The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00053

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BiACH
COUNTY
thejewish floridian
^^F W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 12 NUMBER 37
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28,1986
PRICE 35 CENTS

Shamir Mum On Israel's
Role In Arms Sale To Iran
Barbara Gordon Green
Theodore Bikel
Green To Chair
'Celebration 25'
Bikel To Perform
Barbara Gordon Green, pro-
minent community leader, has
been named to chair 'Celebra-
tion 26' commemorating the
25th Anniversary of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and the kickoff
of the 1987 Jewish Federation-
United Jewish Appeal Cam-
paign. The event will be held
on Sunday, Dec. 14,11 a.m., at
The Breakers.
The announcement was
made by Erwin H. Blonder,
Federation President, who
said, "Mrs. Green has been a
most involved and committed
leader of our community for
many of our 25 years.
Together with her dedicated
committee, she is planning a
most fitting tribute to Federa-
tion's quarter-century of ser-
vice to our community and an
inspiring kickoff for our 1987
Campaign."
The participants will travel
through a time tunnel to relive
the major historical events of
local, national and interna-
tional interest to the Jewish
community. All the past
Presidents of the Jewish
Federation will be highlighted
as part of this historical ex-
hibit. After lunch a short video
presentation featuring
Federation's 25 years of ser-
Inside
Brandeis Consultant Helps
Demographic Study
Committee Formulate
Questions... page 7
Cotillion Founders
Recipient of ADL Award...
page 9
Soviet Jewry Sabbath To
Be Held... page 19
vice to the Jewish community
wiU be shown.
Mrs. Green, in announcing
that actor and folk-singer
Theodore Bikel, will be the
special guest performer at the
celebration, said, "It's an ex-
traordinary experience to be
part of a special milestone in
our history and all of us who
are working on it are filled
with a sense of pride. Twenty
five years of developing a care
and concern for Jews and
Israel will be reflected in
'Celebration 25.'
"We are honored to welcome
Theodore Bikel to our com-
munity once again. He com-
bines his remarkable talent
and success with his deep com-
mitment for Jewish ethics and
values. He, like Federation,
has a sense of responsibility
for the Jewish people and
works continuously for their
betterment."
Born in Vienna, Mr. Bikel
was 13 when he and his
parents left Austria for
Palestine. In 1943 he joined
the internationally famous
Habimah Theatre which he left
a year later to help found the
Israel Chamber Theatre. He
went on to star in many stage
and screen productions among
them "The African Queen,"
*'My Fair Lady" and "The De-
fiant Ones." He has starred in
virtually every top dramatic
show on television and has
repeatedly been nominated for
"Emmy" awards.
Now one of the world's best-
known folk singers, he main-
tains an active schedule ap-
pearing in concerts throughout
the United States and abroad.
Among his recent recordings
is "Silent No More," the
freedom songs of Soviet Jews
CoHtinmcd oa Page 7-
By HUGH 0R6EL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir refus-
ed last Thursday to confirm or
deny widespread reports that
Israel served as a "conduit"
for the shipment of American
arms to Iran. It "has never
been, and is still not, Israel's
policy to disclose anything
about arms sales to other coun-
tries," he said in reply to ques-
tions at a Foreign Press
Association luncheon at the
King David Hotel in
Jerusalem.
He said President Reagan,
in a nationally televised press
conference Wednesday night
had not mentioned Israel as
the "conduit" and he did not
want to "contradict anything
that President Reagan said."
But Reagan contradicted
himself after the press con-
ference. Asked by a reporter
to "explain" a reported
"Israeli role" in a 1985 arms
shipment to Iran and reports
that Israel had suggested his
Administration make contact
with the Tehran regime, the
President replied, "We, as I
say, have nothing to do with
other countries or their
shipments."
Shortly after the press con-
ference, White House aides
issued an amending statement
in the President's name that,
in fact "there was a third coun-
try involved in our secret pro-
ject with Iran." The country
was not named.
But both John Poindexter,
the President's National
Security Adviser, and Donald
Regan, While House Chief of
Staff, conceded that the U.S.
had approved at least one
secret shipment of arms from
Israel to facilitate the release
of American hostages held by
pro-Iranian groups in
Lebanon.
Queried about reports of a
worsening situation for Jews
in Iran, Shamir said Israel was
concerned and would do
everything to help. At the
same time, he said, Israel
Radio was "correct" in playing
down alarmist reports, and
Continued oa Page 14
Yitzhak Shamir
Clashes Continue In Old City
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) r
Tensions remain high in
Jerusalem as 1,000 Jews turn-
ed a memorial march last Sun-
day for a slain Jewish yeshiva
student into an angry
demonstration that almost
turned into a riot. Several
Arab shops in the Old City
were damaged as marchers
burst through the Damascus
gate.
At the regular weekly ses-
sion of the Cabinet, Police
Commissioner David Kraus
said that members of Rabbi
Meir Kahane's Kach move-
ment have been inciting Jews
all week in the Old City. He
also accused students at the
Shumu Banim school of pro-
voking their Arab neighbors.
Meanwhile, Knesset member
Ran Cohen of the Civil Rights
Movement (CRM) was severe-
ly beaten and stoned by
religious zealots last Thursday
on his way to pay a condolence
call on the family of Eliahu
Amdi, the yeshiva student
fatally stabbed by Arabs in the
Moslem quarter of the Old
City.
The attack on Cohen and
continuing anti-Arab violence
Continued on Pare 10
MEET SHULA! Her home is Moshav Ein Yahav, a settlement of 100 families
right up against the Jordan border, between Beersheba and Eilat. The desert
sun is hot, but Shula and her neighbors work hard, and grow tomatoes,
melons, eggplants, onions, watermelons, grapes and red peppers. They
utilize drip irrigation, geothermal water, even the brackish aquifer under
the desert, with methods pioneered by the Jewish Agency mainly with funds
contributed through the Jewish Federation-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
I
1
I
Women's Division In 1965-1966
Looking Back
25 Years of Local
Jewish Federation History
Twenty-four years later, in 1962, under the leadership of
Morton Silberman, the newly elected President, the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County began. Look back with us,
in successive issues of the Jewish Floridian, upon 25 years
of local Federation history a history rich in people work-
ing together to meet the needs of a growing Jewish
community.
Forty-eight years ago a handful of dedicated, energetic
and farsighted people began an undertaking that would
ultimately become the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. It was a time when anyone who was Jewish in West
Palm Beach knew every other Jew. The year was 19S8, when
the Federated Jewish Charities of Palm Beach County was
born.
1966
Robert S. Levy serves as Federation President.
Sylvia Lewis heads Women's Division.
Jewish population reported to be 1,100 families as per-
manent residents and approximately 600 families con-
sidered as families or individuals with a seasonal residency
in the Palm Beach area.
First community-wide Campaign dinner held at Palm
Beach Towers with Rabbi Irving Lehrman of Miami as
guest speaker.
Board selects I. Edward (Bim) Adler for position of Ex-
ecutive Director.
Campaign totals $100,000.
The first community-wide Campaign event is held at the
Palm Beach Towers. Some of the members of the com-
munity in attendance are (left to right) Morton Silber-
man, Ceil and Robert Levy and Carol and Hy Roberts.
By LOUISE ROSS
The formative years of the
Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County were
characterized by a growing
consciousness of the role of
women in the Jewish com-
munity and an expanding new
organization. Until the year
1968, "chairman" meant
either presiding over the en-
tire Women's Division and/or
chairing a fund-raising event.
Women's Division was known
then as the Federation of
Jewish Women as it included
all the presidents of the other
women s organizations in
=J town.
During this time when
Women's Division was beginn-
ing to form the organizational
structure that is more familiar
today, Carol Roberts in 1965
and Sylvia Lewis in 1966
helped shape its destiny. Both
women have fond memories of
those years when every Jew
knew each other.
"It was a close knit com-
munity," remembered Mrs.
Roberts. Mrs. Lewis noted
that "women interested in the
Jewish community attended
meetings of all organizations
since there were so few
B'nai B'rith Women,
Hadassah, Sisterhoods, and
Women's Division. I would br-
ing the message of Women's
Division to the other organiza-
tions. Many were against the
concept and thought we were
creating another competing
group. I told them that there
could never be enough
organizations for any cause
that helped Israel and the
Jewish people."
"At that time," stated Mrs.
Roberts, "women recognized
that by giving their own con-
tribution to the Federation-
UJA Campaign through
Women's Division, they
acknowledged their respon-
sibility to the Jewish communi-
ty. This new commitment
grew out of their concept of
tzdakeh learned at home."
It was through Mrs.
Roberts' persistence that she
became involved in the Jewish
community here. "When I
came to town at the age of 18,
my husband was invited to a
FJC meeting at George
Greenberg's father's home. I
went with my husband but was
shocked when I was told that
women were not permitted at
their meetings and was asked
to wait in the other room. The
next month I again went to the
meeting with my husband, but
when I was asked to leave, I
said no. They didn't know
what to do so I just continued
attending. Subsequently I
served on the Federation
Board as well as with
Women's Division.
Mrs. Roberts, who also
became for a time editor of the
Federation Reporter, a mon-
thly newsletter, said that her
volunteer experience gave her
the background to do what she
is doing now on the County
Commission.
Sylvia Lewis began her in-
volvement in Federation in the
early 1950's when she and her
husband owned and operated
the Jewel Box on Clematis
Street in downtown West
Palm Beach. "I was asked to
solicit the merchants on the
street and was,the first woman
to serve in this capacity."
One Women'8 Division Cam-
paign event stands out in Mrs.
Lewis' mind as Elie Weisel
An early Women's Division meeting at Temple Israel Library.
was the guest speaker. "It was
the first Women's Division
luncheon at the old George
Washington Hotel which is
now the Helen Wilkes
Residence Hotel. There were
65 women present who paid $5
each for the luncheon. We
were proud that we raised
$3,500 at that event.
"Elie Wiesel had a hard time
getting his message out. The
horrors of the Holocaust were
still locked within him. After
his speech, the women crowd-
ed around him. I remember
that he was quite shy and over-
whelmed by his reception."
So many women who were
active in the Jewish communi-
ty in its early years have con-
tinued their interest and in-
volvement to this day. And so
it is with Carol Roberts and
Sylvia Lewis who helped guide
Women's Division in its for-
mative years.
Highlights
Carol Roberts was
recently elected as a Palm
Beach County Commis-
sioner. She has served on
the West Palm Beach City
Commission for eight
years having first been
elected in 1975. She serv-
ed as Vice Mayor in 1976
and 1984 and Mayor in
1985. She is a past Vice
Chairman of the Palm
Beach County Solid Waste
Authority. Mrs. Roberts is
a founder of the Jewish
Community Day School
and a past President of the
Palm Beach County
Chapter of Hadassah as
well as a past Vice Presi-
dent of Florida Atlantic
Region.
Sylvia Lewis is current-
ly the Director of Federa-
tion's Boynton Beach
Branch Office. A resident
of West Palm Beach since
1947, she has been active
in Federation as a
volunteer since the 1950's.
She is a past Board
Member of Federation and
Women's Division and a
past President of Mitzvah
Council, B'nai B'rith
Women. She was Director
of the first ADL office in
West Palm Beach.
U.S. To Israel:
Drop Lavi and Bolster Navy
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) U.S.
Deputy Undersecretary of
Defense Dov Zakheim believes
Israel should abandon plans to
build its second-generation jet
fighter plane, the Lavi. In-
stead, he said Israel should use
the funds, mainly U.S. military
assistance grants, to beef up
its navy with more missile
boats and submarines.
Zakheim, the Pentagon's
chief costs expert, met with
ranking Defense Ministry of-
ficials and Israel Defense
Force senior officers here last
Continued on Page 15
The Nearly New Thrift Shop
THE MORSE GERIATRIC CENTER
Visit and Discover
Distinctive Clothing
Antiques
Contemporary Furniture
Household Goods
Fine Art
Bric-A-Brac
242 South County Road
Palm Beach
655-3230
Hours 10-4:45 Mon. through Sat.
Donations are
deductible
Furniture pick-up
available
?f^Jl 0,,,Jhe Nearly New Thrl,t ShP *"" the program
of care for the elderly at the Center.


i
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Chanukah Candle Campaign To Be Part
Of Community Plea For Soviet Jewry
Terry Rapaport, Chairman
of the Soviet Jewry Task
Force of the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, and Rabbi Joel
Levine, Co-Chairman, have an-
nounced that the task force
has created a Chanukah Can-
dle Campaign to dramatically
remind the Soviet government
of the worldwide impact of
their oppression towards
Soviet Jewry.
"Members of the community
are urged to purchase boxes of
Chanukah candles at the Com-
munity Plea for Soviet Jewry
to be sent to hundreds of
refuseniks in the Soviet
Union," stated Mrs. Rapaport.
"We are hopeful that the
boxes of candles will be receiv-
ed by the refuseniks. However,
those that are not delivered
will still be handled by the cen-
sors reminding them of the
deep concern of so many Jews
worldwide."
Boxes of candles will be
available in the lobby of Tem-
ple Beth El prior to the Com-
munity Plea for Soviet Jewry
to be held on Wednesday, Dec.
10, 7:30 p.m. The rally is spon-
sored by the Soviet Jewry
Task Force with co-conveners
Hadassah and Na'Amat USA.
The Jewish Federation will
actually be sending the candles
to the refuseniks right after
the rally that have been pur-
chased by members of this
community. "Can you imagine
the refuseniks' delight in
receiving this strong message
of love and support? We are
confident that our community
will respond in great numbers
to let our Soviet brethren
know that they are not forgot-
ten" stated Rabbi Levine.
"The Chanukah Candle
Campaign will be followed up
by a Passover Matzoh Cam-
paign with the same purpose
of dramatically impacting
upon Soviet authorities the
shock and horror which is be-
ing experienced by Jews all
over the world when we hear
about story after story of
400,000 refuseniks continually
being persecuted by the Gor-
bachev government," Rabbi
Levine concluded.
For more information, con-
tact Jack Karako, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County secretaries, Patty
Kartell (left) and Stella Gabe, help pack Chanukah candles in
preparation for the Community Plea for Soviet Jewry.
Leisure And Retirement Communities
Roth To Address Educational Meeting
Sam Wadler has been ap-
pointed to chair the Leisure
and Retirement Communities
division of the 1987 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County-United Jewish Appeal
Campaign by Jeanne Levy,
General Campaign Chairman.
Since accepting the position,
he has announced that an
educational meeting will be
held for these communities on
Thursday, Dec. 4, 7 p.m., at
Kirkland Community School,
4200 Purdy Lane.
Dora Roth, a Holocaust sur-
vivor and Israeli who speaks
eloquently for Jews and Israel,
will be the guest speaker.
Douglas Kleiner, Assistant
Executive Director of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, will also ad-
dress the group.
In inviting the participation
of leisure and retirement com-
munity residents in the Educa-
tional Meeting Mr. Wadler
said, "We are very honored to
have Mrs. Roth share her
varied experiences as an
Israeli and Holocaust survivor
with us. She is a vibrant, op-
timistic person, a dynamic and
articulate speaker whose pas-
sion, eloquence and experience
tell the story of Israel."
children who now serve in the
Israel Defense Forces.
Mrs. Roth studied public
relations at the University of
depressed Israeli
neighborhoods and American
communities.
In commenting about the se-
Haifa and served as a liaison cond guest speaker, Douglas
for Project Renewal between Kleiner, Mr. Wadler said,
"Doug also is a very
knowledgeable and committed
member of the Jewish com-
munity who will be able to
enlighten us about the needs of
Jews in our own community."
Mr. Kleiner also serves as
Continued on Page 6-
Dora Roth
Mrs. Roth spent six years in
concentration camps ... three
years in various hospitals
recovering from the ravages of
brutality of Naziism. Rising
above those severe years, she
became a registered nurse and
immigrated to Israel where
she married and raised two
Action Agenda For Soviet Jewry
Soviet Jewry Sabbath
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
and SATURDAY, DEC. 6
at local synagogues
%&?
Interfaith Outcry For Soviet Jewry
TUESDAY, DEC. 9, 9 a.m.
Faith Lutheran Church
COMMUNITY PLEA FOR SOVIET JEWRY
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 10,7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth El
Children's Plea for Soviet Jewry
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 17,7 p.m.
Jewish Community Day School
For more Information concerning eny of the above events, contact
JACK KARAKO, Staff Aeeoeiata for the Soviet Jewry Task Force, at
the Jewlih Federation of Palm Beach County office, 833212a
LIMITED
TIME
OFFER!
SAVE UP TO
50%
ON INCOME TAXES
NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 31,1986
Establish an endowment fund at Federation
before TAX REFORM takes effect.
The Federation Endowment Fund helps
ensure the existence of a strong, vibrant
Jewish community.
Your fund:
...helps meet emergencies
...provides for special needs
...helps fund community services.
For more information about our endowment
programs and the benefits of making a gift to
Federation this year, contact:
ARNOLD I. SCHWARTZMAN
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc.
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite 305
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(305)832-2120

1


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
Vigilant Parents
What ought to be remembered at this time
of the year is that the Public Schools must be
religiously neutral, a principle long
established in an equally long line of judicial
decisions. The Supreme Court has defined
"religiously neutral" as meaning that the
government may not promote any or all
religions, express opposition or hostility to
any or all religion or to no religion, or show
preference for one religion over another.
This hardly means that schools may not
teach about religion. Public Schools should
indeed take cognizance of religion and its
role in our society. Programs which teach
about religion and its role in the historical
development of civilization, as well as its
current role in society, ought to be
developed in the school curricula, providing
they do not violate the religious neutrality of
the school system.
Especially for the Jewish community it
must be emphasized that joint celebrations
of Christmas and Chanukah are no more ac-
ceptable than individual observances. Such
observances only introduce more improper
religious participatory activity into the
Public Schools. They also tend to place
holidays in competition with one another
and typically distort each holiday as a
distinct religious experience in the minds of
children.
Parents who may be assuaged in their
more sensible rejection of any religious
observance in the Public School classroom or
auditorium by the observance of any type of
Chanukah ceremony as well, are con-
tributing to a double assault one to the
separation of church and state principle and
also one upon the understanding of children,
both Jewish and Christian, who come to con-
fuse these separate and distinct holidays as
essentially the same thing.
In the end, because Public Schools are
responsible for teaching our children the
principles of American democracy, it is par-
ticularly important that they observe the
principle of separation of church and state in
the First Amendment as an essential ele-
ment of our religious liberty.
Kahane's Divisiveness
In an address before the National Press
Club in Washington the other Wednesday,
Rabbi Meir Kahane, head of the extremist
Kach Party in Israel, predicted that the Uni-
ty Government there would not survive
another year because the Labor Party would
ultimately call in its chips and demand new
elections.
In this, Kahane expressed no regret, saw
no contradiction in the survival of the Unity
Government with Shimon Peres at the helm
for its two alloted years, and predicted that
his own Kach Party would be there on the
sidelines to pick up the pieces as Likud and
Labor ultimately went to war.
In the end, surely Rabbi Kahane had
heated visions at the National Press Club of
his own elevation to Prime Minister.
At just about the same time, former Prime
Minister Shimon Peres was speaking to
American Jewish Congress officials in New
York and, on Thursday (Nov. 13), before a
session in Chicago of the Conference of
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds.
On both those occasions, Peres spoke not
about war but of peace. Dominantly on his
mind was the growing hostility between
American and Orthodox Israeli Jews over
questions of religion notably, Orthodoxy's
determined struggle to keep the U.S.
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Reform Jewish movement from establishing
itself on a broad basis in Israel without
violent confrontation.
Mr. Peres' note was one that accented
"civilization" the need for mutual respect
and, above all, unity among Jewish
brethren. In this call for unity, the former
Prime Minister has an enviable record of ex-
perience in the Unity Government's first
phase.
It is our hope that, in its second phase
under Yitzhak Shamir and Likud, the record
will be one of equal "civilization." Much has
already been written about the remarkable
achievement of a coalition agreement which,
in 1984 when it was forged, gave little
reason for hope of success.
Much, all of us trust, will be written again
in 1988, when the Unity Government fulfills
its original mandate.
"*" This is what needs to be emphasized. Mr.
Peres did just that in New York and
Chicago. In Washington, Rabbi Kahane
spouted only divisiveness and threats of war
among brotners.
Readers Write
Community Support For Soviet Jews Urged
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
As Americans, we speak
many languages. In the Soviet
Union, Jews must keep quiet
in all of them! At an interna-
tional convention of surgeons,
the discussion centered about
the question of what was the
most difficult operation to per-
form. An American surgeon
declared the most difficult
operation was brain surgery.
A French surgeon claimed the
most difficult was heart
surgery. A Russian surgeon
maintained the most difficult
operation was a tonsilectomy
because it is so difficult to get
a Russian to open his mouth!
Russian Jewry was once the
spiritual and cultural reservoir
of world Jewry. It enjoyed a
creative community with great
Rabbinical Seminaries,
Academies of higher Jewish
learning, world-renowned
scholars and writers, and a
highly developed Yiddish and
Hebrew press.
Today, in the Soviet Union,
Jews are denied human and
religious rights. At great per-
sonal peril, 400,000 Jews in
the Soviet Union have
registered their desire to
emigrate to Israel, and be able
to express their Jewishness as
free people. An immensity of
Jewish intellect is imprisoned
behind the Iron Curtain. Our
efforts to free them must go
forward with renewed vigor.
Our community has adopted
two Refuseniks: Yuli Edelsh-
tein and Cherna Goldort.
Please plan to attend our
Community Plea for Soviet
Jews on Wednesday, Dec. 10,
7:30 p.m. at Temple Beth El.
Also, the Interfaith Outcry for
Soviet Jewry on Tuesday, Dec.
9 from 9 to 11 a.m. at Faith
Lutheran Church, 555 U.S.
Highway 1, North Palm
Beach. Clarence Wagner, Ex-
ecutive Director of Bridges for
Peace will be the keynote
speaker.
Is ours to be the generation
that puts the comfort of our
existence in freedom, ahead of
efforts to free our brethren
from Soviet oppression? You
have the answer. They are our
extended family. Do not turn
away and forget them.
TOBY F. WILK
'Looking Back' Issues Clarified
EDITOR,
The Jewish Floridian:
"Looking Back" can be of
great interest to those
thousands of your readers who
did not live in our Jewish Com-
munity in its formative years.
For their benefit, and as a
resident here since 1947, I
should like to correct some er-
rors in the article on page 2,
entitled "The Silherman
Years."
The Palm Beach Chapter of
B'nai B'rith Women No. 174
was chartered in 1938 and is
the oldest Jewish women's ser-
vice organization in our
country.
B'nai B'rith Women was
particularly active during
World War II, meeting the
soldiers at the trains, giving
them home hospitality and
gifts. B'nai B'rith Girls went
to the USO dances.
There were community ac-
tivities and programs engaged
in by the 1,500 Jews, many of
whom came here to live in the
1920's and 1930's. (The late
Sam Schutzer's oral history
tape which is in the Palm
Beach Junior College's ar-
chives contains much informa-
tion regarding that era.)
The transient relief program
was started by Federated
Jewish Charities, under the
chairmanship, I believe, of the
late Dan Goodmark.
My sincere congratulations
to Federation for all that it
does for Jews in our communi-
ty as well as for our beloved
State of Israel and for Jews all
over the world. Happy 25th
Anniversary.
SYLVIA LEWIS
Focus On Issues
And Then There Are None
Friday, November 28,1986
Volume 12
26 HESHVAN 5747
Number 87
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
CHICAGO (JTA) The
Jewish people faces a calamitous
situation brought on not by its
traditional enemies but by a seg-
ment within Jewry itself which
divides the world first into
"them" and "us" and invariably
rejects "them" and ends with
"us" alone.
This "dichotomous thinking,"
as Rabbi Harold Schulweis termed
it, is dangerous because "it will
rip us apart until there is only the
solipsistic cult of one."
The consequence of "the
acrimony, the biting rhetoric, the
incivility that threatens the
delegitimation of persons, the
disenfranchisement of
movements" was sounded by
Schulweis, the spiritual leader of
Valley Beth Shalom in Los
Angeles, at the 55th General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Addressing a plenary session of
the GA, which was attended by
more than 3,000 Jewish com-
munal leaders from North
America and abroad, Schulweis,
who was the cholar-in-residence
at the GA, pinpointed the source
of the "dichotomous thinking as
the "anger in us; a cumulative
anger which has broken loose ol
its traditional constraints, a long-
festering rage against Jewish im-
potence which has reached its
breaking point; a resentment not
against specific targets but
generalized against a whole range
of things. The anger, long repress-
ed, strikes out against any accessi
ble target, including our-
selves."
Continued on Page 10-


Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Libya Disinformation Toppled One, Obscured Bigger Issue
By London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON The
current controversy in
Washington over the
Reagan Administration's
alleged use of "disinforma-
tion in the U.S. and foreign
news media against Libyan
leader Muammar Khadafy is
part of the bigger debate
over the use of military
force to combat terrorism.
Some of those political and
military voices in the government
arguing against the use of military
force are clearly attempting to
undermine the position of the so-
called "hardliners," led by
Secretary of State George Shultz
and National Security Adviser
John Poindexter.
"This is part of a war against
the war on terrorism," one
Washington insider commented.
THERE IS also a very direct
connection to Israel, according to
U.S. officials, since those
policymakers favoring very tough
and unconventional measures
against Libya are almost always
the most pro-Israeli in their orien-
tation. The other side is clearly
less sympathetic.
In the often-fractious
bureaucratic politics of
Washington, U.S. officials said,
anything that weakens the anti-
Khadafy hardliners is bound even-
tually to result in less overall U.S.
support for Israel. That helps to
explain why Israeli diplomats and
other pro-Israeli political activists
are so concerned over this latest
"disinformation" flap.
"Our best friends, especially
Poindexter, are being hurt right
now," one pro-Israeli analyst said.
Among those resisting the
tough U.S. posture against
Khadafy including last April's
Bernard Kalb (left) resigned, and
Secretary Shultz may follow.
bombing of Libyan targets, have
been officials in the Office of the
Defense Secretary, Caspar
Weinberger; the Joint Chiefs of
Staff; and the Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs Bureau at the
State Department. But their
hesitations have been rejected by
President Reagan, Shultz,
Poindexter and others.
ON OCT. 2, the Washington
Post reported that the Reagan
Administration had launched "a
secret and unusual campaign of
deception" designed to convince
Khadafy that he was about to be
attacked again by U.S. bombers
and perhaps be ousted in a coup.
The secret plan, adopted at a
White House meeting on Aug. 14,
was outlined in a three-page
memo by Poindexter.
The Post story, written by Bob
Woodward, caused a firestorm of
protest, especially in the U.S.
news media, which noted that one
of the key elements of Poindex-
ter's strategy was to combine
"real and illusory events
through a disinformation program
with the basic goal of making
Khadafy think (word underlined
in the original) that there is a high
degree of internal opposition to
him within Libya, that his key
trusted aides are disloyal, that the
U.S. is about to move against him
militarily."
After that memo was prepared,
several U.S. newspapers, starting
with the Wall Street Journal,
reported extensively on supposed
new plans in Washington to use
force against Libya and about the
increased internal opposition to
Khadafy. Woodward suggested in
this story that those reports were
not accurate, based in part on
false information released by the
Administration.
ADMINISTRATION
hardliners, including Poindexter
and Shultz, have been severely
embarrassed by the disclosure of
the secret memo to Woodward.
They suspect that the leak came
from a disgruntled official who
was opposed to the Administra-
tion's tough line against Libya, in-
cluding the use of military force.
The FBI is reportedly looking for
the leaker.
Shultz has denied that he had
ever participated in any meeting
where a plan to misinform the
U.S. media was discussed. "There
isn't any intent to try to spread
around false information," he
said.
But he confirmed that the Ad-
ministration was still very anxious
to "confuse" Khadafy. When the
U.S. bombed Libya in April, he
continued, "it did disorient him,
and it did put terrorism down for
awhile. And we want to keep it
that way.
"There are various ways in
which we can do things that may
cause him concern. If we move the
fleet around in the Mediterra-
nean, that may cause him concern.
I don't see anything wrong with
that."
The Secretary said the U.S.
should not limit itself to
"economic sanctions and military
strikes as a means to try to
disorient him." But at the same
time, he insisted, the government
Continned on Page 14-
Christian Advises Zionists
Not To Generalize
Avi (left) Instills Integrity Among Men
Who Were Unfavorably Discharged
By ROBERT A. CUMINS
Avi is a major in the Israeli Defense Forces.
His assignment is to instill dignity, self-
respect, and the will to belong in men who
have been unfit for military service. Once
they would have been unfavorably discharg-
ed, a devastating stigma in Israeli society.
Now, many are put into Avi's special pro-
gram. The short-term goal is to make them
soldiers; the long-term goal is to make them
productive citizens.
MAJOR AVI explains: "Most of the men in
our program did not finish elementary school.
Fifty percent of their parents did not finish
school. They have low self-image, little con-
fidence, trouble performing tasks. They are
not cooperative. They doiTt think they are
getting anything from our country, so they
don't understand why they should serve in
the army."
Each soldier gets put into a class with
6-to-12- others for a 7-week course. The for-
mal purpose is education. The actual purpose
is deeper a kind of spiritual rehabilitation.
Major Avi's method? The word he uses is
"love."
By DR. EUGENE J. FISHER
When Zionists seek my ad-
vice on how they can pro-
mote their views among
Christians, I first stress that
the Christian community,
no less than the Jewish com-
munity, is pluralistic. This is
true not only among
denominations, But within
denominations. So no single
approach is apt to be
successful.
Having said that, I nevertheless
do have some friendly sugges-
tions. First, Christian individuals
or institutions sometimes are
alleged to have views that they do
not actually hold. For example,
people keep trying to tell me that
the Vatican advocates "interna-
tionalizing" the city of Jerusalem,
when it doesn't, or that the Pope
refuses to recognize the existence
of Israel, which he does.
I HAVE ALSO noticed that the
posture of Zionist organizations
and Jewish agencies in general
tends to be a lot less critical of
Israel in public than in their own
internal discussions. These public
expressions establish a climate
within which it becomes difficult
for some Christian friends of
Israel to disagree, say, on the
West Bank settlement policy,
even if they strongly support
Israel in broad terms.
To me, the more free-flowing
and open-ended the dialogue bet-
ween Christians and Jews the bet-
ter. I think Jews should openly ex-
Dr. Fisher is executive direc-
tor of the Secretariat for
Catholic-Jewish Relations of
the National Conference of
Catholic Bishops. This article
is adapted from a talk he gave
before the Jacob Goodman In-
stitute of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America.
press to Christians their own con-
cerns about Israeli policies and
in the context of clearly-stated
support encourage Christians
to do the same. We might find out
that we are not so far apart after
all, and that a certain amount of
the perceived disagreement bet-
Continued on Page 16
Dr. Eugene Fisher



Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
Morse Geriatric Center
Featured On 'Mosaic'
The expansion and Capital
Campaign of the Joseph L.
Morse Geriatric Center will be
featured on this week's Jewish
Federation sponsored TV
show, "Mosaic. The program,
to be aired on Sunday, Nov.
30, 9 a.m., on Channel 5, is
hosted by Barbara Gordon
Green.
Mrs. Green will be interview-
ing Bennett Berman, Presi-
dent of the Morse; Heinz Ep-
pler, Chairman of the Capital
Campaign; E. Drew
Gackenheimer, Executive
Director; and Barbara Geddis
of Perkins, Geddis, Eastman
Architects of New York who
has been commissioned to
design the expansion.
Discussion will center
around the plans for the Morse
Geriatric Center's expansion
to meet the needs of the elder-
ly in the community and to
develop new programs and
facilities as alternatives to the
institutional setting.
The Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center of the Jewish
Home for the Aged of Palm
Beach County is a 120-bed long
term skilled nursing care facili-
ty located at 4847 Fred
Gladstone Drive (ca-Haverhill
Blvd. between Okeechobee
Blvd. and 45th Street). It is a
beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County.
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
* MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 30,9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon Green Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 30, 7:30 a.m. WPBR 1340
AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 30, 6 a.m. WPEC Channel
12 (8:30 a.m. WFLX TV 29) with host Richard Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, Dec. 4, 1:15
p.m. WLIZ 1340 AM A summary of news and com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 28
Jewish Community Center no school program Free Sons
of Israel 12:30 p.m.
December 1
Jewish Community Day School board 7:45 p.m. Con-
gregation Anshei Sholom Sisterhood board 9:45 a.m.
Women's American ORT Lakes of Poinciana -12:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Royal paid up membership
luncheon B'nai B'rith Yachad Unit board 10 a.m.
Brandeis University Women Palm Beach West 12:30
6 m. Hadassah Tikvah board -1 p.m. Hadassah West
oynton -12:30 p.m. Women's American ORT Mid Palm
- board 1 p.m. United Jewish Appeal Fly-In Temple
Judea board of trustees Jewish Federation Ad Hoc
Committee for Human Services Community Relations
Council 8:30 a.m.
December 2
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village 10 a.m.
Women's American ORT Royal board 9:30 a.m.
Jewish Federation Jewish Educators Council Meeting
and Jewish Community Day School noon Central Con-
servative Synagogue board 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth
Torah congregational meeting 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Shalom board 9:30 a.m.
December 3
Jewish Federation Women's Division Business and Pro-
fessional Steering Committee Meeting 7 p.m. Temple
Emanu-El Adult Education 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Women Olam noon Lake Worth Jewish Center
Sisterhood board 10 a.m. National Council of Jewish
Women Palm Beach board 10 a.m. Yiddish Culture
Group Cresthaven 1 p.m. Jewish Community Center -
board 8 p.m. Jewish Federation Boynton Beach
Village Royale Awards Luncheon noon Jewish
Federation Demographic Study Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Jewish Federation Soviet Jewry Task Force noon
December 4
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee board -
10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women Ohav 1 p.m. Temple
Emanu-El Adult Education Hebrew -10 a.m. Na'Amat
USA Theodore Herzl 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith No. 2939 -
board -1 p.m. Golden Lakes Temple board 9:30 a.m.
National Council of Jewish Women Flagler Evening -
board and regular meeting 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federa-
tion Leisure and Retirement Communities "Educa-
tional Meeting" 7 p.m. Jewish Federation Mini-
Mission Meed Village and Willow Bend 9 a.m.
Beate Klarsfeld Story':
Strong Performance By Fawcett
By HERBERT LUFT
HOLLYWOOD (JTA) -
The courageous anti-Nazi ac-
tivity of Beate Klarsfeld was
brought before the American
public in dramatic, episodic
fashion on Sunday, Nov. 23.
"Nazi Hunter: The Beate
Klarsfeld Story," is a better
than average look at the issues
of the Holocaust and the pur-
suit of the Nazi criminals who
seek to escape justice.
Farrah Fawcett, perhaps
best known for her roles as
glamorous women, is
marvelous as a thoroughly
believable Beate, a German-
born Protestant who became
committed to bringing Nazi
criminals to justice. She
displays broad sensitivity, and
ages convincingly.
But her co-stars are weak.
Academy Award winner
Geraldine Page overacts as It-
ta Halaunbrenner, who with
Klarsfeld chained herself to a
bench in protest in Bolivia. As
Serge, Tom Conti is too
smiley, especially in meeting
Beate in Paris. But the casting
of Hungarians as Germans,
French as French and South
Americans as Bolivians adds
realism.
The movie begins with the
innocent 17-years-old Beate
waving to her parents as she
boards a train in Berlin for
Paris in 1960. There she meets
and falls in love with Serge
Klarsfeld, a law student who
makes her aware of the
Holocaust. The couple of
course eventually become
partners in life and in hunting
Nazis.
Beate's sudden conversion
to hatred of Nazis, including
the indifference shown by her
family is sketchily por-
trayed. More effectively stag-
ed is Beate's first appearance
on the world scene, when she
focuses attention on Nazi
leaders.
The movie shows her
shouting, "Nazi, resign," at
German Chancerllor Kurt
Kiesinger from the gallery of
the German legislature. She
later slaps him.
Also well played is the at-
tempt to kidnap a mass killer
in Cologne, after which the
Klarsfelds turn their attention
To Klaus Barbie, who today
awaits his trial for war crimes
in Lyon, France.
Educational Meeting
Continued from Page 3
Campaign Director of the
Jewish Federation and is in
charge of fund-raising develop-
ment. He attended Hebrew
Union College in Los Angeles
where he graduated from their
School of Jewish Communal
Services. He received his
Masters Degree in Social
Work from the University of
Washington. Prior to coming
to this community, Mr. Kleiner
served as Campaign Director
of the San Francisco Jewish
Federation and as Associate
Director of the Social Planning
and Budgeting Department.
For more information con-
tact Dr. Lester Silverman,
Staff Associate, at the Federa-
tion office, 882-2120.
The movie's first half
featured rapid, staccato im-
ages, but then the portrayal of
the search for Barbie slows to
a tedious and obscure halt at
times. Producer William
Kayden said it was difficult to
condense 20 years of the
Klarsfelds' efforts into a con-
tinuous, comprehensive ac-
count. Also missing is Beate
exposing Kurt Waldheim s
Nazi past at a street meeting
in Vienna.
While essentially accurate,
"The Beate Klarsfeld Story
lacks the terror-filled impact a
Holocaust film ought to have,
and that many French, Rus-
sian and Dutch films do show.
This partly is due to the cons-
tant hugging and kissing by
Beate and Serge, which may
provide necessary relief for
the public, but it is a distubing
juxtaposition with newsreel
shots from the extermination
camps.
The drama was photograph-
ed on location in Paris and
southern France, with Nice
doubling for La Paz, Bolivia,
where Barbie was hiding. The
UN building in Paris was to be
used as the setting of the Ger-
man legislature, but 10 days
before the scene was schedul-
ed, the German Ambassador
protested, contending that the
scene would unflattering por-
tray a German official. The
scene was filmed in a theatre.
"The Beate Klarsfeld Story-
was born in February 1983
when producer Kayden saw
Beate Klarsfeld interviewed
about her campaign to ex-
tradite Barbie.
He set off on his own search
"It took me a full year to find
Serge and Beate Klarsfeld,"
he recalled. "We finally met in
New York in 1984 and I ac-
quired the rights to the life
story." The Klarsfelds served
as consultants.
He found a director, Michael
Lindsay-Hogg, who brought
great commitment to the pro-
ject. "Even in the face of
wars, aviation, television and
space travel," the director
said, "the 20th century will be
marked throughout history by
the Holocaust.
"The quest of Serge
Klarsfeld and Beate, whose
parents through indifference
snared the guilt, aims to right
as much of the wrong during
the Holocaust as is possible, by
exposing and bring to justice
Nazi war criminals."
Lindsay-Hogg sees the cou-
ple as "basically ordinary ...
except that they are fueled by
their commitment and that
they act in an extraordinary
way."
Leningrad Activist Arrested
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Leningrad activist Albert
(Chaim) Burstein was arrested
last Monday as he spoke by
phone from a local post ofice to
Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry director Lynn
Singer. He was sentenced to
15 days in jail for "resisting ar-
rest,' the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry reported.
According to the SSSJ,
Burstein, 21, is one of Len-
ingrad's most daring
refuseniks and has been a
target of beatings, threats and
harassment by KGB. On Nov.
5 he was forcibly prevented
from flying to Vilnius in
Lithuania to join activists
there commemorating the
Holocaust. The next day KGB
agents beat him again and
threatened to kill him, the
SSSJ reported.
Elegance in Entertaining
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Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
National Consultant To
Assist Demographic Study
Stanley Brenner, Chairman
of the Demographic Study
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, has announced that
Dr. Gary Tobin, Director of the
Center for Modern Jewish
Studies at Brandeis Universi-
ty, will serve as a consultant to
the demographic study which
will survey the Jewish com-
munity from Boynton Beach to
Jupiter. He will assist Dr. Ira
Sheskin, primary consultant,
and the Demographic Study
Committee who are forming
questions for a community-
wide telephone survey to begin
Jan. 15.
In making the announce-
ment, Mr. Brenner said, "We
are pleased to have Dr. Tobin
assist us in our study of the
community in order to deter-
mine its needs, practices and
attitudes. His excellent Jewish
communal background and ex-
tensive experiences in conduc-
ting Jewish demographic
studies will make his
assistance invaluable to our
community."
Dr. Tobin stated that not on-
ly conventional demographic
data will be collected but infor-
mation about service delivery,
fund-raising, and religious af-
filiation will be developed so
that Federation, its
beneficiary agencies,
synagogues, and organizations
will be able to use the results
of the study to best meet the
needs in our community. He
emphasized that the role of the
Demographic Study Commit-
tee is critical. "One of the roles
it plays is to mold the survey to
meet the needs of the Palm
Beach area. The real trick is to
ask the right questions. I will
be helping the committee iden-
tify issues and 'concerns
specific to Palm Beach County
so that they can accomplish
their task.
"The migration of Jews to
South Florida has been the
single most important
demographic change
geographically for Jews in the
history of the U.S. New ques-
tions will be asked here
because we need to learn more
about this rapidly expanding
Jewish population."
Prior to his current position,
Dr. Tobin spent 11 years in ur-
ban studies and Jewish studies
at Washington University in
St. Louis. He has a PhD in
Social Planning from the
University of California at
Berkely. He is a consultant on
planning and fund-raising
issues tor Federations, the
Council of Jewish Federations,
United Jewish Appeal, and
others. He has conducted
demographic studies in
numerous cities including St.
Louis, Baltimore, Kansas City,
Rochester, San Francisco, and
Metrowest, New Jersey.
For more information, con-
tact Susan Schwartz, Director
of Planning and Budgeting, at
the Federation office,
832-2120.
Jurist: Arbitrary Acts By USSR
Can Be Challenged
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Samuel
Pisar, an international lawyer
from the U.S. who recently
pleaded successfully in Soviet
courts on behalf of five Jews
arrested during a Simchat
Torah celebration in Moscow,
believes that arbitrary acts by
the Soviet authorities can now
be challenged effectively in
Soviet courts.
Foreign lawyers, refuseniks
and other Jews can make use
of the provisions of Soviet law,
Pisar said. "What is needed is
a certain amount of discretion,
a low profile and a thorough
knowledge of Soviet legal and
criminal procedure," he said.
"CASES SHOULD be
fought on an individual basis. I
doivt think that all can be won,
but given the right men and a
certain amount of determina-
tion some could be successful.
By using this method, the
refuseniks could start a new
On Simchat Torah, Oct. 25,
the Moscow synagogue was
packed and thousands of Jews
thronged the adjacent streets.
The crowd was larger than
usual because Elie Wiesel, the
1986 Nobel Peace Prize win-
ner, had come to celebrate the
day with Soviet Jews.
SHORTLY AFTER 10 p.m.,
while the crowds were still
singing traditional Hebrew
songs and dancing in the
streets, two police cars drove
up and the police ordered the
celebrants to disperse. Most
did. But several resisted. Five
were arrested and booked on
charges of "hooliganism" and
disturbing the peace, both
relatively serious charges in
the USSR.
The next day, a small delega-
tion of Jews who had been at
the Simchat Torah celebration,
called on Pisar at his hotel and
asked him to represent the five
arrested men who were their
relatives or friends. On Mon-
tended a Soviet-American
business conference where he
met Gorbachev.
BEING ADMITTED to the
judge's chambers was a feat in
itself for a foreigner. Pisar
said that by using a combina-
tion of legal arguments and
moral persuasion, he managed
to convince the judge that the
crime for which the five Jews
were arrested was a mere pec-
cadillo which normally would
be dismissed in any democratic
court. The judge ruled that the
five would have to stand trial
in a police court where the
sentences they risked would be
relatively light.
Pisar fought that ruling as
well and after meeting with
the police court magistrate,
managed to obtain relatively
light fines for the accused who
were then released.
Dr. Gary Tobin reviews questions for a community-wide
telephone survey being prepared by the Demographic Stndy
Committee.
Nuclear Suspect's Diary
Broadcast Spurs Dispute
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The broadcast of excerpts
from a diary kept by
Mordechai Vanunu has touch-
ed off an angry controversy
between civil libertarians and
Israel Television over the right
to privacy.
Vanunu is the former
nuclear technican who is in
custody for giving a British
newspaper information about
Israel s alleged nuclear
weapons capability. His
lawyer, Amnon Zichroni, said
that he might press charges
against the Israel Broadcast
Authority.
A TELEVISION reporter
said he found the diary in a
suitcase in a building where
Vanunu once lived. It covers
the years from 1982-85 and
reveals the writer's attitudes
toward women, family,
philosophy, religion and
finances.
The excerpts read on televi-
sion recently described grow-
ing sympathy with the Arab
cause. They depicted a troubl-
ed man who had difficulty com-
municating with others, who
had a "strong urge to prove
himself' and who feared he
was being "followed."
The Civil Rights Association
criticized the publication of the
diary as a "gross invasion of
privacy." According to the
Association, "A man's diary is
one of his most intimate
writings and cannot be
publicized without his con-
sent." The Broadcast Authori-
ty was accused of violating a
1981 law for protection of
privacy.
BUT THE Authority main-
tained that Vanunu-stands ac-
cused of serious offenses
against the State and has lost
his right to privacy. Uri Porat,
Director General of the Broad-
cast Authority, said pains
were taken not to publicize
anything about Vanunu that is
not already known and to
resist "the temptation to score
a great many journalistic
scoops which were contained
in the diary."
The reporter who obtained it
claimed a relative of Vanunu
authorized its publication.
Zichroni, meanwhile, went
to London to prepare for the
case. Vanunu was last seen in
London on Sept. 30. The
government has acknowledged
that he was "under lawful
detention" in Israel and denied
he had been kidnapped by
Israeli agents. When and how
he was brought to Israel re-
mains unexplained.
chapter in their relations with day, Oct. 27, Pisar appeared
the Soviet Administration,
Pisar told the JTA.
The 58-year-old Polish-born
Holocaust survivor and
Harvard-educated jurist
believes the less authoritarian
policies instituted by Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev
makes it possible for others to
achieve the same
breakthrough he did.
before the district judge in -
charge of the case.
He enjoyed certain advan-
tages in that he speaks Rus-
sian fluently, is an expert on
Soviet law and has close links
to Armand Hammer, the
American industrialist known
for his traditional ties with the
Soviet leadership. Only a few
months earlier, Pisar had at-
'Celebration 25'
Continued from Page 1
based on tapes smuggled out
of the USSR.
Mrs. Green has been involv-
ed with Jewish communal
work for more than 20 years.
Currently the host of the
Federation sponsored TV pro-
grams, "Mosaic," Mrs. Green
is a past President of Women's
Division of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County and
a past Vice President of
Federation.
Mrs. Green served as the
General Chairman of the
1981-82 Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal Campaign and
as the Women's Division Cam-
paign Vice President in
1978-79. At the national level
Mrs. Green is a member of the
National UJA Women's Divi-
sion Board and a member of
the National Jewish Media
Board.
For more information con-
tact Ronni Epstein, Director
of Communications, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
The Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
Proudly invites you to attend
Our 25th Anniversary
and the
1987 Jewish Federation/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign Kickoff
Sunday. December 14. 1986
11 a.m. 3 p.m.
The Breakers
Palm Beach
Couvert $25 per person
(includes lunch and program;
Special Guest
Theodore Bikel
No Solicitation of Funds
For more Information and reservations contact Nettie Berk,
Communications Coordinator, at the Federation office, 832-2120.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28,1986
Helping People
Low Income Home Energy
Assistance Program Offered
By NED GOLDBERG
ACSW, LCSW
Assistant Executive Director of
Jewish Family and Children's
Service
All case names mentioned in
these articles are fictitious;
client information at Jewish
Family and Children's Service
is held in the strictest of
confidence.)
Individuals who come to
Palm Beach County frequently
are surprised to find the small
number of subsidized housing
units for low income families,
or low income retirees. There
are also state and county
financial entitlement pro-
grams which pay much less to
recipients in Palm Beach
County, than to recipients who
live in Northeastern and
Midwestern cities. Indeed, the
relocation process for these
low income individuals is one
where their standard of living
may, in fact, decrease. Many
programs which exist in other
communities do not exist in
Palm Beach County.
One Federal program that
may be well known and utilized
in other states, but may be un-
familiar to many local eligible
Ned Goldberg
clients is the Low Income
Home Energy Assistance Pro-
gram. Monies are made
available to the state on a
twice-a-year basis, to subsidize
energy costs for low income in-
dividuals. Anyone eligible and
enrolled in the program will
not learn how much money
they will receive until all ap-
nlications are in. and the
money is divided by the
number of eligible applicants.
In the past, recipients have
received well over $100 twice a
year.
If you are a family of two,
and your total income is not
over $664 per month, you will
probably qualify for this pro-
gram. Remember, your total
income not only includes Social
Security payments, but also
any income earned from other
sources, including interest or
dividends.
To apply, call the Low In-
come Energy Assistance Pro-
gram at 582-7604. The applica-
tion deadline is Dec. 15.
(The Jewish Family and
Children'8 Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located at
8250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 10it. Our telephone
number is 684-1991. The
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation and
the United Way of Palm Beach
County.)
Israel's 2nd Liver Recipient Dies:
Hospital Says Procedure Will Continue
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) -
Eliahu Schreier, Israel's se-
cond liver transplant patient,
died at Rambam Hospital in
Haifa, 18 days after surgery.
His death followed by five days
that of the first transplant pa-
tient, Mira Schichmanter.
Despite the setbacks, Rambam
Hospital director Albert Sat-
tinger said the hver transplant
operations would continue and
the Health Ministry confirmed
that.
Doctors at the hospital said
that Schreier, like
Schichmanter, succumbed to
complications arising from the
advanced stages of their liver
ailments, not the surgery.
Both underwent second opera-
tions to correct internal
hemorrhaging. According to
Sattinger, neither patient
would have hved more than a
few days if they hadn't receiv-
ed transplants.
He stressed that it was im-
possible to evaluate liver
transplants on the basis of only
two cases. He noted that the
first four liver transplants car-
ried out at children's Hospital,
in Pittsburgh, Pa., where the
technique was developed, also
failed to save the patients'
lives, but now there is a 70-80
percent chance of success. Dr.
Vigal Kam, who operated on
Schreier and Schichmanter,
was trained in the procedure
Israel Votes Against Condemnation
of U.S. Raid On Libya
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General
Assembly condemned last
Thursday the United States
for its aerial raid on Libya last
April. Israel joined the U.S.
and other Western countries
in voting against the anti-
American resolution. The vote
was 79-28 with 32 abstentions.
Ambassador Yohanan Bein
of the Israel UN Mission,
justified the American attack
on Libya as a war against in-
ternational terrorism. "The
free world will not surrender
to intimidation and ter-
rorism" Bein told the General
Assembly. He vowed that
Israel will continue to fight in-
ternational terrorism and will
respond mainly against the
"planners and organizers" of
world terror, such as Libya.
The Israeli diplomat disclos-
ed that in February 1986,
about a dozen terrorist groups
from around the world met in
Tripoli, Libya, for a special
"congress" on international
terrorism. The "congress,"
Bein asserted, nominated a
nine-member committee to im-
prove the international net-
work of terrorist organizations
with Libya, Iran and Syria ser-
ving as a "war cabinet" for
that purpose.
"They declared war against
the West, against democracy,
against all those who would
not bend to intimidations and
threats," the Israeli envoy
said. He compared interna-
tional terrorism to organized
crime, calling the Libyan
leader, Muammar Khadafy,
"the godfather of interna-
tional terrorism."
at the Pittsburgh hospital.
Sattinger noted further that
the Israeli patients applied for
transplants only at a late stage
of their illness. The family of
Schreier, who was 59 and lived
in Moshav Shoresh, near
Jerusalem, said they were all
aware of the risks, but decided
they were worthwhile.
Violence In Gaza
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israeli soldiers killed an Arab
driver at a Gaza roadblock
recently, shortly after an
Israeli civilian was stabbed in
the Gaza marketplace. The vic-
tim, Shabtai Shvilli of
Ashkelon, sustained a knife
wound in the back of his neck
but was not badly hurt. He was
taken to a hospital in
Ashkelon.
He was the third Israeli in
two months to be stabbed
while shopping in Gaza. The
two earlier victims, Yisrael
Kitaro and Haim Azran, also
from Ashkelon, were fatally
wounded. The authorities
believe the same assailant was
responsible for the three
attacks.
It was not immediately
known if there is a connection
between the stabbing and the
incident at the roadblock,
where the driver was shot
dead when he failed to respond
to signals to stop. Military
sources said the soldiers were
following standing orders.
They fired into the air, then at
the tires of the vehicle before
they fired at the driver, the
sources said.
Architect's rendering of the proposed Lake Worth Jewish
Center new building.
Lake Worth Jewish Center
Launches Building Drive
The Lake Worth Jewish
Center Building Committee,
under the chairmanship of Clif-
ford Storch (Chairman), Mur-
ray Milrod (Co-Chairman) and
Lou Marks (Co-Chairman) an-
nounces the beginning of a
$500,000 Building Fund Drive
for the construction of a new
building. The synagogue will
be located along 600 feet of
Jog Road, between Lake
Worth Road and Melaleuca
Road.
The building will have a main
sanctuary seating 400 people,
a social hall seating 400 people
and all other necessary educa-
tional and social facilities.
Larry Winker, a well known
local architect and experienced
with designing temples, has
drawn up plans for a "most
beautiful and modern place of
worship which when com-
pleted will be well received by
the growing congregation/'
stated Mr. Storch.
The drive will culminate in a
gala "Builders" dinner-dance
to be held at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches on Wednesday, Dec.
17, 6 p.m. The dinner commit-
tee, Chairpersons are Mrs.
Clifford Storch and Elaine
Goldklang. The honored
speaker will be Rabbi Ben-
jamin C. Kreitman, Executive
Vice President of the United
Synagogue of America.
For invitations call the tem-
ple office, any weekday morn-
ing until 1 p.m.
anaanilfAiri


