The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00068

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
Demographic Study continues ... please stay on the phone
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTY
thjewish floridian
^^^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13 NUMBER 11
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, MARCH 13,1987
PRICE 35 CENTS
Fm4 Mw*M
Tower Commission Report
Israel's Involvement
In Iran-Contra Affair
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan's special
review board on the Iranian-
Contra affair said that while
Israel was heavily involved
and may have initiated the
United States efforts in Iran,
the decision to sell arms to
Iran was an American one for
which the U.S. bears full
responsibility.
"There was heavy Israeli in-
volvement," former Sen. John
Tower, chairman of the three-
member board, said at a White
House press conference. "Of
course, the final decision of our
own participation was our
own."
Former Sen. Edward
Muskie, (D., Maine), who was
Secretary of State in the
Carter Administration, said
that it was not clear who
originated the idea of the U.S.
seeking influence in Iran.
It was an "initiative that
began either in Iran, in Israel
or in the United States," he
said.
BRENT SCOWCROFT, na-
tional security advisor in the
Weizman
Urges Talks
With PLO
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ezer Weizman, the only
member of the government to
publicly call on Israel to
negotiate with the Palestine
Liberation Organization,
declared that only talks with
the PLO or an expressed
readiness for such talks can ex-
pedite peace negotiations with
Jordan.
Weizman, a Minister-
Without-Portfolio who recent-
ly merged his Yahad Party in-
to the Labor Party, addressed
Continued oa Page 2


Inside
I Synagogue's Vandalism
: Spurs Suprama Court Casa
pag*4
I Random Thoughts...
[pagaS
j Rajolcing On Purlm...
:page 10
Interview with laraal
[ Consul Qanaral Timor
13
Ford Administration and the
third member of the board, ad-
ded that the board did not have
the "full picture" on Israel's
involvement.
"There is no question that
the Israelis encouraged, if
(they) did not initiate this
policy, and that they did
whatever they could when it
appeared to be flagging from
time to time to renew its
vigor," Scowcroft said.
"I think the problem is that
our goals and the Israeli goals
were not synonymous," he ad-
ded. "Indeed, in some respects
they have been in conflict."
While Scowcroft did not
describe the difference in
goals, the report does list
them: ** '"...... '
"Israel had long-standing in-
terests in a relationship with
Iran and in promoting its arms
export industry. Arms sales to
Iran could further both objec-
tives. It also offered a means
of strengthening Iran against
Israel's old adversary, Iraq.
"MUCH OF Israel's military
equipment came originally
from the United States,
however. For both legal and
political reasons, Israel felt a
need for U.S. approval of, or at
least acquiescence in, any
arms sale to Iran.
"In addition, elements in
Israel undoubtedly wanted the
United States involved for its
own sake so as to distance the
United States from the Arab
world and ultimately to
establish Israel as the only real
strategic partner of the United
Continued on Page 18
Youth Aliyah graduates are achieving success in officers core
of the Israel Defense Forces thanks to a UJA/Federation aid-
ed special program. Sea "Out of the Mud" on Page 2.
Israel Said To Have
Nuclear Capacity To Level
All Major Mideast Cities
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel appears to have the
nuclear potential to level every
major Middle Eastern city, ac-
cording to a book released last
week by the Carnegie Endow-
ment for International Peace.
Israel's nuclear program "is
far more advanced than
previously believed and ... ac-
cordingly, the pace of pro-
liferation in the region in re-
cent years has been more rapid
than generally acknowledg-
ed," Leonard Spector writes
in "Going Nuclear," the third
annual Carnegie Endowment
for Peace report on nuclear
war.
SPECTOR BASES his
discussion on Israel on
disclosures by Mordechai
Vanunu, a former Israeli
nuclear technician, who pro-
vided the basis for a detailed
account of Israel's nuclear pro-
gram published in the London
Sunday Times last October.
Vanunu's disclosures reveal-
ed that Israel may "now
possess more than 100 nuclear
weapons not the 20 to 25
previously thought and that
some of them may employ
Continued on Page 5
Ruling In
Florida
Sabbath Case
Welcomed
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Legal affairs directors of ma-
jor U.S. Jewish Organizations
expressed pleasure and relief
at the decision by the U.S.
Supreme Court that prohibits
states from denying unemploy-
ment benefits to employees
dismissed for declining to
work on the Sabbath.
The Court ruled 8-1 Wednes-
day in favor of Paula Hobbie,
who had been fired from her
job at a jewelry store in Winter
Park, Fla., for refusing to
work on Friday evenings and
Saturdays because of her
Seventh Day Adventist
religious beliefs.
Because she changed
religions after she was hired,
the State of Florida considered
her subsequent refusal to work
to be misconduct, which then
disqualified her from
unemployment benefits. A
federal court had ruled in
favor of Florida.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee, American Jewish Con-
gress and Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith all had
filed amicus briefs in support
of Hobbie.
"The Supreme Court's 8-1
decision is a major victory for
religious liberty for all," said
Samuel Rabinove, AJCommit-
tee legal director. "Florida's
refusal to award unemploy-
ment benefits to Miss Hobbie
was a violation of the 'Free
Exercise Clause' of the First
Amendment."
That clause prohibits Con-
gress from making a law
"prohibiting the free exercise"
Continued on Page 19
It's Our Turn To Be The Heroes
Super Sunday
Volunteers Still Needed
With nine days to go until Super Sunday '87, the recruitment of volunteers is
building momentum. According to Sam Wadler, a member of the Recruitment
Commfttee, close to 200 volunteers (at press time) have signed up for the day
long community-wide phonathon to be held on March 22 at the Airport Hilton.
People from throughout the community will be calling their friends and
neighbors to ask them to make a pledge to the 1987 Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish Appeal Campaign.
"We are looking for a total of 400 volunteers to successfully cover the phones
and help do other necessary jobs stated committee member Eric Crawford.
The MhSO a.m. to 1:80 p.m. time slot has already been filled and we are grateful
for the community's response. However, we are still recruiting and want to re-
mind people that their help is needed to make Super Sunday a super success," he
said.
To volunteer for Super Sunday, either dip the bottom portion of the ad on page
3 and send it to the Federation. 501 So. Flagler Drive, Suite 305, West Palm
Beach, Fl. 38401, or call the Federation office, 832-2120.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
a
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"B
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3
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5
3
Looking Back
25 Years of Local
Jewish Federation History
1982
Jeanne Levy presides over the Jewish Federation. Cyn-
nie List is President of Women's Division.
Midrasha-Judaica High School approved for college
accreditation.
Jewish Home for the Aged completes successful
building Campaign.
Jewish Community Center Activities Study launched to
determine future direction of JCC development.
Super Sunday '82 creates community spirit by involv-
ing hundreds of volunteers in the Campaign effort.
sun r
Super Sunday '82, this community's first all day
phonathon Campaign effort, is held at the Hyatt Hotel.
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
Jewish community ot Palm Beach County. Professional and
confidential help is available for:
Problems of the aging
Consultation and
evaluation services
Vocational Guidance
mi
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Elder Support Network
684-1991
Moderate fees are charged in family and Individual counseling to
those who can pay. (Fees are based on income and family size.)
The Jewish Family and Children's Service* is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
'Out Of The Mud'
By WENDY ELLIMAN
JERUSALEM On a cold
and windy night, a young
soldier angrily splashed his
way through the mud of a sod-
den Galilee hillside. Pushing
aside a dripping tent flap, he
raged at the man inside: I've
spent my whole life trying to
get out of the mud! You pro-
mised you'd help me. If this is
what you call help, I don't
want it. You can keep the
paratroopers wings!"
The target of this outburst
was Avi Naor of Youth Aliyah,
who had been urgently sum-
moned to camp by the soldier's
commanding officer. "I
couldn't calm the boy that
night," says Naor. "He d been
training hard and he was ex-
hausted. It wasn't the time to
remind him that he was 'back
in the mud,' as he put it, to get
out of it forever. Once he was
dry and rested, he decided to
stay the officers' training
course. He made it, too. To-
day, four years later, he's a
paratroop commander."
That young man is a
graduate of one of Israel's 250
Youth Aliyah schools a
, 50-year-old educational net-
work, largely funded by the
United Jewish Appeal/Federa-
tion Campaign through the
Jewish Agency. Created to
rescue and rehabilitate
traumatized children from
Holocaust Europe, Youth
Aliyah today cares mainly for
Israeli youngsters born into
socially, economically or
culturally disadvantaged
homes.
"Three or four years in
Youth Aliyah helps turn life
around for these youngsters,"
says Naor. "But it can't
always shake the stigma of an
underprivileged start. When
our kids go on to do their
Israel Defense Forces service,
both they and the IDF assume
they're fit only for the lower
ranks of the less glamorous
units. This of course becomes
self-fulfilling."
The IDF is a major social
force in Israel, notes Uri Gor-
don, the Youth Aliyah depart-
ment head. "Every fit
ster in the country seminar, but otherwise no
serves and only the best and favoritism is shown the Youth
Aliyah trainees. The whole
the brightest qualify for the
top positions. They become, in
turn, candidates for the best
civilian jobs after
demobilization."
So, eight years ago. Youth
point is that they succeed on
merit, not because of special
treatment.
The boys' program is an un-
Aliyah launched a support pro- disputed success, according to
to help selected both Youth Aliyah and IDF
gram
graduates enter and complete
officer training courses.
Limited at first to boys, it was
extended to girls in the fall of
1986.
"We believed that helping
some of our kids achieve their
potential in the IDF would
evaluation teams. Of the 400
Youth Aliyah youngsters who
have completed the course, 40
percent have become officers,
and another 36 percent other
command positions far
higher than average.
rhe three-month-old pro-
have a ripple effect far beyond gram for girls, however, is still
the individuals involved," says at the teething problem stage.
Naor. "Within Youth Aliyah "Beginnings are hard," Naor
itself, they would be a symbol said. "We sent recruitment
for younger students, showing letters to 35 girls: 1 signed up,
that it is possible for kids like and of these four have made
them to succeed within the
system. And on a national
level, a kid from a disadvan-
taged neighborhood who com-
mands a crack unit is an ins-
tant hero in his home corn-
officer."
Part of the reason, he
believes, is a strongly anti-
feminist outlook among the
girls who "don't want to ap-
munity displacing local gang pear smarter than the boys"
by qualifying for higher ranks.
Part is that the women's
course is very tough. But part
leaders as role models.
Around 50 Youth Aliyah
candidates are selected each
year. Two weeks of lectures,
training and orientation aim to
give the youngsters a firm
foothold before joining other
officer candidates.
Motivation is reinforced dur-
ing training at a weekend
is clearly because the program
is new.
Youth Aliyah receives alloca-
tions through contributions
made to the 1987 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-UJA Campaign.
Weizman Urges Talks
Continued from Page 1
some 400 dovish members of
the Labor Party's Central
Committee in Tel Aviv. He ex-
pressed frustration with King
Hussein of Jordan for insisting
on keeping his relationship
with Israel a deep secret.
Weizman's speech was view-
ed by political observers as
part of nis ongoing efforts to
assume leadership of the
moderates in the Labor camp.
Another speaker at the
meeting, MK Abba Eban, who
heads the Knesset's Foreign
Affairs and Security Commit-
tee, stopped short of calling
for talks with the PLO. But
Eban observed that any
serious negotiations among
the Palestinians were likely to
have ''distasteful
biographies."
Weizman accused Likud
Ministers of treating Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
"shamefully" at Sunday's
(Feb. 22) Cabinet meeting,
when Peres reported on his
meeting with Egyptian leaders
in Cairo. According to
Weizmann, the Labor-Likud
unity government has ended
its usefulness and now im-
pedes progress on the peace
front.
(4
I Am Too Busy To Make A Will!
Most people are. As a
nutter of fact, seven out
of eight Americans die
without a will. We say to
ourselves, think young,
stay active, plenty of time
for that later! And yet,
our loved ones can suffer
unnecessarily if we
should die intestate
(without a will), not just
financially but in other
ways as well.
Drawing a will is the
way to assure that the
fruits of our life's labors
are distributed in
accordance with our
wishes, and that our heirs
are appropriately
provided for. A will
enables us to:
direct the distribution
of our property the way
we intend;
provide security for
our loved ones, allow for
special health or
educational needs of a
family member;
* name a personal
representative instead of
having' it settled by a
court administrator;
Opportunities for
economical giving stiU
abound in 1987 (after
tax reform '86). Our
Endowment Director
will be happy to assist
you in any way he can.
You may contact him
at Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach
County, (305)
832-2120.
minimize taxes and
administrative costs, to
preserve as much of our
estate as possible, by
using various cost-saving
and tax-saving
opportunities;
make charitable
distributions to support
Erograms and causes we
eheve to be worthwhile.
?
We
arrangement* to provide
continued support for the
various charitable
endeavors we supported
during our lifetimes.
Making a will can be
satisfying, even
enjoyable. Thinking of
loved ones and
thoughtfully providing for
them can assure that our
will truly reflects our
interests and concern for
those individuals and
causes which helped make
our lives meaningful.
When planning your
will, be sure to contact
your attorney for
professional advice and
assurance that the
document will be properly
drafted. For farther
information about
planning a charitable
bequest or other gift,
E lease call or write the
Endowment Fund, Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, 501 Sooth Flagler
Drive, Suite 305, West
Palm Beach. FL 33401.


A Personal View Of
The Otzma Program
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
By SALLY FRIEDMAN
(Editor's Note: The writer's
daughter is one of the 56
students currently in Israel as
the first group of "Otzma"
participants.)
"Be brave for her ..." "Be
brave for her ..."
In my head, I had rehearsed
the scene a hundred times, but
my heart had stubbornly refus-
ed to learn the script.
So there I stood on a late
summer afternoon, crowds
swirling around me at Ken-
nedy Airport, crying the tears
I'd promised myself I wouldn't
as I said goodbye to our Amy.
This was no ordinary good-
bye, no countdown till
Thanksgiving or Parent's
Weekend. This time, the good-
bye stretches over ten months,
over continents, over miles too
awesome to contemplate.
Amy is off to Israel, the land
of her fathers, and she goes
gladly, with the zest of a
modern pioneer. She goes to
Israel to learn what no college
or graduate school could teach
her about devotion to a dream.
The first time we heard the
word "Otzma" was months
before this August day. Back
then, Otzma was a vague con-
cept, just another program
that Amy was exploring.
"She's not serious," we told
ourselves about Amy's deter-
mination to spend her 22nd
year in Israel.
We had much to learn about
our middle daughter ...
We realized by the spring of
Amy's senior year at the
University of Pennsylvania
that Israel was no fleeting no-
tion, no detour from the world
beyond the halls of ivy. Nor
was Otzma just another
program.
"It's wonderful just what
I'm looking for!" Amy had
insisted.
Otzma has beckoned Amy in
its first year of life. The shin-
ing hope of the program is as
simple and as profound as
this: Bring young adults to
Israel for a year of service,
educate them in the Hebrew
language and culture, ask
them to work with their hands,
their hearts and their minds,
and you will create a corps of
future leaders dedicated to the
dream of Zion.
Otzma dares to suggest that
the notion of Jews serving
Jews can transcend old notions
of "obligation." That by expos-
ing young volunteers to the
realities and complexities of
Israeli society, they will truly
share in nation building.
Visionary? Indeed.
But what a vision!
With Amy, we assimilated
the details: once selected by a
participating federation, Amy
would become part of a nation-
wide program coordinated by
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions in cooperation with the
Jewish Agency, the Israeli
Forum, a newly-established
Continued on Page 15
The Young Adult Division
of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
invites you to the
Business Executives Forum
at the elegantly restored
GULF STREAM HOTEL
on the Intercoastal Waterway
1 Lake Worth Avenue, Lake Worth
Thursday, March 19,1987
6-8 p.m.
Cash Bar Hors.D'Oeuvres
Bring Your Business Cards
$10. per person No Solicitation
R.S.V.P. Debbie Hammer, YAD Director,
832-2120
YOU'RE INVITED TO ATTEND
THE MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER'S
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
Second Annual Luncheon
and
Fashion Show
MONDAY, MARCH 30,1987
AT NOON
HYATT PALM BEACHES
Drawing for grand priza color TV. Other prtzaa Include:
gold Jewelry, art, dinner and hotel accommodations.
Donation $35.00
(Tax-Doductlblo)
Franco* Schnltt
Luncheon Chairperson
For reservations, call the Morse Geriatric Center,
471-5111, Ext. 195 or Esther Gruber, Reservation Chair-
person at 967-7029.
Perrin
Ellison
Klein
Klein
Perrin
Super Sunday '87
Training Builds Confidence
Whether it's training for an
athletic event or training for
Super Sunday '87, preparation
pays off in increased con-
fidence. The community-wide
phonathon to raise funds for
the 1987 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Campaign will
be held on March 22 at the Air-
port Hilton. It will involve hun-
dreds of volunteer telephone
workers who will be calling
new contributors to the Cam-
paign as well as those who
have not made their 1987 com-
mitment as yet.
Heading up the Training
Committee is Marva Perrin
who is well versed in the local
and international needs of the
1987 Campaign and has suc-
cessfully trained Campaign
solicitors for many years, ac-
cording to Bernie and Terri
Kurit, Super Sunday '87 Co-
Chairmen. Also training
volunteers will be Kari Ellison,
Carole and Paul Klein, Tony
Lam pert and Bob Perrin. The
committee is still in formation
and Mrs. Perrin is currently
enlisting additional trainers
for Super Sunday.
Telephone solicitors will be
trained for 45 minutes prior to
their 2 hour phone session to
help them feel more at ease
when they get on the phones.
During the training, the pro-
per methods of telephone
solicitation will be taught.
"We will use a UJA produc-
ed training video and each of
our volunteers will have a
model telephone script han-
dout with which to follow the
sample conversations. There
will also be a presentation to
familiarize each caller with the
needs of the 1987 Campaign,"
explained Mrs. Perrin. During
the two hour sessions,
members of the Training Com-
mittee will be available to pro-
vide additional help if needed.
"We just don't leave them
cold," Mrs. Perrin stressed.
Super Sunday, March 22,
will be filled with serious work
by the volunteers but there is
also a sense of excitement,
comaraderie and a satisfaction
in a job well done. Mrs. Perrin
related one of the highlights of
last year's phonathon. "One
caller obtained a $12,500 gift.
That was most unusual but you
never know which volunteer
will call a card like that. That
possibility is part of the excite-
ment generated on Super
Continued on Page 7
It's Our Turn
to be the Heroes...
AS A SUPER SUNDAY VOLUNTEER YOU CAN PERFORM MIRACLES.
Super Sunday Heroes
Provide care to needy elderly
Support high quality educational
programs for our youth
Create a better life for our Jewish
brethren in Israel
Provide aid to communities around
the world through the support of
the 1987 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United Jewish
Appeal Campaign
Sign up Today!!!
It's our turn to be the heroes
and make it a real
Super Sunday, March 22
Sari loc Sa*w Sw*y 17. Jmk Fifcmliii of ._. Cunty. Ml S. FImjmi Mm. Mt 305. w. Pkn Bttdi. Fl. 33401 -
( ) Please include me as a volunteer tor Super Sunday on March 22. at the Airport Hilton. West Palm Beach.
Name __________________________
Address
City
P'mll
State
Zip
(Business)
Telephone (Home)___________________________________
Organization Affixation_________________________________
I will be happy to work Irom
( >830 AM to 1130 AM ( ) 2 30 PM to 5 30 PM
I i 10 U>BB-_-P pv I 14 30 PM lo 7 30 PM
( ) 1230 PM to 330 PM ( ) 630 PM to 930 PM
I | I will be h*pp\ i.' work at an) lime Please let me know when vou need me.
i>-Kit te h*pin^ un *_pci ^urttox il tn*\ h#>r not 4k< dv iun. _
Child care will be
available all day long.


