The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00059

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
1
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BIACH
COUNTY
"Jewish floridian
.^^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 13-NUMBER 2
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, JANUARY 9,1987
PRICE 35 CENTS
ft*tf*IMtot
Controversy Flares
Over Archbishop's
Mideast Visit
UJA LEADERS ACT FOR SOVIET JEWS
... Leonid Slepak (third from left) son of
long-time Soviet Jewish refuseniks Vlad-
mir and Masha Slepak, is shown with some
of the many National United Jewish Appeal
leaders who have visited his parents to give
them hope and bring their message IuhmU
the United States. Myrle and National UJA
Vice Chairman Bernard Borine of
Philadelphia (left) visited the Slepaks in
1977. UJA National Chairman Martin F.
Stein of Milwaukee, next to Leonid, and
Ruth and Alan Ades of New Bedford, Maaa.
(right), visited them in August. "Our arms
are linked as are our hearts," Stein said at
their recent meeting in Washington, D.C.
"We will not rest until your parents and
the 400,000 Jews who have asked to leave
Ahe Soviet Union are freed."
Shin Bet Affair
Shamir Absolved Of Wrongdoing
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir has
been absolved of any wrongdo-
ing in the 1984 killing of two
captured Arab bus hijackers by
Israeli agents and the subse-
quent cover-up of what came
to be known as the Shin Bet
affair.
But the findings of the
special committee set up by
the Justice Ministry to in-
vestigate the episode, touched
off a vituperative quarrel bet-
ween Labor and Likud only
hours after the 65-page docu-
ment was published at
Shamir's request last week.
Likud spokesmen hailed the
report and demanded that
Laborites apologize to the
Prime Minister for their
"blood libel" that he was in
any way involved. Critics of
the report claimed it
whitewashed the political
echelons which bore ultimate
responsibility for the activities
of Shin Bet, Israel's internal
secret service.
The special committee, a
panel of lawyers headed by At-
torney General Yosef Harish,
found that Shamir, who was
Premier at the time of the inci-
dent, did not order the killings
and was not implicated in at-
tempts to cover them up. Their
report castigated the then
Shin Bet chief, Avraham
Shalom, who claimed he acted
on orders from a higher
authority.
It was Shalom's testimony
before a government-
appointed committee that cast
a shadow on Shamir's role,
since the Prime Minister was
the highest political figure and
bore ultimate responsibility for
the Shin Bet. The committee
was chaired by Gen. (Res.)
Meir Zorea.
Zorea was sharply critical of
the panel's report. Calling the
incident one of the biggest
Continued on Page 17
New York Archbishop John
Cardinal O'Connor spent the
first two days of his visit to
Israel trying to untangle
himself from the embarrass-
ment of having to cancel
meetings with Israel's Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog, Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Jerusalem Mayor
Teddy Kollek under pressure
from the Vatican.
However, in what the
Vatican characterized as a
courtesy call rather than a
political meeting, O'Connor
met with Israeli President
Chaim Herzog last Sunday at
his official residence which
also serves as his office. His
talks with Herzog were a
prelude to a meeting with
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres last Monday.
Officially, O'Connor claimed
he had to cut short his visit
because he was scheduled to be
in Rome Jan. 6 to attend the
appointment of a new Aux-
iliary Bishop for New York,
William McCormack.
THE SCHEDULED
changes have disrupted the
delicate relations between
Jerusalem and the Archbishop,
who first prompted an official
invitation to visit Israel after
making statements last sum-
mer in the press sympathetic
to Palestinian nationalism.
"Somehow, a homeland has
to be provided for the Palesti-
nian peoples," O'Connor told a
New York Times reporter
upon his arrival in Rome in
June. "But from a moral
perspective, those people have
to be given a homeland. Other-
wise everything spills over into
every area and that has to
result in a very volatile situa-
tion. So I think that's
imperative."
In efforts to show O'Connor
the problem from an Israeli
perspective, Peres, who was
then Prime Minister, extended
a personal invitation to O'Con-
nor when the two met in New
York in October.
NOW, SOME Israeli and
American Jewish officials say,
it might have been better to
cancel the visit rather than
face a diplomatic controversy
over O'Connor avoiding of-
ficial contacts.
Meanwhile, officials here
Continued on Page 6
Vanunu:
'Not Guilty'
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mordechai Vanunu, the former
technician at the Dimona
nuclear facility, pleaded not
guilty to charges of treason,
grave espionage and passing
information without authoriza-
tion, as his trial opened of-
ficially in Jerusalem District
Court Dec. 28.
"He denied the facts in the
charge sheet," Vanunu's at-
torney, Aharon Zichroni, told
reporters after a 90-minute
closed session. The trial will
resume in six weeks. If con-
victed, Vanunu could face life
imprisonment.
The trial will be held in
camera and only the sentence
will be made public if the ver-
dict is guilty. The tightest
Continued on Page S
Indian Spring Campaign
Berk And Fredkove To Co-Chair
Inside
"Our Lobbyist In Tallahas-
see., page 4
Random Thoughts...
page 6
YAD Sponsors Educa-
tions! Evsnt... psgs 7
Boynton Beach News...
pages
Qlors's Childhood Enrich-
ment Center... psgs 9
Joe E. Berk
Jeanne Levy, General Campaign Chairman of
the 1987 Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal Campaign, has
announced the appointment of Joe E. Berk and
Marvin Fredkove as Co-Chairmen of the Cam-
paign at Indian Spring, Boynton Beach.
Mrs. Levy noted that this was the third year
that Mr. Berk has accepted the leadership of the
fund raising drive. "With the combination of
Joe's continued dedication to helping meet the
needs of Jews locally, worldwide and in Israel,
and Marvin's commitment to becoming actively
involved in this community, we are confident
that they will inspire among their neighbors an
increase in the outpouring of support for this
year's Campaign."
The Co-Chairmen announced that the fourth
Continued oa Page 8
Marvin Fredkove


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Looking Back
25 Years of Local
Jewish Federation History
1972
Robert D. Rapaport serves his second term as Presi-
dent. Bette Gilbert heads Women's Division.
Community pre-school moves to Camp Shalom site.
Women's Division organizes Friendly Visitors program
to augment visits of rabbis to unaffiliated hospitalized and
homebound persons under the Co-Chairmenship of Mary
Broadman and Esther Levy.
Sharir's Resignation On 'Freeze'
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Justice Minister Avraham
Sharir said last week he was
putting his resignation on
"freeze" at the request of
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, until
a replacement can be found.
Sharir, who had announced
some days before that he
would resign, is expected to re-
main in office for at least
another month.
Shamir reiected Sharir's
proposal that he reappoint Yit-
zhak Modai who resigned as
Justice Minister last August.
Modai quit after a bitter per-
sonal confrontation with then
Premier Shimon Peres and
presently serves as a Minister-
Without-Portfolio. Peres and
his Labor Party colleagues
have made it clear they would
not accept Modai's return to
the Justice Ministry.
Likud's choice of a replace-
ment, acceptable to' Labor, is
Transport Minister Haim Cor-
fu. But Corfu has adamantly
refused the job, saying he is
perfectly happy heading the
Transport Ministry and has a
number of projects he wants to
complete before the tenure of
the Labor-Likud unity coali-
tion government expires in
two years.
i
Id

For the finest General Education
in a pervasively Jewish atmosphere..
Kindergarten-8th grade
Comprehensive general and Jewish
education
Non-denominational
Tuition assistance available
5801 Paker Avenue
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
585-2227
Women's Division 1972-73
By LOUISE ROSS
"There seems to be an iden-
tify crisis in the feminine
world if we are to believe what
we read. The experts don't
seem to be able to agree on
what we (as women) should be
first.. woman, wife, mother,
career girl. It would appear to
me that what is most impor-
tant is for each of us to know
ourselves first. We should
know ourselves as a person, as
an independent individual,
able to assume responsibility,
manage our lives and make
meaningful decisions. Every
woman has many oppor-
tunities to express that in-
dividuality. As a contributor to
the Women's Division, you
have found one way."
These words were written,
not in 1987, but in 1972 by
Bette Gilbert who headed
Women's Division that year.
She characterized Women's
Division as "allowing the
modern woman an opportunity
to fulfill an ancient commit-
ment by assuming moral and
financial responsibilities for
fellow Jews in need." The
year's programs reflected this
philosophy.
Staci Lesser chaired the In-
stitute of Awareness for
Women's Division which af-
forded Jewish women's
organizations the chance to
tell the story of their organiza-
tion to the Jewish community.
Two hundred and thirty-five
women representing 12
organizations attended the
luncheon at Temple Israel.
Several events were also
held on behalf of Campaign.
Barbara Gordon Green chaired
the General Gifts Division,
Irene Kornhauser served as
Chairman of the Pacesetters
and Cynnie List headed the
Benefactors Division.
The highlight of the "We
Kept The Promise" luncheon
Bette Gilbert with Bob List
(left) and Robert S. Levy.
Barbara Gordon Green at a
1973 Women's Division Cam-
paign event.
held at the Palm Beach Towers
was a call made to a refusenik
in Russia. According to Mrs.
Gilbert, the ensuing conversa-
tion was an emotional ex-
perience for the women. In her
"Ad Libs from Women's Divi-
sion" column in the Federation
Reporter, she wrote, "He is
sacrificing much more than
dollars in the hopes of getting
to Israel. When he gets there
our dollars will contribute
toward his absorption. Helping
young men like Gabriel is part
of that promise we made.
Following Mrs. Gilbert as
Chairman of Women's Divi-
sion in 1973, was the late Bar-
bara Weinstein. Barbara Gor-
don Green, Mrs. Weinstein's
Campaign Chairman, recalls
her as being a very dedicated
person. "She was organized,
wonderful to work with, and
very involved in what she was
doing."
Mrs. Green remembers the
Communi-teas that Women's
Division held to educate
women throughout the county
about the local community,
Israel, Federation, and
Women's Division as a most
unusual concept. "We held
these teas for two solid weeks,
sometimes three a day. It felt
like we were on roller skates.
Over 200 people were involv-
ed. We ran it like a war we
had a huge bulletin board in
my home, where we had the
teas scheduled according to
Zip codes." In 1973 Barbara
Brams chaired the event and
Ruth Abramson served as Co-
Chair.
Cynnie List chaired the
Special Gifts Division that
year, Ruth Szemzo headed the
Benefactors' Division, while
Jeanne Levy and Zelda Pin-
court co-chaired the Paceset-
ters' Division. At this first WD
event of that year, the
Pacesetters, alter par-
ticipating in a Mini-Mission of
their own, joined with the
Benefactors' Division for a
gala luncheon.
Another combined event
was held by Women's Division
that year. The Advanced and
General Gifts Division under
the leadership of Staci Lesser,
Roz Ornstein and Joan
Wolfberg, held the first joint
luncheon at The Breakers.
Paula Borenstein, the Public
Relations representative of the
Joint Distribution Committee
was the guest speaker.
In addition to their fund rais-
ing and educational corn-
Continued on Pare 13
Federation Shabbat
Each year synagogues across the county devote
a Shabbat to Informing their congregants about
the programs and services of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County and its
beneficiary agencies the Jewish Community
EH!!!! !hlJewi8h Community Day School, the Jewish Family and
Children's Service and the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center...
ATTEND THE SYNAGOGUE OF YOUR CHOICE
Boynton Beach Jewish Center
Congregation Beth Kodcah
501 NE 26 Ave.,
Boynton Beach
Rabbi Leon B. Fink
Golden Lakes Temple %
1470 Golden Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach
Rabbi Joseph Speiser
FRIDAY, JAN. 16
Temple Beth Sholom
315 N. "A" Street, LW
Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg
Temple Beth Torah
900 Big Blue Trace, WPB
Rabbi Steven Westman
Temple Emanu-El
190 North County Road, PB
Rabbi Joel Chazin
Temple Israel
1901No.Flagler.WPB
Rabbi Howard Shapiro
Temple Judea
St. Catherine's
Orthodox Church Social Hall
4000 Washington Road, WPB
Rabbi Joel Levine
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
Temple Beth Am
759 Parkway Street, Jupiter
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
Congregation Aitz Chaim
2518 Haverhill Road, WPB
Temple Beth Zion
129 Sparrow Dr., WPB
Rabbi Seymour Friedman
FRIDAY, FEB. 6
Congregation Anshei Sholom
5348 Grove Street, WPB
Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde
The above listings were included as of nrans timo c,___ .
p.r,,eip.tlng in F.d.r.tlo Sh.bb.,, w'.fch ESfifc SZSX&Z""
fc^SSEA'T* """" A"n Sh*"' F""^ Ch.pl..n, .. ,n.


Roth To Speak At
Century Village Rally
A rally on behalf of the 1987
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish
Appeal Campaign will be held
for residents of Century
Village on Sunday, Jan. 18,10
a.m., at the Clubhouse
Auditorium. In making the an-
nouncement, Sam Wadler,
Hank Grossman and Nat
Cohen, Co-Chairmen of the CV
Campaign, issued a joint state-
ment saying, "Century Village
has the reputation of giving
from the heart. As we begin
our Campaign, join us at the
rally to hear Dora Roth, a
Holocaust survivor and Israeli
who speaks eloquently for
Jews and Israel.
"Although the largest share
of the commitment one makes
to the Federation-UJA Cam-
paign is for Israel, pressing
local needs must be met," con-
tinued the Co-Chairmen. "Our
aging population is steadily
growing larger, as are the
numbers of our youngsters
who must receive a Jewish
education. In addition, scores
of other programs must be
kept going to keep our local
community strong.
"We urge our fellow
residents to join with us to
hear Mrs. Roth. She is a
vibrant, optimistic person who
will share her experiences as
an Israeli and Holocaust sur-
vivor with us. In addition, we
will see a short video presenta-
tion, narrated by Theodore
Bikel, about how far Federa-
tion and the Jewish communi-
ty has come in the past 25
Women's Division
Dr. Schulman To Address
Gathering At Eastpointe
Dorothy Ludwig and Rachel
Rooks, Co-Chairwomen of the
Gathering at Eastpointe spon-
sored by the Women's Division
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, have an-
nounced that Dr. Norma
Schulman, noted psychologist
and lecturer, will be the guest
speaker at the Open Board
Meeting. The Gathering will be
held on Wednesday, Jan. 21,
9:30 a.m., at Eastpointe South
Village Recreational Center.
In making the announce-
ment, the co-chairs urged
women not to miss the oppor-
tunity to meet their neighbors
and hear this dynamic speaker.
"Dr. Schulman will be speak-
ing about 'The New Im-
migrants Women on the
Move,' stated Mrs. Ludwig. In
many ways," she said,
"women are the new im-
migrants ... on the move from
North to South, learning to ad-
just to new life styles and
transitions.
Mrs. Rooks stated," "Dr.
Schulman, an active member
of Women's Division, is very
involved in the Jewish com-
munity. In addition, as a
psychologist, she is sensitive to
the issues facing women as
they move into new com-
munities," stated Mrs. Lud-
wig. "We are very pleased to
have her address our Gather-
ing and look forward to
Dr. Norma Schulman
many new
welcoming
residents."
Dr. Schulman is presently on
the staff of the Humana
Hospital of the Palm Beaches
and in full time private
psychotherapy practice. She is
a member of the Executive
Board of Crisis Line and
President-elect for the Palm
Beach County Chapter of the
Florida Psychological
Association.
A frequent speaker at Plann-
ed Parenthood Programs, Dr.
Schulman has served as a
supervisor for a program for
pregnant teen-age girls. She is
CoBtlnoedooPag.17
DON'T FORGET
YOUNQ ADULT DIVISION OF THE
JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Business Executives Forum
Quest Speaker
LANCE S. CLARKE
Executive Director,
Downtown Development Authority
Thursday, Jan. 15,6 p.m.
ROYCE HOTEL
For reservations, contact Debbie Hammer,
Young Adult Division Director, at the
Federation Office, 832-2120.
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
JDC And Salvadoran
Jewry Rebuild Kindergarten
Dora Roth
years."
Mrs. Roth spent six years in
concentration camps .. three
years in various hospitals
Continued on Page 6
The American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC)
is allocating $50,000 to help
rebuild a kindergarten in San
Salvador, the capital of El
Salvador, according to Heinz
Eppler, President of JDC. The
Estado de Israel, a non-
sectarian school serving 300
students, was destroyed by the
earthquake in October that left
nearly 1,000 people dead and
31,000 families homeless.
"The JDC allocation will
match funds contributed by
the Salvadoran Jewish com-
munity," Mr. Eppler said.
"The combination of funds will
enable the school to be
rebuilt." This marks the first
time that the international
relief agency and the
Salvadoran community have
collaborated on a project.
The kindergarten was
located in a very poor
neighborhood of San Salvador.
Students will be meeting in
tents until the reconstruction
is complete.
"The JDC established a
'JDC Open Mailbox' program
for Salvadoran earthquake
relief in October," noted Ralph
I. Goldman, JDC Executive
Vice President. "This is a
mechanism for the American
Jewish community to con-
tribute toward non-sectarian
relief for victims of major
disasters." The program has
previously been implemented
following disasters in Cam-
bodia, Lebanon, Italy,
Ethiopia, Colombia, and
Mexico.
1987 Campaign -
Major Events
^SS
JANUARY
i. 8
i. 14
i. 15
an. 18
an. 18
i. 28
i. 29
FEBRUARY
Feb. 15 Indian Spring Dance
Feb. 18 Women's Division Pacesetters'
Luncheon
Feb. 20 High Ridge Golf Tournament
Feb. 26 Community Dinner
President's Dinner
The Fountains Cocktail Party
Women's Division Lion of Judah
Poinciana Luncheon
Century Village Rally
The Fountains Golf Tournament
Hunters Run Pacesetters Event
MARCH
Mar. 1 Hunters Run Dinner Dance
Mar. 5 Eastpointe Dinner
Mar. 8 Wellington Event
Mar. 11 Women's Division $365 Event
Mar. 22 Super Sunday
Mar. 23-27 Super Week
APRIL
Apr. 1 Women's Division K'Tubat
Luncheon
Apr. 26 Young Adult Division
INFORMATION: For more details on
Federation events, please call 832-2120.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF THE PALM BEACHES___
IS GROWING FAST
WE NEED TO KNOW HOW FAST!!
THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Is Conducting a "Demographic Study"
In Order To
1. Determine the ekaracterutics of the Jewish population
2. Identify crucial needs in our community
3. Plan programs and services to meet these needs, and
4. Identify community resources.
If you receive a call (January 22nd April 1st I. PLEASE STAY ON THE PHONE!
Your answers will help us BUILD a strong, viable Jewish community ....
.....Now and for many years to come.
We are COUNTING ON YOU to be COUNTED!!!!!!
^0fACV\C
Telephone numbers will be selected randomly by computer, therefore, all call* will be anonymous
The interviewer will not know, and will not ask for. your name or address. I
There will be NO SOLICITATION of funds.
Demographic Stud\ mittee Chair: Stanley B. Brenner
$01 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305. West Palm Beach. FL 33401. Phone: 13031 832-' II