0&A*F*0M
BOAMWHM HOTEL
2*h Co* *
CompHnvntw, tern crn ^^fZ^om
CHANUKAH
4 DAYS/5 NIGHTS $.f)fi &
Dec 25-Dec 29 "'jJO **
Thurs.-Mon. ^^
305-538-5721

55.0CC
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Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
West Bank Palestinians
Moving Away From PLO
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Gen. Ephraim Sneh, the
civilian administrator of the
West Bank, believes that most
of the 800,000 Palestinians in
Judaea and Samaria are mov-
ing away from the Palestine
Liberation Organization to a
more "realistic" position.
"I believe the majority of
Palestinians understand that
Israel is a fact" and "they have
to live peacefully beside
Israel," Sneh said in an inter-
view with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency last Mon-
day. "They understand the
slogans of the PLO to destroy
the Jewish State are irrelevant
and far from reality."
Sneh admits that the "sym-
pathy of the Palestinians is
still with the PLO." But he
said there is a growing
"disillusionment" with PLO
terrorist activities which they
see offer no hope for a solution
of the Palestinian problem.
"Most of the Palestinian
residents of the West Bank re-
ject terrorism," he
maintained.
He said there are less riots,
demonstrations and strikes on
the West Bank and terrorist
incidents have decreased.
Sneh conceded that the
Palestinian youth are more
likely to be radical and militant
as elsewhere in the world. "It
changes with age," he added.
Sneh is in the United States
as part of a program of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith to enhance the
dialogue between Israelis and
Americans. A physician, most
of his career has been with the
Israel Defense Force's medical
corps. He headed the medical
team participating in the
Israeli rescue mission at
Entebbe, Uganda.
Sneh has headed the civil ad-
ministration of the West Bank
UN Chief Warns Of
Volatile Mideast
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar warned here that
without a breakthrough for
peace in the Middle East
"including the Palestine
Liberation Organization"
war can engulf the region once
again.
"The situation in the region
continues to be highly
volatile," de Cuellar said in his
annual report to the General
Assembly, issued last Thurs-
day, on the situation in the
Mideast. "There is a grave
danger that if the present
deadlock in the peace process
is allowed to persist, major
hostilities will break out again
in the area as has happened
several times in the past," the
Secretary General stated.
De Cuellar recalled that the
Yom Kippur War between
Egypt and Israel in 1973
almost led to direct confronta-
tion between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
He warned that a new war in
the Mideast, "with the
development of ever more
sophisticated and destructive
weapons," may be more dif-
ficult to control and may in-
deed bring a nuclear confron-
tation between the
superpowers.
"A just and lasting peace (in
the Mideast) can best be
achieved through a com-
prehensive settlement cover-
ing all aspects of the conflict
and involving all the parties
concerned, including the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion," de Cuellar said.
A comprehensive Mideast
settlement, he continued, must
be baaed on "withdrawal of
Israeli forces from Arab ter-
ritories occupied since June
1967; acknowledgement and
respect for the sovereignty,
territorial integrity and
political independence of all
the states in the region and
their right to live in peace
within secure and recognized
boundaries; and finally a
satisfactory solution of the
Palestinian problem based on
the recognition of the
legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people, including
self-determination.''
The Secretary General was
critical of Israel's settlements
in the West Bank, "I am par-
ticularly concerned about the
consequences that would flow
from the establishment by
Israel of additional set-
tlements in the occupied ter-
ritories," de Cuellar said, ad-
ding: "This is a matter of deep
concern and, more than any
other single factor, con-
tributed to doubts in the minds
of many about Israel's
readiness to negotiate a peace
settlement that would require
its withdrawal from the
territories."
But the Secretary General
also was critical of violent in-
cidents in the region as a ma-
jor obstacle to peace. "Peace
efforts would be enhanced if
there was a lessening of
violent incidents, which all too
frequently involve innocent
lives and of which there have
been some particularly terrible
examples" in the last year, he
stated.
Israelis Destroy
'Terrorist' Boat
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel Air Force helicopter
gunships destroyed a 'Ter-
rorist Doat" in the port of
Sidon, south Lebanon last
Thursday, a military
spokesman announced. He
said the aircraft returned safe-
ly to their base.
The strike was the third dur-
ing the week at terrorist
targets in the Sidon area.
Israeli jets bombed a terrorist
base used for seaborne mis-
sions against Israel the next
day. Combat helicopters at-
tacked the same targets under
protection by jet fighters.
since July, 1985. He is in
charge of government activity
in the area except for security
which is under the military ad-
ministration. The civilian ad-
ministration was created in
1981, but like the military ad-
ministration, is under the
Ministry of Defense. It does
not have authority for the
Jewish settlements on the
West Bank which are under
Israeli law.
While he is in effect in
charge of the civilian govern-
ment of the West Bank, Sneh
stressed that it is Israel's
policy "not to interfere with
the day-to-day lives of the
West Bankers." He noted that
in the civil administration
13,000 of its employees are
local Arabs and only 300 are
Israelis. In addition, he said
Israel wants to improve the
quality of life for the Palesti-
nians. One example he gave
was in the economic field,
where Sneh said Israel has en-
couraged investment from in-
side and outside the West
Bank "very liberal policies"
and butting "bureaucratic
obstacles."
Sneh also said that in four
major West Bank towns
Nablus, Ramallah, Beit Jallah
and Hebron existing
hospitals are being expanded
into regional medical centers
with modern facilities.
He said the number of
hospital beds on the West
Bank are being increased by 50
percent within the next two
years. In addition, primary
care clinics are being establish-
ed in the rural areas. The
health standards on the West
Bank are better than most
Arab countries and almost as
good as Israel, he noted.
All this should answer
charges that Israel wants to
drive the Arabs out of the
West Bank. "If we have a
policy which improves the
quality of life of Palestinians
on the West Bank it doesn't
mean our goal is to drive them
out," he said.
Sneh said that the Israeli
policy on the West Bank is
not a substitute" for an even-
tual peace settlement. Instead
it is to "change the at-
mosphere on the West Bank"
to lead to negotiations bet-
ween Israel and the
Palestinians.
He said the Israeli policy of
allowing the Palestinians con-
trol oftheir daily lives was not
autonomy. He said this could
only come about through
negotiations, not unilaterally.
Nor was Israel sharing rule on
the West Bank with Jordan,
Sneh stressed. "We are the
government of the West
Bank," Sneh said.
Most West Bank Palesti-
nians are Jordanian citizens
and Jordan has recently begun
an economic development pro-
gram on the West Bank, he
noted. Sneh said that most of
the Palestinians eventually
want to see a Jordanian-
Palestinian state.
He noted that on his current
trip to the U.S., the question
he is most asked about is his
opinion on arms shipments to
Iran. "I am very glad this is
not in my jurisdiction," he
Supped. "I have enough pro-
ems of my own."
Homignor Bernard
McGrenehan of St. Edward's
Chuch of Palm Beach accepts
the "Torch of Liberty"
Award.
Joseph Bagby is the recipient
of the ADL award. His wife,
Martha, was also honored.
ADL Chairman Michael C. Burrows (left) greets guest
speaker Joe Reiter at the ADL Luncheon at The Breakers.
H ADL Presents Awards
To Cotillion Founders
By LOUISE ROSS
The Palm Beach County
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith presented the
"Torch of Liberty" Award to
Monsignor Bernard
McGrenehan of St. Edward's
Church of Palm Beach and
Martha and Joseph Bagby at a
luncheon at the Breakers last
week. They were recognized
for their leadership roles in the
formation of the Palm Beach
Cotillion, a dance and etiquette
class for all children in Palm
Beach. The Bagbys conduct
the Cotillion at the Church.
The Cotillion opened in
November, 1985 at St. Ed-
ward's Church under the
auspices of an Inter-
Committee of Clergy and Ad-
visors in response to con-
troversy over a similar group,
the Junior Assembly, which
has been in existence since
1948 and had excluded Jewish
children.
In honoring Monsignor
McGrenehan, St. Edward's
Church and the Bagbys, the
Board of the ADL "recognizes
and appreciates the devoted
leadership and service of the
recipients in preserving liber-
ty, counter-acting bigoty and
advancing the cause of human
rights."
Guest speaker, Joe Reiter,
President of the Florida Bar
Association, noted that
although great strides have
been made in religious and
racial tolerance over the last
two decades, in our own
backyard there are children
who are still restricted. "This
should be brought to the
public's attention. Hopefully,
with understanding and com-
passion, it will be overcome."
He added that social
discrimination in Palm Beach
has "set people against each
other in a destructive game of
one-upmanship, poisoning or
preventing what might nave
been mutually rewarding rela-
tionships. There will always be
some affluent Americans who
will act out of prejudice and
practice racial or religious
discrimination, deciding who is
or who isn't-good enough to
live near them, socialize with
them, go to school with them
and share their leisure with
them."
The Palm Beach County
ADL is chaired by Michael C
Burrows. Luncheon Co-
Chairpersons were Elizabeth
Green, Margaret Luntz, and
Judith Messing. The ADL, one
of the nation's oldest human
relations agencies, was formed
in order to stop the defamation
of the Jewish people and to
secure justice and fair treat-
ment to all citizens alike.
Golda Meir Award
Goes to Family
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) -
State of Israel Bonds presented
its Golda Meir Leadership Award
to a family for the first time. At
the Nov. 9 dinner here that laun-
ched the 1987 international bonds
campaign, Richard Dinner, Dee
and Melvin Swig, Roselyne
"Cissie" Swig and Richard Swig
were honored for their service to
Israel, Jewry and the community
at large.

IBM5M
tm
M


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
News From Hod Hasharon:
Faces From The Neighborhood
By ELIZABETH HOMANS, Project Renewal Community Representative
The success of Project
Renewal is not judged merely
by the physical improvement
of the neighborhood or even by
the social programs developed
during the past few years. The
success of the concept of Pro-
ject Renewal is seen in the
taces of the neighborhood
residents themselves ...
changes from despair to en-
couragement; from apathy to
enthusiasm; from non-
involvement to active par-
ticipation to make a difference
in their own lives and for the
future generations.
At first glance of the smiling
face and sparkling brown eyes
of Shira Itzhak, it is hard to
believe that she is 26 years old.
But after meeting and talking
with her, one realizes that this
is indeed an energetic young
And Then There Are None
Continued from Page 4
Focusing on this anger, Schulweis
observed that it has been
engendered by a world which has
brutally terrorized and relentless-
ly assaulted Jews to a point where
it has produced a "massive
psychic trauma." The twin
elements in the traumatic process
are the Holocaust and the betrayal
and abandonment of the Jews by
the world at large in the time of
their greatest need.
"Now, forty years after the
volcanic earthquake that shook
the foundation of Jewish trust, the
tremblors continue to explode,"
Schulweis said.
"But now they reveal more than
Nazi-fascist atrocity. In recent
years, documents record the
betrayal of allies, the callousness,
the abandonment of the Jews by
prelates, princes, presidents; by
putative allies in Foreign Offices,
Parliaments, Congress even by
the 'great Jewish hope' of those
years, the apotheosis of non-
Jewish friendship, Franklin
Delano Roosevelt."
Jewish anger, Schulweis con-
tinued, "spreads out not only
against Nazism or Fascism. Post-
Holocaust anger is against the
whole of Western civilization
liberalism, rationalism, univer-
salism, pluralism, humanism,
democracy, the gods that failed at
Auschwitz."
Gentile history has bequeathed
to the Jewish people "blood libel,"
"ghetto" "pogrom," "decided"
and "genocide," he observed. And
the Jewish response by some Jews
to Western civilization, Schulweis
said, is: "we have nothing to learn
from you and your ethos. How
dare you lecture to us about
morality, freedom of conscience,
the treatment ofninorities, the
mandate of pluralism after
Dachau, afer Treblinka, after the
White Paper, after the Bermuda
Conference, after the Struma and
the St. Louis? After Buchenwald
and Birkenau, Western civiliza-
tion has forfeited all claims to
moral credibility. We are exempt
from your hypocritical double
standards for us."
More and more Jews view
Westernization as betrayal and
those who accept its values as col-
laborators in the destruction of
Judaic tradition, Schulweis said.
This leads to exclusivism of
"them" versus "us" and is even-
tually internalized as "some of
us." But which "some" now
begins to fester as suspicion of
fellow Jews who do not adhere to
the cultist "us."
Schulweis pointed out that this
erosive and corrosive process
leads Hebrew schools, yeshivot,
day schools, summer camps,
youth programs, nurseries and
toddler programs to be denomina-
tionally segregated. The
denominations do not fraternize,
he noted.
"They do not sing, or dance or
play and certainly do not pray
together," he said. The denomina-
tions claim common festivals and
fasts but do not celebrate them in
common. The end result,
Schulweis declared, is "denomina-
tional apartheid."
Jewish anger has its place if it is
a catharsis to unite, he said. But
excessive and observe anger
threatens to tear the Jewish peo-
ple apart. Finding the proper
target for anger mobilized psychic
and physical energies to combat
the forces which menace and
threaten the survival of the
Jewish people. But generalized
anger indiscriminate anger is im-
potence turned inward against
"some of us." It leads to the aban-
donment of the world and to self-
proclaimed cultist purity,
Shculweis declared.
This, however, he said, is a
sterile form of existence. "How
we define ourselves and others,
whom we include and exclude,
with whom we choose to relate
and whom we choose to ignore,
determines our agenda and our
future," he said. "The post-
Holocaust question before us is
not who is a Jew or who is a rabbi
or who is my neighbor or who is
my brother or sister, but what
shall be the character of
Judaism."
To live in the world "is to live in
a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural,
multi-religious universe. To live
with Egyptians and Syrians, with
Blacks and Chicanos. The world is
our place, even as God is the place
of the world," Schulweis said. To
be engaged in the world "means
to related to non-Jews Chris-
tians, Moslems, gentiles, nations,
churches and with a vision and
wisdom to turn a new leaf in
Jewish history."
There are changes in attitudes,
statements and conciliar declara-
tions of the churches and "We
must take advantage of these
changes," he stated. "Something
new is happening among leading
theologians. We and our children
must read and hear new voices in
old institutions."
Schulweis referred to the chur-
ches' position on the conversion of
the Jews, the understanding of
the spiritual and emotional mean-
ing of Israel, the internal ques-
tioning of Christian prejudices,
the change of teaching texts in
Chrisian schools, the respect and
relevance of Jewish tradition and
contemporaneity.
"I am more interested in the
changing attitudes and teachings
of the churches' contemporary
leaders than in their ancestors'
failings; more in the churches'
descendants than in the churches'
ancestors ... I am more in-
terested in gaining new friends
and in fixating on old enemies,"
he said.
Schulweis said that for too long
a time Jews have spoken about
"the consipiracy of evil." It is now
time to begin speaking about "the
conspirary of good."
In an impassioned plea to the
assembled Jewish leaders at the
General Assembly, Schulweis call-
ed attention to "a muted part of
contemporary Jewish history," to
the "tragic neglect of uncounted,
unknown, unsung, unbefriended
gentiles who risked their lives and
the lives of their families to
shelter, feed and protect our
hounded people during the Nazi
era."
Schulweis referred to "zechor,"
the Jewish imperative to
remember. This imperative he
pointed out, refers not only to the
evil but also to the good. It is not
fair that the goodness of the gen-
tiles who helped be forgotten, he
said.
"We properly hunt down the
predatory criminals and their col-
laborators and bring them to the
bar of justice. We need our peo-
ple needs a Simon Wiesenthal
to search out the rescuers, record
their lives in our history, help
them and raise them to high
honor."
He pointed out that few young
Jews know about the Christian
families who hid Anne Frank; the
heroism of Mother Maria of Paris,
Father Bernard Lichtenberg, and
the villagers of Le Chambon who
were responsible for the rescue of
thousands of Jews in Nazi-
occupied France; the leaders of
the Bulgarian Othodox Church
who refused to deport Jews to the
Nazis; the Portuguese Consul
Aristides de Sousa Mendes who
saved thousands of Jews from
death and deportation; the Italian
army's rescue of thousands of
Croation and Yugoslav Jews; and
the sewer workers of Lvov wh
protected 17 Jews for 14 months
living in the sewers of Lvov, in-
fested with vermin, rats and cold.
Why, Schulweis declared,
"should Jewish children know on-
ly the killer of the dream and not
the heart and hand of gentile
rescuers?" Knowing this, he con-
cluded, would permit mercy to
control anger and offer a more
hopeful vision and heritage to the
next generation.
Refusenik
Dead At 68
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Haim Elbert, a 68-year-old
Red Army veteran who with
his family had been denied exit
visas since they first applied in
1976, died in Kiev Nov. 8, the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported here.
His death came two days
after he learned that the latest
visa application for himself, his
wife, their sons and their
families had been rejected, the
NCSJ reported. Elbert suf-
fered heart attacks and a
stroke in recent years.
According to the NCSJ, his
son, Lev Elbert, a former
Prisoner of Conscience, was
recently summoned to OVIR,
the visa office, expecting the
application to be granted. In-
stead, he was told it was
denied on grounds that he had
failed to disclose "a former
marriage" in a previous ap-
plication. The charge was
false, the NCSJ said.
Haim Elbert was a graduate
of the Stalingrad Military
Academy and served as a com-
pany commander in the
Caucusus during World War
II. He was captured in 1942
and escaped from a German
prisoner of war camp after two
unsuccessful attempts. He sur-
vived in the POW camp by con-
cealing his identity as a Jew.
J-1IH3KJ nitsnnnn iron
PROJECT RENEWAL
woman who has determined to
make a difference not only for
herself, but for those around
her.
The youngest of four
children, Shira was born in
Hod Hasharon to immigrant
parents who arrived in Israel
in 1951 from Iraq. Growing up
in Gil Amal and educated in
Hod Hasharon, Shira served in
the Army and then studied at
Beit Berl, a local Teacher's
College, Receiving a BA in
Education. Her experience in-
cludes teaching Tenach and
literature in High School, as
well as writing short stories
and poems.
Having been the recipient of
a scholarship provided through
the Project Renewal Funds,
Shira has the responsibility of
volunteering her services
within her neighborhood. She
has put her studying and ex-
rriences to good use as the
ditor of the local
neighborhood newspaper.
Shira is very positive about her
experiences regarding the
changes she sees as the result
of Project Rnewal. .. physical
renovations, activities for all
ages, improvement in the level
of education, and enrichment
in the lives of the residents as
a result of the social programs
through Project Renewal.
When asked about her
future, she replies, "I hope to
travel to the United States,
specifically to South Broward
and Palm Beach to visit and
maybe to work in the com-
munity to teach or tutor
Hebrew ... in all aspects,
grammar, reading, writing
and even about the land of
Israel. Then I can come home
and begin my career in
teaching.' She is adamant that
Project Renewal has made a
change in her life and given
her the opportunity to study
and have a profession in
teaching.
Clashes Continue
In Old City
Continued from Page 1
by Jews were denounced by
Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset
speaker Shlomo Hille and
others.
Cohen, a colonel in the
reserves, was treated at
Hadassah Hospital for head in-
juries caused by a rock. "I
fought through all of Israel's
war and was never injured.
Now I was hit by a Jew,"
Cohen said. He stressed that
his attackers came from out-
side the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood in West
Jerusalem where Amdi's fami-
ly is observing shiva, the
seven-day mourning period.
This was confirmed by local
residents. Rage in the
neighborhood was directed
mainly at the press and toward
leftists, such as Cohen. It was
orchestrated by religious ex-
tremists who were identified
as "outsiders."
A memorial service for Amdi
was held last Thursday under
the watchful eyes of some 400
g)licement sent to keep order,
ut the police have been
unable to curb violence against
Arabs in Shmuel Hanavi or in
the Moslem quarter where
Amdi was a student at the
Shuvu Banim yeshiva, run by
the Breslav Hasidim.
Arabs living near the
yeshiva have left their homes
for fear or reprisals by
students. They have been sub-
jected to harassment nightly
since the murder of Armdi.
Several homes were burned
and Arabs have been stoned in
the streets. Arabs have also
engaged in stoning. A preg-
nant woman resident of the
Old City's Jewish quarter was
grazed by a rock last Thursday
afternoon.
The leader of the Shmuel
Hanavi neighborhood commit-
tee said Thursday that the
violence was likely to continue
until the end of the shiva
period. Kollek said that after
the mourning period, "one
should deal with the
phenomenon of the yeshiva
which consistently provokes
the Arab population.'
Kollek spoke to reporters
during a visit to the scene of
the murder on Khaldiye
Street. He said the hotheads
who have been harassing
Arabs all week are serving the
ends of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
Knesset Speaker Hillel said
on a radio interview that the
police must do their utmost to
prevent further hooliganism
because that is exactly what
the terrorist organizations
want to provoke.
Meanwhile, Baruch Mazel,
secretary of the Knesset fac-
tion of the extrmeist Kach Par-
ty, was released on bail. He
had been jailed for 24 hours on
suspicion of organizing riots in
the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood.
Charges
Dropped
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charges have been dropped by
New York City Criminal Court
Justice Roger Hayes against
all 55 rabbis and laypersons
who were arrested Oct. 12 at
the Soviet UN Mission here.
Their demonstration coincided
with the Reagan-Gorbache\
Iceland summit meeting and
Yom Kippur eve.
The protesters, who had
been charged with disorderly
conduct, were organized by
the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry and the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry as part of "Operation
Redemption," a series of
peaceful arrests at Soviet of-
fices in the New York area in
which 415 persons have been
arrested since January 1985,
including 173 rabbis and 12
legislators.