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13,1987
Golan Druze
Restless
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Five years after Israel formal-
ly annexed the Golan Heights, the 12,000-strong Druze
community there continues to resist the political reality
that they are part of the Israeli state.
Initially, their resistance took the form of sullen refusal
to accept Israeli identity cards. More recently there have
been open demonstrations against Israeli rule.
Though overshadowed by the wave of violence that
spread in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, an incident on
Feb. 14 underlined the seriousness of the situation there.
An outburst of pro-Syrian emotions among the Golan
Druze was triggered by the scheduled unveiling of a statute
of Sultan El Atrash, the legendary leader of the Druze
revolt against the French Mandate authorities in 1925.
It occurred in Majdal Shams, the largest Druze village on
the Golan. Israeli police assembled at the village early in
the morning, a Saturday, as a precaution against possible
demonstrations. Druze youths did indeed demonstrate.
Some throwing stones, others armed with chains and clubs,
chanting anti-Israel and pro-Syrian slogans, they clashed
with police.
Eight policemen were injured and at least 11 Druze were
arrested. The demonstration coincided with the fifth an-
niversary of Israeli annexation.
THE SITUATION is ironic. When Israel captured the
Golan Heights in the 1967 Six-Day War, the Druze, alone
among the populations of the occupied territories, proved
friendly. Their four villages surrendered without bloodsh-
ed. Relations with the Israeli authorities developed the
same patterns of friendship and cooperation which
characterized Israel's relations with the Druze minority
within its own borders.
The Druze in Israel are considered the most loyal minori-
ty. Like all Israeli citizens, except Arabs, they do com-
pulsory military service and have proven dependable and
often heroic soldiers in Israel's wars with its neighbors.
There are 45,000 Israeli Druze in 18 villages.
Many hold senior positions in the border police. The
declared policy of the government was to integrate the
Druze as much as possible into Israeli society, though this
policy often has not been implemented.
THE DRUZE are fiercely independent. They broke away
from Islam in the 11th century. Although they are con-
sidered to be ethnic Arabs, many regard themselves as a
separate ethnic entity. They have their own spiritual
leaders. And despite complaints of discrimination, most
Israeli Druze identify with the State.
In contrast, the Golan Druze maintain loyalty to Syria,
which they regard as the legitimate sovereign of the Golan
Heights. Nevertheless, after the Six-Day War they seemed
to accept that Israel was there to stay, pending an overall
political settlement of the Israel-Arab conflict.
Many took jobs in Kiryat Shemona and other Jewish
border towns. Their children studied Hebrew diligently and
many entered Israeli universities. At the same time, the
border with Syria remained relatively open. Golan Druze
frequently visited their families on the Syrian side, many of
whom hold senior positions in the Damascus establishment.
BUT PEACEFUL coexistence changed in 1982 when the
Likud government, with the backing of the Labor Align-
ment, annexed the Golan Heights, terminating military
rule and subjecting the territory to Israeli civil law.
The Druze community balked at carrying Israeli ID
cards. Rallying around their religious leaders, they staged
a silent revolt. For five months they remained within the
confines of their villages, refusing to present Israeli ID
cards at police barriers.
The self-imposed confinement gradually ended. In June,
1982, the Lebanon war shifted public attention away from
the Golan Heights. More and more Druze reluctantly ac-
cepted Israeli ID cards. But the Heights became a center of
Continued on Page 13
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iay. March 13, 1987 12 ADAR 5747
ume 13 Number 11
u-cn xo, i3oi
Shul's Lawyer Tells Supreme Court
Vandalism Was Racist
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The lawyer for a suburban
Washington synagogue that
had been desecrated argued
before the United States
Supreme Court that while
Jews cannot be considered a
race, the vandalism was a
racist act.
Patricia Brannan, a
Washington lawyer, said that
the eight men who sprayed
swastikas and anti-Semitic
slogans on the Shaare Tefila
Congregation synagogue in
Silver Spring, Md., on Nov. 1,
1982, acted because they con-
sidered Jews to be non-whites.
However Deborah Garren, a
Baltimore lawyer representing
one of the vandals, claimed
that while the act was one of
religious discrimination it was
not racist as defined by federal
civil rights laws adopted in
1866.
SHAARE TEFILA, a Con
servative congregation, was
defaced with swastikas and
other Nazi symbols and such
slogans as "Death to the
Jude."
Eight persons were later ar-
rested for the vandalism and
two of them were convicted of
damaging the synagogue. The
synagogue filed a suit in
federal court against all eight
congrega-
had been
charging that the
tion'8 civil rights
violated.
The suit seeks $3,000 to
cover the cost of repainting
the synagogue's walls with any
other money awarded going to
the Montgomery County
Human Relations Commission.
The synagogue is in Mon-
tgomery County, which
borders Washington.
However, the Fourth U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals in
Richmond, Va., rejected the
suit in a 2-1 decision which said
Jews could not use the civil
rights law for protection, as
of the Nazis in Germany and
neo-Nazis and groups like the
Ku Klux Klan in the U.S. is
that Jews were non-whites.
She said this was the belief
of the vandals and that their
intent was racist.
Brannan is a member of the
law firm of Hogan Hartson,
which is co-counsel in the suit
with the Jewish Advocacy
Center, a non-profit group
founded to bring legal action
against those committing anti-
Semitic acts.
KENNETH LIPSON, a co-
founder of the Jewish Ad-
vocacy Center, told reporters
thev were not a separate non- after the hearing, that the pur-
J rvAnn .f ?--* null mnn V -.^ J
white race.
AT THE same time, the
U.S. Court of Appeals in
Philadelphia ruled that Majid
Ghaidan Al-Khazraji, an Iraqi-
born professor, could sue
under the 1866 acts over his
charge that St. Francis Col-
lege in Pennsylvania denied
him tenure because he was an
Arab. His case was also heard
before the Supreme Court
Wednesday.
Brannan, the synagogue's
lawyer, argued that the intent
of the law was to bar racist
acts. While she stressed that
she did not want the Supreme
Court or any other court to
rule on whether Jews were a
race, she said that the ideology
pose of the suit was to send a
"clear message that anti-
Semitic violence would not be
tolerated."
Rabbi Martin Halpern, the
congregation's religious
leader, stressed that "our
generation has been
traumatized by the Holocaust,
which has taught us that
silence is not the answer to
bigotry When one human
being or one institution suffers
debasement, then we debase
all of the human family."
Brannan told reporters that
she was particularly pleased
that the congregation's appeal
to the Supreme Court had
been joined by groups such as
Continued on Page 19
ISRAEL, WITH THE WHOLE
FAMILY THIS YEAR
Discover your heritage together on a
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
FAMILY MISSION
JUNE 15-26,1987
The Family Mission Is The Richest Resource For Teaching Your Children
The Spirit And Challenge Of Israel And What It Means To The
Jewish People
Share With Your Children The Thrill Of Climbing
Masada, A Shabbat At The Western Wall
Visits To Kibbutzim And Israeli Military Bases
For additional information, contact Ronni Epstein,
D.rector of Commun.c.tions, at the Federation office, 832-2120.


Friday, March 13,1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
o
Radio/TV/ Rim
Entertainment
MOSAIC Sunday, March 15,9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Green. Pre-empted.
i'P*TU ~ Sunday March 15, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, March 15, 6 a.m. WPEC Chan-
nel 12 (8:30 a.m. WFLX TV 29) with host Richard Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, March 19,1:15
p.m. WLIZ 1340-AM A summary of news and com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
March 13
Free Sons for Israel board -10:30 a.m.
March 15
Purim Congregation Anshei Shalom Sisterhood Purim
Affair 7:30 p.m. Morse Geriatric Center Concert at
Lands of the President B'nai B'rith No. 3196 9:30 a.m.
Community Cantorial Concert at the West Palm Beach
Auditorium 7 p.m.
March 16
Jewish Federation Executive Committee 4 p.m.
American Israeli Lighthouse -1 p.m. Jewish Community
Day School executive committee 7:45 p.m. Jewish War
Veterans No. 705 board 7:30 p.m. Brandeis University
Women Palm Beach West 12:30 p.m. Hadassah -
Tikvah -12:30 p.m. Jewish Family and Children's Service
- board 7:30 p.m. Women's American ORT West Bend
Meed -1 p.m. Jewish Federation Nominating Commit-
tee noon Jewish Federation Black-Jewish Dialogue
Meeting 7:30 p.m.
March 17
Jewish Federation Leadership Development Commit-
tee 8 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Century Village -10
a.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold -1 p.m. Congregation
Anshei Sholom Sisterhood -1 p.m. Temple Israel board -
7:30 p.m. American Jewish Congress board -12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Lakes of Poinciana board -
12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Shalom noon Jewish
Federation Palm Beach Council Mini Mission 9-2
p.m. Jewish Federation Community Campus Corpora-
tion Meeting 5:30 p.m.
March 18
B'nai B'rith Women 01am board 10 a.m. National
Council of Jewish Women Palm Beach 10 a.m.
Hadassah Shalom -12:30 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group -
Cresthaven 1 p.m.
March 19
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee 12:30
p.m. Women's American ORT Haverhille study group
Morse Geriatric Center Women's Auxiliary board -1:30
p.m. National Council of Jewish Women Flagler Even-
ing 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Community Rela-
tions Council noon Hadassah Z'Hava 12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT No. Palm Beach County Region
- Donor Luncheon Jewish Federation Young Adult
Division Business Executive Forum at the Gulfstream
Hotel, Lake Worth 6-8 p.m.
For more information call the Jewish Federation of-
fice, 832-2120.
? ._^ IJKI Glott Kosher
Passover
Deauville
1987
5747
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Phone: 1-531-3446
Of mm Possow 87 DMuvtto PO Box 402868 Mlomi fttoch Rondo 33140
Random Thoughts
By MURIEL LEVITT
Computer dating seems to
have become very trendy and
taken hold among many young
people today. They visit a
fancy-dancy office, have an in-
depth interview, and then
make a video tape to be seen
by prospective partners. They
face the camera openly, telling
everything about themselves,
and then speak very sincerely
concerning the type of person
they would like to meet. It's all
extremely mod and certainly
high-tech scientific and it's a
brand new, exciting idea, or so
they think.
Well, kiddos, this kind of
pre-marital razz-ma-tazz has
been going on for hundreds
and hundreds of years. There
was no investigative camera,
no complex video tape, and no
advanced technology. Instead
of all these gimmicks, the
motivating force was a good
old fashioned shadchen. For
those who are uninformed (and
there can't be very many of
you) a shadchen is a mat-
chmaker, and this noble pro-
fession still exists and
flourishes in today's society.
Of course some of the fan-
cier, 20th century shadchens
call themselves Introductory
Services or Dating Experts,
and they've come a long way
since they dominated the
matrimonial scene in Europe.
There they met with concern-
ed parents who had daughters
and sons ripe and ready for
marriage. Together with mat-
chmaker the naden (or dowry)
was discussed as well as a fee
to be paid before the wedding.
It was not unusual for the
bride and groom never to have
met until the actual ceremony
took place.
Doubtless there must have
been boo-boos and unlikely
mates were tied together for a
lifetime of marriage
unblemished by divorce or
separation. But, surprisingly,
the majority of these unions
enjoyed years of productivity
and lots of children who grew
up happy and well adjusted. To
us, this system may appear ar-
chaic but it solved many a pro-
blem for worried parents and
hesitant marriage candidates.
Have vou ever known
anyone who has used the ser-
vices of a shadchen? It's kind
of like a Jewish version of the
dating game. Let's face it,
gang, some people need a help-
ing hand and a push towards
the chupah. Contrary to public
belief, matchmaking did not
begin and end with Fiddler on
the Roof.
We all know that every fami-
ly has one or two timid and
bashful souls. Why should they
languish in loneliness when a
visit to the shadchen might
possibly change their lives?
What can a few rubles matter
when the prospect of a
marvelous marriage lies
around the corner?
And let's not forget the
shidachs that have been per-
sonally arranged by family and
friends. Sometimes they are
absolutely terrific and
sometimes not, but a simple in-
troduction or blind date could
make two individuals sublime-
ly happy. I'll bet that many
readers have introduced
couples with satisfying results.
Doesn't it thrill you to bring a
girl and boy together when the
chemistry is perfect and love
follows quickly?
I am proud to tell you that I
have one shidach to my credit.
I introduced two young people
who were children of
neighbors. Both were nogood-
nicks, drop-outs, moocners,
and generally bad news. The
sparks flew, they adored each
other instantly, and it was a
match made in heaven. They
really deserve each other and
have been married for 25 years
fighting and bickering all
the way, but very content in
their competitive marriage.
So you see, in the final
analysis, we all try to do what
the matchmaker does. We
don't have computers or
videos, but we have the savvy
to know which cover will fit
what pot. We have years of ex-
perience, the desire to do
good, and the natural urge to
make a successful match. If I
can do it, you can too. With a
little effort, you could become
almost immortal ... well, if
not immortal, at least they'll
invite you to the chaaenah and
you'll be a genuine, 14 karat
VIP. With that incentive, you
just can't miss!
Israel Said To Have
Nuclear Capacity
Continued from Pmgt 1
nuclear fusion, the principle of
the H-bomb, which would
make them tens of times more
powerful than the atom bombs
used in World War II," Spec-
tor writes.
Evidence also suggests that
Israel deployed a sophisticated
short-range missile, the
Jericho II, during the early
1980's, which it could equip
with a nuclear warhead.
ISRAEL HAS declared that
it "will not be the first to in-
troduce nuclear weapons in
the Middle East," a statement
repeated by Premier Yitzhak
Shamir during his recent trip
to Washington.
Israel continued its nuclear
buildup while the U.S. "at
least partially aware of the
direction of events, turned a
blind eye," Spector writes.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman refused to
comment during a press con-
ference about Spector's
assertions.
Three other Middle Eastern
countries, Libya, Iran and
Iraq, have long been in-
terested in acquiring nuclear
weapons, but made Tittle pro-
gress towards nuclear arming
last year, according to the
report.
Libyan leader Muammar
Khadafy's interest in obtain-
ing nuclear weapons has been
thwarted by a 1983 global em-
bargo on nuclear transfers to
Libya, says the report.
"Although Tripoli has turned
to clandestine nuclear dealings
in the past, it remains unlikely
that Libya will be able to ob-
tain nuclear arms or nuclear-
weapons material by that
means because such com-
modities remain unavailable,"
Spector writes.
Iraq's nuclear program is at
"standstill" as a result of the
destruction of its reactor by
Israel in 1981, declining oil
revenues and the costs of its
war with Iran, the report
states.
Iran has "extensive nuclear
hardware, materials and
technology" that had been
built up by the Shah, although
it has made no recent progress
in its nuclear program, Spec-
tor notes. But Iran's "nuclear
activities pose a future pro-
liferation threat and deserve
to be monitored."
Pakistan made considerable
progress in its nuclear ac-
tivities in 1986 so "it is at a
nuclear-weapons threshold: it
either possesses all of the com-
ponents needed to manufac-
ture one or several atom
bombs or else just remains
short of this goal," Spector
writes. But the U.S. and
Soviet Union may prevent
Pakistan from conducting a
nuclear test, he adds.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
AIPAC Meeting
Dine, Durenberger To Speak On U.S.-Israel Relations
AIPAC Executive Director
Tom Dine and Senator David
Durenberger (R., Minn.) will
brief the Palm Beach com-
munity on the current state of
U.S.-Israel relations at the
home of Jeanne and Irwin
Levy on March 15.
This annual AIPAC fun-
draising event offers the pro-
Israel community a candid
forum for discourse on both
the positive and problematic
aspects of the ever-evolving
state of bilateral relations.
Among the topics for discus-
sion will be t le Administra-
tion's proposed arms sales to
Arab states; the Iran-Contra
affair and its effect on the
U.S.-Israel partnership; and
joint strategic, intelligence
and economic cooperation.
"The U.S.-Israel alliance is
strong and thriving, despite
issues such as the Iran-Contra
and Pollard affairs which are
obvious tension points. We are
now moving beyond these
stumbling blocks and concen-
David Durenberger has
represented his state of Mm-
of Palm Beach, a chief
organizer of the Sunday event
"But the time has come for
concerned Jews to understand
that the forces which shape
our world operate in the
political arena.
'Problematic events and
nesota in the U.S. Senate since xiaues imVe movec[ beyon(j th
1978. Over the years, he s pro- ^ or resoxXTCes 0f j
ved to be a staunch supporter phfianthropy. We must
of Israel and has highhghted ^ere{ore be meaningfully in
her value as stri*g volved and I see no more effec-
American asset in the Middle tiye channe, {or meanintrfu]
sw Dnrenbenrer served political involvement than
AIPAC," insists
East. Durenberger
chairman of the Senate In-
telligence Committee in the
Republican-dominated 99th
Congress. He currently serves
on the Finance, Governmental
Affairs, Environment
through
Stein.
Dine and Durenberger will
speak at the Levy home on
Sunday, March 15, at 4:30 p.m.
Public Works and Select Ag- They will address a subsequent
Tom Dine
trating on increased coopera-
tion with our allies in the Ad-
ministration and on Capitol
Hill," says Dine of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Dine, the Jewish com-
munitv's most prominent lob-
Senator David Durenberger
byist in the nation's capital,
will convey official American
and Israeli perceptions of
Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's recent State visit to
Washington. Dine will also
outline the current status of ef-
forts to revive the stalled Mid-
dle East peace process.
ing Committee.
"Palm Beach is a hub of
Jewish philanthropy; there's
probably no other community
m the country that adheres
more to the Jewish principles
of tzadakah," savs Mike Stein
gathering at 2500 South Ocean
Blvd. at 8 p.m. Interested par-
ticipants must RSVP for
either of these events with
Mike Stein (305-842-0112) or
Lori Kagan at AIPAC
(202-638-2256).
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth they'll never say
'Fen' to your f lanken!
Readers Write
Israel 'The Promised Land9
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
It is written that G-d promis-
We are that future genera-
tion. NOW we have a pro-
mise to keep Israel physically
and economically strong,
ed land (Israel) to Abraham, Israel is the refuge for any Jew
in any troubled area in the
world, now and in the future.
We must keep our ancestors'
promise by participating
through your contribution to
the 1987 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Isaac and Jacob and delivered
it to Moses for his people as
their inheritance. But, this was
a conditional inheritance based
on a promise that the land be
kept intact for future
generations.
Gackenheimer Elected
Treasurer of FAHA
provide high-quality care to
more than 50,000 elderly Flori-
dians. The organization fur-
nishes its members with infor-
mation on state and local
legislation effecting the in-
dustry, and seeks to keep the
membership apprised of the
latest advances in the field.
Mr. Gackenheimer's profes-
sional association member-
ships includes serving on the
Board of Directors of the Na-
tional Association of Jewish
Homes and Housing for the
Aging (NAJHHA). His elec-
tion to the post of Treasurer of
FAHA was preceeded by his
membership involvement in
the organization over the past
three years.
Mr. Gackenheimer has serv-
ed as Executive Director of the
Morse Geriatric Center, West
Palm Beach, since its inception
in July, 1983. Prior to that, he
served as Executive Vice
President of the Hebrew
Rehabilitative Center for the
Aged in Boston,
Massachusetts.
Jewish Appeal Campaign,
where more than 60 cents of
your dollar goes directly to
Israel. If you haven't given, do
it now! If you have, add a little
more!
NATCOHEN
Co-Chairman,
Century Village
1987 Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach Coonty-UJA
Campaign
6. WASHINGTON'S
RICH BROWN FLANKEN
For a more flavorful flanfcen, mix
in G. Washington's Rich Brown
Seasoning and Broth when you
add the water and vegetables to
the meat G. Washington's Sea-
soning and Broth is more than a
flavor enhancer It's a complete
seasoning The special Mend of
herbs and spices flavors your
fianken in more ways than one.
And it does wonders for your
stock, too! With G Washing-
ton's they'll never say 'fen' -
they'M say morel'
KCwtMad (testa* a* Pane
4 pounds beef short ribs
2 tablespoons shortening
1% quarts boiling water
3 packets G. Washington's
Rich Brown Seasoning and Broth
6 whole petaar corns
3 stalks eatery
3 sprigs parsley
2 onions
2 carrots
Lightly brown short ribs in shortening, drain Add remaining ingredients;
stir Cover and cook for 2 hours over low heat, or until meat is tender
Strain stock, set aside as soup Slice the meat. Serves 6 to 8.
E. Drew Gackenheimer
E. Drew Gackenheimer, Ex-
ecutive Director of the Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center of
the Jewish Home for the Aged
of Palm Beach County, has
been elected to the office of
Treasurer of the Florida
Association of Homes for the
Aging (FAHA).
FAHA is a statewide profes-
sional organization represen-
ting over 180 non-profit retire-
ment homes. Member homes
Jewish Studies Taught In Farsi
NEW YORK (JTA) Fif-
teen of the 40 Iranian im-
migrants who are
undergraduates at Yeshiva
University here are taking
what is considered the only
university-level Jewish studies
course in North America
taught in Farsi, the native
language of Iran.
The course on Sephardic
religious laws and customs is
offered in Farsi "because we
feel these students should
learn about their own customs
in their own idiom," explained
Rabbi M. Mitchell Serels,
associate director of the Jacob
E. Safra Institute of Sephardic
Studies at the university.
with J^!8^ ^kadingco&e riatural^decaflrinated
SANKA. GROUND. FREEZE-DR.ED AND INSTANT-AU NATURALLY DECAFFEINATED. K KOSHER


