The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00071

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTY
""Jewish floridian
^^F ^^ ^^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13-NUMBER 14
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, APRIL 3,1987
PRICE 35 CENTS
f-4
'Heartening Development'
Emigration Of 400
Soviet Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two national Jewish organiza-
tions said last Wednesday they
were heartened by reports
from Moscow that 400 Jews
will have been allowed to leave
the Soviet Union by the end of
March, but stressed their
reservations over whether this
"welcome step" signified a
meaningful change of policy or
a gesture aimed at improving
the Soviet image.
Alan Pesky, chairman of the
Coalition to Free Soviet Jews,
noted that since prominent
refusenik Natan Sharansky
was freed from prison and
allowed to leave for Israel in
February 1986, there have
been a number of "heartening
developments," such as the
release from prison of Iosif
Begun and the exit permission
granted long-time refusenik
David Goldfarb.
Nevertheless, Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev "has been
able to reap a public relations
windfall while actually giving
very little in return,' Pesky
said. Ruth Popkin, national
president of Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization
of America, also hailed the
granting of exit visas to 400
Soviet Jews last month.
"We sincerely hope that this
action reflects a significant
change in the Soviet Union's
Continued on Page 23
Elie Wiesel To Address
Rare Joint Session Of
Florida Legislature
Federation Tallahassee day is
also planned for May 7.
Special VIP seating will be
arranged for Federation
leaders and community
members. "This historic event
will be one of the most exciting
and significant activities in re-
cent years," stated Barbra
Kaplan, Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County coor-
dinator for the Tallahassee
Mission.
Elie Wiesel
Nobel prize laureate Elie
Wiesel will address a rare
Joint Session of the Florida
House of Representatives,
Senate Cabinet, and Supreme
Court, on Thursday, May 7 at
11 a.m. in the House of
Representatives Chamber.
Wiesel is coming to
Tallahassee at the invitation of
Speaker Jon Mills and the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations. The annual
Inside
Update On Cherna
Goldort... page 4
Scholars-ln-Residence
For Young Leadership
Retreat Announced...
page 5
Update... Opinion By
Toby Wilk ... page 7
"This is a critical year in
terms of Federal and State
legislative changes which im-
pact on the ability of Federa-
tion and its beneficiary agen-
cies to continue to provide the
programs and services for our
Jewish community. This is a
golden opportunity for us as a
community to let our
legislators know our critical
needs and to discuss legislative
remedies which will remove
the barriers to providing for
these needs. Elie Wiesel, an in-
ternational figure, will help us
maximize our effors," Mrs.
Kaplan said.
A full day's program is being
planned to compliment Elie
Wiesel's address. Critical
issues of concern to the com-
munity will be discussed at a
Legislative Symposium in the
morning and afternoon of May
7. Participants will also have
an opportunity to meet in-
dividually with their respective
Representatives and Senators.
Thev are also invited to be the
Continued on Page 20
-
Super Sunday Heroes Raise $301,858
At the end of an exciting, successful com-
munity wide phonathon Mar. 22, Super
Sunday '87 Co-Chairman Bernie Kurit
displays a sign indicating that the goal of
$300,000 had been reached (and eventually
surpassed making the final total
$301,858.) The phonathon, which raised
funds for the 1987 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, was held at the Airport Hilton
and involved close to 300 volunteers. Terri
Kurit co-chaired the event. For additional
Super Sunday coverage, see pages 12-14.
Israeli-U.S. Spy Scandal Figure
Col. Aviem Sella Resigns
Col. Aviem Sella, the Israeli
Air Force Officer who was in-
dicted in the United States last
month as a conspirator in the
Jonathan Jay Pollard spy scan-
dal, resigned command of Tel
Nof Air Base, the country's se-
cond largest, Sunday, Mar. 29.
The action came 30 days
after the much-decorated pilot
was made Commander of the
Air Base in a move that
displeased the Reagan Ad-
ministration and raised doubts
in the United States over
Israel's sincerity in apologiz-
ing for the Pollard affair.
According to Sella, his sur-
prise decision was "personal
and independently made" and
based on "the deterioration in
Israel-U.S. relations and my
concern for the future of ties
between the two countries and
for relations with American
Jewry."
One U.S. government of-
ficial said in response to Sella's
announcement, "I don't think
it will be accepted in the
United States as an answer to
the issue. His resignation only
enhances the need to come up
Continued on Page 8
Deborah Schwarzberg (left), Marcia Shapiro (second from left), and Amy
Jonas (right), Co-Chairpersons of the "Dor Le Dor Generation to Genera-
tion" minimum commitment $365 Brunch given on behalf of the Women's
Division 1987 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County/United Jewish Ap-
peal Campaign, welcome guest speaker Alice Golembo, actress, Golda Meir s
grandniece, and consultant to the playwright of "Golda." The event, which
attracted over sixty women, was held recently at Governors Club. See pages
15-16 for additional photos.
Demographic Study Continues ... Please Stay On The Phone


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
The Nickman Years 1984-85
Looking Back
25 Years of Local
Jewish Federation History
1985
Myron Nickman serves as Federation President. Sheila
Engelstein serves her second year as Women's Division
President.
Men's and Women's Division Campaigns raise $6.6
million plus $500,000 raised for "Operation Moses."
Jewish Community Relations Council begins historic
dialogue with Catholic and black communities.
First $10,000 Major Gifts Campaign dinner held.
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center announces long
range plan.
Twenty-three young leaders from Palm Beach County
journey to Israel on National UJA Young Leadership
Mission.
Carter: Syria, Jordan
Ready To Talk Peace
I
I
1
3
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former President Jimmy
Carter arrived in Israel last
Thursday (March 26) saying he
was convinced that the leaders
of Syria and Jordan would join
direct peace talks with Israel
held within the framework of
an international peace
conference.
Meeting with Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres shortly after reaching
Jerusalem by the Allenby
Bridge from Jordan, Carter
said that President Hafez
Assad of Syria understood
that an international con-
ference was the next stage
toward direct negotiations.
He said that King Hussein of
Jordan wanted to advance the
peace process and held "flexi-
ble views," but was unable to
move forward in the absence
of an international forum. Ac-
cording to Carter, Assad
regards Jordan as "a leading
force in the peace process."
Carter said that in his own
view, Syria, too, has an impor-
tant role in the process.
Carter's visit to Israel, his
first since 1983 is the final leg
of a tour that took him to
Algeria, Egypt, Syria and Jor-
dan. The former President
stressed repeatedly here and
in the Arab capitals that his
visit was private and the views
he expressed were his own. He
made clear he is not represen-
ting the U.S.
He made several statements
in the course of his journey on
the need to include the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in an international
conference.
Carter's arrival in Israel
coincided with the eighth an-
niversary of the signing of the
Israel-Egyptian peace treaty
on March 26, 1979 at a White
House ceremony. The
signatories were then Israeli
Premier Menachem Begin and
the late President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt. Carter
engineered the treaty.
Carter asked for a meeting
with Begin, who has been liv-
ing in seclusion at his suburban
Jerusalem home since he
resigned from office in August
1983. According to Begin's
spokesman. Yecniel Kadishai,
the 73-year-old former
Premier said "that he can't see
Continued on Page 9
As
By LOUISE ROSS
"Operation Moses'
began its rescue of Ethiopian
Jewry in 1985 amidst official
secrecy, Jews throughout the
world began raising funds to
assist the resettlement of
these new immigrants in
Israel.
And in Palm Beach County,
under the administration of
Myron Nickman, local
members of the Jewish com-
munity responded generously
to the immediate need. From
parlor meetings, to Campaign
events, to the general com-
munity, the story was told
through first-hand accounts
and heart w arming
photographs of the new
immigrants.
Throughout this exciting
time, Mr. Nickman's strong
leadership inspired an out-
pouring of support. With his
General Campaign Chairman
Arnold Lampert, this com-
munity accepted the additional
responsibility for the resettle-
ment of Ethiopian Jews by
raising $550,000 above the
regular Campaign. "Our com-
munity pulled together and
once more displayed the unity
and depth of our commitment
to helping our fellow Jews in
need. Knowing that we were
able to contribute to saving a
vital segment of worldwide
Jewry, gave us impetus to do
our best," recalled Mr.
Nickman.
Having confronted a crisis
Myron Nickman (right) is joined by his General Campaign
Chairman Arnold Lampert (center) and Sy Fine, Chairman of
the North County Campaign, at a fund raising event.
facing the Jewish people with
decisive action, Mr. Nickman
then turned his energy to
strengthening all aspects of
Federation responsibility. A
Long Range Comprehensive
Planning Project was initiated
to study the Federation and its
relationship to the overall com-
munity. "Through this inten-
sive project, we were able to
institute policies, and concen-
trate on involving more
members of the community in
establishing a much more
responsive and viable Federa-
tion," stated Mr. Nickman.
Through the Community
Planning Process the Federa-
tion continued to study the
nature of the elderly and single
parent families. A Single
Parent Task Force was
established to respond to the
growing needs of single parent
families in this community.
Mr. Nickman continued the
special relationship between
this community and Hod
Hasharon, its Project Renewal
sister city. "As a result of our
participation in this program,
Continued on Page 17
ISRAEL, WITH THE WHOLE
FAMILY THIS YEAR
Discover your heritage together on a
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
FAMILY MISSION
JUNE 15-26,1987
The Family Mission Is The Richest Resource For Teaching Your Children
The Spirit And Challenge Of Israel And What It Means To The
Jewish People
Share With Your Children The Thrill Of Climbing
Masada, A Shabbat At The Western Wall
Visits To Kibbutzim And Israeli Military Bases
ni,^f,0rfaJditi0nal.information. intact Ronni Epstein,
Director of Communications, at the Federation office, 832-2120.


Friday. April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Leviton And Cahoon To Co-Chair Community Holocaust Observance
Community activists Elsie
Leviton and Reverend Pamela
Cahoon have been named to
co-chair the Community
Holocaust Observance to be
held on Sunday, April 26, 7:30
p.m., at Temple Israel, 1901
No. Flagler Drive, West Palm
Beach. The event, featuring
renowned Nazi hunter Beate
Klarsfeld as guest speaker,
coincides with Yom Hashoah,
Holocaust Memorial Day.
In making the announce-
ment, Dr. Helen Hoffman,
Chairman of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, said, "Elsie
and Pam, who head our
Holocaust Commission, are in-
volved and caring members of
our community who are
dedicated to keeping the
memory of the Holocaust alive,
insuring that it will not be
repeated. They are planning a
most meaningful Holocaust
observance."
Rev. Pamela Cahoon
Elsie Leviton is a past Chair-
man of the Community Rela-
tions Council and has sat on
Elsie Leviton
the Executive Committee of
the National Jewish Communi-
ty Relations Advisory Council.
She has served on the Jewish
Federation Board and current-
ly is a member of the Board of
Directors of Women's
Division.
Mrs. Leviton has chaired the
Temple Israel Library for over
25 years and is a past Presi-
dent of Hadassah and the
League of Women Voters.
Also active in the secular com-
munity, she has served on the
Planning and Zoning Board of
Palm Beach County and as
Chairman of the Palm Beach
County Board of Adjustments.
Rev. Pamela Cahoon is the
Executive Director of Chris-
tians Reaching Out To Society,
Inc. (CROS), an urban ministry
program established and spon-
sored by the United Methodist
Church. After graduating
from the Candler School of
Theology of Emory Universi-
ty, Rev. Cahoon served as the
associate pastor at St. Paul
United Methodist Church in
Jacksonville, Florida before
accepting her current position.
Rev. Cahoon serves on the
Community Action Council of
Palm Beach County and is a
past Chairman of the Council
on Child Abuse and Neglect,
Inc., which established the
Children's Place, a crisis
nursery for potentially abused
and neglected children.
According to Mrs. Leviton
and Rev. Cahoon,
"distinguished" members of
more than 30 organizations
comprise the Holocaust Com-
mission. In addition to their
work on behalf of the April 26
community observance, they
are bringing the message of
the Holocaust to private
schools, churches, and other
institutions throughout the
community. Comprising the
commission are Eve Baum,
Samuel Benoff, Harreen Ber-
Continued on Page 19
Midrasha Issues Forum
Bridges And Barriers To Communication Examined
The current series of
Midrasha-Judaica Issues
Forums are designed to pre-
sent information concerning
important issues that face
teens and their families and to
provide an environment in
which open, frank discussions
can take place. "In a world full
of pressures and problems, it is
important for us all to take
some time to talk and listen to
one another," states Dean
Rosenbach, Chairman of the
Midrasha Committee of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
To help teens learn how to
open the lines of communica-
tion and better understand one
another, the next Issues
Forum will deal with "Bridges
And Barriers To Communica-
tions: How Can We Unders-
tand Each Other Better." It
will be held on Wednesday,
April 8, 8:15 p.m., at the
Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Ave.,
West Palm Beach.
The program is co-sponsored
by the Flagler Evening
Chapter of the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women and the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service. Sue Benilous, Vice
President for Community Ser-
vice of^he Flagler Evening
Section, noted that part of the
NC JW philosophy is to initiate
programs which fill a need in
the community. "We feel that
the lack of communication bet-
ween teens and parents is a big
problem. We are very excited
to be focusing on this issue for
our first community service
project at Midrasha as it is a
springboard to discussion of
other topics," she said.
NCJW has worked closely
with Planned Parenthood to
develop this outreach program
which NCJW will be taking to
other groups after this in-
augural presentation. Kitty
Clemens, Director of Educa-
tion for Planned Parenthood,
will discuss positive corn-
Alexander Gruber (right), Chairman of the Endowment Pro-
gram of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, was
presented the 1986 Council of Jewish Federation's Endow-
ment Achievement Award at the March Board of Directors
meeting of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County by
President Erwin H. Blonder. The award, presented in
recognition of creative and outstanding leadership to the En-
dowment Program of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, is "testimony to Alex's dedication and concern for
the future of our community and Jewry worldwide", stated
Mr. Blonder.
munication skills preceded by
a short role play by Sue
Benilous and Stephanie Fisch.
Judge Melanie Jacobson, a
member of the Flagler Even-
ing Session, will serve as
Chairperson of the evening
and moderator of a panel
discussion. The discussion will
focus on what encourages and
discourages communication,
what questions are most dif-
ficult to discuss with one
another, whom do you turn to
when you really need someone
to talk to, and much more.
Comprising the panel will be
Continued on Page 22-
THE ENDOWMENT FUND
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Letter of Intent
We have had some welcome response from the previous week's article regarding
LETTER OF INTENT. Some of the key questions that have been asked and the answers
are listed below for your information.
Some important answers about your Letter of Intent:
WHAT IS A LETTER OF INTENT?
A letter of Intent indicates your willingness to consider a bequest or other form
of endowment to the JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY.
IF I SIGN THE LETTER, AM I LEGALLY BOUND IN ANY WAY?
No. The letter of Intent is not a legal document. Your signature merely indicates
your desire to participate in the Endowment Fund Program.
THEN WHY SHOULD I SIGN A LETTER OF INTENT?
Because you believe in endowing the Jewish community so that it will always be
able to deal with future emergencies and changing needs.
I CONTRIBUTE TO THE ANNUAL UNITED JEWISH APPEAL-JEWISH FEDERATION
CAMPAIGN. WHY SHOULD I ALSO MAKE A GIFT TOTHE ENDOWMENT FUND?
Because both gifts are important to the survival of our Jewish people. The Annual
Campaign supports daily needs in our community and in Israel, and the Endowment
Fund provides for special programs, emergencies, and the continuity of services
for the benefit of future generations.
ARE THERE STILL TAX ADVANTAGES IN MAKING A GIFT (AFTER TAX REFORM '86)?
Yes. Consult your attorney or accountant, or call the Endowment Fund Office for
more information.
CAN I SELECT THE FORM OF MY GIFT?
Yes. Your gift can be an immediate donation, or by will, or by life insurance, or
through a variety of charitable arrangements. Some forms may even provide lifetime
income for you.
I AM NOT ABLE TO LEAVE A LARGE GIFT TO THE ENDOWMENT FUND. SHALL I SIGN
A LETTER OF INTENT?
Yes. Your gift in any amount is meaningful and helpful.
"I did not find the world desolate when I entered it, and as
my fathers planted for me, so do I plant for my children."
Talmud Ta'anit23A
501 South r'*qler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm Beach, Florida 33401
Telephone: (305) 832-2120



Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987

Update On Cherna Goldort
Attracting World Attention To Her Plight
By LOUISE ROSS
Eleven years ago Galina
Nabati felt that she had done
everything she could to help
her mother, Cherna Goldort,
get out of the Soviet Union. A
resident of Israel, Mrs. Nabati
had not given up hope of ever
seeing her mother again, but
did not know what else could
be done to help her.
Today, renewed efforts on
Cherna's behalf have refueled
Mrs. Nabati's optimism. This
new activity began as a result
of Cherna's being twinned as
an Adult Bat Mitzvah with
Sandra Goldberg, a resident of
Palm Beach. Mrs. Goldberg
had been active in working for
Soviet Jewry and this symbolic
gesture was a prominent part
of her special occasion.
Her formal efforts to help
Cherna were started,
however, when Mrs. Goldberg
visited Cherna's daughters
during a trip to Israel. After
being apprised of Cherna's
plight and sensing Mrs.
Nabati's desperation, Mrs.
Goldberg promised her that
she would help. Since then, it
has been a full time job for
Mrs. Goldberg, "a labor of
love." And Mrs. Nabati, who
thought no more could be done
for her mother, has renewed
her efforts. "Galina is working
hard on her mother's behalf.
She knows what we are doing
in this community. This has
rekindled her spirit. She has
started to do so much it's
just fantastic," Mrs. Goldberg
said.
Cherna Goldort along with
Yuli Edelshtein have been
adopted as community
refuseniks by the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County through its Soviet
Jewry Task Force. Articles
about Cherna Goldort have ap-
peared in the local press and
her story has been highlighted
at the annual Soviet Jewry
Rally held in December. At the
Children's Plea For Soviet
Jewry during the same month,
Congressman Tom Lewis (R,
FL) talked on the telephone to
Cherna in the Soviet Union.
Subsequently, he delivered an
appeal on her behalf on the
floor of the United States
House of Representatives and
has distributed postcards to
his colleagues requesting
positive action for Cherna to
be sent to officials in the
Soviet Union.
Mrs. Goldberg keeps up with
Galina's activities through cor-
respondence and occasional
visits. When she learned that
an international conference
Sandra Goldberg (fourth from left) helps facilitate a phone
call to Cherna Goldort from members of this community. Par-
ticipating in the telephone session at the Children's Plea For
Soviet Jewry are (left to right) Nathan Kosowski, Dr. Elliot
Schwartz, and Congressman Tom Lewis,
.
Galina Nabati meets with Elie Weisel in Lon-
don to enlist his support on behalf of her
mother, Cherna Goldort.
Sist January to review the
elsinki Accords (part of
which guarantees freedom of
movement of citizens and
freedom of religion), she realiz-
ed that this would be a golden
opportunity for Galina to talk
to key people who could help
her mother. The signatories,
including the Soviet Union,
met to evaluate the progress
each country had made to date
in upholding human rights.
Having brought this to the
attention of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, a special fund was
created by the generosity of
several local residents to send
Mrs. Nabati to Vienna. The
following people made this trip
possible: Shirlee Blonder,
Marilyn Cohen, Dorothy Col-
bert, Sandra Goldberg,
Marilyn Katz, Audrey Lar-
man, Lee Mazer, Gloria
Phillips, and Corinne Ribakoff.
In Vienna Mrs. Nabati met
with the American delegation
who already knew about her
through prior contact by peo-
ple here to assure her
welcome. She had talks with
Warren Zimmerman, the
American ambassador to the
Helsinki review meeting;
although she was not able to
meet personally with the
Soviet delegation, they pro-
mised to give her letter to
Mikhail Gorbachev and
members of the Politburo; she
received a letter from a jour-
nalist in Norway telling her
that he had published an arti-
cle about her mother and ask-
ing what else he could do; she
distributed 1,000 postcards
about her mother; and met
with numerous other officials
and journalists.
was to be held in Vienna this prior to her trip to Vienna,
the
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ol Palm Beach County
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Mrs. Nabati stopped in London
to consult with "London 35," a
human rights group. She
spoke with many journalists
and others in position to help
her. After talking with
historian and journalist Martin
Gilbert, he decided to write an
article about Cherna Goldort
which was originally published
in The Jewish Chronicle in
England and subsequently has
been reprinted in many other
newspapers. (See reprint of
the article on this page.)
While in London Mrs. Nabati
had the opportunity to meet
with a representative of
Margaret Thatcher's Conser-
vative party who organizes her
official trips and meetings.
Mrs. Thatcher went to the
Soviet Union late last month
and was expected to mention
Cherna's plight (along with a
list of other refuseniks) in talks
with Soviet officials.
Not one to be stopped in her
efforts on account of family
illness which kept her home,
Mrs. Nabati sent her sister,
Irina Zeitlin, to attend the
Italian Radical Party Forum to
which Mrs. Nabati had been in-
vited. "I think that my sister
will find another occasion and
another public stage during
this meeting to speak and
broadcast information about
our mother's case, especially
as the Radical Party organized
demonstrations through the
whole of Europe a few months
ago, and agreed then to take
my mother s name among the
four token cases they held as
examples during those
demonstrations," wrote Mrs.
Nabati to Mrs. Goldberg.
Mrs. Goldberg is relentless
in her quest to pressure the
Soviet Union into letting Cher-
na Goldort emigrate to Israel.
She is now involved in forming
an International Committee
for the Freedom of Cherna
Goldort. Mrs. Goldberg has
enlisted the help of former
U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations Jeane
Kirkpatrick who is a member
of the committee and has
agreed to contact members of
Congress to encourage them
to join.
Mrs. Goldberg noted that
people in Palm Beach County
could also help in a very
significant way. "I would like
to see people involved in
writing letters on Cherna's
behalf. (See Addresses page
22). It's- very important
because of what is happening
now. Russia has made new
rules for immigration but
those who have tried for years
to leave are still being turned
down, claiming that they have
state secrets. Just because
there is a new law doesn't
mean they are letting them
out. We have to keep up the
pressure," Mrs. Goldberg said.
Cherna's daughter, Galina, holds a photo of her mother dur-
ing a meeting in England in January.
Senator Edward Kennedy of
Massachusetts is asked by
Galina to help secure her
mother's release from the
Soviet Union.
Trapped In Siberia
f ... April 8, 1987
Vomme 13
4 NISAN 5747
Number 14
By MARTIN GILBERT
The city of Novosibirsk lies
four hours flying time east of
Moscow, in the heart of
Siberia. Twelve years ago
news reached the West of
several Jewish families there
who had sought, and had been
refused, their exit visas. One
of these refuseniks, Moshe
Soifer, first applied to leave 10
years ago. Permission was
never granted. Sue months
ago, he died. Only after his
death was his wife allowed to
leave.
Another of the Novosibirsk
refuseniks, Emanuel
Fainberg, was only given per-
mission to leave after his
daughter, a teenager, had died
of asthma. A third family, the
Poltinnikovs, were so depress-
ed by never getting permission
to leave, that mother and
daughter both committed
suicide. "Only permission
could have saved the situa-
tion," Natan Sharansky, then
in labour camp, wrote to his
mother when he heard the
news "but," he added, "it
came too late."
A fourth Novosibirsk family
which fought for their right to
leave was that of Cherna
Goldort. In 1975 she was refus-
ed permission to leave for
Israel on the grounds that she
had been involved in secret
work. This was not so. That
same year, her eldest daughter
Irina was allowed to go to
Israel, where she has lived
ever since.
Cherna and her daughter,
Galina, trapped in Siberia,
began to study Hebrew: on a
rare visit to Moscow, Cherna
met Ilya Essas, one of the
most active young Hebrew
Continued on Page 22


r.

Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, April 5,9 a.m. WPTV Channel 5 -
with host Barbara Gordon Green.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, April 5, 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340
AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, April 5, 6 a.m. WPEC Channel 12
(8:30 a.m. WFLX TV 29) with host Richard Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, April 9, 1:15
p.m. WLIZ 1340 AM A summary of news and commen-
tary on contemporary issues.
NEXT YEAR IN JERUSALEM Monday, April 6,
10:30 p.m. WPBT Channel 2 This special explains the
significance of Passover.
PASSOVER Wednesday, April 8, 10:30 p.m. WPBT
Channel 2 Ed Asner narrates this program describing the
historical basis and present-day practice of Passover.
'Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
April 4
Jewish Community Day School dinner dance 7:30 p.m.
April 5
Jewish Federation Rabbinic Campaign Event 5 6:30
p.m. Jewish Federation Jewish Education Program
at Temple Israel -10 a.m. Jewish Community Campus
Meeting -10 -12 noon Jewish Community Center "Dad-
dy and Me" Hadassah Florida Atlantic Region Myrtle
Wreath Function Temple Beth El Norman Brody Con-
cert Jewish War Veterans No. 501 -.9:30 a.m.
April 6 '
Jewish Community Day School board 7:45 p.m. Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m.
Women's American ORT Lakes of Poinciana 12:30 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit board 10 a.m. Women's
American ORT Royal board regular meeting 12:30 p.m.
Brandeis University Women Palm Beach West 12:30
p.m. Hadassah Tikvah board 1 p.m. Hadassah -
A viva board -10:30 regular meeting noon Hadassah -
West Boynton 12:30 p.m. Na'Amat USA Council -
donor luncheon and Hyatt Hotel noon Women's
American ORT Mid Palm board -1 p.m. Temple Judea -
Board of Trustees Jewish Federation Young Adult
Division 7 p.m.
April 7
Jewish Federation Community Planning Meeting 4
p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Century Village -10 a.m.
Hadassah Henrietta Szold -1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Ohav board -1 p.m. Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood -
board -10:30 a.m. Jewish Federation Educator* Coun-
cil Meeting at Jewish Community Day School noon
Temple Beth Torah board 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women -
Shalom board 9:30 a.m.
April 8
Jewish Federation Women's Division Executive Com-
mittee -10 a.m. and Board Meeting noon B'nai B'rith
Women Olam board 10 a.m. Lake Worth Jewish
Center Sisterhood 12:30 p.m. Jewish Community
Center Sports Banquet B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit 7:30
p.m. Women's American ORT Lake Worth West board
- 9:30 a.m. Hadassah Shalom board Brandeis Univer-
sity Women Palm Beach West board 10 a.m. B'nai
B'rith No. 3196 board 7 p.m. Women's American ORT -
No. Palm Beach County Region executive committee
Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven -1 p.m. B'nai B'rith
No. 3046 8 p.m. Hadassah West Boynton board 9:30
a.m. Temple Judea Sisterhood board Na'Amat USA -
Palm Beach County donor luncheon 11:30 a.m.
April 9
Women's American ORT Haverhill board 1 p.m.
American Jewish Congress -12:30 p.m. Hadassah Aliva
- donor luncheon at The Breakers Women's League for
Israel 1 p.m. Na'Amat USA Council membership
workshop Jewish Community Campus Meeting 7 p.m.
For information contact the Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
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Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Scholars-In-Residence Announced For
Florida Region Young Leadership Retreat
Howard Stone, who has
spent most of his adult life in
the "historic adventure" of
saving Jewish lives and
rebuilding the Jewish
homeland, and Rabbi Daniel
Allen, Director of the United
Jewish Appeal Young Leader-
ship Cabinet, will be the
scholars-in-residence for the
upcoming Florida Region
Young Leadership Retreat.
The announcement was
made by Sandi Heilbron and
Judge Robert Gross, Co-
Chairmen of the Young
Leadership Retreat Commit-
tee of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, who
noted that the week-end
retreat will be held May 1-3 at
the Hyatt Palm Beaches, West
Palm Beach.
In making the announce-
ment, Ms. Heilbron said, "We
are looking forward to a most
rewarding and fun-filled week-
end featuring our dynamic
scholars-in-residence. Howard
Stone is one of the most ex-
citing and energetic speakers
in the Jewish world who cur-
rently is serving as a leader in
'Operation Independence,' an
effort aimed at strengthening
Israel's economy."
Judge Gross continued, say-
ing, "Danny Allen is an elo-
quent speaker who will share
with us his experiences in the
field of young leadership. Our
young adults will be inspired
by these two outstanding
leaders."
Howard Stone joined UJA in
1971 after serving as a consul-
tant to the organization for
several years. In his first
assignment as National Young
Leadership Director, he was
instrumental in developing a
new generation of Jewish
leadership in communities
throughout the country. He
went on to direct the Overseas
Program for UJA.
Mr. Stone lived in Israel for
several years, as a member of
a kibbutz, and later in
Jerusalem as an advisor to the
Ministry of Health. A gifted
The Jewish
Community Center
of the
Palm Beaches, Inc.
is proud to
present
its 1997
BEST Of THE WEST
adventure through the
South, Southwest,
Pacific Coast
and in-between
For further information
call 689-7700
Howard Stone
writer, his short stories,
poetry and articles have ap-
peared in leading publications
around the world.
Rabbi Daniel Allen is a
former Director of B'nai B'rith
Hillel at Michigan State
University and in Atlanta,
Georgia. Prior to that he serv-
ed as a pulpit rabbi in Sioux Ci-
ty, Iowa. He is a member of
the Rabbinic Assembly and the
UJA Rabbinic Cabinet. He has
served as a consultant to the
Israel Foreign Ministry.
Young adults (20's-40's)
throughout the community are
invited to attend the retreat.
Special programming will be
offered for children ages
kindergarten and above. Since
the retreat is being held local-
ly, participants will have the
option of spending the entire
week-end at the Hyatt at a dis-
counted rate or choosing in-
dividual programs to attend.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Leadership
Development Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Soviet Documents On Nazi War
Criminals Said To Be Valid
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Repeatedly in the cases of
alleged Nazi war criminal John
Demjanjuk, in Israel, and ad-
mitted Nazi Karl Linnas, in the
United States, voices have
been raised against the use of
wartime documents provided
by the Soviets which has been
challenged and denounced by
those who say the Soviets can-
not be trusted to provide
truthful evidence.
Apprehension about such
usage was questioned by Mar-
tin Mendelsohn, a Washington
attorney who serves as counsel
to Simon Wiesenthal in Vien-
na, as well as to the Los
Angeles-based Wiesenthal
Center.
Mendelsohn, addressing the
Jewish Community Relations
Council Holocaust Commis-
sion, said that Linnas who
as of this writing still remains
in the U.S. despite court
orders to deport him "tried
to raise a smokescreen that
somehow his conviction in the
U.S. courts was a result of
Soviet evidence. While some
Soviet evidence and Soviet
material was used in preparing
U.S. evidence, in fact, there's
very little of that."
IN THE Linnas case,
Mendelsohn said that
"evidence was used which
came in part from the Soviet
Union and in part from other
places in the world. But all of
that evidence was presented to
the court under existing U.S.
federal rules of evidence, and
was examined by the U.S.
district court judge according
to those rules and found to be
valid under those rules," and
admitted as such.
Linnas and his lawyers, said
Mendelsohn, did not rebut the
evidence despite being "given
Readers
Write
Kudos To
The Levys
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
When I read the newspaper
these days, it leaves me with a
let-down feeling, Trouble in
the Middle East, especially in
Israel, PLO, Lebanon, Taba,
etc., etc. On the homefront,
drugs, killings, rape, murders,
etc., etc.
How refreshing was the
week-end of March 20 when I
read in the Floridian that Ir-
win and Jeanne Levy made a
$1 million gift to the Jewish
Community Campus for the
betterment of its local
populace.
Their record in providing
better housing and education
in areas of Israel where it
never existed, is well known.
The Levy's practice "Yes I
am my brothers' keeper."
Jeanne and Irwin Levy ex-
emplify the highest ideals of
Jewish Tradition "Service
and Tsedakah."
LOUIS PERLMAN
Century Village
West Palm Beach
every opportunity under our
system to prove that it was
false, to show if there was a
mistake, to show that there
might be some misinterpreta-
tion." The U.S. judge, he em-
phasized, "found the evidence
overwhelming and essentially
unrebutted."
Above all, said Mendlesohn,
the two men have been tried
not so much on the basis of this
evidence but on the testimony
of eyewitnesses from
Treblinka death camp in Dem-
janjuk's case, and Linnas'
"unrebutted confession" made
to a newspaper reporter in
1961 and "to one of his
neighbors more recently."
MENDELSOHN spoke
specifically about the identity
card provided Israel by the
Soviets which places Demjan-
juk at the Trawniki training
camp, which the SS used to
train Soviet POWs to be "good
concentration camp guards."
This card, said Mendelsohn,
"whether it's genuine or not,
really doesn't matter." Sole
use of that card as evidence
could probably not prove Dem-
janjuk's guilt or identity as
"Ivan the Terrible,"
Mendelsohn feels. "It is the six
eyewitnesses ... who
testified to the atrocities that
he committed" who will prove
the'case, he said. "What Dem-
janjuk's lawyers have been
able to do, however, he said, is
"engage in media manipula-
tion," making the card central
to the case. "But it is not."
Demjanjuk was repeatedly
given the opportunity in
Cleveland, six years ago, to
prove the card false, "a piece
of KGB disinformation. And
he did nothing. He produced
no witnesses, he produced no
contrary evidence. He did play
the press," Mendelsohn said,
but "the judge was not
deceived.
"The judge knew that the
government had produced ex-
perts to testify that the card
was genuine and accepted it as
genuine. The reason he ac-
cepted it as genuine was that
he believed the U.S. witnesses
and because Demjanjuk's
lawyers, despite what they
said outside the courtroom, did
nothing to refute the ge-
nuineness of that card. That's
a very important point that
has been lost."
Mendelsohn said he is "not
apologizing at all" for using
Soviet evidence. 'I think it's
good stuff."
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Update
Opinion
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
and are "impressed with the the dedication of the Israeli
seriousness, the toughness and people."
By TOBY F. WILK
The Israeli Supreme Court
ordered Defense Minister It-
zhak Rabin to provide explana-
tion of why his Ministry
postponed military service of
Yeshiva students. The order
required records covering the
entire period since the nation
of Israel was established in
1948. During Israel's first
years, the practice was to
postpone compulsory military
service of Yeshiva students un-
til they were old enough to be
exempt from service. More
than 11,000 Yeshiva students
from 370 Yeshivot now benefit
from this arrangement. Rabbi
Rackman, Chancellor of Bar-
Ilan University stated that
"every man of Torah should
spend at least part of his time
in the physical defense of the
State of Israel."
Violinist Yehudi Menuhin
was awarded the British Order
of Merit. Sir Yehudi, 70, has
degrees from 12 British
Universities as well as awards
and honors from almost every
country in the world.
More than 100 Jews living
on the Pacific Island of New
Caledonia have formed a
religious association. Most of
them originate from North
Africa. This is an outcome of
activities of the Asia Pacific
Jewish Association centered in
Melbourne, Australia, which is
trying to organize and help
Asian and Pacific Jewish
communities.
Persecution of the Jewish
community in Iran increased
in 1986 according to a report
of the UN Commission on
Human Rights. Private and
communal Jewish property has
been confiscated. The report
further noted 64 forms of tor-
ture used in Iranian jails.
The Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews is committed to
abrogation of the agreement
between the American Bar
Association and the Associa-
tion of Soviet lawyers. The lat-
ter is not a counterpart of the
ABA but rather a bogus front
created by the Soviet State,
whose officers actively pro-
mote anti-Semitism in the
USSR.
Cambridge University has
appointed its first Lecturer in
Modern Hebrew. She is Israeli-
born Dr. Risa Domb. This will
enable modern Hebrew to
develop and take its place in
the academic life of the
University.
At a volleyball game bet-
ween the U.S. and USSR
teams held at Stanford Univer-
sity, activists distributed
leaflets and waved banners
with the message: "It's one
thing to wait in line for a
sports event. But one
shouldn't have to wait in line
for freedom"!
Actors at Habimah, Israel's
National Theatre, downed
greasepaint and wigs to strike
for more pay. One of the lead
actors explained that they had
been fobbed off by manage-
ment for three years, and that
it was impossible for actors to
live on their meagre earnings
which were below the national
average for unskilled workers.
Habimah relies on a State sub-
sidy which has been drastically
cut during Israel's recent
economy drives.
Abie Nathan's ship, from
which he operates his "Voice
of Peace" radio station, was
severely damaged in storms
and has beenput into harbor
for repairs. This has cut the
station off the air as he is not
allowed to broadcast from land
or inside Israeli territorial
waters. The station specializes
in first class disc jockeys with
English and American pop and
nostalgic records, as well as
exhortations to make peace
and turn this into a better
world. The station is very
popular in Israel and attracts
its fair share of advertising.
Dr. Aristides de Sousa
Mendes was the Portugese
Consul in Bordeaux when Ger-
many invaded France in 1940.
Over the strident objections of
official Lisbon, Dr. Mendes
issued transit visas to Portugal
to 15,000 Jewish refugees.
Mendes, subsequently, was
recalled, fired and disgraced.
He died penniless in 1954. At
the urging of the Simon
Wiesenthal Center, together
with allies in Congress and Dr.
Mendes' family, Portugal has
at last agreed to make amends.
Dr. Mendes will receive Por-
tugal's highest honor, and his
Diplomatic title will be
posthumously reinstated.
Moscow and Leningrad
Jewish activists protested to
Soviet leader Gorbachev a re-
cent book which revives the in-
sidious canards of the in-
famous Protocols of the Elders
of Zion. Among the book's
claims are: there was no mass
killing of Jews; that Jews want
control of the world; that
Zionists hate all creation; that
Jews instigated pogroms in
Russia; that Zionists set
fascists against the USSR.
Millions have read and absorb-
ed these falsehoods. This
"classic" of anti-Semitic
literature is now also on sale in
Paris. The French edition,
printed in Kuwait, includes a
foreword explaining that its
"publication is now considered
necessary, even imperative."
Jewish organizations in Paris
plan to lodge formal com-
plaints claiming the book
violates French laws that ban
the spread of racial hatred and
contribute to religious
prejudice.
After seeing first hand the
Golan Heights, the Jordan
Valley and other areas of vital
importance to Israel's securi-
ty, influential American
military professionals return
from Israel as firm friends of
the Jewish nation. They gain
new insights into the military
realities of the Middle East,

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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Pockets Of Jewishness In East Europe
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) "Peo-
ple assume that there is
nothing Jewish left in Eastern
Europe everything has been
destroyed and the surviving
Jews have assimilated. But
what they do not realize is that
there are pockets of
Jewishness that still remain
and this needs to be
documented."
Yale Strom, an
ethnographer in his mid-20's,
set out to do just that out of a
"sense of urgency" that the
older Jews in the Eastern bloc
countries are "the last of my
grandparents' generation."
The result is "The Last Jews
of Eastern Europe," a
199-page book based on
research he conducted in
Poland, Rumania,
Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, and the
Soviet Union over a period of
six months in 1984-85. It was
published in January by
Philosophical Library in New
York.
ABOUT two-thirds of the
book consists of striking
photographs of Jews in these
countries taken by Brian Blue,
a long-time friend and profes-
sional photographer who ac-
companied Strom on his trip.
The photos do show abandoned
synagogues and deserted
cemeteries but mostly they
show Jewish life struggling to
continue; gatherings in clubs,
meals in kosher kitchens, holi-
day celebrations, synagogue
services, weddings, a
children's choir.
The book grew out of
Strom's involvement with
klezmer music which began in
San Diego, where he was rais-
ed and graduated from college.
Strom's family is unusual:
Three of his seven siblings are
black, adopted by his parents
when the family lived in
Detroit. "My father had been
in Hashomer Hatzair (the
Socialist Zionist youth move-
ment )and had a strong social
conscience, and both my
parents loved children," he
said.
A classical violinist for many
years, Strom got interested in
folk music and swing, and
after going to a klezmer con-
cert decided to form his own
klezmer band using music
never before recorded. "I
brainstormed all night
March 22, 1981 I remember
the date. That week I flew to
Spy Scandal
Continued from Page 1
with conclusions and not the
opposite. Answers should be
found."
Pollard, a former U.S. Navy
intelligence analyst, was
sentenced to life imprisonment
March 4 for spying for Israel.
He reportedly initiated the
contact between the two coun-
tries and spied for a shadowy
intelligence unit known by its
Hebrew acronym as Lekem
until his arrest outside the
Israeli Embassy in November
1985.
Sella, who was in the United
States at the time, is thought
to be Pollard's "handler" and
the person who put Pollard in
touch with Lekem. *
The promotion of Sella to
the TelNof command occured
four days before he was in-
dicted by a Federal Grand Jury
in Washington.
Eastern Europe to collect
music in the field. I figured, if
there are Jews, there will be
people who will remember folk
music and have reminiscences
of klezmer musicians."
EVERYWHERE Strom
went synagogues, communi-
ty centers, clubs he took his
violin "and let the instrument
do the talking," he said. On
this and on his later trip, "the
violin opened doors. People
sang melodies to me." In
Rumania, he met a family of
Jewish musicians, and later
traveled for a week with a
band of gypsies. "The Jews
and the gypsies borrowed a lot
musically from each other," he
said. He also found reams of
old sheet music gathering dust
in archives and bookstores.
Returning to the U.S. after
three-and-a-half months,
Strom formed his own band,
"Zmiros," which has cut
several recordings, among
them "Eclectic Klezz." At the
same time, he completed a
masters degree at New York
University in 1984, his thesis
being a social history of
klezmer musicians from the
medieval troubadour days to
the present revival, drawing
mainly on Yizkor (memorial)
books. Strom put himself
through graduate school by
playing music all kinds in
the subways and on the street.
It was on the subway, when he
was playing klezmer music
several years later, that he
met his future publisher,
Ginger Runes Najar, who con-
tinues in the footsteps of her
father, founder of
Philosophical Library.
"Being a street musician
gave me street smarts." he
Continued on Page 17
At a Dinner Dance held recently at the Fountains Country
Club, The State of Israel Bonds honored Milton Kukoff for
his tireless devotion to the Jewish people, his community and
the State of Israel. Al Schnitt (left) Chairman of the Foun-
tains' Israel Bond drive, presents the Gates of Jerusalem
Medal to Milton Kukoff.
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Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm beach County Page '
Syria, Jordan Ready To Talk Peace
Continued from Page 2
him, that's all. He didn't give
any reason." Begin and Carter
last met during Carter's 1983
visit.
Carter told reporters
that one of the lessons of
Camp David, at which Egypt,
Israel and the U.S. talked was
that one should not stick to
any single specific formula in
pursuing peace and that it is
time to advance to a new
stage. He said that would seem
to be an international
conference.
He said his visit to Israel was
to raise questions and float
ideas for Israeli leaders, as a
private citizen. He added that
he had never succeeded in con-
vincing Israelis "or anyone
else" to do what they did not
want to do.
Asked why the peace pro-
cess had not advanced after
Camp David, Carter said
"Perhaps there is more I could
have done, but I don't think
that in the last six years (the
tenure of the Reagan Ad-
ministration) it has been as
high a priority as it has been
with me, when it was almost
an obsession."
Carter expressed hope
nevertheless that the last two
years of the Reagan Ad-
ministration would see the
BBYO News
SPRING CONVENTION
The Gold Coast Council of
the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is currently mak-
ing plans for its 1987 Spring
Convention to be held May 1-3
at the Airport Hilton in West
Palm Beach. The theme for the
annual event, which should at-
tract 175 Jewish teens from
area chapters, will be "Enter a
World of Pure Imagination."
The weekend will include slide
shows, speakers and discus-
sion groups centered around
this theme, as well as various
other religious, social and
athletic programs. The annual
Convention is being coor-
dinated by the Council's Vice
Presidents Lawrence
Lambert and Lisa Steinman.
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is the oldest and
largest Jewish youth organiza-
tion in the world and is open to
all Jewish teens ages 14-18.
The Gold Coast Council con-
sists of 20 chapters throughout
North Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties. For
more information about BBYO
and its activities contact
Jerome Kiewe c/o JCC, 6501
W. Sunrise Blvd., Ft. Lauder-
dale, FL 33313.
BASKETBALL LEAGUE
TO BEGIN
The Gold Coast Council of
the B'nai B'rith Youth
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach and State of Israel
Bonds announce that Yoram
Aridor, Israel's former
Finance Minister, will be
speaking at a Cocktail Recep-
tion at the temple on behalf
of Israel Bonds on Sunday,
April 5. The congregation of
Temple Emanu-El will be
receiving Israel's coveted
Heritage Award for their
support and dedication to
building Israel's economy
and promoting its growth
through the sale of Israel
Bonds. Accepting the award
on behalf of the congregation
will be Dr. Richard A. Lynn.
Organization is currently gear-
ing up for its 1987 Basketball
League. Beginning in April
eight chapters of the AZA, the
boys component of the BBYO,
will begin competing for the ti-
tle. Games will be played each
Sunday at the Jewish Com-
munity Center in Ft.
Lauderdale.
Middle East peace process
become a greater priority.
The Reagan Administration
sharply criticized Carter for a
remark before the American
Chamber of Commerce in
Cairo last week that there was
"missing leadership" in
Washington. "President
Reagan has not been inclined
to use negotiation and
diplomacy as a means to
achieve our nation's goals as
have his Democratic and
Republican predecessors. He's
more inclined to exert
America's military strength,
either the actual use of it or
the threat of it." Carter said.
Those remarks brought an
angry response from White
House spokesman Marlin
Fitzwater. He said the
Administration was "deeply
disappointed" that Carter
would make such a statement
on the "very delicate" Mideast
peace process while in a
foreign country. "It is not
right to say we have not been
pursuing the peace process in
the Middle East," Fitzwater
said.
State Department
spokesman Charles Redman
declared that "This Ad-
ministration has remained ac-
tively involved in the peace
process and is deeply commit-
ted to it."
Carter met with Assad in
Damascus for three-and-a-
half hours, according to
Syria's official news agency,
Sana, discussing "issues
relating to the international
situation, the Middle East and
Lebanon."
Carter arrived in Jordan
asserting that "As long as
the parties stay flexible
and listen to contrary views,
the hope for a (international)
conference is kept alive." He
met with King Hussein and
Crown Prince Hassan. Also,
while in Amman, Carter called
for the release of prisoners in
Israel and hostages in
Lebanon. "All those being held
on both sides, unless being
guilty of some crime, should be
released," he said.
In Jerusalem, Carter
said he had no word on any
possible progress on the
hostage issue in Lebanon. He
expressed hope that with the
deployment of Syrian armed
forces in west Beirut, progress
would be made toward the
release of hostages.


