian
magazine article claiming that
the body exhumed from a Sao.
Paulo cemetery last year was
not, contrary to police and
forensic experts' claims, that
of notorious Auschwitz doctor
Josef Mengele.
Among positive
developments in the region
cited was the unanimous deci-
sion by te Uruguayan Senate
urging the government to de-
nounce the 1975 UN resolution
equating Zionism with racism
and "to begin the necessary
measures for a new resolution
which would abrogate ... this
unjust, anti-historic, United
Nations resolution."
4 -
I


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Yom Ha'Atzmaut
Continued from Page 3
twirlers, not soldiers and
weapons of war.
Although I was very im-
pressed and very proud, I was
also confused. Where were the
dancers demonstrating
Israel's rich cultural heritage?
For me, this little country was
a nation that had turned the
desert into a garden, that had
taught the world how to sing in
the face of death. Where was
the music? Where were the
costumes reflecting the color-
ful and texured diversity of
this land that had become a
refuge for Jews the world
over? All I saw was green
green uniforms, green tanks.
"You don't understand,"
Shlomo, my Israeli friend
said to me. "We don't rejoice
in war. These tanks grinding
up the pavement of our cities
don't give us joy. But they do
give us a lot of comfort. Think
about the mother who has
already lost one child, the hus-
band who wants to know that
his marriage will be forever.
Think about the little boy who
hopes to grow up. Why
shouldn't he have as many
possibilities as you do? Why
should he have to live with the
expectation that his future will
end when he reaches 18? These
machines are not our dreams
come true they are merely
an assurance that our dreams
can come true."
And then, in an instant, I
saw blue, and white. And just
where you would expect those
colors on a beautiful spring
day. High above me (moving at
a speed faster than amateur
photographers appreciate)
were three Phantom jets
screeching across the sky,
leaving behind tham a trail of
blue and white plumes that
soon blended into the blue sky
and white clouds. Not far
behind were six helicopters,
slowly and deliberately flying
in the formation of the Star of
David.
It was then that I
understood. Yom Ha'Atzmaut
is not a holiday of commemora-
tion. Yes, Israel remembers its
founders. And Israel has
festivals, singing and dancing,
fireworks and all the things
that go with Independence
Day celebrations. But for
Israel, Yom Ha'Atzmaut in
1973 as well as today is not
simply a rejoicing in the
declaration of 1948. It is no
more a celebration of the
events of 39 years ago than it
is a celebration of the events of
the past 39 days. And of the
days and months that lie
ahead.
If only we had known in May
of 1973. If only we had known
what lay in store. Five months
later, in October 1973,1 and
the whole world came to
know the fragility of the in-
dependence and freedom of
the State of Israel.
It seems to me that unless
we, the Jews who live outside
the land of Israel, can inden-
tify with and work to
alleviate the precariousness
of Israel's existence^ no
celebration of Yom Ha'Atz-
maut will be sufficient. Yom
Ha-Atzma-oot is an affirma-
tion of IsreaT's survival and
of our own.
Golda Meir wrote:
Fifty-four years ago,
together with other children of
my age, I stood on the steps of
a house in Kiev and watched
my father and other fathers
hammering planks across the
doors of our homes for fear of
pogroms that were expected in
our town. Then I did not
understand exactly what was
happening around us; all the
children were silent. The only
sound was the knocking of
hammers. We felt with the
deep instinct of children that
something dreadful and
serious was taking place As I
recall that day, I ask: If it has
been given in one lifetime to go
all the way from the sound of
that hammer in Kiev to life in
the State of Israel where,
though we have no complete
security, we have the
assurance that we are not at
the mercy of pogroms and
that, if anyone strikes at us,
we have the power to defend
children how much more can
a Jew ask?
Yom Ha'Atzmaut is an affir-
mation of Israel's survival
and of our own.
Yom Ha'Atzmaut is observ-
ed each year on the fifth of
Iyar, the Hebrew date that
corresponds to May 14, 1948,
the day on which Israel's in-
dependence was declared.
This year the celebration is
on Monday May 4.