Italian Jewry Disturbed
Over Teaching
Catholicism In Schools
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Quadrennial Congress of the
Union of Italian Jewish Com-
munities (UIJC) is focusing on
what is perhaps the most
disturbing issue for Italian
Jewry since the last Congress
four years ago the teaching
of the Catholic religion in the
Italian school system.
Classes on Catholicism at all
grade levels were introduced
as a result of the 1985 accord
between the Education
Ministry and the Catholic
Episcopal Conference. While
they are voluntary, there is no
feasible alternative for the
very small minority of Jewish
and other children who do not
want to participate.
THE PROBLEM is high on
the agenda of the three-day
conference attended by
delegates from the Jewish
communities of Rome, Milan,
Turin, Florence, Naples,
Venice and many smaller cities
all over Italy. Youngsters from
the Italian Jewish Youth
Federation handed out pam-
phlets at the entrance to the
Palazzo Barberini, where the
conference is taking place,
calling for repeal of the 1985
accords.
The UIJC has compiled
numerous case histories testi-
fying to the ill-effects of the
new law on non-Catholic
children, particularly in
nursery and kindergarten. It is
especially alienating for
Jewish children who cannot, at
their age, understand why
they must be separated from
their friends while Catholic
ideology is taught, the UIJC
points out.
Vittorio Ottolenghi, one of
the four Jewish represen-
tatives on the eight-member
"Mixed Commission" (govern-
ment and UIJC) which is
charged with revising and up-
dating the 1930 treaty bet-
ween the UIJC and the Italian
state, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
is hope the present law may be
suspended immediately and
revised within 2-3 years, at
least as it applies to nursery
and kindergarten.
ITALIAN JEWS have been
joined in protest by the
Waldensian Protestants. Con-
cerned Moslem parents in Italy
also reportedly intend to make
themselves heard through the
channels of Arab Embassies in
Rome.
The Congress is the gather-
ing where every four years
Italian Jews elect their official
representatives, plan their
future and try to gain perspec-
tive on their past.
The opening ceremonies
were honored by the presence
of President Francesco
Cossiga, the first Italian chief
of state ever to attend such an
event. It was addressed by
Foreign Minister Giulio An-
dreotti who spoke for the
human rights of Soviet Jews,
and by the 1986 Nobel
Laureate in Medicine, Dr. Rita
Levi-Montalcini, who traced
the intellectual and moral con-
tributions of Italian Jewry
through the centuries, sym-
bolized by the history of her
own family.
AT THE LAST Congress, in
1982, the UIJC was in a
budgetary crisis which
threatened such communal
services as the Jewish schools
in Rome where nearly half of
the country's 40,000 Jews live.
The community was then also
divided over Israel's invasion
of Lebanon.
But a better atmosphere
prevailed at Monday's open-
ing. 1 tie iinanciai situation nas
improved and Israel is once
again the focus of Italian
Jewish unity. A matter up for
discussion is a revision of the
statutes of the self-governing
UIJC which, since the last
Congress, has been transform-
ed from a public institution
with obligatory registration
and Jewish community taxa-
tion for all Jews, into a
private, voluntary association.
Participants in the Leadership Develop-
ment Program of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County met recently at the
home of Michael Burrows, Federation
Board Member, for the first program of the
1986-87 year. Abe Gittelson (standing), an
Associate Director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education in Miami, facilitated
a workshop on the essential components
for Jewish survival.
Reagan Administration Arms Disclosure
Not To Effect Conspiracy Trial
Hjou axt Unulktd to oin
THE RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
at a
COMMUNITY-WIDE ZIMRIAH (Songfest)
ana
CHILDREN'S PLEA
FOR
SOVIET JEWRY
DATE: DECEMBER 17. 1986
TIME: 7:00 P.M. 8:30 P.M.
PLACE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
5801 Parker Avenue
West Palm Beach
PLEASE CONTACT TOUR
REMGIOUS SCHOOIS fOR DITAIIS
P cS/tontoxtJ )
DEPARTMENT Of EDUCATION
OE THE IEWISH FEDERATION
OE PAIM BEACH COUNTV
On Confutation unit.
THE IEWISH EDUCATORS COUNCIl
OF PAIM REACH COUNTV
and
THE SOVIET |EWR* TASK EORCE
Of THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIl
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
disclosures of the Reagan Ad-
ministration recently that it
approved covert shipments of
American weapons to Iran
"have no bearing whatsoever"
on the prosecution of 17 defen-
dants, including four Israelis,
charged with conspiracy to sell
American weapons to Iran, an
Assistant U.S. Attorney told a
court here last week.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Loma Schofield made the
statement in her opening
remarks at a pretrial motion
hearing in Manhattan's
District Court. The defendants
in the case face charges of con-
spiracy to resell $2.5 billion of
American arms to Iran and of
falsifying the documents need-
ed to gain U.S. approval for
the sales.
SCHOFIELD TOLD
Federal Judge Leonard Sand
that she had discussed the case
with Justice Department of-
ficials and people in the Na-
tional Security Council who in-
formed her that this case is not
related to any of the covert
arms shipments approved or
orchestrated by the Reagan
Administration.
Defense attorneys challeng-
ed the prosecution's state-
ment, noting a remarkable
convergence of the accounts of
defendants in the case and the
events confirmed by the
Reagan Administration and
other sources in the past
weeks.
Attorney Paul Grand,
representing the alleged mid-
dleman in the conspiracy, Sam
Evans, told the court there
was a "startling overlap, coin-
cidence and identity," between
what the defendants had said
on tape and what was actually
happening in government.
ON THE tapes recorded
secretly from December, 1985
to April, 1986 with the help of
an Iranian informant, Cyrus
Hashemi, who posed as an Ira-
nian arms buyer, the defen-
dants said they believed the
policy toward selling weapons
to Iran was under evaluation
within the government.
The defendants said they
believed the Administration
would approve the arms
shipments. In a later tape, the
defendants said the arms deal
had been approved and that
Vice President George Bush
favored it, Secretary of State
George Shultz was against but
nevertheless it would go for-
ward. These positions on the
Iran policy within the Ad-
miministration have also been
confirmed, Grand said.
The defendants also said
arms sales would be allowed
only for the purpose of further-
ing contacts with Iran.
SAND DID NOT rule on the
attorneys' motions which
would require the U.S. At-
torney's office to produce
evidence of what the Ad-
ministration's policy on shipp-
ing arms to Iran has been in
fact for the past two years and
not what the Administration
purported it to be.
Sand told the defense at-
torneys that he was not certain
that such material would be
relevant to or would help the
dedendants' case. He did not
rule on the motion last Tues-
day, but is expected to do so
within the month.
William Kunstler, attorney
for defendant Nicos Minardos,
asked the court to produce the
autopsy and toxicology reports
on the government's key
witness Cyrus Hashemi, who
died in London apparently of
leukemia in July. The U.S. At-
torney's office has said that its
investigation indicated that
Hashemi died of "apparently
natural" causes. Kunstler in-
dicated that it is possible that
Hashemi was killed.
He noted that Hashemi's
death could only help the pro-
secution and hurt the defense
because the defense would not
have the opportunity to cross-
examine the key witness.
KUNSTLER ALSO made a
motion to exhume Hashemi's
body to investigate the
possibility of a murder. It was
denied.
Hashemi, an Iranian ex-
patriate, has emerged as one
of the intriguing puzzle pieces
in the case. Recent press
reports indicated that former
U.S. Attorney General Elliot
Richardson had arranged a
contact between American of-
ficials and Hashemi last year
in efforts to free American
hostages in Lebanon.
According to defense at-
torneys in the case, Hashemi
played a similar role in 1980
when the Carter Administra-
tion contacted him to expedite
the release of the American
hostages in the U.S. Embassy
in Tehran. Hashemi was in-
dicted in 1984 for selling
American weapons to Iran,
after an FBI surveillance of his
room in 1980-81 revealed his
activities.
Attorneys have said
Hashemi made a deal with the
U.S. Attorney's office to act as
an informant in this case in ex-
change for leniency on the
1984 charges.
KUNSTLER REFERRED
to an unconfirmed rumor dur-
ing the hearing. He suggested
that a defendant named in the
indictment, John de la Roque,
who is still a fugitive, is really
Lt. Col. Oliver North of the
Marine Corps, a highly placed
official of the National Securi-
ty Council. North is reportedly
one of the chief architects of
the Iranian-U.S. arms ex-
change and often disguises
himself and uses false names
to conceal his identity.
On the tapes, the defendants
discuss de la Roque's role in
the negotiations. He is said to
be, on the tapes, a former
member of the Delta Force
who is very friendly with
Marine Corps Commandant
Gen. P.X. Kelley and with
other top Administration of-
ficials. On one of the tapes,
Evans told Hashemi that de la
Roque met with Bush's aides
in West Germany to discuss
the covert shipment of arms to
Iran.
The defense attorneys also
made motions to subpoena
North, National Security Ad-
viser John Poindexter, Bush
and other government of-
ficials. Sand did not rule on
this motion.
Refusenik Kogan
Arrives In Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yit-
zhak Kogan, a former elec-
tronics engineer who became
an Orthodox Jew during his
12-year quest for permission to
emigrate from the Soviet
Union, arrived in Israel with
his family last week.
Kogan, who won the name of
"Tzadik (holy man) of Len-
ingrad," was greeted at Ben-
Gurion Airport by an ecstatic
crowd of Habad Hasidim. He
stepped from the plane garbed
in a black kaftan and wearing a
long beard.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Pialm Beach Cdunty/Friday, November 28,1986
J eres Appeals For 'Civilized Way'
1 > Deal With Religious Differences
By RRAY ZUCKOFF
CHIC GO (JTA) An
appeal the Jewish people to
avoid a >plit within its ranks
over i Jgious and secular
issues vas issued here by
Israeli Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres. He urged that
"a civilized way be round to
deal with religious dif-
ferences" that have become
exacerbated in Israel and the
United States.
Addressing more than 3,000
Jewish leaders from North
America and abroad at the
55th General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations
here, Peres said that Jewish
life is marked by variations,
with different strains and dif-
ferent beliefs between and
among the religious and
secular elements in Israel and
the U.S. The variations, he
said, do not worry him. But, he
added, "I am worried about
our unity. Let's be careful not
to split. We are too small a
people to become two or three
people instead of one."
Peres declared: "I call upon
everybody, let's argue without
hate; let's decide our positions
and listen to one another,
among your synagogues and
between the religious and
secular."
THE FOREIGN Minister's
remarks were in keeping with
the General Assembly theme
of Klal Yisrael, the pursuit of
unity in the midst of diversity
and the coexistence of diversi-
ty for the sake of unity. His
remarks were also made
against a backdrop of discord
and disharmony between the
Orthodox on the one side and
the Reform and Conservative
movements on the other over
numerous issues of halacha
(Jewish law), and the restric-
tion imposed on the Conser-
vative and Reform movements
in Israel by the Orthodox
establishment.
Peres, whose remarks on the
imperative need for Jewish
unity were greeted by prolong-
ed applause, said, "I think it is
for you and for us to mobilize
goodwill, to call upon the
heads of each strain to see the
need for Klal, Yisrael, not just
the conviction of each
synagogue, important as it
may be, and to find the
necessary wisdom and pa-
tience and talent to have our
arguments in a way that won't
split us to pieces."
SPEAKING OF another
kind of unity, Peres focused on
the relations between the
United States and Israel. He
said the two countries are in
"an era of cooperation like
never before and with nobody
else. We are not afraid of the
greatness of the United States
and the United States is not
worried about the smallness of
Israel." He did not specify the
areas of cooperation nor did he
allude to reports about Israel's
cooperation with the U.S. in
sending arms to Iran.
He said Israel was very pro-
ud of the fact that the U.S.
recently recognized Israel "by
a very special name, and I shall
pronounce it very clearly a
non-NATO ally/' But Peres
explained that Israel is esen-
tially different than America's
European allies in a number of
ways.
"We do not ask the
American army to protect our
land or our skies," he asserted.
"We shall do that ourselves.
We are allies because we are
not reluctant, we are not shy
or apologetic in our relations
with the U.S. American equip-
ment, up to a point. Israeli
risk, when necessary. Definite-
ly, a non-NATO situation."
ANOTHER KIND of unity
stressed by Peres was interna-
tional cooperation to fight ter-
rorism on a global scale. "The
real danger which innocent
people and nations of goodwill
are facing is not so much full-
fledged wars run by armies but
the terrible criminal violence
of terror," he said. "I think in
many ways Israel was forced
to be the first to confront it
and the U.S. the second."
Terrorism, Peres said, must
be curbed if the peace process
in the Middle East is to con-
tinue. He said that Israel and
the U.S. can help bring peace
to the Mideast for all the peo-
ple. "Our enemies are not
Arabs, Moslems or Christians.
Our enemies are hostility,
belligerency and war," Peres
Aaher Nairn (left), a minister of the Israel Embassy in
Washington, with Jack J. Spitzer (center), chairman of the
David Ben-Gorion Centennial Committee; and Congressman
Sidney Yates (D., HI.) after passage last month of a congres-
sional resolution commemorating the 100th birthday of David
Ben-Gurion, first Prime Minister of Israel. Resolution was
sponsored by Rep. Yates and Sen. Rudy Boschwitz (R.,
Minn.) and was passed by both Houses of Congress before ad-
journment in October.
declared.
He said that "an interna-
tional involvement is also
necessary in order to stop ter-
rorism. The cost of terror from
the point of view of its victims
is high. But terror also affects
the Arab world itself. Leaders
are frightened to death
because of the continuous
threat to their lives, from the
level of mayors to the heads of
state. They cannot make the
right choice. They cannot
select the necessary policies in
order to save themselves from
the terrible expense of military
preparedness and the ongoing
danger of a new war. Unless
terrorism is fought, peace will
not happen at all."
PERES URGED the na-
tions of Europe, especially
West Germany as well as
Japan, whose gross national
Products have increased steep-
er over the past few years and
whose economies are well
organized and viable, to help
the Arabs economically.
"The economic situation of
some of the Arab countries
became so dramatic that their
own governments, their own
systems are in real danger,
and unless real help is offered
the danger will be augmented
and the road to peace will be
impeded," he declared.
But, Peres emphasized,
while international coopera-
tion is necessary tif combat
terrorism and to help stabilize
the economies of Arab coun-
tries, the international com-
munity cannot impose solu-
tions on the Arabs and Israel.
"No imposed solution will be a
success. The road to peace is
through free negotiations bet-
ween Tsrael and her Arab
neighbors," he said.
ISRAEL IS intent on pursu-
ing peace, Peres said, and has
proved this in relation to
Egypt and its ongoing efforts
with Jordan. "Israel is strong
enough to defend itself and is
strong enough to go and
negotiate peace with our
neighbors," he stated. "We
have won all the wars that
have been forced upon us. We
have decided this time to win a
peace."
The world, Peres observed,
"is convinced that Israel is
sincere in trying to halt the
dispute between the Arabs and
ourselves, peacefully,
diplomatically." One of the
consequences of this, he noted,
is that it "helps create a
climate of support for the
peace process in the United
States among the people and
in Congress.
Israel, Peres continued, has
moved in the direction of br-
inging peace to the Mideast
without the help of the United
Nations. The war with
Lebanon has come to an end,
the dispute with Egypt over
Taba has been settled, Arab
mayors have been given in-
creasing authority to run their
own municipalities in the West
Bank, and a Jordanian bank
has been allowed to open in the
West Bank. "Terror has sub-
sided in the West Bank,"
Peres observed. "There is 50
percent less terror this year
than the preceding year."
MEANWHILE Israel inter-
nally still faces some problems.
Peres said there is "no sense in
covering up the divisiveness in
Israel between Sephardim and
Ashkenazim, between
religious and secular groups
and between religious groups
themselves as well and bet-
ween the secular groups as
well, and the Arabs in Israel
who do not get a feeling of
equality." But, he added, "I
have a feeling that the ethnic
divisiveness is diminishing. A
great thing has happened.
Both the Ashkenazim and
Sephardim have begun to feel
Jewish. They have a greater
feeling of equality. We are cor-
recting some mistakes regar-
ding the Arab minority. We
are implementing the things
we demanded when we were
minorities."
Peres also listed some other
achievements in Israel, in-
cluding a balanced budget, a
halt to inflation, increased
foreign trade and a decreased
trade deficit, the absorption of
16,000 Ethiopian Jews who
came to Israel under Opera-
tion Moses, and the ongoing
rehabilitation of impoverished
neighborhoods under Project
Renewal.
The next task for Israel in-
ternally is to settle the Negev,
"the last frontier of Israel,' as
Peres put it, and to make the
desert bloom in line with the
vision of David Ben Gurion,
Israel's first Prime Minister.
The centennial of his birth is
being celebrated this year.
EARLIER IN the day
Thursday (Nov. 13), Peres ad-
dressed some 5,000 people at a
noontime rally for Soviet
Jewry. The Foreign Ministry
told the participants who brav-
ed freezing weather, that the
fight for Soviet Jews is "not a
fight with Russia, not out of
hatred. We are a peaceful peo-
ple. The struggle is for the
right to be a people with our
own tradition who want to be
able to pray to the Lord,
educate our children in our
culture and live a Jewish life."
He called the effort "the moral
struggle of our time," a strug-
gle "that we shall win."
Chicago Mayor Harold
Washington echoed that view
in his remarks at the rally. He
said "this is a moral struggle
in which there are no neutrals.
We choose to stand for the
right of Soviet Jews to prac-
tice their own religion without
fear of repression or reprisal
and for those who chose to
leave to be allowed to do so."
Eloquent appeals on behalf
on Soviet Jewry were also
made by Raymond Epstein,
chairman and former presi-
dent of the CJF; Morris
Abram, president of the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry; Alexander Kushnir, a
refusenik recently allowed to
emigrate after a 10-year bat-
tle; and Pamela Cohen, presi-
dent of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jewry.
Women's Division
1987 Campaign Major Events
THURSDAY, JANUARY 15,1987
Lion of Judah
$5,000 minimum commitment
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18,1987
Pacesetters Luncheon
$1,200 minimum commitment
J0wish Fdration of Palm Btach County
832 2120
*s A v 1987 Campaign -
__* Major Events
SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 13,1986
Major Gifts Dinner
Honored Quest
BENJAMIN NETANYAHU
Israel's Ambassador to the UN
$25,000 minimum commitment
THURSDAY, JANUARY 8,1987
President's Dinner
At The Breakers
$10,000 minimum commitment
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,1987
Community Dinner
At The Breakers
$1,200 minimum commitment
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County
832-2120
i


Friday, November 28, 1986/The-Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach Cotmty Page 13
Organizations
AMIT WOMEN
Rishona Chapter, is having a regular meeting on
Wednesday, Dec. 10, at 12:30 p.m. at the American Sav-
ings Bank, Westgate, C.V.
Entertainment and collation to follow. All members and
guests are welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
Tel Aviv Lodge No. 3015 will hold its next meeting on
Monday, Dec. 1, at 1 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom, 314
North "A" Street, Lake Worth. The Century Village Man-
dolin Ensemble will entertain with a medley of Jewish
music.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Menorah Chapter No. 1496 meets 12:30 p.m., Tuesday,
Dec. 9 at the American Savings Bank. Humorous skits will
be presented by the "Performers." Refreshments served.
Coming events:
Dec. 17, Wednesday, Dinner/Show at the Copacabana
night club, includes transportation.
Dec.30-Jan. 1, New Year's Weekend, includes Seaworld,
gala New Year's Party, Showboat dinner theatre. A bus
leaves every Saturday evening for games at the Seminole
Village. For information call Ruth Rubin.
Olam Chapter will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 3, at the
Challenger Clubhouse, Poinciana Dr., Lake Worth.
Refreshments will be served at 12:30 p.m. The speaker,
Ann Lipton, Jewish Education Director of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, will confront you with
some provocative questions, and some surprising answers.
Bring your husband and friends.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
NATIONAL WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Boynton Beach Chapter coming events:
Wednesday, Dec. 3 There will be a dual piano recital at
the home of Clara Lang at 1 p.m. Pianists, Clara Lang and
Evelyn Tunick.
Wednesday, Dec. 10 Library Trust Luncheon at the
Doral Country Club, Miami. Call Etta Kasten.
Wednesday, Dec. 10 to Saturday, Dec. 13 Regency
Spa-Hotel, 10101 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour; Gratuities to
waiters and busboys included.
Monday, Dec. 15 Paid up membership meeting and
MINI lunch at the Royal Palm Club House, 544 NE 22
Ave., Boynton Beach. Entertainment will follow. 12:30
p.m.
Monday, Dec. 22 Drama Study Group: The subject will
be Lillian Hellman, given by Sally Lehrman, at the Royal
Palm Club House, 544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach, 1 p.m.
HADASSAH
Aviva Chapter Paid-up membership buffet brunch will
take place at noon on Monday, Dec. 8 at the Beach Federal
Bank on Gun Club Road and Military Trail. Laura Shep-
pard co-manager of Chamber Theater will give a one-
woman performance. The Board will meet at 10 a.m.
Paid-up membership luncheon for Cypress Lakes
Chapter on Monday, Dec. 8, noon, at Morse Geriatric
Center, No. Haverhill Rd., West Palm Beach. Kosher
catered luncheon. Playlet will be performed. Donation $7.
Golds Meir-Boynton Beach will hold their general
membership meeting on Thursday, Dec. 18, at 12:30 p.m.
at Temple Beth Sholom, 315 North "A" St., Lake Worth.
Past President, Sydelle Goldenberg will conduct a
Memorial Tribute to the late Estelle Schwartz for her
outstanding work in Hadassah. Following this, Cantor
Howard Dardashti, of Temple Beth Sholom will entertain
with a medley of songs.
Members and friends are invited to attend. Refreshments
will be served.
Coming event:
Sunday, Dec. 14 Habimah Players Matinee at the
Lake Worth High School. Tickets start at $12.50 for the
first five rows; $8 for the orchestra, and $6 for the mez-
zanine. For tickets: Kay Warren, Mary Scheff, or Gert
Rosen.
Shalom W. Palm Beach will participate in the Communi-
ty Plea for Soviet Jewry to be held on Wednesday, Dec. 10,
7:30 p.m., at Temple Beth El, 2815 No. Flagler, W. Palm
Beacn.
Coming events:
Dec. 22-26, four day holiday at Regency Spa, Miami
Beach. A complete Spa package is being offered.
Dec. 30-Jan. 1, celebrate New Year's with a trip to
Florida's West Coast, cruise on Sarasota Bay, dinner
theatres, New Year's party. For reservations for both
trips, contact Lillian Schack, Florence Siegel, Helen
Nussbaum.
Tikvah West Palm Beach meeting Dec. 15 at Anshei
Sholom, boutique 12:30. Dr. Mary Sandier will give a book
report on Kosher Cooking Around the World.
Coming events:
Dec. 7-10, Regency Spa, Miami Beach, call Regina.
Dec. 10, Soviet Jewry Day.
Dec. 14, Flea Market at Century Corners from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. call Florence.
Dec. 18, Israel Bond Luncheon at the Breakers Hotel,
Fashion Show, call Laura.
Tikvah Chapter will hold an Israel Bond luncheon at the
Breakers Hotel on Dec. 18. Guest speaker will be Gerda
Weissman, Klein.
The regular meeting of the West Boynton Chapter will
be hold on Dec. 1 at Temple Beth Kodesh on NE 26 St.
Coming event:
First Annual Bazaar and Flea Market on Sunday, Dec. 7
at Temple Beth Kodesh, NE 26 St., in Boynton Beach.
Doors open at 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Do your Chanukah shopp-
ing early.
Yovel Chapter will have a Study Group on Thursday,
Dec. 4. Sylvia Diamond will review the life and works of
Aaron David Gordon from the book "Great Jewish
Thinkers of the 20th Century." Meeting is open to
members and guests.
HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS OF THE PALM
BEACHES
The Group will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 3,9:30 a.m. at
the American Savings Bank, at the West Gate of Century
Village on Okeechobee Blvd.
Guest speaker will be Lois Frankel the newly elected
State Representative District 83. Topic: Challenges Facing
Florida.
Refreshments will be served. For information call Ed
Lefkowitz.
Please reserve the date Dec. 21, 12:30 p.m., for our an-
nual Chanukah Party, at the Hyatt of the Palm Beaches.
SOUTH FLORIDA JEWISH CIVIL SERVICE
EMPLOYEES
The chapter's paid-up membership luncheon and holiday
party will be held on Sunday, Dec. 7, at 1:30 p.m. at the
Beach (Sunrise) Vacation and Travel Meeting Room, 4645
Gun Club Road, Gun Club Shopping Center, West Palm
Beach. Plaques of appreciation will be awarded to outstan-
ding deserving members for their services for the past
years to the chapter.
Wendy Cathey, Assistant Vice President and Branch
Manager of the Lincoln Savings and Loan will represent
the bank and present a $25 savings account to the lucky
winner. Gifts will be presented to all the paid-up members
as well as many door prizes and gifts.
The Hon. Dennis F. Dorsey and Prof. Donald 'Orsi'
Schultz will discuss "Education Our Natural Resources
The Senior Citizens."
Tickets are available for the annual luncheon and card
party which will be held on Sunday, Jan. 11. For informa-
tion and reservations on the luncheon please call Jeanette
S. Levine.
For information on the chapter meetings and member-
ship please call: Sid Levine, West Palm Beach; Jack
Wiener, Boynton Beach; Don 'Orsi' Schultz, Boynton
Beach.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Golden Rivers will hold its annual Flea Market on Sun-
day, Dec. 7 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in front of Atlantic
Federal Bank (next to Shoprite) at the corner of
Okeechobee and Haverhill Roads. There will be many
household items, articles of clothing, something for
everyone, at low prices.
Okeechobee Chapter will run its annual Rummage Sale
on Sunday, Dec. 14, "Under the Trees" on Southern Blvd.,
just west of Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
Century Chapter will hold its next meeting on Dec. 11, at
Anshei Sholom, at noon. "The Performers' will entertain
with a brand new "(Yiddish) Vaudeville" show. There will
also be a Chanukah Candle Lighting Ceremony. All are
welcome.
Coming events:
Dec. 22-25, four days and three nights, at the Lido Spa,
Monday to Thursday; daily massage, three meals daily,
transporation, gratuities, entertainment, line dancing with
Sylvia Friedland daily.
Dec. 27, Saturday matinee, "Follies" at the Royal Palm
Dinner Theatre.
Dec. 30, Tuesday to Thursday, Jan. 1, "New Year's
Weekend" two nights at Wilson World, Famous Sea
World, two full American breakfasts, one day at Epcot,
New Year's Eve at Mark Two Dinner Theatre, Cypress
Gardens, The Golden Years Water Ski Show, Aquacade
'83, Dinner Black Forest, only $250.

