The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00052

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


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Full Text

THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTY
thjewish flor idian
>^^ jjP OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 12 NUMBER 36
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21,1986
PRICE 35 CENTS
ft*
Sanctions Against Syria Approved By EEC
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Eleven of
the 12 European Economic
Community (EEC) member-
states agreed last Monday to
sanctions aganst Syria on the
basis of Britain's charge that
the Damascus government
was involved with terrorist
acts.
Only Greece refused to con-
demn Syria or vote for the
four-point sanctions program
at the EEC's Ministers Con-
ference in London hosted by
British Foreign Secretary Sir
Geoffrey Howe. The sanctions
themselves are considerably
less than Britain demanded at
an earlier EEC Ministers con-
ference in Luxembourg last
month.
They call for a total ban on
arms sales to Syria; suspen-
sion of high-level exchange
visits between Syria and EEC
countries; police surveillance
of Syrian diplomatic missions;
and security controls on the
Syrian Arab Airlines.
Britain broke diplomatic
relations with Syria on Oct. 24,
after charging that the Syrian
Ambassador in London and his
staff acted in collusion with
Nezar Hindawi, the Jordanian
national convicted of attemp-
Contiaued on Page 20
More than 220 community leaders recently County. Task Force Chairman, Dr. Mark
attended the Mideast Conference on Ter-
rorism sponsored by the Mideast Task
Force of the Community Relations Council
of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
Rattinger (left), greets guest speakers Jay
Fisher (center), attorney for the Klinghof-
fer Foundation, and former Iranian hostage
U.S. Ambassador Bruce Laingen.
(See story on Page 13)
Ginsburg to Address
Community Plea for
Soviet Jewry
UN Condemns Israel For
South Africa Dealings
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General
Assembly condemned by a
large margin Israel's "increas-
ing collaboration with the
racist regime of South
Africa," and demanded that
Israel terminate "all forms of
collaboration" with the
Pretoria government.
The vote last Monday night
was 102-29 with 26 absten-
tions. The anti-Israel vote,
singling Israel out for alleged
military and economic
cooperation with the apartheid
government of South Africa,
was one of eight resolutions
condemning all aspects of
South Africa's apartheid
policies. Israel is singled out
for condemnation on this issue
by the General Assembly
every year as a result of Arab
pressure despite the fact that
Arab and other countries are
engaged in trade and have
other ties with South Africa.
According to information
distributed by the Israel Mis-
Inside
Suite Visit Program
Inaugurated... page 3
Poet Predicted Holocaust
...page 5
Muriel Levitt is Beck with
'Random Thoughts' after
Summer Hiatus... page 7
Background Report on
Weapons Scandal...
page 14
sion here, South Africa im-
ported $10 billion worth of oil
from the Arab countries, from
1980 to 1984, in violation of
the 1979 UN oil embargo on
South Africa.
The anti-Israeli resolution
adopted last week by the
Assembly charged that
Israel's ties with South Africa
constitute "a serious threat to
the international action for the
eradication of apartheid," and
a "threat to international
peace and security."
The resolution underscored
the alleged "military and
nuclear" cooperation between
Israel and South Africa, and
requested an immediate end of
ties between the two
countries.
The United States, Canada
and Australia, as well as most
of the West European coun-
tries, joined Israel in voting
against the resolution. Israeli
diplomats noted that last year
only 19 countries joined Israel
against a similar resolution,
while this year 28 countries
supported Israel.
The anti-Israel vote was
sharply condemned by Am-
bassador Meir Joffe of the
Israel Mission, who blamed the
Arabs and their supporters for
"hypocrisy." He said that
while the Arabs themselves
trade with South Africa, they
push for the condemnation of
Israel. "This is part of their
political war against the
Jewish State," he declared.
Binyamin Netanyahu,
Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, charged, at the opening
debate on apartheid, that the
General Assembly is guilty of
"omission and distortion of the
facts" both of Israel's alleged
cooperation with Pretoria and
the extent of the Arab oil trade
with South Africa.
Netanyahu disclosed that
Israel recently sent an official
letter to the UN Special Com-
mittee Against Apartheid,
reiterating its opposition to
apartheid and declaring its
willingness to participate in in-
ternational efforts to end the
practice of apartheid in South
Africa.
The anti-Israel vote coincid-
ed with the 11th anniversary
of the General Assembly
Continued on Page 8
Terry Rapaport, Chairman
of the Soviet Jewry Task
Force of the Community Rela-
tions Council of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, and Rabbi Joel
Levine, Co-Chairman, have an-
nounced that Rae Ginsburg,
Vice Chairman of the Commis-
sion on International Concerns
of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC), will be the
featured speaker at the Com-
munity Plea for Soviet Jewry.
The plea will be held on
Wednesday, Dec. 10, 7:30
p.m., at Temple Beth El.
"Rae Ginsburg is a dynamic
spokesman on behalf of Soviet
Jewry who has worked active-
ly to highlight the plight of the
refuseniks who are awaiting
exit visas from the Soviet
Union. Since she is in the
forefront of this effort on a na-
tional level, she will be able to
bring to our community an up-
date on this crucial situation,"
stated Mrs. Rapaport.
Rae Ginsburg
Mrs. Ginsburg has long been
active as a volunteer leader
locally, nationally and interna-
tionally. In her home city,
Boston, she currently serves
as President of the Jewish
Community Relations Council
Continued on Page 9
Jews To Help Farmers in Trouble
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) Representatives of farmers' and Jewish organiza-
tions have joined forces to combat the plight of American farmers and the spread
of anti-Semitism in agrarian areas of the country.
This nationwide effort was announced at a meeting here last month at the
headquarters of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (U AHC), the um-
brella organization of Reform Judaism in the U.S. and Canada. The meeting, dur-
ing the Sukkoth holiday, took place under a small succah where the represen-
tatives noted that the setting was a reminder of Judaism's agrarian roots and the
importance of the harvest, celebrated during Sukkoth, to both farmers and Jews.
REPRESENTATIVES announced the beginning of a national petition drive
to obtain one million signatures calling on Congress to declare an immediate
moratorium on farm foreclosures, fair prices for farm products and an emergen-
cy aid program for farm families forced into bankruptcy, foreclosure, and the
most extreme consequences of poverty.
The petition drive was presented by Gertrude White, national president of
Women's American ORT, and David Goldstein, executive director of the Kansas
City (Missouri) Jewish Community Relations Bureau, one of the pioneer Jewish
organizations working to help the family farmer. The two groups have been
working jointly since last April, when Women's American ORT presented the
Continued oa Page 12-


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
The Robert Levy Years 1965-66

;
ft
r
to
i
T
i
Looking Back
25 Years of Local
Jewish Federation History
Twenty-four years later, in 1962, under the leadership of
Morton Silberman, the newly elected President, the Jewish
fi eaeration of Palm Beach County began. Look back with us
in successive issues of the Jewish Floridian, upon 25 years
of local Federation history a history rich in people work-
ing together to meet the needs of a growing Jewish
community.
Forty-eight years ago a handful of dedicated, energetic
and farsightea people began an undertaking that would
ultimately become the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County. It was a time when anyone who was Jewish in West
Palm Beach knew every other Jew. The year was 19S8, when
the Federated Jewish Charities of Palm Beach County was
born.
1965
Robert Levy elected Federation President.
Thelma Newman named moderator of Federation spon-
sored TV program on Channel 5. The name is changed to
"Our People.'7
Federation receives special commendation from the
Florida Council on Human Relations "for their commit-
ment through Judaism to meaningful children's intergroup
relations for promoting civil rights and equal opportunity
by being the first organization in this community that ac-
cepts black children into their preschool and camp
program.
Campaign raises $82,000.
Children from throughout the community participate in
the Federation pre-school.
By LOUISE ROSS
He may have been the
youngest President that the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County has had in its 25
year history, but Robert Levy
was also one of the most
energetic. During the for-
mative years when this com-
munity was emerging from
concern primarily with con-
tributing money to help Israel
to a realization that, in order
to help Jews worldwide, it
must also strengthen its own
community, Mr. Levy helped
create an organizational struc-
ture which would effectively
carry out this mandate.
Prior to 1965, the communi-
ty was small enough to be run
by a five-man Federation Ex-
ecutive Committee who would
meet weekly for lunch to
"discuss" and implement the
issues. When Mr. Levy became
President, he increased the in-
volvement of more people to
meet the needs of this com-
munity. "I created with my
Vice President, Dan Biblin, an
organizational structure which
increased the number of Vice
Presidents and assigned to
them specific responsibilities,"
Mr. Levy said in an interview
with the Jewish Floridian.
Seated at his desk in his law
offices, Mr. Levy perused
through back issues of the
Reporter, Federation's mon-
thly newsletter, fondly
remembering those days.
"These sure bring back
memories. I could look at these
for hours. There's my son at
the pre-school and ...," he
said.
According to Mr. Levy,
building Jewish identity was
difficult in those days. "That
was one of our greatest
challenges." It was the Sue
Day War in 1967 that helped
coalesce Jewish identity, but in
the early days of Federation, it
was the desire to build a
Jewish Community Center
that got many young families
involved, according to Mr.
Levy.
"Most of us came from com-
munities which already had
JCC's or YMHA-YWHA's. We
wanted the same thing for our
families here so we got
together with a professional
from the Jewish Welfare
Board to guide and advise us.
He told us, however, that it
was necessary to build a com-
munity first before construc-
ting a building and that's how
we got started locally." Sol
Silverman, the Federation's
first Executive Director, was
hired in January 1962 to carry
out this responsibility and he
helped guide the Federation
admirably during its early
years.
It was also Mr. Levy's par-
ticipation in a United Jewish
Appeal Young Leadership Mis-
sion to Israel in 1965 that
sparked his involvement on a
national level. He went on to
serve as Vice Chairman of the
National Young Leadership
Cabinet and spoke on behalf of
UJA around the country.
It was during Mr. Levy's
term that the second Ex-
ecutive Director of Federation
left the community unex-
pectedly. Mr. Levy, with the
help of Bette Gilbert, took on
the responsibility of running
the Federation on a day to day
Members of the 1965 Executive Committee are (left to right)
Dr. Sherwin Isaacson, Stanley Lustig, Robert List, Bette
Gilbert, Robert S. Levy, Daniel Biblin, and Henry Blum.
basis until the hiring, many
months later, of I. Edward
Adler. "I am particularly pro-
ud of the progress made by
Federation under these trying
conditions and having been in-
volved in the selection of Bim
Adler as Executive Director,"
stated Mr. Levy.
Among other achievements
in those years were the expan-
sion of Camp Shalom and the
community pre-school. As a
result of Federation's policy of
accepting children of all races
into these programs, it was
awarded a special commenda-
tion from the Florida Council
on Human Relations. Mr.
Levy's tenure also saw the in-
auguration of Federation's
Jewish Community Forum, a
lecture series with nationally
prominent Jewish leaders in
the fields of education,
religion, culture, politics and
social issues, and the raising,
for the first time, of more than
$100,000 in the annual
Campaign.
As Mr. Levy related his
memories of those days, he
recalled an interesting and
humorous anecdote involving
the Honor Roll which was
published from 1962 to 1967
listing names of contributors
and the amount of their gifts
to the Federation-UJA Cam-
paign. "A fellow gave a con-
tribution on the condition that
he would remain anonymous.
However, by mistake, when
the Honor Roll was published,
the word 'anonymous' ap-
peared alphabetically where
the donor's name would have
been listed. Everyone knew
who he was and, as a result, he
stopped making contributions
for years," stated Mr. Levy.
Through Mr. Levy's involve-
ment and dedication, the
Federation moved forward in
providing help to Israel and
worldwide Jewry while
recognizing that the future of
the Jewish people lies also in
building strong local
communities.
1965 EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
Robert S. Levy, President
Robert E. List,
1st Vice President
Daniel L. Biblin,
Vice President
Henry Blum, Vice
President
Dr. Sherwin Isaacson,
Vice President
Bette Gilbert, Secretary
Stanley H. Lustig,
Treasurer
1966 EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
Robert S. Levy, President
Robert E. List,
Vice President
Daniel Biblin,
Vice President
Dr. Sherwin Isaacson,
Vice President
Joseph R. Cohen,
Vice President
Sylvia Lewis, Secretary
Stanley Lustig, Treasurer
Highlights
Mr. Levy has served
three times as General
Campaign Chairman of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United
Jewish Appeal campaign.
Most recently he has
chaired the Community
Planning Committee and
has sat as a member of the
Endowment Fund
Committee.
He is a past National
Vice-Chairman of the Na-
tional Young Leadership
Cabinet of the United
Jewish Appeal and was a
member of its Executive
Committee. He was a
member of the National
Campaign Cabinet of the
UJA and sat for several
years on the Executive
Committee of the National
Leadership Committee of
the Council of Jewish
Federation and Welfare
Fund.
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard Suite 104
West Palm Beach, Florida 33409
JEWISH FAMILY AND CHILDREN'S SERVICE
An outstanding professional and counseling agency serving the
"SSSS, fSIPSSPSy Palm BMch County. Professional and
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Problema of the aging
Consultation and
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Vocational Guidance
Marital counseling
Parent-child conflicts
Personal problems
Elder Support Network
684-1991
fi^T!*^1*** 25 "ftB?- ,n lamHY Bnd Individual counseling to
2j2E22vJS* a***"'* beneficiary agency o4
the J.wlth Federation of Palm Beach County.


Adjustment Problem Cited
for Jewish Emigre's
Return to USSR
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 8
By RICHARD BONO
(The Southern Israelite)
And DIANE WOLKOW
(The Kansas City
Jewish Chronicle)
ATLANTA (JTA) The
decision by a Soviet Jewish
emigre living here to return to
the Soviet Union has startled
the organized Jewish
community.
Yuri Chapovsky, 27, an-
nounced at an Oct. 24 press
conference that he was return-
ing to the Soviet Union
because his hopes for a better
life were not fulfilled in
America. Chapovsky came to
the United States in 1979 with
his parents and younger
brother.
With him at the press con-
ference, conducted by the
Soviet Information Office in
Kay to Chair
Washington, D.C., were three
other Soviet emigres wishing
to return, including another
Jew, Israel Glickman of Dallas.
CONVERSATIONS here
with friends of Chapovsky's
family and Jewish communal
workers who helped him in-
dicated that his departure was
psychologically, not politically,
motivated. Described as ex-
tremely bright, especially in
mathematics, Chapovsky also
was portrayed as troubled,
unhappy and dissatisfied for
some time.
"I think he has some pro-
blems, and I don't think the
United States is one of them,"
said a source close to the fami-
ly. "I think maybe it's just per-
sonal problems ... We don't
Continued on Page 19
Leadership Development Program
Erwin H. Blonder, Presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County, has an-
nounced the appointment of
Soni Kay to chair the Federa-
tion's Leadership Develop-
ment Program, In commen-
ting on the appointment, Mr.
Blonder said, "I am most
pleased to appoint Soni to this
position as she exemplifies the
next generation of community
leaders. She became involved
in Federation on a committee
level, and through her commit-
ment and dedication, is now
most capable of taking on this
important leadership
position."
In accepting this assign-
ment, Mrs. Kay noted that mis
would basically be a transition
year for the Leadership
Development Program. "In
the past this has been an entry
level program to develop new
leaders. This year we are look-
ing to include those people who
have already been involved in
the Jewish community and ac-
quaint them with Federation,"
she said.
Mrs. Kay served as a
member of the Leadership
Development Committee for
several years, having been
designated Chairman-elect in
1985. She participated in the
Florida Region United Jewish
Appeal Young Leadership Mis-.
sion to Israel in 1985. Mrs.
Kay is a member of Hadassah
and Temple Beth David.
Soni Kay
Mrs. Kay has a Masters in
Pediatric Occupational
Therapy from the University
of Florida and has a private
practice in this field.
The Leadership Develop-
ment Program encourages and
stimulates the training and
development of potential
leaders for the organized
Jewish community through in-
tensive study seminars, lec-
tures and weekend retreats.
National and regional lec-
turers are invited to speak to
the groups on a wide range of
current topics.
For more information, con-
tact Mark Mendel, Staff
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120.
For the finest General Education
In a pervasively Jewish atmosphere...