Recently a Cocktail reception was held on
behalf of State of Israel Bonds/Temple
Emanu-El of Palm Beach. Dr. Richard
Lynn (third from left) accepted the coveted
Heritage Award on behalf of the con-
gregants of Temple Emanu-El. The
Heritage Award is presented to individuals
or groups which demonstrate a continuing
commitment to the economic survival to the
State of Israel through the purchase of
Israel Bonds. Special guest speaker for the
event was Israel's former Finance
Minister, Yoram Aridor (right), who spoke
to the gathering at the Hyatt Palm Beaches
about the current issues facing Israel and
the relationship between Israel and the
U.S. and the world. Co-Chairmen of the
event are (left to right) Irving Korn and
Jonas Barenholtz.
Three grade level spelling bees were held recently at the
Jewish Community Day School. The winners were, at the
Junior High School level, (left to right) second place. Beryl
Cohen, first place, Cynthia Simon, third place, Elissa Lord.
At the fourth/fifth grade level, were (left to right) first place,
Lisa Gordon, third place, Andrew Demers, second place,
Rebecca Klein.
Second/third grade level winners were (left to right) third
place, B.J. Rosen, first place, Rafi Cohen, fourth place, Mark
Glassman, second place, Rachel Needle.
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Many nursing (\
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We are Broward's only Kosher certified
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Our goal is to return our patients to their loved ones
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-
4


Full Text
Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, May 1, 1987
Background Analysis
Critical Future For Unity Government
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The national unity coalition
government, held together by
the political needs of its main
components, may collapse in
the weeks or months ahead.
Pundits have been predic-
ting its downfall almost from
the day it was formed in 1984.
But it has weathered
numerous crises brought on by
the fierce ideological dif-
ferences between Labor and
Likud. It passed a crucial test
last October when Shimon
Peres handed over the office of
Premier to Yitzhak Shamir.
The rotation of power agree-
ment between the two was
meticulously observed and im-
plemented with hardly a
ripple.
But now some of the most
knowledgeable political
observers believe the end is
near because Shamir wants it
so.
They say the 71-year-old
Likud leader is convinced it is
now opportune to break the
uneasy partnership with Labor
and go to the electorate for a
new mandate. Shamir is said
to believe such a move will
enhance his personal political
fortunes and those of his par-
ty. He thinks he has the issue
to win an early election and
the power to retain the leader-
ship of Likud.
He is aware, these observers
say, that his present advan-
tage could disappear if he
waits too long for showdown.
The next statutory elections
are scheduled for late in 1988
and much could happen by
then to weaken his position.
Shamir's personal and
political stock were
significantly strengthened at
the Herut Party convention on
April 1. He was elected
without opposition to head the
movement. His most serious
challenger. Deputy Premier
and Housing Minister David
Levy, was outmaneuvered and
forced to drop any immediate
efforts to replace Shamir.
That could change, and,
from Shamir's standpoint the
time lapse between the con-
vention and the next elections
must be minimal.
Shamir and his Likud col-
leagues also believe that the
issue of an international con-
ference for Middle East peace
is an ideal issue on which to
fight an election. A conference
poses the possibility of trading
territory for peace treaties.
Likud prefers to go to the
electorate with a territorial
issue rather than submit to an
examination of Likud's
domestic economic record dur-
ing the years when it headed
the government.
While Peres continues to
press vigorously for an inter-
national conference with
specific conditions for Soviet
and Palestinian participation
Likud sees a growing body
of public opinion in favor of a
hardline position on the ad-
ministered territories and the
Palestinians.
In an election campaign,
Likud would pillory Peres for
allegedly seeking to "sell out"
to the Soviets and Palestinians
by countenancing their par-
ticipation in the peace process.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization factions which
met in Algiers earlier this
month played into Likud hands
by pronouncing the 1985 ac-
cord between PLO chief Yasir
Arafat and King Hussein of
Jordan null and void; and by
attempting to entice the ex-
tremist terrorist groups head-
ed by George Habash and Naif
Hawatmeh to re-align with the
PLO with which they broke
years ago.
In addition, Israel's economy
is relatively stable at this time,
which reduces the need for
Likud to defend its past
economic record. A Likud
Minister, Moshe Nissim, heads
the Finance Ministry and he
has proven popular with the
public. All of this could change
drastically by 1988.