Robert Mayer Evans, veteran
newsman and film-maker,
will speak at Temple Israel
on Dec. 7, on behalf of the
State of Israel Bond
Organization. Mr. Evans has
lived and worked in several
dozen countries spread over
five continents. He is a
former CBS News Foreign
Correspondent and CBS
News Bureau Chief in
Moscow for the Soviet
Union. Norman Bauer,
honoree at the Sunday
Testimonial Brunch, will
receive the Heritage Award
from the State of Israel.
Engagement
Announcement
GOLD-FISHER
Stanley and Carol Gold of
Miami announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Har-
riet of Fort Lauderdale to
David Fisher, son of Albert
and Liela Fisher of Fort
Lauderdale.
Harriet is the grand-
daughter of the late Maurice
and Lena Gold and the late
Fred and Tillie Sandier, long
time residents of Miami.
She is a graduate of the
University of South Florida
and is currently employed as a
sales representative for
Sylvania Lighting Services.
David is a graduate of the
State University of New York
at Buffalo, and is the owner of
Sun Fabrics of Fort
Lauderdale.
A June wedding is planned
at Temple Samuel/Or Olom in
Miami.
LJROWARD
IJAPER *
PACKAGING
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
PALM BEACH S32 0211
QjROWARD
IJAPER a
IJACKAGING


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28,1986
Disinformation
Kalb Resigned, Shultz Not Far Behind
Continued from Page 5
"shouldn't get involved in any
operation where we try to mislead
our news media or our public in
any way, shape or manner. And as
far as I know, we haven't. And I
certainly wouldn't be part of
that." '
BUT ONE immediate casualty
from the escalating "disinforma-
tion" controversy was State
Department spokesman Bernard
Kalb, who resigned in protest on
Oct. 8.
"In taking this action," he said,
"I want to emphasize that I am
not dissenting from Secretary
Shultz, a man of integrity, a man
of credibility. Rather I am dissen-
ting from the reported disinfor-
mation program."
Kalb, a former television news
reporter who served in the State
Department for nearly two years,
said he was concerned "about the
impact of any such program on
the credibility of the United
States. Faith in the word of
America is the pulse beat of our
democracy. Anything that hurts
America's credibility hurts
America."
Thus, Kalb said he personally
could not continue as spokesman
for the State Department. "I'm
familiar with the absolute require-
ment of credibility," he said.
Kalb's surprise resignation has
generated enormous shock waves
in Washington. Coming on the eve
of President Reagan's mini-
summit with Soviet General
Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev, the
resignation clearly embarrassed
and weakened the President.
It has opened up many ques-
tions involving the Administra-
tion's overall credibility. Kalb's
dissent has clearly tended to con-
firm that the Administration had
indeed sought to plant false
stories in the U.S. news media as
part of a disinformation campaign
aimed at confusing Khadafy. Ad-
ministration officials deny any
such plan.
BUT KALB, the 64-year-old
former correspondent, could not
passively go along with the
reported effort. "You have a
choice as an American, as a
spokesman, as a journalist
whether to allow oneself to be ab-
sorved in the raaks of silence,
whether to vanish into unopposed
acquiescence or to enter a modest''
dissent," he told reporters during
an emotional news conference.
His voiced cracked and he was
near tears. He was applauded by
the journalists at the end of the
session.
Since the Washington Post first
disclosed the anti-Libya disinfor-
mation plot on Oct. 2, Kalb has
been deeply bothered. "It has pur-
sued me unshakably," he told the
New York Times.
"I have been agonizing about
this thing," he continued. "I knew
nothing about it. I was concerned.
I was concerned with the impact
of any such program on the
credibility of the United States
and the word of America and what
the word of America means ...
And I was concerned about my
own integrity.
"MY OWN integrity means
something to me personally, but in
the grand scheme of things I'm a
simple asterisk. What I know is I
didn't want my own integrity to
get scooped up in this
controversy."
At the White House, there was
deep anger at Kalb, especially
because of the timing of his dis-
sent. Many of Reagan's closest
political associates had never
trusted Kalb very much to begin
with. His appointment nearly two
years ago was pushed through
personally by Shultz.
Disinformation target was Libya's
Muammar Khadafy.
Kalb, in his resignation state-
ment, went out of his way to
praise Shultz. But the two men
clearly differed in their assess-
ment of the disinformation pro-
gram, and its impact on U.S.
credibility.
Shultz, in earlier defending
anything that might confuse
Khadafy, had quoted Winston
Churchill who said during World
War II: "In time of war, the truth
is so precious, it must be attended
by a bodyguard of lies."
Later, when a journalist told
Shultz that the disinformation
story represented a serious
"charge" against the Administra-
tion, the Secretary replied: "Why
is that a charge?
"If I were a private citizen
reading about it, and I read that
my government was trying to con-
fuse somebody who was conduc-
ting terrorist acts and murdering
Americans, I would say, 'Gee, I
hope it is true.' I don't see why
you think this is a charge."
BUT KALB obviously
disagreed. After agonizing for
several days, Kalb confronted
Shultz with his decision. The
Secretary did not try to change
his mind.
On Oct. 8, the Secretary issued
a terse statement: "I am sorry to
see Bernie Kalb go. I admire him
as a friend. Bernie has my thanks
for the job he has done, and I wish
him well."
White House Chief of Staff Don
Regan was irritated by Kalb's ac-
tion. But he also was defensive. "I
think a lot of this talk about our ly-
ing or dissimulation, or what have
you, has been overblown,
misunderstood," he said. "I don't
think the President has been
wounded at all."
Pressed on the CBS Morning
News to explain Kalb's resigna-
tion, Regan replied: "I'll leave
that up to you to ask Mr. Kalb.
He's an employee of the State
Department. He doesn't come
under me. And I've had no conver-
sation with him."
public that "we have not lied to
anyone. Did we have a plan to deal
with Muammar Khadafy? Of
course we did. We'd be derelict in
our duty if we didn't"
Regan, in response to another
question, said that Poindexter's
Aug. 14 memo outlining a disin-
formation program against
Khadafy was simply designed to
keep the Libyan leader "off-
stride." He said the U.S. hoped to
"keep questions in his mind. Let
him think that something was
goind to happen so as to keep him
off-stride. This man's a murderer,
a terrorist. We have to deal, and
deal with him so that he is con-
stantly off-stride."
Kalb, in an interview on ABC's
"Nightline" television program,
noted that when he accepted the
State Department assignment he
had said that the guidelines in-
cluded "no lies, no misleading, to
be as forthcoming as possible
within security constraints ..
I've sought to abide by those
guidelines."
Kalb also rejected the notion
advanced by some Administration
officials that the U.S. should
plant false stories in the foreign,
as opposed to American, news
media. He warned that such
stories overseas are quickly
"echoed" back home, and are
dangerous.
KALB CONFIDED only with
his wife, Phyllis, nd his younger
brother, Marvin Kalb of NBC
News, before making his an-
nouncement. "This was not an
easy thing for me to, but it's
something I had to do," he said.
"You know, I came here suddenly.
I was taken by surprise at the
Secretary's invitation, and I'm
leaving with as comparable sud-
denness. There seems to be an in-
evitability about it."
The son of Jewish immigrants
from Poland and Russia, Kalb
worked for the New York Times
from 1946 to 1961. He then joined
CBS News, serving in Hong Kong
and Indonesia for many years. In
1980, he joined NBC News, cover-
ing the State Department with his
brother.
USA Today reported that the
Cable News Network is interested
in hiring Kalb. But he has not
commented on his future plans.
In the meantime, one of
Poindexter's top aides, Howard
Teicher, has come under some
sharp private criticism from those
U.S. Navy Commissions
Technion To
Study Wave Patterns
HAIFA, Israel The
United States navy has com-
missioned Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology's Coastal
and Marine Engineering
Research Institute (CAMERI)
to study wave patterns in
Mediterranean ports. The fin-
dings will enable commanders
of the Sixth Fleet, currently in
the Mediterranean, to plan
fleet movements and predeter-
mine ports of anchor in accor-
dance with anticipated wave
patterns.
know in advance wave height,
force, direction, and other
vital criteria for specific ports
and times. Also included will
be information on climate,
wind factors, bathymetry (the
measurement of ocean water
depths), weather phenomena,
and tactics for varied weather
scenarios.
Taking part in the 18 month
study are experts in marine
hydrodynamics and computer
science. The research commis-
. sioned at Technion is part of a
During its initial stage, the series of projects on wave pat-
study will focus on the ports of terns being conducted by
Haifa and Ashdod. Later, it various institutions around the
will be expanded to encompass world for the U.S. Navy. The
other ports in the Eastern Technion project will cost
Mediterranean basin including $60,000 for the initial stages.
Crete, Cyprus, and Beirut.
The reasearch involves
development of a computeriz-
ed model for forecasting wave
patterns. The computer pro-
gram to be developed by Tech-
nion will enable the captain of
CAMERI is a joint sub-
sidiary of Technion and the
Israel Ports Authority. In-
itiated in 1976, CAMERI
engages in basic and applied
research aimed at contributing
officials opposed to the hardline
policy against Libya.
Teicher, director of
politico/military affairs at the Na-
tional Security Council, is said to
have been among those officials
briefing The Wall Street Journal
on the latest terror threats com-
ing from Libya. But he is said to
have the very strong support of
Poindexter.
Shamir Mum
Continued from Page 1
foreign press reports of the
plight of Iranian Jews were
exaggerated.
Shamir may have been refer-
ring to, among others, a New
York Times report from Vien-
na last week that "persecution
of Jews in Iran has reached
such intensity that hundreds of
them have joined a much
larger exodus of Moslem Ira-
nians fleeing the country."
The Times attributed its infor-
mation to refugees from Iran
arriving in Vienna and officials
of organizations there
assisting them.
According to Shamir, the
situation of Jews in Iran is no
worse than that of other
religious minorities and it has
not deteriorated. Asked who
he would like to see win the
Iran-Iraq war, he said he had
no sympathy for either side.
Shamir also stood firm on his
insistence that Israel violated
no British laws in the case of
Mordechai Vananu, the former
nuclear technician now in
custody in Israel who was
allegedly kidnapped in London
by Israeli agents last month..
"Vananu left (Britain) on his
own accord," Shamir said.
"We are not obliged to give
any promises to any country. I
cannot say we have promised
something to Britain but we
have only stated the fact that
we have not violated any
British law. And this person
(Vanunu) left Britain of his
own free will. That's all."
R^n wen, on *, ha h. ^^ThftTsSSFhS {"***"fT 23
anted to assure the American BJin in tha m~^~om ? improvement of ports and
wanted
sailing in the Mediterranean to
ships.
But reports from London
said the British government is
not satisfied with Israel's ex-
planation of Vanunu's disap-
pearance from London Oct. 1.
David Waddington, Minister
of State in the Home Office,
said in the House of Commons,
that while there is no evidence
Vanunu was kidnapped, "I cer-
tainly regard it as unsatisfac-
tory that the Israeli authorities
have declined to give any ex-
planation, or even the date of
his arrival in Israel."
Vanunu is awaiting formal
charges here for either es-
pionage or treason for giving a
British newspaper information
about Israel 8 alleged nuclear
weapons capabilities.
Supreme Court
To Hear Appeal
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Supreme Court has
agreed to hear the appeal of
Lithuanian-born Juozas
Kungys, a war crimes suspect,
against a Federal appellate
decision to strip him of his
U.S. citizenship. Kungys, 70, a
resident of Clifton, NJ., is ac-
cused of lying about his Nazi
past when he immigrated to
the U.S. in 1948 and obtained
citizenship in 1954. He is alleg-
ed to have participated in the
massacre of more than 2,000
Jews in Lithuania in 1941.


.
""r ~-
The Computerization
of Israeli Agriculture
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
HAIFA, Israel A decade
ago, scientists at the Faculty
of Agricultural Engineering at
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology developed a new
way of crating oranges. The
technique eliminated one of
the four binding wires which
held the crates together and
saved about a penny and a half
on each crate. "It's not much
when you consider a small
shipment with only a few con-
tainers," noted Prof. Kalman
Peleg of the Agricultural
Engineering Faculty, who
worked on the project. "But
when you're working with 50
million containers, it all adds
up to a lot of money."
The historv of Technion's
development in orange-crate
design reveals a problem
which is besieging many sec-
tors of Israeli agriculture. It is
beginning to compete with its
own inventiveness.
When the new design in
orange-crate packing was in-
troduced, the cost of
marketing Israel's Jaffa
oranges was reduced, and
Israeli citrus growers
benefited. Within a few years,
however, every major orange
grower in the world got wind
of the Technion design, and to-
day there's hardly an orange
shipped for export anywhere
on the Seven Seas that isn't
packed in a Technion-style
crate. Thus, today, Israeli
citrus exporters find
themselves competing against
their own ideas on the interna-
tional market.
The problem wouldn't be too
bad if Israel's agricultural
rivals copied only orange-crate
design. Major concerns arises
when one learns the full extent
of imitation. In recent years,
knowledge of Israeli
agricultural technology has
spread around the world.
Israeli greenhouse designs can
be found on Moroccan tomato
farms. Israeli irrigation techni-
ques can be seen in Spanish
citrus groves. Indeed, much of
North Africa and Southern
Europe has become a
showcase of Israeli
agricultural technology.
The problem is, however,
that all of this Israeli genius is
being used to help other coun-
tries compete against Israeli
produce in the lucrative
Western European market.
And Israel's agricultural rivals
have other advantages which
give them an edge in pricing:
cheap labor costs and shorter
shipping distances. Thus, a
Moroccan farmer, using Israeli
agricultural techniques, and
employing cheap labor, can
produce crops less expensively
than an Israeli farmer. And at
less than half the distance to
the markets, the transporta-
tion costs are much lower, too.
This situation could squeeze
Israeli produce out of the
marketplace but the
pressure will hopefully make
the Israeli farmers more com-
petitive than ever before.
Israeli agriculture thrives on
adversity. Each new challenge
serves to stimulate ingenuity
and proficiency. When adversi-
ty is persistent, so is creativi-
ty. Indeed, in Israel, necessity
is the mother of invention.
Sophistication in Israeli
agriculture began decades ago
in the border kibbutzim. Farm
workers learned, sometimes
tragically, that there was
great danger in simply shut-
ting down irrigation systems
in the fields during the even-
ing. Lone kibbutzniks were
favorite targets for sniping
terrorists. This untenable
situation led to the develop-
ment of computerized
automatic shut-off valves.
New developents in Israeli
agriculture have evolved in
response to terrorist attacks,
political isolation, the harsh
climate, and meager water
resources.
As part of the Lob Angeles-based Simon
Wiesenthal Center's new research and
Htepped-up efforts to track Naxi war
criminals. Center Dean Rabbi Marvin Hier
(second from left) recently met in Miami
with Venezuelan (omul General Benjamin
Ortega (second from right) to present his
government with a list of suspected Nazi
war criminals living in Venezuela. Accom-
panying Rabbi Hier was Robert L. Novak
(left), recently-appointed director of
development for the Center's new Southern
regional office based in Miami; and (right).
Congressman William Lehman, (D., Fla.)
one of the House of Representatives'
leading experts on South America. Includ-
ed on the Center's list were the names,
emigration data and alleged crimes of the
suspects and, in one case, a current
address.
Extradition Battle Shaping Up
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Attorney General Yosef
Harish is fighting proposed
legislation to avoid the extradi-
tion of William Nakash, a Jew
wanted for robbery and
murder in France. Nakash is
supported by a coalition of
rightwing and religious
elements who say they fear he
will be a target of revenge on
ethnic grounds if he is im-
prisoned in France. The
murder victim was an Arab.
Nakash allegedly killed him
in the course of a robbery in
the French town of Besancon
in 1983. France has asked for
extradition. But Justice
Minister Avraham Sharir has
proposed a special law that
would give him the authority
to impose a prison sentence on
Nakash in Israel equivalent to
whatever sentence is pro-
nounced in France.
The case is being argued
before the Ministerial Legisla-
tion Committee where Harish
maintained that the Justice
Minister's proposal runs
counter to Israel's legal
system as well as its interna-
tional legal commitments. He
also denounced Nakash as
"trash" who "came to Israel in
order to destroy it."
The Attorney General's
harsh words were in response
to a remark by Interior
Minister Yitzhak Peretz of the
Shash Party that the "Jewish
aspects" of the case should be
conidered. Nakash's attorney,
Ronald Rot, filed a complaint
against Harish with the
Justice Minister. "The At-
torney General has no moral or
functional right to call my
client trash," Rot said.
U.S. To Israel: Drop
Lavi and Bolster Navy
Leukemia Victim Given Small
Chance Of Recovery
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Doctors treating leukemia vic-
tim Michael Shirman said last
were announced by Dr. Haim
Brautbar of Hadassah Medical
Center here, where the tests
were made. Shirman was
hospitalized several days ago
Thursday that he has only a at Kaplan Hospital in Rehovot.
1A.1C ______A. _1_______ r .... CT_______>_ l.lli.1 .nm.ncf tfW
10-15 percent chance of sur-
vival, even with a bone mar-
row transplant from his sister,
Inessa Flerova, because his
condition has deteriorated
seriously in the past 11
months.
Flerova's initial request for
exit visas was denied by the
Soviet authorities. Later she
was told she could leave, but
without her husband and
children. As an international
campaign on behalf of Shirman
was mounted in the West, the
authorities relented to the ex-
tent that she could take her
young children to Israel,
however, her husband, Viktor
high asVp^ent Flerova aT Pf?"' ""** jff-feig^ norSrffteborder. They were
rived in lrnoi \*h k #WmO behind on a legal technicality. ^ firgt Katyusha fired into
Shirman urged his sister not Israel in two months,
family. As the
They said that if Flerova had
heen given permission to leave
the USSR last February, when
she first requested it, his
chances would have been
as
press conference on Capitol
Hill that doctors gave him only
three months to live unless he
had a bone marrow transplant.
His sister was the only possible
donor. The Soviet authorities
agreed some weeks ago to
allow Flerov to accompany his
wife.
RocketsFired
At Israel
TEL AVTV (JTA) A
number of Katyusha rockets
were fired at Israel from south
Lebanon last Tuesday. One ex-
ploded in Galilee causing slight
damage but no casualties. The
others fell in the security zone
week. His message disap-
pointed his Israeli hosts,
though his opposition to the
Lavi has long been known.
The Israelis maintain that
the production figures on the
Lavi projected by Zakheim and
other Pentagon officials are
unrealistically high and that
the Israeli cost-per-unit
figures are more realistic.
The American suggestion
that Israel build more missile
boats and submarines also
poses financial and technical
Eroblems. Israel has never
uilt submarines, and U.S.
naval shipyards build only
nuclear subs. They have not
built conventional undersea
craft for decades.
The Americans have sug-
gested two West German
shipyards and Zahkeim pro-
posed that Israel pay for the
vessels in goods or services
rather than cash. But the
Israelis say the costs are too
high for a barter deal.
On the other hand, the U.S.
is interested in building missile
boats for Israel, although
Haifa Shipyards has con-
siderable experience with that
type of craft and is badly in
need of orders.
nved in Israel with her family
three weeks ago.
. WITH SHIRMAN'S disease
in an advanced stage, the doc-
tors are uncertain whether to
go ahead with the transplant
because of the patient's
weakened condition and the
|poor outlook for success.
The prognosis was all the
imore painful because tests
|showed that Flerova's tissues
re entirely compatible with
ler brother's. The test results
to divide her
months dragged on, the cam-
paign intensified. Shirman, at-
tended by a physician, flew to
Reykjavik, Iceland, to appeal
personally to Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, who was
there for the Oct 11-12 sum-
mit meeting with President
Reagan.
Later he flew to
Washington, where he told a
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
said that there is no danger of
war in the near future and he
doesn't think Syria wants a
confrontation with Israel. He
said on a radio interview that
Israelis are not worried about
threats and bellicose
statements emanating from
Damascus and would not be
drawn into a clash. If Syria at-
tacked Israel, it would pay a
heavy price, Shamir said.
s>
5>
THINK ABOUT IT!
14% of all accidents involve
drinking or drugs
45% of all fatal accidents
involve drinking or drugs
MidrashaJudaica High School
TEEN/PARENT ISSUES FORUM
presents
The Danger of Drugs
And Alcohol"
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 3,7:45 p.m.
Jewish Community Day School
5801 Parker Avenue West Palm Beach
Midrasha is sponsored by The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County. For more information contact
Ann Lynn Llpton, Education Director
at the Federation office, 832-2120.
it