Kindergarten-8th grade
Comprehensive general and Jewish
education
Non-denominational
Tuition assistance available
5801 Paker Avenue
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
585-2227
Alan L. Sholman
Ehud Olmert
Martin Stein
Shulman to Chair
Suite Visit Program Inaugurated
Jeanne Levy, General Cam-
paign Chairman of the 1987
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County-United Jewish
Appeal Campaign, has an-
nounced tlif appointment of
Alan L. Shulman to chair the
inaugural Suite Visit program
for this community. The pro-
gram will be held Dec. 1-3 at
The Breakers.
According to Mrs. Levy, the
program is designed for major
contributors who will be called
upon by local Campaign
leadership to meet with
distinguished national and in-
ternational guests at an ap-
pointed time. "Communities
around the country have found
this program most helpful in
launching their Campaigns.
This is the first time we have
elected to participate in this
program and we are honored
to have Alan in charge of our
local effort. He has served as
Chairman of National UJA's
Fly-In Program and brings
with him experience and
dedicated leadership," stated
Mrs. Levy.
In accepting the appoint-
ment, Mr. Shulman said, "By
major givers making their
commitments early, standards
will be set for the whole com-
munity to follow. Major con-
tributors have an added
responsibility to be role models
in a community. The Suite
Visit program is designed as a
concentrated effort to create a
disciplined climate and
timetable for contributors to
recognize the Jewish needs
both in our own community
and worldwide and to respond
with their commitments.
"Through my personal in-
volvement in similar programs
in a number of communities
around the country, I have
found Suite Visits to be an ex-
citing, effective component in
the solicitation process. We
are expecting our face-to-face
solicitations with maior con-
tributors to launch the most
successful Campaign in our
community's history."
Mr. Shulman has announced
that our own leadership will be
joined by national and lnterna-
Continued on Page 11
ACT
NOW
TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF CURRENT TAX LAWS-
GIVE TO FEDERATION IN 1986
Pay your annual campaign gift this year.
Establish a philanthropic fund with Federation.
Use it to recommend gifts to Federation, its
agencies and other charities.
Every gift this year to Federation allows you to save
up to 50< on every dollar donated.
For more information on these programs, contact:
ARNOLD I. SCHWARTZMAN
Endowment Director
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, Inc.
501 South Flagler Drive. Suite .105
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
(305)832-2120


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Making Deals
With Terrorism
It would be nice to blame it exclusively on
the French for refusing to promise that
there can be no deals with terrorists. For a
long time, the French have been saying that
they make no deals with Arab terrorist
groups or with countries bankrolling them,
and so there would be no need to sign a com-
mitment proposed by The Twelve the
European Economic Community nations
to that effect in Luxembourg last month.
But for just as long a time, no matter what
they say, the French have quietly done just
that made deals whenever and wherever
they thought it would help keep the peace
from terrorist activity in their own country.
In the Lerner-Lowe classic "My Fair Lady,"
one of the lyrics declares that the French
don't actually care what you do so long as
you pronounce it correctly.
So much for the French, including Prime
Minister Jacques Chirac, who this week
passed along the story allegedly told him by
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher at
that meeting of the EEC Council of
Ministers in Luxembourg to the effect that
Syria was not to blame tor the bombing at-
tempt of an El Al jet in London on Apr. 17.
No, according to Chirac's retold tale, it
was the Israelis. Presumably, the Prime
Minister pronounced his words very
beautifully indeed as he reported what the
Germans now insist is a lie.
The Reagan Involvement
But what about the Greeks, who want
nothing whatever to do with an organized
war on terrorism?
Moreover, what about Ronald Reagan,
President of the United States, who now, it
is clear, has been engaging in a covert opera-
tion these last two years to trade American
arms to Iran for terrorist hostages in
Lebanon, as a three-part series ending in
The Jewish Floridian last week appears now
to have so accurately reported?
This is the same President Reagan who
has time and again made public utterrances
that he would never deal with terrorist
hostage-takers. This is the same President
Reagan who has been twisting the arms of
our so-called European allies, all of whom
except Great Britain, have refused to enter
enthusiastically into a war on terrorism
except to make nice speeches about such a
war.
So we are back again to pretty words
beautifully pronounced, the French ideal of
the tightness of things. Only it is not just the
French who are hypocrites. So are the other
European nations for whom there are no
enemies, only customers. So is President
Reagan who, it appeared, just about con-
vinced the Europeans last week to join him
and the British in isolating Syria over the
Apr. 17 attempted bombing of the Israeli jet
at Heathrow.
That is, until the story about the U.S.
arms deal with Iran finally emerged.
Deception in Government
Now that the President's own duplicity is
a national scandal, what is there left to ex-
pect in the war on terrorism?
We can say of the French that they have
learned nothing from history, their own
especially. We can say that they did not take
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German Nazism seriously in the 1930's,
allowing Nazi and Fascist groups to flourish
freely in their country. We can say that they
fought like paper tigers against the Ger-
mans in World War II. We can say of France
that, now that it has been holding Klaus Bar-
bie, the notorious "butcher of Lyon," in jail
for the past few years, it drags its feet in
trying him.
But the French can take care of their own
wickedness. They have always been able to
do that. But in the wake of our own national
scandal, there is so much more to be said
about stealth, secrecy, deception and
outright lies in the halls of our own
government.
Serious Talk Needed
For us, there is something sad in observ-
ing Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.)
telling a Jewish gathering in New York the
other night that he will continue his efforts
to get the United States Embassy in Israel
to move from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
It takes two to tango Sen. Moynihan to
make the promise and the Jewish gathering,
in this instance guests of the Fourth Annual
Defender of Jerusalem Award ceremony, to
listen to him. Both are to blame for such a
wasteful presentation.
The fact is that su^h a move would be ab-
solutely unrealistic at this time or even in
the foreseeable future. Those who know
something about the Realpolitik of the area
also understand that the United States
operates a consular office in Jerusalem
which actually serves as an Arab affairs
center with the specific purpose of soft-
soaping Arab Israelis and even Jordanians
in the West Bank territories. This is not
what a U.S. consular office is supposed to be
doing. The purpose of a consular office is as
a regional adjunct to its embassy in the
capital of the host nation, with its specific
services to Americans not to citizens of
Israel.
Insiders have long witnessed a tug of war
between the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv and
'forMr message of peace, atonement
lAr 3*4 human dignity H
r*UTO;xau,.-Ta
the consular of ice in Jerusalem, which has
powers beyond just about any other or-
dinary consular office operated by any other
nation anywhere else in the world. Behind
the scenes stories abound that embassy per-
sonnel in Tel Aviv regard consular personnel
in Jerusalem as "enemies" and that the con-
flicting political, and therefore ideological,
purposes of these two offices make in-
telligent cooperation between them essen-
tially impossible.
This state of affairs symbolizes the ab-
solutely schizophrenic attitude that our
State Department has toward the status of
Jerusalem, let alone Israel, its Arab citizens,
and Arab nations nearby. In the face of such
a situation, can anyone honestly anticipate a
U.S. move of its embassy to Jerusalem soon?
It is noble of Sen. Moynihan that he main-
tains this ultimate purpose as an item on his
personal agenda. But it is of little conse-
quence. Worse, the Jewish organization
which he addressed should also have
understood this. To lend a serious ear to
such talk is demeaning not only of the ideal
that Sen. Moynihan says he espouses. It is
also demeaning to the audience.
Inside Afghanistan
Friday, November 21,1986
Volume 12
19 HESHVAN 5747
Number 36
Larry Greenfield spent this
past Yom Kippur eve lying in
the back of a truck for seven
hours, being driven across
Pakistani frontier country. He
was headed for a rendezvous
which would take him inside
Afghanistan for a week with
the mujahedin, anti-
communist Islamic guerrillas.
In that week he would lose
more than ten pounds, witness
two battles and, he said,
discover that all those fighting
in the name of Allah are not
the same.
Why would a 24-year-old
graduate of Georgetown
University Law School with
a Zionist background under-
take such a journey? Because
Greenfield draws a parallel
between the destruction of the
Jews 40 years ago and the
destruction of Afghanistan to-
day. "I was always taught
never to forget, never to be
silent."
That and a strong interest in
foreign policy led him to the
Washington-based Committee
for a Free Afghanistan. The
committee helped arrange
some contacts and Greenfield
traveled to Karachi, Pakistan,
then on to the wild border city
of Peshawar and finally,
secretly, into Afghanistan.
He said that of the approx-
imately 16 million people who
lived in the country before the
Soviet invasion, one million
have been killed and 4.5
million driven out. The
Russian crime in Afghanistan
must not be shrouded in the
silence of Americans, Jews in
particular, he stressed.
What about the argument
that the mujahedin would, if
victorious, imitate Khomeini
next door in Iran and establish
a fundamentalist Islamic
republic, anti-Western and
anti-Israel? Greenfield
acknowledged the visions
among the guerillas, but noted
that the band of fighters he
traveled with was from the Na-
tional Islamic Front Associa-
tion. It is the most moderate of
the seven groups opposing
Moscow's puppet government
in Kabul.
In conversations through his
guide/interpreter, the Califor-
nia was told that "most mu-
jahedin do not support the
Palestinians or Arafat. They
were brought up to love Arafat
and the PLO, but since he's an
ally of the Soviets ... and has
never done anything for them,
they do not share the (PLO)
cause."
Greenfield did not tell his
companions that he was
Jewish, but "I found a grudg-
ing respect for Israel. The
Moslems respect those who
take care of their own. They
know that the Arabs have 20
states and the Jews only one."
His companions also told him
that they did not like ter-
rorism, that "it was not part of
their interpretation of Islam to
kill women and children. They
don't like Khomeini" whose
regime reportedly is now try-
ing to improve relations with
Moscow and forcing Afghan
refugees in Iran to fight Iraq
they despise
"and
Khadafy."
A four-day hike (they rarely
slept more than two hours a
night) took them deep into
Afghanistan to a mountain
ridge overlooking Khost, the
site of a Soviet airbase. Along
the way, moving with a group
of about 50 mujahedin broken
into five squads of ten each,
they encountered hostile fire.
"It sounded very close ...
There was a brief exchange,"
each side trying to intimidate
the other.
But there was a more deter-
mined battle on the ridge at
Khost. Greenfield accom-
panied a squad of about ten
men. "About a kilometer away
we could spot the runway, a
white strip with shadows that
were MI-24 Hind helicopter
gunships." The squad he was
with began firing mortars and
rocket-propelled grenades at
the airfield.
Then for four hours they hid
under rocks while the Soviets
responded with rocket fire.
"You could hear the whistling
sounds and the explosions.'
His companions, used to such
bombardment, smoked
cigarettes, talked, even laugh-
ed. Eventually, Greenfield
said, he joined them.
But more than the battles,
he remembers the destruction
of the Afghan countryside and
especially the wounded, in
Afghanistan and in makeshift
hospitals in Pakistan. Many of
them are children hands,
Continued on Pafe 18


Friday, November 21,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Russian Minister
Visits N. Y. Synagogue
Hebrew School Kids
By JOSEPH BERGEK
An unlikely visitor toured
a Hebrew day school on
Manhattan's East Side
recently. The visitor was
Konstantin M. Kharchev,
chairman of the Soviet
Government's Council of
Religious Affairs, which
supervises organized
religion.
The Park East Day School is the
kind of religious school that by law
is not allowed in the Soviet Union.
But Kharchev saw an elementary-
school classroom where children
are taught to celebrate Sabbath
eve, where a "father" blesses the
wine, and a "mother" blesses the
flaming candles. He even joined in
Israeli dances with 30 youngsters,
kicking his legs up, chuckling with
pleasure and hugging students.
HIS HOST, Rabbi Arthur
Schneier of Park East Synagogue,
who is president of the Appeal of
Conscience Foundation, an in-
terdenominational group, tried to
make the point that religious
belief, if it is to take hold, must be
ingrained at a young age.
But Kharchev said his Govern-
ment believed religion should be
taught only to adults because only
they are mature enough to make
up their minds about faith. Moral
values are taught by the Com-
munist Party, he said.
Although the argument was not
settled, Kharchev seemed pleased
that he could engage in such
discussions. He is trying to per-
suade his hosts that the Soviet
Union is interested in making ac-
commodations to religious groups.
According to Rabbi Schneier,
Kharchev is the first Soviet
Government official in charge of
religious affairs to visit the United
States. During his 12-day trip,
Kharchev has also met with
Roman Catholic, Eastern Or-
thodox and Protestant leaders in
New York, Atlanta and
Washington.
IN AN hour-long interview in
Manhattan, Kharchev, 52 years
old, a gregarious man who was
smoking American cigarettes,
said the "revolutionary process of
democratization under way"
under Mikhail S. Gorbachev would
also affect religious life.
The broad policy in recent
decades has been not to close the
nation's 8,500 churches, but to
control them. Religious education
is forbidden for children and teen-
agers, except within the family. If
bishops, priests and rabbis remain
within unspoken limits, they are
left alone. Religious faiths that
are not officially accepted,
however, like some Christian fun-
damentalist sects, are still
repressed.
Kharchev said that under revis-
ed legislation, churches would be
permitted to own property. He
also said that religious leaders
were appearing on radio and
television, that more churches
were open and encountered fewer
tensions with the authorities and
that 100,000 Bibles would be
published there next year.
He said the official attitude
toward religion had changed. In
the 1960's, he said, the official
view was that religion would
vanish, but this prognosis did not
turn out to be true. Authorities
now realize, he said, that they
must work realistically with
religion in a country where 20 per-
cent of the people are regarded as
"believers.*
"FOR THE first time in the
Soviet Union," Kharchev, a
democratization in Russia 'underway.'
Kharchev to Rabbi Schneier
nonbeliever, said, "the believer is
being portrayed as a positive per-
son, as a good person, as a person
with high moral qualities."
Speaking of the Soviet Union's
1.8 million Jews, Kharchev said
the Government was prepared to
increase the number of students
who are sent to a rabbinical
seminary in Budapest, the only
one in the Soviet bloc. It would
also consider training rabbinical
students in the United States, he
said, provided the "climate bet-
ween the two countries" permit
such an exchange.
Later, at a news conference at
the Overseas Press Club, Khar-
chev said all but two or three of
the Soviet Union's 110
synagogues had a rabbi. He was
corrected by Rabbi Schneier, who
said only four or five synagogues
in the largest cities had rabbis.
The others are led by laymen, the
rabbi said. Kharchev conceded
that he had not studied the
background of synagogue leaders.
At the news conference, Khar-
chev faced questioning by ac-
tivists on behalf of Soviet Jewry
Continued on Page 16
Writer Uri Greenberg Foresaw Holocaust
In His Poetry Well Before the Fact
poet came to write by sitting
with feet in a river.
By ZEV GOLAN
The underground war for
Israel's independence, the
Holocaust, and the Six-Day
War all appear in the songs
of Uri Zvi Greenberg
(1896-1981). Nothing
unusual about that, you may
be thinking, except that
each of them appeared in
Greenberg's poetry 20 or
more years before they ac-
tually took place.
The great Hebrew poet, Chaim
Nachman Bialik, once asked
Greenberg how he was able to
write of the Holocaust and to
describe the murder of millions of
Jews in 1922. Greenberg
answered that this was simply
"what I saw before my eyes. A
more startling secret is revealed
by Uri Zvi's widow, Aliza: "Many
of the poems in Rehovot Hanakar,
a 1961 volume describing in detail
the atrocities of the Holocaust,
were written the previous decade
before Uri Zvi had read the grim
news reports from Europe. Yet all
the facts we know today corres-
pond to the poems."
GREENBERG, however, does
more than prophesy, notes
philosopher Dr. Israel Eldad, a
student of Greenberg's work. In
"Holy of Holies," he imagines he
has carried his mortally wounded
mother to the land of Israel. She
speaks:
Let me touch your body ...
your garment* are rough, my son,
soldier's clothes
and a rifle on your shoulder ...
good for you my son...
Onee I wished to see you robed only
in silk.
This is no longer what I with.
While other Hebrew poets ac-
companied the Jewish people on
its way and gave expression to the
struggle for statehood, explains
Dr. Eldad, Greenberg predated it,
commanded it. "His books," says
Eldad, "made history."
Do not nod at my sorrow be you
as sorrowful as I.
And again:
Blessed is the sorrow that leads to
anger...
and blessed is the anger that leads
to deeds holy and cruel.
The Jewish youth of the 1930's
and 1940's read lines such as these
and understood that their lot was
not silken clothing but rather
readiness for battle. Greenberg's
expressionistic poetry often reads
like Old Testament prose, and oc-
casionally like intensely personal
romantic lyricism, but it always
takes the reader on a demanding
journey through Jewish history,
as well as history yet-to-be-made.
"The lines are sometimes a bit
long," remarked Bialik, "but what
strong expression, pathos, mean-
ing and the main thing, a fabulous
centra] theme: the redemption of
Israel."
Aliia Greenberg says her late
husband's work was "clearly
religious poetry" in that his soul
was in constant search of a
faraway God. "He attempted to
define existence and he invariably
found God at its base." He was in-
fluenced first and foremost by
Jewish midrashim and prayers,
also by Heine, and he enjoyed
Whitman and Blake, but he was
born a rebel.
Young Uri Zvi's first work fac-
tually describes how he came to
write: sitting with his feet in a
Coatiaaed oa Page If