It's Our Turn To Be The Heroes
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Super Sunday '87 March 22
The following people heve
volunteered for Super Sunday '87.
Betty Abramowitz
Jewish Federation
Alta Bees Arons
Jewish Federation
Syd Auapltz
Jewish Federation
Ida Barton
Jewish Federation
Louis Beck
Jewish Federation
Sylvia Beck
Jewish Federation
Joshua L Becker
Jewish Federation
Time Becker
Hadaasah
Harry Berger
Jewish Federation
Estelle Berger
Jewish Federation
Helen Berglda
Jewish Federation
Qerda Bettauer
Temple Emanu-EI
Gertrude Birnback
Jewish Federation
Ellen Bovarnlck
Leadership Development
Debby Brass
Women's Division
Dorothy M. Brock
Na'Amat USA
Al Brownsteln
Jewish Federation
Shirley Brownsteln
Jewish Federation
Carrie Chlat
Cong. Anshei Sholom
Jack Chlat
Cong. Anshei Sholom
Israel Andy Cohen
Boynton Beach Council
Blanche B. Cohen
Lake Worth Jewish Ctr.
Lillian Y. Cohen
Hadassah
Sylvia Cohen
Boynton Beach Council
Evelyn Coleman
B'nai B'rlth
Eric Crawford
Young Adult Division
Cantor Howard Dardashti
Young Adult Division
Ann Diamond
Women's Division
Victor Duke
B'nai B'rlth
Alice Q. Effrat
Jewish Federation
Shirley S. Feldman
Jewish Federation
Mollie Fltterman
Jewish Federation
Robert Fltterman
Jewish Federation
Dick Flah
Leadership Development
Martha Friedland
Jewish Federation
Barbara Frledlander
JFCS
Leontlne Friedman
Hadassah
Ann Qallubler
Temple Beth El
Esther Qastwlrth
Holocaust Survivors
Clara S. Selder Qershowltz
Jewish Federation
Claire Giber
Jewish Federation
Dan Giber
Jewish Federation
William H. Qlater
Temple Beth El
Faye G later
Temple Beth-El
Milton Gold
Jewish Federation
Sis Gold
Jewish Federation
Ethel Green
Jewish Federation
Jerome J. Gross
Jewish Federation
Hank Grossman
Community Relations Council
Esther F. Gruber
Women's Division
Tammy Hamberg
Jewish Federation
Sandl Hellbron
Young Adult Division
Robert S. Herman
B'nai B'rlth
Gertrude Hilton
ORT
Rita Hilton
ORT
Florence Hirschman
Jewish Federation
Helen Hoffman
Jewish Federation
Arnold J. Hoffman
Jewish Federation
Michael Jacobson
Jewish Federation
Jack M. Karako
Jewish Federation
Taml Karako
Jewish Federation
Irene Katz
Leadership Development
Sonl Kay
Leadership Development
Claire Kazinec
Leadership Development
Florence Kieff
Temple Beth El
Dorothy Kiever
Jewish Federation
Florence Klppel
Na'Amat
Oofrt
mMMyaim
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
"Fed the personal touchof pmjesaotiakiuth 30 years of experience.
OOPACABANA
POSADA DEL SOL
MISSION HILLS RESORT
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7
(305) 531-1271
Pearl Kline
Jewish Federation
Esther Kosowski
Women's Division
Nathan Kosowski
Jewish Federation
Arlene Kramer
Jewish Federation
Bonnie Krauss
Jewish Federation
Gail M. Kressal
JCC
Barry Krischer
JCC Day Sch.
Dorothy Kurclas
Jewish Federation
Bernie Kurlt
Jewish Federation
Terr! Kurlt
Jewish Federation
Milton Kurland
Jewish Federation
Ruth Kurland
Jewish Federation
Anthony Lamport
Young Adult Division
Arnold Lamport
Jewish Federation
Marilyn Lamport
Women's Division
llene Lamport
Jewish Federation
Joyce Lamport
Jewish Federation
Michael A. Lamport
Young Adult Division
Ed Lefkowltz
Holocaust Survivors
Arthur B. Lelbovit
Jewish Federation
Blanche Leibowitz
Cong. Anshei Sholom
Mark Levy
Jewish Federation
Stacey Levy
Jewish Federation
Continued on Page 20
Training Builds Confidence
Continued from Page 3
Sunday."
The obtaining of new gifts is
increasingly becoming the
focus of Super Sunday. "We
reach the majority of our con-
tributors through our affiliate
Campaigns, so we look to
Super Sunday to call those in
our community who have
never given to the Campaign
to familiarize them with the
needs of Jews locally, in Israel,
and around the world," stated
Mrs. Perrin. One-hundred-and-
sixty-four new gifts were
solicited at last year's all day
phonathon totaling $62,343.
'This year we hope to do even
better," she said.
The trainers have all been
active members of the Jewish
community which enables
them to inspire and instruct
the volunteer telephone
workers' to become successful
and confident solicitors. Marva
Perrin has served in numerous
capacities in the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. They include
Chairperson of the Palm
Beach Division for the 1985
general Campaign, Campaign
Vice President of the Women's
Division and Chairperson ot
the Federation Nominating
Committee. She currently is
Women's Division Worker
Training Chairperson, Project
Renewal Chairperson for the
Jewish Federation, and Vice
President of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School.
Kari Ellison moved to this
community three years ago
and has worked as a staff
associate for the Federation
for two years. She currently is
the Hillel coordinator for Palm
Beach County and teaches at
Midrasha-Judaica High
School. Her volunteer work
within the Jewish community
includes membership on the
Board of the Young Adult
Division of Federation, on the
Otzma Committee, the Com-
munity Relations Council and
the Black-Jewish Dialogue.
Carol and Paul Klein have
co-chaired the Training Com-
mittee previously and are con-
tinuing to help out this year.
Mrs. Klein has served in many
capacities in Women's Division
including Jewish Women's
Assembly Co-Chairperson,
Outreach Vice President, and
has served on the Campaign
Cabinet. This year she is
Chairperson of the Women's
Division Annual Meeting.
Paul Klein has served as
Chairman of the Jewish
Federation's Midrasha Com-
mittee for many years and is a
member of the Education
Committee. A past President
of the Jewish Community
Center, Dr. Klein received the
1978 National Leadership
Development Award from
Federation and is a past
member of the Federation's
Campaign Cabinet.
Tony Lampert has been a
member of the Super Sunday
Committee for several years.
Actively involved with the
Young Adult Division from its
inception, he is Vice Chairman
for Campaign. He also is very
active with B'nai B'rith.
Bob Perrin has worked ac-
tively for Super Sunday for
many years and has previously
chaired the Training Commit-
tee. He is a past member of the
1984 Campaign Cabinet of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
For more information, con-
tact the Jewish Federation of-
fice, at 832-2120.
WINTER
pptjbi.
PASSOVER
9 Days/8 Nights 9 Days/4 Nights
J599 J369 am
lomttt **y. OTikMr fro. $M prr niffe. '*JW*
Enjoy the traditional atmosphere that can only be found
in a completely Sabbath ana Yom Tov observing hotel.
e li\t-|\ ani>nim i lull with live i mi Ti.iimni ni ( Mymptt si/e *w minting pool U.i room 1 lull* i (inducted Seder
semees In well known ( jntor Oourmet dl.in kosher muls Service* in our own Synagogue
GLATT KOSHER
Ybul HosIS GartenW'g family
l ou Mason Michael Amara Joyce
Solomon Romenoeig family
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ARRANGE I)
woi Sam o
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(305)531-4213
UUl io: a~M
Nv San once ?1 *ni If You Are One Of The Million Jews
Who Bought Israel Bonds
During The Yom Kippur War...
... you gave Israel Its heart and strength In a time
ot crisis and helped the nation reconstruct Its post-war economy.
Israel Wants To Say "THANK YOU"
... by giving you credit for up to 22 months advance Interest on your maturing 1972 or
1973 Israel Bonds when you reinvest In Bonds ot a higher denomination.
Bring Your 72-'73 Bonds To Your Synagogue
For Reinvestment On Purim Eve, March 14th
A representative will he on hand to help you effect your easy reinvestment ...It you
are not able to attend Purim services or your Synagogue Is not participating, ploase
call the Bond office at 686-8911.
These are some of the Synagogues in our area
participating in the Purim Reinvestment program:
Golden Lakes Temple
Lake Worth Jewish Center
Temple Beth David
Temple Beth El
Temple Beth Torah
Temple Israel
Treasure Coast
Jewish Center


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
Women's Division
B and P March Meeting
Over 80 women attended the March program of the Business and Profes-
l^a^^^Mkr^aW V*. v A^^^^^^^^^mmm^^m^m niork^ Women's Networking Group of the Women's Division of the Jewish
Welcoming guest speaker Nancy Thompson (third from left) are Robin Federation of Palm Beach County at the Airport Hotel. The women, many of
Weinberger, B and P Program Chairperson; Dr. Debbie Lubell and Nina wnoin were new to the group, listen intently as guest speaker Nancy Thomp-
Brookner Silverman, Co-Chairpersons of the March program meeting. Not gon preaent a fast paced course on Image Awareness,
pictured is the third Co-Chairperson, Robin Bernstein.
Nina Brook ner Silverman (center) greets Ellen Ram pell.
Women's Division Vice President for B and P, and Barbara
Sommers, B and P Chair Designate.
Carol Barack,
Director of
Vocational
Services for
the Jewish
Family and
Children's Ser-
vice, informed
the women
about the ser-
vices offered
by her agency.
Roxanne Axelrod, Eileen Zimkind, and Ann Sloop
\1
Esther Siniakin, Bernice Brookner, Vivian Friedman, Wanda Wiersma, and
Meryl Heller.
Adrianne Weissman, Evelyn Lewis, Jackie Goldman, and Lois Weinstein.
II---------------------------------"
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The Jewish Community Day School
cordially invites you to attend our
Annual Dinner Dance
in support of the scholarship fund
Saturday, the fourth of April. 19a?
at half past seven in the evening
Hyatt Palm Beaches
no solicitation of funds
couvert $125 per person
black tie optional
dietary laws observed
rsvp March 2?th
Benjamin i Hornstein Elementary School
Rapaport Junior High School


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
A Thank You From The Sharanskys
By LOUISE ROSS
Upon hearing of the birth of
Avital and Natan Sharansky's
daughter, Rachel, several
months ago, community ac-
tivist and Jewish Floridian of
Palm Beach County columnist
Toby Wilk sent them a mazel
tov along with a gift to
welcome "the newest member
of OUR family."
Much to her surprise and
delight, Mrs. Wilk received a
hand printed thank you note
signed by the Sharanskys. "I
never expected to hear from
them, knowing how involved
they are internationally, for
our people," commented Mrs.
Wilk. "It was, therefore, a
most pleasant surprise," she
said.
Natan Sharansky, who lives
in Israel, just celebrated his
first year of freedom. Prior to
his release from a Soviet
prison and his subsequent
emigration to Israel, his wife
Avital was an ardent
spokesman on his behalf.
Through her efforts and those
of the international Jewish
community, he was granted
permission to leave the Soviet