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Most Significant Impact
On Jews During 1986
Terrorism
Four of the ten events that had the most significant im-
pact on Jews during 1986 were connected with interna-
tional terrorism, according to Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
They were the massacre of 21 Jews in an Istanbul
synagogue, Britain's breaking-off of diplomatic relations
wiht Syria because of that nation's involvement in ter-
rorism, the American bombing of Libya and the U.S. sale of
arms to "terrorist" Iran.
According to Perlmutter, "if (the bombing of) Libya
represented American resolve that we will not be in-
timidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to 'terrorist' Iran
was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a retrieving
virtue in trading arms for hostages it was the indignant
reaction of the American people a reaction so strog as to
render less likely renewed American genuflection to
terrorists."
Perlmutter's list of the most significant events of 1986
follows:
1. The massacre of 21 Jews in the Istanbul synagogue by
Arab terrroists. It underscored, as if underscoring were
needed, the lie that Arab terrorism is really anti-Israel and
not anti-Semitic. And the inane responses, including
former President Jimmy Carter's that the reason for the
blood splattered walls of the synagogue and for its jaggedly
torn bodies was "lack of progress in the Middle East."
2. Relatedly, the exposure of the Syrian connection to
terrorism in London, in Rome, in West Berlin. The
significance here is not so much in the bloodiness of Syria's
hands as in Great Britain's immediate breaking of relations
with Syria. Britain, once again, role model.
3. The United States' bombing of Libya. Terrorism has
ever been more vulnerable to retaliation than to a deplor-
ing editorial.
4. And if Libya represented American resolve that we wil
not be intimidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to terr-
roist Iran was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a
retrieving virtue in trading arms for hostages it was the in-
dignant reaction of the American people a reaction so
strong as to render less likely renewed American genuflec-
tion to terrorists.
5. Pope John Paul II's visit to the Central Synagogue in
Rome. A long, oh so long journey, some 2000 years in the
traveling. It was a reminder of the long darkness in
Catholic-Jewish relations past, and a promise of a poten-
tially warmly lit future.
6. The release of Natan Sharansky and the Nobel Peace
Prize to Eli Wiesel. Sharansky, because no matter the
Soviet cage remains bolted shut, his courage, his dignity
and his political acumen are inspiration for prisoners of
conscience the world over. Wiesel, because his Jewish
values are a reflection of Judaism's most cherished
teachings, and because be himself is a great teacher.
Humanity walks taller because there is a Sharansky,
because there is a Wiesel.
7. The shame of Waldheim. Not so much because the
President of Austria is a revealed liar; the real shame of
Waldheim is that no matter he is a liar and on such a sub-
ject! a majority of his countrymen simply didn't care
enough. They voted the Nazi liar their approbation.
Waldheim shamed, the Austrian electorate shamed.
8. In March, two Lyndon LaRouche candidates prevailed
in the Illinois Party primaries. Heady with victory,
LaRouche fielded 234 candidates in state primaries. Only
13 managed to make it to the November elections. All
each and every one of them were defeated. The lesson?
That the American people, when the facts are given them,
reject bigotry. And significantly, that the LaRouchites, on
stage, in the spotlight, are their own most effective
prosecutors.
9. The sentencing of ten members of the Nazi-like group
known as The Order. The Justice Department's vigorous
prosecution of hate-activists stands as an unmistakable
warning to neo-Nazis that bigotry inspired crimes will no
be tolerated. Will, instead, be vigorously prosecuted.
10. The new set of emigration rules announced in
November by the Soviet Union. They augur even fewer exit
visas for those seeking freedom. Through November, 1986
only 873 Jews were permitted to leave, a fraction of the
400,000 seeking to breathe free. Gorbachev releases a
Sharansky, and Orlov, loosens the leash on a Sakharov, a
Bonner, and basks in his "public relations" victories. But
the hundreds of thousands who are not celebrities, do not
make headlines, but continue to molder in the Communist
prison-state they are the real measure of his character.
Looking Out For The Jewish
Agenda In Tallahassee
By LOUISE ROSS
As the new government af-
fairs consultant to the Florida
Association of Jewish Federa-
tions, Bernie Friedman will be
looking out for the Jewish
community's interests in
Tallahassee.
After addressing a recent
meeting of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, he stopped into
the Federation's Communica-
tions' office to discuss how he
helps this community. Mr.
Friedman began discussing his
new position by heaping praise
on his predecessor.
"The government affairs
program was established four
years ago under the leadership
of Elaine Bloom who was
recently re-elected back to the
Florida legislature as a State
Representative from Miami
Beach. For the last four years,
Elaine has been a vibrant force
for the Jewish agenda in
Tallahassee."
This youthful attorney, who
has worked for the last five
years for Congressman Larry
Smith as his campaign
manager and chief of staff, will
be focusing his energies on the
Jewish agenda in Tallahassee.
"The issues of the Jewish com-
munity are multi-faceted,
geared to compassion and car-
ing for those who can't afford
the basic necessities of life,"
he said. "Jewish Federations
are becoming full service social
Bernie Friedman
service agencies providing
care for the elderly, meals on
wheels, Jewish education,.
Jewish Community Center
programs, nursing home
facilities, and much more. As
social service agencies,
Federations need to advocate
in the state capitol for funding
for these human service
delivery programs."
According to Mr. Friedman,
there is always the danger of
losing these state and federal
funds. "The federal govern-
ment has basically abdicated,
to a certain extent, the in-
itiative in the area of social
service programs. Through
block grants, it has given the
states authority to fund local
programs so that the state
capitol is really where deci-
sions are made as to which pro-
grams are funded. Basically
the federal government is prr^
viding the money and the state
is administrating its
programs."
The funding crisis in the
government trickles down to
many local programs. Mr
Friedman noted that the pro-
blems of the elderly in South
Florida are becoming more
and more significant in the last
five or six years as we are
becoming a graying population
with the migration of the
elderly into this area. "The in-
frastructure is not completely
in place to take care of our ag-
ed. Florida has a tremendous
amount ofproblems. For being
the third fastest growing
state, it is one of the lowest tax
states. It is sort of ironic," he
said.
Mr. Friedman stressed that
the local community must
become active in letting their
legislators know what their
agenda is. "As the local com-
munity is incredibly active in
the pro-Israel fight in
Washington and directly in-
volved in the political process
there, they must realize that
there is a battle in Tallahassee
that also needs to be address-
ed. At the same time, they
need to focus attention on the
Continued on Page 15
Rescuer Comes Out Of The Shadows
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A man
who has secretly worked to
rescue Jews from lands of
persecution for more than 40
years has finally come out of
the shadows.
Shaike Dan, 76, is the sub-
ject of a six-hour television
documentary to be screened in
Israel on this year's In-
dependence Day. In it, he will
be honored by many of those
he brought to the safety of
Eretz Yisrael and by Israeli
leaders, including some of the
people who worked alongside
him.
Recently, a group of leading
British Jews were shown ex-
tracts of the program at a
special preview at the home of
the Israeli Ambassador in Lon-
don, Yehuda Avner. It was at-
tended by Dan himself and his
wife Eva, a member of an il-
legal aliya transport he
organized from Yugoslavia in
1946.
Dan, a tall, white-haired man
with a wry sense of humor,
emerges as a person of great
determination for whom help-
ing a single Jew to reach Israel
is as important as helping
1,000.
Among those who pay
tribute to his work are Tony
Simonds, former commander
of M19, the British intelligence
unit in Cairo which organized
the escape of Allied prisoners
from Nazi-occupied Europe;
former parachutist Reuyeri
Dafne, assistant director of
Yad Vashem; former Premier
Shimon Peres; former Presi-
dent Yitzhak Navon and
Knesset member Yitzhak
Artei.
The program is entitled
...
"Blind Jump," a reference to
Dan's exploits as one of the 26
Jews from Palestine
parachuted into Nazi-occupied
Europe in the midst of World
War II. Several lost their lives
in this highly risky operation,
including two women Hanna
Senesh and Haviva Reik.
Their mission, organized by
British intelligence, was to
organize escape routes for cap-
tured British and American
pilots from occupied Europe.
But they also made contact
with Jewish community
leaders and other anti-German
forces.
In the program, Simonds
says that the parachutists had
only a 10 percent chance of
themselves escaping capture
by the Nazis. They were dou-
ble heroes, he says: if caught
they could be shot twice as
Continued on Page 7
It's A New Year-
Start A New Career!
Start off on the right track by attending the Job Seminar.
Topics include: marketing yourself, the hidden job market, and
learning employability skills.
The seminar will be held from 10:00 a.m.-12 noon, at Jewish
Family and Children's Service, 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 104, West Palm Beach, on Jan. 12.
For pre-registration, contact Carol Barack, MA, Director of
Vocational Service, at 684-1991.
Jewish floridian
ol Palm Baach County
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oomwnlno "Our Volca" and "Fadaratlon Haportar'
p*w..*iww, '.!1'0' N,coo.d.na.o. AaartiajitNwa Coordinator
M.ihM "'"'rOuc**. Ih-ougn MM M*, B> Wee..., M.nc* o' ,ea<
sacond Cia.ii Pottage Paid at Waal Palm Baach
FRED* SMOCHEt
Ed.to. 4itd Publish?
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>FFi<
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POSTMASTFR cHJ -i 6'hSl M'4m' 'l-33101 Phone. V3460S
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Pj) Bon 012973, Miami. Fla 33101
Combmad J.wi, "l'.'"IW"j *ie. letae. MimSNIIU
Erwin H Blonder Ci^wE.. T"'1'^ P*"" B~Ch Coun,' "*- WU^t *"""%
Wnanaky. T^Z2JEJ!T2~*1 *P* Q'^nbaum, Arnold L. Lampert. Marva P.'"". AJJ
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. newioni, 501 South Flagiar Or, Waal Palm Baach. FL 33*0t.
SUBSCfllPTIoJrJwTes L' SSn^ 9l 1987 8 TE VETH 5747
Volume13 Number 2



Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Preserving Tradition: Yemenite Wedding Customs
By CAROL GREEN
One of the sadder byproducts of
the process of modernization is
the standardization of modern life
and ritual. Take the wedding, for
example; all too often today's
Jewish bride walks down the aisle
to the strains of the traditional
wedding march in a ceremony her
grandmother would certainly
have frowned upon.
In Israel, however, the process
of modernization has taken a bit
longer and, as a result, much of
the old flavor remains. For
Israelis, especially those who
trace their roots to Arabic or
Levantine countries, weddings
are a time for "something old,"
though that "something old" is
more likely to be a veiled
Yemenite kaftan than a veil of an-
tique Belgian lace.
"Weddings are really the only
time we take out our traditional
clothing and sing songs from the
old country," explains Yemenite
community leader Naomi Sharabi.
SHARABI, who comes from an
ancient Yemenite family her
family on her father's side can
trace itself to the period of the
Talmud is a Yemenite culture
afficionado. Singlehandedly, she
founded and directs Ezrat Avot, a
cultural and community center
serving the Yemenite community
of Jerusalem. She has plans to add
a museum of Yemenite culture
and art to the center, including an
exhibit on Yemenite wedding
customs.
These days, Sharabi explains,
most Yemenites marry in typical
Israeli style. The real highlight of
the Yemenite wedding celebration
takes place the night before the
wedding, after the bride has gone
to the mikvah or ritual bath to
purify herself. This evening is call-
ed the henna because of the
special red dye that is prepared
and applied to the palms of the
hands and soles of the feet of the
bride and female guests at the
ceremony.
"It is considered to give protec-
tion from the 'evil eye,' explains
Sharabi. The dye, which is made
from ground up leaves of the
Hawsonia alba plant, was known
throughout the ancient world for
its healing qualities. Maimonides
recognized its value and prescrib-
ed it as a cure for excema. "Ac-
tually, variations of the henna
ceremony are performed
throughout the Middle East by
Arabs as well as Jews," adds
Sharabi.
IN YEMEN, the reddish dye
was applied to the bride's hands
and face in decorative patterns.
A large
percentage of the
younger
generation
marry non-
Yemenites and,
inevitably, their
children feel even
less of a
connection to the
Yemenite
tradition, but
many are also
returning to
their roots and
once again
coming to
appreciate the
beauty of their
culture.
So coveted was the privilege of
dyeing the bride that a notable
woman of the community would
pay for this honor with a gift to
the young couple. Today, the most
revered and pious of the older
female relatives applies the dye to
the bride's palm. "The hands and
face, however, are no longer
decorated," says Sharabi.
On henna night, both bride and
groom don the garb of Yemenite
royalty. For the bride, this is a
Jalayeh or silk kaftan em-
broidered with gold threads on
which are hung gold coins and
other ornaments. Among the or-
naments, small pomegranates are
hung, traditional symbols of fer-
tility, as well as coins and other
trinkets arranged in groups of
threes, fives and sevens, all
numbers with kabbalistic
significance. Beneath her robe,
the bride wears pantaloons which
are also decorated with gold coins.
In Yemen, the coins were the
bride's dowry, though in Israel
they are purely decorative.
To match her gown, the bride
wears an elaborate headdress. In
wealthier families, this headdress
would contain mother of pearl in-
lays and precious metals, explains
Sharabi. The groom dons a
galabiya, or gold embroidered kaf-
tan, the garment of the kings of
Yemen. In traditional Yemenite
henna ceremonies, the bride and
groom are kept separated from
each other. In modern Israel,
however, the separation is less
strictly enforced, and the groom is
often present as a guest at the
henna ceremony.
The young couple are serenaded
with songs in Yemenite, and an-
cient Judeo-Arabic dialect combin-
ing elements of Arabic, Aramaic
and Hebrew. Interestingly, the
songs do not celebrate the beauty
of the bride but warn the couple
that they face a difficult road
ahead of them. "The songs don't
say your life will be as happy as it
is now. They say you can expect to
have difficulties, but they can
work it out," explained Sharabi.
IN ACCORDANCE with
Jewish law, the male and female
guests separate for singing and
dancing of intricate Yemenite folk
dances, which are performed to
the accompaniment of a Yemenite
style mandolin and a steel drum.
Sometimes guests perform these
dances with lighted cakes on their
heads for the bride's
entertainment.
A large percentage of the
younger generation marry non-
Yemenites and, inevitably, their
children feel even less of a connec-
tion to the Yemenite tradition, but
many are also returning to their
roots and once again coming to
appreciate the beauty of their
culture.
A Sephardi ketuba (marriage contract).
Jews Must Better Address Drug Abuse,
Says Rabbi/Psychiatrist
By BEN GALLOB
A Hasidic rabbi and psychiatrist
asserts that, "if anything," Jews
are "over represented in
substance abuse." Rabbi
Abraham Twerski, medical direc-
tor of the Gateway Rehabilitation
Center in Alquippa, Pa., recently
told a Newton, Mass., synagogue
audience that alcohol and drug ad-
diction commonly afflict
American Jews, according to the
Jewish Advocate of Boston.
He said the Jewish community
must acknowledge "this truth"
and act on it. Twerski, who was
ordained in 1951, began studies in
psychiatry when he observed that
Jews in trouble sought counseling
from psychiatrists rather than
rabbis.
ALONG WITH marijuana,
New Feature Film Looks At An
Israeli Intermarriage Problem
By MARGIE OLSTER
Moshe Mizrachi has returned to
Israel after a 10-year hiatus to
write and direct a new film about
a traditional Sephardic family in
Jerusalem facing intermarriage
during the British mandate.
Mizrachi, the Oscar-winning
Israeli director who has spent the
past 10 years making movies in
Paris, based the plot of "Every
Time We Say Goodbye" on a per-
sonal recollection of an event in
his own family.
The film, starring Tom
("Nothing in Common,"
"Splash") Hanks and Cristina
Marsillach, a well-known Spanish
actress, was filmed entirely in
Jerusalem. Hanks plays an
American pilot in World War II,
David Bradford, who has
volunteered for the British Royal
Army and is recovering from an
injury in Jerusalem and awaiting
further orders.
In the meantime, Hanks' non-
Jewish squadron leader, played by
British actor Benedict Taylor,
plans to wed a young, traditional,
Sephardic Jewish girl, Victoria,
played by Israeli actress Anat
("Lemon Popsicle") Atzmon.
VICTORIA INTRODUCES her
friend Sarah (Marsillach) to
David, and the two fall in love
against a "Romeo and Juliet"
background. Sarah must choose
between the love of her closely-
knit and staunchly traditional
Sephardic family, and her roman-
tic love with the non-Jewish
soldier.
Producer Sharon Hare I, who
also produced "HaLahaka" (The
Troupe) and several other Israeli
films, said Mizrachi came to her
two years ago with his simple but
moving story, and she asked him
to write a script based on it. "It
took him 20 years to do it. He fer-
ried the pain in his life of how this
woman was tortured," Harel said.
The story is based loosely, ac-
cording to Harel, on a similar
drama that happened to one of
Mizrachi's aunts who lived in his
family's home when he was a
young boy. Harel would not say if
the movie and the real life event
had the same outcome.
Harel, the daughter od Yossi
Harel, commander of the ship Ex-
odus, said she was personally
fascinated by the script because
she is the daughter of an
American mother and an Israeli
father. But beyond that, Harel
said the film tackles a prevalent
social problem during the British
Continued on Page 16-
The rabbi said
the Jewish
community must
acknowledge
"this truth" and
act on it.
Twerski, who
was ordained in
1951, began
studies in
psychiatry when
he observed that
Jews in trouble
sought
counseling from
psychiatrists
rattier than
rabbis.
alcohol and cocaine, Twerski
listed numerous prescription
drugs in medicine chests in Jewish
homes which he said are abused
daily. He declared that the only
time to take a drug is during il-
lness. He said "coming home from
work tense is not sick. The only
people who are not tense are
dead." He urged Jews to find
natural ways to relax.
The Gateway Center offers a
drug and detoxification program.
It provides kosher diet for pa-
tients who ask for it.
Twerski said that low self-
esteem characterizes substance
abusers, and that this is common
in Jewish families, where guilt
often exists and tends to create
feelings of inadequacy. Such feel-
ings are usually unjustified he
noted, because the guilt-ridden
often are intelligent and likeable.
Many of his listeners were
alcoholics, drug addicts or com-
pulsive overeaten. Most, it was
reported, were getting help in
Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics
Anonymous or Overeaters
Anonymous, programs which
Twerski said he supported as safe
for Jews. Many listeners also
belonged to the Boston chapter of
Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically
Dependent Persons and Signifi-
cant Others (JACS), which spon-
sored the rabbi's talk.
HE URGED his listeners to let
their rabbis know that sermons on
alcoholism and other drug addic-
tion were welcome and to place
notices in their synagogue
bulletins giving information on
the rehabilitation programs for
alcoholics and addicts in the
Greater Boston area.
In a talk the previous day, Twer-
ski urged an assembly of Boston
c~,yis to discuss alcoholism and
addiction from their pulpits and
open their synagogues to self-help
groups.
Jeff Neipris of Boston, vice
president of JACS and editor of
the organization's journal, said
that support for such programs
was improving in the Boston
Jewish community. Twerski, in
his synagogue talk, said that ad-
diction is often handled badly in
the Jewish community.
Neipris said that the Boston
JACS chapter was receiving funds
from the Combined Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Boston and
that he hoped to see a substance
abuse education program
established for Jews in the Boston
area.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Radio/TV/ Rim
Entertainment
Z9v 4
. *M9A*C -Sunday, Jan. 11, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Green. Pre-empted.
Jt!PAYIM ~ Sunday. Jan. 11, 7:30 a.m. -
WPBR-1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The
Jewish Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
,S5AiX)M Sunday, Jan. 11, 6 a.m. WPEC Channel
12 (8:30 a.m. WFLk-TV-29) with host Richard Peritz
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, Jan. 15, 1:15
p.m. WLIZ-1340-AM A summary of news and com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
January 9
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 Oneg Shabbat at Congregation An-
shei Sholom 8:15 p.m. Free Sons of Israel board -10:30
a.m.
January 10
Jewish Federation Leadership Development Program -
7:30 p.m.
January 11
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 Cruise to Mexico through Jan. 15
United Jewish Appeal President's Mission to Israel
Hadassah West Boynton dinner/dance 6 p.m. Temple
Judea Men's Club
January 12
Jewish Federation Women's Division Pacesetters
Assignment Meeting 10-12 and 2-4 p.m. Women's
American ORT Royal -12:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans
No. 705 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Lake Worth
West board 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT Palm
Beach -1 p.m. Brandeis University Women Palm Beach
West -12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Boynton Beach -
noon United Order of True Sisters board -10 a.m. and
regular meeting 1 p.m. Hadassah Aviva board -10:30
a.m. and regular meeting noon Women's American ORT
- West Bend Meed Jewish Federation Demographic
Study 7:30 p.m.
January 13
Jewish Federation Women's Division Super Sunday
Committee noon Yiddish Culture Group Century
Village 10 a.m. Hadassah Lee Vassil board
Hadassah Henrietta Szold board -1 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Ohav board 9:30 a.m. Temple B'nai Jacob
Sisterhood board 10:30 a.m. Na'Amat USA Ezrat -
noon Women's American ORT West Palm Beach -12:30
p.m. Na'Amat USA Theodore Herzl board -10 a.m.
B'nai B'rith No. 2939 -1 p.m. Hadassah Florida Atlantic
Region "Woman of Valor" luncheon noon Hadassah -
Aliya "Woman of Valor" luncheon noon Hadassah
Aviva "Woman of Valor" luncheon noon Central Con-
servative Synagogue Women's Auxiliary 7:30 p.m. Tem-
ple B'nai forah Sisterhood 8 p.m. Na'Amat USA -
Sharon noon Jewish Federation Chaplain Aides -1:30
p.m.
January 14
Temple Emanu-El Adult Education lecture 9:30 a.m.
Lake Worth Jewish Center Sisterhood -12:30 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Yachad Unit 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Shalom -
board Brandeis University Women Palm Beach West -
board -10 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3196 board 7 p.m.
Women's American ORT North Palm Beach County
Region executive committee B'nai B'rith No. 3046 8
p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1 p.m.
Hadassah West Boynton board 9:30 a.m. Temple
Judea Sisterhood board Jewish Federation Fountains
Cocktail Party 4 p.m.
Jamary 15
Jewish Federation Women's Division Lion of Judah 3
&m. Jewish Federation Boynton Beach Happening -
uteri Ron noon. Jewish Federation Young Adult
Division Business Executive Forum-Royce 6-8 p.m.
Jewish Federation Local Concerns noon National
Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee 12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Haverhill Study Group Tem-
ple Emanu-El Adult Education Hebrew -10 a.m. Morse
Geriatric Center Women's Auxiliary Board 1:30 p.m.
Lake Worth Jewish Center Sisterhood lunch and fashion
show noon National Council of Jewish Women Flagler
Evening 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Z'Hava -12:30 p.m.
For more information contact the Jewish Federation
832-2120.
. I '
Random Thoughts
'.
By MURIEL LEVITT
Many times in various col-
umns I have referred to the
delights of good Jewish cook-
ing. It can be an absolute joy,
full of Yiddish tahm and ethnic
glory. What can compare with
spicy hot cholent, cheesy blint-
zes, succulent knishes and the
like? So much for the good
stuff.
Have you ever been invited
out to dine at someone's home
when the meal was incredibly
bad, yet the smiling hostess
was totally unaware of the
disaster she had wrought. I
must tell you that on quite a
few occasions, in several states
where we have lived, I have
seen this happen, and I con-
tinue to marvel at how many
rotten cooks are floating
around these days. It never
ceases to amaze me.
One of my dear friends told
me about a recent full course
dinner she had made for her
son and a brand new schneer
(that's a daughter-in-law for
those who don't know
mamaluschen). The meal
started out rather badly and
from there on it was downhill
all the way. She first served
pale gefilte fish from the jar
which was pulpy and tasteless.
Her chicken soup was more
like dishwater than soup, and
was almost cold because she
had miscalculated the heating
time. The brisket was
overseasoned, stringy, and the
bottom had stuck to the pot
and burned to a crisp. Even
the fresh veggies had been
overcooked and were soggy,
with no eye appeal at all. The
potatoes (potted with the
brisket) had also been cooked
much too long and fallen apart.
Everything my friend served
was just plain awful. Even the
store bought cake was stale
and dry. She is a good sport,
and I am sure that the telling
of her story was much funnier
than the actual reality.
This hilarious episode
brought back many fond
memories of my dearly beloved
late mother-in-law. She was a
truly darling woman ... kind,
empathetic, and generous, but
honestly one of the world's
great bad cooks. In Mama's
house the oven was where she
kept the brown paper* bags
that were saved for garbage.
She didn't know from roasting
or baking anything. Every
single dish she offered was
either fried or gedempfed. And
no matter what you ate from
Mama's kitchen, the aftertaste
was chicken since everything,
and I mean everything, was
cooked in schmaltz.
Her idea of hamburgers was
to mix hock flaysch (whioh she
ground herself, not trusting
the butcher) with lots of eggs,
stale rolls, and onions. This
was formed into aesunter pat-
ties, then steeped for over an
hour in chicken fat. These
atom bombs Mama called
cutletn and my husband still
thinks these hockey pucks are
better than my healthier, broil-
ed, pure meat variety. I recall
eating breaded veal chops at
Chez Levitt which were well
fried in lots of schmaltz, and
then suffering gastric distress
all the way from the West
Bronx to New Jersey. It was
heartburn alley all the way.
I also remember that
wonderful day when we gifted
Mania with a fancy new elec-
tric broiler. Do you recall the
round chrome broilers with the
long black wooden handles?
We thought it would liberate
her from the frying pan, but
we were wrong. She never us-
ed the broiler since she was un-
familiar and uneasy with elec-
tric appliances and much
preferred the familiar old
methods. So, my sister-in-law
and I insisted on showing her
how to use it when we next
visited. Dummies that we
were, we did not realize that
the meat had been ritually
soaked and well salted. When
we used the electric broiler,
the steak swelled up, inflated
with water. It turned a cruddy
gray, becoming leathery and
inedible. So much for Mama
and the broiler. You cS
change the habits of a lifetime
although for a brief moment
we really thought we could. '
Well, many years have flown
by and our dear Mama is no
longer with us. Any time I
smell chicken fat it brings to
mind our wonderful family
gatherings around the kitchen
table, full of affection, warmth
and indigestion. Say ... does
anyone know where I can buy
a quart of pure, unadulterated
fresh schmaltz? What a great
way that would be to bring
back yesterday's memories, a
rotten case of heartburn, and
the way things used to be.
Controversy
Continued from Page 1
and in Israel have been careful
not to criticize O'Connor, say-
ing the changes were directed
by the Vatican in Rome.
Rabbi Ronald Sobel of Tem-
ple Emanu-El, a friend of
O'Connor, said that although
O'Connor did not go to Israel
as an official envoy of the
Vatican, there was much hope
of improving relations bet-
ween Israel and the Holy See.
"THESE LATEST events
lead one to sadly conclude that
perhaps it would have been
better had the trip not been
planned at all at this time,"
Sobel said.
Nathan Perlmutter, Na-
tional Director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, agreed that O'Connor
would have been better off to
not have scheduled his visit
under these circumstances.
"The Vatican has embar-
rassed John Cardinal O'Con-
nor and itself more than it em-
barrasses Israel. The Vatican's
long-expressed and genuine
concern with theological anti-
Semitism is welcome. But its
concern is compromised by
this kind of cynical, political
gamesmanship," Perlmutter
said.
'Not Guilty'
Continued from Page 1
security was maintained to
seclude Vanunu from the
media as he was driven to
court at 7:30 a.m. local time
Sunday. The authorities took
extreme measures to avoid a
repetition of the incident of
Dec. 21 when Vanunu was
brought to court to be remand-
ed in custody for the duration
of the trial.
At that time he managed to
flash a message to the media,
printed on the palm of his
hand, alleging that he was kid-
napped in Rome on Sept. 30 by
Israeli agents.
This Sunday morning, the
windows of the prison van
were painted opaque white and
a blanket was hung between
the driver's compartment and
the rear of the van to prevent
anyone from catching a glimp-
se of the prisoner.
A person, presumably
Vanunu, was taken from the
rear of the van with a sack
over his head and his body con-
cealed partially by an umbrella
held by a guard.
Vanunu is accused of passing
information to a British
newspaper alleging that Israel
has been building an arsenal of
nuclear weapons for 20 years.
An additional charge may be
pressed against him for at-
tempting to communicate with
the press. Police are in-
vestigating the incident to
determine whether there are
grounds for an indictment.
Roth
Continued from Page 3
recovering from the ravages of
brutality of Nazism. Rising
above those severe years, she
became a registered nurse and
immigrated to Israel where
she married and raised two
children who now serve in the
Israel Defense Forces.
Mrs. Roth studied public
relations at the University of
Haifa and served as a liaison
for Project Renewal between
depressed Israeli
neighborhoods and American
communities.
For more information, con-
tact Dr. Lester Silverman,
Campaign Associate, at the
Federation office, 882-2120.
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Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Rabbi Sherman To Address
YAD Educational Forum
Senator Edward M. Kennedy cited Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev's "extraordinary record of excellence, scholar-
ship, truth and commitment to the cause of Israel," upon ac-
cepting an honorary degree from the University. The award
conferment was the culmination of three days of ceremonies
at which the University marked the centennial of the birth of
Israel's first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion. At these
events tribute was paid to the 100 Ben-Gurion Centennial
Fellows who have contributed generously to the Centennial
Edowment Fund, established by the university to foster the
founding father's vision of a thriving and productive Negev
desert.
Sandi Heilbron and Carol
Shubs, Co-Chairpersons of the
Educational/Cultural Commit-
tee of the Young Adult Divi-
sion of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, have
announced that Rabbi Alan
Sherman, Director of the Com-
munity Relations Council of
the Federation, will be the
guest speaker at the group's
first forum. The event will be
held on Tuesday, Jan. 27, 7
p.m., at the Hyatt Hotel, West
Palm Beach.
Rabbi Sherman will address
the subject, "The Choices We
Face." "We urge all young
adult singles and couples to
join with us to hear more about
the unique challenges faced by
Jews in a Christian society,'
stated Ms. Heilbron. Ms.
Shubs noted that Rabbi Sher-
man is highly respected for his
involvement in community
relations in the Palm Beaches.
"We welcome him to our in-
augural educational/cultural
forum and look forward to his
in-depth, provocative explora-
tion of this most relevant
Rabbi Alan Sherman
issue," stated Ms. Shubs.
According to Ms. Shubs, the
purpose of this newly formed
Educational/Cultural Commit-
tee of YAD is to provide the
opportunity for young adults,
ages 25-40, to explore issues
relevant to them as Jews. Ad-
ditionally, Ms. Heilbron noted
that "in the year ahead, we
will sponsor a variety of pro-
grams which will enable young
adults to explore their Jewish
identity in a manner that is
both creative and
informative."
In addition to his position as
Director of the Community
Relations Council, Rabbi Sher-
man serves as Federation
Chaplain and Director of
Religious Services for the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center.
He is very active in the
general community, serving as
President of the Ministerial
Fellowship of the Palm
Beaches. He is a member of
the Board of Directors of the
Urban League, co-host of the
monthly television show,
"Perspectives in Faith" on
Channel 12, is religion colum-
nist for the Palm Beach Post
and serves on the Board of the
Palm Beach County Communi-
Continued on Page 9
Shadows
Continued from Page 4
enemy agents and as Jews.
Simonds, a pro-Jewish of-
ficer who served with Orde
Wingate in Palestine, says
that M19 had to keep its war-
time collaboration with the
Jews a strict secret not only
because of the Nazis but
because of the Palestine police
whom he calls "a bloody
nuisance." They were so anti-
Jewish, he says, that "you
would think they were on the
wrong side in the war."
Dan is portrayed in the pro-
gram as the single most impor-
tant Zionist in organizing aliya
from Eastern' Europe both
during the war and in the
decades which followed. He
was also involved in tracking
war criminals and in securing
staging posts for the Zionist
arms lift to Palestine in
1948-49.
He was a man of many dif-
ferent aliases, one of which
featured in the anti-Semitic
Slansky trial in Communist
Czechoslovakia.
The program suggests a link
between this and the
mysterious murder in Prague
in 1968 of Charles Jordan, the
American Jewish head of the
Joint Distribution Committee.
Dan is said to have confirmed
that he himself was the intend-
ed victim of Jordan's killers,
who had been confused by the
slight similarity in their second
names.
Q]ROWARD
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1 tablespoon FLEISCHMANN S
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6 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Dash powdered saffron, optional
1 package FLEISCHMANN'S-
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1 cup hot water (125 to 130*F)
Vi cup FLEISCHMANN S Sweet
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In shallow oteh. beat FLEISCHMANN S Egg Beaters, vamla and cin-
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Boynton Beach News
Hunters Run
Weiners To Co-Chair Pacesetters Dinner Dance
Marilyn and Martin Even-
chik, General Co-Chairmen of
the Hunters Run 1987 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, have announced
the appointment of Rhoda and
Bernard Weiner as Co-
Chairmen of the Pacesetters
Dinner Dance. The $1,750
minimum commitment event
will be held on Thursday, Jan.
29, 6:30 p.m., at the Hunters
Run Clubhouse, Boynton
Beach. Linda and Benjamin
Frankel are hosting the Din-
ner Dance given on behalf of
the 1987 Federation-UJA
Campaign.
Mr. and Mrs. Evenchik
noted that although the
Weiners are new residents of
Hunters Run, they are not new
to working on behalf of the
Jewish community. "We are
very gratified that Rhoda and
Bernie, who were active in the
South County Jewish Federa-
tion, have continued their in-
volvement in this community,"
stated Mrs. Evenchik.
The Weiners indicated that
they were glad to have become
involved in such a caring com-
munity as Hunters Run. "We
also are grateful that Linda
and Ben Frankel are hosting
this year's Pacesetters event,
as they have done every year
since its inception," Mr.
Wiener said.
According to Mrs. Weiner,
this year's Dinner Dance
theme is "Pacesetters Are
Berk And Fredkove To Co-Chair
Continued from Page 1
annual $300
minimum commitment Dinner
Dance given on behalf of the
1987 Federation-UJA Cam-
paign will be held on Sunday,
Feb. 15, 6 p.m., at the Indian
Spring Country Club.
Formerly active in the
Jewish Federations of Greater
Hartford, Connecticut and
Lima, Ohio, Mr. Berk has lived
in Palm Beach County for
nearly five years. He is a
member of Temple Sinai in
Delray Beach and has visited
Israel twice, witnessing the
trial of Adolph Eichmann dur-
ing his first trip in 1961. He
has also been active in the
Chamber of Commerce,
United Way, Lions and
Rotary.
Mr. Fredkove has been a
seasonal resident the last five
years, having been active in
the Federation's Indian Spring
Committee last year. A past
President of the Married
Couples League, a member of
the Board of Directors, and a
member of the Board of
Education of his synagogue in
Minneapolis, Minnesota, he
m
Mm -m *^M Kg 1
m" B |*| 1
Mae Levy accepts the honor of "Woman of the Year" at the
Rishona Palm Beach Chapter of Hadatsah's recent Youth
Aliyah Luncheon. Looking on are Program Chairman Mar-
jorie Dreier and President Lillian J. Cohen.
PASSOVER1987
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
PRESENTS
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AT THE "NEW"
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FROM
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Plus 18% lor la> and gratuities
For Additional Information Contact:
Universal Kosher Tours Inc.
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212-594-0836 800-221-2791
now is a member of Temple of
Aaron in St. Paul. In addition
to memberships in other civic
organizations, Mr. Fredkove
has been a member of the
Planning Committee and City
Council of Mendota Heights, a
suburb of St. Paul.
For more information, con-
tact Sylvia Lewis, Boynton
Beach Director, at the Boyn-
ton Beach branch office,
737-0746.
All Aglitter" "We will be
celebrating Federation's 25
years of service to the com-
munity. A cocktail reception
will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed
by the dinner at 7:30 p.m.,"
she said.
The Weiners, originally from
Elkins Park, Penn., moved to
Boca Lago, Fla. 11 years ago.
Since then they have been ac-
tive in the general and
Women's Division Federa-
tion/UJA Campaigns there.
Mr. Weiner is also active in
Philadelphia, serving on the
Boards of the Weizmann In-
stitute and the Jewish Na-
tional Fund.
Mrs. Weiner is also a sup-
porer of JNF and has been for
many years. She is a member
of many Jewish organizations
including Brandeis National
Women's Committee and
Hadassah. In the general com-
munity, she is a docent can-
didate at the Museum of Art in
Ft. Lauderdale.
Serving on the Pacesetters
Committee are Millie and Cy
Altman, Marcia Bimbaum,
Lois and Albert Brodsky,
Rhoda and Bernard Weiner
Eileen and Fred Gattegno
Bunny and Philip Kendall
Marilyn and Larry Prigozin
Betty and Louis Rubinoff
Harriet Sail, Elaine and Mar
tin Sussman, Barbara Wax
and Leona Wolf.
Members of the Hunters
Run Advisory Committee are
Ibby and Allyne Gottleib,
Naomi and Harris Kessler,
Rima and Samuel Robinson!
Rita and Edwin Stein, Phyllis
and Edward Schain, Joan So-
ble, Carole Solomon, Thomas
Strasser, Irving Wax, and
Zelda and Joseph Zeger.
For more information, con-
tact Sylvia Lewis, Boynton
Beach Director, at the Boyn-
ton Beach branch office,
737-0746.
Boynton Beach Happening
Excitement Being Generated
By Chance To Get Together
Sidney Brodsdy and Jerome
Gross, Co-Chairmen of the
Boynton Beach Council, noted
that reservations were coming
in at a rapid pace for the up-
coming Boynton Beach Hap-
pening. In a joint statement,
the Co-Chairmen said, "We
are receiving a very positive
response from the residents of
our 14 communities to the
Happening. We welcome all
our neighbors to take this ex-
citing opportunity to socialize
with one another as well as to
show their commitment to the
Jewish people, locally,
worldwide, and in Israel."
The Boynton Beach Happen-
ing will be held on Jan. 15,
noon, at the Hunters Run
Clubhouse. The $50 minimum
commitment luncheon is given
on behalf of the 1987 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign. Holocaust survivor
and Israeli, Dora Roth, will be
the guest speaker. Luz
Morales, a Filipino singer, will
perform her repertoire of
ethnic songs in Hebrew, Yid-
dish, French, Italian, Spanish,
Polish and English. She has
appeared in night clubs in ma-
jor cities and on the Tonight
and Today TV shows.
The Boynton Beach Council
represents the communities of
Banyan Springs, Bent Tree
East, Bent Tree West, Chan-
ticleer, Colonial Club, Green-
tree, Leisurville, Lime Tree,
Mirror Lakes, Palm Chase,
Parkwalk, Pinetree, Estates of
Silver Lake, and Village
Royale on the Green.
Luncheon couvert is $10 in-
cluding gratuity. For reserva-
tions, contact Fran Witt,
Boynton Beach Assistant
Director, at the Boynton
Beach branch office, 737-0746.
DELUXE KOSHER
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.2ftSkJanuary 8'1987 7:00 p.m.
at2305South FlaglerDrive,W.PB
Local Representative: IRIS BLUM-MURRAY aao moo


Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Michael Burrows Early Childhood Enrichment Center
Preparing The Children Of Giora For The Future
By ELIZABETH ROMANS
Project Renewal
Community Representative
The Michael Burrows Early
Childhood Enrichment Center
was opened for full service to
the residents of the Project
Renewal neighborhood Giora
in Hod Hasharon on Sept. 1.
The newly constructed Center
provides a beautiful, fresh,
sunshine-tilled setting for the
young children of Giora, age
birth to 6 years. There, they
receive the foundation that
will help to determine their
future, not only in school, but
throughout their entire lives.
From the inception of Pro-
ject Renewal, one of the main
areas of concern has been
education, both formal and in-
formal. Having found in the
Israel History Lectures
Offered At Nova University
Gottlieb Hammer, author
and former New York business
executive who has been involv-
ed in American and Jewish af-
fairs and the State of Israel for
nearly 50 years, will speak on
"A Century of Zionist
History" at a series of three
lectures in January sponsored
by Nova University's Institute
for Retired Professionals.
David Mill man, Director of
the Institute, in announcing
the three lectures by Mr. Ham-
mer, said that the public is in-
vited to attend the series at no
charge. "We are anxious to ac-
quaint prospective members in
the South Florida community
with the wide range of pro-
grams and activities at Nova,"
Mr. Millman said.
The Hammer lecture series,
to be given on three con-
secutive Wednesdays from 10
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nova
University's Parker Building,
3301 College Ave., Ft. Lauder-
dale, is as follows:
Jan. 14 "Development of
Modern Zionism" (1880-1939)
Jan. 21 "Israel's Miracle
Birth" (1939-1949)
Jan. 28 "Israel-U.S.A.:
Jewish Community, Problems
and Promises" (1949 to
present)
Mr. Hammer, now a resident
of Bay Harbor, is Executive
Vice Chairman Emeritus of
the United Israel Appeal,
chairman of the Executive
Committee of the Florida
Region of the American Com-
mittee for the Weizmann In-
YAD Forum
Continued from Page 7
ty Relations Board. National-
ly, Rabbi Sherman serves on
the Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council.
Members of the Educa-
tional/Cultural Committee are
Allen Baron, Lynn Cohn,
WilliaiW Einziger, Mindy
Freeman, Amy Goldenberg,
Jeffrey Hoffman, Martin List,
Shelly Molomot, and Fred
Salomon.
The cost of the forum is $5.
There will be a cash bar and
hors d'oeuvres will be served.
The evening begins with a
reception at 7 p.m. followed by
the program at 7:30 p.m.
For reservations and/or
more information, contact
Debbie Hammer, Young Adult
Division Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.