Page. 6 The Jewish Floridian of Pahri Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Introduction to Judaism
Program Featured On 'Mosaic9
i
The Introduction to Judaism
program of the Palm Beach
County Board of Rabbis will be
featured on this week's Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County sponsored TV pro-
gram, "Mosaic," hosted by
Barbara Gordon Green. The
program will be aired on Sun-
only community-wide cross
movement program existing in
the U.S. today as all other pro-
grams are offered through a
particular movement or
synagogue, according to Ms.
Lipton.
Ms. Lipton, who has been
coordinating the program
aspect of the program is the
Two Prominent Jews
day, Nov. 23, 9 a.m., on Chan- since it8 Kfcto tb5S|S
nel ago, said, "A truly remarkable
Mrs. Green will interview
Jew by choice Tracy
Simkowitz and her husband,
Mark, who are graduates of
the Introduction to Judaism
program. In addition, Rabbi
William Marder of Temple
Beth David, President of the
Palm Beach County Board of
Rabbis, and Ann Lynn Lipton,
Director of the Department of
Education of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County, will be featured.
With close to 50 graduates
and 12 couples presently
enrolled, the program encom-
passes Reform and Conser-
vative congregations. It is the
fact that all Conservative and
Reform rabbis and congrega-
tions participate. The rabbis
sponsor the individuals and
guide them through the pro-
gram which helps prepare
them for the conversion
process."
For more information, con-
tact Ms. Lipton at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Special guest speaker Dr. Norms Schulman addresses the Oc-
tober meeting of the Women's Division Campaign Cabinet of
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County.
Offer Different Approaches to Attain Peace
By ANDREW MUCHIN
NEW YORK (JTA) In a
hostile world capable of
obliterating itself with nuclear
weapons, what can concerned
Jews do to wage peace? Two
Jews renowned for their own
such efforts offered different
approaches here recently.
Nobel peace laureate Elie
Wiesel, an author and lecturer.
Radio/TV/ Film
Entertainment
Z9y
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 23, 9 a.m. WPTV Chan-
nel 5 with host Barbara Gordon Green Conversion
Institute.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 23, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 23, 6 a.m. WPEC Channel
12 (8:30 a.m. WFLX TV-29) with host Richard Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, Nov. 27, 1:15
p.m. WLIZ 1340-AM A summary of news and com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
EVENT: SHALOM '87, Wednesday, Feb. 25, matinee
2:30 p.m., evening 8 p.m. West Palm Beach Auditorium.
* Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm, Beach
County.
Community Calendar
November 21
Temple Emanu-El Adult Education Lecture 8 p.m.
November 22
Jewish Federation
Program-7:30 p.m.
Leadership Development
November 23
Jewish Community Center book fair Golden Lakes Tem-
ple Sisterhood 10 a.m. Jewish Federation Campaign
Leadership Institute at Airport Hilton -10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Congregation Aitz Chaim Synagogue Dedication and Din-
ner 4 p.m.
November 25
Jewish Federation Board of Directors Meeting 4 p.m.
Yiddish Culture Group Century Village 10 a.m.
Hadassah Lee Vassil paid up membership luncheon -
12:30 p.m. Na'Amat USA Ezrat board -10 a.m. Tem-
ple Beth Torah Men's Club 8 p.m. Na'Amat USA -
Sharon board -10 a.m. Hadassah West Boynton trip
to New Orleans through Nov. 30 Jewish Federation -
Jewish Education Committee 8 p.m. Jewish Federa-
tion Young Adult Division Business and Executive
Forum at The Governors Club 5:30 to 7:30
November 26
Jewish Community Center no school program Golden
Lakes Temple Men's Club Thanksgiving weekend holiday
Women's American ORT No. Palm Beach County
Region board Yiddish Culture Group Cresthaven 1
p.m. Temple Beth Torah Sisterhood board 8 p.m.
November 27
Thanksgiving Hadassah Henrietta Szold weekend
through Nov. 29 Temple B'nai Jacob Sisterhood -
weekend at Miami Beach Women's American ORT West
Palm Beach "Sea Escape" through Nov. 29 Na'amat
USA Theodore Herzl Thanksgiving weekend through
Nov. 29 B'nai B'rith No. 2939 Harder Hall through Nov.
30 Women's American ORT Mid Palm West Coast
Weekend through Nov. 29.
suggested words as a limited,
but the only, tool for peace.
"... I am much more
pessimistic than many of you. I
used to believe that words can
work wonders. I no longer
believe that," he said.
"I do believe that the best
language available to human
beings is still words. When
words fail, what replaces them
as a form of communication?
There's only one available
form violence so we must
use words, and in this area, we
Jews have been masters."
SPEAKING TO 375 people
at the presentation of the
Jewish Peace Fellowship's se-
cond Abraham Joshua Heschel
Peace Award at the Linden-
baum Jewish Community
Center, Wiesel pondered why
the issue of peace "hasn't
penetrated the Jewish com-
munity to a sufficient degree
... Somehow the Jewish com-
munity turns off. It's not ready
to listen, let alone act."
The reason, he postulated,
may be a feeling of
helplessness. "I agree there is
something to that," he said,
considering the god-like
powers of the leaders of the
U.S. and the USSR to begin
the destruction of the world
with the push of a button. "We
must stop that international
death wish that exists occa-
sionally in society," Wiesel
stated.
Even with words well used,
he doesn't foresee imminent
and complete change. "I don't
believe that we can change the
course of human destiny now,"
he said. "But I do believe that
if we continue together, we
shall have more people like
us."
IN ISRAEL, this compas-
sion could catch fire with Jews
and Arabs, he predicted, caus-
ing "an awakening of their
own humanity toward each
other." Wiesel stated that the
true measure of a Jew's
humanity is his or her attitude
toward Palestinians.
Rabbi Bruce Cohen, the reci-
pient of the Heschel peace
award, embodies that attitude
in his work, Interns for Peace.
The 10-year-old program has
placed 73 Arabs and Jews
from Israel, the U.S. and other
countries in more than 25
Jewish and Arab villages in
Israel.
During their one or two-year
placements, the interns first
earn how to act as catalysts
for peace. Then they attempt
to develop educational, social,
recreational or community
development projects that
Cohen said involve their Arab
and Jewish participants on
equal footing. The program
has directly affected 8,000 peo-
ple, he said and indirectly
thousands more.
RATHER THAN utilizing
words for peace, as Wiesel
suggested, Cohen advocates
"direct and concrete ex-
Continued on Page 10
ANDY STATMAN: ON RESPECTING YOUR HERITAGE AND YOUR BODY.
One of the questions I'm always
asked is: "Why do you choose to
play Klezmer music?" The answer
is simple. Klezmer music is pan of
my musical inheritance. Klezmer
touches deep and profound feelings
relating to my heritage.
Other Jewish people who hear it
experience the same feelings. It
touches them in ways no other music
does Which is why I play Klezmer
music to serve the community by
playing music that brings together
Jews from different backgrounds.
Playing Klezmer music is stren-
uous. That's one reason why I take
care of myself. So I exercise and
watch what I eat But taking care of
myself doesn't mean giving up the
k KOSHKR
things I enjoy. Like coffee. That's
why I drink Sanka* Brand Decaf-
feinated coffee. It's a good cup of
coffee-really smooth and satisfying.
Since caffeine doesn't fit into my
life-style. Sanka* is a great way to
enjoy as much coffee as I want. I can
have it anytime I want, even right
before performing.
The way I look at it. good health
is a gift from G-d. Therefore. ^_
I have to take care of myself. iS
Sanka* helps me do just that.


HHj H|

Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewiah Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Random Thoughts
By MURIEL LEVITT
What I am about to relate
will in no wav solve the energy
crisis or affect peace in the
Middle East. However, I
thought that you just might en-
joy reading about how and why
I first began wearing glasses.
Up until my teen years I was
raised in a typical Jewish mid-
dle class area of the Bronx,
New York. We did all the same
things that other Jewish
families did. We played
together and we stayed
together despite the
devastating depression era.
Although most of my friends
went to religious school or
Sunday school, attended tem-
ple on holidays, and strongly
identified as Jews, the families
I knew were not Orthodox or
devoutly pious. We pretty
much conformed to that
pattern.
In retrospect, I am sure that
money was far from plentiful,
but my sister and I were never
made to feel any lack or scarci-
ty of the necessities of life. As
a matter of fact, we were often
given minor treats when we
were young. One of my
favorite luxuries was going to
the movies every week. Today
this is no big deal, but in the
1930's let me tell you it was
the high point of my week.
On Saturday afternoon, if I
had been obedient and per-
formed well in school, my
mother would gift me with 15
cents. This sounds like a mere
pittance but to me it was a
princely sum. And for one
dime I could gain admittance
to the Mt. Eden theater. With
the remaining nickel, I was
free to choose from the
counter of goodies in the lobby.
I felt rich! However, I must
confess that in short order I
stopped buying candy and
began investing my five cents
in sour pickles. Imagine... for
just a nickel I could buy three
luscious, juicy barrel pickles.
By eating them slowly and
nursing them along carefully,
they lasted an entire afternoon
through two complete show-
ings of a double feature. Today
I can barely sit through one
movie much less four!
This weekly adventure to
movieland lasted for a long,
long time ... probably 'till I
was nine. One Saturday (for
what reason I absolutely can-
not recall) I missed my usual
matinee. In some mysterious
manner which is long gone and
lost to me, I ended up at the
local Public Library. It was a
discovery that changed the
course of my life!
Although my parents had a
typical Hebraic respect for
learning and education, they
owned a retail business and
never had the time, reason, or
opportunity to frequent
libraries. I was the one who
brought books into our home
and made reading a family
passion.
Books opened up a whole
new world to me. Every hour I
could spare was spent in
discovery of the written word.
The librarians became my
friends and mentors, making
varied selection, and many
suggestions to whet my
literary appetite. I thrilled to
Grimm's fairy tales, wept at
Elsie Dinsmore's perpetual
anguish, and delighted in Lit-
tle Women. It was an incredi-
ble experience for a nine-year-
old.
Shortly thereafter I
systematically read through
the entire children's section
alphabetically. Whenever I
came across a book of seeming
interest that I had never read
before, a feeling of pitfe joy
pervaded. It was as though so-
meone had given me an unex-
pected gift. I am not ashamed
to admit that I still experience
the same sensation on my fre-
quent visits to the library. To
me, an unread book is a bright
promise, and a wonderful
adventure yet to be experienc-
ed. I firmly believe that my ex-
tensive reading was the
preface and laid the ground-
work for my career as a
writer.
Both parents were very sup-
portive of my voracious
reading habits. We discussed
books and authors at the din-
ner table. My parents positive-
ly beamed if a particular
writer turned out to be Jewish.
You must remember that this
was before television when
children had not yet been
mesmerized by the tube.
Books became such an in-
tegral part of my existence
that I would cover my head
with a blanket and read by
flashlight into the late, late
hours when everyone thought
I was fast asleep. In the dawn-
ing, I would lie across the bed
and by the dim light, read from
a book which was positioned
on the floor.
This continued for well over
a year when the inevitable hap-
pened. My teachers noticed me
squinting and having difficulty
with fine print. A note was
sent home recommending a
visit to an ophthalmologist.
As I told you in the beginn-
ing, my tale will not affect any
of the world's problems, but
this is the true story of how
and why I came to wear
glasses, so help me
Hemingway.
Second Gala Set for Morse
Preparations for the Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center's
Second Gala Affair move into
full swing! The Gala will be
held at the Breakers Hotel,
Palm Beach, on Sunday even-
ing, Dec. 21.
"A magnificent affair is
planned, stated Eleanor
Fleischman, chairperson of the
Gala. "The Mediterranean
Ballroom of the Breakers is a
beautiful setting for this most
important social function to
benefit the Center and can
easily accommodate what we
know will be an overwhelming
response."
"Last year's Gala was held
at the Poinciana Club and the
event was very successful. We
had 330 Center supporters in
attendance but because of
space limitations, we had to
Eleanor Fleischman
refuse many reservations. This
year there will be no such
problem."
"Although this is the
Continued on Page 9
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Them's never been a better time for the great
taste of Fleischmanns.
Fleischmann's.gives every meal a holiday flavor.
/mandel brodt\
Vt cup FLEISCHMANN S. v> teaspoon grated lemon peel Margarine, softened ?K cups aH-piiposa Hour 1 cup soo* 4 teaspoons baking powdti M cup EGG WATERS. 1* teaspoon MM CnotestefOl-traemfteaUoa V cup PIAKIERS. SWtnjO Product Almonds toasted and chopped 1 teaspoon almond extract W lefts MM heat togskwt FlUSCHMAieX S Margame lug* EGG HATERS OMes WeUm M%*M Egg Produa almond esttact and lemon poe< unM e kkwdsd Su Hew. bating tomtit* and FlAlinie Slwenrt Akiwn* r teKteed OMde douo" heft PJMi twH lanes, steps each an el oougr. *> an 1 31 Huts) leal en a giaaeee baking sheet takeM3W kx35mmmomnmgoldenonwi WMiara cutWMWinchskces it dewed mum tkcad Mendel free* to own to least unki l^ frowned Makn 30 hed-mch skces
15
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SAVE15C
When you buy any package o
Fletschmann's Margarine
-------------------


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Helping People
Do Bubbe and Zeide Still Exist?
A Personal view from
Barbara Friedlander,
MSW, of Jewish Family
and Children's Service
(All case names mentioned in
these articles are fictitious;
client information at Jewish
Family and Children s Service
is held in the strictest of
confidence)
The traditional Jewish fami-
ly is changing; no longer do the
majority of grandparents live
with their children. Today,
what we are more likely to see
is the nuclear family, with the
generations living far apart
from each other. The elderly
often become isolated in retire-
ment communities, and young
people have left their native
hometowns to pursue career
opportunities. Beyond
geographic mobility and self-
actualizing ambitions, there
are other threats to the vital
ties between generations.
These include divorce and in-
termarriage, which both pose
special problems for
grandparents.
When a family divorces, the
grandchildren may be cut off
from the grandparents of their
non-custodial parent because
grandparents have no legal
right to see their grand-
children. In order to resolve
this problem the Foundation
For Grandparenting has been
established nationwide. So far,
42 states have instituted laws
that provide for visitation
under certain circumstances.
Grandparents are invaluable
to children in single parent
families, because they can pro-
vide the additional love,
teaching, and parenting that
the children require.
With inter-married families,
grandparents have an oppor-
tunity to establish relation-
ships based on Jewish culture
and values. It is the grand-
parent who, where possible,
can maintain Jewish con-
sciousness and involvement
within the inter-married home.
Grandparent relationships
are valuable in whatever form
they take. They serve to
UN Condemns
Israel for South
Africa Dealings
Continued from Page 1
resolution equating Zionism
with racism. One of the
arguments the Arabs used,
when they pushed for the
adoption of the Zionism-
equals-racism resolution, was
that Israel was a major sup-
porter of South Africa's apar-
theid government.
Barbara Friedlander
stabilize families, relieve fears
of aging among the young, of-
fer uncritical and unequivocal
love to their grandchildren,
and they offer their grand-
children, a sense of continuity
which is based on a common
life style, a shared religious
tradition, and family ex-
periences. The characteristics
that influence the quality of
grandparent/grandchildren
relationships include: the state
of your health, both physical
and mental; having had time to
rest after raising your own
children; your own experience
with your parents and grand-
parents; the prevailing social
atittude. and availability.
A common problem that
grandparents face is long
distance grandparenting.
Although the distance creates
certain boundaries, you do not
have to live close to your
grandchildren to have a warm,
influential relationship with
them. Building a relationship
is based on the quality of time
you spend with your grand-
children. These times need not
involve expensive or spec-
tacular activities, but rather
the relationship should develop
through sharing ordinary ac-
tivities. It is the way you are
together that counts.
In order to overcome the
distance, grandparents can
use telephone calls, video and
audio tapes, postcards, letters
and visits. Communicating
with your grandchildren
should be fun. Although your
life may seem ordinary to you,
to your grandchildren, it may
be fascinating. By sharing
eventful times like the first car
you rode in, what it was like
without television, the depres-
sion, etc., you are building a
living history for your grand-
children. Jewish tradition
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believes that you are alive as
long as you live in someone's
memory. By sharing your life,
you are giving yourself a
chance at immortality, and at
the same time, you are
strengthening your grand-
children's roots.
The Bubbe and Zeide of the
80 's may live far away from
their children, and Bubbe may
not be cooking chicken soup,
but the opportunity to
establish a close, loving rela-
tionship is still there.
(The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Palm
Beach County, Inc., is a non-
profit agency designed to meet
the social, emotional and
counseling needs of the Jewish
community of Palm Beach
County. Our office is located at
2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.,
Suite 10U- Our telephone
number is 68U-1991. The
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is a beneficiary agency
of the Jewish Federation and
the United Way of Palm Beach
County.)
Alon Ben-Gurion, grandson of David Ben-Gurion (left),
recently spoke at the Jewish Museum in New York to
kick off the year-long celebration of David Ben-Gurion's
100th birthday. With him are New York City Coun-
cilman Stanley E. Michels (center) and Dr. Benjamin
Hirsch, Executive Director of the David Ben-Gurion
Centennial Committee. The David Ben-Gurion Centen-
nial Committee is sponsoring a series of events com-
memorating David Ben-Gurion in the coming year in-
cluding: street namings in New York and other cities;
academic symposiums at major universities throughout
the country; and a gala at the Kennedy Center in
Washington, D.C. Councilman Michels is the sponsor of
a bill currently before the New York City Council to
rename a New York street 'Ben-Gurion Place.'
Instead of serving the same old thing this Shabbos. why not try Ronzoni" pasta? Your
family will be delighted as they spin their forks and soak up their sauce with any one of
our 70 shapes and varieties. All made to our exacting standards with 100% durum
wheat semolina for unsurpassed taste and texture
Ronzoni" is not only good for Shabbos, its good for you. Made of completely natural
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So start a new tradition this Shabbos with Ronzoni" No pasta shapes up better.