Accordingly, Shamir has
taken steps to precipitate a
new crisis with Labor which
this time may well be carried
to its logical conclusion the
need of the unity government.
In recent weeks, the
Premier has launched a bitter
and relentless personal attack
on Peres who as Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister has been
actively seeking support
abroad for an international
peace conference.
When Peres visited Spain
four weeks ago for that pur-
pose, among others, Shamir
publicly expressed the wish
that he would "not succeed."
While Peres was abroad,
Shamir denounced the idea as
"crazy," a position that would
result in Israel's isolation and
threaten its survival.
"Defeatism" and "lunacy"
were the terms he used to
describe Peres. While the two
men have feuded publicly in
the past, neither ever used
such extreme language. Com-
ing from the usually taciturn
Shamir, they seemed to
observers part of a contrived
strategy rather than an un-
characteristic loss of temper.
"When Yitzhak Shamir, who
is generally polite and reserv-
ed, calls Shimon Peres crazy,
there are two possible explana-
tions," Haaretz political cor-
respondent Yoel Markus wrote
last week. "Either it was a slip
of the tongue or he is
deliberately seeking to bring
down the unity government
and trigger early elections. I
have good reason to believe it
was the latter ..."
The day that article ap-
peared, Shamir and Peres met
privately for the first time in
more than a month, to discuss
their public row over an inter-
national conference and the
stalemate over the appoint-
ment of the next Israeli Am-
bassador to Washington.
No sooner had the meeting
ended when aides of the two
leaders proclaimed there was
no breakthrough, no rap-
prochement. Each man re-
mained entrenched in his posi-
tion. Peres vowed to pursue
the conference option and
Shamir blasted it anew.
The Ambassadorial appoint-
ment remains in limbo while
the incumbent envoy, Meir
Rosenne, his tour of duty soon
to expire, packs his bags.
Labor Ministers rallied
around their leader, declaring
they would "not permit"
Peres' peace-seeking mission
to be sabotaged by Shamir.
Likud Cabinet ministers
caucused and issued their own
statement which echoed
Shamir's ringing denomina-
tion of an international forum.
Israel, at the moment
therefore, is pursuing two
foreign policies, mutually ex-
clusive. The question remains
how long this anomaly can con-
tinue before the government
breaks down.
Shamir responding to
reporters' questions late last
month, would not deny that
this was a clear possibility,
though he called it the "worst
possibility."
A telephone poll of Labor
Ministers by Haaretz elicited
the unanimous opinion that
Shamir's remarks showed that
the unity government has
reached the end of the road
because it is no longer possible
for Peres and Shamir to work
together.
Education Minister Yitzhak
Navon, a Laborite, said
Shamir's attacks on Peres
created a grave crisis. Never-
theless, associates of Peres in-
sisted that the Foreign
Minister does not want to
precipitate a crisis. But, they
added, he could no longer ig-
nore Shamir's inflammatory
language and would soon take
"appropriate steps."
Unrelated to the personal
battle between Peres and
Shamir but likely to affect the
politcal futures of both, is the
scandal of the Jonathan
Pollard spy case. The involve-
ment of Israel's top political
echelons with the American
Jew caught spying on the U.S.
for Israel and sentenced to life
imprisonment is under in-
vestigation by two panels.
Simultaneous but completely
separate is the probe being
conducted by the special in-
telligence subcommitee of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, under the
joint chairmanship of Laborite
Abba Eban and Likud's Eliahu
Ben-Elissar. Both panels are
operating in camera. When
they present their reports,
possibly some time in May,
both Peres and Shamir could
be badly discredited. Both
served as Premier during
various stages of Pollard's
activities.
Both deny any prior
knowledge of the affair. Mean-
while, a flood of speculation
and rumor swept over the
political community late last
month at the prospect that
Peres and Defense Miniser
Yitzhak Rabin may be replaced
by younger men as a result of
the Pollard affair.
There is no shortage of new
blood and political ambition in
Labor Party ranks. For the
moment, future contenders for
party leadership remain loyal
and diffident. But at the same
time they indicate that their
time could be approaching.
One candidate, Histadrut
Secretry General Yisrael
Kessar, summed up the situa-
tion when he told reporters
recently. "I do not expect a
succession struggle at this
time. There is no reason for a
leadership contest now, so for
the present I am doing nothing
in that direction."