Gottlieb Hammer
stitute of Science and
Honorary Chairman of the In-
stitute's American Committee.
Mr. Hammer also is the
author of the recently-
published book, "Good Faith
and Credit," a compelling and
informative account of the
events preceding the establish-
ment and the subsequent
development of the State of
Israel. Mr. Hammer worked
closely with such noted Jewish
leaders as Chaim Weizmann,
David Ben Gurion, Golda Meir,
Abba Hillel Silver and Meyer
Weisgal.
The Institute for Retired
Professionals (IRP) was
established at Nova in 1976 to
provide participants the oppor-
tunity for continued intellec-
tual activity in a university set-
ting. Classes are conducted by
IRP members for their peers,
Nova University staff
members and outside academi-
cians. In addition to the varied
curriculum, members are ex-
tended the privilege of
auditing two college courses at
no charge. Field trips and
social functions are also part of
the IRP program.
For additional information
pertaining to the IRP pro-
gram, contact Professor
Millman at Nova University.
Wolfe Re-Elected
CLEVELAND (JTA) -
Milton Wolf recently was
elected to a second term as
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of
Cleveland.
beginning of the Project that a
high percentage of the
children tested were below the
level of the standard of learn-
ing in Israel, priorities were
set for Early Childhood Educa-
tion and Enrichment pro-
grams in Giora and Gil Amal.
Because of the sincere con-
cern of Michael Burrows for
the ideals of Project Renewal
and his generous financial
commitment, The Early
Childhood Enrichment Pro-
gram now has a permanent
home after spending several
years in "extra" spare rooms
or even traveling from place to
place in the car of the special
education teacher Merry Ben
Yoav. As many as 60 children
are benefitting from the ac-
tivities and programs provided
for them and their parents as
well. In addition to the Enrich-
ment program, the Center pro-
vides the setting for the
Development Team of
psychologist, physical
therapist, and speech therapist
to work together for the
assessment, treatment, and
therapy of the children to
develop their maximim
potential.
The children have the oppor-
tunity to express themselves
through story-telling, drawing
pictures and role-playing.
There is special audio-visual
equipment to assist the
children in understanding and
also to stimulate coordination
between listening and reading.
Essential one-to-one contact
with the children is provided
by Merry and her assistant,
Tzippi Ochayon, during the
Elizabeth Homans (left) visits the Michael Barrows
Early Childhood Enrichment Center and watches
special education teacher Merry Ben Yoav work with
one of the students.
afternoon activities between
the hours of 3-7 p.m. Emphasis
is also placed upon helping the
parents to understand their
children better and to en-
courage better relationships
between parent and child.
Several special evenings are
planned for this purpose, some
only for the parents and some
with the parents and children
together.
The Center buzzes with the
happy sounds of children and
one receives a special warm
feeling to know that these
children indeed have a bright
future because they are receiv-
ing a good strong foundation
through the Early Childhood
Enrichment program in the
Burrows Center.
NoSaltmakesyour
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your mothers
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Good food can be salt-free and not taste Wand, thanks to NoSairSaftMematrve.NoSall
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BR04LED HAUBUT with FrtiA Tomato Sauce
vs teaspoon sugar (optional)
' teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon NoSalt Salt
Alternative
4 1-inch thick halibut steaks
(8 ounces each)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic minced
1 Vi pound ripe plum tomatoes
chopped (peeled it desired)
'<4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
Va cup fresh basil, chopped or
1 tablespoon dried basil
In large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons oil and saute onion and garlic until
onion is tender Stir in tomatoes, parsley, basil, sugar and pepper Cook
over medium-high heat 10 minutes or until tomatoes are soft, stirring
frequently Stir in Vi teaspoon NoSalt.
Meanwhile, combine remaining oil with lemon juice and '/ teaspoon
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Makes 4 servings
Calories per serving: 373
Sodium per serving: 142mg
C 1967 Norcktt Thayei Inc NoSalt is a rtgislerad uaaemaik oS NorciiU Thayt Inc
NoSah?
Salt without sodium.



Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
making monthly home visits to
assure continued supervision;
making contacts with relatives or
close friends; providing ongoing
information to out-of-town
relatives; testifying at legal pro-
ceedings; managing finances; and
arranging to clean the person's
apartment, including getting any
needed furniture.
JASA makes an annual report
to the court about the
beneficiaries' finances and makes
quarterly reports to JASA
trustees, funding sources and
others who have a right to know.
The MAP unit is funded by
grants from the UJA-New York
Federation, the Schemer Family
Foundation and other such
sources.
GOLDENSOHN NOTED that
conservatorship is not always
needed, explaining that when the
income of a mentaUy-impaired
person comes moatly from Social
Security or another government
source, "many problems can often
be solved by designation of a
representative payee," who can
then get the individual's benefit
checks and pay the person's bills
while the person remains at home.
She said she believed that in the
absence of relatives or friends, the
agencies have a responsibility to
take on this task.
Asked how many New York Ci-
ty Jews are theoretically eligible
for MAP help, Goldensohn said
that, according to an unverified
1985 estimate by the Human
Resources Administration, the
city-wide overall health and
welfare agency, there were near-
ly, 1,130 eligible Jews.
Children from Manhattan's Rodeph Sholom
Day School meet at the JNF House in New
York City with Jonathan Miller (center), an
Israeli actor featured in 'Grandpa's Tree/ a
video which was filmed in Israel and pro-
duced by the Jewish National Fund's
Education Department. The young critics
enthusiastically responded to the video's
theme of Tu B'Shevat, the Jewish New
Year of the Trees, which will fall on Feb.
14.
Special Social Welfare Program
Assisting Frail Elderly To
Avoid Institutionalization
Editor of East Jerusalem
Arabic Newspaper Deported
By DAVID LANDAU lawyers, he said: "I am a vic-
And HUGH ORGEL tim ofpolitical revenge for my
TEL AVIV (JTA) struggle as a political person,
Akram Haniya, editor of the f8 a journalist and as a writer,
East Jerusalem Arabic daily t0 achieve the lemtimato
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK Frail
elderly who have difficulty
taking care of themselves
need not be candidates for
hospitals and nursing
homes. A program of a
Jewish social welfare agen-
cy here, which has begun its
second year with 22 clients,
provides an intermediary
service.
The Management Assistance
Program of the Jewish Associa-
tion for Services for the Aged, one
of three such program under
Jewish auspices in the United
States, has been described as pro-
tective service for mentally im-
paired older adults who no longer
can manage their own affairs.
Clients, most of whom are Jewish,
range in age from their 70s up to
97, and most are in their 80s.
Twelve of them are conser-
vatees. Under New York State's
Mental Hygiene Law, a conser-
vator is a court-appointed guar-
dian of property for persons who
have suffered a "substantial im-
pairment of their ability to care
for their property."
THE LAW specifies that a fin-
ding of "substantial impairment"
is not to be equated with a finding
of "incompetence," the latter
which results in a major loss of
rights.
MAP director Edith Goldensohn
said that it was difficult to find
prospective beneficiaries, as they
seldom have contact with the
agencies that may be able to help
them.
Once a potential recipient is
identified, the MAP aid process
begins with careful and lengthy
deliberations by the director and a
caseworker as to just what the
prospective client will need. Solu-
tions can include a variety of ar-
rangements, such as home care,
delivered meals and arranging for
involvement of the family.
The deliberations stem in part
from the need to prevent MAP
from entering into a conservator-
ship too soon "because that status
is a very serious matter," Golden-
sohn said. "It takes away a per-
son's right to conduct his or her
own affairs and manage his or her
own finances."
UNLIKE LAWYERS, who are
court-appointed as individuals, the
conservatorship for MAP clients
is appointed to a JASA as a whole.
This assures both continuity and
an integrated range of services,
Goldensohn said.
Referrals to the MAP program
are made by friends and relatives
and by other agencies of UJA-
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater New York.
MAP serves only JASA clients.
It works in close cooperation with
JASA social services throughout
New York City and on Long
Island. Goldensohn added that
MAP "takes cases only from
JASA social workers. We are
simply not equipped to provide
financial management services to
other agencies, but we do offer
consultation to other agencies on
how a case should best be
handled."
A determined effort is made to
involve families in the process. In
fact, rather than to apply to be a
conservator, JASA has helped
some half dozen families
themselves to become
conservators.
Goldensohn said that MAP con-
tinues "to work jointly with fami-
ly members to assure the ongoing
well being" of the new
beneficiary.
SHE CITED the case of Mrs.
W., a childless widow who has
enough money to support herself,
but who often forgets to pay her
bills. She trusts only her accoun-
tant, but he cannot serve as her
conservator, and referred her to
JASA.
When a JASA social worker
met with Mrs. W., she refused to
take a medical examination,
despite some obvious health pro-
blems. She was disheveled, had
not bathed recently and could not
remember whether she had eaten
that day.
Adrienne Roydan, the JASA
caseworker, gradually won the
trust of Mrs. W., who had initially
been very disturbed at the
thought of strangers "interfering
in her life."
Now, an attendant hired by
JASA straightens up her apart-
ment and makes sure she eats pro-
perly and baths regularly. Golden-
sohn said it took three months to
achieve that much "and we were
lucky because the accountant
could tell us about her finances,
saving us a great deal of time and
trouble." The process of getting a
conservatorship can take sue
months.
Once the conservatorship is
granted, the MAP and the JASA
caseworker plan a budget, im-
plementing JASA investment pro-
cedures, when that is appropriate;
set up separate bank accounts for
each conservatee; and prepare ac-
counting reports.
GOLDENSOHN SAID that
while other Jewish social agencies
have similar programs, MAP is
probably the largest of its land and
the most formally organized. The
Boston Jewish Family and
Children's Service and Jewish
Social Services of Madison, Wis.,
have similar programs.
MAP services, as described by a
JASA spokesperson, include
assessment to decide what the in-
dividual needs and protect the
person's safety; arrangement for
home care, constant if needed; ar-
rangement for delivered meals
and medical attention; providing
escorts to medical appointments;
A-Shaab, was deported Sun-
day after dropping his appeal
to the Supreme Court against
the expulsion order.
Haniya was put aboard a
Swissair flight to Zurich at
Ben Gurion Airport and is
believed en route to Algeria.
He surprised his supporters
and accusers alike Friday
when he dropped his
to achieve the legitimate
rights of my people."
The Israeli authorities who
brought charges against
Haniya claimed he was a
senior political activist of El
Fatah, the military wing of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, and a conduit for PLO
funds and orders. He denied
the charges. The authorities
conceded there was no
wucii iic uiupjwu ins appeal, -------i-"W~ """" ""
charging that he was "a victim evidence to link Haniya to ter-
of political revenge."
He said he decided not to
fight deportation after the
high court ruled last week that
virtually all of the evidence
compiled against him was
classified information that
could not be made available to
his attorneys. This meant in ef-
fect that Haniya could not de-
fend himself because he did
not know what to defend
against.
In a statement to his
$1 Million Chair
The Annenberg Research In-
stitute for Judaic and Near
Eastern Studies announces a
pledge of one million dollars from
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Rothfeld
of Philadelphia to establish the
Charles W. and Sally Rothfeld
Chair in Jewish History. Walter
Annenberg, Chairman of the
Board of the Institute, made the
announcement to the Trustees.
EARN MONEY......
......and he|Pthe Jewish Community of the Palm Beaches
AT THE SAME TIME!
nJUf Je"j?h0F'edJeratrion of Palm Beach County is conducting
a Demographic Study of the Jewish Population of the Palm Benches.
We are looking foV individuals with clear speaking voices to do telephone interviews.
The Facts:
Calling will begin on January 22,1987 and will continue for 4-8 weeks
All calling will take place at the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
B SffittRIS aSTSSl WedM8day ^ 2 PM"10 PM -d *** Tuesday.
p\ot3i^^
S+ztt isunday'J" *
will be $5/hour and will be pS toSKtt^L-ZfS fOT "?training 8e8ai for all survey weeks. Participants who average the 12 hour ininimum


Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County
Morse Geriatric Center Holds Second Gala Affair
Page 11
(Left to Right) Heinz Eppler, Capital CampaiirnTi d^Z
Ruthe Eppler; Gertrude Berman and Bennet? 82JlKS
dent of the Morse Geriatric Center.
(Left to right) Pearl and Jack Resnick
along with Marilyn and Stanley Katz enjoy
the Gala festivities.
Gala Chairman Eleanor Fleischman with
Men's Associates President Bernard PI is skin
and Honey Plisskin, member of the Women's
Auxiliary Board and Gala Committee are all
smiles as their names are announced as the
Women's Auxiliary President Sylvia Berman "V?*""^68.* ?nnou,,ced M the GaU Committee member N
, rresiaeni ayivia Herman, wmnerg of the 1987 automobile drawing. Chairman Dorothy Durchlag.
Gala Committee member Norma Grabler and Dinner Co-
Enjoying the evening are Gala Committee members (left to right) Helen
Sodowick, Vice President of the Women's Auxiliary; Dale Nadel, Drawing
Chairman; Lenore Black, Dinner Co-Chairman; and Dorothy Ludwig, Vice
President of the Women's Auxiliary.
I fl
/ jKk H
* MM Br1; m" 1 J
\w tIl.. *\ C"HC *
Sunday evening, Dec. 21,
the Venetian Ballroom of the
Breakers Hotel came alive
with over 500 supporters of
the Center dancing to the
music of the Paul Farmer
Orchestra.
"This marvelous event has"
exceeded all expectations,"
stated Eleanor Fleischman,
Chairman of the Gala Affair.
we anticipated a good atten-
dance but never expected over
500 responses. We're thrilled
with the comments from our
guests about our wonderful
menu, music and grand ser-
vice. Planning next year's
event will be a great
challenge."
The Second Gala Affair
wgan with cocktails at 7
o clock in the Mediterranean
Koom. The model and artist's
rendering of the expansion to
we Center were on display for
the guests.
At 8 o'clock the dinner and
Jincing commenced in the
Venetian Ballroom. During the
evening, Center President
"ennett M. Berman welcomed
the guests and recognized Mr.
and Mrs. Jack Resnick for
their support of the Center
with the addition of the Jack
and Pearl Resnick Pavilion in
the Center's upcoming expan-
sion. Eleanor Fleischman ex-
tended her welcome and in-
troduced the Gala Committee,
thanking them for their
dedicated work on the Gala
event. Sylvia Berman, Presi-
dent of the Women's Aux-
iliary, then spoke announcing
the organization's commit-
ment to donate $500,000 to the
Center's expansion program.
Gert Berman was called to
pick the winning drawing
ticket for the 1987 automobile
as Drawing Chairman Dale
Nadel announced Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Plisskin as the win-
ners. Mr. Plisskin is President
of the Center's Men's
Associates and Mrs. Plisskin is
a member of the Women's
Auxiliary Board, and serves on
its Gala and Tribute
Committee.
"Proceeds from the Second
Gala Affair will benefit the
Center supporters gather at the Breakers Hotel for the Center's Second An-
nual Gala Affair. (Left to right) Alexander Gruber, Frances Schnitt, Esther
Gruber and Albert Schnitt.
Attending the Gala (left to right) are Edna and Sam Mittleman, Center Board Member,
and Lillian and Milton Edwards.
residents of the Center, aiding
in their programs of care. The
Morse Geriatric Center is the
culmination of the dreams,
dedication and commitment of
our guests who attended
Uala and many others in
community who share
the knowledge of an announce-
the ment that the goals for the
immunity who share our support of the Center's expan-
goate. We look forward to next sion program have been met,"
year s Gala with the sure concluded Mrs. Fleischman.