Kosher
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CHEESE STUFFED SHELLS FLORENTINE
1 package (12 oz.) RONZONI* Jumbo Shells
1 |ar (29 oz.) marinara sauce
V5> teaspoon salt
v* teaspoon pepper
v? teaspoon oregano
1 package (10 oz.) BIRDS EYE*
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Action Agenda For Soviet Jewry
Soiet Jewry Sabbath
FRIDAY, DEC. 5
and SATURDAY, DEC. 6
at local synagogues
%h^
Interfaith Outcry For Soviet Jewry
TUESDAY, DEC. 9,9 a.m.
Faith Lutheran Church
COMMUNITY PLEA FOR SOVIET JEWRY
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 10,7:30 p.m.
Temple Beth El
Children's Plea for Soviet Jewry
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 17,7 p.m.
Jewish Community Day School
For more Information concerning any of the We rents, contact
JACK KARAKO, Staff Associate for tho Soviet Jowry Task Force, at
the Jewish Federation of Palm Beech County office, 832-2120.
Ginsburg to Address Community
Plea for Soviet Jewry
Continued from Page 1
of Greater Boston, as a
member of the Executive
Committee of the Combined
Jewish Philanthropies and on
the boards of several other
communal organizations.
Nationally, in addition to
her Vice Chairmanship of
NJCRAC, she is on its Ex-
ecutive Committee where she
serves as a member of the
Budget Committee. Mrs.
Ginsburg sits on the Boards
of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee and
HIAS and is a national Hillel
Commissioner.
Mrs. Ginsburg has been very
active in Hadassah having
served as a National Vice
President. She represents her
Federation at Jewish Agency
Assemblies and sits on the
Board of Trustees of the
United Israel Appeal. Recent-
ly, she was appointed to the
Youth Aliyah Committee of
the Jewish Agency.
"We are very pleased to
have such a distinguished per-
son address our community
plea. At a time when world opi-
nion is uniting on behalf of
Soviet Jewry, we must learn
what we can do to hasten their
freedom from oppression,"
stated Rabbi Levine. "By our
community turning out in full
force, we will be sending
another strong message to 'let
our people go.' "
The Community Plea for
Soviet Jewry is sponsored by
the Soviet Jewry Task Force.
Co-conveners are Hadassah
and Na'Amat USA. For more
information, contact Jack
Karako, Staff Associate, at the
Federation office, 832-2120.
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
USSR Allows Goldfarb to
Visit Ailing Father in U.S.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Soviet authorities last Tuesday
granted a temporary tourist
visa on medical grounds to
Olga Goldfarb, enabling her to
visit her emigre father David
Goldfarb, who is recuperating
here from lung cancer surgery.
She was told to pick up her
passport last Thursday, accor-
ding to her brother, Alex
Goldfarb of New York. It con-
tained a visa good for a week's
stay in the United States. Her
request to take her older
daughter with her was re-
jected. The temporary visa is
independent of her family's ap-
plication for emigration visas.
The granting of her visa is
unusual. "This is the first case
known to me that a refusenik,
who is in conflict with the
regime, is given a foreign
passport, which is a privilege
only for the elite," said Alex
Goldfarb.
The brother, a Columbia
University professor of
microbiology, saw a connec-
tion between his sister's visa
and the issuance of formal
regulations stipulating accep-
table grounds for emigration
by Soviets, which includes
visitation of seriously ailing
relatives. The rules indicate
that an emergency visa would
be considered within three
days. "This is exactly what has
happened," Alex Goldfarb
said, "so they really do what
they say."
After learning he had cancer
on Oct. 29, David Goldfarb
wrote a frank letter Nov. 2 to
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev asking that his
daughter, a 34-year-old
Moscow physician, be permit-
ted to visit him. The elder
Goldfarb praised Gorbachev's
recent signs of more Soviet
flexibility, yet criticized
overall Soviet policy toward
Jews and emigration.
"... (You) have the will and
capacity for radical change,"
Golfarb wrote, "... yet, there
can be no true relaxation
without trust, and your
emigration policy is not help-
ing to build the trust ... I
realize that my decision to
emigrate may be embarrassing
to the Soviet Union, because it
doesn't fit the official doctrine.
"But my decision has been
made, and destroying me and
my family would not undo the
embarrassment. It will only
make more people listen to
politicians who call the Soviet
Union an 'evil empire.' "
David Goldfarb was flown
suddenly to the U.S. Oct. 16
with is wife Cecilia aboard in-
dustrialist Armand Hammer's
private jet. The 67-year-old
retired geneticist was a pa-
tient in a Moscow hospital at
the time, suffering from
severe complications of
diabetes and heart disease.
He underwent four hours of
surgery recently to remove an
upper lobe of his left lung.
Morse Gala
Continued from Page 7
Center's Second Gala, many
'firsts' are on the program.
The elegant evening will in-
clude exciting announcements
about the Center's capital
campaign drive and, this year,
there will be a drawing for a
1987 automobile," stated Mrs.
Fleischman.
The contribution for the
Gala is $150 per person.
Cocktails will be served at 7
p.m. and the dinner dance will
begin at 8 p.m. Music for the
Gala Affair will be provided by
the orchestra of Paul Farmer.
For those interested in at-
tending the Second Gala Affair
of the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center, please con-
tact the Public Relations
Department at the Center,
471-5111, Ext. 195.
f GARDEN RAVIOLI V__________________
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking N\
I Calls for Chef Boy ar dee Cheese Ravioli.
2 packages (10 oz. each) frozen
chopped broccoli
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan
cheese
Vt cup finely chopped onion
1 medium clove garlic, crushed
Vi cup chopped red-or green peppers
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
2 cans (15 oz. each) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Sauce
Cook broccoli according to package directions; drain well. Add
Parmesan cheese and mix well. Saute onion, garlic and peppers in
butter until lightly browned; combine with broccoli. Place Ravioli
in saucepan over low heat; stir occasionally until thoroughly
heated. Add half of the broccoli mixture to Ravioli; save half for
garnish. Arrange in shallow or IVi quart serving dish. Garnish
edge with remaining broccoli. Serves 4 to 6.
GREAT TASTE
NATURAL
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and plump raisi(*s that are never
auoarcoeHdinsome raisin brans.
And because Post knows how
imporlant fiber is, we put more fiber
in our flakes than any other leading
raisin bran. Plus, Post is certified
Kosher so you can serve it with
confidence
Be sure to tiy Post Natural Raisto
Bran. When it comes to great taste,
X* a natural
pomwm>mmtoymnmmtimMtmMLg.
MM PP MllPff** aaWaB* ** M MIKKWf TIMMTTflff.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Pre-School Holiday Program Proving Great Success
Federation Offers Discount for Home Start
When the Home Start pro-
gram was launched nationally
one year ago, no one could be
sure it would succeed. Today
no one can doubt that it has. In
just 12 months there are over
10,000 Home Start
subscribers.
Home Start, a publication of
Behrman House, is a Jewish
education program for young
children, designed for the
whole family to share. For
children Home Start is a seven
times a year holiday "happen-
ing" when they receive a
package containing a colorful
story book and a play and learn
magazine. Since a major goal
of Qie program is family par-
ticipation, the first mailing
also includes a parent hand-
book which explains in some
detail the meaning and rituals
for each holiday to which the
program is themed. For some
parents this is a refresher
course. For many others it is a
first experience of learning,
along with their children. This
first mailing also includes a
cassette tape of holiday songs
and stories which, according to
parents, children never tire of
playing.
This program is being made
available in this community
under the auspices of the
Department of Education of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County at a reduced
price of $20. A gift subscrip-
tion from the Department of
Education has been given to
each religious school in the
community to acquaint them
with the program.
The Educators Council of
the Palm Beaches also en-
dorses this program. In com-
menting on this home learning
program, Ms. Lipton stated.
Home Start is a remarkable
program that guides parents
m enriching their children's
Jewish lives as well as pro-
viding them with an educa-
tional experience. Unfor-
tunately, in our society where
religious education is a very
small part of a child's ac-
tivities, this program allows
families to make Jewish
holidays a living part of their
home life .in an extremely
creative and exciting way."
Each Home Start package
comes addressed to the child,
in time to learn about, to
prepare for and to celebrate
Chanukah, Purim, Passover,
Shavuot, and, of course, Shab-
bat. The fall package combines
material for Rosh Hashanah,
Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Sim-
chat Torah.
In each package there is a
story book, illustrated in full
color, and a separate play and
learn magazine for the family
to share. The latter has games,
puzzles, a simple holiday recipe
and crafts. Part of the
Chanukah package, for exam-
ple, includes a dreidel to color,
cut out, play with, and learn
Hebrew letters from, a poster-
size picture of Judah Maccabee
to hang on the wall with paper
latkes to feed him while blind-
folded, and a simple menorah
that parent and child can make
together.
Started in Baltimore seven
years ago as a project of the
Bureau of Jewish Education, it
quickly gained in popularity
and after a few years was
adopted by the Jewish Educa-
tional Service of North
Differerent Approaches
Continued from Page 6
perience" manifested in
cooperative activity. However,
his intended result jibes with
Wiesel's: a geometrically in-
creasing cadre of people im-
bued with compassion and em-
pathy, willing to seek peaceful
solutions to conflict.
"By focusing on action-
oriented activities, not words,
we believe we're influencing
the future," he said. "You
really cannot appeal to groups
to come together out of simple,
pure altruism, morals or
ethics. Rather, you can bring
together different groups ...
to join in projects that benefit
both parties equally."
The most successful Interns
projects become integrated in-
to the daily lives of the
villages, he explained. Cohen
hopes to reorganize the pro-
gram to maintain 30 interns in
the field and thus expand its
programs and add participants
from throughout the Middle
East.
THE PEACE award is nam-
ed for the late rabbi and
educator known for his in-
tegration of theology and ef-
forts for peace. He was involv-
ed with the fellowship in op-
posing the Vietnam war and in
the civil rights movement.
His daughter Susannah
Heschel, an author, recalled at
the ceremony her father's par-
ticipation with Dr. Martin
Luther King at the crucial civil
rights march in Selma, Ala.
The family feared for the
rabbi's safety, but he returned
home unscathed and un-
daunted. She recalled that he
told his family, "I felt like my
legs were praying."
Consider Aliyah
South African
Jews Told
JOHANNESBURG (JTA)
The chairman of the South
African Zionist Federation has
urged his nation's Jews to
more seriously consider im-
migration to Israel, as their
relatively comfortable South
African lifestyle could end.
The Jewish Echo of
Glasgow, Scotland, reports
that M.W. "Mockie" Fried-
man warned delegates to the
recent federation conference
here of "a dark night for Jews,
with danger emanating from
the extreme right and extreme
left."
In advocating the federation
to establish a task force on
aliyah, he imparted further ad-
vice: If Israel imposes punitive
measures on the government
of South Africa regarding
apartheid, it would result in
"additional serious problems
for South African Jewry."
America as a pilot experimen-
tal program to be used in key
cities throughout the United
States. Last year its publica-
tion was assumed by Behrman
House which enriched the
material.
The materials have been us-
ed in nursery schools and
primary grades of religious
schools, but have been most ef-
fective at home where young
parents are able to use Home
Start for enriching holiday
celebrations. "At this time of
the year as families gather for
Chanukah, it is a perfect op-
portunity to share Jewish iden-
tity with your children and
grandchildren through the
Home Start program,' stated
Ms. Lipton.
A child can be enrolled in
Home Start at any time and
receive the complete cycle of
seven holiday mailings. To
order Home Start for use local-
ly and/or further information,
contact Dr. Elliot Schwartz,
Education Department
Associate, at the Federation
office, 832-2120. To order for
use in areas other than the
Palm Beaches, use the order
blank located in the Home
Start ad on page 15.
Children and their parents learn about Jewish holidays
through Home Start.
Jewish Agency Working to Retain
Jewish Presence in Galilee
By BILL CLARK
UJA Press Service
SFAD, Israel Large maps
pinned to the walls in the
Jewish Agency's Jerusalem
headquarters look like battle
glans for a campaign in the
alilee. And, indeed, they are.
Colored grids and pins on
those maps reveal that the
population of the Galilee is
now evenly divided between
Arabs and Jews and the
Arabs are experiencing a
natural increase nearly double
that of the Jewish population.
With each passing year, the
Jewish character of Israel's
northern tier is being
submerged deeper beneath a
rapidly expanding Arab
community.
In some regions, such as the
mountains around Sfad, Arabs
outnumber Jews two-to-one. A
national minority gaining a
clear numerical majority in
one region almost guarantees
a separatist movement.
Cyprus has been torn by such
Greek-Turkish strife; Kurdish
and Armenian regions have
been in a state of nearly
perpetual civil war in Iraq;
Iran, Turkey, and Lebanon
have been shattered by fac-
tional strife.
Demographic changes here
in the Galilee, IsraeFs north,
are one of the most serious
groups of problems Israel
faces. So, the Jewish Agency,
which receives most of its
funds from American Jews
through their local
UJA/Federation Campaign,
has launched a major cam-
paign to restore the Galilee
character. It is an enormous
challenge, and success is by no
means assured.
"In the short term, we can
do very little about changing
the numerical balance unless
there is an enormous aliyah,"
says Talma Duchan, chief of
the Jewish Agency's planning
team for the Galilee, referring
to Jewish immigration to
Israel. So the Agency is using
a combination of short-term
tactics and long-term
planning.
Tactics involve supporting
the Galilee's current Jewish
population to prevent further
emigration. At the same time,
the Jewish Agency is setting
down the infrastructure for
long-term goals, such as the
"Region 2000" which may br-
ing 100,000 more Jews to the
Galilee.
Mechanization has made
Israeli agriculture so produc-
tive that fewer people are
needed to run farms, and this
has resulted in serious
unemployment in the Galilee's
predominantly agricultural
Jewish communities. To
counter this, United Jewish
Appeal/Federation Campaign
resources are being used to set
up a variety of small industries
and tourism projects.
UJA/Federation funds are
also being used to establish
new settlements at strategic
Galilee locations.
A great deal of Arab expan-
sion in the Galilee is illegal,
Ms. Duchan said. "Israeli law
applies. Everyone Jews and
Arabs alike must have
building permits and build ac-
cording to the master plan,"
she added. Nevertheless, there
are today, about 10,000 illegal
Arab dwelling units in the
Galilee.
"In some cities, the
municipality would demolish
such buildings," she said. "But
in the Galilee, it becomes a na-
tional problem with strong
political implications. So
demolition of illegal structures
is not being done."
Thus, maps of the Galilee
have become chess boards of
sorts, with Jewish Agency
planners trying to second-
guess the next step of illegal
expansion in the Arab sector.
CONSTRUCTION I NDKRWAY IN IS1 IL'S NORTH.
-UK projecU underway in Israel's Galilee region, the
! ?t"l 1** WIthin Urad Pre-1967 borders construc-
ITil/Si dePend n part, on American Jews through the
UJA/Federation Campaign. UJA Press Service Photo.