Other hopefuls include
Minister of Economic Coor-
dination Gad Yaacobi, Energy
Minister Moshe Shahal,
former Health Minister
Mordechai Gur who now heads
Solel Boneh, the Histadrut
construction company, and
Minister-Without-Portfolio
Ezeer Weizman who recently
merged his Yahad Party with
Labor.
Weizman told reporters that
he considered himself suitable
to lead the Labor Party, ad-
ding, however, only in the
post-Peres era.
MK in Miami
Israel Can't Afford Coalition Split
By ELLEN ANN STERN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
The Israel coalition govern-
ment is deeply divided over the
issue of an international peace
conference in the Mideast, but
Israel, unlike any other nation,
cannot afford "the luxury" of
living without a coalition
government, said Avidov
Cohen, a member of the Likud
Party and Deputy Speaker of
the Knesset.
Cohen was in Miami last
week before joining two other
Knesset members on a two-
day visit to Honduras followed
by attendance at the Inter-
parliamentary Conference in
Nicaragua.
THE TWO main factions of
the coalition, Likud and Labor,
have been divided over the
idea of an international peace
conference, which Cohen says
he totally opposes.
"On our part, we see such a
conference as an Arab excuse
to evade direct negotiations
and recognize Israel. We think
that sovereign state can never
allow its fate to be decided by
strangers," Cohen said.
The key areas that might
eventually be subject for
negotiation as the possible site
for an autonomous Palestinian
national entity are the West
Bank and Gaza strip also
known by their biblical names,
Judea and Samaria. That area
was recently the site of
violence when a Molotov
cocktail was thrown into the
Avidov Cohen
ment. On the other hand, the
government must use very
hard force in order to sustain
order. People who are caught
should be expelled from the
country."
Addressing the tension bet-
ween the coalition partners,
Cohen predicted that it would
remain united at least until
next year. "I think so, and I
hope so," he added.
And if there were to be an
early election, Cohen predicts
that the outcome would be the
same, another coalition with
Labor and Likud as the domi-
nant partners.
"THE AIM of the Arab peo-
neighbors in the same way
Israel and Egypt negotiated a
peace treaty, Cohen said.
"I THINK (Jordan's King)
Hussein would like very much
to talk to us," Cohen said.
"He's afraid. Arab leaders are
afraid of suffering the same
fate Sadat did," Cohen said of
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat, who was assassinated.
"They've got to take the
courage Sadat had and talk
together with us without
preconditions."
Asked about relations with
the Soviet Union, Cohen said
they are not warming. "Nor-
mal relations are warm. Now,
there are no relations at all.
When they say they will
release 100,000 Jews, then I
will call it relations."
One of the issues that Cohen
said the Israel delegation will
try to bring up for a vote at the
Nicaraguan conference is the
topic of Jews in the Soviet
Union.
"BUT YOU know an inter-
national conference would in-
clude many countries opposed
to Israel," Cohen said. "These
include the Soviet Union. We
know beforehand it (the vote
at the Nicaragua conference)
and
state the economy
defense problems."
The issue of the peace con-
ference has come out in bitter
verbal barbs that party leaders
car of an Israeli family, killing have thrown at each other, but
a pregnant woman.
"SOME OF the Jewish
residents of Judea-Samaria
tried to retaliate. I am against
that," Cohen said. "I don't
think they should take the law
into their own hands. They
should leave it to the govern-
Israeli people in a coalition to
overcome the difficulties of the
it has not come to the Knesset
for a formal vote. "I think and
hope it will be turned down,"
Cohen said. "If there is disap-
proval, maybe this thing will
bring the election nearer."
Israel should enter direct
negotiations with its Arab
arouse public opinion. Israel
and Jews all over the world
will not forsake their brothers
and will not hold peace talks
until those who wish to leave
the Soviet Union can come
home. Jews don't emigrate,
they come home."
Cohen said other issues that
will be discussed during the
Nicaraguan conference are the
Iran-Iraq War, the elimination
of tariffs and other barriers,
and the contribution of
parliaments to the world for an
international peace
Continued on Following Pajfe


*
Friday, May 1, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
PLO Making Inroads
In Latin America
Shomron became a lieutenant general in
the process.
Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron (right) took over as
the Israel Defense Force Chief of Staff
from retiring Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy.
Levy Retires
Shomron Is Israel's New Chief of Staff
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Supreme com-
mand of the Israel Defense Force chang-
ed hands last month when retiring Chief
of Staff Lt. Gen. Moshe Levy turned over
his pennant and insignia of rank to his
successor, Maj. Gen. Dan Shomron, who
was promptly promoted to Lt. Gen. by
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
BOTH SENIOR officers received per-
sonal congratulations from President
Chaim Herzog, Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and Rabin. Shomron was received by an
honor guard at IDF general headquarters
and went to his office to chair his first
meeting of the IDF high command.
Levy drove to his home in Kibbutz Beth
Alfa where he donned civilian clothes
after 33 years in uniform. His immediate
plans are not known. He expects to go to
the U.S. for advanced university studies.
Shomron, 50, now Israel's 13th Chief of
Staff, was born in Kibbutz Ashdod
Yaacov in the Jordan Valley and began
his military career in 1966 as a
paratrooper.
HE COMMANDED an armored divi-
sion in Sinai during the Six-Day War,
later served as commander of the
southern front and in numerous staff jobs,
rising to Deputy Chief of Staff before his
appointment early this year to supreme
commander.
He is best known to the Israeli public as
the planner of "Operation Jonathan," the
long-range rescue of hostages from
Entebbe airport in Uganda on July 4,
1976.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion's increasing ties with
Peru have become a source of
controversy within President
Alan Garcia's administration,
according to "Latin American
Report," published by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith
The ADL also reported that
the PLO and its supporters are
continuing efforts toward
estabishing an office in Argen-
tina and gaining increased
stature in other Latin
American countries.
In making the report public,
Abraham Foxman, ADL's
associate national director and
head of its International Af-
fairs Division, noted that
Bolivia has just upgraded the
status of the PLO mission in
La Paz. Foxman said he had
sent a telex to President Vic-
tor Paz Estenssoro expressing
"profound concern."
The telex said that "permit-
ting the PLO to expand great-
ly the number of its agents and
granting them privileges or-
dinarily reserved for diplomats
... poses a grave threat to
personal safely, public order,
stability and ultimately to
democratic institutions."
"Latin American Report,"
published by ADL's Jarkow In-
stitute for Latin America, is
written by Rabbi Morton
Rosenthal, director of the
ADL's Latin American Affairs
Department, and Martin
Schwartz, assistant director.
It provides information on
issues and events in Latin
America affecting Jewish com-
munities in the region and the
State of Israel. The ADL
report gave the following ex-
amples of differences emerg-
ing within the Peruvian
government's ruling APRA
Party over relations with the
PLO.
Violence Continues Along Israel's Northern Border
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israel Defense Force soldiers
were killed in an ambush by
terrorist infiltrators in Upper
Galilee early Sunday morning
(April 19). The three terrorists
were killed shortly afterwards
by an IDF patrol.
The dead soldiers were iden-
tified as Lt. Yoav Sharon,
whose funeral was held in
Haifa later Sunday, and Sgt.
Assaf Alon. The incident cap-
ped a weekend of violence
along Israel's northern border.
On Saturday morning, a con-
Second-year medical student Stuart Varon has already tasted
the sweet smell of scientific success. While doing research at
the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, the
young American confirmed the curative powers of garlic. He
wanted to verify an observation cited in the Talmud: "Garlic
kills parasites in the bowels." With David Mirelman, Besen-
Brender Professor of Microbiology and Parasitology, Varon
showed that allicin, the pungent active principle in garlic, is a
potent killer of dysentery amoeba in laboratory cultures.
tingent of about 60 heavily
armed guerrillas of the Iran-
backed Shiite extremist Hez-
bullah attacked a position man-
ned by the IDF and the allied
South Lebanon Army (SLA)
near Kantara village in the
south Lebanon security zone
10 kilometers from the Israel
border.