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
Christian Urges Jews To Avoid
Generalizing in Zionist Discussion
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Continued from Page 5-A
ween us is more artifical than real.
Criticism conducted within the
context of unequivocal support for
the existence and security of
Israel should include ongoing
discussion about resolving the
needs of Palestinian Arabs.
Responsible criticism also
demands careful consideration of
all the actors in the Middle East,
not just Israel.
IT IS MORE than a little
hypocritical, for example, for
Christians to continually criticize
Israeli policy on the West Rank as
"pushing out" Palestinians from
their homes and yet to ignore, as
we mostly have, the Judenrein,
not to mention Christianrein, of-
ficial policy of our "moderate" al-
ly, Saudi Arabia. It is hypocritical
for Christians to condemn Israel's
incursion into Lebanon and yet ac-
quiesce, by silence, in Syria's oc-
cupation of that tragic land.
One can, it seems, be anti-
Zionist simply by the selectivity of
what one chooses to criticize. The
line between anti-Zionism and
anti-Semitism is a notoriously thin
fine.
Two other points need to be
made more clear to Christians.
First, the emphasis in most
Jewish explanations of Israel to
Christians has naturally been on
the relationship between the
Holocaust and the moral justifica-
tion for the State, a point that is
becoming widely accepted.
BUT WHAT is lost in this em-
phasis is the fact that Israel is also
a refuge for Jews victimized by
Arab/Muslim intolerance. Hence
there is a susceptibility among
Christians to the anti-Zionist pro-
paganda line that Israel is a
Western "imposition" on Islam, a
solution to a Western problem
(anti-Semitism) forced on the
Muslim world.
The story of the Jews from
Yemen and other Arab lands forc-
ed to flee to Israel for survival
needs to be told. Israel can thus be
seen and supported as the proper
dwelling place, the heart of the
Jewish people whether
Western or Eastern.
The second point calls for
challenging the view, which I hear
more and more frequently among
Christians, that the Palestinians
are "the Jews of the Middle
East." An ideal response, of
course, would be a creative Zionist
solution to "the Palestinian pro-
blem," a phrase taken over from
the Jewish experience.
This would require the par-
ticipation of key Arab govern-
ments and the Palestinians
themselves. Whatever one thinks
of Palestinian peoplehood
historically, the fact remains that
the Palestinians now exist as a
people and must be dealt with as
such.
CHRISTIAN theologians need
to undertake the task of remin-
ding their co-religionists that the
Jews are Jews. For centuries,
with often tragic results, we
Christians have claimed to be "the
New Israel," a phrase nowhere
found in the New Testament.
To see Christian theologians
now declaring the Palestinians to
be "the true Israel" is frighten-
ingly reminiscent of certain
elements of the ancient teaching
of contempt. It needs to be
challenged theologically as well as
factually. Denying that Zionism is
racism, as most Christian
denominations have done, is only
the first step.
David Goldfarb's Daughter
In N.Y. for Week's Visit
By SUSAN RIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Olga Goldfarb, daughter of
the Soviet emigre David
Goldfarb, arrived in New
York Sunday fof a one-week
visit with her father, who is-
recuperating here from lung
cancer surgery. She was
granted a one-week tem-
porary visa by Soviet
emigration authorities last
week, a move considered
unusual for a refusenik
whose application to per-
manently emigrate from the
Soviet Union was concur-
rently pending.
David Goldfarb's seven-year
ordeal as a refusenik was abruptly
terminated Oct. 16 when in-
dustrialist Armand Hammer flew
him and his wife Cecilia to the
United States aboard his private
jet. The 67-year-old retired
geneticist was a patient in a
Moscow hospital, suffering from
complications of diabetes and
heart disease.
UPON HIS arrival in New
York, he was immediately admit-
ted to Columbia-Presbyterian
Medical Center where tests Oct.
29 revealed lung cancer. On Nov.
2, David Goldfarb sent a letter to
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev
asking that his daughter, who re-
mained behind in Moscow, be
allowed to emigrate to join him in
New York with her husband, Yuri
Lev, and two daughters, Katya,
10, and Nadia, 4.
In his letter, David Goldfarb
said of his daughter's family that
"They have been trying to obtain
exit visas together with me, and
there is no reason on earth why
they shouldn't be permitted to
follow me now The chances
that my daughter will make it
without high-level intervention
are small unless your overall
emigration policy changes."
Goldfarb also praised Gorbachev's
"recent reforms in other fields,"
which "make me believe that
change is possible."
Goldfarb was scheduled for
surgery Nov. 5, and Columbia-
Presbyterian was asked to pro-
vide that information to the
Soviets. Olga then applied for per-
mission for a temporary tourist
visa to visit her father in the
hospital, and was told on Nov. 11
to report to the OVIR emigration
office two days later to pick up her
passport, which contained a visa
good for one week's stay.
THE 34-YEAR-OLD pediatri-
cian was given permission only for
herself and was refused permis-
sion to bring along her older
daughter, as she had requested.
Olga told reporters at a news
conference at Kennedy Airport
that the granting of the emergen-
cy visa "happened so quickly. I
didn't think I would get it, but I
did. The Soviet Union is unpredic-
-table." She also said her parents'
release "is considered a miracle in
Moscow," and that she believes
her visa is part of that miracle.
The Comprehensive Senior Center through a Federal Grant
Title III of the Older Americans Act provides transportation
to persons 60 years or older, who do not drive or cannot use
the public transportation system, serves Hot Kosher Meals in
a group setting, delivers Kosher meals to homebound persons
and offers daily educational and recreational programs. Call
689-7703 for further information.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
at the JCC is designed to keep
persons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by registered dieti-
cian. Daily varied programs
educate and entertain older
adults each day. There is no
fee, but contributions are re-
quested. Reservations must be
made, call Carol or Lillian at
689-7703.
Monday, Dec. 1 "Games"
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Dec. 2 Informa-
tion About Seasons Perfor-
mances, by Florida Repertory
Theatre, Laura Weston
Wednesday, Dec. 3 "Ex-
ercise" with Shirley Sheriff
Thursday, Dec. 4
"Children of China," Slides,
Frank Lodge
Friday, Dec. 5 To be
announced
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
Kosher Meal delivered to their
home are eligible.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in a designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation. For more in-
formation and/or reservations,
call 689-7703 and ask for
Helen or Lillian in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:40 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Palm Beach County School
Board Adult Education
Classes: There are no set fees
for classes. Participants are
asked to make a contribution.
All classes are held at the JCC.
A new winter session will
begin Jan. 26.
Weight Control And Nutri-
tion: "The Gangs Weigh"
Monday, 2:15 p.m. Last class
Dec. 8.
Exercise And Health
Education: Wednesday, 10
a.m. Last class Dec. 10.
"Ways to Wellness":
Thursdays, 1:15 p.m. Last
class Dec. 19.
Writers Workshop: Friday,
10 a.m. Last class Dec. 12.
OTHER SENIOR
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series: Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m.
Second Tuesday Council:
Second Tuesday of each
month, 2 p.m.
TIMELY TOPICS/
ROUND TABLE
DISCUSSION
A group of men and women
meet each week to discuss all
phases of current events. For
lunch first at 1:15 p.m. make a
reservation by calling
Veronica at 689-7703. There is
no fee, but contributions are
requested. The regular discus-
sion group begins at 2:15.
SPEAKERS CLUB
Thursday, 10 a.m. Persons
wishing to stay for an extend-
ed Kosher luncheon get
together, make reservations
with Veronica, 689-7703.
AT YOUR SERVICE
Health Insurance
Assistance: The first and
third Wednesday of every
month at 1:30 p.m.
Legal Aid: A representative
from the Legal Aid Society of
Palm Beach County will be
available by appointment only
on the first Thursday of the
month.
Senior Employment: A
representative from the Na-
tional Council of Senior
Citizens is available by ap-
pointment. Call Veronica
689-7703.
VOLUNTEER
NEWS AND VIEWS
Volunteer your time and
talents. People are needed for
mailings, book reviews,
musical entertainment,
workers for the pre-school,
etc. Call Carol Fox for an ap-
pointment 689-7703.
Tel Aviv University
Offers Music Program
NEW YORK In coopera-
tion with the Overseas Student
Program (OSP), the Tel Aviv
University Samuel Rubin
Academy of Music is offering a
full-year Music Program in
1987-88 to American and
Canadian students currently
enrolled in undergraduate or
graduate degree programs.
Applications are being ac-
cepted through May 1, 1987.
This marks the first time the
Academy has opened any of its
programs to overseas
students, according to the an-
nouncement by the univer-
sity's Office of Academic Af-
fairs. Courses offered include
Orchestra Repertory,
Chamber Music, and
Workshop for Contemporary
Music. Students also have a
choice of OSP courses in Mid-
dle Eastern Studies.
All courses in the year-long
program are taught in English
and are designed to earn full
credit at home colleges and
universities. Participation in a
pre-semester Intensive
Hebrew Language Program is
required. Residence is in on-
campus dormitories.
Founded in 1945 and a part
of Tel Aviv University since
1966, the Samuel Rubin
Academy of Music is the only
institution of its kind in Israel
offering Bachelor's and
Master's degrees. A number of
former and present students of
the Academy have won top
prizes in international
competitions.
OSP music students are
eligible to participate in week-
ly public concerts and annual
competitions. Optional private
lessons (voice and instrumen-
tal) are available.
University-sponsored
weekend tours are an integral
part of the program. Sites in-
clude Jerusalem, Massada, Ein
Gedi and the Golan Heights.
For application forms and all
information, interested
students should write or call:
Office of Academic Affairs,
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University, 360 Lexington
Avenue, New York, NY 10017.

JCC News
For reservations and more information about the follow-
m-TmraiM' C YOUNG SINGLES (20'S AND 30'S)
Enioy a day of "fun in the sun" starting at 11 a.m. Sun-
day, Nov. 30 on the beach at Singer Island. Join the group.
Look for the large orange and white umbrella in front of
the Greenhouse.
Get together at the Center, 700 Spencer Dr., West Palm
Beach at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 3 to plan the winter
calendar and partake of a picnic type menu of French
bread, cheese and fresh fruit salad. Donation: $2. All are
welcome.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40-60)
Meet at the Center (700 Spencer Dr.) Monday, Dec. 1 at
7:30 p.m. to plan a winter season of exciting events. All are
welcome. Coffee and cake will be served. Donation: $1.
On Sunday, Nov. 30 at 5 p.m., meet at Riviera Lanes for
an evening of bowling fun. Come play or just cheer all
are welcome. Afterwards the group will go out for a bite to
eat. Donation: $1 plus your own fare.


Cardin Says
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Pluralism Needed in Jewish Life
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
CHICAGO (JTA) A call
for pluralism in Jewish life in
North America, abroad and in
Israel was issued here last
week by Shoshana Cardin,
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations. She was
making her keynote address to
more than 3,000 Jewish
leaders from the United
States, Canada and overseas
attending the 55th General
Assembly of the CJF.
The commitment to
pluralism "nurtures mutual
respect among specific
ideological groupings and
seeks the pursuit of unity even
in the midst of serious dif-
ferences," Cardin declared in
her address entitled "Klal
Yisrael Federation's Role in
Building Community." This
also was the theme of the en-
tire convention which ended
last week.
"WE BELIEVE that
honest differences can be a
source of creativity. We
believe that the agenda which
unites us is far more powerful
and significantly more com-
pelling than the agenda which
divides us," she said. Further-
more, Cardin stated, "We are
committed to a civil, even if
passionate discourse. We are
opposed to shrill and strident
discourse.'
The CJF leader emphasized
that "the Federation environ-
ment must not be used to
leverage specific religious or
ideological support at the ex-
pense of other religious per-
suasions and ideologies ...
Respect for different
ideological, religious or
political persuasions we ac-
cept. Demanding that one
ideology or persuasion prevail
to the exclusion of others we
decry."
Cardin's address was a
dramatic reaffirmation that
the CJF is a collectivity of
diversity in unity and the unity
of diverse elements and views,
all working to "enhance the
opportunities for effective
community building" and mak-
ing it "a shared responsibili-
ty," as she put it. All Jews,
Cardin declared, "should be
participatory Jews." She
noted that "Judaism is not a
spectator ideology."
HER ADDRESS was in
many ways markedly different
in scope and substance than
those CJF presidents have
delivered in previous General
Assemblies. It was less con-
crete in terms of organiza-
tional guidelines, but more
powerful in terms of a
philosophical guideline for "a
vision of Klal Yisrael at home,
abroad and in Israel."
Without specifying, her
urgent appeal for pluralism in
Jewish life alluded to some of
the discordant and vexing
religious, social and economic
issues extant in Jewish life.
These ideas include: the
ongoing conflict over who is a
Jew; the role of the Orthodox
establishment in Israel; the
nuclear weapons build-up by
the United States and Soviet
Union; the Reagan Ad-
ministration's economic and
social policies affecting the
lower and middle income
segments of American society;
the Jewish community as a
Shoshana Cardin
single or multi-issues-oriented
community; and attitudes
toward abortion, the sanc-
tuary movement, and the kind
of leadership the Jewish com-
munity requires to assure its
vitality and viability.
CARDIN ALSO obliquely
criticized financially affluent
movers and shakers in the
community who seek to use
their influence to try to sway
the Federation movement
toward their views, as well as
the Reform movement, which
has indicated that it would
have to rethink its financial
contributions to Israel unless it
was allowed a greater role in
religious affairs.
"CJF and Federations must
maintain an open forum where
all can participate, where all
can express themselves
without feeling threatened and
without threatening others.
We must be extremely wary of
tactics which may be coercive
or tactics which may seek to
threaten our ability to respond
to the needs of Klal Yisrael by
withholding money," she said.
"Money should not and can-
not be used as an instrument
for the pursuit of specific
ideological or religious
primacy in the pursuit of
power or to redress grievances
... I call upon our co-workers
in all the ideological and
political movements of Jewish
life to remain fervent and pas-
sionately committed to their
ideologies to seek to per-
suade to seek to engage one
another through creative, civil
and effective discourse.
"I MUST, however, be can-
did. I fear that a significant
segment of our people can be
alienated as a result of the
animosity and hostility that is
being generated in our com-
munal framework. Some may
even choose a spectator role
because of this negativism."
Cardin urged the assembled
leaders to "be prepared to
take risks and design new ap-
proaches test new ideas and
experiment with new modes in
the art and science of what the
French call 'engage' in order
to build a more just, more open
and more equitable larger
society."
Cardin said the task of
Federations is to maintain an
effective and all-inclusive
Jewish community by
demonstrating "that our doors
are open to all who can belong
... to all who may wish to par-
ticipate but don't know how.
"JEWS IN OUR continen-
tal community, affiliated or
unaffiliated, detached or even
alienated, must begin to feel
viscerally that the communal
enterprise the Jewish Federa-
tion wants them, is ready to
embrace them and make room
for them ...
"We should not set precondi-
tions, on the contrary, we
must convey the message that
our communal enterprise
the Jewish Federation ex-
tends itself and invites every
individual and every discrete
group into an interdependent
relationship with community,
representing our belief that
'all Jews are responsible to and
for one another.' "
Herbert M. Mabry, left, president of the Georgia State AFL-
CIO, receives the American ORT Federation Community
Ahcievement Award at a recent tribute dinner held at the
Hyatt Regency in Atlanta. Dinner chairman Sidney Feldman
presented the ORT award to Mabry 'in recognition of his
outstanding leadership and his accomplishments on behalf of
the people of Georgia.' Nicholas Bonanno, of the Interna-
tional Ladies Garment Workers' Union, and Tom Cordy, of
AMC Mechanical Contractors, were dinner co-chairmen.
Kahane Arrested In U.S.
For Disordely Conduct
By MICHAEL DEVEREY
Kansas City Jewish Chronicle
KANSAS CITY (JTA) -
Controversial Knesset
member Rabbi Meir Kahane
was arrested last Tuesday
night in Overland Park, Kans.,
a suburb of Kansas City, on a
charge of disorderly conduct
following a brief clash with
Palestinian protestors during
his speech.
He was released on his own
recognizance and is scheduled
to be arraigned in Overland
Park Municipal Court on Dec.
2. He could send a lawyer in
his place, according to a
spokesman for the Overland
Park Police Department.
About 20 minutes into
Kahane's 75-minute address at
the Doubletree Hotel in
Overland Park, he berated
Arab Dresence in Israel. Mousa
Israel Bonds To Conduct Intensive
Cash Collection Effort
An intensive community-
wide drive will be conducted
by the Palm Beach County
Israel Bond campaign
throughout the month of
December to convert all un-
paid Bond commitments into
cash for Israel's economic
development, Emma Gerr-
inger, Cash Chairman, has
announced.
The effort is part of a coast-
to-coast campaign in all com-
munities throughout the
United States and Canada.
"Israel urgently needs Bond
proceeds now to carry forward
the remarkable improvement
flowing from the Unity
Government's 1985 austerity
program to expand its
economic growth," Gerringer
said.
She continued: "Friends of
Israel have responded in 1986
with unprecedented Bond sup-
port. Heartening as it is, the
nation must have the actua^
proceeds that provide Israel
with the means to provide
more jobs and expand
economic opportunities.'
As part of Israel Bond Cash
Month, the Palm Beach Cash
Committee will mobilize local
Bond volunteers to make per-
sonal visits, set up telephone
squads and organize special
Israel Bond cash events during
December.
Friends of Israel who wish to
make their Israel Bond
payments are invited to call
686-8611.
Israel Not To Upgrade
Representation in Austria
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres said last Wednesday
that Israel does not plan to
upgrade its diplomatic
representation in Austria. This
apparently means that Israel
will not name a replacement
for Michael Elizur, the former
Ambassador in Vienna, who
retired several months ago.
The Vienna Embassy is
presently headed by a Charge
d'Affaires. A new Ambassador
would have to present his
credentials to President Kurt
Waidheim whose Nazi past
was exposed during the
Austrian election campaign
last summer.
Peres, replying to questions
in the Knesset, said Israel's
position toward Austria would
depend in the long run on
world reaction to Waidheim.
He noted that U.S. Secretary
of State George Shultz has
refrained from meeting with
Waidheim. But Soviet Foreign
Minister Eduard Shevard-
nadze has called on him.
Shukair, 41, a member of the
Palestinian Human Rights
Coalition, and a group of sup-
porters began shouting from
the back of the hotel's meeting
room.
"You took their land from
them," yelled one. Kahane
yelled for the protestors to be
quiet while he spoke. When
they did not, Kahane demand-
ed that the police eject
Shukair.
Then numerous police and
hotel security officers and
about 140 stunned onlookers
went hush as the rabbi charged
at Shukair. Arms flailed, pun-
ches reportedly were thrown,
and Gary Lockhart a Kach In-
ternational member from
Lawton, Okla., helped police
separate the rabbi and
Shukair.
Shukair and one of his sup-
porters, Rezek Muslet, 26,
were led away in handcuffs by
police, charged with disorderly
conduct. Another half dozen of
their supporters also left the
ballroom.
Despite the interruption,
Kahane, founder of the mili-
tant Jewish Defense League
and the Kach Party's lone
member of Knesset, continued
his speech at the Kach fund-
raiser. Overland Park police
arrested him afterward.
Preceding the speech,
Shukair and Muslet were seen
outside the hotel protesting
Kahane's appearance. They
picketed alongside about 35
protestors representing the
American Jewish Committee
here, two congregations, the
Jewish Community Relations
Bureau of Greater Kansas Ci-
ty, the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Kansas City and
Ruah/New Jewish Agenda.
Rabbinical Association
spokesman Rabbi Philip Field
issued a statement condemn-
ing Kahane and his views on
Arab-Israeli relations.
Earlier, Kahane attempted
to meet with leaders of the
Jewish Federation or JCRB,
despite their consistent opposi-
tion to him and his policies. As
in other cities, he was denied
access to Federation offices.


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
Bar Mitzvah
**
DEAN GOULD
Dean Gould, son of Gerald
and Lois Gould of Palm Beach
Gardens, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Nov. 29, at Temple
Israel. Rabbi Howard Shapiro
will officiate at this adult Bar
Mitzvah.
Dean attended the Universi-
ty of Florida and is interested
in music, weight training, and
Softball. He will be sharing this
simcha with his brothers and
sisters, Randy, Cary, David,
and Elizabeth.
CHAD MURRAY
Chad Derek Murray, son of
Iris and Warren Murray of
West Palm Beach, will become
a Bar Mitzvah on Friday, Nov.
28, at Temple Israel. Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will officiate.
Chad will be twinning his Bar
Mitzvah with Leonid Aronson
of Kharkov, Russia.
An eighth grade student at
Palm Beach Day School, Chad
is a member of the Drama
Club, Soccer Team, Lacrosse
Team and "E" Club. He is in-
terested in art and music and
is an avid collector.
Sharing the occasion with
Chad are grandparents Evelyn
and Henry Blum, long time
residents of West Palm Beach,
and Hilda and Joseph Murray
Chad Murray
of Hollywood, Florida.
LOUIS SHAPIRO
Louis Lee Shapiro, son of
Gale Nancy Shapiro of Well-
ington, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, Nov. 29, at Temple
Beth Zion. Rabbi Seymour
Friedman will officiate.
Louis is in the eighth grade
at Crestwood Middle School
Louis Shapiro
where he is a member of the
National Junior Honor Society
and plays saxophone in the
marching band. Louis has also
acted in several musicals. He
plays football, programs com-
puters and participates in the
"Adopt-a-Grandparent" pro-
gram at a local nursing home.
Louis will be celebrating this
occasion with his two younger
brothers.
Identification Card Proposal
For Converts Condemned
NEW YORK (JTA) A
proposal in Israel to stamp the
identification cards of converts
to Judaism to indicate they
were not of Jewish birth was
condemned here last week by
Ernest Michel, executive vice
president of the UJA Federa-
tion in New York.
The proposal, by the Interior
Ministry in Jerusalem earlier
this year, raised a storm of
protest in Israel and abroad. It
was not implemented.
Michel, addressing the an-
nual luncheon of American
Women for Bar Dan Universi-
ty to honor veteAn New York
UJA leader Myrtle Hirsch,.
said: "This is no policy for
Israel to adopt. I deplore it as
I'm sure every one of you
does."
MICHEL RECALLED
growing up in Nazi Germany
and being forced to carry an
identity card "in which the
Nazis identified me as a Jew
and gave me and every
other Jewish male the mid-
dle name of Israel. Every
Jewish woman and girl was
fiven the middle name of
arah for her identity card,
which was also stamped with
the epithet, 'Jude.' "
But, Michel added, "I think
it would be wrong of us to ex-
aggerate the failings of Israeli
society. Israel was created out
of hundreds of different
civilizations. It would be folly

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to expect that, after a brief 38
years, Israel should turn out to
be an ideal society. Yet it is a
nation that every one of us can
take pride in and rejoice in as
we share in its achievements."
Hirsch, chairman of Project
Renewal for the UJA-
Federation women's campaign
since 1980, was honored as "a
dedicated Zionist, outstanding
humanitarian and devoted
communal leader in the United
States and Israel."
HIAS Scholarship
Competition
NEW YORK, N.Y. HIAS,
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society, is inviting applica-
tions for its 1987 Scholarship
Awards. In announcing the
awards, Robert L. Israeloff,
HIAS President, explained
that those eligible to apply for
the scholarship awards are
HIAS-assisted refugees who
have settled here since 1976
and have made exceptional
progress in their adjustment to
life in the United States. Each
of the scholarships carries a
$500 stipend. The scholarships
will be presented at the
organization's 107th Annual
Meeting, scheduled for March
12, 1987.
Applications and further in-
formation may be obtained by
writing to HIAS Scholarship
Awards, HIAS, 200 Park
Avenue South, New York,
N.Y. 10003. Completed ap-
plications should be returned
to HIAS, postmarked no later
than Jan. 15. Award winners
will be notified no later than
Feb. 22.
The international migration
agency of the organized
Jewish community, HIAS
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society is a beneficiary of
the UJA-Federation of
Greater New York and Jewish
federations across the country.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33485. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Satur-
day 9 a.m.
CENTRAL CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF THE PALM
BEACHES: Services held Friday 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m.
at Temple B'nai Jacob, 2177 Congress Ave., West Palm Beach.
Mailing address: 500 South Australian Ave., Suite 402, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Howard
Bender.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. Evening services 6:30 p.m. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Mincha followed by Sholosh
Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:15 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services daily 8:30 a.m. Friday evening 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor
Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 29%, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5065. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:15 am. and 5:46 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Steven R.
n.lCantor Elliot. Rosenbaum. Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone3-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabba&Hervices, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5849
Okeechobee Blvd., No. 201, West Palm Beach, FL 33417. Phone
471-1526.


Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Candle lighting Time
Wiesel Friday evening, Nov.
28 at 8 p.m. at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center, the corner of
Southern Blvd. and Flagler
Drive.
This Service is in honor of
Elie Wiesel's achievement of
winning the Nobel Peace
Prize. Rabbi Levine will
Nov. 28-5:11 p.m.
highlight the life of Mr.
Wiesel. Cantor Newman will
chant special music.
During the Service, Denelle
Plummer, daughter of Marcie
and Louis Plummer, grand-
daughter of Jack and Rosalee
Stern, will receive her Hebrew
name. Jack Karako and Tami
Sucher will be called to the
Torah in honor of their upcom-
ing marriage.
Members and friends are
welcome to attend. Child care
under the direction of Miriam
Ruiz will be provided.
For more information, call
the office.
Rabbis To Hold Soviet Jewry Sabbath
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin
has inaugurated a series of
special Friday evening ser-
vices to honor selected groups
within the suburban Lake
Worth area.
Dec. 5 will be Poinciana
night at the Lake Worth
Jewish Center, 6513 Dillman
Road, West Palm Beach. All
residents of Poinciana are cor-
dially invited to meet and
greet their neighbors at the
regular Friday evening service
at 8:15 p.m. An Oneg Shabbat
will follow at which time you
will have an opportunity to
socialize with your neighbors.
All are invited.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
A New Year's Eve gala will
be held at Temple Beth Torah
900 Big Blue Trace, Well-
ington, Fla. It will be a fun par-
ty with a live dance orchestra,
party snacks, a late supper, in-
cluding a midnight champagne
toast, party favors, and much
more.
BYOB (bring your own bot-
tle) and a complete selection of
set-ups will be provided. The
festivities will begin at 9 p.m.
Tickets are limited,
therefore reservations and
table requests should be made
j Area
Deaths
ABRAMSON
Sidney, 83, of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Menormh Gardens and Funeral
Chapels, West Palm Beach.
ALSON
Or. Herbert E.. 67, of 118 Golden Lakes
Blvd., West Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
dian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
BERMAN
Anne, 80, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
BRIZELL
JJyer, 94. of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
DEUTSCH
W>, 93, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
norah Gardens and Funeral Chapels,
West Pklm Beach.
BORN
[*", 75, of Century Village. West Palm
ch Riverside Guardian Funeral Home.
*st Palm Beach.
KESSLER
Eleanore E., 71, of West Palm Beach.
wvenude Guardian Funeral Home, West
Palm Beach.
I LEE
AraoW. of Lake Worth. Levitt-Weinatein
^wteed Security Plan Chapel, West
Palm Beach.
ROSS
Arthur V, 67, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
wemstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
8TAV1SKY
j;v*lyn, 77, of Century Village, West Palm
?"oh Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
""""ty Plan Chapel, Weat Palm Beach.
TAUB
** W. of Lake Worth. Levitt-Weinstein
*^j"ed Security Plan Chapel, West
TAYLOR
*>' 82, of Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
'toeril Home. West Palm Beach.
yiSHNEW
""7. 70, of Lake Worth. Levitt-Weinstein
8K3.Sw:urity "- "* Wert
early. No tickets will be sold at
the door. Tickets are $30 each.
Please call Sylvia Lipkin for
reservations and details.
TEMPLE BETH ZION
Temple Beth Zion, the Con-
servative Temple of the
Western Communities, will
hold its first Traditional Shab-
bat Dinner Friday, Dec. 5. Ser-
vices will begin at 6 p.m. (a
change of normal time). Dinner
will start at 6:30 p.m. There
will be lots of eating, singing
and dancing.
Seating is limited reserva-
tions will be taken on a first
come first serve basis. For fur-
ther information please call
the Temple office.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel Shabbat Ser-
vice on Friday, Nov. 28 will be
conducted by Rabbi Howard
Shapiro. Chad Murray, son of
Iris and Warren Murray will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah. He
will read his torah portion and
chant the kiddush.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
During the evening service
child care will be provided.
On Saturday morning Nov.
29, Dean Gould, son of Lois
and Gerald Gould will have his
Adult Bar Mitzvah. Services
will begin at 10:30 a.m.
Everyone is invited.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Joel Levine and Can-
tor Anne Newman will conduct
a Service of Tribute to Elie
Area rabbis are being urged
to deliver sermons or
messages about the continuing
oppression of 400,000
refuseniks in the Soviet Union
at Friday evening services,
Dec. 5, and Saturday morning
services, Dec. 6. The an-
Council of the Jewish Federa-
tion of Palm Beach County,
and Rabbi Joel Levine of Tem-
ple Judea, Co-Chairman.
Rapaport. "The Soviet Jewry
Sabbath will also help motivate
the community to attend the
Community Plea for Soviet
Jewry to be held on Wednes-
day, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., at
Temple Beth El."
The Soviet Jewry Sabbath
will kick-off a ten day Com-
munity Plea for Soviet Jewrv
nouncement was made by Action Agenda and will help "tEwiifw, S3?aw!
Terry Rapaport, Chairman of the community become more J 9tt?et Jewry T?k.Fo5*
the Soviet Jewry Task Force aware of ways to help the
Community Relations refuseniks, according to Mrs
Rabbi Levine noted that
of the
Temple Emanu-El Begins
Adult Education Forums
Temple Emanu-El of Palm
Beach announces its Adult
Education program for
1986-1987, marking its
seventh anniversary season.
On Friday, Dec. 19, 8 p.m.,
Florida's first female Supreme
Court Justice, Rosemary
Barkett, will take over the
pulpit to speak on "The Ap-
pellate Courts; Their Balanc-
ing Function." Justice Barkett
has been the recipient of many
awards, has served on
numerous committees, and is a
member of several law
societies.
On Friday, Feb. 20, 8 p.m.,
attorney Marc A. Perl,
Sharanskys
Name Baby
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The daughter born to Avital
and Natan Shcharansky here
was named Rahel, during Sab-
bath services at a Jerusalem
synagogue. She was named for
a sister of her paternal grand-
mother, Ida Milgrom. She is
the couple's first child.
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member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the International
Association of Jewish Lawyers
and Jurists, and of the
American Jewish Congress
Liaison to the White House
and U.S. Congress, will be the
guest speaker.
The final Friday evening lec-
turer on March 20, 8 p.m., will
be Professor Lawrence L.
Langer, alumnae professor of
English, author of three books
on the Holocaust experience,
and Fullbright Professor of
American Literature. The lec-
tu s are open to the public.
All are welcome at no charge.
has sent every rabbi in the
community a packet which in-
cludes biographies of our com-
munity refuseniks, Cherna
Goldort and Yuli Edelshtein."
Rabbi Levine addressed the
Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis at a recent meeting and
was gratified with their
cooperation.
He also noted that rabbis
could also choose the next
week-end to deliver their
Soviet Jewry sermons if they
had previous commitments on
the designated day. "Our Ac-
tion Agenda concludes on Dec.
17 with the Children's Plea for
Soviet Jewry at the Jewish
Community Day School, so
that the weekend of Dec. 12
and 13 would be equally ap-
propriate," he said.
For more information, con-
tact Jack Karako, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
Beth Kodesh Central Conaervative Anshei Sholom *
Beth Abraham Altz Chaim Bath Am Bath El *
Recognizing That Vital Jewish
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a
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Page 20 The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
Canadian Official Examining Request to Charge Revisionist Author
By SON CSILLAG
MONCTON, New
Brunswick (JTA) The
case of Malcolm Ross, the
author of booklets alleging a
worldwide Jewish conspiracy
and denying that the
Holocaust happened, may be
reactivated because of a fresh
complaint.
Dr. Julius Israeli, the
original plaintiff in the case,
has lodged a new complaint
with New Brunswick
Attorney-General David
Clark, asking that Ross be
charged with promoting
hatred against Jews.
Israeli, an Orthodox Jew liv-
ing in Newcastle, about 100
Calgary Holocaust
Monument Unveiled
CALGARY (JTA) Western
Canada's second outdoor monu-
ment commemorating the Jewish
victims of the Holocaust was
unveiled here earlier this month at
the Calgary Jewiah Center.
The monument is a sculpture
commissioned from Roy
Leadbeater of Edmonton by Bill
and Alyse Schwartz, reports the
Jewish Star of Calgary. It
features abstract figures of a
man, woman and child rising from
flames in front of a black granite
wall on which names of Nazi vic-
tims eventually will be engraved.
October Inflation
2.4 Percent
TEL AVTV (JTA) Oc-
tober's inflation rate was 2.4
percent, the Central Bureau of
Statistics reports. That was
the lowest October rate in 13
years, noted Finance Minister
Moshe Nissim, who cautioned
that it was no indication of an
upward trend. He said October
traditionally is an "expensive"
month because of seasonal in-
creases in the prices of pro-
duce, clothing and footwear.
Histadrut labor federation
Secretary General Yisrael
Kessar noted that the October
increase was lower than had
been feared, but still was
relatively high. For the first 10
months of 1986, prices rose by
14.6 percent.
Hebrew U. Opens
Eight Days Late
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Hebrew University began
its 1986-87 academic year on
Nov. 10, eight days late
because of financial difficulties
and a related dispute with the
Housing Ministry. Facing a
court order, the university
opened its dormitories. It had
e; Her kept them closed
bemuse the Housing Ministry
refused to allow the university
to raise dormitory fees. About
5, students live in the dorms. The
university sought to raise the
fe< because of a financial
sh rtfall due to reduced
g< rnment funding over the
past several years. The freeze
of fees at the current level will
increase the deficit by $1
million.
miles from here, argues Ross
should be charged with
disseminating hate propagan-
da, because of several articles
Ross published in local
newspapers in New Brunswick
recently.
In articles published in the
Northumberland News and
The Miramichi Leader last
month, Ross writes why he
published his allegedly anti-
Semitic books, where the
public can buy them, and how
he came upon his beliefs.
Israeli believes that it is
enough to reactivate hate
charges against Ross.
Earlier this fall, Clark decid-
ed not to charge Ross with pro-
moting hatred against Jews
after a year-long investigation
by the Moncton police force
and the Attorney General's
office.
Clark explained that two of
Ross' books did not fall within
the definition of hate literature
and that a third probably did,
but was no longer available to
the public, having been out of
print for five years.
An embarrassed Clark
quickly decided to reconsider
that decision after several
journalists in New Brunswick
were able to get copies of the
book, "Web of Deceit," from
local libraries. Only a few days
later, however, Clark announc-
ed his original decision not to
charge Ross would stand.
Clark said in a telephone in-
terview that the Public Pro-
secutor's office is examining
Israeli's new complaint.
In the articles in question,
Ross, the Maritime Provinces
director of the Christian
Defense League, writes that
his "whole purpose in writing
and publishing is to exalt Jesus
Christ and to inform Chris-
tians about the great Satanic
movement which is trying to
destroy our Christian faith and
civilization.
"I believe that by throwing
off this hold of Jewish domina-
tion, we will usher in a period
of economic, political and
spiritual freedom."
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So, if you want to give your family food
that's nutritious and delicious and what
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Full Text
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
News From Hod Hasharon:
Faces From The Neighborhood
By ELIZABETH HOMANS, Project Renewal Community Representative
The success of Project
Renewal is not judged merely
by the physical improvement
of the neighborhood or even by
the social programs developed
during the past few years. The
success of the concept of Pro-
ject Renewal is seen in the
laces of the neighborhood
residents themselves ...
changes from despair to en-
couragement; from apathy to
enthusiasm; from non-
involvement to active par-
ticipation to make a difference
in their own lives and for the
future generations.
At first glance of the smiling
face and sparkling brown eyes
of Shira Itzhak, it is hard to
believe that she is 26 years old.
But after meeting and talking
with her, one realizes that this
is indeed an energetic young
And Then There Are None
Continued from Page 4
Focusing on this anger, Schulweis
observed that it has been
engendered by a world which has
brutally terrorized and relentless-
ly assaulted Jews to a point where
it has produced a "massive
psychic trauma." The twin
elements in the traumatic process
are the Holocaust and the betrayal
and abandonment of the Jews by
the world at large in the time of
their greatest need.
"Now, forty years after the
volcanic earthquake that shook
the foundation of Jewish trust, the
tremblors continue to explode,"
Schulweis said.
"But now they reveal more than
Nazi-fascist atrocity. In recent
years, documents record the
betrayal of allies, the callousness,
the abandonment of the Jews by
prelates, princes, presidents; by
putative allies in Foreign Offices,
Parliaments, Congress even by
the 'great Jewish hope' of those
years, the apotheosis of non-
Jewish friendship, Franklin
Delano Roosevelt."
Jewish anger, Schulweis con-
tinued, "spreads out not only
against Nazism or Fascism. Post-
Holocaust anger is against the
whole of Western civilization
liberalism, rationalism, univer-
salism, pluralism, humanism,
democracy, the gods that failed at
Auschwitz."
Gentile history has bequeathed
to the Jewish people "blood libel,"
"ghetto" "pogrom," "decided"
and "genocide," he observed. And
the Jewish response by some Jews
to Western civilization, Schulweis
said, is: "we have nothing to learn
from you and your ethos. How
dare you lecture to us about
morality, freedom of conscience,
the treatment of*iinorities, the
mandate of pluralism after
Dachau, afer Treblinka, after the
White Paper, after the Bermuda
Conference, after the Struma and
the St. Louis? After Buchenwald
and Birkenau, Western civiliza-
tion has forfeited all claims to
moral credibility. We are exempt
from your hypocritical double
standards for us."
More and more Jews view
Westernization as betrayal and
those who accept its values as col-
laborators in the destruction of
Judaic tradition, Schulweis said.
This leads to exclusivism of
"them" versus "us" and is even-
tually internalized as "some of
us." But which "some" now
begins to fester as suspicion of
fellow Jews who do not adhere to
the cultist "us."
Schulweis pointed out that this
erosive and corrosive process
leads Hebrew schools, yeshivot,
day schools, summer camps,
youth programs, nurseries and
toddler programs to be denomina-
tionally segregated. The
denominations do not fraternize,
he noted.
"They do not sing, or dance or
play and certainly do not pray
together," he said. The denomina-
tions claim common festivals and
fasts but do not celebrate them in
common. The end result,
Schulweis declared, is "denomina-
tional apartheid."
Jewish anger has its place if it is
a catharsis to unite, he said. But
excessive and observe anger
threatens to tear the Jewish peo-
ple apart. Finding the proper
target for anger mobilized psychic
and physical energies to combat
the forces which menace and
threaten the survival of the
Jewish people. But generalized
anger indiscriminate anger is im-
potence turned inward against
"some of us." It leads to the aban-
donment of the world and to self
proclaimed cultist purity,
Shculweis declared.
This, however, he said, is a
sterile form of existence. "How
we define ourselves and others,
whom we include and exclude,
with whom we choose to relate
and whom we choose to ignore,
determines our agenda and our
future," he said. "The post-
Holocaust question before us is
not who is a Jew or who is a rabbi
or who is my neighbor or who is
my brother or sister, but what
shall be the character of
Judaism."
To live in the world "is to live in
a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural,
multi-religious universe. To live
with Egyptians and Syrians, with
Blacks and Chicanos. The world is
our place, even as God is the place
of the world," Schulweis said. To
be engaged in the world "means
to related to non-Jews Chris-
tians, Moslems, gentiles, nations,
churches and with a vision and
wisdom to turn a new leaf in
Jewish history."
There are changes in attitudes,
statements and conciliar declara-
tions of the churches and "We
must take advantage of these
changes," he stated. "Something
new is happening among leading
theologians. We and our children
must read and hear new voices in
old institutions."
Schulweis referred to the chur-
ches' position on the conversion of
the Jews, the understanding of
the spiritual and emotional mean-
ing of Israel, the internal ques-
tioning of Christian prejudices,
the change of teaching texts in
Chrisian schools, the respect and
relevance of Jewish tradition and
contemporaneity.
"I am more interested in the
changing attitudes and teachings
of the churches' contemporary
leaders than in their ancestors'
failings; more in the churches'
descendants than in the churches'
ancestors ... I am more in-
terested in gaining new friends
and in fixating on old enemies,"
he said.
Schulweis said that for too long
a time Jews have spoken about
"the consipiracy of evil." It is now
time to begin speaking about "the
conspirary of good."
In an impassioned plea to the
assembled Jewish leaders at the
General Assembly, Schulweis call-
ed attention to "a muted part of
contemporary Jewish history," to
the "tragic neglect of uncounted,
unknown, unsung, unbefriended
gentiles who risked their lives and
the lives of their families to
shelter, feed and protect our
hounded people during the Nazi
era."
Schulweis referred to "zechor,"
the Jewish imperative to
remember. This imperative he
pointed out, refers not only to the
evil but also to the good. It is not
fair that the goodness of the gen-
tiles who helped be forgotten, he
said.
"We properly hunt down the
predatory criminals and their col-
laborators and bring them to the
bar of justice. We need our peo-
ple needs a Simon Wiesenthal
to search out the rescuers, record
their lives in our history, help
them and raise them to high
honor."
He pointed out that few young
Jews know about the Christian
families who hid Anne Frank; the
heroism of Mother Maria of Paris,
Father Bernard Lichtenberg, and
the villagers of Le Chambon who
were responsible for the rescue of
thousands of Jews in Nazi-
occupied France; the leaders of
the Bulgarian Othodox Church
who refused to deport Jews to the
Nazis; the Portuguese Consul
Aristides de Sousa Mendes who
saved thousands of Jews from
death and deportation; the Italian
army's rescue of thousands of
Croation and Yugoslav Jews; and
the sewer workers of Lvov wh
protected 17 Jews for 14 months
living in the sewers of Lvov, in-
fested with vermin, rats and cold.
Why, Schulweis declared,
"should Jewish children know on-
ly the killer of the dream and not
the heart and hand of gentile
rescuers?" Knowing this, he con-
cluded, would permit mercy to
control anger and offer a more
hopeful vision and heritage to the
next generation.
Refusenik.
Dead At 68
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Haim Elbert, a 68-year-old
Red Army veteran who with
his family had been denied exit
visas since they first applied in
1976, died in Kiev Nov. 8, the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported here.
His death came two days
after he learned that the latest
visa application for himself, his
wife, their sons and their
families had been rejected, the
NCSJ reported. Elbert suf-
fered heart attacks and a
stroke in recent years.
According to the NCSJ, his
son, Lev Elbert, a former
Prisoner of Conscience, was
recently summoned to OVIR,
the visa office, expecting the
application to be granted. In-
stead, he was told it was
denied on grounds that he had
failed to disclose "a former
marriage" in a previous ap-
plication. The charge was
false, the NCSJ said.
Haim Elbert was a graduate
of the Stalingrad Military
Academy and served as a com-
pany commander in the
Caucusus during World War
II. He was captured in 1942
and escaped from a German
prisoner of war camp after two
unsuccessful attempts. He sur-
vived in the POW camp by con-
cealing his identity as a Jew.
J1UI3ISJ niifij"mnn n>raxi
PROJECT RENEWAL
woman who has determined to
make a difference not only for
herself, but for those around
her.
The youngest of four
children, Shira was born in
Hod Hasharon to immigrant
parents who arrived in Israel
in 1951 from Iraq. Growing up
in Gil Amal and educated in
Hod Hasharon, Shira served in
the Army and then studied at
Beit Berl, a local Teacher's
College, Receiving a BA m
Education. Her experience in-
cludes teaching Tenach and
literature in High School, as
well as writing short stories
and poems.
Having been the recipient of
a scholarship provided through
the Project Renewal Funds,
Shira has the responsibility of
volunteering her services
within her neighborhood. She
has put her studying and ex-
periences to good use as the
Editor of the local
neighborhood newspaper.
Shira is very positive about her
experiences regarding the
changes she sees as the result
of Project Rnewal.. physical
renovations, activities for all
ages, improvement in the level
of education, and enrichment
in the lives of the residents as
a result of the social programs
through Project Renewal.
When asked about her
future, she replies, "I hope to
travel to the United States,
specifically to South Broward
and Palm Beach to visit and
maybe to work in the com-
munity to teach or tutor
Hebrew ... in all aspects,
grammar, reading, writing
and even about toe land of
Israel. Then I can come home
and begin my career in
teaching." She is adamant that
Project Renewal has made a
change in her life and given
her the opportunity to study
and have a profession in
teaching.
Clashes Continue
In Old City
Continued from Page 1-
by Jews were denounced by
Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset
speaker Shlomo Hille and
others.
Cohen, a colonel in the
reserves, was treated at
Hadassah Hospital for head in-
juries caused by a rock. "I
fought through all of Israel's
war and was never injured.
Now I was hit by a Jew,"
Cohen said. He stressed that
his attackers came from out-
side the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood in West
Jerusalem where Amdi's fami-
ly is observing shiva, the
seven-day mourning period.
This was confirmed by local
residents. Rage in the
neighborhood was directed
mainly at the press and toward
leftists, such as Cohen. It was
orchestrated by religious ex-
tremists who were identified
as "outsiders."
A memorial service for Amdi
was held last Thursday under
the watchful eyes of some 400
policement sent to keep order.
But the police have been
unable to curb violence against
Arabs in Shmuel Hanavi or in
the Moslem quarter where
Amdi was a student at the
Shuvu Banim yeshiva, run by
the Breslav Hasidim.
Arabs living near the
yeshiva have left their homes
for fear or reprisals by
students. They have been sub-
jected to harassment nightly
since the murder of Armdi.
Several homes were burned
and Arabs have been stoned in
the streets. Arabs have also
engaged in stoning. A preg-
nant woman resident of the
Old City's Jewish quarter was
grazed by a rock last Thursday
afternoon.
The leader of the Shmuel
Hanavi neighborhood commit-
tee said Thursday that the
violence was likely to continue
until the end of the shiva
period. Kollek said that after
the mourning period, "one
should deal with the
phenomenon of the yeshiva
which consistently provokes
the Arab population.'
Kollek spoke to reporters
during a visit to the scene of
the murder on Khaldiye
Street. He said the hotheads
who have been harassing
Arabs all week are serving the
ends of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
Knesset Speaker Hillel said
on a radio interview that the
police must do their utmost to
prevent further hooliganism
because that is exactly what
the terrorist organizations
want to provoke.
Meanwhile, Baruch Mazel,
secretary of the Knesset fac-
tion of the extrmeist Kach Par-
ty, was released on bail. He
had been jailed for 24 hours on
suspicion of organizing riots in
the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood.
Charges
Dropped
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charges have been dropped by
New York City Criminal Court
Justice Roger Hayes against
all 55 rabbis and laypersons
who were arrested Oct. 12 at
the Soviet UN Mission here.
Their demonstration coincided
with the Reagan-Gorbachev
Iceland summit meeting and
Yom Kippur eve.
The protesters, who had
been charged with disorderly
conduct, were organized by
the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry and the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry as part of "Operation
Redemption," a series of
peaceful arrests at Soviet of-
fices in the New York area in
which 415 persons have been
arrested since January 1985,
including 178 rabbis and 12
legislators.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 28, 1986
News From Hod Hasharon:
Faces From The Neighborhood
By ELIZABETH ROMANS, Project Renewal Community Representative
The success of Project
Renewal is not judged merely
by the physical improvement
of the neighborhood or even by
the social programs developed
during the past few years. The
success of the concept of Pro-
ject Renewal is seen in the
taces of the neighborhood
residents themselves .. .
changes from despair to en-
couragement; from apathy to
enthusiasm; from non-
involvement to active par-
ticipation to make a difference
in their own lives and for the
future generations.
At first glance of the smiling
face and sparkling brown eyes
of Shira Itzhak, it is hard to
believe that she is 26 years old.
But after meeting and talking
with her, one realizes that this
is indeed an energetic young
And Then There Are None
Continued from Page 4
Focusing on this anger, Schulweis
observed that it has been
engendered by a world which has
brutally terrorized and relentless-
ly assaulted Jews to a point where
it has produced a "massive
psychic trauma." The twin
elements in the traumatic process
are the Holocaust and the betrayal
and abandonment of the Jews by
the world at large in the time of
their greatest need.
"Now, forty years after the
volcanic earthquake that shook
the foundation of Jewish trust, the
tremblors continue to explode,"
Schulweis said.
"But now they reveal more than
Nazi-fascist atrocity. In recent
years, documents record the
betrayal of allies, the callousness,
the abandonment of the Jews by
prelates, princes, presidents; by
putative allies in Foreign Offices,
Parliaments, Congress even by
the 'great Jewish hope' of those
years, the apotheosis of non-
Jewish friendship, Franklin
Delano Roosevelt."
Jewish anger, Schulweis con-
tinued, "spreads out not only
against Nazism or Fascism. Post-
Holocaust anger is against the
whole of Western civilization
liberalism, rationalism, univer-
salism, pluralism, humanism,
democracy, the gods that failed at
Auschwitz."
Gentile history has bequeathed
to the Jewish people "blood libel,"
"ghetto" "pogrom," "decided"
and "genocide," he observed. And
the Jewish response by some Jews
to Western civilization, Schulweis
said, is: "we have nothing to learn
from you and your ethos. How
dare you lecture to us about
morality, freedom of conscience,
the treatment of iinorities, the
mandate of pluralism after
Dachau, afer Treblinka, after the"
White Paper, after the Bermuda
Conference, after the Struma and
the St. Louis? After Buchenwald
and Birkenau, Western civiliza-
tion has forfeited all claims to
moral credibility. We are exempt
from your hypocritical double
standards for us."
More and more Jews view
Westernization as betrayal and
those who accept its values as col-
laborators in the destruction of
Judaic tradition, Schulweis said.
This leads to exclusivism of
"them" versus "us" and is even-
tually internalized as "some of
us." But which "some" now
begins to fester as suspicion of
fellow Jews who do not adhere to
the cultist "us."
Schulweis pointed out that this
erosive and corrosive process
leads Hebrew schools, yeshivot,
day schools, summer camps,
youth programs, nurseries and
toddler programs to be denomina-
tionally segregated. The
denominations do not fraternize,
he noted.
"They do not sing, or dance or
play and certainly do not pray
together," he said. The denomina-
tions claim common festivals and
fasts but do not celebrate them in
common. The end result,
Schulweis declared, is "denomina-
tional apartheid."
Jewish anger has its place if it is
a catharsis to unite, he said. But
excessive and observe anger
threatens to tear the Jewish peo-
ple apart. Finding the proper
target for anger mobilized psychic
and physical energies to combat
the forces which menace and
threaten the survival of the
Jewish people. But generalized
anger indiscriminate anger is im-
potence turned inward against
"some of us." It leads to the aban-
donment of the world and to self
proclaimed cultist purity,
Shculweis declared.
This, however, he said, is a
sterile form of existence. "How
we define ourselves and others,
whom we include and exclude,
with whom we choose to relate
and whom we choose to ignore,
determines our agenda and our
future," he said. "The post-
Holocaust question before us is
not who is a Jew or who is a rabbi
or who is my neighbor or who is
my brother or sister, but what
shall be the character of
Judaism."
To live in the world "is to live in
a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural,
multi-religious universe. To live
with Egyptians and Syrians, with
Blacks and Chicanos. The world is
our place, even as God is the place
of the world," Schulweis said. To
be engaged in the world "means
to related to non-Jews Chris-
tians, Moslems, gentiles, nations,
churches and with a vision and
wisdom to turn a new leaf in
Jewish history."
There are changes in attitudes,
statements and conciliar declara-
tions of the churches and "We
must take advantage of these
changes," he stated. "Something
new is happening among leading
theologians. We and our children
must read and hear new voices in
old institutions."
Schulweis referred to the chur-
ches' position on the conversion of
the Jews, the understanding of
the spiritual and emotional mean-
ing of Israel, the internal ques-
tioning of Christian prejudices,
the change of teaching texts in
Chrisian schools, the respect and
relevance of Jewish tradition and
contemporaneity.
"I am more interested in the
changing attitudes and teachings
of the churches' contemporary
leaders than in their ancestors'
failings; more in the churches'
descendants than in the churches'
ancestors ... I am more in-
terested in gaining new friends
and in fixating on old enemies,"
he said.
Schulweis said that for too long
a time Jews have spoken about
"the consipiracy of evil." It is now
time to begin speaking about "the
conspirary of good."
In an impassioned plea to the
assembled Jewish leaders at the
General Assembly, Schulweis call-
ed attention to "a muted part of
contemporary Jewish history," to
the "tragic neglect of uncounted,
unknown, unsung, unbefriended
gentiles who risked their lives and
the lives of their families to
shelter, feed and protect our
hounded people during the Nazi
era."
Schulweis referred to "zechor,"
the Jewish imperative to
remember. This imperative he
pointed out, refers not only to the
evil but also to the good. It is not
fair that the goodness of the gen-
tiles who helped be forgotten, he
said.
"We properly hunt down the
predatory criminals and their col-
laborators and bring them to the
bar of justice. We need our peo-
ple needs a Simon Wiesenthal
to search out the rescuers, record
their lives in our history, help
them and raise them to high
honor."
He pointed out that few young
Jews know about the Christian
families who hid Anne Frank; the
heroism of Mother Maria of Paris,
Father Bernard Lichtenberg, and
the villagers of Le Chambon who
were responsible for the rescue of
thousands of Jews in Nazi-
occupied France; the leaders of
the Bulgarian Othodox Church
who refused to deport Jews to the
Nazis; the Portuguese Consul
Aristides de Sousa Mendes who
saved thousands of Jews from
death and deportation; the Italian
army's rescue of thousands of
Croation and Yugoslav Jews; and
the sewer workers of Lvov wh
protected 17 Jews for 14 months
living in the sewers of Lvov, in-
fested with vermin, rats and cold.
Why, Schulweis declared,
"should Jewish children know on-
ly the killer of the dream and not
the heart and hand of gentile
rescuers?" Knowing this, he con-
cluded, would permit mercy to
control anger and offer a more
hopeful vision and heritage to the
next generation.
Refusenik
Dead At 68
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Haim Elbert, a 68-year-old
Red Army veteran who with
his family had been denied exit
visas since they first applied in
1976, died in Kiev Nov. 8, the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported here.
His death came two days
after he learned that the latest
visa application for himself, his
wife, their sons and their
families had been rejected, the
NCSJ reported. Elbert suf-
fered heart attacks and a
stroke in recent years.
According to the NCSJ, his
son, Lev Elbert, a former
Prisoner of Conscience, was
recently summoned to OVIR,
the visa office, expecting the
application to be granted. In-
stead, he was told it was
denied on grounds that he had
failed to disclose "a former
marriage" in a previous ap-
plication. The charge was
false, the NCSJ said.
Haim Elbert was a graduate
of the Stalingrad Military
Academy and served as a com-
pany commander in the
Caucusus during World War
II. He was captured in 1942
and escaped from a German
prisoner of war camp after two
unsuccessful attempts. He sur-
vived in the POW camp by con-
cealing his identity as a Jew.
J1HI3ISJ niisj-mnn ni=m
PROJECT RENEWAL
woman who has determined to
make a difference not only for
herself, but for those around
her.
The youngest of four
children, Shira was born in
Hod Hasharon to immigrant
parents who arrived in Israel
in 1951 from Iraq. Growing up
in Gil Amal and educated in
Hod Hasharon, Shira served in
the Army and then studied at
Beit Berl, a local Teacher's
College, Receiving a BA UJ
Education. Her experience in-
cludes teaching Tenach and
literature in High School, as
well as writing short stones
and poems.
Having been the recipient of
a scholarship provided through
the Project Renewal Funds,
Shira has the responsibility of
volunteering her services
within her neighborhood. She
has put her studying and ex-
periences to good use as the
Editor of the local
neighborhood newspaper.
Shira is very positive about her
experiences regarding the
changes she sees as the result
of Project Rnewal.. physical
renovations, activities for all
ages, improvement in the level
of education, and enrichment
in the lives of the residents as
a result of the social programs
through Project Renewal.
When asked about her
future, she replies, "I hope to
travel to the United States,
specifically to South Broward
and Palm Beach to visit and
maybe to work in the com-
munity to teach or tutor
Hebrew ... in all aspects,
grammar, reading, writing
and even about the land of
Israel. Then I can come home
and begin my career in
teaching." She is adamant that
Project Renewal has made a
change in her life and given
her the opportunity to study
and have a profession in
teaching.
Clashes Continue
In Old City
Continued from Page 1
by Jews were denounced by
Mayor Teddy Kollek, Knesset
speaker Shlomo Hille and
others.
Cohen, a colonel in the
reserves, was treated at
Hadassah Hospital for head in-
juries caused by a rock. "I
fought through all of Israel's
war and was never injured.
Now I was hit by a Jew,"
Cohen said. He stressed that
his attackers came from out-
side the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood in West
Jerusalem where Amdi's fami-
ly is observing shiva, the
seven-day mourning period.
This was confirmed by local
residents. Rage in the
neighborhood was directed
mainly at the press and toward
leftists, such as Cohen. It was
orchestrated by religious ex-
tremists who were identified
as "outsiders."
A memorial service for Amdi
was held last Thursday under
the watchful eyes of some 400
policement sent to keep order.
But the police have been
unable to curb violence against
Arabs in Shmuel Hanavi or in
the Moslem quarter where
Amdi was a student at the
Shuvu Banim yeshiva, run by
the Breslav Hasidim.
Arabs living near the
yeshiva have left their homes
for fear or reprisals by
students. They have been sub-
jected to harassment nightly
since the murder of Armdi.
Several homes were burned
and Arabs have been stoned in
the streets. Arabs have also
engaged in stoning. A preg-
nant woman resident of the
Old City's Jewish quarter was
grazed by a rock last Thursday
afternoon.
The leader of the Shmuel
Hanavi neighborhood commit-
tee said Thursday that the
violence was likely to continue
until the end of the shiva
period. Kollek said that after
the mourning period, "one
should deal with the
phenomenon of the yeshiva
which consistently provokes
the Arab population.'
Kollek spoke to reporters
during a visit to the scene of
the murder on Khaldiye
Street. He said the hotheads
who have been harassing
Arabs all week are serving the
ends of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
Knesset Speaker Hillel said
on a radio interview that the
police must do their utmost to
prevent further hooliganism
because that is exactly what
the terrorist organizations
want to provoke.
Meanwhile, Baruch Mazel,
secretary of the Knesset fac-
tion of the extrmeist Kach Par-
ty, was released on bail. He
had been jailed for 24 hours on
suspicion of organizing riots in
the Shmuel Hanavi
neighborhood.
Charges
Dropped
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charges have been dropped by
New York City Criminal Court
Justice Roger Hayes against
all 55 rabbis and laypersons
who were arrested Oct. 12 at
the Soviet UN Mission here.
Their demonstration coincided
with the Reagan-Gorbachev
Iceland summit meeting and
Yom Kippur eve.
The protesters, who had
been charged with disorderly
conduct, were organized by
the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry and the Long
Island Committee for Soviet
Jewry as part of "Operation
Redemption," a series of
peaceful arrests at Soviet of-
fices in the New York area in
which 415 persons have been
arrested since January 1985,
including 178 rabbis and 12
legislators.