f
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
JWV Ladies Auxiliary National
President Visited Florida
Donna S. Green, National
President of the Florida
Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans, recently made
an official visit to Florida. She
spoke at the Department
quarterly meeting held at the
Hollywood Beach Hilton
Hotel.
A resident of La Jolla, Calif.,
Mrs. Green was elected to her
present position during the
group's 50th annual conven-
tion in Las Vegas.
Active in religious, civic and
social programs for many
years, Mrs. Green began her
volunteer activities as a child
assisting her mother during
World War II in Chicago's
USO programs. Her volunteer
activities span many organiza-
tions, including 29 years ser-
vice to JWVA which she
originally joined because of her
husband s active status in
JWV. Other volunteer ac-
tivities include Galilee Group
Hadassah, Community Chest,
Mothers March on Polio,
Muscular Dystrophy Associa-
tion, Women's American ORT,
B'nai B'rith, United Jewish
Appeal, Cub and Girl Scouts of
America, Parent-Teacher
Association, Parent-Teacher
Organization of Beth Abraham
Congregation, American Red
Cross, American Cancer Fund,
American Heart Fund and
more.
Import Prices To Decline By 20%
By DAVID LANDAU munity (EEC), the Finance
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ministry announced.
The prices of a large selection The Ministry warned
of imports, mainly expensive however, that if the price
durables, fell by as much as 20 drops trigger an unrestrained
spending spree by the public
complies with tariff
agreements it has with the
European Economic Corn-
additional taxes and "levies
would be imposed on the pur-
chases. According to the
Terrorist Gang Captured
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Security forces have un-
covered and captured a gang
of Moslem terrorists operating
in the Gaza Strip, the IDF
spokesman announced.
The gang members are
reported to have been respon- operating in the Gaza area.
sible for the recent stabbing ________
murders of Chaim Azran, 35,
and Yisrael Kitaro, 43, two
Ashkelon residents, while they
were shopping in Gaza. The
gang also wounded another
man, Shabtai Shwili.
The IDF spokesman said the
gang members belonged to the
Islamic Jihad movement,
regarded as the most extreme
of all the terrorist groups
Treasury, the cumulative ef-
fect of the reduced prices of
imports would be a one per-
cent fall in the cost-of-living
index.
Israel has reciprocal
agreements with the EEC call-
ing for significant tariff reduc-
tions on industrial products.
They have been in effect for
several years but the largest
was implemented at the be-
ginning of the year. Israel
benefits mainly in the area of
agricultural products which
competes favorably on the
European market, even with
produce from EEC countries.
The biggest drop here was in
the price of family-size cars
which fell by about 18 percent.
Palm Beach Lodge 221 of the Free Sons of Israel
recently donated $200 to Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm Beach County, for the pur-
chase of Chanukah toys for agency clients. The funds
were made available through the Lodge's Foundation
Fund. Standing among Chanukah toys are, left to
right, Leo Bennet, President, Lodge 221, Diane
Levine, 5th Deputy Grandmaster of the Free Sons of
Israel, and Ned Goldberg, Assistant Executive Direc-
tor, Jewish Family and Children's Service.
Soldier Jailed
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
Defense Force Lt. Col. David
Leiser was sentenced to seven
years in prison and reduced in
rank to private by a military
court for smuggling hashish
from Lebanon into Israel. He
was dismissed from the army.
Leiser had been in command of
a border check point.
Sara Halbert will be honored
by Olam Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women at its 5th An-
nual "Gift of Love" luncheon
to be held on Monday, Jan.
19, noon, at the Palm Beach
Polo and Country Club in
Wellington. The luncheon
will benefit the BBW
Children's Home in Israel.
Mrs. Halbert is immediate
past President of the chapter
and will be honored for her
involvement in community
work locally. For reserva-
tions, send a check for $30
payable to BBW to Eleanor
Weinstein, 6995 Lupin Lane,
Lake Worth, FL 33467.
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
General Meeting of Royal Palm Beach Lodge No. 3046
on Wednesday, Jan. 14 in Village Hall at 8 p.m. Guest
speaker Mr. Stanley Shotz, Co-chairman of ADL Commit-
tee of Florida. Guests are invited. Collation to follow.
Yachad Unit of Palm Beach County No. 5231 will be as
follows. Please note change of date and place.
The meeting will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 7:30 p.m.
at the Indian Spring Country Club, 11501 Indian Spring
Trail, Boynton Beach, FL 33437. Leonard Greenberg,
founder of Coleeco Industries, now President of Indian
Spring, will be our host and guest speaker. His subject will
be "An Interpretation of Judaism" from the writings of the
philosopher, Abraham J. Heschel.
A question and answer period will follow. Refreshments
will be served.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter meets 12:30 p.m. Jan. 13 at "the
American Savings Bank. Teddy Blendis will give a book
review on "Belonging" by James McNeish.
Coming events:
Jan. 11, "Legends" with Carol Channing and Mary Mar-
tin at the Poinciana Theatre.
Jan. 19-24, Cruise on "The Royale" out of Cape
Canaveral, five days, four nights, to Nassau and Private
Coves.
Feb. 3, Hialeah, dinner included.
Feb.. 11, "The Spirit" cruise on the Intracoastal from the
Diplomat Hotel, includes lunch and Musicama
entertainment.
Feb. 24-March 1, Pre-Mardigras in New Orleans, staying
at Chateau Lemoyne Hotel in French quarter, touring
Tallahassee and New Orleans. A bus leaves every Saturday
and Thursday for games at the Seminole Village. For infor-
mation call Ruth Rubin, West Palm Beach.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
The Palm Beach East Chapter is planning a twilight
concert and cocktail party on Jan. 18 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the
Eastpointe Golf and Racquet Club in Palm Beach Gardens.
The cost is $12.50 per person.
HADASSAH
Florida Atlantic Region Chapters cordially invite the
community to its annual "Woman of Valor" luncheon and
fashion show on Tuesday, Jan. 13, noon, at the Boca Raton
Hotel and Club, Boca Raton. (Contribution $100)
Beverlv Goldberg of the National Board of Hadassah, will
be the honored guest speaker.
Henrietta Szold Chapter will hold its Educational In-
stitute Day on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 10:30 a.m. at the
auditorium of Lakeside Village in Palm Springs. The pro-
gram will consist of "A Salute to the Righteous Gentiles"-
there will be a lunch break (brown bag lunch), and coffee
and cake will be served. At 1:30 p.m., Rev. William N. II-
nisky, pastor of Calvary Temple Assembly of God will
speak. He spent six years in Beirut, Lebanon for Campus
Ministries. He had to leave that country due to the escala-
tion of the war in that country. The meeting is open to the
public.
Shalom West Palm Beach Chapter will meet on
Wednesday, Jan. 21 12:30 p.m., at Congregation Anshei
Sholom Program will feature Rabbi Joel Levine of Temple
Judea. All welcome.
Coming events:
Feb. 10 Jewish Education day at Florida Atlantic U
reserved seating. Cost $4.50. Contact Florence Wexler or
Lillian Schack.
uF,fb' l9rJAnn^1 Plede luncheon in support of
Hadassah Medical Organization, at The Breakers For
reservations, contact Sylvia Citron or Estelle Kashdan.
Yovel West Palm Beach Chapter will hold a Bazaar-Flea
2KS. 1 d^ Am' & at Centurv Corners
(Okeechobee Blvd. and Haverhill Rd.) from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
The chapter will hold its membership meeting on Thurs-
day Jani 15 noon, at Congregation Anshei Shalom. A
Youth Alivah program "Homeward Flight" will be
presented by Yovel members, directed by Ann Hopfan
Members and guests are invited.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Regular meeting of the Haverhill Chapter will be held
Thursday, Jan. 22, at 12:30 p.m. at the Beach Savings and
Loan (formerly Sunrise Bank), Gun Club Rd. at Military
Trail Program: Ralph Stern, former ORT student, will
speak on his experiences.
n ?e'frPa,B Chapter will meet Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 12:30
p.m. at Congregation Anshei Sholom, Centurv Village The
RTp^SeaSe.^ *** "d "**"** by the Actors
Coming events:
r~T*!^Iy.arch 8l at 2A5b The Habimah Players at the
Crestwood Community Middle School, Royal Palm Beach
Contact Anne Cohen, Wellington M, 114, CentoVyWlkge!
h^f^rL6; f!HAday atcthe Reeency Spa-Hotel, Bal Har-
Village Prn' Norwich N, 327 Century


bssS ml
Helping People
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
A personal view from
ted Goldberg, ACSW,
LCSW
Lssistant Executive Director
of Jewish Family
and Children's Service
[Without question, some of
Jie most distraught in-
Jviduals who call JFCS and
sk for help are recent widows
nd widowers. To have shared
life with someone for 40, 50
60 years, and then to find
Ineself without a mate is a
levastating loss that many
lave great difficulty recover-
ng from.
But no matter how many
|tories we hear of some
ereaved individuals who lose
he will to live, many more
eople are able to rebuild their
ives after a loss. To eventually
Ivercome a loss and perhaps
Iven find happiness again is
lot an act of betrayal to the
memory of the deceased
[pouse, although some widows
Ind widowers will not accept
|his concept.
When recent widows and
/idowers call and request
Counseling, they are not all
Jealing with exactly the same
Issues. Some need help finding
lew purpose in life. Some feel
borne guilt over the death of
their spouse. All deal with a
lew sense of loneliness which
they may never have ex-
srienced before.
The needs of widows and
/idowers have not gone un-
loticed in this community.
[Agencies like the Widowed
[Persons Service and Hospice
have developed programs for
[widows and widowers. Con-
Igregations like Temple Israel
had sponsored a suport group
I for a number of years.
At JFCS, our interest in the
I needs and issues facing
widows and widowers is ongo-
ing. A six-session adjustment
group is run several times a
year by staff member Jenni
Frumer, MSW. A support
group for widows and
widowers has met for several
years, on a weekly basis, at
| Congregation Anshei Sholom.
Women's
Division
1972-73
Continued from Page 2
ponents, Women's Division
sponsored the Friendly
Visitors. Under the co-
chairmenship of Mary Broad-
man and Esther Levy, trained
volunteers would visit unaf-
filiated patients at nursing
homes and at area hospitals. In
a report, the women noted
that they were visiting pa-
tients in St. Mary's, JFK,
Good Samaritan and would
soon be including the newly
constructed Doctors Hospital
in their rounds.
Through the efforts of Bette
Gilbert, Barbara Weinstein,
and many other dedicated
women, Women's Division was
taking on more and more
responsibility in its ongoing
concern for Jews locally,
worldwide and in Israel.
Women who were comfortable
in their roles of "wife, mother,
and career girl" were suc-
cessfully addrn the role of
committed member of the
Jewish community.
Ned Goldberg
That group is currently being
staffed by me, with the ongo-
ing assistance of volunteer
Jack Weber. In addition, staff
from JFCS regularly address
gatherings of singles groups
and fraternal organizations
that contain many widowed
members on topics related to
life adjustment as a single
person.
If you are concerned about a
family member or friend who
is recently widowed, or in-
terested in starting a support
group for widows or widowers
in your area, call JFCS at
684-1991.
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc. is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located at
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 10U- Our telephone
number is 681,-1991. The
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation and
the United Way of Palm Beach
County.)
At the State of Israel Bonds Women's Division Fashion
Show held recently at The Breakers Hotel, $500,000 in bonds
were sold. Two awards were given during the luncheon. The
President's Award went to Madame Bea Alexander (center),
in recognition of $100,000 in Israel Bond purchases made by
her during 1986. Local Women's Division Chairman Evelyn
Blum accepts the Community Campaign Award given to 1'alm
Beach County for its outstanding 1986 Women's Division
campaign. Rubin Breger is Palm Beach County's Israel
Bonds Executive Director.
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
DANISH
BAKERY
Publlx
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
~> t----------
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or Seeded,
Sliced or Unsllcad
Italian Bread
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Spicy ami Delicious, Apple or
Dutch Apple
Pie
$169
each
Available at Publlx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Your Choice, Blueberry
or Chocolate
Cake Donuts
4J9<
Available at all PubHx Stores
end Fresh Danish Bakeries
Topped with Powdered
Sugar or lei
1-*.
Available at ail Publix Stores
and Freeh Danish Bakeries
For the Diet Conscious
Bran Muffins
tog*
w V
MS
Quantity