Shulman Named to Chair
Suite Visit Program
Friday, November 21, 1986rThe Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Continued from Page 3
tional leaders to help in this
program. "We are pleased to
have Ehud Olmert, a member
of the Israeli Knesset, and
Martin Stein, UJA National
Chairman, meet with our ma-
jor contributors. Mr. Olmert
brings to us a very personal in-
volvement in Israel affairs. He
is an articulate spokesman for
the Israeli government and
recognizes the unique and im-
portant role American
diaspora plays in helping to
solve the problems and
frustrations of a new nation.
"Mr. Stein is a dynamic
leader who played a major role
in Operation Moses, the rescue
of Ethiopian Jewry, and is
committed and concerned for
the well-being of Jews around
the world. He will share with
our community his experiences
in Eastern Europe, Russia and
Israel."
New BBYO
Chapter
Forming
The Gold Coast Council of
the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is currently for-
ming a new chapter in the
Wellington/Royal Palm/West
Palm Beach area for Jewish
boys and girls in grades 9-12.
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization has chapters
throughout the United Suites,
Canada, Israel, England,
France and South America.
Locally there are over 600
members in Gold Coast Coun-
cil, which spans North Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
Counties.
BBYO sponsors a wide
variety of social, athletic, com-
munity service, religious and
cultural activities. These in-
clude dances, sports leagues,
conventions,' religious ser-
vices, speakers, parties and
much much more. BBYO also
provides Jewish teens with in-
valuable leadership training
and enables them to meet
other Jewish teens from all
over the state of Florida, the
United States and even the
world.
If you are a Jewish teen age
14-18 and would like to know
how you can become involved
in this new chapter we invite
you to contact Jerry Kiewe at
(305) 581-0218.
Media Award
To Lange
SEATTLE (JTA) The
American Jewish Committee
has presented its Mass Media
Award to Bob Lange, pro-
ducer of the "Seeds of Hate"
documentary on the radical
fight's influence on debt-
ridden Midwest farmers,
shown on ABC TV's "20/20."
The AJCommittee's William
Petschek National Jewish
Family Center prize has gone
to the Parenting Centers pro-
gram of he Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, which
provides Jewish living ex-
periences to families.
Mr. Olmert, a member of the
Herat party in the Likud
Parliamentary block, was first
elected to the Knesset in 1973
at the age of 28, making him
the youngest of all Knesset
members. A native of Israel,
he graduated from Hebrew
University, and is now a prac-
ticing lawyer. In the years of
his service in the Knesset, he
received wide-spread publicity
for his extensive concern and
involvement in the social pro-
blems in Israel.
Mr. Stein pioneered and
served as UJA's National Vice
Chairman for the Community
Leadership Consultation Pro-
gram. He also chaired the
special Task Force for Opera-
tion Moses. He is a member of
the Board of Directors of
United Israel Appeal, having
served as a past Vice Chair-
man of that organization. He
currently serves on the Ex-
ecutive Committee of the Na-
tional Jewish Resource
Center. He has been a member
of the Board of Trustees of
Friends of Hebrew University
and a National Vice President
of AIPAC. He has been very
active in many other Jewish
and civic organizations in his
home state of Wisconsin.
Mr. Shulman is a past Presi-
dent and past General Cam-
paign Chairman of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County. He presently serves
as a member of its Board of
Directors, and was Chairman
of its Long Range Planning
Study. He is also a member of
the Board of Trustees of the
Morse Geriatric Center.
Nationally Mr. Shulman is a
member of the Board of Direc-
tors of the Joint Distribution
Committee and is a former
member of the Board of the
Council of Jewish Federations.
He is a National Vice Chair-
man of the United Jewish Ap-
peal and presently is National
Allocations Chairman and a
member of the Financial Rela-
tions Committee.
For more information, con-
tact Douglas Kleiner, Cam-
paign Director, at the Federa-
tion office, 832-2120.
Reviewing the documents that created the Jewish Communi-
ty Campus Corporation which will hold title to the campus to
be located on a site on Military Trail are Zelda Pincourt,
President, Jewish Community Center, and Erwin H. Blonder,
President, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County. The
campus will house the Jewish Community Center, the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County, and the Jewish Family and
Children's Service. For more information contact Marjorie
Scott, Capital Campaign Director, at the Federation office
832-2120.
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Page. 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Jev s To Help Farmers in Trouble
Kansat
distrib
UAHC
Th
100,00
and sp
W
ORT-J
Continued from Page 1
ity JCRB with a $25,000 grant to initiate a farm crisis project. The
on of the petitions is being carried out by Women's American ORT and
e are now 300 farm families going under every day, said Goldstein, over
farm families per year, and he cited the accompanying increases in child
lse abuse, mental illness, "and the hopelessness.'
ITE, speaking for Women's American ORT and the Women'^ American
RB Farm Crisis Project, outlined the range of projects considered for in-
teraction between Jewish groups and farmers, Christian clergy, rural media,
teachers and public officials, including the consideration of programs of direct
financial aid and the development of expanded mental health services. "Once we
started learning about their (farmers') problems, we felt we had a moral respon-
sibility toward them."
White explained that "as the vocational and technical training arm of the
Jewish people, ORT appreciates the importance of productive labor, both as a
means of livelihood and because it cannot be separated from the dignity of the in-
dividual or the wealth of society. We feel a tremendous affinity for these farm
families."
Goldstein said his agency first became involved in the farm crisis through in-
vestigations into the rabidly racist, anti-Semitic broadcasts of radio station
KTTL-FM in Dodge City, Kansas, whose religious sermons advocated violence
against Jews, blacks and law enforcement officials.
HE SAID that as members of the Kansas City JCRB learned more about the
extremists, they simultaneously learned about the problems of family fanners,
and "determined that for our own security it was necessary to develop a pro-
gram to combat anti-Semitism and racism because of our religious and social
values, and the tradition of Jewish community relations agencies in aiding people
in pain."
The petition, said Goldstein, "is the centerpiece of a multifaceted program to
educate and involve urban Jews and through Jews other urban people in action
on the farm crisis."
Goldstein stressed the appropriateness "for Jews and farmers to work
News From Hod Hasharon
New Project Manager Named
together." Among other Jewish agencies working to alleviate the farm crisis, he
said, were the Des Moines, Iowa, Jewish Community Relations Council, which
provided about $10,000 to farm families for emergency survival assistance, and
the Minnesota Jewish Community Relations Council Anti-Defamation League,
which established a person-to-person program bringing together Jews and
farmers for "discussion and action."
GOLDSTEIN ALSO cited the St. Louis American Jewish Committee,
which, through former Lt. Gov. Harriett Woods, began a hotline offering legal
advice to farmers.
Alexander Schindler, president of the UAHC, announcing the UAHC par-
ticipation in the petition drive, noted the place of Jews alongside farmers.
"Judaism teaches a respect for the land and those who till it... We must revere
the farmer as much as the scholar, for both do the Lord's work. It is our solemn
obligation to make certain that they will not be denied the fruits of their labor."
The UAHC's Committee on Social Action passed a resolution last April "to
undertake educational activities, to inform its congregations and affiliates of the
Jewish and urban stake" in the farm crisis.
Schindler noted that the UAHC effort grew from the April resolution, which
called the farm crisis "the most severe since the Great Depression" and urged
legislative action to "stem the tide of farm foreclosures, offer reasonable and im-
mediate debt relief to farmers in severe economic crisis and address the ongoing
social service needs of farm and rural populations."
DAVID SENTER, national director of the American Agriculture Movement
who gave up his farm and brought his family to Washington, D.C. to lobby Con-
gress for legislation favorable to the farmer, described the farm crisis as rapidlv
becoming "an irreversible situation" brought about by the greed of a small
number of giant companies that do everything from buying the fruits of the
harvest to packaging it and distributing it.
They, and the Reagan Administration's farm policies, he said, have been
responsible for the disastrous proportions of the farm crisis, reducing the
number of farmers until ownership of the land rests in the fewest possible hands.
In accepting the petition, Cy Carpenter, president of the National Farmers
Union, welcomed "the special efforts of our Jewish friends in undertaking to
help us correct the injustice that is being imposed on American farmers ...
Those of the Jewish faith have written a proud and productive history of involve-
ment and leadership, and more than their share of caring and sharing when peo-
ple are denied or oppressed."
Mayor Eliyahu Shimoni an-
nounced at a recent meeting
of the Local Steering Com-
mittee of the Project
Renewal Neighborhoods of
Giora and Gil Amal, Hod
Hasharon, that Hadassah
Salamon will assume the
responsibilites as Project
Manager. She is replacing
Ziona Kemelman who had
been manager for five years.
Hadassah is no stranger
either to the residents or to
the Florida community. Hav-
ing worked as the Ad-
ministrative Secretary for
the past five years, her
responsibilities have included
the administration of the
Jewish Agency/Hod
Hasharon Project Renewal in
all aspects and specifically
with regards to the budget
and personnel. Her
background both profes-
sionally and during her Army
service definitely prepared
her for her present respon-
sibilies. During the Army ser-
vice she was involved with
Communication and after
graduation from Jerusalem
University with a degree in
law, she practiced for five
W
rmiatsj nitsj-rnnn niun
CT REIMEWAL
years. She is the mother of
three children, Aviv, 15, It-
zhak, 13, and Orit, 6tt. Her
husband Moahe is an In-
dustrial Management
Engineer employed by
Bezek, the newly-organized
telephone company in Israel.
When asked what she con-
siders the biggest change as
the result of Project
Renewal, she said "initially,
the physical renovations of
the homes and streets and
physical projects provided
through the commitment of
the Florida communities. In
recent years, the evidence of
the results of the importance
of better education and in-
volvement of the residents to
make changes for themselves
could be considered the
greatest change." Hadassah
feels for the future that we
must continue to strive for
improvement and work
together with our partners
from Palm Beach and South
Broward.
Continuing in their posi-
tions in the office is Malka
Lador, general secretary;
Shoshana Tamir, accountant;
and Sadia Iraqui, manager
for the Housing and Physical
renovations. It is apparent
that the team work and the
consistency of staff such as
found in the Project Renewal
office in Hod Hasharon has
helped in many ways to
assure the success and im-
plementation of the concepts
of Project Renewal.
British Labor Party Seeking
Better Relations with Israel
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) The
British Labor Party is men-
ding fences with Britain's
350,000-strong Jewish com-
munity and is seeking to renew
its traditional friendship with
Israel's Labor Party, strained
in recent years because of the
emergence of anti-Zionism in
some Labor circles here. Labor
Party leader Neil Kinnock
spoke last Tuesday night at a
Labor Zionist dinner marking
the 80th anniversary of the
establishment of Poale Zion in
Eastern Europe and the 65th
anniversary of its British
branch affiliation with the
British Labor Party. He
shared the platform with the
Israeli Minister of Economic
Coordination Gad Yaacobi.
Yaacobi said the growing
rapprochement between the
Labor movements in both
countries was symbolized by
their common views on ter-
rorism. He praised the British
government for its tough ac-
tion against Syria, which was
involved in an attempt to blow
up an El Al airliner last April.
Kinnock stressed the con-
tinued need to deal with the
causes of terrorism, but he
spelled out a six-point plan to
deal with its effects. They are:
more effective coordination
between national security
agencies; tighter extradition
laws; better cooperation bet-
ween police forces; an interna-
tional convention to protect
travellers from hijacking and
murder; exposure of the sup-
port systems and state fun-
dings on which terrorists rely;
and prevention of the abuse of
diplomatic immunity.
Kinnock acknowledged that
anti-Semitism still infects
Europe. He said the Poale
Zion's task was to remind the
Labor movement of the cons-
tant need for vigilance against
it.
Time Out in Israel
A few years ago the most popular candy bar in Israel was
a delicious tidbit named Time Out. Sales were so brisk that
the manufacturer suspended distribution temporarily to
allow its other candy lines to catch up. .
A new "Time Out" appears to be an Israeli favorite.
Under the first half of the national unity government, led
by former Prime Minister Shimon Peres, Israelis enjoyed a
two-year time out from war, rampant inflation and political
contentiousness. The Peres-led government also improved
Israel's relations with the United Sates, Egypt, Eastern
Europe and Africa, and facilitated increased Jordanian in-
volvement on the West Bank. Peres himself was rewarded
with a 71 percent approval rating among Israelis.
Now it is Yitzhak Shamir's turn to lead the unity govern-
ment. But Shamir comes to power with a different
background. He is known as a "hard-liner," one of a hand-
ful of Likud members to have voted against the Camp
Davki Accords. As leader of the Labor Party, Peres in-
herited a history of heavy government involvement in the
economy and a Jordan option for the West Bank. Shamir,
head of the Likud, is heir to a more laissez-faire economic
approach and favors a much-increased Jewsih presence in
Judea and Samaria.
However, in his speech presenting his new government
to the Knesset, Shamir reinforced the principles of the na-
tional unity agreement. He stressed that his government
would pursue the peace process begun at Camp David and
"enlarge the arena of peace to encompass additional coun-
tries in the region." He reiterated the national unity
government plank which calls on Jordan to join the peace
process.
Of the Arab residents of the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
Shamir said, "We aspire to having these residents run their
own lives," providing they are willing to disassociate
themselves from the PLO and other terrorist organiza-
tions. He highlighted the national unity policy which rejects
the establishment of "another Palestinian state" in addi-
tion to Jordan in the administered territories.
The Prime Minister committed himself once again to
"the supreme value of settlement in all parts of Eretz
Yisrael' in accordance with the national unity agreement.
While the Prime Minister restated the guidelines of the na-
tional unity government, which in practice permit a small
number of new settlements, he is under pressure from the
political right to increase the number rapidly, a move op-
posed by Labor.
Peres and Shamir also hold different views on an interna-
tional peace conference. Peres sees an international peace
conference as an interim step toward direct negotiations;
Shamir would accept such a conference only after direct
negotiations. But Shamir points out that "so long as there
is no (peace) proposal from the Arab side that could be ac-
cepted by part of the government, there is no reason that
could prevent the continued existence of the government."
The Prime Minister hopes to continue Israel's respite
from the political roller-coaster and to finesse the
"inherent difficulties" of the national unity government. "I
don't have to look for them," Shamir has said, "I must
overcome them."
(Near East Report)


Friday, No
21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of
h County
Page 13
Terrorism Explored At Mideast Conference
By LOUISE ROSS
Although he was ahle to
relate personally to the plight
of the hostages in Beirut,
former Iranian hostage U.S.
Ambassdor Bruce Laingen
could shed no new light on the
circumstances surrounding the
release of hostage David
Jacobsen earlier this month.
Addressing a group of 220
community leaders at the
Mideast Conference on Ter-
rorism at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches sponsored i>y the
Mideast Task Force of the
Community Relations Council
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, Am-
bassador Laingen condemned
terrorism and said, "I can't
speak personally about the re-
cent hostage release. Obvious-
ly I feel rather strongly about
the welfare of hostages as I
was one myself. The problem
is I'm under the same direction
as anyone else is to avoid
speculating on that."
He did, however, have some
very personal recollections of
his involvement in the Iranian
crisis. Ambassador Laingen
was one of 52 Americans who
spent 444 days captive when
terrorists seized the U.S. Em-
bassy in Tehran in 1979. "Last
week was the seventh anniver-
sary of the theft of my em-
bassy in Tehran," he said.
"We were used as pawns but it
was a dramatic success for
them because it put in place
the regime that is.there today.
For us it was a failure a
failure of policy, first in the
revolution itself and the over-
thow of the Shah and a failure
of the seizure of the embassy
six months later. The tragedy
ended well, though, as we
CRC Chairman Helen Hoff-
m a n welcomes the
participants.
were used as symbols of
something more positive for
our country's psyche in the
future."
On the subject of the Iran-
Iraq War, Ambassador La-
ingen believes strongly that an
end to that conflict is in our
country's best interests. He
thinks it will benefit the
American hostages, but warns
that their safety cannot over-
ride other American interests
and objectives. Ambassador
Laingen also sees that the end
of the conflict will reduce
Iran's role in terrorism and
will provide a basis for the
U.S. to resume a relationship
with Iran.
Opening session guest
Over 280 people attended the Jewish Community Day
School's Tenth Annual Barbecue recently held at the school.
Children enjoyed a lively game of volleyball during the day.
Winner* of the rattle were: First prize, Jacqueline Kandel, in
center with daughter, Johanna; second prise, Dr. Gernie
Moorhead, sold by Lynne Ehrlkh (second prize winner* not
pictured); third prise, Mark and Stacey Levy (far left and fifth
from left), sold by Rhonda Shore (fourth from left). Second
from left ia Robert Abranu, Co-Chairman of the Barbecue
with Joan Tochner (right).
speaker, Jay Fisher represents
the estate of Leon Klinghoffer
who was murdered by
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion terrorists on the cruise
ship Achille Lauro. Fisher told
the audience that, on behalf of
the estate, he had brought two
lawsuits before the courts.
"Mrs. Klinghoffer, who has
since died, wanted to hold
responsible those people in
charge of the hijacking."
Therefore, a lawsuit against
the owners of the Achille
Lauro charges that lax securi-
ty aboard the vessel made it
possible for the PLO to board
and carry out their illegal ac-
tions. There was no searching
of luggage and vendors got on
at every stop without being
searched. The 375 crewmen
did nothing to assist the hijack-
ed passengers, he alledged. "A
common carrier has a respon-
sibility to use reasonable
means to protect the
passengers," Fisher contends.
In what he calls a simplier
case, Fisher is suing the PLO
directly. "They killed my
client. He is certain that the
PLO can be sued in an
American court of law since
they own property in New
York and do business there. In
addition, the PLO does not
have political immunity. "If we
do nothing more than say that
we have jurisdiction over the
PLO, think of the conse-
auences. We can hurt them in
le pocketbook," he stated.
Fisher suggested several
things that an individual could
do to combat terrorism. He
said that travelers should be
aware of suspicious people,
and also that we shouldn't in-
tellectualize about the reasons
for terrorism. "There is no
justification for killing women
and children."
Fisher also emphasized that
it was important not to let ter-
rorists frighten us. "Don't be
afraid to go to Israel and
travel," he remarked. "Ter-
rorists want to limit tourism."
He concluded by urging the au-
dience to support with time
and money any organization
that educates and provides
support to fight terrorism.
Two workshop sessions were
also held. Brian Abrahams,
Legislative Analyst for
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee, addressed the
legislative issues on Capitol
Hill dealing with world ter-
rorism. Phil Baum, Associate
Executive Director of the
American Jewish Congress,
discussed the AJC's record on
the PLO and their role in inter-
national terrorism. There was
a lively exchange of ideas bet-
ween the audience and the
speakers at both workshops.
The program was moderated
by Dr. Mark Rattinger, Chair-
man of the Mideast Task
Force, who welcomed the par-
ticipants and introduced the
day's theme. Helen Hoffman,
Chairman of the Community
Relations Council, introduced
the opening session speaker,
Jay Fisher. During a workshop
session, she remarked on the
foresight of Dr. Rattinger and
his Task Force in choosing the
topic of terrorism for the
Mideast Conference. "With
the release of David Jacobsen
and the subsequent public and
media outcry it caused into the
possibility of trading arms for
hostages, a no more relevant
and current topic could have
been chosen," Hoffman said.
Workshop speakers were (left to right) Brian Abrahams,
Legislative Analyst for American Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC), and Phil Baum, Associate Executive Direc-
tor of the American Jewish Congress.
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Lucerne Lake* Lodge No. 3132 announces its Dec. 7
Sunday meeting at the FWEC Finnish Social Hall, 908
Lehto Lane (off Melaleuca between Military and Kirk).
Traditional Bagel-Lox-Cream Cheese Breakfast will be
served at 9:30 a.m.
On this day of memories there will be a presentation of
"The David Ben Gurion Centennial."
The Vision of the Founder: "Has It Stood the Test of
Time?"
Panel discussion by Hy Nadrich, President; Ed Roths-
tein, Whilom Professor and Sociologist; Sam Roskin,
Publisher and Editor. Moderator: Len Turk.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY NATIONAL WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
Palm Beach East Chapter will present their Showcase
Meeting at The Hyatt Palm Beaches on Dec. 3 at 10 a.m.
HADASSAH
Lee Vaasil Chapter will hold its Paid-Up Membership
Luncheon, Tuesday, Nov. 26 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom, 315 No. ,rA" St., Lake Worth.
Lunch is planned and the program for the day will
feature the Lee Vassil Singers.
For information call Helen Toder.
Tikvah Chapter will be spending Nov. 26-30, Thanksgiv-
ing weekend, at the Caribbean Hotel, Miami Beach. Kosher
meals, transportation and tips are included.
Plan on coming to the Flea Market on Dec. 14 at Century
Corners from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
NA'AMAT USA
The Theodore Herzl Clnb will have a Chanukah pro-
gram on Dec. 4 at 1 p.m. at Sunrise Bank, Gun Club Shopp-
ing Center, Military Trail. There will be entertainment and
refreshments.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
On Monday, Nov. 24, at noon, the Lake Worth West
Chapter will have a paid-up luncheon and fashion show
given by Regi's of Lake Avenue at the Gulf stream Hotel on
Lake Worth.
Palm Beach Chapter will have a three day holiday at the
Lido Spa in Belle Island, Miami Beach, Dec. 11 to Dec. 14.
This includes meals, entertainment, massage and much
more.
The next regular meeting of the Mid-Palm Chapter will
be held on Monday, Nov. 24, at 1 p.m. at Temple Beth
Sholom, 316 No. "A" St., Lake Worth.
The program for the day will be a book report by Helen
Nussbaum.
Husbands and friends are invited.
Future events will be:
Jan. 18 "Forever Yours Musically" with Rita and Ira
Shore Sunday matinee at John I. Leonard High School,
$6.60 each. For tickets call Lee Levine.
Okeechobee Chapter will hold its monthly meeting on
Monday, Dec. 1, at 12:30 p.m. at the home of Jeanette
Pallor. Guest speaker Dr. William D. Katz,
Psychotherapist and Diplomate of the American Academy
of Behavioral Medicine will discuss "Coping with Stress.'
The Poinciana Chapter will have a Paid Up Membership
Luncheon Meeting on Nov. 24, at 12:30 p.m. in the Social
Hall of The Challenger Club.
........
.




Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Possible Weapons Scandals
Put Israeli Leaders Under the Gun
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel's unexpected an-
nouncement last Sunday that
it is indeed holding atom-
suspect Mordechai Vanunu in
custody and that he is to face
trial may have come just in
time to prevent a dangerous
deterioration in relations bet-
ween London and Jerusalem.
There can be little doubt
that the timing of the Cabinet
Secretary's statement
Israel's first official word on
this seven-week-old saga
was linked to the growing
wave of media speculation in
Britain that Vanunu, the
former Dimona nuclear reac-
tor technician, was kidnap-
ped from British soil by
Israeli agents.
Worse still, the British
press early last week was
suggesting that Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher
had actually been apprised
ahead of time, by then-
Premier Shimon Peres, of
Israel's intention to abduct
Vanunu.
Vanunu, an extreme left-
winger who left Israel for
Australia last year, sold what
purported to be detailed
plans of a nuclear-bomb-
manufacturing facility at
Dimona to the Sunday Times
of London. He presumably
will be charged with treason
in what is likely to be a
closed-door trial.
The Israeli statement last
week took pains to insist that
Vanunu had not been snatch-
ed from British soil and
therefore no conversation
about such an abduction had
taken place between That-
cher and Peres.
According to reports from
London last week, the
government there is making
a determined effort to make
do with this terse Israeli posi-
tion and to have the British
media make do with it, too.
Plainly, had Israel con-
tinued to stay silent, the
credibility of one of its major
friends on the world stage,
Thatcher, would have been
seriously jeopardized as the
story continued to burgeon
on Fleet Street. The British
Premier could have been
damagingly embarrassed.
In addition, Israel's top
policymakers and their legal
advisers may have been pro-
mpted to act now and release
a public statement for fear of
being forced to by the High
Court of Justice.
But beyond these tactical
and legal considerations,
Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
Foreign Minister Peres and
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin may well have been
moved by a more fundamen-
tal examination of Israel's
condition at this most ex-
tremely delicate juncture in
its various foreign relation-
ships and especially rela-
tionships connected with
covert activities.
They may have decided to
clean up, as best they could,
the messy aftermath of the
Vanunu affair before bracing
themselves to face possibly
heavy fallout from the arms-
to-Iran affair.
The Israeli policymakers are
keenly aware of the still
ominous build-up of question-
ing and criticism within the
American political communi-
ty over insistent reports that
the U.S. and Iran are engag-
ed in longtime negotiations
and tradeoffs involving arms
for hostages and that
Israel is playing the role of
secret middleman, and sup-
plier of the arms to the Kho-
meini regime.
At the moment, criticism
and opposition from at home
and abroad are focused at the
Reagan Administration.
Critics charge that dealing
with Iran over hostages' lives
undermines the very essence
of America's purported
policies on terrorism.
But Israel, which according
to some U.S. media reports
initiated the negotiation, is
bound to take a great deal of
flak itself if this affair con-
tinues to gather momentum.
Politicians and pundits are
bound to point out that Israel
is always stridently ad-
vocating an arms boycott of
any state abetting terror
and yet here is evidence that
the same Israel is actively
participating in an ongoing
arms-supply relationship
with the quintessential ter-
rorist state ...
Indeed, Israel has called
forcefully on France to aban-
don plans to sell arms to
Syria, because of Syria's
close involvement in ter-
rorism as unmasked in the
Hindawi trial in London.
European Community
Foreign Ministers were due
to discuss their relationships
with Syria at a meeting in
London last Monday and
Israel's position is one they
would naturally hear out, if
not necessarily adopt.
But that position must in-
evitably be weakened by the
steady stream of reports that
Israel is itself, on behalf of
the U.S., selling weapons to
Iran.
Compounding Israel's
discomfort is a string of other
damaging intelligence-
related episodes:
The Pollard affair, involv-
ing U.S. Naval analyst
Jonathan Jay Pollard, who
allegedly passed on American
secret assessments to the
Israelis, hit the headlines just
one year ago and the scars
it left are still unhealed.
The Shin Bet affair, involv-
ing the cover-up of an illegal
killing of two Palestinian ter-
rorists, is not yet concluded.
Police investigators are
wrestling with the conflicting
accounts of Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir and then-Shin
Bet head Avraham Shalom
regarding who authorized the
killings and the cover-up.
The security aspects of the
Vanunu affair must surely
disturb the Israeli intelligence
community and its political
masters. According to foreign
reports, one senior Shin Bet
official already has been fired
in the wake of what appears to
have been a major security
lapse.
During a Hagigat HaSefer celebration, JCDS second grade
students join in singing and dancing.
JCDS Second
Graders Honored
Israel's First Liver
Transplant Patient Dies
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mira Schichmanter, Israel's
first liver transplant patient,
died shortly before dawn Nov.
8 of complications that follow-
ed surgery at Rambam
Hospital in Haifa. A mother of
two from Kfar Saba, she had
had her 40th birthday in her
hospital bed, surrounded by
her family who were with her
at the time of death.
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The second grade students
of the Jewish Community Day
School recently celebrated a
major achievement along the
road to Jewish education and
awareness. They received
their first Torah Study Books
during a Hagigat HaSefer
celebration before parents,
teachers, friends and fellow
Day School students.
Coinciding with the festival
of Simchat Torah, the celebra-
tion began with a processional
of the Sefer Torahs around the
Doctors said her death was
not caused by the operation,
which was successful but by
massive internal hemorrhag-
ing related to the liver ailment
she had suffered for years,
which had made the transplant
necessary. She had been
recovering up to five days
after surgery and was about to
be released from the intensive
care unit when she began to
bleed, and a second operation
was performed.
A Rambam Hospital
spokesman said it would con-
tinue with liver transplants ap-
proved by the Health Ministry
and was not discouraged. Doc-
tors noted that the first liver
transplants in the U.S., where
the technique was developed,
had a high mortality rate at
first but chances for recovery
now are much improved.
Meanwhile, the second liver
transplant patient, Eliahu
Schreier, 59, remained in
critical condition at Rambam
Hospital. He underwent
surgery several days after
Schichmanter and also had to
undergo a second operation for
internal bleeding.
room. Then the 22 children,
under the direction of their
Jewish studies teachers,
Shoshana Sharf and Judy
Serelson, gave a presentation,
in Hebrew about how the
Jewish people came to accept
the Torah. The festivities also
included singing and dancing
and a few words of congratula-
tions from the 8th graders and
was followed by a treat of can-
died apples and a "Mazel Tov"
cake.
Committee members for the annual Youth Aliyah Luncheon
to be sponsored by the Rishona Palm Beach Chapter of
Hadassah gather to finalize their plans. The event will be
held at the Royce Hotel in West Palm Beach on Monday, Dec.
8 at noon. Membership vice president Mae Levy will be
honored as "Woman of the Year" for 1986. Seated (left to
right) are: Harriet Rand, Luncheon co-chairman; Celia Miller
and Barbara Thrasher. Standing are: (left to right) Laura
Hyman, Toby Glazer, luncheon co-chairman; Reba Rodman
and Eleanor Suchoff, publicity.
Elegance in Entertaining
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KT
warn m
mi'
Friday, November 21, 19
::
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Histadrut Boss Vows Cooperation
Israel Kessar, Secretary-
General of Israel's powerful
Histadrut trade union federa-
tion, intends to continue
cooperation with the post-
rotation national unity govern-
ment. This is so even though
the Histadrut which in-
cludes nearly 80 percent of
Israel's work force tradi-
tionally has been a major sup-
tion, another large share to
medical and other fundamen-
tal social services. "So to cut
economic assistance supported
the government's stabilization
" YTlV^w8*!; the budget is very easy to say,
SSSf whlch^ cushioned but ver* SbSaSt to achieve"
workers against the worst ef-
fects of rampant inflation.
As a result, inflation, which
had hit an annual rate of more
than 440 percent, fell to the
present 20 percent range.
Asked about "privatization"
the sale of government-
owned businesses to the
private sector, another sug-
gestion to spur economic
the Histadrut would not op-
pose denationalization of some
firms other than basic utilities.
He acknowledged that selling
government-owned firms "is a
way to mobilize foreign funds
to come to our country."
The Yemeni-born labor
leader was not enthusiastic
about a tax reduction
porter of the Labor alignment Unemployment did rise to ap- growth Kessar said, "This is another proposal suggested by
and an opponent of the Likud prcoamately-8 percent, high by a slogan the government is us- economists to generate
li nf nam Pnma Minima. Israeli Standards, but nOW an- iner nnt a n/tliov Hmuovor pcnnnmic ornwt.h Kpwuir said
bloc of hew Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir.
"There has been no rotation
in the Histadrut," Kessar jok-
ed in a recent Washington
talk, "so there is no excuse to
change our policy." He said
that his umbrella organization
of Israeli unions will back the
economic policies of the
government under Shamir as
long as they do not change
from those followed for the
past two years under former
Prime Minister Shimon Peres.
"We are sincere we want to
keep stability."
In the first half of its term
the unity government imposed
temporary wage and price
freezes, cut government spen-
ding including subsidies for
food, fuel and other necessities
- and presided over an inten-
tional erosion of consumer
buying power. Real income fell
by as much as 20 percent.
The plunge in world oil
prices and the availability of
$1.5 billion in emergency U.S.
standards, but now ap-
pears stable at 7.5 percent.
However, Kessar, a Labor
alignment Knesset member,
stressed that controlling infla-
tion was not the only goal of
economic reform. After
meeting with Secretary of
State George Shultz, the
Histadrut boss said he was
"very happy to hear that he
(Shultz) sees the future of
Israel's economy not only in
fighting inflation but in
economic growth." Kessar
noted that the labor federation
already has won from its
members a contribution equal
to three days' pay to a job-
creating investment fund.
Asked by NER whether ad-
ditional budget cuts would be
necessary to reduce inflation
to the single-digit range, as
urged by many analysts,
Kessar said, "I don't think the
government needs to cut any
further." He asserted that the
budget now is rigidly balanced,
with one-fourth committed to
defense, one-third to educa-
ing, not a policy." However, economic growth. Kessar said
he would support tax cuts if
they did notforce government
cuts in social service programs
or increases in user fees.
He said that in his talk with
Shultz, the Secretary showed
interst in "co-determination"
in Israel joint worker-
management derision-making.
Kessar emphasized increasing
productivity as a means to
economic growth and said that
some Hi8tadnnVowned enter-
prises have initiated profit-
sharing.
(Near East Report)
Bomb Explodes at
Antwerp Synagogue
PARIS (JTA) A power-
ful bomb exploded outside the
main synagogue in Antwerp
last Monday night causing ex-
tensive damage but no
casualties. The building was
unoccupied at the time.
A police spokesman said the
explosive was placed outside
the main entrance. No
messages were found and as of
late afternoon last Tuesday no
group claimed responsibility.
Two caretakers who live
behind the synagogue said
they heard no suspicious
noises during the night.
The bomb destroyed the
synagogue gate and shattered
its windows and those of
neighboring buildings. Ant-
werp has a large Jewish com-
munity. Six years ago, ter-
rorists attacked a group of
Jewish children waiting to
board a bus for a summer
camp. One child was killed and
a dozen were seriously injured.
Dorothy Rautbord will be
hosting a Cocktail Reception
for the members of the Palm
Beach County Israel Bond
Society at her home on Dec.
6. Members of the Society
make commitments of finan-
cial resources to purchase
Israel Bonds in excess of
$100,000, $25,000, and
$10,000. Dorothy Rautbord, a
member of the Israel Bond
Society, has been an active
member of the Palm Beach
community. She is s board
ember of the Visiting Nurse
Service, the Northwood In-
stitute, the Boy's Club,
American Technion Society,
*nd the American Jewish
Committee. She is President
of the Palm Beach Round
Table and a Trustee of
Chicago's Roosevelt
University.
* Don't Risk
Your Life Savings*
Nursing Home
Insurance
Available Ages
55 to 84
$80 daily benefit
as low as $320/Yr.
Several Companies A
Plane to Choose From
JROri H. i\mm
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120 S. Olive- Suite 403
West Palm Beach, PL 33401
659-7878
< THE HANUKKAH GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR ?)
Just before each Jewish holiday
a special package arrives wjjh
your child's name on it.
Give your child the Home Start every
Jewish child deserves. A year long
celebration of being Jewish for ages 4-7.
Holiday songs to sing.
Holiday games to play.
Holiday puzzles to solve.
Holiday decorations to make.
Holiday recipes that small children
can help prepare.
Holiday blessings to say along with
the grown-ups.
Full-color picture books that explain
what each holiday means and how we
celebrate it.
DELIVERED IN DECEMBER:
HANUKK AH **&
FULL-COLOR HANUKKAH PICTURE BOOK
A child s-eye view of the heroic Maccabees, the
Menorah. the dreidel. and the happy holiday in which
they all play a part.
PLAY AND LEARN HANUKKAH MAGAZINE
A dreidel to color, cut out. and play with Hanukkah gelt
game. A Menorah that parent and child can make
together Easy way to make latkes and how a small
child can help A poster-size picture of Judah Maccabee
to hang on the wall and paper latkes to feed him while
you are blindfolded
DELIVERED IN JANUARY:
SHABBAT Psshose
* FULL-COLOR SHABBAT PICTURE BOOK
A child's introduction to the holiday that comes every
week of the year
* PLAY AND LEARN SHABBAT MAGAZINE
Set the Shabbat table. Shabbat helper chart with
stickers that record each thing the child does to help
Candlesticks and hallah cover any child can make
Sabbath games (the quiet kind in keeping with the day)
DELIVERED IN MARCH:
PURIM Package
* FULL COLOR PURIM PICTURE BOOK
Esther. Mordecai. Ahasuerus and the evil Haman are
presented in scenes of oriental grandeur
* PLAY AND LEARN PURIM MAGAZINE
Purim card game (the losing card has a snarling picture
of you-know who) Make your own gragger Cut out
your own Purim mask Make your own Megillah Purim
finger puppets
DELIVERED IN APRIL:
PASSOVER Phae
* FULL-COLOR PASSOVER PICTURE BOOK
Practically a miniature Haggadah for the very young,
preparing the child for the Emily's own Seder
* PLAY AND LEARN PASSOVER MAGAZINE
Make your own afikoman bag and Seder napkin rings
Cut out and paste your own Haggadah Cut out and
paste your own Seder plate (and learn the name of
everything on it).
DELIVERED IN JUNE:
SHAVUOT^*^
* FULL-COLOR SHAVUOT PICTURE BOOK
How the same holiday can be a spring harvest festival
and a celebration of Torah can be hard for even adults
to understand, butjthis little book makes the connection
perfectly clear
* PLAY AND LEARN SHAVUOT MAGAZINE
Help Moses climb lo the top of the mountain A holiday
mobile to hang in'your room A Torah of your own to
dress with love and pride
DELIVERED IN SEPTEMBER ~~~
ROSH HASHANAHra^e
(includes Yom Kippur and Sukkot)
* TWO FULL COLOR FALL HOLIDAY BOOKS
High Ho\y Days: a child's introduction to the shofar. Kol
Nidre. and the concept of atonement, written and
illustrated with a quiet reverence Sukkof Why we
build a sukkah The great Simhat Torah parade in the
synagogue.
* PLAY AND LEARN FALL HOLIDAYS MAGAZINE
New Year's cards to make and send to people you like a
lot Make your decorations to hang in the sukkah Color
your own Simhat Torah flag and take it to the syn-
agogue to wave in the parade
DELIVERED NOW:
PARENT Package
* PARENTS HANDBOOK Keyed to the
materials the child will receive for each holiday
* FULL-COLOR PICTURE BOOK A small
child's introduction to the idea of prayer as'' talking
to God"
* CASSETTE TAPE Holiday stories and songs
Have your own sing-along on every holiday
CYCLE OF SEVEN HOME START MAILINGS:
FULL-COLOR HOLIDAY BOOKS
PLAY AND LEARN MAGAZINES
CASSETTE TAPE. PARENT HANDBOOK
To order, mail this coupon to: ) Only $20 Complete
HvMv 9lja.Bl Bebrma, Hinae JMWachungAue We*Orange NJ07052
QChack or money ordererx*J DChorgeVJSA D Charge MASTERCARD
| CHILD'S NAME AND ADDRESS YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS
To Order for local
uaa, contact:
DR. ELLIOT SCHWARTZ
Jewish Federation
832-2120