Italian Jewry Disturbed
Over Teaching
Catholicism In Schools
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Quadrennial Congress of the
Union of Italian Jewish Com-
munities (UIJC) is focusing on
what is perhaps the most
disturbing issue for Italian
Jewry since the last Congress
four years ago the teaching
of the Catholic religion in the
Italian school system.
Classes on Catholicism at all
grade levels were introduced
as a result of the 1985 accord
between the Education
Ministry and the Catholic
Episcopal Conference. While
they are voluntary, there is no
feasible alternative for the
very small minority of Jewish
and other children who do not
want to participate.
THE PROBLEM is high on
the agenda of the three-day
conference attended by
delegates from the Jewish
communities of Rome, Milan,
Turin, Florence, Naples,
Venice and many smaller cities
all over Italy. Youngsters from
the Italian Jewish Youth
Federation handed out pam-
phlets at the entrance to the
Palazzo Barberini, where the
conference is talcing place,
calling for repeal of the 1985
accords.
The UIJC has compiled
numerous case histories testi-
fying to the ill-effects of the
new law on non-Catholic
children, particularly in
nursery and kindergarten. It is
especially alienating for
Jewish children who cannot, at
their age, understand why
they must be separated from
their friends while Catholic
ideology is taught, the UIJC
points out.
Vittorio Ottolenghi, one of
the four Jewish represen-
tatives on the eight-member
"Mixed Commission" (govern-
ment and UIJC) which is
charged with revising and up-
dating the 1930 treaty bet-
ween the UIJC and the Italian
state, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
is hope the present law may be
suspended immediately and
revised within 2-3 years, at
least as it applies to nursery
and kindergarten.
ITALIAN JEWS have been
joined in protest by the
Waldensian Protestants. Con-
cerned Moslem parents in Italy
also reportedly intend to make
themselves heard through the
channels of Arab Embassies in
Rome.
The Congress is the gather-
ing where every four years
Italian Jews elect their official
representatives, plan their
future and try to gain perspec-
tive on their past.
The opening ceremonies
were honored by the presence
of President Francesco
Cossiga, the first Italian chief
of state ever to attend such an
event. It was addressed by
Foreign Minister Giulio An-
dreotti who spoke for the
human rights of Soviet Jews,
and by the 1986 Nobel
Laureate in Medicine, Dr. Rita
Levi-Montalcini, who traced
the intellectual and moral con-
tributions of Italian Jewry
through the centuries, sym-
bolized by the history of her
own family.
AT THE LAST Congress, in
1982, the UIJC was in a
budgetary crisis which
threatened such communal
services as the Jewish schools
in Rome where nearly half of
the country's 40,000 Jews live.
The community was then also
divided over Israel's invasion
of Lebanon.
But a better atmosphere
prevailed at Monday's open-
ing, me nnanciai situation nas
improved and Israel is once
again the focus of Italian
Jewish unity. A matter up for
discussion is a revision of the
statutes of the self-governing
UIJC which, since the last
Congress, has been transform-
ed from a public institution
with obligatory registration
and Jewish community taxa-
tion for all Jews, into a
private, voluntary association.
Participants in the Leadership Develop-
ment Program of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County met recently at the
home of Michael Burrows, Federation
Board Member, for the first program of the
1986-87 year. Abe Gittelson (standing), an
Associate Director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education in Miami, facilitated
a workshop on the essential components
for Jewish survival.
Reagan Administration Arms Disclosure
Not To Effect Conspiracy Trial
you axe. Dnuittd to fj-oin
THE RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
.i
COMMUNITY-WIDE ZIMRIAH (Songfest)
md
CHILDREN'S PLEA
FOR
SOVIET JEWRY
DATE: DECEMBER 17, 1986
TIME: 7:00 PM 8:30 P.M.
PLACE JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
5801 Parker Avenue
West Palm Beach
PLEASE CONTACT VOUR
RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS fOR DETAILS
^
JCy
DEPARTMENT Of EDUCATION
Of THE |EWISH FEDERATION
Of PALM SEACH COUNT*
On Coafuxntion THE |l WISH EDUCATORS COUNCIL
Of PALM REACH COUNT*
and
THE SOVIET IEWRV TASK FORCE
Of THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
disclosures of the Reagan Ad-
ministration recently that it
approved covert shipments of
American weapons to Iran
"have no bearing whatsoever"
on the prosecution of 17 defen-
dants, including four Israelis,
charged with conspiracy to sell
American weapons to Iran, an
Assistant U.S. Attorney told a
court here last week.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Lorna Schofield made the
statement in her opening
remarks at a pretrial motion
hearing in Manhattan's
District Court. The defendants
in the case face charges of con-
spiracy to resell $2.5 billion of
American arms to Iran and of
falsifying the documents need-
ed to gain U.S. approval for
the sales.
SCHOFIELD TOLD
Federal Judge Leonard Sand
that she had discussed the case
with Justice Department of-
ficials and people in the Na-
tional Security Council who in-
formed her that this case is not
related to any of the covert
arms shipments approved or
orchestrated by the Reagan
Administration.
Defense attorneys challeng-
ed the prosecution's state-
ment, noting a remarkable
convergence of the accounts of
defendants in the case and the
events confirmed by the
Reagan Administration and
other sources in the past
weeks.
Attorney Paul Grand,
representing the alleged mid-
dleman in the conspiracy, Sam
Evans, told the court there
was a "startling overlap, coin-
cidence and identity," between
what the defendants had said
on tape and what was actually
happening in government.
ON THE tapes recorded
secretly from December, 1985
to April, 1986 with the help of
an Iranian informant, Cyrus
Hashemi, who posed as an Ira-
nian arms buyer, the defen-
dants said they believed the
policy toward selling weapons
to Iran was under evaluation
within the government.
The defendants said they
believed the Administration
would approve the arms
shipments. In a later tape, the
defendants said the arms deal
had been approved and that
Vice President George Bush
favored it, Secretary of State
George Shultz was against but
nevertheless it would go for-
ward. These positions on the
Iran policy within the Ad-
miministration have also been
confirmed, Grand said.
The defendants also said
arms sales would be allowed
only for the purpose of further-
ing contacts with Iran.
SAND DID NOT rule on the
attorneys' motions which
would require the U.S. At-
torney's office to produce
evidence of what the Ad-
ministration's policy on shipp-
ing arms to Iran has been in
fact for the past two years and
not what the Administration
purported it to be.
Sand told the defense at-
torneys that he was not certain
that such material would be
relevant to or would help the
dedendants' case. He did not
rule on the motion last Tues-
day, but is expected to do so
within the month.
William Kunstler, attorney
for defendant Nicos Minardos,
asked the court to produce the
autopsy and toxicology reports
on the government's key
witness Cyrus Hashemi, who
died in London apparently of
leukemia in July. The U.S. At-
torney's office has said that its
investigation indicated that
Hashemi died of "apparently
natural" causes. Kunstler in-
dicated that it is possible that
Hashemi was killed.
He noted that Hashemi's
death could only help the pro-
secution and hurt the defense
because the defense would not
have the opportunity to cross-
examine the key witness.
KUNSTLER ALSO made a
motion to exhume Hashemi's
body to investigate the
possibility of a murder. It was
denied.
Hashemi, an Iranian ex-
patriate, has emerged as one
of the intriguing puzzle pieces
in the case. Recent press
reports indicated that former
U.S. Attorney General Elliot
Richardson had arranged a
contact between American of-
ficials and Hashemi last year
in efforts to free American
hostages in Lebanon.
According to defense at-
torneys in the case, Hashemi
played a similar role in 1980
when the Carter Administra-
tion contacted him to expedite
the release of the American
hostages in the U.S. Embassy
in Tehran. Hashemi was in-
dicted in 1984 for selling
American weapons to Iran,
after an FBI surveillance of his
room in 1980-81 revealed his
activities.
Attorneys have said
Hashemi made a deal with the
U.S. Attorney's office to act as
an informant in this case in ex-
change for leniency on the
1984 charges.
KUNSTLER REFERRED
to an unconfirmed rumor dur-
ing the hearing. He suggested
that a defendant named in the
indictment, John de la Roque,
who is still a fugitive, is really
Lt. Col. Oliver North of the
Marine Corps, a highly placed
official of the National Securi-
ty Council. North is reportedly
one of the chief architects of
the Iranian-U.S. arms ex-
change and often disguises
himself and uses false names
to conceal his identity.
On the tapes, the defendants
discuss de la Roque's role in
the negotiations. He is said to
be, on the tapes, a former
member of the Delta Force
who is very friendly with
Marine Corps Commandant
Gen. P.X. Kelley and with
other top Administration of-
ficials. On one of the tapes,
Evans told Hashemi that de la
Roque met with Bush's aides
in West Germany to discuss
the covert shipment of arms to
Iran.
The defense attorneys also
made motions to subpoena
North, National Security Ad-
viser John Poindexter, Bush
and other government of-
ficials. Sand did not rule on
this motion.
Refusenik Kogan
Arrives In Israel
TEL AVTV (JTA) Yit-
zhak Kogan, a former elec-
tronics engineer who became
an Orthodox Jew during his
12-year quest for permission to
emigrate from the Soviet
Union, arrived in Israel with
his family last week.
Kogan, who won the name of
"Tzadik (holy man) of Len-
ingrad," was greeted at Ben-
Gurion Airport by an ecstatic
crowd of Habad Hasidim. He
stepped from the plane garbed
in a black kaftan and wearing a
long beard.




Italian Jewry Disturbed
Over Teaching
Catholicism In Schools
Friday, November 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11

By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Quadrennial Congress of the'
Union of Italian Jewish Com-
munities (UIJC) is focusing on
what is perhaps the most
disturbing issue for Italian
Jewry since the last Congress
four years ago the teaching
of the Catholic religion in the
Italian school system.
Classes on Catholicism at all
grade levels were introduced
as a result of the 1985 accord
between the Education
Ministry and the Catholic
Episcopal Conference. While
they are voluntary, there is no
feasible alternative for the
very small minority of Jewish
and other children who do not
want to participate.
THE PROBLEM is high on
the agenda of the three-day
conference attended by
delegates from the Jewish
communities of Rome, Milan,
Turin, Florence, Naples,
Venice and many smaller cities
all over Italy. Youngsters from
the Italian Jewish Youth
Federation handed out pam-
phlets at the entrance to the
Palazzo Barberini, where the
conference is taking place,
calling for repeal of the 1985
accords.
The UIJC has compiled
numerous case histories testi-
fying to the ill-effects of the
new law on non-Catholic
children, particularly in
nursery and kindergarten. It is
especially alienating for
Jewish children who cannot, at
their age, understand why
they must be separated from
their friends while Catholic
ideology is taught, the UIJC
points out.
Vittorio Ottolenghi, one of
the four Jewish represen-
tatives on the eight-member
"Mixed Commission" (govern-
ment and UIJC) which is
charged with revising and up-
dating the 1930 treaty bet-
ween the UIJC and the Italian
state, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
is hope the present law may be
suspended immediately and
revised within 2-3 years, at
least as it applies to nursery
and kindergarten.
, ITALIAN JEWS have been
joined in protest by the
Waldensian Protestants. Con-
cerned Moslem parents in Italy
also reportedly intend to make
themselves heard through the
channels of Arab Embassies in
Rome.
The Congress is the gather-
ing where every four years
Italian Jews elect their official
representatives, plan their
future and try to gain perspec-
tive on their past.
The opening ceremonies
were honored by the presence
of President Francesco
Cossiga, the first Italian chief
of state ever to attend such an
event. It was addressed by
Foreign Minister Giulio An-
dreotti who spoke for the
human rights of Soviet Jews,
and by the 1986 Nobel
Laureate in Medicine, Dr. Rita
Levi-Montalcini, who traced
the intellectual and moral con-
tributions of Italian Jewry
through the centuries, sym-
bolized by the history of her
own family.
AT THE LAST Congress, in
1982, the UIJC was in a
budgetary crisis which
threatened such communal
services as the Jewish schools
in Rome where nearly half of
the country's 40,000 Jews live.
The community was then also
divided over Israel's invasion
of Lebanon.
But a better atmosphere
prevailed at Monday's open-
ing, i tie financial situation nas
improved and Israel is once
again the focus of Italian
Jewish unity. A matter up for
discussion is a revision of the
statutes of the self-governing
UIJC which, since the last
Congress, has been transform-
ed from a public institution
with obligatory registration
and Jewish community taxa-
tion for all Jews, into a
private, voluntary association.
Participants in the Leadership Develop-
ment Program of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County met recently at the
home of Michael Burrows, Federation
Board Member, for the first program of the
1986-87 year. Abe Gittelson (standing), an
Associate Director of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education in Miami, facilitated
a workshop on the essential components
for Jewish survival.
Reagan Administration Arms Disclosure
Not To Effect Conspiracy Trial
Hjou a\t Onvlttd to Q-oin
THE RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
at a
COMMUNITY-WIDE ZIMRIAH (Songiest)
ana
CHILDREN'S PLEA
FOR
SOVIET JEWRY
DATE: DECEMBER 17. 1986
TIME: 7:00 P.M.-8:30 P.M.
PLACE: JEWISH COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
5801 Parker Avenue
West Palm Beach
PLEASE CONTACT YOUR
RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS FOB DITAIIS
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
OF THE |EWISH FEDERATION
OF PALM REACH COUNTY
On Cm%jm*mtlm witt
THE IEWISH EDUCATORS COUNCIL
OF PALM REACH COUNTY
and
THE SOVIET IEWRV TASK FORCE
OF THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS COUNCIL
*bmst?
By MARGIE OLSTER
NEW YORK (JTA) The
disclosures of the Reagan Ad-
ministration recently that it
approved covert shipments of
American weapons to Iran
"have no bearing whatsoever"
on the prosecution of 17 defen-
dants, including four Israelis,
charged with conspiracy to sell
American weapons to Iran, an
Assistant U.S. Attorney told a
court here last week.
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Lorna Schofield made the
statement in her opening
remarks at a pretrial motion
hearing in Manhattan's
District Court. The defendants
in the case face charges of con-
spiracy to resell $2.5 billion of
American arms to Iran and of
falsifying the documents need-
ed to gain U.S. approval for
the sales.
SCHOFIELD TOLD
Federal Judge Leonard Sand
that she had discussed the case
with Justice Department of-
ficials and people in the Na-
tional Security Council who in-
formed her that this case is not
related to any of the covert
arms shipments approved or
orchestrated by the Reagan
Administration.
Defense attorneys challeng-
ed the prosecution's state-
ment, noting a remarkable
convergence of the accounts of
defendants in the case and the
events confirmed by the
Reagan Administration and
other sources in the past
weeks.
Attorney Paul Grand,
representing the alleged mid-
dleman in the conspiracy, Sam
Evans, told the court there
was a "startling overlap, coin-
cidence and identity," between
what the defendants had said
on tape and what was actually
happening in government.
ON THE tapes recorded
secretly from December, 1985
to April, 1986 with the help of
an Iranian informant, Cyrus
Hashemi, who posed as an Ira-
nian arms buyer, the defen-
dants said they believed the
policy toward selling weapons
to Iran was under evaluation
within the government.
The defendants said they
believed the Administration
would approve the arms
shipments. In a later tape, the
defendants said the arms deal
had been approved and that
Vice President George Bush
favored it, Secretary of State
George Shultz was against but
nevertheless it would go for-
ward. These positions on the
Iran policy within the Ad-
miministration have also been
confirmed, Grand said.
The defendants also said
arms sales would be allowed
only for the purpose of further-
ing contacts with Iran.
SAND DID NOT rule on the
attorneys' motions which
would require the U.S. At-
torney's office to produce
evidence of what the Ad-
ministration's policy on shipp-
ing arms to Iran has been in
fact for the past two years and
not what the Administration
purported it to be.
Sand told the defense at-
torneys that he was not certain
that such material would be
relevant to or would help the
dedendants' case. He did not
rule on the motion last Tues-
day, but is expected to do so
within the month.
William Kunstler, attorney
for defendant Nicos Minardos,
asked the court to produce the
autopsy and toxicology reports
on the government's key
witness Cyrus Hashemi, who
died in London apparently of
leukemia in July. The U.S. At-
torney's office has said that its
investigation indicated that
Hashemi died of "apparently
natural" causes. Kunstler in-
dicated that it is possible that
Hashemi was killed.
He noted that Hashemi's
death could only help the pro-
secution and hurt the defense
because the defense would not
have the opportunity to cross-
examine the key witness.
KUNSTLER ALSO made a
motion to exhume Hashemi's
body to investigate the
possibility of a murder. It was
denied.
Hashemi, an Iranian ex-
patriate, has emerged as one
of the intriguing puzzle pieces
in the case. Recent press
reports indicated that former
U.S. Attorney General Elliot
Richardson had arranged a
contact between American of-
ficials and Hashemi last year
in efforts to free American
hostages in Lebanon.
According to defense at-
torneys in the case, Hashemi
played a similar role in 1980
when the Carter Administra-
tion contacted him to expedite
the release of the American
hostages in the U.S. Embassy
in Tehran. Hashemi was in-
dicted in 1984 for selling
American weapons to Iran,
after an FBI surveillance of his
room in 1980-81 revealed his
activities.
Attorneys have said
Hashemi made a deal with the
U.S. Attorney's office to act as
an informant in this case in ex-
change for leniency on the
1984 charges.
KUNSTLER REFERRED
to an unconfirmed rumor dur-
ing the hearing. He suggested
that a defendant named in the
indictment, John de la Roque,
who is still a fugitive, is really
Lt. Col. Oliver North of the
Marine Corps, a highly placed
official of the National Securi-
ty Council. North is reportedly
one of the chief architects of
the Iranian-U.S. arms ex-
change and often disguises
himself and uses false names
to conceal his identity.
On the tapes, the defendants
discuss de la Roque's role in
the negotiations. He is said to
be, on the tapes, a former
member of the Delta Force
who is very friendly with
Marine Corps Commandant
Gen. P.X. Kelley and with
other top Administration of-
ficials. On one of the tapes,
Evans told Hashemi that de la
Roque met with Bush's aides
in West Germany to discuss
the covert shipment of arms to
Iran.
The defense attorneys also
made motions to subpoena
North, National Security Ad-
viser John Poindexter, Bush
and other government of-
ficials. Sand did not rule on
this motion.
Refusenik Kogan
Arrives In Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yit-
zhak Kogan, a former elec-
tronics engineer who became
an Orthodox Jew during his
12-year quest for permission to
emigrate from the Soviet
Union, arrived in Israel with
his family last week.
Kogan, who won the name of
"Tzadik (holy man) of Len-
ingrad," was greeted at Ben-
Gurion Airport by an ecstatic
crowd of Habad Hasidim. He
stepped from the plane garbed
in a black kaftan and wearing a
long beard.