m
f ^ Prices Effective
la^fcjj January 8 thru 14.1987
&

>
Publix


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
S. African Jewry Hasn't The Clout
To Effectively Fight Apartheid
By MARCUS ARKIN
Johannesburg
There was much coverage in the
Afrikaans-language press of Elie
Wiesel's receipt of the Nobel
Peace Prize. Numerous editorial
comments recalled that during a
lecture tour of South Africa 11
years ago, Wiesel declared he had
acquired a better understanding
"of the Afrikaner and his
heritage."
He said it would be "arrogant"
for a visitor to suggest political
solutions for the country's dif-
ficult problems though most
reports did add that Wiesel had
expressed himself "disturbed and
disheartened" about living condi-
tions in black townships.
In contrast, some English-
language papers have been carry-
ing reports of a maverick Reform
rabbi, Ben Isaacson, who recently
returned from a visit to the U.S.,
where his message to American-
Jewish audiences was to differen-
tiate between the "Jewish
establishment" in South Africa
and those Jewish individuals like
himself "sincerely seeking to end
apartheid."
HIS ADVICE was "not to
believe representatives of the
Jewish establishment when they
go overseas saying they are in the
foreground in fighting against
apartheid; I told them that was a
lie and that those of us who were
really fighting it were being
ostracized and boycotted."
While it is true that Isaacson for
some time has been a thorn in the
flesh of bodies like the South
African Jewish Board of Deputies,
it is the manner of his message,
not the message itself, which has
been criticized. For example,
Isaacson frequently uses the argu-
ment that South Africa is
undergoing the same
"dehumanization process" as the
Jews experienced in Nazi Ger-
many. Some regard that headline-
seeking sensationalism as
distasteful and wholly out of place
in the local context where even
the African National Congress
has yet to accuse the Botha
government of genocide.
Isaacson told a Philadelphia au-
dience recently that the Board of
Deputies and South African
Zionist Federation "have always
taken the line that the apartheid
issue is a political issue, not a
moral issue. They have attacked
black leaders. The Jewish
establishment has been
Marcus Arkin is a former
director general of the South
African Zionist Federation
and editor of 'South African
Jewry: A Contemporary
Survey,' published by Oxford
University Press.
hypocritical to the utmost.
BUT WIESEL't restraint
(most untypical of the majority of
American Jewish visitors) and
Isaacson's odious comparison
divert attention from the fun-
damental collective weakness of
South African Jewry in the ongo-
ing struggle against racial
discrimination. As a percentage of
the country's white (that is, fully
enfranchized) population, the
Jewish community is roughly
equal to the ratio of American
Jewry to the total population of
the U.S. Yet, the political clout of
South African Jewry is puny when
contrasted with the influential
voice of the Jewish lobby in the
U.S.
Only once since the establish-
ment of the Union of South Africa
in 1910 has there been a Jewish
member of the cabinet, and he
held a minor portfolio. There are
few parliamentary constituencies
where the Jewish vote is really
significant. No Jewish Am-
bassadors are to be found,
although South Africans of col-
ored and Indian origin hold such
rank. Jews are not conspicuous as
journalists or in the other media,
and Jewish academics by and
large tend to keep a low profile.
Thus, while individuals in all
walks of life have played and con-
tinue to play important roles in
the campaign for political reform,
and on a scale far more significant
than Isaacson pretends, the
Jewish community as a whole can-
not avoid being something of a
toothless tiger in this regard.
THERE IS ONE notable excep-
tion, the South African Union of
Jewish Students, with a member-
ship around 6,000, and its ac-
tivities concentrated overwhelm-
ingly on campuses in Johan-
nesburg and Cape Town. For
many years, through its educa-
tional seminars and publications,
SAUJS consistently has attacked
racial injustice and the abuses of
the "apartheid regime."
But much of these outpourings
have been shallow and hysterical,
contributing very little toward a
clearer understanding of unique
and complex issues which
ultimately may or may not be
resolved with the help of construc-
tive action on the part of South
Africa's Jewish citizens.
As American firms continue to
pull out and the bandwagon of in-
ternational sanctions rolls on,
commentators in the South
African Jewish press are
highlighting some strange side-
effects. One was the recent af-
fidavit signed by officials of the
Zim American-Israeli Shipping
Co. affirming that their company
does not do business with South
Africa, a clause insisted on by the
San Francisco Board of Super-
visors as part of a new agreement
between Zim and that city's port
authority.
Apparently the board failed to
draw a distinction between the
shipping line's American sub-
sidiary and its Haifa-based parent
company, whose container vessels
remain frequent visitors to South
Africa ports.
BUT WHAT struck local
observers was the alacrity with
which a major Israeli enterprise is
prepared to submit to foreign
boycott pressures when Israeli na-
tional policy has been to denounce
such practices for the last 38
years. If the Israel government, it
is argued, were to decide that it
best suits the Jewish State's in-
terests to curtail or avoid
altogether commercial contacts
with South Africa, that would be
one thing, and in fact would be no
different than what the Swedes
have done already. In this case it
is the government of San Fran-
cisco that is dictating which third
parties Israeli firms may or may
not deal with.
Meanwhile, a severely depress-
ed economy and uncertain
political future serve to encourage
emigration of young Jewish
adults. Yet, in spite of strenuous
efforts by the South African
Zionist Federation, there is no
marked upsurge of aliyah, the ma-
jority of emigrants finding their
way to Canada, the U.S. and
Australia.
In fact, few South African
Jewish grandparents don't have
at least one gandchild living
abroad. And again the current
diplomatic onslaught has its
bizarre overtones. For instance,
many of the passengers between
Johannesburg and Toronto (there
are no direct flights) comprise
these grandparents on visits to
their offspring.
WZO Reorganizing Emissary System
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The World Zionist Organiza-
tion is going ahead with a
radical reorganization of its
overseas emissary system. The
shlichim (emissaries) will
henceforth be representatives
of the WZO Executive, rather
than of any individual depart-
ment, and they will be required
by contract to engage in aliya,
education, youth work, and all
other Zionist-related activities
as directed by an overall WZO
director in each country.
WZO Chairman Leon Dulzin
told reporters recently the
reform would cut down on
politicization both in appoint-
ments and in deployment
within the emissary system.
"There will no longer be pro-
tectzionaires (the favorite) of
the various departments
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among the shlichim," Dulzin
said.
The reform follows a
thorough study of the issue by
a panel headed by former
Supreme Court President
Justice Moshe Landau. The
emissary system costs the
WZO some $20 million a year
about one-third of its total
budget. There are some 700
shlichim.
Dulzin said the reform could
save as much as $4 million. It
would go into effect in the four
main centers North
America, Britain, Argentina
and France in the new fiscal
year.
The reformed system will be
supervised by a special com-
mittee comprising the WZO
chairman and treasurer, the
chairmen of four key depart-
ments, two members or the
public and two representatives
of the Zionist youth
movements.
Illl
An armed Israeli
soldier walks past
Arab women selling
vegetables and fruit
in the Gaza
marketplace. Some
of the women have
covered their clothes
with plastic sheets to
rotect themselves
from the rain which
has been falling
steadily in Israel,
bringing to a halt
many of the
demonstrations
which had been
taking place in the
West Bank and
Gaza.
VOA Agreement
U.S. Accused Of Reneging
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
United States government
was accused of reneging on an
agreement to give Israeli com-
panies half of the contracts for
construction of Voice of
America (VOA) radio
transmitters in the Negev.
Ilan Oren, chairman of the
Arava regional council, charg-
ed that the Communications
Ministry yielded to an
American decision to give local
contractors only 20 percent of
the work instead of the 50 per-
cent guaranteed when the U.S.
and Israel signed an agree-
ment in principle for the pro-
ject last July.
Israel Radio reported that
Premier Yitzhak Shamir will
appoint a ministerial commit-
tee to decide whether to accept
the American terms.
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Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
New Development
In Demjanjuk Trial
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
three-judge panel trying John
Demjaniuk granted the
suspected Nazi war criminal a
one-month postponement last
week at the request of his
American attorney, Mark
O'Connor, to allow him addi-
tional time to study prosecu-
tion documents.
The trial of the Ukrainian-
born former resident of
Cleveland, Ohio, opened for-
mally in a Jerusalem District
Court on Nov. 26 but was ad-
journed until Jan. 19 after a
40-minute preliminary hear-
ing. It is now scheduled to
resume Feb. 15.
The accused was
represented at the postpone-
ment hearing by an Israeli
lawyer, Yoram Schechtel, who
agreed to assist O'Connor in
preparing the defense.
Schechtel will not take an ac-
tive part in the trial but will be
available for consultation by
O'Connor on points of Israeli
law.
The judges were critical of
the American lawyer for what
they saw as undue delay in
preparing his case. O'Connor
had asked for several
postponements on grounds
that he had been unable to find
an Israeli colleague willing to
participate in Demjanjuk's
defense. The court noted that
Schechtel's presence indicated
that he has solved that
problem.
Demjanjuk, the first
suspected war criminal ever
extradited to Israel for trial,
has been charged with war
crimes, crimes against
humanity and crimes against
persecuted people. He is alleg-
ed to be the Treblinka death
camp guard known by inmates
as "Ivan the Terrible" for his
brutality, and directly respon-
sible for the deaths of tens of
thousands of Jews and others.
"Ivan" allegedly operated the
gas chambers.
Demjanjuk's defense hinges
on mistaken identity. The
panel hearing the case consists
of Supreme Court Justice Dov
Levin and District Court
judges Dalia Lerner and Zvi
Tal.
Congratulations are in order following the
signing of a coalition agreement involving
Herat, Techiya and Tami, three American
Zionist organizations whose agendas call
for Israel's peace with security, settlement
of Judea and Samaria, and a free enterprise
economy. Establishing the United Israel-
Zionist Coalition are (left to right) Rabbi
Mitchell Serels, Tami; Harry S.
Taubenfeld, Herat; and Michael I. Teplow,
Techiya.
Defense Ministry Closes Swiss Bank
Account Used In Iran Arms Deal
Refusenik Cancer Victims
Appeal To Red Cross
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Defense Ministry recently
closed a Swiss bank account
used to transfer money from
weapons purchased by Iran to
the Americans via Israel, ac-
cording to Israeli press
reports.
Press reports in the past
month uncovered that part of
the money from the Swiss ac-
count into which the Israelis
deposited the payments was
diverted to aid the Nicaraguan
rebels, or Contras. But the
Israeli government has
vehemently denied any
knowledge of the diverted
funds.
A Defense Ministry in-
vestigation into all the finan-
Future Level of Israeli-Austrian
Ties Remain Open
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres receiv-
ed the Austrian Ambassador,
Otto Pleinert, here last Month.
But the question remained
open as to the future level of
diplomatic relations between
the two countries.
Pleinert reportedly express-
ed his government's desire
that the former level be
restored and Peres responded
that this was also the wish of
the Israeli government.
Pleinert also expressed hope
that Israel would soon appoint
a new Ambassador to Vienna.
It is not known what Peres
replied.
Israel has had no Am-
bassador in the Austrian
capital since its envoy, Michael
Ehzur, retired several months
ago. A successor to Elizur has
not been named because the
government does not want an
Ambassador of Israel to pre-
sent credentials to the
Austrian President, Kurt
Waldheim, whose Nazi past
was exposed during the elec-
tion campaign hut umra jr.
Pleinert, whose tour of duty
in Israel expires in a few mon-
ths, told reporters after
meeting with Peres that he
could not rule out the possibili-
ty that he will not be replaced,
unless a new Israeli Am-
bassador is sent to Vienna by
then.
Pleinert stressed that
Austria wants to improve rela-
tions with Israel in all spheres.
He said a plan was under con-
sideration to send the famed
Vienna State Opera to Israel
to participate in the 40th an-
niversary celebrations of the
Jewish State in 1988.
rial accounts connected to the
arms deal affair found that
Israeli arms dealers Yaacov
Nimrodi and Al Schwimmer
delivered some $3 million to
Israel from the sale of the first
TOW missiles in September
1985.
The Israelis, at the request
of American officials, then
deposited half the money in a
Swiss account whose number
was provided by the
Americans. The rest of the
money went to Iranian arms
dealer and middleman
Manucher Ghorbanifar, also at
the Americans' request. About
$700,000 to $800,000 went to
the Israeli government to com-
pensate for shipping expenses,
according to the report in
Haaretz.
The Defense Ministry has ac-
counted for all the funds
transferred to it, the report
said. But the Defense
Ministry's investigation did
not account for money
transferred to middlemen and
arms dealers which did not
reach Israel, according to the
report.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Five refuseniks suffering from
cancer have sent a joint appeal
to the International Red Cross
in Geneva, it was reported by
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
The refuseniks wrote: "We
have been trying for many
years to get permission from
the Soviet authorities to
emigrate to our children,
grandchildren, sisters,
brothers and other relatives in
Israel. Now, despairing of the
constant refusals to satisfy our
legal demands, we turn to you
and ask you to help us in our
calamitous situation."
The refuseniks and their
conditions are:
Leah Maryasin of Riga, 61,
multiple myeloma; Yuri
Shpeizman of Leningrad, 54,
lymphosarcoma; Marianne
Simantova of Leningrad, 61,
cancer of the uterus; Mikhail
Furman of Leningrad, 78,
cancer of the larynx; and
Elizaveta Gershis of Len-
ingrad, 50, breast cancer.
Agenda In Tallahassee
Continued from Page 4
Jewish social agenda and that
takes place in Tallahassee.
"We are fortunate to have in
this area two wonderful State
legislators. State Senator
Eleanor Weinstein and State
Representative Lois Frankel
are two dynamic newly elected
officials who are emotionally
and intellectually committed
to our agenda. People in this
community need to work with
them on a day to day basis to
educate them and to identify
for them the programs and
needs of the Jewish communi-
ty," Mr. Friedman concluded.
"Moro in yoo /
iaa Mow?"/
"TohSo
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center through a Federal Grant
Title III of the Older Americans Act provides transportation
to persons 60 years or older, who do not drive or cannot use
the public transportation system, serves Hot Kosher Meals in
a group setting, delivers Kosher meals to homebound persons
and offers daily educational and recreational programs. Call
689-7703 for further information.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
at the JCC, is designed to keep
persons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by registered dieti-
cian. Daily varied programs
educate and entertain older
adults. There is no fee, but
contributions are requested.
Reservations must be made,
call Carol or Lillian at
689-7703.
Monday, Jan. 12 "Games"
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Jan. 13 Children
from the Pre-School join the
Seniors for music and fun
Wednesday, Jan. 14 Helen
Gold, RD
Thursday, Jan. 15 Pam
Parcus, Dietician
Friday, Jan. 16 The Per-
formers "Yiddish Vaudeville
Revisited"
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
Kosher Meal delivered to their
home are eligible. This pro-
gram has aided people on both
short and long term basis.
There are no set fees for these
programs but persons are ask-
ed to make weekly contribu-
tions. Call Carol 689-7703 in
West Palm Beach for more
information.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in a designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation. People are
taken to treatment centers,
doctor's offices, hospitals and
nursing homes to visit spouses,
social service agencies or
nutrition centers. The han-
dicapped are serviced in a
special lift vehicle. There is no
fee for this service but par-
ticipants are encouraged to
contribute their fair share.
This service is in great demand
so make reservations in ad-
vance. For more information
and/or reservations, call
689-7703 and ask for Helen or
Lillian in the Transportation
Department, between 9 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
School Board Palm Beach
County Adult and Communi-
ty Education Classes: Winter
session will begin Jan. 26 and
will continue for eight weeks.
The School Board provides in-
structors at the JCC. There are
no fees for these classes, ex-
cept if supplies are needed.
Participants are asked to make
a contribution.
Weight Control, Instructor
Arthur Gang:
Mondays at 1:46 p.m. A
simplified well planned pro-
gram for those interested in
weight reduction and control.
Stress Management, In-
structor Joyce Hogan:
Tuesdays, at 1:16 p.m.
Learn techniques on now to
cope with everyday pressure,
and how to improve physical
and mental health and sense of
well being.
Exercise and Health
Education Instructor Shirley
Sheriff:
Wednesdays, at 10 a.m.
Light exercise to aid in achiev-
ing more energy and concen-
tration along with discussions
on various health topics.
Speak Out, Instructor
Shirley Sheriff:
Wednesdays, at 1:15 p.m.
A thought provoking and
stimulating class for those who
enjoy interaction of people.
Limited registration.
Writers Workshop, In-
structor, Ruth Graham:
Fridays, at 10 a.m. A
creative approach to writing
one's life story using
memorabilia, diaries, letters
and pictures. Registration
limited.
Palm Beach Junior College
of Continuing Education
North Campus: Provides in-
structors at the JCC. There are
no fees for these classes, ex-
cept if supplies are needed.
Participants are asked to make
a contribution.
Great Decisions, Instructor
Professor Milton Kurland:
This class will begin on Jan. 29
and continue for eight weeks.
This series includes a set cur-
riculum of lectures and discus-
sions relating to current social,
economic and political issues.
Student participation is
limited. Call 689-7703 to
register for this class.
OTHER CLASSES
AND ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series:
Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m.
Alfred Parsont, Instructor.
This class will run straight
through until spring. There is
a fee, $2.50 per session for
members, $3 per session for
non-members.
Timely Topics/Round Table
Discussion Group:
A stimulating group of men
and women meet each week to
discuss all phases of current
events. Many members are en-
joying a Kosher lunch and
more camaraderie at 1:15 p.m.
before the regular discussion
group begins at 2 p.m. Make
reservation by calling
Veronica at 689-7703. There is
no fee, but contributions are
requested.
Speakers Club:
The regular weekly meeting
of this group will take place on
Thursday at 10 a.m. Persons
wishing to stay for an extend-
ed Kosher luncheon, make a
reservation with Veronica,
689-7703.
Fun with Yiddish, with
David Sandier:
Mondays at 10 a.m. A
morning of humor and fun fill-
ed with interesting Yiddish
content.
SPECIAL PROGRAM
JCC Wisdom of the Body
Series, Consultant, Gert
Freidman First session
Wednesday, Jan. 21 at 1:30
p.m. "Normal Breathing
and Respiratory Problems."
Lecturer, Dave Baker, Pro-
gram Administrator of the
American Lung Association.
Essential information regar-
ding normal breathing,
asthma, hay fever and bron-
chitis will be presented.
After a question and answer
period a social hour will follow.
Refreshment will be served.
Everyone is welcome.
AT YOUR SERVICE
Health Insurance
Assistance: Edie Reiter
assists persons with filing in-
surance forms and answers
questions. The third Thursday
of each month.
Home Financial Manage-
ment: How to reconcile your
checkbook, questions about bill
payments, personal income tax
and any other questions about
simple personal home financial
problems, Herb Kirsch, consul-
tant. The first and third
Wednesday of every month at
1:30 p.m.
Senior Employment: An op-
portunity for seniors to obtain
employment. A representative
from the National Council of
Senior Citizens is available by
appointment. Call Veronica at
689-7703.
VOLUNTEER NEWS
AND VIEWS
Needed:
Consumer Education
Leader
Persons interested in
Stamp Collecting
An Artist in residence
Workshop leaders (so-
meone with particular skills or
talent to lead a workshop)
Trip planner and leaders
Telephone receptionists
A sewing machine and VCR
are also needed
Contact Carol Fox at
689-7703.
The Silent Crier-The
Non Gifted Child
Arnold Newberger of
Chicago and Palm Beach is
being honored this year by
The Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. Mr.
Newberger will receive the
Seminary's Centennial Medal
for Achievement at 12:30
p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 1 at the
Jewish Theological
Seminary's Centennial Lun-
cheon at The Breakers.
Chairman for the event is
Harold Hassenfeld.
Honorary Chairmen are
Nathan Appleman, Arthur H.
Bienenstock, Peter I.
Feinberg, Benjamin S. Horn-
stein and H. Bert Mack.
Robert S. Sloat, PhD, will
present a workshop which will
focus on criteria employed in
defining giftedness in today's
schools on Jan. 13, 7:30 p.m.,
at the Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches,
700 Spencer Drive, West Palm
Beach.
According to Dr. Sloat, "The
major problem in the area of
gifted education may no longer
be how to educate the gifted,
but rather who they really are:
that is, what specific children
are we talking about those
with high IQ scores or those
with special talents or those
who demonstrate some
creative abilities?" Dr. Sloat
will discuss reasons for under-
achievement based upon dif-
ferentiation of types of
giftedness and suggestions for
utilizing special abilities of
gifted children.
Dr. Sloat is Professor
Emeritus of Human
Rehabilitative Services at the
University of Northern Col-
orado at Greeley, recent Direc-
tor of the Troywood Learning
Environment in Lake Worth
and currently serves as a
private consultant to educa-
tional organizations and in-
stitutions. Dr. Sloat is widely
published and hold degrees
from Adelphi College, Hofstra
University and the University
of Texas at Austin.
For further information
about the workshop, call the
JCC at 689-7700.
New Feature Film On
Israeli Intermarriage Problem
Continued from Page -r>-
mandate that is relevant today.
"THERE WERE many stories
like that in Israel," Hard said.
"The whole society was opposed
to intermarriage. Either the fami-
ly intervened, or the girl moved to
Liverpool The British culture
was very tempting and very
promising."
Harel noted that even Ezer
Weizman, a member of the Israeli
Knesset and nephew of Israel's
first President, Chaim Weizmann,
had a sister who married a British
non-Jew and moved to England.
Atzmon plays the girl who has
defied her family and agreed to
marry the British captain, David's
friend. Her family disowns her,
and she is lonely and depressed
after the marriage.
Even though Atzman comes
from a non-traditional Israeli
family, she said, "It would hurt
my father a lot if I married a non-
Jew. I would have a problem that
exists all over Israel today."
The actress won Israel's version
of the Oscar for best actress in the
movie "Dead End Street," in
which she played a prostitute
discovered by a television crew
that wants to make a movie about
the rehabilitation of prostitutes.
After rehabilitation, the crew
abandons her and she is left at the
turning point.
ATZMON ALSO has starred in
nine other movies, including
"Dizengoff 99," a film also pro-
duced by Harel. At 28, Atzmon
has reached the top of Israel's film
industry and is ready to try to
break into the ultra-competitive
international film scene.
"I would like to have the oppor-
tunity to do things outside Israel
because (working only in Israel)
can be limiting," she said. "But I
love my country, and I want peo-
ple to know that I am an Israeli
actress."
Marsillach, 23, is, like Atzmon,
making her international film
debut in "Every Time We Say
Goodbye." Her parents are two of
the leading theatrical per-
sonalities in Spain. Father
Adolpho Marsillach is a
playwright, stage director, actor
and director of the National
Classical Theatre of Spain.
Mother Teresa Del Rio is an
internationally-knwon actress.
Marsillach, who is not Jewish,
had never visited Israel prior to
filming the movie. Mizrachi coach-
ed her in the ways of Sephardic
Jewish families. "I understood im-
mediately because in the South of
Spain, people have the same tradi-
tions, the traditions of the
Catholic religion," Marsillach
said.
SHE SAID she approached her
role emotionally, not intellectual-
ly. Marsillach found Israel to be
friendly and similar to Spanish
culture in many aspects.
"The first shock is that you are
in the Holy Land everything is
mystical," she said. Marsillach liv-
ed in Jerusalem from last
February to April, but said she
had too little time to explore.
Marsillach is now on a scholar-
ship in New York to study acting.
The actresses and producers
had only words of praise for
American film star Hanks, who
like Marsillach visited Israel for
the first time during the filming.
They described him as highly pro-
fessional and hard working, char-
ming, witty and anxious to learn
about his role. That interest land-
ed him a tour of an Israeli Air
Force base with one of the best
imaginable tour guides, Ezer
Weizman, the father of the Israeli
Air Force.
JTA Services
&tk
ISRAELI FOLKLORE
ENSEMBLE OF BUENOS
AIRES, ARGENTINA
SATURDAY, JAN. 17, 1987
8:00 PM-10:00 PM
PALM BEACH GARDENS
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $6.
AOVANCI SALE: Mail check with serf-
addressed stamped envelop* enclosed to
Jewish Community Center 700 Spencer Drive.
West Palm Beach. Ft 33409 Deadline lor
advance sale is January ic 1987
Please Cal 689-7700 For Further Information