The Jewish Community Day
School commemorated Purim
with the reading of the
Megillah, a costume parade
and contest, and a Purim
Carnival on Mar. 16, Shushan
Purim. Erica Sagaj started
out the day in her Purim
costume and later enjoyed
having her face made up as a
clown at the carnival.
miff
FOR
PASSOVER.
The same Del Monte quality
dried fruit you count on year
round is also Kosher for Passover.
Always moist and delicious,
DEL MONTE* Raisins and
Prunes bring a natural sweetness
to your celebration table.
Use the coupon below for spe-
cial savings, and let our quality
tradition join yours.
WtGROW
MANUFACTUtKR-S
WHEN YOU BUY ANY DEL MONTE'
DRIED J/RUIT ITEM.
RETAi_ER: One coupon pef purchase ol product
ttkcaM Any ofier ust constitutes Iraud Con-
sumer to pay sales Ux (Aw) it copied, trans
erred. proMMed. taxed or restricted Good only
m USA, AWs. FP0s. We Ml reimburse you
lor the race value, plus M handfcnu, provided
you and Ihe consumer have complied w* >
otter terms Cash value 1/201 DEL MONTE
CORPORATION, Dept #59/1. El Paso.TX 79966
i


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Business Executives Forum
Over 80 business and professional young adults had the opportunity to
socialize at the 3rd Business Executives Forum sponsored by the Young
Adult Division of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County held recently
at the Gulfstream Hotel in Lake Worth. Enjoying the comaraderie are Patti
Lampert, Mark Gillenson, and Janet Reiter.
BEF Co-Chairman David Shapiro (right) welcomes Ron and Beth Levenson
and Lydia Schoenfeld. ___
Having a chance to socialize at the end of a business day are Michael
Rosenberg, Michael Leibowitz, and Lloyd Findler.
Jeff Wisnicki, Pamela Sharpe, Scott Ackerman, and Larry Sharpe enjoy cat-
ching up on the day's events.
Not since the asking of the Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
*
Its Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They ve been making it big in
Jewish homes for years Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
true for tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, lake time out
for Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier'
Kosher for Passover
iw -. r.r TETLEY. TEA
"Finn i* tantier*
A special meal for a special time.
Special times deserve the best! This Passover, make your meal
extra special with a delicious kosher turkey from Empire.
Each turkey meets the highest kosher standards for purity
and excellence (and Empire's standards for great taste).
Treat your family and friends to the unforgettable taste
of Empire...and feast on the compliments.
THE MOST TRUSTED NAME IN KOSHER FOODS.
1 (800) EMPIRE-4


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Role Of U.S. Jewish Labor During Holocaust Recalled
By HENRY SREBRNIK
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Though it was "small,"
"marginal," "late in arriv-
ing," and uneven in its flow,
the monetary assistance sent
to Jews in Poland during the
Holocaust by the American
Jewish labor movement was
"a gesture of fraternity amidst
despair," according to Prof.
Kenneth Waltzer of Michigan
State University.
Speaking to a conference
held March 8-10 under the
auspices of the U.S. Holocaust
Memorial Council and the In-
ternational Bonhoeffer Socie-
ty, Waltzer told his listeners
that, when news of the mass
murders emerged, the Jewish
labor leaders "responded
actively."
THEY PRESSURED the
Roosevelt Administration to
speak out, tried to mobilize
American labor on behalf of
rescue, and sent funds illegal-
ly, through the London-based
Polish government-in-exile, to
the Jewish underground in
Poland.
The Jewish labor leaders
heads of the needle trades'
unions, fraternal organizations
such as the Workmen's Circle,
The Century Village
Women's Auxiliary
Of The Morse Geriatric Center
Invites you to our
2nd Annual Open House
Sunday, April 5,1987
* 1:30 p.m.
AT THE JOSEPH L. MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
Guided Tours of the Facility
Presentation of Center Expansion Program
Entertainment
Refreshments
THERE IS NO CHARGE. RSVP ANY COMMITTEE MEMBER.
CENTURY VILLAGE COMMITTEE
Blossom Cohen 683-3901 Esther Molat 686-6685
Emma Gerringer 686-8858 Claire Schwartz 684-1138
Available transportation by reservation only. Please contact a Committee Member
for further information.
All Auxiliary members are asked to bring friends and neighbors. HELP US BUILD
OUR MEMBERSHIP!
and Socialist and Yiddish
groups were themselves im-
migrants with extended family
ties in Europe, explained
Waltzer. They also had
political links to the Jewish
Labor Bund in Poland.
As early as 1934, the union
leaders had created an um-
brella organization, the Jewish
Labor Committee, to combat
the effects of Nazism. During
the war, when accounts of the
genocide reached America,
they stepped up their ac-
tivities, noted Waltzer. A mass
rally was held in New York's
Madison Square Garden in Ju-
ly, 1942, and on December 2,
1942, some 500,000 workers in
New York stopped work dur-
ing a Day of Mourning. David
Dubinsky, head of the Interna-
tional Ladies Garment
Workers' Union, referred to
Poland as "a slaughter house."
HOWEVER, though a
delegation of leaders met with
President Roosevelt a few
days later, and a Joint
Emergency Committee on
Continued on Page 16
DELICIOUS FISHES ?
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
The first name in kosher foods brings
you the finest from the sea! Delicious
haddock, cod. sole, and flounder fillets,
flash-frozen for convenience and flavor!
Ask your grocer for Empire fish fillets
For that special meal,
start with Empire!
The Mos Trusted Name in Kosher Foods '
I (800) EMPIRE-4


FOR PASSOVER
WITH ARM & HAMMER
BAKING SODA
No other household product can help you get ready for
Passover quite like pure and natural ARM & HAMMER"
Baking Soda. Certified Kosher for Passover, ARM &
HAMMER Baking Soda's versatility makes it perfect for both
Passover baking and cleaning.
Its soft, mildly abrasive crystals clean delicate surfaces
such as refrigerators, countertops, kitchen ranges-even
fiberglass-without scratching. Just sprinkle it on a damp
sponge, scrub, rinse and wipe dry It leaves no residue
ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda is also ideal for
Passover baking Its leavening process complies fully with
Passover dietary laws. And don't forget to place boxes in
your refrigerator and freezer to keep them smelling fresh
and clean
So pick up several boxes of ARM & HAMMER Baking
Soda this Passover You'll marvel at its many uses'

noal7"vU33<
Kosher for Passover




Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Close to 300 Super Sunday H<
phonathon to raise $301,858 for
Palm Beach County-United Je
hundred and twenty five new gift
$100,000. This was an increase o
year's new gifts.
This is why some of them be
"I'm President of Golden Riven
Chapter, Women's American ORT, and
as a volunteer I know that Jewish
Federation does a marvelous job for the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center, the
Jewish Community Day School, and all
the things that we like to think we're
part of."
Dorothy Gotthelf
"To contribute in my own small way to
a very good cause."
Dr. Mitchell Indictor
"There are so many Jews all over the
world and here in Palm Beach County
they just need our dollars, they need our
help. There's programs in Palm Beach
County especially that will benefit
myself and all my friends and family
and people not as fortunate as I am. By
calling people and getting money today,
I feel that I'm helping people all around
me.
Renee Tucker
SUN
NPMP


Heroes volunteered at the day-long
for the 1987 Jewish Federation of
Jewish Appeal Campaign. Four
jifts were received, bringing in over
e of more than 65 percent over last
became Super Sunday Heroes.
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
SDAY
"UJA is my baby. I've always been
involved in it. When I worked up North,
I was Chairman in our building where I
worked."
Shirley Feldman
"There's a great need in the community
to collect funds for Israel and I think
this is one of our better ways for doing
it."
Moshe Adler
"I've been involved with the Business
and Professional Women and I think
that the things that the Federation does
is important to help other people get
involved with their commitment to the
Jewish religion and to the Jewish
people."
-Elite Halperin



Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Thank You, Volunteers
Thanks for being Super Sunday '87 Heroes and making
our communitywide phonathon a successful event. Hun-
dreds of you gave unselfishly of your time to reach out to
thousands of your fellow Jews throughout Palm Beach
County.
As a result of your commitment and energy, we raised
over $301,858 which will be used to strengthen the Jewish
community locally, overseas and in Israel.
We could not have put together such a successful project
without the generous assistance of committee Chairmen,
Federation staff, teen volunteers, organizations
throughout Palm Beach County, and you, our Super Sun-
day volunteers who made the calls and helped the day run
smoothly.
We apologize if we have inadvertently left out your
name.
We sincerely thank you and we'll see you all again next
year.
Bernie and Terri Kurit
Super Sunday '87 Co-Chairmen
Betty Abramowitz
Roberta Abrams
Patricia Abramson
Bim Adler
Moshe Adler
Marci Adler
Alta Bess Arons
Syd Auspltz
Carol Barack
Robert L. Barwald
Eve Baum
Gloria Belgard
Barry Berg
Marjorie Berg
Harry Berger
Mrs. Harry Berger
Fred Berk
Nettie Berk
Ruth Bernstein
Miriam Binder
Gertrude Birnback
Norman Bleach
Erwin Blonder
Ada Boff
Ellen Bovarnick
Debby Brass
Shari Brenner
Sylvia Brochstein
Dorothy M. Brock
Harry M. Browner
Lee Browner
Al Brownstein
Marilyn Carradi
Denny Caruso
Evelyn Caruso
Ben Chait
Jeanette Chait
Vera Charles
Carrie Chiat
Jack Chiat
Paul Chrystal
Rabbi Alan Cohen
Blanche B. Cohen
Sylvia Cohen
Evelyn Coleman
Eric Crawford
Laney Dahan
Cantor Howard Dardashti
Sheryl Davidoff
Betty Deutsch
Ann Diamond
Alan Dorfman
Jacqueline Duay
Victor Duke
Herb Edelstein
Gertrude Edelstein
Alice G. Effrat
Lynne Ehrlich
Robert Eidus
William Einziger
Kari Ellison
Steve Ellison
Sheila Engelsteln
Jay Epstein
Ronnl Epstein
Michael Felden
Shirley S. Feldman
David Finger
Robert Fitterman
Mollie Fitterman
Dick Flah
Susan Fleischer
Mindy Freeman
Martha Friedland
Barbara Friedlander
Anne Fuss
Stella Gabe
Angela Gallicchio
Ann Gallubler
Eileen Gattegno
Fred Gattegno
Jean Gershitz
Clara S. Seider Gershowitz
Ben Gerson
Dan Giber
Claire Giber
William H. Glater
Faye Glater
Milton Gold
Lillian Gold
Ned Goldberg
Frank Goldstein
Rose Goodman
Helen Gordon
Dorothy Gotthelf
Estelle Gould
Ahron S. Grad
Charles Green
Carol Greenbaum
Sidney H. Greene
Doris Greene
Hilda Greenspoon
Irma Grimm
Jerome J. Gross
Hank Grossman
Esther F. Gruber
Sandy Grunther
I lean Gut hart?
Elite Halperin
Tammy Hamberg
Debbie Hammer
Debbie Hays
J'aime Heidt
Sandi Heilbron
Robert S. Herman
Gertrude Hilton
Rita Hilton
Florence Hirschman
Dr. Mitchell Indlctor
Marshall Isaacson
Robin Isaacson
Michael Jacobson
Claire Jaffe
Florence Kanter
Rosemarie Kanter
Jonathan Kaplan
Jack M. Karako
Tami Karako
Patty Kartell
Irene Katz
Sindee Katz
Jim Kay
Soni Kay
Florence Kleff
Florence Kippel
Carole Klein
Jeffrey Klein
Paul Klein
Vivian Klein
Douglas Kleiner
Pearl Kline
Linda Kolnitsky
Esther Kosowski
Nathan Kosowski
Arlene Kramer
Bonnie Krauss
Dorothy Krever
Barry Krischer
Dorothy Kurcias
Bernie Kurlt
Terri Kurit
Milton Kurland
Ruth Kurland
Anthony Lamperi
Arnold Lampert
llene Lampert
Joyce Lampert
Marilyn Lampert
Michael A. Lampert
Patti Lampert
Ed Lefkowitz
Arthur B. Leibovit
Blanche Leibowitz
Dr. Alan LeRoy
Marilyn LeRoy
Mim Levinson
Shirley Lezell
Michael Ufshitz
Ruthe Lifshitz
Sherry Linden
Louise Lipkin
Sandy Lipshltz
Ann Lynn Lipton
Bob List
Cynnie List
Karen List
Marty List
Marcy Marcus
Alan Mason
Zelda Pincourt-Mason
Sharon Matheos
Mark Mendel
Carol Messina
Jeanne-Marie Methfessel
Miriam Mirsky
Esther Molat
Al Moskowitz
Anne Neugeboren
Larry Ochstein
Jay Ossen
Jeff Paine
Nat Passon
Rhea Passon
Amy Pearlman
Marvin Percher
Mrs. Marvin Percher
Sarah Pfeffer
Bernard Pllsskin
Molly Podorzer
William Poel
Shirley Pomerantz
Melissa Proc
Sandy Proc
Jeanne Rachles
Ellen Rampell
Dr. Mark Rattinger
Janet S. Reiter
Jean Rosen
Dean J. Rosenbach
Frieda Rosenberg
Li la Rosenberg
Isadore Rosoff
Teresa Rosoff
Louise Ross
Helen Rothberg
Rosalind Rubenfeld
Herman Sakowitz
Edna H. Sands
Dr. Elliot Schwartz
Susan Schwartz
Bernie Sakren
Louis Schafrank
Louis Schelnbaum
Rhoda Schelnbaum
Sylvia Schneider
Yetta Schneider
Dr. Norma Schulman
Claire Schwartz
David Schwartz
Syd Schwartz
Anne Seagull
Solomon Seinberg
David Shapiro
Marcla Shapiro
Rabbi Alan Sherman
Anne Shiller
Lillle G. Sher
Carol Shubs
Dr. Lester Sllverman
Peppy Sllverstein
Adele Simon
Elizabeth Slavln
Dorl Smith
George Spivak
Irene Spivak
Phyllis Stahl
Sam Staver
Mrs. Bob Stein
Betty Steinberg
Faye Stoiler
Claire Sucher
Nat Super
Paula Super
Coleman Sussman
Tesse Sussman
Herman J. Tauber
Marilyn David Topperman
Mollie Tradburks
Danny Tucker
Renee Tucker
Sam Wadler
Bruce Wall
Wendy Weil
Rose Weinberg
Arthur Welntrob
Linda Weiss
Rose Weiss
David Welsh
Helen Welsh
Sheryl Lynn Wllk
Susan Wolf-Schwartz
Beth Wolfsie
Andrew Wohl
Rose Young
Herbert Zemll
Alice Zlpkin
Morris Zlpkin
Cecy Zlvow
Rachel Zymeck
TEENS
Shawn Barat
Jeremy Berg
Zack Berg
Erika Berry
Tammy Bleiman
Lauren Block
Dlna Brass
Justin Brass
Jonathan Davidoff
Areila Davis
Orl Feistman
Adam Gray
Bill Harris
Ivy Harris
Rachel Klein
Danny Konigsberg
Eric Kurit
Matt Kurit
Josh LeRoy
Eddie Mullen
Rachel Pesvner
Joey Rosen
David Simon
Scott Skier
Sheryl Wllk
iFibfFL Telegram Received From Sen. Lawton Chiles
1-020258A07V 03/20/87
1CS IPMWGWJ WSH
ZJCZC 00512 GOVT CHWASHINGTON DC 155 0J-20 515P EST
PIS JACK KARAKO* DLR
JEWISH FLOTATION OF PAL* BLACK COUNTY
t*Ta0-D-PAE4-am-CTRCkE-- 501 S FLAGLER
WEST PALM BEACH FL 33406
BT
DR SUCTE 305
TO SUPER SUNDAY VOLUNTEbKS:
I REGRET THAT I AM UNABLE TO SHAMfc. THIS EXCITING DAY WITH YOU*
BUT TritHh IS A iESSAGE 1*0 LIKE TO PASS ON TO YOU ALL*
THESE DAYS I HEAR PEOPLE COMPLAIN THAT WE ARE LIVING IN THE AGE OF
SELF CENTEREDNESS. THAT WE BRUSH ASIDE THE NEEDS OF OUR NEIGHBORS*
THAT VOLUNTEERISM IS DYING.
WHATS HAPPENING HERE TODAY TURNS THESE NOTIONS ON THEIR HEAD.
EVERY ONE OF YOU IS TESTIMONY TO THfc FACT THAT THE SPIRIT OF
1ZEOAKAH IS AS STRONG TODAY AS IT WAS IN THE DAYS OF ABRAHAM.
YOUR SENSE OF CARING TOUCHES MANY. IT XTH.f4DS FROM HOIEBOUND SENIOR
CITIZENS IN S* FLORIDA TO JEWISH CHILDREN IN ISRAEL. FROM ETHOPIAN
JEWRY TO THOSE IN EASTERN EUROPE* YOUR CAKING IS FAR REACHING.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA HAS MUCH TO HE PROUD OF.
THANK YOU FOH ALL YOU HAVE DONE AND CONTINUE TO DO.
BEST OF LUCK TODAY.
SENATOR LAWTON CHILES
Mffil
1800 EST
IPM50FL


Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Women's Division (Dor Le Dor) Luncheon
Karen List, Marcy Marcus, Women's Division Campaign Vice President
Carol Greenbaum, and Eleanor Strauss
Helen Welsh, Miriam Krieger, Deanna Roos, Esther Molat, and Claire
Schwartz
Lorraine Virshup, Rhonda Paston, Women's Division President Mollie Fitterman, Estelle
Keiss, and Mim Levinson
\
Gladys Meyers, Barbara Grimpel, and Helen Sodowick
Helen Marshall, Syd Schwartz, Sonia Koff, Fay Kadis, and Eileen Nickman
Alice Zipkin, Peggy Vegosen, and Cynnie List
Ruth Shapiro, Desna Goldman, Trina Harrison, and Rita Pearlman
Angela Gallicchio, Renae Gleiber, and Ann Kachel
/*2S

Fran Gordon and Diane Kaufman
Esther Szmukler and Sheila Engelstein,
Women's Division Immediate Past President
Deborah Brass and Adele Simon
Continued on Page 16

x


fegelfr The Jewish Ftoridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 198T
Continued front Page 15
I
Dorothy Ludwig, Nancy Dickson, Esther Gruber, and Pauline Silverstein Freda A""* Antweil, and Ida Karlan
Senator Charges World War II Allies Abandoned Jews To Hitler
WASHINGTON Senator
Claiborne Pell told an audience
of German dignitaires, Jewish
leaders and survivors of a Ger-
man anti-Nazi resistance
movement he was convinced
there was an "unwritten
agreement" among the World
War II allies "to leave the
Jews to Hitler."
Sen. Pell, Chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, said, "The more I
study the Holocaust period,
the more I am convinced that
there was an unwritten agree-
ment between Roosevelt and
Churchill to leave the Jews to
Hitler."
He made his remarks at a
ceremony in the Capitol
Building (Feb. 23) marking the
formation by the American
Jewish Congress of a White
Rose Foundation to honor the
Jewish Labor
Continued from Page 11
European Jewish Affairs was
created in 1943, "they produc-
ed few results," observed
Waltzer.
At the Bermuda Conference,
held in April 1943, "it became
apparent the Roosevelt Ad-
ministration opposed doing
much to rescue or even
relieve the condition of Jews
in Nazi-occupied Europe.
Many of the Jewish leaders felt
they had failed completely.
Growing despair set in, and
the Joint Emergency Commit-
tee collapsed."
Despite these domestic set-
backs, the labor organizations
continued to funnel money to
the Jewish underground in
Poland, via ZEGOTA, the
Council for Aid to Jews, set up
by the Polish resistance.
BETWEEN DECEMBER,
1942 and December, 1944, a
total of "350,000 was sent "to
sustain the battered remnants
of the underground and to pro-
vide food, medicine, clothing,
shelter, forged 'Aryan'
documents, and arms," said
Waltzer. The money was car-
ried into Poland by
parachutists wearing special
money belts.
Though the amounts raised
were "terribly small" by
modern standards and arrived
mostly after the destruction
for the Warsaw and other
Jewish ghettos, stressed
Waltzer, "the money gave the
Jewish underground added
respectability with the Polish
underground, with whom rela-
tions (during the war) were not
always cordial."
memory of young German
Christians who risked their
lives to fight Nazism. Leaders
of the underground resistance
movement called themselves
the White Rose.
The ceremony also saw the
presentation to the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council of
a rare collection of anti-Nazi
leaflets distributed by the
White Rose at the height of
World War II. The gift was
presented by two survivors of
the movement, Franz Joseph
Mueller and Anneliese Knoop-
Graf, who flew from Germany
for the occasion.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of the American
Jewish Congress, who chaired
the proceedings, noted that
the concept of the White Rose
Foundation grew out of a
"pilgrimage" to Munich, Ger-
many, at the time of President
Reagan's controversial visit to
the Bitburg cemetery in May
1985. The purpose of that
AJCongress delegation, com-
posed of Jews and non-Jews,
was to pay tribute to the
memory of the White Rose
founders. Himself a survivor
of the Holocaust, Mr. Siegman
Continued on Page 24
cc^x*^^
long dwttnc* can* only


Pockets Of Jewishness
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Continued from Page 8
id. This came in very handy
n his second trip to Eastern
Europe and the Soviet Union
in 1984-85. He was often asked
by border guards to prove he
was a musician. One time he
played a Slovak song for a
Czech guard who then insisted
he play "0 Susannah."
HE ALSO played klezmer
music on the famous Charles
Bridge in Prague, directly in
front of the giant crucifix. A
plaque states that in 1609 after
a Jew was accused of
desecrating it, the ghetto com-
munity was punished and com-
pelled to pay for affixing the
Hebrew words ''kadosh,
kadosh, kadosh" ("holy, holy,
holy" from the daily prayers)
in gold around the crucifix.
Strom felt his playing Jewish
music there was a statement of
Jewish survival. (A guitarist
later joined him and they made
$50.)
In Warsaw, he played and
gave lectures to groups of 40
to 60 young artists and profes-
sionals, Jews and non-Jews,
jammed into a room in so-
meone's home. These
"chavurot" (small groups) met
to explore Yiddish culture.
"We often jammed until four
in the morning," he said.
Strom played another role in
Eastern Europe, as well. "I
The Nickman
Years 1984-85
Continued from Page 2
Hod Hasharon has undergone
a remarkable physical and
social transformation. Very
warm ties developed and we
both benefited as we moved
closer together in the spirit of
partnership," stated Mr.
Nickman.
Mr. Nickman recalled that
the Campaign that year ex-
ceeded $6.5 million. Every
division reported marked in-
creases. "We had a tremen-
dously exciting Community
Dinner Dance where we all
walked into a Bruce Sutka
creation of the Old City of
Jerusalem. We danced under
its arches, strolled through its
marketplace and enjoyed
ourselves immensely," he said.
The efforts of Mr. Nickman
and those who joined with him
in leadership positions combin-
ed to move our community for-
ward in providing for Jews
locally, in Israel, and overseas.
was a messenger between the
Jews in one country and the
next." Feeling isolated and
forgotten, they had asked him
to "let us know what's happen-
ing to our brothers in the other
(Soviet bloc) countries." The
itinerant klezmer musician
"traditionally played this role
of disseminator of news from
one shtetl to another," he said.
"I was just doing this in a
modern way."
WHILE STROM was doing
research filling many
notebooks with facts and com-
ments Blue was taking over
6,000 photographs of Jews in
both large cities and small
towns. About 125 are current-
ly on exhibit at the Spertus
Museum in Chicago until the
end of March, when they will
travel around the country.
During their travels, he and
Blue realized that "every Jew
we met over the age of 40 is a
survivor." The old people, in
their 70's and 80's, are surpris-
ingly active. One 82-year-old
man who does all the physical
work for the local Jewish club
including chopping wood
told Strom, "I don't have the
luxury of retiring. I have an
important job to do and if I
don't do it, who will?"
There are also young people
who are committing
themselves to Judaism. One
man Strom met in Budapest
had just had himself circumcis-
ed at the age of 42. He would
not, however, have the opera-
tion performed on his son
because of fear of anti-
Semitism: "Who knows if
there is going to be another
Holocaust?" he said to Strom.
"These countries are soaked
with their family's blood,"
Strom said. "It's the easiest
subject to portray in a gloomy
way but we wanted to por-
tray life." He hopes to do a
film on his trip for PBS, and to
continue his ethnographic
work. "As long as there will be
a minyan in Eastern Europe I
will continue to do research
there."
Organizations
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Next meeting will be Thursday, April 9 at the American
Savings Bank, 12:30 p.m.
The guest speaker is S. Paul Beard, managing director of
the new Palm Beach County Center for the Arts being con-
structed on the grounds of the Palm Beach Junior College.
He will discuss his plans for the Center. Guests welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
Annual Dinner Dance and Installation of Royal Palm
Beach Lodge No. 3046 will be held on Sunday, April 5,
6:30 p.m., at Indian Trail Country Club.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter is holdng its Paid-up Membership
Luncheon and Installation of Officers on April 7 at the
Sheraton Hotel, Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. For information
contact Irma Haas, Chatham R-360, West Palm Beach.
Coming events:
April 4, Cruise on the Viking Princess.
April 12, "Applause" at the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre.
April 28, Cruise on the Intercoastal.
May 10, Mothers Day Cruise on the Viking Princess.
May 20, Luncheon and Card Party at the Oriental
Express.
A bus leaves every Saturday and Thursday for games at
the Seminole Village. For information call Ruth Rubin,
West Palm Beach.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Boynton Beach Chapter coming events:
Monday, April 6, Installation Luncheon at the Indian
Spring Country Club, 11501 Indian Spring Trail, Boynton
Beach, at noon.
Monday, April 20, Study Group: Sally Lehrman will con-
tinue her series on playwrite, Lillian Hellman with the play,
"Toys in the Attic," 1 p.m. at the Royal Palm Club House,
544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach.
Monday, April 27, Study Group: Royal Palm Club House
at 1 p.m. A short story will be read and discussion will
follow.
HADASSAH
Cypress Lakes Leisureville will have a regular
membership meeting Wednesday, April 22, 12:30 p.m. at
American Savings and Loan, West Gate of Century
Village, Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. The program
will feature Drs. Steven and Ellen Cutler, chiropractors. A
mini-luncheon will be served. Everyone welcome.
Shalom W. Palm Beach will participate in the Myrtle
Wreath ceremony, honoring Hadassah Life Members and
Associates, on April 5, 9:30 a.m., at Temple Emeth,
Delray. Transportation will be available. Contact Florence
Wexler.
Tikvah Chapter will participate in the Myrtle Wreath
Brunch at Temple Emeth, Delray Beach on April 3. Call
Frances Rose for more information.
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
The chapter will meet on Sunday, April 12, 1 p.m. at the
Beach Federation Savings and Loan, 4524 Gun Club Road,
West Palm Beach.
Palm Beach County Under-Sheriff, Charles McCutcheon
and Sam Goldstein, Deputy Sheriff will discuss "Crime and
Crime Prevention."
For information contact Sid Levine, 2557 Emory Drive
West, Villa C, West Palm Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter will hold its next meeting on April 9, at
Congregation Anshei Sholom, at noon. A representative
from Prudential Bache will speak on how to invest money
for best results.
Royal Chapter will hold its rummage sale on April 5 from
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Southern Blvd. in Royal Palm Beach.
Contact Ruth Gradess for further information.
The following day, April 6, an executive board meeting
will take place at 9:30 a.m. at Village Hall in Royal Palm
Beach and the general meeting will follow at 12:30 p.m.
Participants are requested to bring their lunch. Gary
Tuckman, anchor newscaster for Channel 12, will be the
guest speaker. The meeting is open to the public.
West Palm Beach Chapter coming events:
Tuesday, April 7 at 3 p.m. in the Art Room of the Cen-
tury Village Clubhouse General monthly meeting.
Tuesday, April 28, Luncheon at Frances Langford's
Outrigger and cruise on the St. Lucie River. Bus transpor-
tation arranged. Contact Rose Samuelson, Bedford C-64
C.V. or Frieda Abel, Norwich D-89, C.V.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Regular meeting will take place on Tuesday, April 7, at 1
p.m. at Congregation Aitz Chaim. Guest speaker Buck
Kinard, Public Relations executive for Channel 5, will
speak on "The Last 25 Years of Television." Members and
guests invited.
Coming event: Luncheon and Card Party to be held on
Wednesday, April 8, at noon at Iva's Restaurant,
Okeechobee Blvd. Members and guests invited.
FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS
...AND EVERYDAY!
Breakstone's butter is 100% natural, premium quality
butter. Since 1882, it's the only butter gcxxl enough to
have the Breakstone's name.
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
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or variety). I
RETAILER K/alt inc. {Dairy Group) ram- I
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\