NATAN (ANATOtY) SHARANSKY
Bn-Zion St., Jerusalem 95423
t
viera *vvvj.cV\ C^,<- opur acee&ocA^
TV\ax\\< ^\oa
onc^ W fcV\e cj&fc ^olv soat evs*.
tW. 4cfcoa\ c& oar sbrucy^e -to oe.-urV,t our
C*ic V\op. tV\cxL u^e uOlW soon -s.ee oAV oar
^r\crxdi2> united w^B* a^. V-^eve \o 3erosoieiv>
Union. Since then he has
championed the plight of other
refuseniks.
fev&J Physicians Group Seeks To Treat Soviet Work Camp Inmates
By JUDITH COLP
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
About a year ago, Martin
Motew, a Chicago physician,
sat in the Moscow apartment
of a Soviet refusenik and
listened to tales of the Soviet
work camps that made him cr-
inge. Prisoners were given
poor nutrition and those with
active tuberculosis drank from
the same cups as the rest of
the camp.
"I began to conceptualize
the idea that someone has to
look after these people,"
Motew said last Thursday at a
press conference at the Na-
tional Press Club.
He decided to found the In-
ternational Physician's Com-
misson for the Protection of
Prisoners. The group is com-
mitted to bringing attention to
the poor medical care of Soviet
Jews and the group is a
member of the Union of Coun-
cil for Soviet Jews.
The Physician's Commission
hope to establish a neutral
group of physicians, probably
affiliated with the Red Cross,
that would go into the labor
camps to treat patients. About
50 doctors from the United
States, Canada, Britain,
France, Sweden and Israel are
currently members.
Vladimir Brodsky, a car-
diologist who is co-chairman of
the commission, spent a year
in Siberia as a political
prisoner before being allowed
to emigrate to Israel. He
described the labor camps as
rampant with disease in-
cluding tuberculosis, which in-
fects about 50 prisoners a
year, pneumonia, and scabs.
The sick were rarely given
medicine and were forced to
work long hours in sub-zero
temperatures. Prisoners are
permitted to bathe about once
every three weeks, are fed on a
small amounts of bread and
herring, sleep in overcrowded
rooms on hardwood floors and
are often beaten by the
guards.
Even the care they could
receive in Moscow is
"primitive," said Kenneth century medical care are lack-
Prager, a member of the ing. There is a virtual absence
Physician's Commission who of such disposable items as syr-
visited Moscow last year. inges, needles, catheters and
"The staples of twentieth intravenous tubing in hospitals
and clinics," said Prager, a
New York internist.
Prager added that Soviet
Jews receive the most inferior
care. When a Jewish woman
brought her young son u
doctor because he was wetting
his bed, she was told that the
problem was caused by his
circumcision.
J)fafi^JmM,i1
Ronzoni* wants to teach you how to give
your family delicious, satisfying Italian
meals without any difficolta (difficulty). All
you have to do is serve Ronzoni* frozen
Italian entrees.
Ronzoni* entrees are rapido (quick) and
facile (easy) to prepare. They contain all
the autentico (authentic) ingredients any
great Italian cook would use: fresh cheeses
such as ricotta, mozzarella, romano and
parmesan, imported olive oil and plum
tomatoes. And the assortimentqs (choices)
are among the best-loved Italian dishes
of all time: Vegetable Lasagne, Cheese
Manicotti, Spinach Canneloni, Pasta
Primavera, Fettucine Alfredo and
Cheese and Broccoli Ravioli.
These mouth-watering selections are
all natural with no artificial additives or
preservatives. Plus, most contain 340
calories or less.
So why spend hours in the cucina
(kitchen) when you can spend just minutes
preparing Ronzoni* frozen entrees? Once
you try them, we're sure you'll agree:
Ronzoni Sono BuonV-Ronzoni Is So
Good?
1967 Ronzoni Foods Cofporafcon
Ronzoni Sono Buoni-Ronzoni Is So Good!
.a


Page 10 The Jewah FTorktim of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
Rejoicing On Purim:
A Jewish Obligation
Mordecal commanded the
Jews to observe "days of
feasting and merrymaking"
every year on the anniversary
of Punm. Therefore, a festive
meal known as the Purim
seudah is central to the Purim
celebration. It is held on Purim
afternoon (March 15) before
sundown. At this gathering, it
is customary to drink alcoholic
beverages and to "loosen up."
By tradition, one is permitted
to drink to excess to the
point (but not beyond?) where
one confuses the distinction
between barukh Mordecai
(blessed be Mordecai) and arur
Haman (cursed be Hainan).
(And who stays sober to
judge?) This drinking to the
verge of inebriation reminds
us of Ahasuerus' drunken orgy
and adds to the merriment of
the occasion.
The seudah is also an occa-
sion for clever skits, witty
poems and for dressing up in
costumes. (In Israel, the
costumes rarely reflect the
Purim story.) Religious
schools, congregational and
community adult groups hold
Purim plays (Purimspiels) and
carnivals.
Various scholars have
discerned a deeper impulse in
the Purim plays, which often
provide biting parodies of
authority figures (teachers,
community leaders, etc.). One
Christian theologian, Harvey
Cox, draws our attention to
the dramatic performances
that were associated with the
medieval Feast of Fools. He
suggests that such plays were
a consciously encouraged
device: They served as a
harmless conduit channeling
the anti-social and rebellious
emotions of the common folk
while, at the same time, reaf-
firming their subjugation.
Perhaps some of that is
reflected in Purim which,
through humor, permits the
deflation of potentially inflam-
matory pressures.
The tradition of the Purim
Clay has also been compared
y literary historians to the
Christian mystery plays of the
Middle Ages, both of which
may have arisen contem-
poraneously and both of which
dealt with the dramatization of
biblical stories. If the two had
a common beginning,
however, they rapidly diverg-
ed: medieval mystery plays
were church-centered, usually
primarily serious and often
lavishly produced; Purimspiels
were generally the reverse.
Over the centuries, the Purim
productions diversified. In
some Jewish communities, it
was customary for Purim
spielers to engage in street
theater or go from house to
house presenting outrageously
funny (or, sometimes, only
outrageous) parodies of
megiUat estayr and other Bible
Hamantaschen:
A Treat For Purim
What Jewish holiday doesn't
have its own distinctive food?
For Purim, it is hamantaschen
the pastry filled with poppy
seeds and honey or with prune
lekvar (or, nowadays, with
apricot jam, strawberry
preserves, chocolate (??) or
other fruit). The triangle-
shaped pastry resembled a
pocket on a garment, since
tasch is German for "pocket."
Mohn is the word for poppy
seeds. The filled pastry, known
as mohntaschen, became, by a
punning reference, haman-
taschen, Haman's pockets.
Some people say that the
triangular shape is a reminder
of the Persian hats worn by
courtiers such as Haman. In
Italy, they are known as orec-
chi di Aman Hainan's ears!
Whatever their etymological,
anatomical and/or haber-
dashery origin, hamantaschen
are the most appropriate
sweet for Purim.
stories.
In addition to the man)
religious school production*
mounted for Purim, a numbei
of congregations and Jewish
centers around the country
have developed the tradition ol
writing and staging a Purim
satire every year. Today, too,
potentially explosive pressures
face every group (and not only
external ones, either) and
being able to laugh at
ourselves is sometimes the
best medicine.
Muh-lo-ah Manot
The sweetest. Jewish
holidays are those on which joy
is shared. On Purim, it is
customary to give gifts of food
and fruit both to friends and to
the poor (see Esther 9:22).
Since it is known that gifts are
an offering of friendship as
well as an act of tzedakah,
those who are poor can feel
that what they receive is a
mark of friendship rather than
an acknowledgement of their
impoverishment. Thus, their
dignity is maintained in a
situation where a "hand out"
(in this case, food) is being
given to them directly by
known donors (perilously close
to the basket-over-the-arm
kind of "charity" our Jewish
tradition condemns. The
"friendship" level saves these
gifts from such a negative
connotation.)
Gifts of baked goods, fruit,
almonds or other nuts and beer
or wine are customarily sent in
little packages or in decorated
baskets. This tradition is called
mish-lo-ah manot "the sen-
ding of portions." Shalaeh
monos is the Ashkenazi form of
mish-lo-ah manot. These gifts
are great fun to prepare and a
joy to receive! Ii you've never
sent them before, why not
make this year the first time
even ifyou're the only one sen-
ding. Chances are that some of
your friends will decide to par-
ticipate in this special pleasure
too, and that next year you will
not only give but get!
In addition, it is customary
to give a financial gift to the
synagogue on Purim, reminis-
cent of the makhatzit hashekel
paid by each Israelite in the
wilderness as a form of na-
tional tax. This money is also
used to help the needy (and
might therefore best be
directed to the rabbi(s)' discre-
tionary/good works fund).
Parallels
Purim was the original gift-
giving holiday and, in this
custom, at least, sounds like
what Halloween has become
today. Children would go in
costume from house to house
(or apartment door to apart-
ment door) "begging" for
coins ("Heint is Purim,
morgen is oys; geb mir a
whatever the word for penny
was in that country und varf
mir aroys!" "Today is
Purim, tomorrow it's not; give
me a penny and throw me
out!") Interestingly enough, a
recent article on pre-Lenten
activities quoted a very similar
rhyme used by Christian
children on Shrove Tuesday.
There are other parallels, too.
In medieval France and Italy,
the Jewish community
celebrated Purim with
elaborate carnivals com-
plete with a parade, featuring
floats, clowns and biblical
"tableaux" that echo the
carnival spirit and activities of
Mardi Gras. (In Israel, a major
carnival-like parade is held in
Tel Aviv on Purim. It is called
Ad lo yada "until one does
not know..." a name ap-
parently bestowed on the ac-
tivity by the great modern
Hebrew poet Chaim Nachman
Bialik.)
:*:**>>>>w*s*>>R<*:*xw^
Recipe
BASIC DOUGH
Mi cup milk
V cup sugar
1% tsp. salt
V cup margarine
Vi cup warm water
2 pkg. dry yeast
2 beaten eggs
5 cups unbleached white flour
1 beaten egg plus 1 tbsp. water
for assembly
Scald milk; add sugar, salt
and margarine. Cool to
lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in
water, stir in milk mixture,
add 2 beaten eggs and 3 cups
flour. Beat until smooth, at
least 50 strokes. Stir in addi-
tional 2 cups flour; knead on
floured board until smooth and
elastic. Place in oiled bowl and
turn once to coat dough with
oil. Cover and let rise in a
warm place until double in bulk
1 to 2 hours.
Punch down and turn out on
lightly floured board. Roll out
to Vi" thickness. Cut into
rounds approximately 4" in
diameter (a coffee can makes a
good cutW for these). Place a
heaping leaspoonful of filling
on each round and moisten the
edges with egg/water mixture.
Bring the edges together to
form a triangle. Pinch the
seams together tightly, brush
with beaten egg and place on
lightly greased cookie sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees until
golden brown about 20-25
minutes.
POPPYSEED FILLING
Mix together in saucepan:
1 cup poppy seed
Vi cup milk
2 tbsp. sugar
dash of salt
Bring mixture to boil, stirr-
ing contstantly. Pour a small
amount into 1 beaten egg. Add
this to the mixture in the
saucepan and boil 1-2 minutes
or until thick.
Although poppy seed is the
traditional filling, other fillings
such as apricot jam or orange
marmalade may be used.
Sometimes a rolled sugar
cookie dough is used in place of
the yeast dough. Either way
you are sure to enjoy this
treat, and the children will be
delighted!
x-xx-x-:-:-:-:-:*:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.^^
Israel Denies Tower Allegation
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Defense Ministry dismissed as
"totally groundless" an allega-
tion in the Tower Commis-
sion's report that Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin had of-
fered to send Israeli instruc-
tors to help the Contras, the
Nicaraguan rebels attempting
to overthrow the Sandinista
government.
On the contrary, Rabin
received a request for such aid
and rejected it "out of hand,"
according to a Ministry state-
ment released.
The Tower Commission was
appointed by President Ronald
Reagan to investigate the sale
of U.S. arms to Iran.
The statement said: "The
report of the Tower Commis-
sion issued (Thursday (Feb. 26)
in the U.S. contains, among
other things, a memorandum
conveyed by Col. North to Na-
tional Security Advisor John
Poindexter. According to this
memorandum, the Defense
Minister had allegedly offered
aid to the Contras in the form
of instructors. This allegation
is totally groundless."
The statement was referring
to Lt. Col. Oliver North, a
former National Security
Council employee, and Vice
Admiral John Poindexter, the
former director. Both were
dismissed after the Iran-
Contra scandal broke last
November.
The statement disclosed that
during Rabin's visit to the U.S.
in May 1986, North telephoned
him and asked for an urgent
meeting. "In the meeting,
which took place at the
Waldorf Astoria Hotel (in New
York), North dwelt at "length
on the problems of the Contras
and said he had suggested to
Continued on Page 12