Volunteers Deliver
Chanukah Food Baskets
Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
r
People in 100 homes from
Delray to West Palm Beach
have received special gifts this
Chanukah. The Jewish Com-
munity Center of the Palm
Beaches, through a special
allocation from its Title III
Older Americans Act grant,
administered by the
Gulfstream Area Agency on
Aging, provided its home-
bound Older Adults with
kosher food baskets this holi-
day. These baskets contain a
variety of non-perishable
Kosher foods and sundries.
The JCC delivers over
24,000 kosher meals to the
homebound throughout the
year providing them with one-
third of their daily nutritional
requirements. "These
Chanukah Baskets," accor-
ding to Jean Rubin, Director of
the JCC Senior Program,
"enable our homebound to
have additional nourishing
foods as well as necessary
every day sundries on their
shelves to be used as needed.
Twenty volunteers from the
JCC packaged and delivered
the meals to the homebound.
Sol Yellin of Golden Lakes has
been delivering meals since the
beginning of the service four
JCC News
For reservations and more information about the follow-
ing programs, contact the Jewish Community Center
689-7700. *
JCC CHILDREN'S OUTING TO CHINESE CIRCUS
On Wednesday, Jan. 14 at 6:30 p.m., for children
kindergarten through 6th grades, the JCC offers an even-
ing at the WPB Auditorium to see the Chinese Circus.
Everyone will meet at the JCC Pre-school, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd. at 6:30 and return to the pre-school after
the show.
Pre-registration is a must! Call early as spaces are filling
fast! Fees which include transportation to and from the
JCC and admission are $9 per child for Center members
and $15 for non-members.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-60)
Enjoy an evening of Jai Alai on Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 7:30
p.m. Meet at the Fronton (1415 W. 45th St.) just outside
the gift shop. It is Ladies Night, ladies enter free men
$3.
Party at Luckies in the PGA Sheraton on Sunday, Jan. 11
starting at 8 p.m. Join the group for a Singles Night of dan-
cing, mingling and fun special prices on cocktails from
8-10 p.m. Ask for the group at the door. Donation: $1 plus
own fare.
On Saturday, Jan. 17 at 8 p.m., begin a fun-filled evening
at the Ambrosia Restaurant (Dixie, north of Belvedere) for
an Italian dinner. After dinner cross the street to the Com-
edy Corner in the Carefree Theatre or meet at the theatre
at 10:30 p.m. for the show. RSVP by Jan. 11 with a $5
check to JCC, 700 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach, FL
33409, Att'n. Pursuits Comedy Night. This covers the en-
trance fee to the theatre there is a two-drink minimum at
the show.
SINGLES (30-40)
Enjoy a Saturday evening party at the home of Jerry Zel
on Jan. 10, 8:30 p.m. Bring a swimsuit for a dip in the
Jacuzzi. Donation: JCC members $2, non-members $4. For
directions call Ann at the Center.
Meet at Cheers in the Royce Hotel (Belvedere Rd. west of
1-95), Wednesday, Jan. 14 at 5 p.m. for a happy hour of
drinks and hors d'oeuvres. Plan to stay for the talent show-
starting at 9 p.m. Ask for our group at the door. Donation:
$1 plus your own fare.
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
Get together on Sunday, Jan. 11, 2 p.m., at John Prince
Park for a BBQ picnic. Hot Dogs, chips and a cooler with
ice will be provided BYOB. There will be games and good
times for all. Look for bright balloons at the BBQ grills.
On Thursday, Jan. 15 at 7 p.m., meet at Ciao's (U.S. 1, on
the east side, north of Southern Blvd.) to enjoy an Italian
dinner. Call by Jan. 12 to reserve.
On Saturday, Jan. 17 at 10 p.m., Ned Goldberg will open
his home for a very special house party. Members of the
Argentinian Dance Troupe "Reguesh'r will attend after
their performance that evening to join those in attendance.
Open bar and munchies. Donation: JCC members $4, non-
members $6.
years ago. "It is very gratify-
ing that I can help people in
this way," says Mr. Yellin.
"When I deliver the meals I
usually spend about 15
minutes talking with the peo-
ple and trying to cheer them
up. Many of the homebound
are lonely and they look for-
ward to seeing me. They light
up when I get there!" Mr.
Yellin, who is retired,
volunteers in the community
and "tries to be helpful
wherever there is a need.
The home deliveries is one
part of a complex food and
transportation program at the
JCC Comprehensive Senior
Service Center. The Center
serves over 31,000 Kosher
meals during the year at the
JCC and provides over 31,000
trips per year through its
transportation program.
These trips enable older adults
who have no other means of
transportation to visit their
doctors, come to the Center
for meals and visit loved ones
in homes.
Volunteers know that what
they do is in line with the
Jewish tradition of doing
"Mitzvahs" or selfless good
deeds for those in need.
Chanukah is a good time for
rededication to human service.
Shamir
Absolved Of
Wrongdoing
Continued from Page 1
scandals in Israel's history, he
said on an Israel Radio inter-
view that while the findings
were legally in order, the panel
failed to place any blame on
the political establishment for
its failure to act after it
became apparent that a wrong
had been committed.
"Everyone was happy,
though something disgusting
had been done," Zorea said.
He admitted his committee
had been misled by Shalom's
testimony "and in the end
nobody was found guilty or
punished because of the
Presidential pardon."
Zorea was referring to the
pardons granted by President
Chaim Herzog to Shalom and
several of his associates
though none was ever charged
with an offense. He criticized
Labor Party leader Shimon
Peres, who became Premier
shortly after the incident, for
going along with the Presiden-
tial pardon and for not forcing
Shalom to resign. Shalom did
resign, but only after the scan-
dal broke earlier this year.
Labor Party spokesmen, in-
cluding Abba Eban, Chairman
of the Knesset's Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee,
also criticized the panel, not
for its findings but for
overlooking political respon-
sibility. Likud, however, laud-
ed Shamir for his "fortitude"
and "resolute stand" in the
face of "blood libels" and
"calumny" by the Labor
Party.
Laborites promptly noted
that it was Likud which stub-
bornly opposed any investiga-
tion into the affair by the
police, legal authorities or a
government commission when
it first surfaced.
B'nai B'rith Women, Mitzvah Council with their President,
Helen Sickerman, visited the King David Center Convales-
cant Home in West Palm Beach recently to help them
celebrate Chanukah. The trip was organized under the chair-
manship of Evelyn Fisher. Presents were distributed by the
visitors and many individual contacts made. Sunny Levin of
the "Soundsfamiliar" group is shown performing.
JDC Approves
1987 Budget
The Board of Directors of
the American Joint Distribu-
tion Committee approved a
$57 million budget for 1987 at
its annual meeting, Thursday,
Dec. 11.
The budget represents a six
percent increase over the 1986
budget of $54 million. It will
fund JDC programs in Israel
and more than 30 other coun-
tries. JDC President Heinz
Eppler called it a responsible
budget and said: "It addresses
the needs of the Jewish com-
munities around the world."
The annual meeting was the
culmination of a week of
meetings and programs that il-
lustrate the national and inter-
national scope of JDC ac-
tivities. Committees organized
by areas of the world reviewed
operations and deliberated
questions of program and
budget.
Jewish education is a major
focus of JDC work in Western
Europe and Latin America.
Executive Vice President
Ralph I. Goldman described a
major study of educational
programs in France, a joint
project of JDC and the Jewish
Agency Jewish Education Sub-
committee. "The study will
produce an inventory of what
exists and a plan for what is
needed," Mr. Goldman said.
He stressed that the local com-
munity is involved with the
study. "We are not seeking a
JDC Program or a Jewish
Agency program. Rather, we
want to help develop an in-
digenous French Jewish com-
munity program for Jewish
education."
Mr. Eppler reported on a
plan to form a training school,
or "seminario," in Argentina
for Jewish communal workers.
He said that this will
strengthen JDC's effort to in-
crease the professionalism of
social services in Latin
America's Jewish
communities.
The Board approved a new
direction of service, in which
the JDC will reach out to a
general community in need, if
that will also help a Jewish
community.
The focus of the plenary lun-
cheon meeting was JDC's
work in Israel. The keynote
speaker was Avraham Har-
man, President of Hebrew
University from 1968 to 1983
and ambassador to the United
States from 1959 to 1968. In a
summary of current social and
political circumstances in
Israel, he noted that the JDC,
UJA, and similar agencies ac-
count for about 10 percent of
what is spent on social services
and community development.
"That's the context in which
I think the JDC and the UJA
should view their role in
Israel," he said. "You are in-
dispensable to what we want
Israel to be, to how we want
the people of Israel and the
new immigrants who join us
how we want them to live."
On Monday, Dec. 8, the JDC-
Brookdale Institute of Geron-
tology, established by JDC in
Israel, held its second annual
U.S. forum, on "Pursuing
more effective quality
assurance for the elderly in in-
stitutions." Dr. Sidney Katz of
the National Academy of
Sciences presented the fin-
dings of a far-reaching study
on nursing home regulations.
Since its founding in 1974,
the Brookdale Institute has
become a national center on
aging in Israel and helped the
government develop policies to
deal with the country's rapidly
aging population. It has built
an international reputation by
working with Jewish com-
munities in the United States,
Argentina, and Chile.
The JDC Board also elected
17 new directors, representing
widespread areas of the
United States, as well as
Canada and England.
Women
Continued from Page 3
a regular instructor for Crisis
Line volunteer training classes
and a faculty member of the
Florida Society for Clinical
Hypnosis training workshop.
Dr. Schulman participated in
the Women's Division Cameo
Business and Professional
Women's Mission to Israel in
1982. Presently she is a
member of the Women's Divi-
sion Board, a member of the
Women's Division B and P
Women's Networking Group
Steering Committee, and a
member of Federation's
Demographic Study
Committee.
For more information, con-
tact Lynne Ehrlich, Women's
Division Director, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
2



Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9,1987
UJA-Federation Panel
To Assess Programs For Reform,
Conservative Movements
NEW YORK (JTA) -
UJA-Federation has formed
an ad hoc committee to assess
the levels of funding for pro-
grams in Israel of both the
Reform and Conservative
movements.
Morton Kornreich, Chair-
man of the Board of Directors
of UJA-Federation, said the
committee was formed follow-
ing a recent meeting between
rabbis and lay leaders, spon-
sored by UJA-Federation.
Reform and Conservative
leaders have expressed con-
cern that their programs and
institutions receive inadequate
funding from the Jewish
Agency.
Campaign contributions are
allocated through the UJA-
Federation Overseas Affairs
Division to the Jewish Agency.
The Jewish Agency gives
financial aid to various
humanitarian programs in
Israel, including immigrant ab-
sorption, youth aliya, educa-
tion, rural settlement, and
neighborhood rehabilitation.
Rabbi Saul Teplitz, of Con-
gregation Sons of Israel, in
Woodmere, N.Y., and Chair-
man of the Rabbinical Ad-
visory Council of UJA-
Federation, will head the six-
member committee, it was an-
nounced. Members include
Rabbi Jerome Davidson, of
Congregation Beth El in Great
Neck, L.I.; Billie Gold, Chair-
man of the UJA-Federation
Jewish Information and Refer-
ral Service and Vice President
of the Board of Jewish Educa-
tion; Ira Kellman, Vice Presi-
dent of the Board of Jewish
Education; Rabbi Binyamin
Walfish, Executive Vice Presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Council
of America; and Robert
Goldman, a captain in the
FAU to Offer $25 Tickets
To Hope Fund Raiser
A limited number of tickets for
"Bob Hope in Person," the
Florida Atlantic University Foun-
dation's 1987 annual benefit per-
formance, are available at $25
each, at the University Center
Ticket Office, 393-3758.
The legendary entertainer will
perform at the University Center
Auditorium on Saturday, Feb. 28,
at 8 p.m. He will be accompanied
by the FAU Jazz Band.
Featured vocalist with Bob
Hope will be Debby Whorley, a
regular on his nationwide tours,
who is as much at home with
romantic ballads as she is belting
out Broadway hit tunes.
Reservations are still being ac-
cepted for $1,000 Patrons whose
gifts underwrite the program.
Patrons will be entertained at a
cocktail reception and dinner with
Mr. Hope immediately preceding
the performance.
Other major gift categories are
Concert Masters at $500 per cou-
ple, First Chairs at $250 per cou-
ple, with the major portion of
these contributions being tax-
deductible. Donor tickets at $50
per person also can be obtained.
All gift category tickets are
available now and priority seats
will be assigned through the FAU
Foundation, Florida Atlantic
University, Room 383, Ad-
ministration building, Boca
Raton, FL 33431. Checks should
be made payable to the FAU
Foundation.
MK Proposes
Legalized Prostitution
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Labor MK Ore Namir appeal-
ed for the legalization of pro-
stitution in Israel as a means
to control the spread of AIDS
and other diseases and out of
concern for the health and
welfare of prostitutes.
Namir, who chairs the
Knesset's Labor and Social
Welfare Committee, was inter-
viewed on "New Evening," a
program sponsored jointly by
Educational Television and the
Israel Defense Force Radio.
She quoted rabbinical
authorities on the recognition
of prostitution.
Namir indicated her primary
concern was over AIDS, Ac-
quired Immune Deficiency
Syndrome, which affects
primarily homosexual and
bisexual males. She noted it
has been determined that the
virus can be transmitted by
females to males, though
women do not suffer from the
invariably fatal ailment to the
same extent as men.
Recent investigations by
Israeli doctors and social
workers indicated, however,
that the incidence of the virus
is higher among women than
men and that 30 percent of
prostitutes in Israel carry the
virus. Most carriers do not
come down with the disease.
Namir said she spoke to pro-
stitutes "who, after all, are
human beings and deserve pro-
tection and rights," and
almost all of them favor licens-
ed premises from where they
could provide their services in
a sheltered, controlled en-
vironment. As long as there
are men willing to pay for
those services, there will be
prostitutes, she observed.
Namir recalled that a
Cabinet-appointed committee
several years ago recommend-
ed legalizing prostitution as a
means of controlling it. "But
as with many other committee
recommendations, the govern-
ment never had the courage to
implement the committee's
findings," she said.
Vanguard Club of UJA-
Federation and a member of
its board of directors.
An all-day meeting with
Jewish Agency and UJA of-
ficials and representatives of
the three movements is plann-
ed for Jan. 12 in New York.
The committee will then fly
to Israel in early February on a
seven-day fact-finding trip.
Members will hold discussions
with Jewish Agency officials
as well as leaders of the
Reform, Conservative, and Or-
thodox movements. They will
also visit various institutions
associated with the three
movements.
The committee will report its
findings to UJA-Federation
leadership. A follow-up
meeting will take place bet-
ween rabbis and presidents of
the three movements and UJA
leadership.
Lake Worth Jewish Center
marked the start of a major
fond raising campaign to
build its own synagogue at a
Builder's Ball held recently
at the Hyatt Palm Beaches.
The congregation, now
numbering over 600
members, has been conduc-
ting services in interim local
churches daring the three
years since its inception. The
new building will be erected
on Jog Road, just south of
Lake Worth Road. The even-
ing's pledges totalled
$350,000, with almost' half
the membership in atten-
dance. Plans for an early
start of construction are in
effect, with the hope that
facilities will be available for
the 1987 High Holy Days. The
honored speaker was Rabbi
Benjamin C. Kreitman,
(above), Executive Vice
President of the United
Synagogue of America. Rab-
bi Richard K. Rocklin,
spiritual leader of the Con-
servative synagogue, temple
President, Murray Milrod;
Vice President, Philip
Goldklang and building
Chairman and Co-Chairman,
Clifford Storch and Louis
Marks also addressed the
gathering.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Satur-
day 9 a.m.
CENTRAL CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE: Services held
Friday 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 9:30 a.m. at the Jewish Communi-
ty Day School, 5801 Parker Avenue, West Palm Beach 33405.
Mailing address: 500 Australian Avenue, Suite 402, West Palm
Beach FL 33401. Phone 655-6503. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Can-
tor Howard Bender.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. Evening services 6:30 p.m. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Mincha followed by Sholosh
Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services Monday and Thursday, 8:15 a,m.
Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 29%, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:15 a.m. and 5:45 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1692 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Saturday morning 10
a.m. Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5849
Okeechobee Blvd., No. 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33417. Phone
471-1526.
T


Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Syn
ill
e News
BOYNTON BEACH
JEWISH CENTER
"Beth Kodesh" presents its
first Cultural Program "Two
Artists in Recital," Robert
Marrinoff, lyric tenor and
Harry Love, violinist. The con-
cert will take place on Sunday,
Jan. 18. Information and
tickets may be obtained by
contacting the temple office.
CONGREGATION
BETH ABRAHAM
On Friday, Jan. 2, the
Treasure Coast Jewish
Center/Congregation Beth
Abraham installed its new of-
ficers and members of the
Board of Trustees for 1987.
The officers are Albert
Ugelow, President; Dr. David
Bright, First Vice President;
Victor Rappaport, Second
Vice President; Gene Goldin,
Treasurer; Robert Klatch,
Financial Secretary and Karen
Cotler, Recording Secretary.
The new members of the
Board are Rhonda Cooper,
Stephen Lewen, Charles
Steinberg and Jocelyn
Zuchman. The outgoing Presi-
dent Dr. Arthur Young served
as the installing officer.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Installation of Officers will
be held on Friday, Jan. 9 at
8:15 p.m. with Rabbi Richard
K. Rocklin officiating, at 6513
Dillman Road.
Single's Breakfast Meeting
will be held at the Beach Sav-
ings and Loan (formerly
Sunrise) on Sunday, Jan. 11 at
9:30 a.m.
Men's Club Breakfast
Meeting will be held at the
Beach Savings and Loan
(formerly Sunrise) on Sunday,
Jan. 11 at 9:30 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
On Friday, Jan. 9 the Tem-
ple will celebrate Family Night
I Shabbat Service, conducted by
Rabbi Howard Shapiro with
the Young Singles par-
Iticipating in the service. Can-
Itor Peter Taormina will lead
I the congregation in songs.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
I During the evening child care
Iwill be provided. Everyone is
|invited.
TEMPLE JUDEA
David Juratovac will
|observe his Bar Mitzvah at the
Temple Sabbath Services, Fri-
day, Jan. 9 at 8 p.m. Rabbi Joel
-evine and Cantor Anne
Deaths
|>AVIS
Irene, of Lake Worth. Lrvitt-Weinstein
guaranteed Security Plan. West Palm
peach.
pOLDBERG
I I. of (Vntury Village, West Palm
arh Levitt-Weinntein Guaranteed
Plan, West Palm Beach
fOLDSTEIN
R l i Palm Beach. 1
larai untv Plan
I 1'itlm Be.
PODMAN
West Palm Beach. Menorah
era] ChapsJa, West Palm
| IS
' Village. West Palm
' I Palm Bm
Newman will officiate at ser- Drive
vices held at St. Catherine's r
Cultural Center, the corner of tJt'iT'!; ,nforma?on about
Southern Blvd. and Flagler mple Judea' cal1 the offirp
Bar Mitzvah
DAVID JURATOVAC
David Juratovac, son of Mr.
Frank R. Juratovac and Mrs
Debbra Alms of West Palm
Beach, will become a Bar Mitz-
vah on Friday evening, Jan. 9
at Temple Judea. Rabbi Joel
Levine will officiate.
David, an eighth grade stu-
dent at Palm Beach Public, en-
joys football, baseball and ten-
nis. He attends Midrasha-
Judaica High School.
David is twinning his Bar
Mitzvah with Markel Mitzieva
of the Soviet Union to
highlight the plight of Soviet
Jewry.
Candle lighting Time
f*P^b Jan. 9 5:29 p.m.
Holland Helps Israel
Counter Epidemic
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
emergency consignment of
10,000 units of flu vaccine ar-
rived here from The
Netherlands and was approved
by the Health Ministry. It is
being distributed to phar-
macies all over the country.
JCT Project Combats World Hunger
NEW YORK (JTA) In
an international effort to com-
bat world hunger, Prof. Meier
Schwarz of the Jerusalem Col-
lege of Technology (JCT) is in
Peru working on a project he
developed in Israel which is be-
ing funded by the United
States, according to JCT presi-
dent, Prof. Zvi Weinberger.
Schwarz is exploring ways to
grow food in the arid regions
of the world where both arable
land and fresh water are in
short supply and crops have
never been grown before. The
project is officially listed by
the State Department as U.S.
Agency for International
Development Project CS-325,
"Growing Commercial Crops
Under High Saline Conditions
Using Advanced Sand Culture
Methods."
The new system developed
by JCT of growing crops in
sand using brackish or saline
water previously thought
unusable for growing
anything, offers a way to
counter the threat of large-
scale famine, Weinberger said.
That threat is especially real in
the Third World nations of
Africa, Asia and Latin
America where the problem of
feeding ever-growing popula-
tions grows more acute every
day, he observed.
The new technique is being
used to grow crops of
tomatoes, lettuce and
cucumbers at the Universidad
National Agraria Campus, 14
kilometers east of Lima and
the Pacific Ocean where the the
soil is sandy and where no rain
Idu
falls at all during the year. The
project is under the direction
of JCT Prof. Meier Schwarz in
conjunction with a Peruvian
staff headed by Dr. Salomon
Helfgott Lerner.
The technique of growing
crops in sand with saline
(relatively salty) water grew
out of extensive work in
hydroponics. Hydroponics is
the science of growing plants
without soil, in an inert
medium such as gravel, and
supplying them with a
chemical nutrient solution.
Moving from hydroponics in
the laboratory to growing
plants in sand was a logical
next step, according to
Schwarz.
Growing plants in saline
water imposes a strain on
them, causing them to grow
more slowly and with smaller
yields. The main stumbling
block has been getting the
plant to channel less of its
energy into the root system
and more into building up
photosynthesis tissue and pro-
ducing the yield product.
JCT researchers have found
that by carefully monitoring
and controlling the flow of the
saline water according to
precise formulas during the
various growing stages of the
plants, this problem can be
overcome and the plants made
to produce satisfactory yields.
By successfully exploiting
planet's abundant
resources of sand and saline
waters, new, previously
uninhabited areas of the world
could became available for set-
tlement, Schwarz noted.
Established settlements in
such areas would gain new
sources of food and new
sources of income from selling
their surplus.
Israel is in the grip of an
Asian flu epidemic, a par-
ticularly virulent strain of
Taiwan and Singapore flu
which claimed 89 lives in the
last two weeks of November
and has put thousands on the
sick list.
The local supply of vaccine
has run out. The imported am-
pules are expected to sell out
in a few hours. The Health
Ministry wants to restrict
them to the high-risk groups
young children and elderly
persons suffering from chronic
ailments. The Dutch-made vac-
cine sells for 21 Shekels ($14) a
dose, double the cost of a
French-made vaccine against
the normal strain of flu. New
stocks of the latter are due
here.
THE JEWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
urges you to
Join The Synagogue
Of Your Choice
... because vital Jewish Institutions
build strong Jewish communities.
Jewish Underground
Member Sentenced
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ira
Rappoport was sentenced to
30 months in prison and bound
over for an additional 18 mon-
ths by a Jerusalem District
Court. The Gush Emunim
emissary, who returned to
Israel from the U.S. last
month to face charges stemm-
ing from his membership in a
Jewish terrorist underground,
told the court, "Prison in
Israel is better than life
abroad. Living abroad is the
real prison."
The American-born Rap-
poport was convicted of
belonging to a terrorist group
and participating in the car
bomb attack that crippled
former Nablus Mayor Bassam
Shaka in June, 1980. The pro-
secution had demanded a
three-year jail sentence plus a
two-year suspended sentence.
But the court decided other-
wise because Rappoport had
returned to Israel voluntarily.
WINTER SEASON
PRE-NEED SPECIAL
TWO GRAVES
$300
Including Perpetual Care
Offer Limited To Dec. 1,1986
Thru January 31, 1987 Only
Act now and save on these
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9321 Memorial Park Road
7'A Miles West of 1-95 via Northlake Blvd. Exit
Cemeteries Funeral Chapels Mausoleum Pre-Need Planning


Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Same great taste
in an exciting new pack.
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer, Heart Disease.
Emphysema, And May Complicate Pregnancy.
9 mg. "tar". 0.7 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.
* ?