*
moMPTut


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Israel's Ambassador to The United States,
Meir Rosenne, (left) spoke with a group of
over 75 people at a reception held recently
in Palm Beach. With him are, Robert S.
Levy, Co-Chairman of the Palm Beach State
of Israel Bonds Campaign, and Dorothy and
Sidney Kohl, hosts for the reception.
Hillel Plans Holocaust Memorial Week
The students at Hillel at
Florida Atlantic University
are planning a Holocaust
Memorial Week to take place
April 6-10 on campus. (Yom
Hashoa, April 26, is celebrated
after the Spring semester has
finished.)
On Monday the students will
participate in a general educa-
tion day. Tables will be set up
around the campus where
students may view films and
receive literature.
Cm Wednesday April 8 there
will be a panel discussion:
"Why did the Holocaust hap-
pen? Could it ever happen
again?"
On Thursday April 9 the film
Genocide will be shown.
There will be a continual
library display all month.
For more information, con-
tact Karl Ellison, Hillel Coor-
dinator, at the FAU Campus.
JDC Gets Grant For Agricultural
Project In Ethiopia
NEW YORK (JTA) -
United Support of Artists for
Africa has granted the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC)
$150,000 for an agricultural
recovery project in the Gondar
region of Ethiopia, according
to JDC president Heinz
Eppler.
U.S.A. for Africa was found-
ed in 1985 in response to the
reports of widespread famine
in Ethiopia. It gained im-
mediate prominence with the
song and music video, "We
Are the World."
THE JDC will use the funds
to buy oxen, seeds, and tools
that will help farmers regain
self-sufficiency. "After so
many years of famine," Eppler
said, "thousands of rural
families have completely lost
their ability to continue farm-
ing. They have to start over
from scratch, but they have
nothing to start with."
Sylvia Hassenfeld, chairman
of the JDC Committee on the
Third World, said "Restoring
traditional life styles and
rebuilding the farmers' pro-
ductivity is far more cost-
effective than perpetuating
the relief syndrome. We are
very grateful for USA for
Africa's support, and we look
forward to working together
to help Ethiopians recover
from the horrible effects of
drought and famine."
The project will help about
12,000 families, or 60,000 peo-
ple, according to JDC ex-
ecutive vice president Ralph '
Goldman. "All are farmers
who were directly affected by
the emergency," he explained.
"Either they were displaced
Perot Recognized
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Dallas- businessman and
philanthropist Ross Perot has
received the Raoul Wallenberg
Award of the American Com-
mittee for Shaare Zedek
Hospital in Jerusalem and the
Raoul Wallenberg Committee
of the United States.
from their homes, or they sold
their tools and oxen during the
worst of the drought to buy
food."
GOLDMAN SAID the oxen,
seeds, fertilizer, and other sup-
plies will be bought in Ethiopia
and then distributed in the
designated area.
JDC has been providing non-
sectarian assistance in the
Gondar region since 1983. In
addition to the agricultural
recovery project, JDC has built
a health center in the village of
Tedda and is planning a
polyclinic in the town of
Gondar.
ALL Boom* H"*J
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JCC News
ALL SINGLES
On Monday, April 13 at 6:30 p.m., Singles of all ages will
gather at the Jewish Community Center of the Palm
Beaches, 700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach, to celebrate
Passover together. A buffet style Kosher Seder dinner will
be served. Everyone will be asked to assist in some way to
make this a very warm and special event. Reservations by
check must be received by April 7. Fee: JCC Members $12,
non members $15, children under age 5 free, ages 6-12 $5,
ages 12-15 $7.
YOUNG SINGLES (20-30)
On Sunday, April 5 at 7 p.m. get together at a member's
house for another Pot Luck dinner. If your last name
begins with A-J, bring a main dish, K-R bring a salad or
side dish and S-Z, bring a dessert. Drinks will be provided.
Cost: $2.
Get together on Thursday April 9, 6:45 p.m., at the
Cinema *N Drafthouse (10th Ave. No. and Congress) to en-
joy a movie, good company and drink in this sociable set-
ting. Donation: $1 plus own fare.
SINGLES (30-40)
Meet at Cheers in the Royce Hotel on Tuesday, April 7
from 5-7 p.m. to enjoy good drinks and good company.
Donation: $1 plus own fare.
SINGLES PURSUITS (40-59)
Meet Thursday, April 7, 6:30 p.m., at the Gulfstream
Hotel (Lake Ave. and the Intracoastal in Lake Worth) for
dinner. Afterwards, cross the street to Bryant Park to
listen to the sounds of Big Band music. Bring a folding
chair or blanket for the concert.
On Sunday, April 5 at 11:30 a.m. meet at Shooters in
Boynton Beach for brunch. Bring a bathing suit and spend
the afternoon relaxing around the pool. Donation: $1 plus
own fare.
PRIME TIME SINGLES (60 and over)
Get together at the Center Thursday, April 2, 7 p.m., for
an evening of Yiddish conversation, both humorous and
serious, by David Sandier. Refreshments will be served.
Donation: Members $1, non-members $1.25.
For more information contact the JCC at 689 7700.
FromKadaish
to
ChadGadyo
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Far Availability Information (707) 829-5686
This SuMMERr
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
Invites You to Sample
The Wonderful World of
Western Europe
Visit ,he 9nd c^P"*1cl"" "f Europe lake lasting
WM"fc friendship* with Jewish teens In Belgium
rrancc. and England. rorm relationship* with mcinbeis of
your tour that will laat a lifetime. Broaden your hort ions by
seeing the world Add an Impressive experience to your
high school years far your college applications Experi-
ence profoundly the sense of being one with Jews
throughout the wortdl
This summer, be a tratlbiaier by participating In BBYO s
newest summer program, the Capital cities tour of
Europe. Along with 5SO other Jewish teens, you will
have the pleasure and excitement at spending time In
Amsterdam Brussels. Antwerp. Paris), and London
... and that s not all. There will be exciting side trips to points of interest outside of these
major cultural and population cemersl
wit h over 30 years of experience providing professionally supervised overseas programs.
BBYO is recognized around the world as an expert in the Held of teen travel.
Call Collect
(202) 857-6633
OR CONTACT THE LOCAL B'NAI B'RITH
YOUTH DIRECTOR AT: 305 253-7400
Open to all Jewish teens 15-18 years old
ESCAPED A FklENDUER CUMATE
Don't let the Florida heat get to you!
Head north for the Fallsview. You'll be
greeted with cool, comfortable surroundings
and warm, friendly receptions.
Plan to make your summer reservations
now and take advantage of our special
Extended Stay Rates. At that rate, you'll enjoy
the Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and
swimming, a championship Robert Trent
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three sumptuous meals a day.
So this summer, come to where the
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CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-431-0152
ELLENVILLE, NY. 12428


v

elping People
iking Yourself: Enhancing Self Esteem
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
r ----------- j ins*. K.*S\*\A
enough," and replace this with
confident, rational thinking.
I
I
I
L
A personal View from Bar- *?h Jl"?' ^^ f exPecti"8
)ara Friedlander, MSW yTL FT YUr HT'
Counseling Program Coor- oV "ic^'t''o^lCLf^
iinator at Jewish Family and m not K0^
:hildren'8 Service.
(All case names mentioned in
ihese articles are fictitious;
client information at Jewish
family and Children's Service
w held in the strictest of
\cmfidence.)
Self-esteem is an evaluation
&f your own worth, based on
how you compare yourself
,Wth others. The end result of
vour evaluation will either be
lings of worth or wor-
dlessness. Unfortunately, we
end to be our own worst
enemies; however, self-
confidence and positive feel-
lings about oneself can be
developed.
A person with high self-
lesteem projects poise, self-
Iconfidence and optimism,
Iwhich comes from being
satisfied with yourself. You
I have learned to be your own
I best friend, and MB do not de-
Ipend on the" praise and en-
Icouragement of others in
order to like yourself. You ac-
Icept your good qualities and
the bad qualities and you ac-
I cept imperfection.
A person with low self-
I esteem lacks self-confidence,
' has a pessimistic outlook, and
does not like themselves very
much, and tends to be overly
sensitive to criticism. If you
see yourself as weak or in-
ferior, you invite a vicious self-
fulfilling prophecy. You
believe yourself unworthy, you
expect to fail, and when this
happens, it serves to confirm
what you believed all along.
The first step toward raising
your self-esteem is to admit
that you have negative
qualities, is natural and does not reflect
your self worth as a person. It
is unreasonable to demand
perfection of yourself.
The next step is to affirm
your positive qualities and at-
tributes. In order to have a lov-
ing and respecting attitude
about yourself, you need to
recognize your talents and ac-
complishments. Then look for
ways to increase your source
of positive strokes, by expan-
ding your social network, say-
ing good things to yourself, ex-
amining new ideas and becom-
ing informed about a new in-
terest. Learn to ask for what
Holocaust
Continued from Page 3
tisch, Catherine M. Brunson,
Rabbi Alan Cohen, Rev.
William Compton, Peter
Daniels, Kenneth Farber,
Esther Froelich, Angela
Gallicchio, Susan Glaser and
Rev. Thomas Graham.
Additional members are
Helen Hoffman, Rev. Allen
Hollis, Rev. William Ilnisky,
Lillyan Jacobs, Dorothy Mof-
son Kaye, Rev. Derek King,
Midge Lansat, Ed Lefkowitz,
Ann Lynn Lipton, Rabbi
William Marder, Rabbi
Howard Shapiro, Louise
Shure, Barbara Steinberg, La
Vonne-Stiffler, Mayor Samuel
A. Thomas, and Rabbi Steven
R- Westman.
For additional information,
contact Debbie Hammer, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
A person's sense of self is
ever growing. You cannot
change the past, but you can
change today and tomorrow.
Anything can be unlearned, nc
matter what your age; it is
never too late. People can
always learn new things, feel
better about themselves and
change their lives.
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located at
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 104. Our telephone
number is 684-1991. The
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Fedeartion and
the United Way of Palm Beach
County.)
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CERTIFIED KOSHER FOR PASSOVER nODl5"TO3
Why Are These
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Small Whole Onions
Cauliflower (box & bag)
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Cooked Squash
Small Whole Onions
Whole Baby Cairols
Whole Strawberries
Sugar Snap- Snap Peas
Red Raspberries in hie syrup
Strawberries in lite syrup
Because they're Kosher for Passover.
While most of our delicious fruits and
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these Birds Eye products are also Kosher
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e 1987 Genet al Food* Corpof alon
-