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Hebrew University Opens School Of Veterinary Medicine
Senior Israeli veterinary
research positions are vacant
today because of a shortage of
qualified people. In two years
time, that shortage will begin
to be filled by the first
graduates from the recently
established Koret School of
Veterinary Medicine at the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Strategically located at the
Hebrew University's Faculty
of Agriculture in Rehovot, 40
miles from Jerusalem and 15
from Tel Aviv and just down
the road from the Ministry of
Agriculture's Kimron Institute
of Veterinary Medicine at Beit
Dagan, the School recently
began its second year of opera-
tions and teaching. Nine of the
20 students in the first class
have been granted awards for
excellence by the University
Rector. This proportion of ex-
Lithuanian
Jewish Group
Seeks Peers
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Assistance to Lithuanian Jews
organization is seeking the
named of Lithuanian Jews and
their progeny. To send a name,
or for more information, write
the organization c/o Joseph
Grilishes, President, 245 E.
11th St., New York, NY
10003.
cellent students exceeds that
of any other academic unit at
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
The four years of studies at
the Koret School of Veterinary
Medicine (for students who
have already completed at
least two years at a university)
are provided in three depart-
ments Veterinary Biology,
Veterinary Pathology and
Microbiology, and Veterinary
Medicine and Surgery.
In addition to catering to its
regular students, the school
has begun organizing continu-
ing education and refresher
courses for experienced Israeli
veterinarians, all of whom
were trained outside Israel.
The intention is to enrich their
knowledge of semi-tropical
and tropical animal diseases
prevalent in Israel and, at the
same time, to utilize these
practitioners' own knowledge
and experience in the field
with local animal diseases,
through discussion and ex-
change of information among
themselves and with the lec-
turers. In the future, the
School plans to broaden the
scope of the program and to
create an international center
for learning, enrichment and
research projects in veterinary
medicine.
Apart from the basic need
for an indigenous veterinary
medical school, one of the main
reasons for establishing the
school was that the ad hoc
system of providing for
Israel's need for trained
Cmon
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YOUR HOSTS THE DtNNERSTEIN t FRIEHLING FAMILIES
veterinarians, by sending
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breaking down. The ever-
increasing pressure for places
in good schools of veterinary
medicine throughout the West
had, in most cases, caused
them to restrict admission to
their own nationals, leaving
Israelis no avenue open for
quality studies in veterinary
medicine. The Koret School
provides such an avenue and
fills the need.
Veterinary medicine in the
last quarter of the 20th Cen-
tury is much more than just
the care and treatment of sick
animals. It is also a vital ad-
junct to human medicine, with
a central role in public health,
and it has a contribution to
make in the ongoing fight
against diseases that scourge
mankind.
The research groups at the
Koret School are investigating
areas such as: slow virus
diseases in ruminant animals
and their relationship with
human AIDS; lung cancer in
sheep from the veterinary
aspect and as a natural model
for human cancer; the proto-
zean diseases Babesiosis and
Anaplasmosis in ruminants;
lymphoproliferative diseases
in turkeys; various influences
in fetal development; and em-
bryo transfer diseases in
domestic animals. School staff
members also pursue col-
laborative research projects
with scientists in Washington
State University, Florida
University at Gainsville, and
the University of California at
Davis.
The Jewish Community Center
of tjwPalm Beeches 0mmm
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THE
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Sunday, March 22 2 PM
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Or.
WPB
Not a lot of dough
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
Chief Rabbi Of Moscow:
Soviet Jews Free To Be Jewish
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Adolf
Shayevich, the Chief Rabbi of
Moscow, claimed here that
Soviet Jews have complete
freedom to practice their
religion.
Shayevich replied to ques-
tions at a session of the United
Nations Human Rights Com-
mission devoted to human
rights and the status of inU
national human rights and the
status of international human
rights covenants. He was
brought here from Moscow by
the Soviet delegation to the
Commission.
According to Shayevich, who
heads Moscow's Choral
Synagogue, the majority of the
two million Jews in the USSR
are non-believers by choice,
not by force. He said that anv
Jew who wished to live by the
laws of Moses and the Torah
was free to do so.
The question of freedom of
religion in his country is in-
terlinked with questions of
ethics and standards,
Shayevich said. He urged
everyone to cooperate in the
matter of human rights, but
with greater objectivity than
has been shown until now.
146 Jews Left USSR In February
NEW YORK (JTA) Ex-
it visas were granted to 146
Soviet Jews in February, com-
pared to 98 in January, the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported. Of these, 29
went to Israel, according to
the Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry.
NCSJ chairman Morris
f bram expressed hope "that
t us slight increase could be
t le beginning of a series of
t ;eps that would lead to the
release of the 11,000 long-term
refuseniks, some of whom
have been waiting for more
than 15 years, as well as the
processing of approximately
370,000 others who, we know,
also seek to be repatriated to
Israel.
"We also hope that the re-
Could Be Worse
GENEVA (JTA) The
persecution of Jews in Iran in-
creased in 1986, but they do
not suffer as much as other
non-Islamic minorities, accor-
ding to a report presented to
the United Nations Human
Rights Commission here.
Israel Denies
Continued from Page 10-
the President to organize a
private group of some 20 to 50
Israeli or British instructors.
"Col. North said he prefer-
red a group of Israeli instruc-
tors, since they have greater
experience and also speak
Spanish. In his opinion, the
matter had to be conducted
privately and not via govern-
ments. Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin rejected the pro-
posal out of hand during his
meeting with Col. North."
maining Jewish Prisoners of
Conscience will be freed and
that they, and all former
Prisoners of Conscience will be
allowed to leave for Israel.
Then, and only then, will we be
certain that the oft-used word
'glasnost' (openness) has a
literal meaning where human
rights are concerned."
Charismatic Protestant Church
Will Appeal Ruling in Philly
PHILADELPHIA (JTA) The New Life Church, a
charismatic Protestant church that has attracted the ire of
neighboring Jews here, will appeal a Philadelphia Zoning
Board denial of a zoning variance for the church's
sanctuary.
THE CHURCH'S attorney, Jeffrey Lowenthal, said
the hoard ruled on unreliable evidence and that it voted in
closed session, which may be in violation of state law.
The city Bureau of Licenses and Inspections has per-
mitted the church's Sunday school and office to function in
a converted adult movie theater in a suburban shopping
center. The center is zoned commercial. About 70 local
residents, many of them Jewish, protested the church's re-
quest for the variance on Dec. 18.
Attention Young Adults
HOLD THE DATE
WHAT: Young Leadership Retreat
WHEN: May 1-3,1987
WHERE: Palm Beach Hyatt
Sponsored By:
United Jewish Appeal
Council of Jewish Federations
Florida Association of Jewish Federations
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
For more information, contact Mark Mendel, Director
of Leadership Development, at the Federation office,
832-2120.
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
invites you to join us
1987 Young Adult/Leadership
Development Mission-To-lsrael
June 15-26
Experience the emotional
impact of Masada
Visit an absorption
center for Ethiopian
Jewry
Join other young singles
and couples between the
ages of 22-40 for 11
unforgettable days in the
homeland of our people
AN EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME
COME WITH US AND DISCOVER YOURSELF
For information call:
Debbie Hammer or Mark Mendel at the Federation office,
832-2120
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Lake Worth Lodge will meet on Wednesday, March 18,
7:45 p.m. at the Challenger Country Club, 3536 Poinciana
Drive, Lake Worth. Stanley Shotz, Chairman of the Anti-
Defamation League Committee of the Florida State
Association of B'nai B'rith Lodges will present a program
entitled, "The Gathering Storm-Hatred Goes Public."
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter will hold its Fourth Annual Donor
Luncheon at the Royce Hotel, West Palm Beach, at noon
on Tuesday, March 17. The guest speaker will be Stanley
Shotz, Chairman of the Anti-Defamation League Commit-
tee of the Florida State Association of B'nai B rith Lodges.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Beach Chapter coming events:
March 14 Saturday matinee at the Burt Reynolds Din-
ner Theatre, $32. Gratuities included.
Monday, March 16 General Meeting at the Royal Palm
Club House, 544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach, at 12:30 p.m.
Monday, March 23 Study Group: Mary Helfand will
review the book Birthright by Joseph Amiel. The place
Royal Palm Club House, 544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach,
at 1 p.m.
March 27-29 Cape Coral weekend in Coral Springs.
$150 for non-golfers, $170 for golfers, includes free golf
and electric cart. A one day outing for non-golfers.
Palm Beach East Chapter is having its Closing Lun-
cheon Wednesday, March 25 at noon at the Garden Club
Restaurant at 140 Sunrise Ave., Palm Beach. A gourmet
Luncheon will be followed by a fashion show by Evelyn and
Arthur and a musical Program by Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
DEBORAH HOSPITAL FOUNDATION
Deborah Hospital Foundation coming events:
March 19-22 Lido Spa
March 24 Luncheon and Card Party at Birds Nest Too
in Drexel Plaza
April 13-16 Passover, four days, three nights at the
Marco Polo Hotel
May 24-27 Memorial Day Weekend, four days, three
nights at the Shore Club Hotel
CHAIHADASSAH
Chai Hadassah will hold its regular meeting on Thurs-
day, March 26 at the Challenger CC, Lake Worth, at noon.
Featured speaker will be Dr. Arthur Virshup, a specialist
in Arthritic diseases and Rheumatology.
All are invited for this informative lecture regarding our
health. Refreshments will be served.
HADASSAH
Shalom W. Palm Beach Chapter will meet on Wednes-
day, March 18, 12:30 p.m., at Congregation Anshei
Sholom, Century Village, W. Palm Beach. Dori Dascher
and the Tikvah Players will present a Purim program. For
more details, call Helen Nussbaum.
Tikvah Chapter will meet March 16 at Anshei Sholom at
1 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sam Wadler.
NA'AMAT USA
Golda Meir Club will hold a regular meeting March 18 at
American Savings Bank, Westgate and Okeechobee. The
program will be Merry Minstrels. Refreshments.
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN
The Palm Beach Section will hold its next meeting on
Wednesday, March 18, at the Royce Hotel at 10 a.m. Palm
Beach County Commissioner Dorothy Wilken will speak on
Palm Beach County Growth West.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Chai Luncheon to be held at the Royce Hotel on Wednes-
day, March 25, at noon. Guest entertainer Shoshana
Flexer.
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Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Affable Consul General
Timor Has Lived Exotic Life in Eight Countries
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Like a character out of a
| John Le Carre spy novel,
Rahamim Timor, the new
Consul General of Israel in
Miami, looks like your
average, affable family man
until you discover that he
has lived in eight exotic
countries, lived through a
siege, been attacked by ter-
rorists and seen a govern-
ment fall.
And that's not even all the
material that goes into the real-
life past of this soft-spoken man
who fought in Israel s War of
| Independence.
BORN IN 1924 in Jerusalem,
I the sixth generation of his family
to be born there, Timor is a
I member of what some used to call
'the Israeli aristocracy": Jews
who moved from Spain to
| Jerusalem long before the State of
Israel waa born.
"I'm not longing for those old
| days in Jerusalem," says Timor.
'We lived close, among ourselves
I it was a very small community.
We all lived in the Jewish quarter
of the old city, and to get there we
had to pass through the Moslem
I section.
"We lived under the constant
threat of attack," recalls Timor.
"Whenever anything was publish-
ed about Jews from Poland or
; Russia coming to Palestine,
anything that would strengthen
the Jewish presence there, there
were threats, and they used to
have mini-pogroms, stabbings,
attacks.
"The British were supposed to
protect us, but didn't. In 1938 it
got so bad, my family had to move
to the New City."
DESPITE THE stabbing of a
young Israeli and his brother in
the Arab souk late last month,
Timor does not believe that
Jerusalem is more dangerous now
than it was back when he was a
boy.
"Then they attacked us simply
because we were weak," says
Timor. "It's much, much safer
now in Jerusalem. In those days,
we were a minority. We don't de-
pend on British or Arab police
anymore but on our police."
Would he ever consider letting
Jerusalem become an interna-
tional city for the sake of peace
with the Arab nations?
"It wouldn't work," contends
Timor. "When Jordan had
Jerusalem, all Jews, not just
Israelis, were prohibited access to
holy places. And why should we,
who have always been persecuted
by the Christians and Moslems, do
this for them? Jerusalem is not
negotiable."
RAHAMIM TIMOR lived
through the siege of Jerusalem
during the War of Independence,
which may help explain why he
feels so strongly about not giving
the city up.
"Families literally starved. We
fought our way through so con-
voys of food could be brought in.
We were rationed to one pint of
water per person a day, and that
pint of water was for everything.
The water was from cisterns
which collected rainwater we
had no pipelines in the old
Jerusalem.
"Each family had its own supp-
ly, and that was locked and ration-
ed, which kept us from dying of
thrist, like the Arabs thought we
would."
"I lost many good friends," says
Timor.
One of Timor's good friends
who survived was Yitzhak Navon,
who was active with him in the
7... we don't depend on British
or Arab police anymore ...'
Consul General Rahamim Timor will address a
meeting of the Israel-Mideast Task Force of the Com-
munity Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County Thursday, March 26, noon at the
Jewish Federation Office, 501 So. Flagler Drive, Suite
305, West Palm Beach. Topic: Economic Issues of
Israel.
:*x-x*:*w*:-:w^^
go and set a dangerous precedent
that members of a given minority
could just leave Ethiopia. If not
for the Rabbinate, ways and
means to bring the Falashas over
to Israel would have been found."
Whether or not the Falashas
should be converted to Judaism
before being fully integrated into
Israeli society, a question that
upsets the Falashas, who see
themselves as "original Jews,"
Timor says that he "cannot have a
personal opinion," but sees
"nothing wrong with converting
them to be on the safe side."
"ZAIR WAS difficult," says
Timor of another African country
where he served. "I was there at a
time when the tribes were
fighting each other. I presented
my credentials as Ambassador to
President Kasaboovoo, the first
and last elected president of Zair,
on the afternoon of Nov. 24. In the
evening, four hours later, Mobutu
had his coup d'etat."
But no post could have been as
difficult as Cyprus.
"Cyprus was a very tough
assignment," admits Timor. "Ar-
chbishop Macarious, the head of
the Greek church, was the head of
state as well. Cyprus was infested
with PLO agents on the one hand,
and on the other, before the Camp
David agreement, Cyprus was the
only place which served as a
bridge between Israel and the
Arab countries."
"REPRESENTING Israel
abroad is not an easy thing. There
are risks involved," says Timor.
"I was attacked by the PLO in
Cyprus. They put a bomb in my
house, and through sheer luck my
wife and daughter were on the far
outer side. The bomb exploded,
ripped the house in two, but they
escaped."
Timor's other two children were
still on their way back from
school, and Timor, whom the ter-
underground army of resistance,
the Haganah. Sixteen when he
joined, Timor smuggled messages
and arms, as well as keeping
lookout while the adults trained.
AT THE age of 18, Timor joined
the fighting corps as a full soldier.
His wife, whom he met not long
after the War of Independence,
was also a soldier, a sergeant in
the Central Command.
"Who would have thought that
we would fight so long for our in-
dependence?" asks Timor. "We
thought back then that in two or
three more years we would be
through with the fighting, we
would be a nation like other
nations."
IN 1956, Timor took up his first
foreign post as Israel Vice Consul
in Addis Ababa, where he served
twice.
"Ethiopia was very challeng-
ing," recalls Timor, who speaks
Amharic, the principal language
of Ethiopia, in addition to the
other seven languages listed in his
official biography.
"The-then president of Israel
begged me to do all I could to
meet with the Falashas and help
them come to Israel and study if
they wanted to, to help them in
any way I could."
"The Falashas thought for cen-
turies that they were the last rem-
nant of the Jewish nation," says
Timor. "They have all the same
major traditions, such as Yom
Kippur, Shabbat, and the Tehara
(rituals concerning the purity of
women.)"
"THEY WERE known in
Ethiopia for their beautiful and in-
telligent women. Those who had
the money wanted a Falasha wife
if she converted.
"When they stayed in their
ghettos, no one would touch them.
But if they went to school, or to
engage in commerce, they disguis-
ed themselves. Out of fear of be-
ing molested or forced, the
Falasha women would sometimes
tattoo blue crosses on their
foreheads.
"In America, people change
their last names (to make them
less Jewish-sounding.) It's the
same sort of thing," adds Timor.
If the Falasha community was
known about in Israel as far back
as 1956, why was there no large
scale Aliyah from Ethiopia as
there was from moat other coun-
tries with Jewish communities?
"For many years the Rabbinate
did not arrive at a decision about
whether or not the Falashas were
Jews. Unlike the Yemenites,
another isolated Jewish communi-
ty, their links to Judaism could not
be traced. They had been out of
contact with the rest of the Jewish
world," explains Timor.
THERE HAS BEEN specula-
tion that the Falashas were
originally part of an envoy from
King Solomon's court, sent to ac-
company the Queen of Sheba. Said
Timor:
"Also the Ethiopian govern-
ment of the-then emperor, Haile
Selassie did not want to let them
rorists tried to ambush and
assassinate, had taken another
route to the Israel Embassy that
day in April, 1973.
"I stayed on one and a half more
years in Cyprus as Ambassador,"
continues Timor. "After the
building was repaired, we lived in
the same apartment, to prove that
we are not afraid of the PLO."
Timor's wife and children never
complained, he says.
SO HOW does a man who has
served in places as remote and ex-
citing as Kinshasha and Lome-
Togo feel about accepting a post
in Miami?
"I had other offers, but I chose
this post. It is a challenge," says
Timor. "For a change, I have
come to a place where most of my
work is linked with Jews. I would
like some experience with the
U.S. Twenty-five years ago I
might not have come, but I want a
term of experience here."
"Florida has the fastest grow-
ing Jewish population in the
United States," adds Timor, "and
Miami is the gateway to Latin
America. I want to use my ex-
perience in Latin America to
establish contact with the Carib-
bean and Central America"
"I'm not accredited to the U.S.
government, but you could say
that I'm accredited to the Jewish
Federations," Timor points out
with a laugh.
WHAT LIES ahead for this
much-traveled man? Home
maybe.
"In three years I'll go back to
Israel, unless the Israeli govern-
ment wants me to do another job,
or I choose to do something else.
For the moment, my plans are to
go back to Israel," says the man
who claims that if he were young
and had it all to do over again, he
would become a farmer in the Ju-
dean hills or the Galilee.
So, for all the farmers who
dream of exciting travels, it may
be nice to know that a man who
has had 32 years of diplomatic ser-
vice in eight posts dreams of stay-
ing put.
Golan Druze Restless
Continued from Page 4
political unrest.
Basically, the Golan Druze saw annexation as an attempt
to enforce a new loyalty upon them. They refused to give
up their loyalty to Syria, which they regard as their coun-
try, and because of family ties there.
SOME ISRAELIS believe the Druze loyalty to Syria is
only an expedience. Frequent talk by various Israeli
leaders of possible negotiations with Syria over the Golan
has caused many Druze to wonder if the Israeli presence
was indeed permanent. Israel's return of the Sinai to
Egypt in exchange for a peace treaty heightened those
concerns.
The pro-Syrian demonstrations are seen in some Israeli
quarters as a hedge against the possibility that the Golan,
or part of it, may one day be returned to Syria. Israelis who
insist that the Golan is an eternal part of Israel say that if
Israel makes the Heights non-negotiable as it has East
Jerusalem, the Anti-Israel mood among the Druze will
change.
Meanwhile, Druze Knesset member Zeidan Atashe of the
opposition Shinui Party blamed the police presence for the
violence at Majdal Shams.
ALTHOUGH THE Heights are an integral part of Israel
with a different legal status than the administered ter-
ritories, the policy there remains the same as in the ter-
ritories. Political demonstrations likely to incite the popula-
tion are forbidden.
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
* V
Helping People
Third Annual Senior Activities Festival Held
By MARILYN
DAVID TOPPERMAN
On Jan. 17, Jewish Family
and Children's Service was
one of 75 community groups
and organizations present at
the Third Annual Senior Ac-
tivities Festival, held at the
Palm Beach Auditorium.
There were over 7,000 people
attending, who received infor-
mation about what Palm
Beach County offers senior
adults. Among the diversity of
exhibitors represented were
home health agencies, con-
sumer protection agencies,
volunteer bureaus, Palm
Beach County schools, Parks
and Recreation, alternative
living arrangements, and
social service agencies, offer-
ing different opportunities for
formal and informal education,
recreation, volunteer place-
ment, and retirement lifestyle
alternatives.
Jewish Family and
Children's Service had a booth
displaying our services
through photographs and
brochures. People of all ages
stopped to speak with our
staff: Susan Fleischer, Marilyn
David-Topperman, and Sindee
Katz, our social work student
from Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity. There were many "snow
birds" unfamiliar with Palm
Beach County who came to the
Senior Fair to learn about
Palm Beach County services.
Some asked our staff about
volunteering. Our agency has
a friendly visitor which pro-
vides volunteers to our
"Volunteers Have A Heart"
reception, held on February
12,from 2 to 4 p.m., at our
agency office.
A number of young seniors
spoke to our staff about ser-
vices for their aging parents,
many of whom are in their
80's. We informed them of
casework services, our home
health aide program, and
monitoring services, to name a
few.
For those individuals with
frail parents outside the
geographical area, the nation-
wide Association of Jewish
Family and Children's Ser-
vices and local Jewish Family
Service agencies have a new
program called the Elder Sup-
port Network. This program,
locally named bv JFCS of Palm
ff
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ForBow&GMift-IC
YOU* MOUNT AM Of FUN
MOUNTAIN CITY. GEORGIA
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pallng WaMr SkHng AarobK*. TannM
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Rock CMnbtng. BaakaibaM. Soccar.
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JFCS Caseworker Marilyn David-Topperman ex-
plains the services provided by the agency to an in-
terested person attending the Third Annual Senior
Activities Festival held recently at the West Palm
Beach Auditorium.
Beach County as the Elder
Connection, will serve to act as
a link between concerned fami-
ly and geographically distant
parents. Professional staff
who work with the parents do
a complete assessment of
physical, psychological, and
cognitive capabilities, as well
as financial and environmental
resources. After that, a plan is
developed in discussion with
the children and the family
member. The Elder Connec-
tion Program can put those
who are concerned about dis-
tant relatives in touch with
professionals who can monitor
the relative, as needed.
Some senior adults stopped
by and were surprised to
discover that we offer
speakers who talk on a variety
of interesting topics to groups.
Others sought us out to tell us
they enjoyed presentations our
agency had made recently on
"Over Sixty and Still Sexy,"
and "Long Distance
Grandparenting."
One woman, about 35 years
of age, was accompanied by
her 70 year old father. They
had recently relocated to the
area and as new residents they
experienced many unfulfilled
needs: recreational, educa-
tional, and social. Both father
and daughter were satisfied to
learn more about the com-
munity, and felt they would
make a better adjustment as a
result.
The Third Annual Senior Ac-
tivities Festival was a huge
success. It was a learning ex-
perience for the 7,000, plus in-
dividuals who attended, as well
as for the agencies, who
benefitted from actually see-
ing and learning more about
each other. As an agency, we
had the opportunity to do some
successful! outreach. We are
looking forward to attending
next year.
If you would like more infor-
mation about our special ser-
vices for older adults, please
call Jewish Family and
Children'8 Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., at
684-1991.
.