At least 18 of the attackers
were killed in a pitched battle
and four IDF soldiers were
slightly wounded. The attack
was apparently well planned,
employing mortars,
machineguns, rocket-propelled
grenades, rifles, hand
greanades and bazookas. IDF
infantrymen counter-attacked,
supported by tanks and
helicopter gunships.
Helicopters later strafed the
area north of the Litani River
where the Hezbullah terr-
rorists fled.
The ambush 24 hours later
was by terrorists of Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat's mainstream El
Fatah who apparently were on
a mission to take Israelis
hostage in exchange for the
release of Palestinian
prisoners. They managed to
cut through the border securi-
ty fence between Manera and
Yiftach villages in the Galilee
panhandle during the night.
When the cut was discovered
at daybreak, IDF infantry and
helicopters began a search of
regions where many Israeli
civilians were spending the
Passover holiday. The IDF suf-
fered its fatalities when a
squad came under fire at short
range from a concealed posi-
tion. Another patrol stormed
the position, wiping out the
terrorist gang.
Weapons found on their
bodies included pistols, hand
grenades, shoulder-launched
missiles and battle gear, along
with food and water. Also
found were leaflets with the
Fatah emblem demanding the
release of security prisoners.
The gang is believed to have
come from Sidon in south
Lebanon and probably
sheltered in Lebanese villages
before they entered Israel.
Mai. Gen. Yossi Peled, com-
mander of the northern front,
said the presence of Syrian
traps in Sidon, in support of
Lebanon army units, put
pressure on the south Lebanon
security zone. Hezbullah guer-
rillas, denied freedom of move-
ment in the north, were focuss-
ing on the security zone which
is manned largely by the SLA,
he said.
Reports from Lebanon said
Israeli artillery bombarded 14
villages north of the security
zone, causing a number of
casualties and heavy damage
to property.
While President Garcia
has made statements suppor-
ting the PLO, the president of
the Chamber of Deputies, Fer-
nando Leon de Vivero, is
quoted as saying, during an
APRA delegation's visit to
Israel, that the statements "do
not speak for all sectors of the
APRA Party."
Senator Javier Valle
Riestra, the leader of the Peru-
vian delegation to the United
Nations Human Rights Com-
mission in Geneva, delivered a
strongly anti-Israel speech
urging PLO participation in an
internatonal Middle East
peace conference and Israeli
withdrawal to its 1948
borders.
Susequently, APRA Party
Secretary general Luis
Negreiros assured the Israeli
Ambassador to Peru that the
Senator's remarks did not
reflect the sentiments of the
party or of the government.
And in January, leading Peru-
vian officials visited Israel and
met with Israeli leaders.
The report said that
Nicaraguan President Daniel
Ortega expressed Sandinista
"solidarity and firm support
for the noble struggle of the
Palestinian people' in a letter
to PLO chief Yasir Arafat,
which was broadcast over
Nicaraguan radio.
In Argentina, according to
the ADL, Zehdi Terzi, the PLO
representatigve to the UN,
told reporters that the PLO is
trying "to establish ...
bilateral and diplomatic rela-
tions with Argentina." In an
article in La Prensa, Terzi,
reported that PLO represen-
tatives have had "secret con-
tacts" with the military,
government officials, and
"heads of subversive groups."
Continued on Page 19
MK In Miami
Continued from Preceding Page
conference.
On the subject of inflation,
Cohen said the percentage has
dropped from 600 percent to
about 22 percent a year.
"ONLY A coalition between
the two big parties could
achieve that. That's why I see
the importance of this coali-
tion. Plan for economic expan-
sion should come from two
parties. To split would lead to
unrest. We cannot afford the
luxury of one party as you
have in the United States and
other countries.
"I think also that the Jewish
people in Israel need the
Jewish people outside of Israel
the same way as the Jewish
people living outside need
Israel. We must cooperate
together for the future and
safety of our future."
Cohen said he doesn't refer
to the existence of Jews out-
side of Israel as living in GaltU
or diaspora. "Everyone living
outside is doing it on their own
free will."
He added that Israel is
"sorry that we invest much of
our riches in defending our
country. We should be glad if
we could invest more in
developing Israel and in help-
ing the neighboring countries
to develop. This can be done
only after peac. in the area.
And I think the Jews living
outside Israel can help us to
achieve these goals and
hopes."


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