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, funded by
Gulfstream Area Agency on Aging, provides a variety of ser-
vices to persons 60 years or older, along with interesting and
entertaining educational and recreational programs. All
senior activities are conducted in compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
of the Jewish Community
Center is designed to keep per-
sons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious, nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by our registered
Dietician along with varied
programs. Volunteers and
staff are helpful and gracious.
Diners enjoy meeting and
eating together each day.
There is no fee, but contribu-
tions are requested. Reserva-
tions must be made, so please
call either Carol or Lillian at
689-7703.
Monday, April 6 Games
with Fred Bauman.
Tuesday,
Exercises.
April 7 -
NEW CLASSES
Coping with Alzheimer's
at Home. Classes on
Thursdays at 1:30 p.m.
Improve Your Memory.
Classes on Fridays at 1:30 p.m.
OTHER CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge Series.
Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m.
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Vita Tax Assistance.
Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Health Insurance. Third
Thursday of each month. Call
for appointment or
information.
Timely Topics. Mondays at
2 p.m.
A special lecture will take
lace on April 6. What will
Xn to your spouse if you
a catastrophic illness?
Will he or she have to turn to
Welfare? Attorney Michael
Lampert will address this pro-
blem. Everyone is welcome.
Also, any member who wishes
to attend luncheon before the
meeting (at 1:15) may do so by
signing up the week before or
calling Ruth at 689-7703 for
reservation.
PASSOVER SEDER
The Comprehensive Senior
Service Center announces that
Passover will be celebrated
with a Seder in the Kosher
Meal Program. It will be con-
ducted by Dr. Elliot Schwartz,
former Director of the Bureau
of Jewish Education in Rhode
Island, on Monday, April 13 at
11 a.m. Seating is limited so
make reservations early.
Florida Legislature
t
Continued from Page 1
guests of the Florida Associa-
tion of Jewish Federations
Government Affairs Commit-
tee at a luncheon where they
have another opportunity to
meet with their legislators.
In addition to the state
issues, a Soviet Jewry Press
Conference and Rally will be
held on the steps of the State
Capitol building at 1:30 p.m.
At this time, the establishment
of the Florida State Public Of-
ficials for Soviet Jewry will be
announced.
Community members are en-
couraged to actively par-
ticipate in this event. To join
with other members of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, call Rabbi Alan
Sherman, Community Rela-
tions Council Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Wednesday, April 8 Chair
Exercises with Shirley Sheriff.
Thursday, April 9
Children of Pre School will
entertain seniors.
Friday, April 10 Music
with Gerry.
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
quired daily nutrition for
adults.
Persons who need meals for
a short period of time, until
their health returns, should
call the JCC at 689-7703 for in-
formation. There are no set
fees for meals in this program
but we ask each one to make
weekly contributions.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons sixty years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation who must go to
treatment centers, doctor s of-
fices, hospitals and nursing
homes to visit spouses, social
service agencies and nutrition
centers. We service the han-
dicapped in our special lift
vehicle. There is no fee for this
service but participants are en-
couraged to contribute their
fair share. Reservations must
be made at least 48 hours in
advance. For more informa-
tion and/or reservations,
please call 689-7703 and ask
for Helen or Lillian in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
The School Board of Palm
Beach County Adult and Com-
munity Education Classes:
Weight Control. Mondays
at 1:45 p.m.
Stress Management.
Tuesdays at 1:15 p.m.
Exercise and Health
Education. Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
Speak Out. Wednesdays at
1:15 p.m.
Palm Beach Junior College
of Continuing Education
North Campus:
W&e not just good,were nice.
Ana generous too!
Introducing Bonus Plus CDs. The new
Bonus Plus CDs from Flagler Federal are proof-
positive of our generosity. Because they give you
more than a short-term and a high yield. More than
a cash bonus of up to f 50 for each 110,000 you
invest Even more than free travelers checks, free
notary service, and a free Hurricard good at over
250 Publix stores throughout the state.
Because, now, when you invest in a new
Flagler Federal Bonus Plus CD, you'll also get a
Flagler Federal Chexpress Account -with a cash
bonus of up to $60 to start you off Well also
give you your first 200 checks and, to top it all off,
well transfer your monthly CD interest to your
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So stop at the Flagler Federal branch nearest
you and open up a
new Bonus Plan
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that makes all the
others look, well,
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Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 21
JDC To Aid Ecuadorian Quake Victims
Edna Hibel recently received the Humanitarian Award for
1987 from the Palm Beach Council of B'nai B'rith. The
"Stone Moses Statue" by the noted Russian emigre artist
David Fisher, was presented to her by Samuel Benoff (second
from left), President of the Council. An Edna Hibel Unit of
B'nai B'rith is in formation. Shown with Mrs. Hibel are
Israeli Col. Itzhak Itzzhaki (left), Seymour Reich (fourth
from left), International Vice President of B'nai B'rith.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC)
is responding to the earth-
quake in Ecuador is respon-
ding to the earthquake in
Ecuador by opening its
mailbox to donations for
emergency relief and by im-
plementing an assistance on
behalf of the American Jewish
Community.
President Heinz Eppler said
the program will give people
here the opportunity to offer
financial assistance to
Ecuadorians left homeless by
the earthquake. JDC has open-
ed its mailbox in past cases of
natural disasters around the
world, including crises in Mex-
ico, Colombia and most recent-
ly, El Salvador.
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JDC executive vice presi-
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Catholic, Protestant, and
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Page 22 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987
* *
k<- fe'
Addresses Of Officials
To Write On Behalf Of Cherna Goldort:
Russian Officials/Ministries
The Honorable Uri
Dubinin
Ambassador Embassy of
the USSR
1 Andrei Sakharov Plaza
Washington, DC 20036
Mr. Mikhail Gorbachev
Sec. Gen. of the
Communist Party
The Kremlin
Moscow, RSFSR; USSR
USSR
Altaiisky krai,
Biisk 22
Institute "ANIIHKT"
Director Savachenko
USSR
Moscow
Bogdana Khmelnitskogo
12
Ministry of Industry
Sample Letters:
Dear...
I am writing in behalf of
Cherna Goldort of
Novosibirsk, USSR,
who since 1972 has been
repeatedly denied permis-
sion to be reunited with
her daughters and grand-
children in Israel. This 54
year old widow is very sick
with a heart condition.
Please uphold the Soviet
Union's commitment for
family reunification and
the right of freedom of
movement for its citizens
under the Helsinki accord
and grant Cherna Goldort
an exit visa.
Thank you for your pro-
mpt attention.
Dear. .
Let Cherna Goldort of
Novosibirsk go! She is be-
ing kept in Russia. She is
very ill and alone and
wants to be reunited with
her family in Israel.
U.S. Mailing Addresses
Pres. and/Mrs. Ronald
Reagan
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Ave.
Washington, DC 20500
The Hon. George Shultz
Secretary of State
Department of State
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20520
Senator Robert Graham
Senator Lawton Chiles
Senator John F. Kerry
Senator Edward Kennedy
166 Russell Senate Office
Building
Washington, DC 20510
Congressman Daniel A.
Mica
131 Cannon House Office
Building
Washington, DC 20515
Congressman Tom Lewis
1313 Longworth House
Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Congressman Barney
Frank
1317 Longworth House
Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Congressman Nicholas
Mavroules
440 Cannon House Office
Building
Washington, DC 20515
Congressman J. Mar key
205 Cannon House Office
Building
Washington, DC 20515
Sample Letter:
Dear...
I am writing in behalf
of Cherna Goldort of
Novosibirsk who has been
reportedly denied
permission to join her two
daughters and
grandchildren in Israel.
This 55 year old widow
lost her job and has no
relatives in Russia.
Please help her to
emigrate to Israel and
freedom! She is ill and
her children want to care
for her!
Thank you for all your
help.
Trapped In Siberia
Continued front Page 4
teachers of that time, who was
much impressed both by her
vivacity and by her determina-
tion to join her daughter in
Israel.
In 1979 Cherna Goldort was
summoned to an interview
with General Slontezky, a
senior emigration department
official in Novosibirsk, who
told her: "You have one
daughter in Israel and another
with you. If you want to be
with both of them, then let
Galina go, and it will be easier
for you to receive permission
for yourself." Galina applied,
and was allowed to leave. She
too settled down in Israel. Her
mother, applying once more as
General Slontezky had sug-
gested, was yet again refused
her exit visa.
Each year, Cherna Goldort
received a further refusal.
Each year, she travelled to
Moscow to meet Ilya Essas
and the other Hebrew
teachers. At one moment she
joined a small Hebrew-
language circle in Novisibirsk
itself, but it was soon broken
up by the KGB. For Cherna as
for so many Soviet Jews, lear-
ning Hebrew was to be a
preliminary to living in the
Jewish state; but even that
was denied her. Novosibirsk
and Jerusalem are both in Asia
on the same continent. But
as far as Cherna Goldort was
concerned, they might have
been on different planets.
For seven years now Cherna
Goldort has been denied the
right to join her two
daughters, or to be with the
grandchildren whose faces she
knows only from photographs.
The repeated rejections of her
request to leave are a flagrant
violation of the Helsinki Ac-
cords of 1975, in which the
Soviet Union specifically ac-
cepted (as did Britain and the
U.S.) the importance of speedy
reunification of divided
families.
Today, the denial of an exit
visa to Cherna Goldort is in
stark contrast to the world-
II
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wide mood of euphoria at the
"new" Soviet approach to
human rights, not to speak of
the actual new Soviet emigra-
tion regulations of January 1,
which give all divided families
the right of reunification.
Under these regulations, Cher-
na Goldort ought to have been
among the 98 Soviet Jews
allowed out this January (not
500 according to one senior
Soviet spokesman).
A year ago, Cherna
Goldort's teacher, Ilya Essas,
was given permission to leave
the Soviet Union, to join his
parents in Israel. On his last
day in Moscow, he saw Cher-
na, who had made the long
journey in order to say good-
bye to him. "She was tired,
weary, a different woman,"
Essas recalled during a recent
visit to London, at a public
meeting organized by the
Foreign Affairs Committee of
the Board of Deputies. He
went on to tell his British
listeners:
"Cherna Goldort is one of
those people who need im-
mediate help from every point
of view: people whose refusal
is absolutely baseless today.
Their secrets, if there ever
were any, are obsolete. What
is not obsolete is their health;
they are getting older."
Cherna Goldort is one of
more than nearly 2,000 Soviet
Jews who have been
refuseniks for 12 years and
more. She is one of at least 300
divided families, each of
whom, under the new Soviet
regulations, should now be in
Israel. She is also one of 100
mothers still living in the
Soviet Union whose children,
all living in Israel, have formed
a new group with the name:
"Let Our Parents Go!" Cherna
Goldort, one of those parents,
is 56 years old. Surely the time
has come to end her torment,
and to re-unite her with her
daughters.
Continued from Page 3
Neil Newstein, Director of the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service; Dr. Larry Mack, a
local psychologist who has
worked with youth groups; Dr.
Norma Schulman,
psychologist and teacher at
Midrasha; student represen-
tatives from each grade; and
Midrasha
parents. Angela Gallicchio.
President of the Flagler Even-
ing Section, will welcome the
students and parents.
The community is invited to
participate in this Issues
Forum. For more information,
contact Ann Lynn Lipton,
Education Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday
9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8 a.m. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.
For times of evening services please call the Temple office,
689-9430.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m.. Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 am.
ORTHODOX

CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:45 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5849
Okeechobee Blvd., No. 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33417. Phone
471-1526.


(UU"ll"W
^^
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 23
Synagogue News
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Sisterhood will be held on
Wednesday, April 8 at 6513
Dillman Road, West Palm
Beach. An exchange and
discussion of Passover recipes
both traditional and new will
be the subject of the meeting.
A collation will be held at
12:30 p.m. preceeding the
regular meeting.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Friday, April 3, 6:15 p.m.
Family Shabbat Dinner. Ser-
vice at 7:45 p.m. Birthdays and
Anniversaries to be celebrated
at Service. Call Temple for
reservations.
Sunday, April 5, Cantor Nor-
man F. Brody will give a con-
cert with the Epstein Brothers
Orchestra at Temple Beth El
at 7 p.m. featuring Jewish
songs of the theatre, Israeli
and cantorial favorites. For
tickets call the Temple.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
The Temple Choir will per
form at the Spring Concert on
Saturday, April 11, 8 p.m. In
addition the Nagilla Dance
Troupe of Miami will perform
Israeli, Yeminite and
Chassidic Dances in full
costume. Cantor Elliot Rosen-
baum will sing as well as Jack
and Mildred Pitchon. The
donation is $7.50 per person.
Contact the Temple for more
information.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday, April 3 the Tem-
ple will celebrate Family Night
Shabbat Service, conducted by
Rabbi Howard Shapiro, with
the Ben Gurion 100th birthday
presentation by the Seventh
Grade. Lauren Debs will chant
the kiddush. Cantor Taormina
will lead the congregation in
songs.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited. During
the evening service child care
will be provided.
On Saturday morning April
4 at 10:30 a.m. Lauren Debs,
daughter of Howard and
Sheila Debs, will celebrate her
Bat Mitzvah.
Second Letter From Soviet Twin Brings
Welcome News To Bar Mitzvah Youth
By LOUISE ROSS
Although Adam Fischer
received presents acknowledg-
ing his March 20 Bar Mitzvah
at Temple Judea, a most
welcome "gift" was delivered
the day before. He received a
second letter from Michael
Mermershtain of Ushgorod,
USSR, his Soviet "twin," less
that three months after being
pleasantly surprised by the
first.
"My mom and everybody
was so excited when the letter
came that they opened it
before I got home. (After
reading it) what really shook
me up was that on March 28,
Mike is having his own Bar
Mitzvah. As far as we know,
this is the first public Bar Mitz-
vah (in the Soviet Union),"
Adam said.
According to Rabbi Joel
Levine, who officiated at
Adam's Bar Mitzvah, the fact
that this letter, acknowledging
that a Bar Mitzvah was to take
place, got through Soviet cen-
sorship was in itself
miraculous. "Before this, all
ceremonies were held in
secret, if at all," he said.
"Adam's letter gives hope to
others who write to their
twins."
To highlight the plight of
Soviet Jewry, the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
county sponsors this "twinn-
ing" program where Bar and
Bat Mitzvah youngsters are
encouraged to include their
twin symbolically in their
ceremony and to correspond
with them. Some receive
replies, others do not.
When Adam writes to Mike
Area Deaths
BLAUSTEIN
Morris A., 88, of Lake Worth. Riveraide
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
GOSS
Frederick, 62, of Lake Worth. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, Weat Palm Beach.
HARRIS
Max 89, of Century Village, Watt Palm
"fach Riverside GuardianFuneral Home.
West Palm Beach.
HYDE
{kslyn H 77. of Lake Worth. Levitt-
weinstem Guaranteed Security Plan
Uapel. West Palm Beach.
LEVY
Anna E 96, 0f Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
SHIPMAN
go*- 77, of Century Village. West Palm
*** Menorah Gardens and Funeral
c>pels. West Palm Beach
again, he will tell him all about
his Bar Mitzvah and this time
he will have something even
more exciting to ask him. "I
want to know how his Bar
Mitzvah went," he said. Adam
had tried to call Mike previous-
ly but couldn't get through.
When the operator finally call-
ed back, it was 2:30 a.m. and
the call couldn't be completed.
As a result of Adam's
positive experience with the
"twinning" program, he has
advice for others who will be
corresponding with their
Soviet twins. "Go ahead and
keep writing. People can
receive more than one (letter)
and people who haven't (heard
from their Soviet counterpart),
will receive a letter," Adam
said.
400 Soviet Jews
Continued from Page 1
long-standing policy of repres-
sion of its Jewish citizens and
is more than an illusory and
politically motivated ploy to
improve its relations with the
United States in the pursuit of
its own ends," Popkin said.
"Time, and the release of addi-
tional Soviet Jews, with tell,"
she added.
Pesky noted that while only
three Jews remain political
prisoners in the USSR, "They
are there on trumped-up
charges, as were all Jewish
prisoners held captive solely
because of their desire to
emigrate to Israel."
He said "the Soviet emigra-
tion policy has the effect of de-
nying the right to emigrate to
some 400,000 Jews" who have
asked to leave for reasons
other than family reunifica-
tion, "including repatriation to
Israel." Therefore, "mere
numbers are not enough.
There must be normalization
of the Soviet's emigration
procedures."
Popkin congratulated the
new emigrants who will be
reunited with family and
friends in time for the
Passover holidays next month.
"We look forward to the time
when all Soviet Jews will
celebrate Passover in
freedom," she said.
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Jj*^ April 3 7:20 p.m.
Bar Mitzvah
BRYAN COHEN
Bryan Cohen, son of Myrna
and Fred Cohen of Palm Beach
Gardens, will be called to the
Torah on Saturday, April 4 at
Temple Beth David. Rabbi
William Marder and Cantor
Earl Rackoff will officiate.
Bryan is a seventh grade stu-
dent at The Benjamin School,
where he is on the student
council and senior high school
varsity tennis team. He enjoys
tennis and photography.
Bryan will be sharing the
day with his Soviet Twin, Abe
Gilman of the Soviet Union.
Sharing the simcha with his
brothers, Greg and Todd, are
his grandparents, Virginia and
Nathan Lippock and Anne and
Fred Stern of Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania.
Bryan Cohen
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
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Page 24 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, April 3, 1987