M
Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
)uncil For Jewish Education Conference *
Steinberg Stresses Role
Of Jewish Day School
Wedding
(At a recent Council for
wish Education Con-
Wence.held at the Hyatt
|otel, Barbara Steinberg, Ex-
itive Director of the Jewish
fcommunity Day School, spoke
efore an audience of fellow
lay school directors and
tureau of Jewish Education
lirectors from across the U.S.
nd Canada. Her topic, "The
School: Retrospect, Pro-
opi-
and
spect, Functioning in a Com-
munity Setting,'7 sparked a
discussion in which the
audience voiced various
nions on her analysis
ideas.
One of the proposals
presented by Mrs. Steinberg
was that "the responsibility to
teach ideology should be left to
the home and synagogue. The
school should teach ritual and
The Otzma Program
she may serve the elderly, the
sick, or school children with
exotic faces?
Of course we worry. We are
parents!
But then we think of the
final airport meeting at which
ed like family.
Continued from Page 3
roup dedicated to strengthen-
ig ties to American Jewry,
id WZO.
Suddenly, our Amy was link-
with agencies and planners
id activists on two con-
inents. Like her, we were
__ed by the scope and spirit these young men and" women
f Otzma. And aU of us were sang and cheered and embrac-
ledly awed by a pro-
architected to guarantee
version and challenge.
We devoured the informa-
as it arrived, and, beyond
^prehension now, shared in
le dream. The Otzma
tiedule hangs on our kitchen
letin board. It will be our
Duchstone to Amy's next ten
fionths. And somewhere in Tel
Lviv is a family that will be
Lmy's for those months. Amy
already been linked with
Israeli family which will
welcome her, host her on
lidays, ease her culture
shock, and, hopefully, provide
emotional nourishment.
The night before Amy left
for her New York orientation,
wrote that family a letter. I
tried to tell its members what
|it will mean to us to know that
icross the world, Amy has a
lome. No words were ade-
quate to express our gratitude.
Do we have anxieties about
ur daughter and what lies
ihead for her? Yes! Yes! Yes!
How will it feel for her on
February nights when she is
)n a Moshav harvesting crops,
x>ne-tired, homesick, perhaps,
' straining every muscle in
ler body?
How will it be for her in a
Jroject Renewal town where
We picture Amy climbing
the ancient hills, drinking in
the sights and sounds of
Jerusalem, that ultimate
seductress. We try to imagine
her adventures, her link to an
ancient heritage that spans
centuries, generations, oceans
of tears and we rejoice that
for now, our daughter belongs
to Otzma. This blink of time
will always be hers to claim.
At Kennedy Airport, when
that inevitable moment of par-
ting came, I chose to be last,
standing back as Amy's father
held her in his arms for a long
moment, as her sisters em-
braced her, reluctant to let go.
What could I say? How could
I say it?
What message to send with a
beloved daughter to sustain
her for ten months?
I chose a single word.
"Shalom!" I whispered to
Amy.
And we both smiled through
our tears.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, at the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County office, 832-2120.
ethical behavior." She con-
tinued, "I believe that we have
to respect parents as having
made intelligent decisions
about the way they wish to
conduct the religious life of
their families."
Mrs. Steinberg noted that in
community day schools, which
by their very nature are com-
prised of students from
diverse Jewish backgrounds,
beliefs and practices, it is the
hope and goal of the Jewish
studies curriculum to "teach a
religious philosophy that
begins with tolerance and will
ultimately lead to appreciation
then acceptance and finally to
admiration of the differences
as well as the commonalities
among the Jewish people."
Following Mrs. Steinberg's
presentation, the principals of
the various Jewish community
day schools met and ultimately
organized and established the
Jewish Community Day School
Network (JCDSN). This Net-
work is committed to the
"acknowledgement of the
validity of all major streams of
Jewish thought and the incor-
poration of this principle into
the schools' curricula." The
purpose of the JCDSN will be
to define, clarify and advocate
common-areas of interest and
act as a support and facilitator
to staff, administration and lay
leadership.
-----------This Summer;-----------
Escape 16 A Friendlier Climate
Don't let the Florida heat get to you!
Head north for the Fallsview. You'll be
greeted with cool, comfortable surroundings
and warm, friendly receptions.
Plan to make your summer reservations
now and take advantage of our special
Extended Stay Rates. At that rate, you'll enjoy
the Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and
swimming, a championship Robert Trent
Jones golf course, racquetball, boating and so
much more. There's even a choice of two or
three sumptuous meals a day.
So this summer, come to where the
atmosphere is as inviting as the weather.
(BESOT COCNTWY CUJ) w w **
EmisvilW
CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-431-0152
r^ ELLENVILLE, N.Y. 12428 t^^ii
FINKEL-SCHULMAN
The marriage of Renee
Sheri Finkel and Mr. Jeffrey
Schulman took place March 8
at Temple Beth Shumel. Rabbi
Ralph Glixman officiated.
The bride is the daughter of
Herbert and Eva Finkel of
Miami, granddaughter of
Joseph and Sonia Liberman of
Miami, and Myer and Kate
Finkel of Miami Beach. She
was attended by her sister,
Elise Burger, as matron of
honor, and bridemaids Maria
Moraitis, Leslie Fuentes,
Anula Shah, Diane Gipson,
Debbie Schulman, Suzanne
Duncan, Rebecca Lury, and
Cheryl Lury. Her dress was a
long silk organza, beaded and
sequinced bodice and trimmed
in venise lace. She wore a coor-
dinating hairpiece, with a
fingertip veil.
Mr. Schulman is the son of
Lois Schulman of Edison, New
Jersey, and Richard Schulman
of Freehold, New Jersey,
grandson of Marie Schulman
of North Miami Beach, and
Julius Bard of Fort Lauder-
dale. He was attended by
Frank Duncan as best man,
and ushers Marc Schulman,
John Duncan, Mark Burger,
Mitchell Prince, Ron Orland,
Jeff Orland, Jim Hisey, and
Lenny Armuth.
A finance graduate of the
University of South Florida,
the groom is employed by Con-
:ress Financial. Mrs.
lulman is a recent graduate
Mrs. Jeffrey Schulman
of the University of South
Florida with a degress in
microbiology.
Following the wedding
reception, the couple honey-
mooned in Hawaii. They will
reside in Pembroke Pines upon
their return.
PASSOVER1967
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Untraditionally
Why is this cruise
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For this special sailing,
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your familys most enjoyable holidays.
WeVe chosen the most popular
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So this Passover,
celebrate old traditions
with new friends. Book now for the only
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From $1295*
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Page 16__The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
r"
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americana Act, funded by
Gulf stream Area Agency on Aging, provides a variety of ser-
vices to persona 60 years or older, along with interesting and
entertaining educational and recreational programs. All
senior activities are conducted in compliance with Title VI of
the Civil Rights Act.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
of the Jewish Community
Center is designed to keep per-
sons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious, nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by our registered
Dietician along with varied
programs. There is no fee, but
contributions are requested.
Reservations must be made, so
please call either Carol or
Lillian at 689-7708.
Monday, March 16 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, March 17 Helen
Gold, RD (Interesting Facts
About Nutrition)
Wednesday, March 18 -
Chair Exercises with Shirley
Sheriff
Thursday, March 19 Dr.
Alsofrom, noted psychologist
will speak. "Symptoms of Be-
ing Normal."
Friday, March 20 Sabbath
Services
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
kosher meal delivered to their
home are eligible. Each meal
consists of one-third of the re-
JCC News
ALL SINGLES
An exciting mini-series for singles of all ages entitled
Mediation and Meditation will be held at the JCC (700
Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach) on four consecutive Mon-
day nights beginning March 16 at 8:15 p.m. This series will
be led by Deri Ronis, Doctoral Candidate in International
Studies and teacher of Metaphysics. It will help you become
more in charge of vourself and your life. Learn the benefits
of meditation and how to apply it on a practical level. Cost:
JCC members $9 non-members $12.
On Tuesday, March 17 at 7:30 p.m., singles are invited to
the Jewish Community Center to attend a high interest
workshop entitled "How To Build Dynamic Relationships."
Dr. Mack Douglas, leader of singles groups for many years
and the author of 11 books will lead the group. Donation:
%2. Call early to reserve space.
Attend a Singles Service at Temple Beth El in Boca
Raton (333 S.W. 4th Ave.) on Friday, March 30 at 10 p.m.,
followed by an Oneg Shabbat. Directions: 1-95 to Palmetto
Park Rd., east to 4th Ave., right one-and-a-half blocks). All
are welcome.
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
Join with Boca singles at a Purim Dance at the Boca JCC
on Saturday, March 14 from 8:30 p.m. midnight. Enjoy
the D.J., and hamentashen. There will be a cash bar. Dona-
tion $7.
SINGLES (20'8-40's)
On Sunday afternoon, March 15, from 2 p.m. join with
other singles at one of our member's home on the Loxahat-
chee River for a day of playing volleyball, horseshoes,
riding a pontoon boat, watching the sunset or just sitting
idly by the river among friendly people. Enjoy a tasty B-
B-Q and bonfire. Bring whatever you wish to grill (kosher
style) soda, beer, chips and the fire will be provided as
well as the traditional hamentashen in honor of Purim.
Children are welcome. Rain date: Sunday, March 22. Dona-
tion: JCC members $3 non-members $4.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-60)
On Sunday, March 15 at 11 a.m. meet at TGI Friday's in
Crystal Tree Plaza (US 1, So. of PGA) to enjoy brunch and
share good company. Donation $1 plus own fare.
PRIME TIME SINGLES (60 PLUS)
Gather at the Center on Thursday, March 19 at 7 p.m. for
a gala Purim Party. Laugh with the guest comedienne, en-
joy hamantashen dessert and the reading of the megillah
fun for all. Donation: JCC members $2 non members
$2.50. All are welcome.
For more information call the JCC 689-7700.
Public Relations Associate
Challenging position in Public Relations Department
of growing 120 bod long term health cars facility.
Position requirements Include: Excellent written/verbal
communications and proven administrative and clerical
abilities. Prior P.R. experience preferred. Excellent
working environment. Benefits package. Please send
resume In confidence to:
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center
4847 Fred Gladstone Drive
West Palm Beach, Florida 33417
E.O.E.
quired daily nutrition for
adults.
Persons who need meals for
a short period of time, until
their health returns, should
call the JCC at 689-7703 for in-
formation. There are no set
fees for meals in this program
but we ask each one to make
weekly contributions.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in our designated area for per-
sons sixty years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation who must go to
treatment centers, doctor s of-
fices, hospitals and nursing
homes to visit spouses, social
service agencies and nutrition
centers. We service the han-
dicapped in our special lift
vehicle. There is no fee for this
service but participants are en-
couraged to contribute their
fair snare. Reservations must
be made at least 48 hours in
advance. For more informa-
tion and/or reservations,
please call 689-7703 and ask
for Helen or Lillian in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Weight Control. Mondays
at 1:45 p.m.
Stress Management.
Tuesdays at 1:15 p.m.
Exercise and Health
Education. Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
Speak Out. Wednesdays at
1:15 p.m.
Writers Workshop. Fridays
at 10 a.m.
Great Decisions. Thursdays
at 2 p.m.
NEW CLASS Thursday,
March 19 at 1:30 p.m. "Coping
with Alzheimer's at Home."
Ruth Janko, MS. A very
special class to relieve the
uncertainties, anguish and
isolation of caregivers of
Alzheimer patients by
teaching coping skills,
disseminating scientific and
medical information and
alleviating stress.
Intermediate Bridge
Series. Wednesdays at 1:30
p.m.
Timely Topics/Round Table
Discussion Group.
Moderators: March 16, Harry
Epstein; March 23, Harry
Browner; March 30, Sylvia
Skolnik.
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Speakers Club. Thursdays
at 10 a.m.
Fun with Yiddish. Mondays
at 10 a.m.
Tax Assistance. Wednesdays
at 10 a.m.
Health Insurance with Edie
Reiter. On third Thursday of
each month. Please call for ap-
pointment or information.
Managing Diabetes. Jewish
Community Center Wisdom of
the Body Series, Thursday,
April 2 at 2 p.m. Consultant
Gert Friedman announces that
Cheryl Scott, RN will present
"Everything you want to
know regarding diabetes."
The basics of the body and
nutrition will be discussed.
Refreshments will be served
after a question and answer
period. Everyone is invited.
Bowling, Anyone? We
would like to invite you to
bowl. It doesn't matter how
you play, it only matters that
you want to play and be part of
a fun group. You can bowl as
gicers with the Bat Gurian
adassah Bowling League.
Enjoy meeting other women,
younger and older. Bowl and
partake of doughnuts and cof-
fee. Cost, $6.50 per session.
Call Sandy Tannenbaum at
471-1406 for information.
VOLUNTEER
NEWS AND VIEWS
Volunteers are continually
needed at the Jewish Com-
munity Center. Please call
Carol, Coordinator of
Volunteers for an appoint-
ment, 689-7708.
A special welcome to our
new volunteers: Libby Bangel,
Betty and Leon Finkel and
Evelyn Calichman. Do you
have knowledge to share? A
collection to show? A talent to
perform? Our seniors would
enjoy having you come and
visit us.
ATTENTION SENIORS!!
Do you want to work part
time?
The Jewish Community
Center needs senior aides.
We need:
1. Aides to work with our
various groups and classes.
2. Clerical Assistants
3. Nutrition Program Aide
in Delray at Congregation An-
shei Emuna.
All applicants must be eligi-
ble to participate in the Senior
Aide Program. Please call
820-4786.
The Marranos Of Louisbourg
By STANLEY SHOTZ
Special to the Jewish Floridian
The opportunity to escape
the Spanish inquisition
brought Marranos to many
foreign lands. It was to
France, and then to modern
Nova Scotia, that the Por-
tuguese merchant and fisher-
man Jeann Baptise Rodrigue,
a converted Jew, traveled to
establish a new home.
The most acceptable way to
enter the "New World," was
by becoming a part of the
Louis XV settlement at
Louisbourg, 'the capital of the
colony originally called, Ik
Royale. The new settlement
was only open to Catholics and
so the convert, Rodrigue, was
qualified to become a mer-
chant at the fortress city. He
had married Anne De Bellisle.
and when they finally arrived
at the fortress at Louisbourg
their first child, Michel was
four years old. Michel in 1738,
married Marguerite Lartigue.
the daughter of a judge, ana
they had five children: Follow-
ing the interests of his father
he too became a shipowner ana
merchant.
The fortress was established
by Louis XV, to protect the
French interests in Quebec
and included at that time as
well, a great portion of what is
now the State of Maine. The
archives of the partially
restored fortress at
Louisbourg today, provide
dozens of certificates of mar-
riages, births and baptisms of
the children and grandchildren
of Jean Baptise Rodrigue and
his wife, Anne.
The system of shipping in
olden times had to be designed
so as to accommodate the
sailors and the stevedores,
who were involved with the
handling of the cargo and
freight Doing transported on
the ships. They were most
often, illiterate. Still, they
Goods marked with the Jewish star await delivery to the
home of Jean Baptise Rodrique, a Marrano, in the restored
fortress of Louisbourg in Nova Scotia.
needed to be able to quickly
identify the bales, casks, cases
and in fact all forms of mer-
chandise and materials, in
order that the proper items be
ut ashore at various ports for
elivery to the correct mer-
chants to which the items had
been consigned. Thus came the
simplified practice and pro-
cedure of putting a "mark of
identification on each item
relating to a specific designee.
As an example, all the freight
destined for the "Crown" was
identified with the Fluer-de-ly,
the Royal coat of arms of
France. No one could ever err
by wrongly delivering a
package that was for the
'Court," when it was so dear-
ly categorized in the hold of
the ship and on the wharfs of
ports around the world.
Jean Baptise Rodrigue and
his son, Michel had need to
design a symbol of easy
recognition for the cargo that
would be sent to them in the
new world. On display,
throughout the re-constructea
wharehouses and homesite of
the Rodrigue family and in the
street adjacent to the cour-
tyard are biles of burlap wrap-
ped bundles depicting freignt
(from the ships arriving from
France. Containing foodstuffs,
clothing and building materials
each item had stenciled on
each side the identification
mark of the Rodrigue family-
their own coat of arms The
Star of David! How clever and
cunning they must have been
to have designed an identifica-
tion mark for those who would
enter the port and hope to
identify their fellow co-
religionists.
Unknown to the Governor,
the military and the
shipowners, the Star of David,
was introduced into the "New
World," by a family which
deeply felt the need for out-
ward identification of their
suppressed and hidden faith. It
must have proven to be a
strange but welcome sight for
other Marranos on arrival at
the port of IUe Royale to be
witness to a clandestine signal
from Jean Baptise Rodrigue
and his son Michel, that in-
deed, the Jews were already
on the shores of America.