Full Text
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, January 9, 1987
Most Significant Impact
On Jews During 1986
Terrorism
Four of the ten events that had the most significant im-
pact on Jews during 1986 were connected with interna-
tional terrorism, according to Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
They were the massacre of 21 Jews in an Istanbul
synagogue, Britain's breaking-off of diplomatic relations
wiht Syria because of that nation's involvement in ter-
rorism, the American bombing of Libya and the U.S. sale of
arms to "terrorist" Iran.
According to Perlmutter, "if (the bombing of) Libya
represented American resolve that we will not be in-
timidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to 'terrorist' Iran
was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a retrieving
virtue in trading arms for hostages it was the indignant
reaction of the American people a reaction so strog as to
render less likely renewed American genuflection to
terrorists."
Perlmutter's list of the most significant events of 1986
follows:
1. The massacre of 21 Jews in the Istanbul synagogue by
Arab terrroists. It underscored, as if underscoring were
needed, the lie that Arab terrorism is really anti-Israel and
not anti-Semitic. And the inane responses, including
former President Jimmy Carter's that the reason for the
blood splattered walls of the synagogue and for its jaggedly
torn bodies was "lack of progress in the Middle East."
2. Relatedly, the exposure of the Syrian connection to
terrorism in London, in Rome, in West Berlin. The
significance here is not so much in the bloodiness of Syria's
hands as in Great Britain's immediate breaking of relations
with Syria. Britain, once again, role model.
3. The United States' bombing of Libya. Terrorism has
ever been more vulnerable to retaliation than to a deplor-
ing editorial.
4. And if Libya represented American resolve that we wil
not be intimidated by terrorism, the sale of arms to terr-
roist Iran was a monumental misjudgement. If there was a
retrieving virtue in trading arms for hostages it was the in-
dignant reaction of the American people a reaction so
strong as to render less likely renewed American genuflec-
tion to terrorists.
5. Pope John Paul II's visit to the Central Synagogue in
Rome. A long, oh so long journey, some 2000 years in the
traveling. It was a reminder of the long darkness in
Catholic-Jewish relations past, and a promise of a poten-
tially warmly lit future.
6. The release of Natan Sharansky and the Nobel Peace
Prize to Eli Wiesel. Sharansky, because no matter the
Soviet cage remains bolted shut, his courage, his dignity
and his political acumen are inspiration for prisoners of
conscience the world over. Wiesel, because his Jewish
values are a reflection of Judaism's most cherished
teachings, and because be himself is a great teacher.
Humanity walks taller because there is a Sharansky,
because there is a Wiesel.
7. The shame of Waldheim. Not so much because the
President of Austria is a revealed liar; the real shame of
Waldheim is that no matter he is a liar and on such a sub-
ject! a majority of his countrymen simply didn't care
enough. They voted the Nazi liar their approbation.
Waldheim shamed, the Austrian electorate shamed.
8. In March, two Lyndon LaRouche candidates prevailed
in the Illinois Party primaries. Heady with victory,
LaRouche fielded 234 candidates in state primaries. Only
13 managed to make it to the November elections. All
each and every one of them were defeated. The lesson?
That the American people, when the facts are given them,
reject bigotry. And significantly, that the LaRouchites, on
stage, in the spotlight, are their own most effective
prosecutors.
9. The sentencing of ten members of the Nazi-like group
known as The Order. The Justice Department's vigorous
prosecution of hate-activists stands as an unmistakable
warning to neo-Nazis that bigotry inspired crimes will no
be tolerated. Will, instead, be vigorously prosecuted.
10. The new set of emigration rules announced in
November by the Soviet Union. They augur even fewer exit
visas for those seeking freedom. Through November, 1986
only 873 Jews were permitted to leave, a fraction of the
400,000 seeking to breathe free. Gorbachev releases a
Sharansky, and Orlov, loosens the leash on a Sakharov, a
Bonner, and basks in his "public relations" victories. But
the hundreds of thousands who are not celebrities, do not
make headlines, but continue to molder in the Communist
prison-state they are the real measure of his character.
,
Looking Out For The Jewish
Agenda In Tallahassee
By LOUISE ROSS
As the new government af-
fairs consultant to the Florida
Association of Jewish Federa-
tions, Bernie Friedman will be
looking out for the Jewish
community's interests in
Tallahassee.
After addressing a recent
meeting of the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, he stopped into
the Federation's Communica-
tions' office to discuss how he
helps this community. Mr.
Friedman began discussing his
new position by heaping praise
on his predecessor.
"The government affairs
program was established four
years ago under the leadership
of Elaine Bloom who was
recently re-elected back to the
Florida legislature as a State
Representative from Miami
Beach. For the last four years,
Elaine has been a vibrant force
for the Jewish agenda in
Tallahassee."
This youthful attorney, who
has worked for the last five
years for Congressman Larry
Smith as his campaign
manager and chief of staff, will
be focusing his energies on the
Jewish agenda in Tallahassee.
"The issues of the Jewish com-
munity are multi-faceted,
geared to compassion and car-
ing for those who can't afford
the basic necessities of life,"
he said. "Jewish Federations
are becoming full service social
Bernie Friedman
service agencies providing
care for the elderly, meals on
wheels, Jewish education,,
Jewish Community Center
programs, nursing home
facilities, and much more. As
social service agencies,
Federations need to advocate
in the state capitol for funding
for these human service
delivery programs."
According to Mr. Friedman,
there is always the danger of
losing these state and federal
funds. "The federal govern-
ment has basically abdicated,
to a certain extent, the in-
itiative in the area of social
service programs. Through
block grants, it has given the
states authority to fund local
programs so that the state
capitol is really where deci-
sions are made as to which pro-
grams are funded. Basically
the federal government is pro-
viding the money and the state
is administrating its
programs."
The funding crisis in the
government trickles down to
many local programs. Mr.
Friedman noted that the pro^
blems of the elderly in South
Florida are becoming more
and more significant in the last
five or six years as we are
becoming a graying population
with the migration of the
elderly into this area. "The in-
frastructure is not completely
in place to take care of our ag-
ed. Florida has a tremendous
amount of problems. For being
the third fastest growing
state, it is one of the lowest tax
states. It is sort of ironic," he
said.
Mr. Friedman stressed that
the local community must
become active in letting their
legislators know what their
agenda is. "As the local com-
munity is incredibly active in
the pro-Israel fight in
Washington and directly in-
volved in the political process
there, they must realize that
there is a battle in Tallahassee
that also needs to be address-
ed. At the same time, they
need to focus attention on the
Continued on Page 15
Rescuer Comes Out Of The Shadows
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) A man
who has secretly worked to
rescue Jews from lands of
persecution for more than 40
years has finally come out of
the shadows.
Shaike Dan, 76, is the sub-
ject of a six-hour television
documentary to be screened in
Israel on this year's In-
dependence Day. In it, he will
be honored by many of those
he brought to the safety of
Eretz Yisrael and by Israeli
leaders, including some of the
people who worked alongside
him.
Recently, a group of leading
British Jews were shown ex-
tracts of the program at a
special preview at the home of
the Israeli Ambassador in Lon-
don, Yehuda Avner. It was at-
tended by Dan himself and his
wife Eva, a member of an il-
legal aliya transport he
organized from Yugoslavia in
1946.
Dan, a tall, white-haired man
with a wry sense of humor,
emerges as a person of great
determination for whom help-
ing a single Jew to reach Israel
is as important as helnine
1,000.
Among those who pay
tribute to his work are Tony
Simonds, former commander
of M19, the British intelligence
unit in Cairo which organized
the escape of Allied prisoners
from Nazi-occupied Europe;
former parachutist Reuven
Dafne, assistant director of
Yad Vashem; former Premier
Shimon Peres; former Presi-
dent Yitzhak Navon and
Knesset member Yitzhak
Artei.
The program is entitled
"Blind Jump," a reference to
Dan's exploits as one of the 26
Jews from Palestine
parachuted into Nazi-occupied
Europe in the midst of World
War II. Several lost their lives
in this highly risky operation,
including two women Hanna
Senesh and Haviva Reik.
Their mission, organized by
British intelligence, was to
organize escape routes for cap-
tured British and American
pilots from occupied Europe.
But they also made contact
with Jewish community
leaders and other anti-German
forces.
In the program, Simonds
says that the parachutists had
only a 10 percent chance of
themselves escaping capture
by the Nazis. They were dou-
ble heroes, he says: if caught
they could be shot twice as
Continued on Page 7
It's A New Year
Start A New Career!
Start off on the right track by attending the Job Seminar.
Topics include: marketing yourself, the hidden job market, and
learning employability skills.
The seminar will be held from 10:00 a.m.-12 noon, at Jewish
Family and Children's Service, 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 104. West Palm Beach, on Jan. 12.
For pre-registration, contact Carol Barack, MA, Director of
Vocational Service, at 684-1991.
the
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FILES


Friday, January 9, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Preserving Tradition: Yemenite Wedding Customs
By CAROL GREEN
One of the sadder byproducts of
the process of modernization is
the standardization of modern life
and ritual. Take the wedding, for
example; all too often today's
Jewish bride walks down the aisle
to the strains of the traditional
wedding march in a ceremony her
grandmother would certainly
have frowned upon.
In Israel, however, the process
of modernization has taken a bit
longer and, as a result, much of
the old flavor remains. For
Israelis, especially those who
trace their roots to Arabic or
Levantine countries, weddings
are a time for "something old,"
though that "something old" is
more likely to be a veiled
Yemenite kaftan than a veil of an-
tique Belgian lace.
"Weddings are really the only
time we take out our traditional
clothing and sing songs from the
old country," explains Yemenite
community leader Naomi Sharabi.
SHARABI, who comes from an
ancient Yemenite family her
family on her father's side can
trace itself to the period of the
Talmud is a Yemenite culture
afficionado, Singlehandedly, she
founded and directs Ezrat Avot, a
cultural and community center
serving the Yemenite community
of Jerusalem. She has plans to add
a museum of Yemenite culture
and art to the center, including an
exhibit on Yemenite wedding
customs.
These days, Sharabi explains,
most Yemenites marry in typical
Israeli style. The real highlight of
the Yemenite wedding celebration
takes place the night before the
wedding, after the bride has gone
to the mikvah or ritual bath to
purify herself. This evening is call-
ed the henna because of the
special red dye that is prepared
and applied to the palms of the
hands and soles of the feet of the
bride and female guests at the
ceremony.
"It is considered to give protec-
tion from the 'evil eye,' explains
Sharabi. The dye, which is made
from ground up leaves of the
Hawsonia alba plant, was known
throughout the ancient world for
its healing qualities. Maimonides
recognized its value and prescrib-
ed it as a cure for excema. "Ac-
tually, variations of the henna
ceremony are performed
throughout the Middle East by
Arabs as well as Jews," adds
Sharabi.
IN YEMEN, the reddish dye
was applied to the bride's hands
and face in decorative patterns.
A large
percentage of the
younger
generation
marry non-
Yemenites and,
inevitably, their
children feel even
less of a
connection to the
Yemenite
tradition, but
many are also
returning to
their roots and
once again
coming to
appreciate the
beauty of their
culture.
So coveted was the privilege of
dyeing the bride that a notable
woman of the community would
pay for this honor with a gift to
the young couple. Today, the most
revered and pious of the older
female relatives applies the dye to
the bride's palm. "The hands and
face, however, are no longer
decorated," says Sharabi.
On henna night, both bride and
groom don the garb of Yemenite
royalty. For the bride, this is a
Jalayeh or silk kaftan em-
broidered with gold threads on
which are hung gold coins and
other ornaments. Among the or-
naments, small pomegranates are
hung, traditional symbols of fer-
tility, as well as coins and other
trinkets arranged in groups of
threes, fives and sevens, all
numbers with kabbalistic
significance. Beneath her robe,
the bride wears pantaloons which
are also decorated with gold coins.
In Yemen, the coins were the
bride's dowry, though in Israel
they are purely decorative.
To match her gown, the bride
wears an elaborate headdress. In
wealthier families, this headdress
would contain mother of pearl in-
lays and precious metals, explains
Sharabi. The groom dons a
galabiya, or gold embroidered kaf-
tan, the garment of the kings of
Yemen. In traditional Yemenite
henna ceremonies, the bride and
groom are kept separated from
each other. In modern Israel,
however, the separation is less
strictly enforced, and the groom is
often present as a guest at the
henna ceremony.
The young couple are serenaded
with songs in Yemenite, and an-
cient Judeo-Arabic dialect combin-
ing elements of Arabic, Aramaic
and Hebrew. Interestingly, the
songs do not celebrate the beauty
of the bride but warn the couple
that they face a difficult road
ahead of them. "The songs don't
say your life will be as happy as it
is now. They say you can expect to
have difficulties, but they can
work it out," explained Sharabi.
IN ACCORDANCE with
Jewish law, the male and female
guests separate for singing and
dancing of intricate Yemenite folk
dances, which are performed to
the accompaniment of a Yemenite
style mandolin and a steel drum.
Sometimes guests perform these
dances with lighted cakes on their
heads for the bride's
entertainment.
A large percentage of the
younger generation marry non-
Yemenites and, inevitably, their
children feel even less of a connec-
tion to the Yemenite tradition, but
many are also returning to their
roots and once again coming to
appreciate the beauty of their
culture.
A Sephardi ketvba (marriage contract).
Jews Must Better Address Drug Abuse,
Says Rabbi/Psychiatrist
By BEN GALLOB
A Hasidic rabbi and psychiatrist
asserts that, "if anything," Jews
are "over represented in
substance abuse." Rabbi
Abraham Twerski, medical direc-
tor of the Gateway Rehabilitation
Center in Alquippa, Pa., recently
told a Newton, Mass., synagogue
audience that alcohol and drug ad-
diction commonly afflict
American Jews, according to the
Jewish Advocate of Boston.
He said the Jewish community
must acknowledge "this truth"
and act on it. Twerski, who was
ordained in 1951, began studies in
psychiatry when he observed that
Jews in trouble sought counseling
from psychiatrists rather than
rabbis.
ALONG WITH marijuana,
New Feature Film Looks At An
Israeli Intermarriage Problem
By MARGIE OLSTER
Moshe Mizrachi has returned to
Israel after a 10-year hiatus to
write and direct a new film about
a traditional Sephardic family in
Jerusalem facing intermarriage
during the British mandate.
Mizrachi, the Oscar-winning
Israeli director who has spent the
past 10 years making movies in
Paris, based the plot of "Every
Time We Say Goodbye" on a per-
sonal recollection of an event in
his own family.
The film, starring Tom
("Nothing in Common,"
"Splash") Hanks and Cristina
Marsillach, a well-known Spanish
actress, was filmed entirely in
Jerusalem. Hanks plays an
American pilot in World War II,
David Bradford, who has
volunteered for the British Royal
Army and is recovering from an
injury in Jerusalem and awaiting
further orders.
In the meantime, Hanks' non-
Jewish squadron leader, played by
British actor Benedict Taylor,
plans to wed a young, traditional,
Sephardic Jewish girl, Victoria,
played by Israeli actress Anat
("Lemon Popsicle") Atzmon.
VICTORIA INTRODUCES her
friend Sarah (Marsillach) to
David, and the two fall in love
against a "Romeo and Juliet"
background. Sarah must choose
between the love of her closely-
knit and staunchly traditional
Sephardic family, and her roman-
tic love with the non-Jewish
soldier.
Producer Sharon Harel. who
also produced "HaLahaka" (The
Troupe) and several other Israeli
films, said Mizrachi came to her
two years ago with his simple but
moving story, and she asked him
to write a script based on it. "It
took him 20 years to do it. He car-
ried the pain in his life of how this
woman was tortured," Harel said.
The story is based loosely, ac-
cording to Harel, on a similar
drama that happened to one of
Mizrachi's aunts who lived in his
family's home when he was a
young boy. Harel would not say if
the movie and the real life event
had the same outcome.
Harel, the daughter od Yossi
Harel, commander of the ship Ex-
odus, said she was personally
fascinated by the script because
she is the daughter of an
American mother and an Israeli
father. But beyond that, Harel
said the film tackles a prevalent
social problem during the British
Continued on Page 16-
The rabbi said
the Jewish
community must
acknowledge
"this truth" and
act on it.
Twerski, who
was ordained in
1951, began
studies in
psychiatry when
he observed that
Jews in trouble
sought
counseling from
psychiatrists
rather than
rabbis.
alcohol and cocaine, Twerski
listed numerous prescription
drugs in medicine chests in Jewish
homes which he said are abused
daily. He declared that the only
time to take a drug is during il-
lness. He said "coming home from
work tense is not sick. The only
people who are not tense are
dead." He urged Jews to find
natural ways to relax.
The Gateway Center offers a
drug and detoxification program.
It provides kosher diet for pa-
tients who ask for it.
Twerski said that low self-
esteem characterizes substance
abusers, and that this Is common
in Jewish families, where guilt
often exists and tends to create
feelings of inadequacy. Such feel-
ings are usually unjustified he
noted, because the guilt-ridden
often are intelligent and likeable.
Many of his listeners were
alcoholics, drug addicts or com-
pulsive overeaters. Most, it was
reported, were getting help in
Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics
Anonymous or Overeaters
Anonymous, programs which
Twerski said he supported as safe
for Jews. Many listeners also
belonged to the Boston chapter of
Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically
Dependent Persons and Signifi-
cant Others (JACS), which spon-
sored the rabbi's talk.
HE URGED his listeners to let
their rabbis know that sermons on
alcoholism and other drug addic-
tion were welcome and to place
notices in their synagogue
bulletins giving information on
the rehabilitation programs for
alcoholics and addicts in the
Greater Boston area.
In a talk the previous day, Twer-
ski urged an assembly of Boston
i<~ois to discuss alcoholism and
addiction from their pulpits and
open their synagogues to self-help
groups.
Jeff Neipris of Boston, vice
president of JACS and editor of
the organization's journal, said
that support for such programs
was improving in the Boston
Jewish community. Twerski, in
his synagogue talk, said that ad-
diction is often handled badly in
the Jewish community.
Neipris said that the Boston
JACS chapter was receiving funds
from the Combined Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Boston and
that he hoped to see a substance
abuse education program
established for Jews in the Boston
area.