At a reception recently held in Palm Beach on behalf of State of Israel Bonds,
Gilbert Tilles, (fourth from left) was presented with the prestigious David
Ben-Gurion Award for his outstanding support and dedication to the growth
and development of the State of Israel. Presenting the award was Chairman
of the event, Eugene Ribakoff, (third from left). Special guest was Israel i
Ambassador Meir Rosenne, (second form left). Saul Kramer (left) and Merrill
L. Bank (right) served as Honorary Chairmen.
Senator Charges
Continued from Page 16
spoke of his "conflicting emo-
tions" on that occasion. Much
of his family, he explained, had
perished under the Nazi "em-
pire of evil."
"What finally enabled me to
deal with that personal con-
flict," Mr. Siegman declared,
"was the luminous example of
integrity and heroism of Ger-
man Gentiles involved in the
White Rose, however small in
a far larger sea of German in-
difference and collaboration."
Other members of Congress
who attended included Sen.
Robert Kasten (Wis.), and
Congressmen Ben Gilman
(NY), John Lewis (Ga.), and
Sidney Yates (111.).
Former U.S. Ambassador to
West Germany Arthur Burns
noted that in the final analysis
it was "the evil of apathy and
indifference toward fellow
human beings" against which
the White Rose students
fought.
West Germany's Am-
bassador Guenther van Well
told the audience that the for-
mation of the White Rose
Foundation represented "an
important step that we have
taken in our relationship" and
a "basis for German-Jewish
dialogue."
The purpose of the White
Rose Foundation, according to
Mr. Siegman, is to "build
bridges" between democratic
forces in West Germany and
the American Jewish com-
munity, a relationship "in par-
ticular need of attention not
only because of the tragic past
but also because of the new
strains imposed by the Bitburg
incident."
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Full Text
JThe Jewish FVoridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, AprH 3, 1987
Continued from Page 15
Dorothy Ludwig, Nancy Dickson, Esther Gniber, and Pauline Silverstein Freda ** Ann* Antweil, and Ida Karlan
Senator Charges World War II Allies Abandoned Jews To Hitler
WASHINGTON Senator
Claibome Pell told an audience
of German dignitaires, Jewish
leaders and survivors of a Ger-
man anti-Nazi resistance
movement he was convinced
there was an "unwritten
agreement" among the World
War II allies "to leave the
Jews to Hitler."
Sen. Pell, Chairman of the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, said, "The more I
study the Holocaust period,
the more I am convinced that
there was an unwritten agree-
ment between Roosevelt and
Churchill to leave the Jews to
Hitler."
He made his remarks at a
ceremony in the Capitol
Building (Feb. 23) marking the
formation by the American
Jewish Congress of a White
Rose Foundation to honor the
Jewish Labor
Continued from Page 11
European Jewish Affairs was
created in 1943, "they produc-
ed few results," observed
Waltzer.
At the Bermuda Conference,
held in April 1943, "it became
apparent the Roosevelt Ad-
ministration opposed doing
much to rescue or even
relieve the condition of Jews
in Nazi-occupied Europe.
Many of the Jewish leaders felt
they had failed completely.
Growing despair set in, and
the Joint Emergency Commit-
tee collapsed."
Despite these domestic set-
backs, the labor organizations
continued to funnel money to
the Jewish underground in
Poland, via ZEGOTA, the
Council for Aid to Jews, set up
by the Polish resistance.
BETWEEN DECEMBER,
1942 and December, 1944, a
total of "350,000 was sent "to
sustain the battered remnants
of the underground and to pro-
vide food, medicine, clothing,
shelter, forged 'Aryan'
documents, and arms," said
Waltzer. The money was car-
ried into Poland by
parachutists wearing special
money belts.
Though the amounts raised
were "terribly small" by
modern standards and arrived
mostly after the destruction
for the Warsaw and other
Jewish ghettos, stressed
Waltzer, "the money gave the
Jewish underground added
respectability with the Polish
underground, with whom rela-
tions (during the war) were not
always cordial."
memory of young German
Christians who risked their
lives to fight Nazism. Leaders
of the underground resistance
movement called themselves
the White Rose.
The ceremony also saw the
presentation to the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council of
a rare collection of anti-Nazi
leaflets distributed by the
White Rose at the height of
World War II. The gift was
presented by two survivors of
the movement, Franz Joseph
Mueller and Anneliese Knoop-
Graf, who flew from Germany
for the occasion.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of the American
Jewish Congress, who chaired
the proceedings, noted that
the concept of the White Rose
Foundation grew out of a
"pilgrimage" to Munich, Ger-
many, at the time of President
Reagan's controversial visit to
the Bitburg cemetery in May
1985. The purpose of that
AJCongress delegation, com-
posed of Jews and non-Jews,
was to pay tribute to the
memory of the White Rose
founders. Himself a survivor
of the Holocaust, Mr. Siegman
Continued on Page 24
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*.---..

Pockets Of Jewishness
Friday, April 3, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Continued from Page 8
said. This came in very handy
on his second trip to Eastern
Europe and the Soviet Union
in 1984-85. He was often asked
by border guards to prove he
was a musician. One time he
played a Slovak song for a
Czech guard who then insisted
he play "0 Susannah."
HE ALSO played klezmer
music on the famous Charles
Bridge in Prague, directly in
front of the giant crucifix. A
plaque states that in 1609 after
a Jew was accused of
desecrating it, the ghetto com-
munity was punished and com-
pelled to pay for affixing the
Hebrew words "kadosh,
kadosh, kadosh" ("holy, holy,
holy" from the daily prayers)
in gold around the crucifix.
Strom felt his playing Jewish
music there was a statement of
Jewish survival. (A guitarist
later joined him and they made
$50.)
In Warsaw, he played and
ve lectures to groups of 40
60 young artists and profes-
sionals, Jews and non-Jews,
ammed into a room in so-
neone's home. These
"chavurot" (small groups) met
o explore Yiddish culture.
'We often jammed until four
n the morning," he said.
Strom played another role in
astern Europe, as well. "I
The Nickman
Years 1984-85
Continued from Page 2
lod Hasharon has undergone
remarkable physical and
scial transformation. Very
/arm ties developed and we
?th benefited as we moved
loser together in the spirit of
partnership," stated Mr.
Jickman.
Mr. Nickman recalled that
le Campaign that year ex-
jeded $6.5 million. Every
ivision reported marked in-
reases. "We had a tremen-
>usly exciting Community
[inner Dance where we all
talked into a Bruce Sutka
feation of the Old City of
jrusalem. We danced under
arches, strolled through its
Marketplace and enjoyed
irselves immensely," he said.
iThe efforts of Mr. Nickman
)d those who joined with him
[ leadership positions combin-
to move our community for-
ird in providing for Jews
lly, in Israel, and overseas.
was a messenger between the
Jews in one country and the
next." Feeling isolated and
forgotten, they had asked him
to "let us know what's happen-
ing to our brothers in the other
(Soviet bloc) countries." The
itinerant klezmer musician
"traditionally played this role
of disseminator of news from
one shtetl to another," he said.
"I was just doing this in a
modern way."
WHILE STROM was doing
research filling many
notebooks with facts and com-
ments Blue was taking over
6,000 photographs of Jews in
both large cities and small
towns. About 125 are current-
ly on exhibit at the Spertus
Museum in Chicago until the
end of March, when they will
travel around the country.
During their travels, he and
Blue realized that "every Jew
we met over the age of 40 is a
survivor." The old people, in
their 70's and 80's, are surpris-
ingly active. One 82-year-old
man who does all the physical
work for the local Jewish club
including chopping wood
told Strom, "I don't have the
luxury of retiring. I have an
important job to do and if I
don't do it, who will?"
There are also young people
who are committing
themselves to Judaism. One
man Strom met in Budapest
had just had himself circumcis-
ed at the age of 42. He would
not, however, have the opera-
tion performed on his son
because of fear of anti-
Semitism: "Who knows if
there is going to be another
Holocaust?" he said to Strom.
"These countries are soaked
with their family's blood,"
Strom said. "It's the easiest
subject to portray in a gloomy
way but we wanted to por-
tray life." He hopes to do a
film on his trip for PBS, and to
continue his ethnographic
work. "As long as there will be
a minyan in Eastern Europe I
will continue to do research
there."
Organizations
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Next meeting will be Thursday, April 9 at the American
Savings Bank, 12:30 p.m.
The guest speaker is S. Paul Beard, managing director of
the new Palm Beach County Center for the Arts being con-
structed on the grounds of the Palm Beach Junior College.
He will discuss his plans for the Center. Guests welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
Annual Dinner Dance and Installation of Royal Palm
Beach Lodge No. 3046 will be held on Sunday, April 5,
6:30 p.m., at Indian Trail Country Club.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter is holdng its Paid-up Membership
Luncheon and Installation of Officers on April 7 at the
Sheraton Hotel, Palm Beach Lakes Blvd. For information
contact Irma Haas, Chatham R-360, West Palm Beach.
Coming events:
April 4, Cruise on the Viking Princess.
April 12, "Applause" at the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre.
April 28, Cruise on the Intercoastal.
May 10, Mothers Day Cruise on the Viking Princess.
May 20, Luncheon and Card Party at the Oriental
Express.
A bus leaves every Saturday and Thursday for games at
the Seminole Village. For information call Ruth Rubin,
West Palm Beach.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Boynton Beach Chapter coming events:
Monday, April 6, Installation Luncheon at the Indian
Spring Country Club, 11501 Indian Spring Trail, Boynton
Beach, at noon.
Monday, April 20, Study Group: Sally Lehrman will con-
tinue her series on playwrite, Lillian Hellman with the play,
"Toys in the Attic," 1 p.m. at the Royal Palm Club House,
544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach.
Monday, April 27, Study Group: Royal Palm Club House
at 1 p.m. A short story will be read and discussion will
follow.
HADASSAH
Cypress Lakes Leisureville will have a regular
membership meeting Wednesday, April 22, 12:30 p.m. at
American Savings and Loan, West Gate of Century
Village, Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach. The program
will feature Drs. Steven and Ellen Cutler, chiropractors. A
mini-luncheon will be served. Everyone welcome.
%&%,&/
Shalom W. Palm Beach will participate in the Myrtle
Wreath ceremony, honoring Hadassah Life Members and
Associates, on April 5, 9:30 a.m., at Temple Emeth,
Delray. Transportation will be available. Contact Florence
Wexler.
Tikvah Chapter will participate in the Myrtle Wreath
Brunch at Temple Emeth, Delray Beach on April 3. Call
Frances Rose for more information.
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES
The chapter will meet on Sunday, April 12, 1 p.m. at the
Beach Federation Savings and Loan, 4524 Gun Club Road,
West Palm Beach.
Palm Beach County Under-Sheriff, Charles McCutcheon
and Sam Goldstein, Deputy Sheriff will discuss "Crime and
Crime Prevention."
For information contact Sid Levine, 2557 Emory Drive
West, Villa C, West Palm Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Century Chapter will hold its next meeting on April 9, at
Congregation Anshei Sholom, at noon. A representative
from Prudential Bache will speak on how to invest money
for best results.
Royal Chapter will hold its rummage sale on April 5 from
7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Southern Blvd. in Royal Palm Beach.
Contact Ruth Gradess for further information.
The following day, April 6, an executive board meeting
will take place at 9:30 a.m. at Village Hall in Royal Palm
Beach and the general meeting will follow at 12:30 p.m.
Participants are requested to bring their lunch. Gary
Tuckman, anchor newscaster for Channel 12, will be the
guest speaker. The meeting is open to the public.
West Palm Beach Chapter coming events:
Tuesday, April 7 at 3 p.m. in the Art Room of the Cen-
tury Village Clubhouse General monthly meeting.
Tuesday, April 28, Luncheon at Frances Langford's
Outrigger and cruise on the St. Lucie River. Bus transpor-
tation arranged. Contact Rose Samuelson, Bedford C-64
C.V. or Frieda Abel, Norwich D-89, C.V.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Regular meeting will take place on Tuesday, April 7, at 1
p.m. at Congregation Aitz Chaim. Guest speaker Buck
Kinard, Public Relations executive for Channel 5, will
speak on "The Last 25 Years of Television." Members and
guests invited.
Coming event: Luncheon and Card Party to be held on
Wednesday, April 8, at noon at Iva's Restaurant,
Okeechobee Blvd. Members and guests invited.
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