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Florkiian of Palm Beach County Page 17
-. <
Asolo Touring Theatre To Perform 'Reynard The Fox '
The Jewish Community
Jenter of the Palm Beaches
brings the acclaimed Asolo
Touring Theatre back to West
Palm Beach on Sunday, March
with its hilarious, fast-
w^d and heartwarming pro-
duction of REYNARD THE
FOX by Arthur Fauquez. This
Igpecial performance by the
lAsolo Touring Theatre (ATT)
[will begin at 2 p.m. at the Ben-
[jamin S. Hornstein Elemen-
Itary School, 5801 Parker Ave.,
(West Palm Beach. Tickets are
I $4 and are available at the
JCC, 700 Spencer Dr., WPB
or by phoning 689-7700.
REYNARD THE FOX tells
the story of that lively, fun-
k>vmg scoundrel fox who loves
to play tricks on fellow animals
he feels are bossy, greedy, or
too filled with their own self-
importance. Reynard's tricks
get him into trouble, however,
when King Noble the Lion
punishes the fox with proba-
tion: on pain of death, Raynard
must not commit more than 24
crimes in the next year. As the
seasons progress, however,
Reynard is unable to resist an
occasional prank on the
pompeus, egotistical Tiecelin
the Crow; the slow-witted
lover of honey, Brun the Bear;
and the cunning and ambitious
Baron of the Animal Kingdom,
Ysengrin the Wolf. Despite
help from his friend the gentle,
honest Lendore the Marmot,
Reynard finds himself in
danger of being hanged at the
end of the year, and must once
again use his wits to escape his
Aroni
Bagley
Fisher
"The charm of this play
and what makes the character
so appealing is Reynard's ir-
repressible love of life and the
possibilities for fun," said
director Robert G. Miller.
"But Reynard is not just a buf-
foon. He respects his friend,
the Marmot, and saves her
from being eaten by the wolf,
and he protects the bumbling
good-natured lion. A complex
character, Reynard is at once
caring and obstreperous, wick-
ed and kind, unpredictable and
utterly lovable.'
"A favorite of young au-
diences throughout the world,
this play's charming animal
characters, uproarious situa-
tions and hair-raising escapes
will delight youngsters and
their parents as well," stated
Zelda Pincourt Mason, JCC
President.
Now in its 16th year, Asolo
Touring Theatre is a fully pro-
fessional company that draws
on the talents of highly
Qualified actors, directors,
esigners and managers to
shape its exciting repertory of
plays.
Weizmann Florida Region
To Open Office
Motzen
Cantorial Concert To Feature
International Cast
Cantors from Tel Aviv, Mon-
treal, Toronto, and Miami will
be featured at a Cantorial Con-
cert, Sunday, March 15, 7
p.m., at the West Palm Beach
Auditorium. Zvee Aroni,
Yaakov Motzen, David Bagley
and David Fisher, along with
the 42 piece North Miami
Beach Symphony Orchestra
and the Beth Torah Congrega-
tion Choir, will present an
evening of liturgical, Israeli,
and Chasidic music.
The Palm Beach Liturgical
Culture Foundation is a non-
profit organization founded
last year to perpetuate
liturgical and Jewish music. In
addition to sponsoring the
Cantorial Concert, the Foun-
dation awards scholarships to
youngsters who showpromise
in the cantorial field. This year
a presentation will be made at
the concert to one of the boys
in the choir who will be given a
year's scholarship to study
with a professional.
Cantor Zvee Aroni began his
musical studies as a child in
Jerusalem, where he sang as a
soloist with many famous can-
tors. He founded and directed
the Manhattan School for Can-
tors and served on the faculty
of two educational institutions.
He currently serves as cantor
of Beth Torah Congregation in
North Miami Beach.
Cantor Yaakov Motzen
studied with many great can-
tors including Cantor Yitzchak
Eshyel in Israel. He has served
as chief cantor of Givatayem,
Haifa, and Ramat Gan and has
appeared in concerts
Continued on Page 19
Norman D. Cohen, Chair-
man of the American Commit-
tee for the Weizmann Institute
of Science, has announced that
the Committee will open a
branch office in the Palm
Beach area this spring.
The opening will mark the
first branch office in the
history of Weizmann in
Florida. The Institute has
maintained its main office in
Greater Miami for nearly 15
years.
The announcement of a
"presence" for Weizmann in
Palm Beach was made by Mr.
Cohen at a Cocktail Reception
hosted by Mr. Cohen and his
wife, Judith, at their Sloan's
Curve home in Palm Beach.
Guest speaker was the emi-
nent scientist and im-
munologist Dr. Fritz Bach,
Director of the Immunobiology
Center at the University of
Minnesota in Minneapolis. Dr.
Bach discussed the important
role the Weizmann Institute
plays in international science
and research.
The Institute, now in its
52nd year, is currently engag-
ed in nearly 700 different
scientific and research pro-
jects, ranging from cancer and
multiple sclerosis to energy
and agriculture. The Institute
is ranked today among the
leading basic science research
centers of the world.
For additional information
pertaining to the Weizmann
Institute, write to Lee
Millman, Executive Director,
Florida Region, Weizmann In-
stitute of Science, 1550 N.E.
Miami Gardens Drive, Suite
405, N. Miami Beach, FL
33179, or telephone 940-7377
in Miami.
Judith and Norman Cohen Host Weizmann Reception
Irwin and Bonnie Guild.
From left,'Irving Korn, Lee Halzel, Lee Korn
and Dr. Lawrence Halzel.
Norman D. Cohen, Chairman of the American
Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science,
and his wife, Judith, recently hosted a Cocktail
Reception at their Sloan's Curve home for the
internationally-known scientist and immunologist,
From left, Dr. Fritz Bach, Director of the
Immunobiology Center at the University of
Minnesota at Minneapolis, Norman D. Cohen,
Chairman of the American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute, and Judith Cohen.
Dr. Fritz Bach. Dr. Bach discussed the important
role the Weizmann Institute, which is located in
Rehovot, Israel, plays in international science and
research.
Mr. Cohen announced that the Institute's
American Committee will open an office in the
Palm Beach area this spring. Cohen asked the 50
guests who attended the reception "to become a
steering committee to develop the Palm Beach
region.'
Lee Millman, Executive Director of the Florida
Region office, which is based in Miami, said,
"Florida already ranks fourth in the nation in
terms of raising funds for the Weizmann Institute,
following New York, Los Angeles and Chicago.
Our goal for this year is to raise $2 million."
Mr. Cohen underscored the role of U.S.
contributions to the Weizmann Institute. He noted
that 40 per cent of Weizmann's total budget is
funded by world-wide contributions and that 60 per
cent of that amount emanates from the American
Committee's 12 regional support offices
throughout the country.
Rowland Schaefer, Chairman of the Florida
Region of the American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute, and Dr. Bessie F.
Lawrence, in whose honor the Institute's
International Summer Student Science Program
at Rehovot is named.
From left, Ann Hendeles, Jacob Hendeles,
Miriam Kerzner and Morris Kerzner.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT


a I
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 13, 1987
JDC Funds Rebuilt Mexican School
.
Hie Rabbinical Corner
DEVOTED TO DISCUSSION OF THEMES AND ISSUES RELEVANT TO JEWISH UFE. FAST AND PRESENT
Become A Mordecai, Become An Esther
By RABBI JOEL L. LEVINE
Temple Judea
How fortunate we are as
Jews to celebrate festivals
which truly have timeless
messages. Purim is another
example of how we can not on-
ly enjoy its hilarity but relate
its lesson to the often tragic
and bizarre events of our day.
We are reminded of the
Book of Esther when we read
and hear about the Iran-
Contra scandal, when ter-
rorists compel even the power-
ful nations of the world to
negotiate out of fear, when
over 400,000 Soviet Jews find
their fate as refuseniks depen-
ding upon the whims of a
government groping to find its
own direction. We are remind-
ed of the Book of Esther when
we read and hear about
religious extremists of our
own people resorting to public
vilification of others rather
than to toleration of opposing
points of view. We are remind-
ed of the Book of Esther when
we see with our own eyes the
poor of our nation frustrated
Rabbi Joel Levine
by bureaucracy and govern-
ment inaction.
The Hamans of our time
devote their energies to make
so many people miserable, to
maintain darkness where
there should be light, to keep
people feeling despondent
when they should have hope.
Today, we need more
Mordecais and Esthers. To-
day, we need human beings
who would be so bold and
courageous to break out of the
mold of conformity and indif-
ference and prove to the
Hamans of our time that in-
deed good will triumph over
evil.
When we lend a deaf ear to
calls for social action, when we
are too busy to attend rallies
for religious action, when we
are either rude or hang up our
telephone to calls for tzedaka,
then we maintain an at-
mosphere for the Hamans of
our time to continue their
destructive work.
This year, become a
Mordecai. This year, become
an Esther. Become a partner
in the mitzva of tikun olam.
Together, let us create
together a world in which
more and more people will
become energized to bring
light and hope to these troubl-
ed times, a world where more
and more people will be drawn
closer to God.
Tower Commission Report
Continued from Page 1
States in the region."
The report added that "Iran
badly wanted" the U.S. Tow
and Hawk missiles that Israel
could provide to counter Iraqi
superiority in planes and ar-
mor. "Israel was more than
willing to provide these
weapons to Iran, but only if
the United States approved
the transfer and would agree
to replace the weapons," the
report said.
TOWER SAID that the
board believes that Reagan ap-
proved Israel's first sale of
arms to Iran in August 1985,
before the shipment took
place. Reagan, in his first
testimony to the board, said he
approved the sale in August,
but then later told the board
his approval came after the
shipment. Since then he has
said he cannot remember when
his approval came. Tower
Jolt and pmdntnc
adult
urology
piotWtc dbordar* famata
mconUnanca and Waddar
dnofdwi can^ar of tna
btaddar and proatata laaar
sur0ary ultrasound and
parcutanaoua traatmant
of Ktdnay aan mata
nfartaWy. Impotanca and
Implant aurpary
SlEVBiJ.
Carttftad by Wia
Amarlcan Board of Uratoey
Diptomta. Harvard
Medical School
Massachusetts General
Hospital Harvard Program
to Urology
John f Kennedy Matftcai Contra
110 JFK. Circle Aoarrta). Florida
964-1607
pointed out that one reason
why the board could not come
to any conclusions on the ex-
tent of Israel's involvement
was that the Israeli govern-
ment refused to allow it to in-
terview the Israelis involved.
The Israeli government had
agreed to reply to written
questions, but had not done so
before the report was
completed.
Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, during his visit to
Washington recently, promis-
ed to cooperate with the
Senate and House committees
investigating the Iran/Contra
affair. But it was not clear
whether he would allow the
Israelis involved to be
interviewed.
Israeli Embassy spokesman
Yosef Gal said that the Em-
bassy received the board's
questions on Feb. 16. He said
they were very detailed, and it
was "impossible" to provide
the information in time. But he
said "we are cooperating"
with all the investigations.
TOWER ALSO said the
board had not come to any con-
clusions on the transfer of
funds from the sale of arms to
Iran to the Contras. He said
the board was denied access to
the Swiss banks involved, and
Adm. John PoIndexter, the
former National Security Ad-
visor, and Marine Lt. Col.
Oliver North, the former Na-
tional Security Council
employee involved in the Iran
affair, among others, refused
to testify before the board.
However, the report noted,
as previously made public, that
North, under questioning from
Attorney General Edwin
Meese, said the diversion of
funds "was an Israeli idea."
Shamir denied in
Washington any Israeli in-
volvement in the diversion of
funds.
He also stressed that Israel
acted in the Iran affair as an
ally and friend of the U.S.
"Even if the government of
Israel actively worked to begin
the initiative and to keep it go-
ing, the U.S. government is
responsible for its own deci-
sions," the board's report
stressed.
IT ADDED that "Although
Israel dealt with those por-
tions of the U.S. government
that it deemed were sym-
pathetic to the initiative, there
is nothing improper per se
about this fact. U.S. decision-
makers make their own deci-
sions and must bear respon-
sibility for the consequences."
Tower said that while the
U.S. effort started out as a
way to seek influence with
moderates in Iran, it "very
quickly became an arms-for-
hostages affair." He noted
that while Reagan could be
faulted for his management
style, the fault lay with his ad-
visors who did not provide him
with the type of advice needed.
The board members specifical-
ly blamed Poindexter, former
Central Intelligence Agency
director William Casey and
White House Chief of Staff
Donald Regan.
The report details the entire
Iranian affair in chronological
order, but there was little in-
formation not already publicly
known.
Policeman
Wounds Girl
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli policeman wounded a
16-year-old Palestinian girl in the
leg when he opened fire on a
crowd after his vehicle was stoned
in the Gaza Strip town of Khan
Yunis last week. The policeman
said he fired into the air to
disperse the stone-throwers and
then fired at their feet.
NEW YORK (JTA)- A
junior high school in Mexico
City, destroyed in the
September 19, 1985 earth-
quake, is holding classes in a
new building built through the
combined efforts of the
American and Mexican Jewish
communities, which raised
$2.5 million for the purpose,
the Joint Distribution Commit-
tee (JDC) announced.
The JDC responded to the
Mexican disaster with a "JDC
Open Mailbox" which funnels
contributions by American
Jews toward non-sectarian
disaster relief.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday
9 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. Evening services 5:45 p.m. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Mincha 5:45 p.m. followed by
Sholosh Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a.m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5967. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm. Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:45 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St Helen's Pariah Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-669-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:16 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5849
Okeechobee Blvd., No. 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33417. Phone
471-1526.


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Syn
ill
e News
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Sisterhood will present a
Purim Auction on March 22 at
the Social Hall. Hamantashen
and beverages will be served.
The cost wul be $3 per person.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday evening March 13
Temple will celebrate Jewish
Music Month with the first ap-
pearance of its Congregational
Choir. Rabbi Howard Shapiro
will conduct the service. Can-
tor Peter Taormina will lead
the congregation in songs.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited. During
the evening service child care
will be provided.
On Saturday evening March
14 everyone is invited to at-
tend the first night of Purim
with readings of the Megilla.
This should be a very festive
evening. Service will start at
7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Yetta Kailes will conduct
Temple Judea Sabbath Ser-
vices with Cantor Anne
Newman on Friday, March 13
at 8 p.m. at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center., the corner of
Southern Blvd. and Flagler
Drive.
Mrs. Kailes teaches Adult
Intermediate Hebrew at Tem-
ple Judea. A long time member
of the congregation, Mrs.
Kailes taught Hebrew and con-
ducted services while she lived
on Long Island.
Following Services, the con-
gregation is invited to attend
an oneg shabbat sponsored by
Sisterhood. Child care will be
provided under the direction of
Miriam Ruiz. For more infor-
mation, call the office.
Project Hineni is a unique
part of Temple Judea's
spirituality program. Hineni
groups meet every four to six
weeks in strategic locations in
the Palm Beaches. At Hineni
meetings, Rabbi Joel Levine
explores with participants the
meaning and the role God can
play in life. Rabbi Levine
shares his belief in God and
participants share their per-
sonal feelings about God, im-
mortality, and the meaning of
religion for moderns.
The following Hineni
meetings are scheduled: Mon-
day, March 16 for the Lake
Worth-South Palm Beach area
at 7:30 p.m. hosted by Mel and
Estelle Brenner. March 23 for
the Northend at 7:30 p.m.
hosted by Eitan and Lisa
Kandel. Thursday, April 2 for
the Wellington-Royal Palm
Beach area at 7:30 p.m. hosted
by Larry and Susan Mack, and
Wednesday, March 26 at 10
a.m. hosted by Esther Dorff
for the Golden Lakes-Century
Village communities.
For reservations for any
Hineni group, call Celia May at
the Temple Judea office Tues-
day and Thursday mornings.
Temple Beth David Celebrates
Jewish Music Month
Temple Beth David will
celebrate Jewish Music Month
on Friday, March 20, at 8 p.m.
Cantor Earl Rackoff and the
Temple Beth David Choir will
present a program of Yiddish
and Israeli songs. The Friday
evening service will also be
highlighted with special
liturgical selections in honor of
this joyous occasion.
"This evening of song and
harmony is fun for old and
young alike, for through song
we help to remember our past
and refresh our present,"
noted Cantor Rackoff. The
choir members are Ruth
Bleiman, Gwen Boykin, Eddy
Burg, Steven Chavkin, Abbie
Feuer, Jean Fisher, Joan
Foster, Marlene Garvis,
Monroe Greenbere. Ruth
Cantor Earl Rackoff
AOLER
Fnuie, of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
BERMAN
Norman, 66, of Lake Worth. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
COHEN
Ben, 86, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Ihapel. West Palm Beach.
FRATKIN
Samuel H 81. of West Palm Beach.
Menorah Gardens and Funeral Chapels,
West Palm Beach.
FRIEDMAN
Albert, 84. of Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
dian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
FI'ERSTEIN
M'ths. 76, of Lake Worth. Menorah
l.ardens and Funeral Chapels. West Palm
Beach.
GBOBSBssM
Max. 79, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstem Guaranteed 8ecurity Plan
( hapel. West Palm Beach.
JACOBS
Lester, 72, of Palm Beach Gardens. Levitt-
Einstein Funeral Home. West Palm
Beach.
JORDAN
Harry. 79. of West Palm Beach. Riverside
Uiardian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
KLEIN
"tv. 84, of Palm Springs. Riverside Guar-
*n Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
LEWART
Mortimer, 67, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chspd. West Palm Beach.
Area Deaths
MANN
Benjamin B 89, of North Palm Beach.
Riverside Guardian Funeral Home, West
Palm Beach.
OFFENBERGER
Louis, 84, of Golden Lakes, West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels. West Palm Beach.
REISSMAN
Leonard, 73, of Lake Worth. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
ROBINSON
Neal, 42. of West Palm Beach, Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
Beach.
SATZ
Louis. 75, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel. West Palm Beach.
SCHUR
Dorothy, 87, of West Palm Beach and Fort
Pierce. Riverside Guardian Chapel. West
Palm Beach.
SECKLER
Helene R.. of The Fountains. Lake Worth.
Riverside Guardian Funeral Home, West
Palm Beach.
SHURE
Alfred E., 69, of Boca Raton. Menorah
Gardens and Funeral Chapels. West Palm
Beach.
SMALLS
Arthur. 88, of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Menorah Gardens and Funeral
Chapels. West Pslm Beach.
WADLER
Abraham. 75. of Century Village, West
Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home. West Palm Beach.
Kurland, Lillian Rackoff, Lor-
raine Waldman, Bill Wyman
and Sally Zinman.
An Oneg Shabbat will follow
the service, and is being spon-
sored by the Temple Beth
David Congregation in honor
of the Choir.
All are welcome. For further
information please call the
Temple office.
Vandalism
Continued from Page 4
the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, the NAACP
Legal Defense and Educa-
tional Fund, the International
Network of Children of
Holocaust Survivors and the
American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors.
A decision is not expected
for several months.
Sabbath
Continued from Page 1
of religion.
Marc Stern, AJCongress
legal affairs director, echoed
Rabinove's views and pointed
out that the decision reaffirms
two recent Court decisions.
The Court ruled in Estate of
Thornton v. Caldor (1985) and
Bowen v. Roy (1986) that ac-
commodations such as shifting
public school graduations to
avoid conflicting with Sabbath
are not government establish-
ment of religion, which the
First Amendment prohibits.
In addition, he said the deci-
sion places the "Free Exercise
Clause on very firm ground."
Jill Kahn, ADL's assistant
legal affairs director, also was
"extremely pleased." She said
the decision was significant in
that it reaffirmed two cases
that prohibited denial of
unemployment benefits
because of religious beliefs,
Sherber vs. Verner (1963) and
Thomas v. Review Board of
the Indiana Employment
Security Division (1981).
Concert To Feature
International Cast
Continued from Page 17
throughout the world. He now
serves as cantor of Congrega-
tion Shomrim Laboker-Beth
Yehudah-Shaare Tefillah in
Montreal.
Cantor David Fisher has
been performing worldwide
for the past ten years. Born in
Israel, he served as soloist
with the Rabbinical Choir of
the Israel Defense Forces.
Upon completion of his army
duty, he served as cantor of
the Great Synagogue in Tel
Aviv and subsequently went to
South Africa for a three-year
term there. He now resides in
Israel where he has received
awards for his Chassidic and
Yiddish performances.
Cantor David Bagley is in-
ternationally recognized as
one of the world's leading can-
tors. At the outbreak of World
War II, he fled with his family
to Japan and then to Shanghai,
where he remained for six
years. In 1947 he emigrated to
the United States where he of-
ficiated in leading synagogues.
After the Six Day War in 1967
he settled in Israel and was ap-
pointed cantor of the Great
Synagogue of Ramat Gan. He
is now the cantor at Beth
Sholom Synagogue in Toronto.
The concert is being produc-
ed by the Palm Beach
Liturgical Culture Foundation
under the chairmanship of
Max Shapiro. He noted that
this community event was
made possible with the
cooperation of area
synagogues who are
distributing tickets. Tickets
can only be purchased at the
synagogues and will not be
available at the door.
For tickets, contact the
following participating
synagogues: Temple Beth
Sholom, Congregation Beth
Kodesh, Golden Lakes Tem-
ple, Temple Beth Zion, Temple
Israel, Congregation Aitz
Chaim, Temple Emanu-El
Lake Worth Jewish Center
Temple Beth David, Con
gregation Beth Abraham
Temple Beth David, and Tern
pie B'nai Jacob.
BfiBBBaBaaBsasasasasasBBassajsssssssssssM
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
Join The Synagogue
Of Your Choice
... because vital Jewish Institutions
build strong Jewish communities.
PLAN
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WITH
THIS
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Just bring this ad to Menorah Gardens and
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,v
Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 18,1987
Super Sunday Volunteers

Continued from Page 7
Louise Li >kin
Jewish Federation
Ann L. Lipton
Jewish Federation
Karen List
Young Adult Division
Zelda Pincourt Mason
Women's Division
Esther Molat
Women's Division
Al Moskowitz
Jewish Federation
Tillle Mutterperl
Temple Beth El
Mark Page
Jewish Federation
Stella Page
Jewish Federation
Rhea Passon
Jewish Federation
Nat Passon
Jewish Federation
Marvin Percher
Jewish Federation
Mrs. Marvin Percher
Jewish Federation
Sarah Pfeffer
Jewish Federation
Molly Podorzer
Hadassah
Shirley Pomerantz
Jewish Federation
Edith B. Raboy
Jewish Federation
Mark Rattinger
Federation Board
Shirley Rauch
Jewish Federation
Bea Rauchwarger
Hadassah
Helen Rochman
Holocaust Survivors
Harold Rose
Jewish Federation
Pearl Rose
Jewish Federation
Dean J. Rosenbach
Jewish Federation
Lila Rosenberg
Jewish Federation
Isadore Roaoff
Volunteers for Israel
Louise Ross
Jewish Federation
Helen Rothberg
Brandeis
Mel Rothberg
Brandeis
Rosalind Rubenfeld
Women's Division
Robert D. Rubin
Young Adult Division
Herman Sakowitz
Jewish Federation
Barnett Sakren
B'nai B'rith
Tiffany Sakren
B'nai B'rith
Edna H. Sands
Hadassah
Louis Scheinbaum
Jewish Federation
Rhoda Scheinbaum
Jewish Federation
Sylvia Schneider
Jewish Federation
Yetta Schneider
ORT
Claire Schwartz
Jewish Federation
Syd Schwartz
Jewish Federation
Marcia Shapiro
Women's Division
Clifford Shapiro
Jewish Federation
Gertrude Shepard
Hadassah
Lillle Q. Sher
Assoc. Jewish Charities
Miriam Sherman
Jewish War Veterans
George A. Shiller
Jewish Federation
Carol Shubs
Leadership Development
Peppy Sltversteln
Women's Division
Adele Simon
Women's Division
Mr. Lee Smith
Temple Beth Torah
Mrs. Lee Smith
Temple Beth Torah
Ruth Sommer
ORT
George Spivak
Jewish Community Day School
Irene Spivak
Jewish Community Day School
Phyllis Stahl
Jewish Federation
Maiahe Stein
Jewish Federation
Irene Stewart
Jewish Federation
Paula Super
Hadassah
Nat Super
Hadassah
TeeseSussman
Jewish Federation
Coleman Sussman
Jewish Federation
Marilyn David Topperman
JFCS
Herman J. Tauber
B'nai B'rith
Mollle Tradburks
Jewish Federation
Danny Tucker
Jewish Federation
Renee Tucker
Jewish Federation
Sam Wadler
Jewish Federation
Arthur Weintrob
B'nai B'rith
Susan Wolf-Schwartz
Women's Division
Muriel Wollnsky
Brandeis
Rose Young
Women's Division
Hilda Zell
Hadassah
Alice Zlpkin
Women's Division
Morris Zlpkin
Jewish Federation
Rachel Zymeck
Temple Beth El
Low
isn't
The first grade students of the Jewish Community Day
School recently celebrated a milestone in their education as
they receieved their first Siddurim, presented by eighth
grade students in a special ceremony before family, friends
and teachers. The children have reached the point in their
study of Hebrew at which they can begin to read and unders-
tand many of the prayers in the liturgy.
lowest
Now is lowest,
ByUS.Gov't. testing method.
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SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL: 3 mo. "tar". 0.3 tag. meonn.
av. par bgsrtttt by FTC method.
,1


Full Text
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, March 18, 1987
Rejoicing On Purim:
A Jewish Obligation
Mordecai commanded the
Jews to observe "days of
feasting and merrymaking"
every year on the anniversary
of Purim. Therefore, a festive
meal known as the Purim
seudah is central to the Purim
celebration. It is held on Purim
afternoon (March 15) before
sundown. At this gathering, it
is customary to drink alcoholic
beverages and to "loosen up."
By tradition, one is permitted
to drink to excess to the
point (but not beyond?) where
one confuses the distinction
between barukh Mordecai
(blessed be Mordecai) and arur
Haman (cursed be Haman).
(And who stays sober to
judge?) This drinking to the
verge of inebriation reminds
us of Ahasuerus' drunken orgy
and adds to the merriment of
the occasion.
The seudah is also an occa-
sion for clever skits, witty
poems and for dressing up in
costumes. (In Israel, the
costumes rarely reflect the
Purim story.) Religious
schools, congregational and
community adult groups hold
Purim plays (Purimspiels) and
carnivals.
Various scholars have
discerned a deeper impulse in
the Purim plays, which often
provide biting parodies of
authority figures (teachers,
community leaders, etc.). One
Christian theologian, Harvey
Cox, draws our attention to
the dramatic performances
that were associated with the
medieval Feast of Fools. He
suggests that such plays were
a consciously encouraged
device: They served as a
harmless conduit channeling
the anti-social and rebellious
emotions of the common folk
while, at the same time, reaf-
firming their subjugation.
Perhaps some of that is
reflected in Purim which,
through humor, permits the
deflation of potentially inflam-
matory pressures.
The tradition of the Purim
Elay has also been compared
y literary historians to the
Christian mystery plays of the
Middle Ages, both of which
may have arisen contem-
poraneously and both of which
dealt with the dramatization of
biblical stories. If the two had
a common beginning,
however, they rapidly diverg-
ed: medieval mystery plays
were church-centered, usually
primarily serious and often
lavishly produced; Purimspiels
were generally the reverse.
Over the centuries, the Purim
productions diversified. In
some Jewish communities, it
was customary for Purim
spielers to engage in street
theater or go from house to
house presenting outrageously
funny (or, sometimes, only
outrageous) parodies of
megillat estayr and other Bible
Hamantaschen:
A Treat For Purim
What Jewish holiday doesn't
have its own distinctive food?
For Purim, it is hamantaschen
the pastry filled with poppy
seeds and honey or with prune
lekvar (or, nowadays, with
apricot jam, strawberry
preserves, chocolate (??) or
other fruit). The triangle-
shaped pastry resembled a
pocket on a garment, since
tasch is German for "pocket."
Mohn is the word for poppy
seeds. The filled pastry, known
as mohntaschen, became, by a
punning reference, haman-
taschen, Haman's pockets.
Some people say that the
triangular shape is a reminder
of the Persian hats worn by
courtiers such as Haman. In
Italy, they are known as orec-
chi di Aman Haman's ears!
Whatever their etymological,
anatomical and/or haber-
dashery origin, hamantaschen
are the most appropriate
sweet for Purim.
stories.
In addition to the man>
religious school productions
mounted for Purim, a number
of congregations and Jewish
centers around the country
have developed the tradition ol
writing and staging a Purim
satire every year. Today, too,
potentially explosive pressures
face every group (and not only
external ones, either) and
being able to laugh at
ourselves is sometimes the
best medicine.
Mish-lo-ah Manot
The sweetest Jewish
holidays are those on which joy
is shared. On Purim, it is
customary to give gifts of food
and fruit both to friends and to
the poor (see Esther 9:22).
Since it is known that gifts are
an offering of friendship as
well as an act of tzedakah,
those who are poor can feel
that what they receive is a
mark of friendship rather than
an acknowledgement of their
impoverishment. Thus, their
dignity is maintained in a
situation where a "hand out"
(in this case, food) is being
given to them directly by
known donors (perilously close
to the basket-over-the-arm
kind of "charity" our Jewish
tradition condemns. The
"friendship" level saves these
gifts from such a negative
connotation.)
Gifts of baked goods, fruit,
almonds or other nuts and beer
or wine are customarily sent in
little packages or in decorated
baskets. This tradition is called
mish-lo-ah manot "the sen-
ding of portions." Shalach
mono8 is the Ashkenazi form of
Recipe
BASIC DOUGH
% cup milk
*h cup sugar
1% tsp. salt
Vi cup margarine
Vfe cup warm water
2 pkg. dry yeast
2 beaten eggs
5 cups unbleached white flour
1 beaten egg plus 1 tbsp. water
for assembly
Scald milk; add sugar, salt
and margarine. Cool to
lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in
water; stir in milk mixture,
add 2 beaten eggs and 3 cups
flour. Beat until smooth, at
least 50 strokes. Stir in addi-
tional 2 cups flour; knead on
mish-lo-ah manot. These gifts
are great fun to prepare and a
joy to receive! If you've never
sent them before, why not
make this year the first time
even if you're the only one sen-
ding. Chances are that some of
your friends will decide to par-
ticipate in this special pleasure
too, and that next year you will
not only give but get!
In addition, it is customary
to give a financial gift to the
synagogue on Purim, reminis-
cent of the makhatzit hashekel
paid by each Israelite in the
wilderness as a form of na-
tional tax. This money is also
used to help the needy (and
might therefore best be
directed to the rabbi(s)' discre-
tionary/good works fund).
Parallels
Purim was the original gift-
giving holiday and, in this
custom, at least, sounds like
what Halloween has become
today. Children would go in
costume from house to house
(or apartment door to apart-
wmmmmmmmmmmNommm
floured board until smooth and
elastic. Place in oiled bowl and
turn once to coat dough with
oil. Cover and let rise in a
warm place until double in bulk
1 to 2 hours.
Punch down and turn out on
lightly floured board. Roll out
to V4" thickness. Cut into
rounds approximately 4" in
diameter (a coffee can makes a
good cutter for these). Place a
heaping teaspoonful of filling
on each, round and moisten the
edges with egg/water mixture.
Bring the edges together to
form a triangle. Pinch the
seams together tightly, brush
with beaten egg and place on
lightly greased cookie sheet.
Bake at 375 degrees until
golden brown about 20-25
minutes.

ment door) "begging" for
coins ("Heint is Purim,
morgen is oys; geb mir a
whatever the word for penny
was in that country und varf
mir aroys!" "Today is
Purim, tomorrow it's not; give
me a penny and throw me
out!") Interestingly enough, a
recent article on pre-Lenten
activities quoted a very similar
rhyme used by Christian
children on Shrove Tuesday.
There are other parallels, too.
In medieval France and Italy,
the Jewish community
celebrated Purim with
elaborate carnivals com-
plete with a parade, featuring
floats, clowns and biblical
"tableaux" that echo the
carnival spirit and activities of
Mardi Gras. (In Israel, a major
carnival-like parade is held in
Tel Aviv on Purim. It is called
Ad lo yada "until one does
not know..." a name ap-
parently bestowed on the ac-
tivity by the great modern
Hebrew poet Chaim Nachman
Bialik.)
POPPYSEED FILLING
Mix together in saucepan:
1 cup poppy seed
Mi cup milk
2 tbsp. sugar
dash of salt
Bring mixture to boil, stirr-
ing contstantly. Pour a small
amount into 1 beaten egg. Add
this to the mixture in the
saucepan and boil 1-2 minutes
or until thick.
Although poppy seed is the
traditional filling, other fillings
such as apricot jam or orange
marmalade may be used.
Sometimes a rolled sugar
cookie dough is used in place of
the yeast dough. Either way
you are sure to enjoy this
treat, and the children will be
delighted!
Israel Denies Tower Allegation
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Defense Ministry dismissed as
"totally groundless" an allega-
tion in the Tower Commis-
sion's report that Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin had of-
fered to send Israeli instruc-
tors to help the Contras, the
Nicaraguan rebels attempting
to overthrow the Sandinista
government.
On the contrary, Rabin
received a request for such aid
and rejected it "out of hand,"
according to a Ministry state-
ment released.
The Tower Commission was
appointed by President Ronald
Reagan to investigate the sale
of U.S. arms to Iran.
The statement said: "The
report of the Tower Commis-
sion issued (Thursday (Feb. 26)
in the U.S. contains, among
other things, a memorandum
conveyed by Col. North to Na-
tional Security Advisor John
Poindexter. According to this
memorandum, the Defense
Minister had allegedly offered
aid to the Contras in the form
of instructors. This allegation
is totally groundless."
The statement was referring
to Lt. Col. Oliver North, a
former National Security
Council employee, and Vice
Admiral John Poindexter, the
former director. Both were
dismissed after the Iran-
Contra scandal broke last
November.
The statement disclosed that
during Rabin's visit to the U.S.
in May 1986, North telephoned
him and asked for an urgent
meeting. "In the meeting,
which took place at the
Waldorf Astoria Hotel (in New
York), North dwelt at'length
on the problems of the Contras
and said he had suggested to
Continued on Page 12


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FILES


Friday, March 13, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Hebrew University Opens School Of Veterinary Medicine
Senior Israeli veterinary
research positions are vacant
today because of a shortage of
qualified people. In two years
time, that shortage will begin
to be filled by the first
graduates from the recently
established Koret School of
Veterinary Medicine at the
Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
Strategically located at the
Hebrew University's Faculty
of Agriculture in Rehovot, 40
miles from Jerusalem and 15
from Tel Aviv and just down
the road from the Ministry of
Agriculture's Kimron Institute
of Veterinary Medicine at Beit
Dagan, the School recently
began its second year of opera-
tions and teaching. Nine of the
20 students in the first class
have been granted awards for
excellence by the University
Rector. This proportion of ex-
Lithuanian
Jewish Group
Seeks Peers
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Assistance to Lithuanian Jews
organization is seeking the
names' of Lithuanian Jews and
their progeny. To send a name,
or for more information, write
the organization c/o Joseph
Grilishes, President, 245 E.
11th St., New York, NY
10003.
cellent students exceeds that
of any other academic unit at
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem.
The four years of studies at
the Koret School of Veterinary
Medicine (for students who
have already completed at
least two years at a university)
are provided in three depart-
ments Veterinary Biology,
Veterinary Pathology and
Microbiology, and Veterinary
Medicine and Surgery.
In addition to catering to its
regular students, the school
has begun organizing continu-
ing education and refresher
courses for experienced Israeli
veterinarians, all of whom
were trained outside Israel.
The intention is to enrich their
knowledge of semi-tropical
and tropical animal diseases
prevalent in Israel and, at the
same time, to utilize these
practitioners' own knowledge
and experience in the field
with local animal diseases,
through discussion and ex-
change of information among
themselves and with the lec-
turers. In the future, the
School plans to broaden the
scope of the program and to
create an international center
for learning, enrichment and
research projects in veterinary
medicine.
Apart from the basic need
for an indigenous veterinary
medical school, one of the main
reasons for establishing the
school was that the ad hoc
system of providing for
Israel's need for trained
Cmon
Stevensville
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YOUR H08TS THE DWNERSTEIN ft FRIEHLINQ FAMILIES
veterinarians, by sending
students abroad to study, was
breaking down. The ever-
increasing pressure for places
in good schools of veterinary
medicine throughout the West
had, in most cases, caused
them to restrict admission to
their own nationals, leaving
Israelis no avenue open for
quality studies in veterinary
medicine. The Koret School
provides such an avenue and
fills the need.
Veterinary medicine in the
last quarter of the 20th Cen-
tury is much more than just
the care and treatment of sick
animals. It is also a vital ad-
junct to human medicine, with
a central role in public health,
and it has a contribution to
make in the ongoing fight
against diseases that scourge
mankind.
The research groups at the
Koret School are investigating
areas such as: slow virus
diseases in ruminant animals
and their relationship with
human AIDS; lung cancer in
sheep from the veterinary
aspect and as a natural model
for human cancer; the proto-
zean diseases Babesiosis and
Anaplasmosis in ruminants;
lymphoproliferative diseases
in turkeys; various influences
in fetal development; and em-
bryo transfer diseases in
domestic animals. School staff
members also pursue col-
laborative research projects
with scientists in Washington
State University, Florida
University at Gainsville, and
the University of California at
Davis.
The Jewish Community Center
of the Palm Beaches
pnitnts
THE ASOLO
TOURING THEATER
production of
w
**%**
THE
FOX
by Arthur Fuquez
Sunday, March 22 2 PM QjY
at Benjamin 8. Hornstein 8
Jewish Community Day School a
Advance tickets are available at the JCC, 700 Spencer
WPB and Keren Orr PreSchool. 2415 Okeechobee Blvd..'
Not a lot of dough
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