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Writer 'Saw' Holocaust Coming
In Poetry Before the Fact
Continued from Page 5-
river he was suddenly unable to
breathe; throwing his head back,
he felt a warmth engulfing his
body. Years later in another poem
he reflects:
My god surely cursed me
for he caused me to see the charred
and slaughtered of my tribe
The old and the young, and the in-
fants, too like sheep in a
butchershop
He commanded my eye to see and
my nostrils to smell
and my hand to hold the paper, to
record it all in a book.
This is no blessing. My God cursed
me greatly.
Greenberg fought in World War
I in the Polish army and was im-
pressed by the determination of
the Serbs to be free. He reached
the shores of Eretz Israel in
December, 1923 and spent three
days walking, as a true pilgrim, to
Jerusalem. His early poems in
Israel glorify the pioneers and kib-
butzim ("We are the army of the
barefoot.. .," "Sing of how our
stomachs shrivel in the Land of
Israel...," "This is the land in
which fever is glory and tuber-
culosis a Vision..."), but
Greenberg quickly grew disillu-
sioned with the local political
establishment.
THE REBEL had alienated the
Jews of Berlin by warning that
their time was running out; he had
alienated the Yiddishists by swit-
ching, at his mother's urging, to
writing in Hebrew; and now he
alienated the Labor movement by
criticizing what he saw as the
Mazel Tov to
the Sharanskys
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
5.2 pound baby girl was born
by Caesarian section to Avital
Sharansky, wife of Soviet
Jewry activist Natan Sharan-
sky, at Misgav Ladach
Hospital here last Thursday
morning.
IT IS THE FIRST child of
the couple who were reunited
last February after Natan
spent nine years in Soviet
prisons and labor camps.
The proud father told
reporters at the hospital short-
ly after the birth that his
daughter is "a very beautiful
little girl." He went so far as
to say she is "an exact copy"
of her dad. The infant was
named Rahel at a religious
ceremony on Sabbath recently.
"complacency" of its leaders in
the face of Arab attacks.
After the Arab pogroms of
1929, the poet went to see the
bodies of the murdered Jews. "He
did things like that," says Aliza.
"In one body he counted 80
wounds. Imagine to stand there
and count!" But the sensitive poet
felt this was his obligation.
Greenberg seemed to live
simultaneously in the time of
Abraham, King David, Titus, the
present and the future. Nor did he
separate between the imagination
and the rational. "The mind
grasps what the imagination
grasps." He united feeling and
thought, all parts of the Jewish
people, all aspects of Jewish
culture, referring to the partisans
of the Holocaust as Lamed Vav-
niks, the 36 Righteous Men, call-
ing bloody shirts "holy prayer
shawls."
GREENBERG'S poetry is full
of cities that are altars drenched
in Jewish blood, full of placid snow
with red drops, full of Messiahs
who come to the very threshhold
before stopping. If Greenberg
perfected mourning into a science,
his widow Aliza remarks, his
religion was one of longing and
desire, for God and for greatness.
Tomorrow you will not be able to
want what today you can do .
Tomorrow God will not hear your
prayers .
Tomorrow you will not have a
man of Vision calling to you .
Despite Uri Zvi's great love for
Jerusalem he spent many
nights sleeping on its ancient
walls he could not live there for
long: "I cannot bear it the
Destroyed Jerusalem all about
me." Greenberg spent the 1930's
travelling back and forth to
Poland, renting auditoriums at his
own expense to warn Jews of the
impending disaster.
At first, he warned; later he was
to develop what he once called "a
science of mourning." The
destruction of European Jewry
left the poet racked and ever-
restless. In Rehovot Hanahar, Dr.
Eldad postulates, he settled ac-
counts: the account of a prophet
with his people, who mostly ig-
nored or even hated him; and the
account of a people with its God
who stood by during the
destruction.
And then Greenberg again goes
a step further, making his
Holocaust poetry unique: he for-
mulates the demands incumbent
on God and the Jews in the wake
of the Holocaust.
After the despair there is no more
despair
and all descents are also ascents.
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Russian Minister Visits
Synagogue Hebrew School
Continued from Page 5-
and by reporters for Jewish
publications.
JONATHAN WOLF, a teacher
at Lincoln Square Synagogue in
Manhattan, complained that
religious objects brought in by
tourists were seized, Hebrew-
Russian dictionaries were
unavailable, and leaders of private
Talmudic study groups were
harassed by the police.
Susan Birnbaum of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency asked about
reports that a mikvah, a ritual
bath, in the smaller of Moscow's
two synagogues, one in the
Marina Roshcha neighborhood,
had been attacked or possibly
destroyed. Another reporter ask-
ed why the dissident Iosif Begun
was not permitted to have a Bible
in his jail cell.
Kharche v did not reply to all the
points. Under Soviet law, be said,
a tourist can bring in a Bible only
for personal use. He said the
mikvah had been built in violation
of Government procedures, but
was allowed to remain and was
functioning when he left for the
United States. As to Begun, he
said, the denial of a Bible was in
violation of Soviet law.
IN GENERAL, he said, it is his
agency's job to defend the rights
of believers against local
authorities who apply the law
incorrectly.
During the visit to the Hebrew
day school, Kharchev met two
children of Soviet emigres, Gen-
nady Vovchuk, 13, and Sasha
Nerush, 11. Buoyed by this touch
of home, Kharchev questioned
them in Russian, but Sasha seem-
ed aloof. His mother's sister, he
told Kharchev, is still in the Soviet
Union.
Copyright by the New York Times
The Comprehensive Senior Center through a Federal Grant
Title III of the Older Americans Act provides transportation
to persons 60 years or older, who do not drive or cannot use
the public transportation system, serves Hot Kosher Meals in
a group setting, delivers Kosher meals to homebound persons
and offers daily educational and recreational programs. Call
689-7703 for further information.
KOSHER MEALS
The Kosher lunch program
at the JCC is designed to keep
persons healthy physically and
mentally. Participants enjoy
delicious nutritious foods that
are a result of carefully plann-
ed menus by a registered dieti-
cian. Daily varied programs
educate and entertain older
adults each day. People with
valuable knowledge constantly
visit the center to inform and
enlighten participants. There
is no fee, but contributions are
requested. Reservations must
be made, call Carol or Lillian
at 689-7703.
Monday, Nov. 24
"Games" with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Nov. 25 Hanley
Hazelton Center, St. Mary's
Hospital Alcohol and Drug
Rehabilitation, Patrick Guffer
Wednesday, Nov. 26 Pam
Parker, Dietician
Thursday, Nov. 27 Closed
for Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 28 "Sabbot
Services"
Kosher Home Delivered
Meals Homebound persons
60 years or older who require a
Kosher Meal delivered to their
home are eligible. This pro-
gram has aided people on both
short and long term basis.
There are no set fees for these
programs but persons are ask-
ed to make weekly contribu-
tions. Call Carol 689-7703.
TRANSPORTATION
Transportation is available
in a designated area for per-
sons 60 years of age or over
who do not use public
transportation. We take peo-
ple to treatment centers, doc-
tor's offices, to hospitals and
nursing homes to visit spouses,
to social service agencies and
nutrition centers. We service
the handicapped in a special
lift vehicle. There is no fee for
this service but participants
are encouraged to contribute
their fair share. This service is
in great demand so make
reservations in advance. For
more information and/or
reservations, call 689-7703 and
ask for Helen or Lillian in the
Transportation Department,
between 9 a.m. and 4:40 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Palm Beach County School
Board Adult Education
Classes: There are no set fees
for classes. Participants are
asked to make a contribution.
All classes are held at the JCC.
Call Veronica 689-7700 for
more information.
Weigh Control And Nutri-
tion: "The Gangs Weigh"
Monday, 2:15 p.m.
Exercise And Health
Education: Wednesday, 10
a.m.
"Ways to Wellness":
Thursdays, 1:15 p.m.
Writers Workshop: Friday,
10 a.m.
OTHER SENIOR
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series: Wednesdays, 1:30 p.m.
Second Tuesday Council:
Second Tuesday of each
month, 2 p.m.
Timely Topics/Round Table
Discussion: Mondays, 2:15
p.m.
Speakers Club: Thursday,
10 a.m.
AT YOUR SERVICE
Health Insurance
Assistance: Third Thursday of
each month.
Home Financial Manage-
ment: The first and third
Wednesday of every month at
1:30 p.m.
Legal Aid: by appointment
only on the first Thursday of
the month.
Jack Rosenbaum, JCC Director of Health and Physical
Recreation, congratulates Cheri Mullen on her trophy for be-
ing overall winner in the 6-8-year-old group at the Jewish
Community Center of the Palm Beaches' Superstar Sunday
held at Camp Shalom on Nov. 9.
Superstars Excel at
JCC Superstar Sunday
Despite threatening
weather at the starting time,
75 people came to the Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches Superstar Sun-
day at Camp Shalom, Nov. 9
and thoroughly enjoyed the
day which turned out to be
beautiful.
Participants competed in
such events as dashes,
distance runs, ball throws,
long jumps, basketball hot
shots and schmerltz throws.
The following people were
overall winners within their
age categories: 2-5 year olds:
1st, Jason Leaf, 2nd, Becky
Barag. 6-8 year olds: 1st,
Cheri Mullen, 2nd, Jeffrey
Sherman, 3rd Jennifer Zim-
merman. 9-10 year olds: 1st,
Abie Schwarzberg, 2nd Josh
Perrin, 3rd, Joey Rosen. 11-13
Jear old boys: 1st, Eddie
lullen, 2nd, Jamie Zimmer-
man, 3rd, Todd Levine. 11-13
year old girls: 1st, Meredith
Ostrow, 2nd, Rebecca Krebs.
11-90 year olds (ladies): 1st,
Lois Nogga, 2nd, Jacqueline
Kandel, 3rd, Shirley Mullen.
11-90 year olds (men): 1st,
Doug Barr, 2nd, Steve
Schwarzberg, 3rd, Herman
Sakowitz. Congratulations to
all the winners!
Warmest gratitude goes to
the volunteer referees who
made the day fun and helped
keep events running smoothly.
Special thanks to Jack Kerman
of WKGR-Radio for his lively
trivia sports quiz and handling
of the score keeping.
The following people and
firms deserve a great vote of
appreciation for their sponsor-
ing of this great day: Sandy
Myers, PA; Michael Lampert,
Esq.; Jeffrey S. Penner, MD,
PA; Eisner and Lubin, CPA's;
Paul Klein, DDS; Law Firm of
Cohen, Scherer, Cohen and
Silverman, PA; Arnold and
Anthony Lampert of Profes-
sional Planners, Inc.; DKS
Designs, Inc. and Deborah
Schwarzberg.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF THE PALM BEACHES
WE SERVE
PEOPLE
of all ages through cultural, social,
recreational & educational programs.
WE INVITE YOUR 1987 MEMBERSHIP
For further information and
application please call 689-7700.
OHMNlMI


3rd Annual Jewish
Book Fair at JCC
A book review, a view from
behind TV cameras, hand-
writing analysis, authors, pup-
pets, storyteller, magician,
new and used books and media
are all features of the Jewish
Community Center of the
Palm Beaches' Third Annual
Book Fair. This special event,
according to Chairpersons
Lisa and Leonard Hanser,
takes place on Saturday, Nov.
22 and Sunday Nov. 23 at the
Center, 700 Spencer Drive,
West Palm Beach. Admission
is free.
The Fair kicks off at 7:30
p.m. on Saturday. Marci and
Moshe Adler, Saturday's
Chairpersons, state that major
events include Frank Bostwick
reviewing When All You've
Ever Wanted Isn't Enough
written by Rabbi Harold
Kushner plus Don Silverman
speaking on "Television, An
Insider's View." Rabbi
Kushner is the author of the
best sellers When Bad Things
Happen to Good People and
When Children Ask About God.
Mr. Bostwick is Director of
Community Education at
Crestwood Community Middle
School in Royal Palm Beach
and "Stage" book reviewer.
Mr. Bostwick has entertained
and enlightened hundreds of
audiences form Stuart to Pom-
pano Beach since 1978.
Don Silverman, newest
WJNO Talk Show Host, two
time Emmy Award Winner
and TV Producer of Mork and
Mindy, Dick Cavett Show and
others, will provide unique in-
sights about the world of
television. In addition to Mr.
Bostwick and Mr. Silverman
all kinds of books will be on
sale: Judaica, gift books, art
books, novels, informative
educational materials from
The Learning Plant and a used
book section.
Sunday's events begin at 10
a.m. and conclude at 4 p.m.
For adults, Shirl Solomon, a
leading handwriting analyst
and expert, as well as publish-
ed author and lecturer, will
discuss "How to Determine
Children's Levels of Ability
Based on Their Handwriting
and Drawings." Ms. Solomon's
last book was nominated for
the Junusz Korozak Award for
its contribution to the field of
Child Development.
In the "Author's Corner,"
Harriet Swerdlick and Edith
Reiter, local authors, will be on
hand to autograph their book,
Rainy Day Golf Games.
For children of all ages: Judy
Lipkin, puppeteer and
storyteller, will entertain with
children's tales by Jewish
authors; Sam Lamerson,
Master Magician and Juggler,
will perform; and there will be
a "Media Space" a place for
children to read, listen to
cassettes and records and view
special Biblical video cassettes
of the new Hanna Barbera's
"The Greatest Adventure
Series."
For people interested in
Chanukah items and decora-
tions, gift wrapping and a wide
variety of gifts, the JCC
"Chanukah Boutique" will be
open.
For additional information,
please call 689-7700.
Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Catholic Bishop Urges UN
To Reverse Racist Resolution
JCC Promotes
'Ways to Wellness'
For three years the Jewish
Community Center has offered
a class to teach people how to
manage stress. Joyce Hogan,
RN, an instructor provided by
the Palm Beach County School
Board Adult Education, has
worked in the field of wellness
for 27 years in Palm Beach
County, having been employed
by St. Mary's, Good
Samaritan, JFK, Lake
Hospital, etc. She specializes
in physical and mental health.
Ms. Hogan said, "Almost
everyone today has a need to
learn and develop skills and at-
titudes to help them handle
and cope with the stresses of
life more effectively and effi-
ciently." Students have found
this class to be one of the
highlights of their week and
one student said, "You will go
home feeling so much better
about yourself and your life."
This class meets Thursdays
at 1:15 p.m. There is no fee but
contributions are requested.
No reservations are necessary.
Call Veronica for information,
689-7703.
JCC News
For reservations and more information about the follow-
ing programs, contact the Jewish Community Center,
689-7700.
YOUNG SINGLES (20's and 30's)
Meet at the Blue Heron Fleet for a night of deep sea
fishing. Join the group on Saturday, Nov. 22 at 6:45 p.m.,
the boat leaves promptly at 7 p.m. Fee of $15 per person in-
cludes bait, rod, reel and expertise.
JCC SINGLES (30's and 40*s)
Enjoy Brunch on the Beach at McArthur Park (formerly
Air Force Beach) on Sunday, Nov. 23. Meet at 10:30 a.m.
with a filled picnic basket. Children are welcome. Look for
the large orange and white beach umbrella. Donation: $1.
SINGLE PURSUITS (40,b-60')
Meet Tuesday evening from 5-7 p.m., Nov. 25 to enjoy
the Happy Hour at Margarita's. Donation: $1 plus own
fare.
Meet in front of the Royal Poinciana Playhouse on Sun-
day morning at 9:30 a.m., Nov. 23 to enjoy a scenic bike
ride together. Bike rentals are nearby. At 11 a.m. tte
group will arrive at Wag's (Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.) for
brunch where non-bikers can join the group. Donation $1.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Bishop James Malone, presi-
dent of the U.S. Catholic Con-
ference, has urged the United
National General Assembly to
reverse its "deplorable"
resolution equating zionism
with racism.
This was the first time a
U.S. Catholic Conference
president had commented on
the resolution since it was
labelled as "unjust" by Joseph
Cardinal Bernardin shortly
after the General Assembly
adopted the resolution on
November 10, 1975.
Malone's statement was
issued from the conference of-
fice here prior to the opening
last Monday of the annual
meeting of the National Con-
ference of Catholic Bishops,
which he also heads. He said he
agrees wtth Bernardin's state-
ment in 1975 that the resolu-
tion "retards the necessary
struggle against racism in the
world and opens the door to
harassment, discrimination
and denial of basic human
rights to members of the
Jewish community throughout
the world."
However, Malone added that
he also reaffirms "the prin-
ciples of peace in the Middle
East as put forth by the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Bishops in 1973 and again in
1978."
He outlined these as a "com-
prehensive peaceful solution"
with recognition by all of
Israel's right to exist;
"recognition of the rights of
Palestinian Arabs to participa-
tion" in negotiations for the
future; "recognition of the
'unique religious significance
of Jerusalem' through an in-
ternal guarantee of access to
holy places and preservation of
its 'religiously diverse
citizenry'; and affirmation of
UN Resolution 242 as a basis
for a just settlement."
"The years since the
deplorable UN vote on Zionism
as racism and since the is-
suance of our own statements
have served to increase the
urgency of condemning the
former and working toward
realizing the principles enun-
ciated in the latter," Malone
said.
Meanwhile, the American
Section of the International
Association of Jewish Lawyers
and Jurists has created the
Project to Combat Anti-
Semitism and Anti-Zionism
(Project CASAJ) to actively
oppose all manifestations of
the "Zionism is racism"
resolution. The project is aim-
ed at educating both Jews and
non-Jews on the issue.
At a forum at George
Washington University last
week, organized by the
American Section and the
George Washington Universi-
ty Hillel Foundation, Jeane
Kirkpatrick, former United
States Ambassador to the
United Nations, said that
resolutions should be introduc-
ed annually .in the Security
Council and General Assembly
to repeal the anti-Zionism
resolution.
Also participating in the
forum were: Alan Keyes,
Assistant Secretary of State
for International Organiza-
tional Affairs; Allan Gerson, a
Deputy Assistant Attorney
General; Tova Herzl, a Con-
gressional liaison officer for
the Israel Embassy; and
Yoram Dinstein, a law pro-
fessor at Tel Aviv University,
who is currently a visiting pro-
fessor at the New York
University School of Law.
President Reagan sent a
message to the forum in which
he said he was proud that he
and his two predecessors,
Presidents Ford and Carter,
had opposed the UN
resolution.
He said it was a nonpartisan
issue. Americans "have been
united and will remain united
in our commitment to Israel, in
our conviction that Israel has a
right to exist and a right to ex-
ist in peace," Reagan declared.
Kirkpatrick said that since
the failure of the Arabs to
defeat Israel in 1967 and 1973,
there has been an effort to
"undermine Israel by political
means inside the United Na-
tions." She called this a "kind
of war by other means."
Keyes said the effort to
deligitimize Israel was not
aimed just against Israel or
Jews but all those who support
the Jewish State, particularly
the U.S. He said beyond this it
was aimed at those like Israel
who believe in democratic
principles.
But Keyes warned that the
"Zionism is racism" resolution
also was aimed at causing
domestic dissension within the
U.S. particularly at creating a
split between American Jews
and American blacks.
An example of this was at
the University of Maryland,
outside Washington, recently,
when Jewish and black
students clashed over the ap-
pearance by Kwame Toure,
formerly Stokely Carmichael.
The Jewish students ob-
jected to the black Student
Union inviting Toure since in a
talk at the university last spr-
ing, he said the "only good
Zionist is a dead Zionist." Dur-
ing his speech, Toure was
heckled by Jewish students,
and he called them "Zionist
pigs" and said "Zionism is
Satan in disguise."
USSR Intends to Streamline
Exit Visa Process
VIENNA (JTA) The
Soviet Union intends to
streamline and speed up the
processing of applications for
exit visas, according to Anato-
ly Movtchan, a member of the
Soviet delegation attending
the 35-nation Conference on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe, the follow-up con-
ference on implementation of
the 1975 Helsinki accords.
Movtchan, a specialist in in-
ternational law, told the
newspaper Arbeiterzeitung
that his country will introduce
a new emigration law early
next year to eliminate
bureaucratic impediments for
persons seeking to leave the
USSR. His announcement was
later confirmed by emigrants
who came here to fight for exit
visas for relatives. They said
they had received similar in-
formation from other Soviet
delegates to the conference.
MOVTCHAN SAID the new
law would abolish unwar-
ranted delays and sloppiness in
handling visa applications. In
the future, standard applica-
tions will have to be acted
upon within a month, though
complicated cases may require
six months to be processed, he
said.
Applications filed for per-
mission to leave in order to
seek medical treatment abroad
will be answered within three
days, the Soviet delegate said.
But there will be no change in
present policy which refuses
exit visas to persons con-
sidered privy to military or
technological secrets or those
awaiting trial in the USSR.
Meanwhile, Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists here noted a pronounc-
ed change in the attitude of the
Soviet delegates. Whereas at
former international con-
ferences they were completely
ignored, they are now being
listened to by Soviet diplomats
and sometimes even engaged
in lengthy personal discus-
sions, the activists said.
Health Fair '86 served 102 people at the Jewish Community
Center of the Palm Beaches on Nov. 9. Sponsored by the JCC
and the Palm Beach Kidney Association, 28 volunteers and 16
professionals conducted screenings for height and weight,
blood pressure, kidneys, glaucoma, oral cancer and health
counseling. The Information Center had displays from the
Lung Association of Palm Beach County, Arthritis Founda-
tion, Palm Beach County Blood Bank, American Cancer
Association, American Diabetes Association, and Crisis Line.
The Palm Beach Association provided the special glaucoma
testing machine as well as professional staff.



Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21,1986
French Synagogue Council

in Dispute With WJC
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Cen-
tral Consistory, which ad-
ministers and represents most
synagogues in France, has
temporarily withdrawn from
the Representative Council of
Major French Jewish
Organizations (CRIF) to nro-
test the latter's recent affilia-
tion with the World Jewish
Congress. The Consistory was
sharply critical of the WJC's
campaign to expose the Nazi
past of Austrian President
Kurt Waldheim which, it main-
tains, only assured
Waldheim's election.
The Waldheim affair was
cited by the Consistory as one
example of what it sees as the
WJC's tendency to act and
claim to speak on behalf of
world Jewry on major issues
without prior consultation
with the various Jewish com-
munities it purports to
represent.
The Consistory charged that
the current WJC president,
Edgar Bronfman, and the late
Nahum Goldmann, former
president of the WJC, were
both guilty of this practice.
The Consistory, France's
Jewish religious organization,
is one of the three main consti-
tuents of CRIF. The others are
the FSJU (Fonds Social Juif
Unifie), which runs the United
Jewish Appeal campaigns and
is reponsible for social and
cultural activities, and the
French Zionist Movement.-
CRIF joined the WJC last spr-
ing, to create the European
Jewish Congress, which has
been headed since Oct. 1 by
CRIF President Theo Klein.
The campaign against
Waldheim was launched by the
WJC's New York office
without bothering to sound out
the various European com-
munities, the Consistory
charged. As a result, it trig-
gered a strongly nationalistic
backlash in Austria which pro-
pelled Waldheim to the
Presidency.
Klein, meanwhile, dismissed
the Consistory's withdrawal as
"an episode without great
importance."
Israel Signs SDI
Research Contract
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
signed a contract with the U.S.
recently, to undertake
research on anti-ballistic
missile defense systems, a pro-
ject related to the Reagan Ad-
ministration's Strategic
Defense Initiative (SDI), com-
monly known as Star Wars.
The contract, reported to be
in the neighborhood of $5.1
million, is the first of its kind
entered into by the U.S. with a
non-NATO country. It was
signed here by David Ivri,
director general of the
Defense Ministry, and Gordon
Smith, deputy director of the
SDI Organization.
IT IS REGARDED as
Israel's first bid for a share on
the U.S.-Israel memorandum
of understanding on strategic
cooperation signed by the two
countries last May.
Apart from participating in
lucrative SDI contracts, Israel
has a special interest in anti-
ballistic missile research to
counter the advanced Soviet
SS-21 short-range missiles
reportedly in Syrian hands.
The SS-21s are capable of
reaching any part of Israel
from Syrian territory.
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Michael Gordon
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
Michael Gordon, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Joel Gordon of Atlan-
tis, will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
Nov. 22, at Temple Beth
Shalom, Lake Worth- Rabbi
Emanuel Eisenberg will
officiate.
Michael is in the eight grade
at the Jewish Community Day
School. He is a member of the
school's tennis and basketball
teams and is also interested in
football and baseball.
Family members sharing in
the simcha will be his sister
Lisa and grandmothers Regina
Parnes of West Palm Beach
and Helen Gordon of Stam-
ford, Connecticut. Relatives
and friends will be attending
from New York, Louisiana and
Georgia.
Michael will be twinned with
Michael Rabinovich to
highlight the plight of Soviet
Jewry.
LORI GROSSMAN
Lori Ilissa Grossman,
daughter of Holly and Joe
Grossman of Wellington, will
be called to the Torah on Nov.
22 at Temple Beth Torah. Rab-
bi Steven Westman and Can-
tor Elliot Rosenbaum will
officiate.
Lori is an 8th grade honor
student at Crestwood Middle
School. She is an officer of the
Temple Youth Group and plays
the flute in symphonic and
marching band at her school.
She enjoys baseball, bowling,
swimming and traveling.
Lori will be twinned with
Katrina Gagkayev of Moscow
to highlight the plight of
Soviet Jewry.
Inside
Afghanistan
Continued from Page 4
legs, faces blown off by
miniature Soviet mines. The
mines are designed to maim,
not necessarily to kill, and are
disguised as brightly-painted
toys, pencils, or cassettes.
They are meant to demoralize
the people, to make it difficult
or impossible for them to con-
tinue in the-villages and coun-
tryside which support the
mujahedin.
Greenfield has begun speak-
ing to campus and human
rights groups. He hopes to
raise money for mine detec-
tors; he does not intend to be
silent.
(Near East Report)
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
BOYNTON BEACH JEWISH CENTER BETH KODESH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 38435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Leon B. Fink. Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30 a.m.;
Thursday 8:30 a.m. Sabbbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m., Satur-
day 9 a.m.
CENTRAL CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF THE PALM
BEACHES: Services held Friday 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m.
at Temple B'nai Jacob, 2177 Congress Ave., West Palm Beach.
Mailirg address: 500 South Australian Ave., Suite 402, West
Palm Beach, FL 33401. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor Howard
Bender.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33417. Phone 684-3212. Office hours 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Rabbi Isaac Vander Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 a.m. Evening services 6:30 p.m. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. Mincha followed by Sholosh
Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33413.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. Cantor Abraham
Mehler. President Murray Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 am!
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4657 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Rackoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 am.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Rabbi Alan L. Cohen. Cantor Norman
Brody. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m.
Daily Minyan 8:16 a.m., Sunday and legal holidays 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services daily 8:30 a.m. Friday evening 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: 129 Sparrow Dr., Royal Palm Beach, FL
33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 9:00 a.m. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman. Phone 798-8888.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch. Cantor
Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m., Saturday and
holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 am.
TEMPLE EMANUEL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Cantor David Feuer.
Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9:30 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation
Beth Abraham: 3998 SW Leighton Farms Road, Palm City
33490. Mailing address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33495. Phone
287-8833. Rabbi Israel J. Barzak. Services Friday evenings 8 p.m.
and Saturday 10 a.m.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAIM: 2518 Haverhill Rd., West
Palm Beach 33417. Phone 686-5055. Sabbath services 8:45 a.m.
and sundown. Daily services 8:16 a.m. and 5:45 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
857146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 a.m. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone
747-1109. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428. Sabbath Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St. Helen's Pariah Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960. Mailing address:
P.O. Box 2113, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: 900 Big Blue Trace, West Palm
Beach, FL 33414. Friday services 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Steven R.
Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone 793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantor Peter
Taormina. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5154
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone 471-1526.

a^a^ai


mmml

Friday, November 21, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Syiu
Adjustment Problem Cited
iii
e News
CONGREGATION
ANSHEISHOLOM
Sisterhood will hold its
Board Meeting on Monday,
Dec. 1, at 9:45 a.m., and its
Regular Meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 16, at 1 p.m., when the
Tikvah Players will perform a
musical program of Jewish
holidays.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
The seventh grade students
of the temple's religious school
will participate in a special Fri-
day Shabbat service on Nov.
21 at 8 p.m. There will be
readings in Hebrew and
English and chanting of many
melodies of the Shabbat ser-
vice. The Oneg Shabbat follow-
ing the service will be spon-
sored by the parents of the
students.
The temple's annual inter-
faith Thanksgiving Service
will take place on Thanksgiv-
ing Eve, Nov. 26, 7:30 p.m. at
Westminster Church in Palm
Beach Gardens.
This annual service is one of
the temple's oldest and most
significant events, going back
to the very first years of its ex-
istence. The two houses of
worship have a long and close
relationship, since it was
Westminster which reached
out and shared its facilities
with Temple Beth David for
many years.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Shabbat Service on Friday,
Nov. 21 will be very special.
This Shabbat will welcome all
new families who have joined
the Temple this fall.
Area
Deaths
BAKER
Meyer, 77, of Boynton Beach Levitt-
weinatein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Plm Bead).
COHEN
William, 73, of West Palm Beach. Levitt-
wemstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
KATZMAN
Jeannette, of Century Village, West Palm
Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
Secunty Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
LEITMAN
Sm. 79, of 5780 Fertuey Drive E., West
raim Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral
Home, West Palm Beach.
MARTIN
Se'ma. 60, of Lake Worth. Menorah
J*en and Funeral Chapels, West Palm
PITKIN
Dvid M 83, of North Hampton "H," Cen-
^V Village. West Palm Beach Levitt-
"einstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
jABiNowrrz
*tn<* M., 74, of Boca Raton. Riverside
,JUr*an Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
AFFHAN
Frances, 88. of Cresthaven Boulevard, West
if"" Beach. Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed
a*aT*y Plan Chapel, West Palm Beach.
SCHUSTER
*">*rd. 79, of 97 Plymouth, Century
*H. West Palm Beach. Levitt-Weinstein
ferf Security Plan Chq* Wa*
Rabbi Howard Shapiro,
spiritual leader of the
synagogue, is planning a
welcoming ceremony to con-
secrate all new members of the
Temple who have become a
part of Temple Israel's com-
munity of concerned and com-
mitted Jews.
On that same Friday evening
we will celebrate the Adult Bat
Mitzvah of Lynn Schwartz.
On the evening of
Thanksgiving, Wednesday,
Nov. 26 at 7:30 p.m. a Com-
munity Thanksgiving Service
will be held at the Payne
Chapel, AME Methodist
Church, located at 801 9th St.,
West Palm Beach. The follow-
ing congregations will par-
ticipate: The First Unitarian
Church, Church of the Holy
Spirit, Tabernacle Missionary
Baptist Church, Union Con-
gregational Church, and Tem-
ple Israel.
All of the Clergy will
participate.
Continued from Page 3
feel he's thinking straight."
Said another source, "It
isn't the politics, but his own
mixed-up reaction to life in
America and what he expects
to find in Russian society."
His family, which lives in the
Atlanta area, reportedly is
distraught over Yuri's deci-
sion. They have been
unavailable to the media, and
family friends are protecting
their privacy. Those friends
who spoke with the reporters
did so anonymously. Jewish
communal workers and of-
ficials also were reluctant to
comment on the case, adhering
to a policy of client
confidentiality.
HOWEVER, a Jewish com-
munal source said Chapovsky
worked part-time in Atlanta in
1983 after receiving a
Master's degree in applied
mathematics at the Georgia
Institute of Technology. Dur-
ing the Oct. 24 press con-
ference, Chapovsky said that
despite the degree he was
unable to find a job.
But a former professor at
the institute, John Wallace,
questioned Chapovsky's in-
ability to find a job. "Even the
worst students get at least one
job offer, and the good
students get several very
lucrative job offers," he said in
a telephone interview. Chapov-
sky made the institute's dean's
list several times, according to
institute spokesman Charles
Harmon.
Four Synagogue Arsonists Arrested
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Four young men have been ar-
rested in Rumania in connec-
tion with an arson attack
against a synagogue in the
Moldavian town of Bohush, ac-
cording to reports that have
reached here. The synagogue
was burned to the ground last
month following the stabbing
of the Jewish janitor there.
Rumanian police are in-
vestigating the double attack.
According to reports, the
janitor is now out of danger
and his condition is -improving.
He was the only person injured
during the attack, which was
carried out by masked men.
The attacks occurred a day
following a visit to the
synagogue by the Hasidic
Rebbe of Bohush, who now
lives in Israel.
Director Appointed
TORONTO (JTA) -
Yaacov Erez has been ap-
pointed national executive
director of the Canadian
Friends of Tel Aviv Universi-
ty, succeeding Moshe Zarmi,
who will work in private in-
dustry in Israel.

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The Jewish communal
source also disclosed that after
obtaining the Master's degree,
Chapovsky studied in France
toward his PhD, and there as
in the U.S., he was "unhappy
and dissatisfied." He left
France without completing his
studies, and when he returned
here "he was pretty much
determined that the United
States was not for him either,"
said the source.
SOVIET EMIGRES often
have trouble adjusting to the
"radically different" life in
America, according to
Leonard Cohen, executive
director of the Jewish Family
Service here. Some Soviet
emigres can't shake the idea of
having a niche provided by
society. But most, including
Chapovsky's family, adapt just
fine.
"Of the 600 Soviet refugees
we have resettled in Atlanta
since 1973, this is the first
overt situation that I'm aware
of in which an individual has
actually chosen to go back to
Russia," Cohen said.
That's also the case nation-
wide, according to a State
Department official who spoke
anonymously. The official said
the Soviets have intensified
their campaign to convince
their citizens that life in the
West is problematic and that
many former Soviets now in
the West are dissatisfied.
The president of the Union
of Council for Soviet Jews and
the associate director of the
National Conference on Soviet
Je^vry noted.this phenomenon
in separate statements.
Temple Israel State of Israel
Bond Committee recently an-
nounced that Norman Bauer
will be the honoree at the
testimonial Brunch at the
Hyatt Palm Beaches on Dec.
7. Norman Bauer is a
Clevelander who came to the
Palm Beach area via In-
dianopolis eleven years ago.
Mr. Bauer is President of
Bauer Lamp Company of the
Palm Beaches. Bauer ex-
presses his concern for the
community by performing
and underwriting the ex-
penses for many concerts on
behalf of the Morse Geriatric
Center and Temple Israel.
All the proceeds from these
concerts go directly to the
Temple and to Morse
Geriatric Center.
Beth Kodaah Central Conservative Anahat Shotom *
Bath Abraham Altz Chilm Bath Am Bath El *
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986

Pope Invited to Lead Prayer Day in Jerusalem
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) Pope
John Paul II, who invited
representatives of all faiths to
a 'day of prayer for peace" in
Assisi last month, was himself
invited to lead a day of prayer
against war and terrorism in
Jerusalem.
The occasion was a Papal au-
dience which concluded the se-
cond International Catholic-
Jewish Theological Colloquium
attended by about 70 Catholic
and Jewish Scholars from
Israel, the U.S., West Ger-
many and Rome. The three
branches of Judaism Or-
thodox, Conservative and
Reform were represented.
The invitation to the Pope was
extended by Nathan Perlmut-
ter, national director of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, one of the
Sanctions
Against
Syria
Approved
Continued from Pag* 1
ting to smuggle explosives
aboard an El Al airliner at
Heathrow Airport last April
17.
At the Luxembourg
meeting, Howe had urged his
EEC partners to follow Bri-
tain's lead, or at very least
recall their Ambassadors from
Damascus. In London last
Monday, he agreed to accept
watered-down sanctions in
order, reportedly, to overcome
ie objections of Spain, Italy,
France and West Germany.
The EEC Council of
Ministers will set up an ad hoc
working committee to imple-
ment tiie sanctions. But they
are not considered likely to do
Syria much harm. The ban on
Western arms sales, the
strongest measure, will be
more than offset by the Soviet
Union, which has long been
Syria's major supplier of
weapons and military
equipment.
France stopped arms
shipments to Syria last March
and Britain has sold only $20
million worth of equipment to
Syria over a three-year period,
mainly communications equip-
ment which Syria can easily
obtain elsewhere.
Prime Minister Jacques
Chirac of France and
Chancellor Helmut Kohl of
West Germany agreed last
Sunday to back Britain while
preserving relations with
Syria. France went along
despite an announcement by a
pro-Syrian group in Beirut
that it would release three
F ench hostages within 24
h- irs. Two of the hostages
v. re released last Tuesday.
E tremist Shiite groups in
L banon with close links to
S -ia and Iran still hold eight
F nch nationals hostage.
,ast Monday's decision to
in pose sanctions on Syria took
tl form of "the President's
st rement" because Greece's
isal breached the unanimi-
required of all EEC joint
isions. Howe is the current
President of the Council of
Ministers.
rt
organizers of the colloquium.
The ADL, he told the Pon-
tiff, was "deeply honored to be
represented in your day of
prayer and peace in Assisi.
Perhaps what is needed in ad-
dition to a day of prayer for
peace is a day in which we con-
template the evil of terrorism,
and as the site for such prayers
against the scourge of ter-
rorism and war, where more
appropriate than in the city of
peace, Jerusalem, led by
whom, more appropriately,
than by your prophetic voice of
peace.'
RABBI Leon Klenicki,
director of the ADL's Inter-
faith Department and one of
the speakers at the colloquium,
told reporters later, 'John
Paul didn't reply to the sug-
gestion, but his face clearly ex-
pressed pleasure. He lingered
a while to chat with us."
Other organizers of the collo-
ium, which was conducted at
e Domus Mariae Convention
Center here, were the Pon-
tifical University of St.
Thomas Aquinas, the Centro
Pro Unione and Sisters of Zion
(SIDIC), in cooperation with
the Holy See's Commission for
Religious Relations with the
Jews.
Only basic faith com-
mitments defining Christian
and Jewish identities were
firmly "off limits" for discus-
sion. Otherwise, the papers
read and discussed covered a
wide range of theological and
historical subjects. The at-
mosphere was lively and there
were broad areas of general
agreement. Where distinct dif-
ferences emerged, they were
accepted without question.
Three main points that
emerged from papers and
discussion were: a deepening
sense of common Biblical
roots; a joint positive and
negative evaluation of libera-
tion theology; and acceptance
of Israel in all its human and
political imperfections, as the
first stage of Jewish national
and universal redemption, an
ongoing process in the alliance
between God and humankind.
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FILES


Friday, November 21,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
Russian Minister
Visits N. Y. Synagogue
Hebrew School Kids
By JOSEPH BERGER
An unlikely visitor toured
a Hebrew day school on
Manhattan's East Side
recently. The visitor was
Konstantin M. Kharchev,
chairman of the Soviet
Government's Council of
Religious Affairs, which
supervises organized
religion.
The Park East Day School is the
kind of religious school that by law
is not allowed in the Soviet Union.
But Kharchev saw an elementary-
school classroom where children
are taught to celebrate Sabbath
eve, where a "father" blesses the
wine, and a "mother" blesses the
flaming candles. He even joined in
Israeli dances with 30 youngsters,
kicking his legs up, chuckling with
pleasure and hugging students.
HIS HOST, Rabbi Arthur
Schneier of Park East Synagogue,
who is president of the Appeal of
Conscience Foundation, an in-
terdenominational group, tried to
make the point that religious
belief, if it is to take hold, must be
ingrained at a young age.
But Kharchev said his Govern-
ment believed religion should be
taught only to adults because only
they are mature enough to make
up their minds about faith. Moral
values are taught by the Com-
munist Party, he said.
Although the argument was not
settled, Kharchev seemed pleased
that he could engage in such
discussions. He is trying to per-
suade his hosts that the Soviet
Union is interested in making ac-
commodations to religious groups.
According to Rabbi Schneier,
Kharchev is the first Soviet
Government official in charge of
religious affairs to visit the United
States. During his 12-day trip,
Kharchev has also met with
Roman Catholic, Eastern Or-
thodox and Protestant leaders in
New York, Atlanta and
Washington.
IN AN hour-long interview in
Manhattan, Kharchev, 52 years
old, a gregarious man who was
smoking American cigarettes,
said the "revolutionary process of
democratization under way"
under Mikhail S. Gorbachev would
also affect religious life.
The broad policy in recent
decades has been not to close the
nation's 8,500 churches, but to
control them. Religious education
is forbidden for children and teen-
agers, except within the family. If
bishops, priests and rabbis remain
within unspoken limits, they are
left alone. Religious faiths that
are not officially accepted,
however, like some Christian fun-
damentalist sects, are still
repressed.
Kharchev said that under revis-
ed legislation, churches would be
permitted to own property. He
also said that religious leaders
were appearing on radio and
television, that more churches
were open and encountered fewer
tensions with the authorities and
that 100,000 Bibles would be
published there next year.
He said the official attitude
toward religion had changed. In
the 1%0's. he said, the official
view was that religion would
vanish, but this prognosis did not
turn out to be true. Authorities
now realize, he said, that they
must work realistically with
religion in a country where 20 per-
cent of the people are regarded as
"believers."
"FOR THE first time in the
Soviet Union," Kharchev, a
democratization in Russia 'underway.'
Kharchev to Rabbi Schneier
nonbeliever, said, "the believer is
being portrayed as a positive per-
son, as a good person, as a person
with high moral qualities."
Speaking of the Soviet Union's
1.8 million Jews, Kharchev said
the Government was prepared to
increase the number of students
who are sent to a rabbinical
seminary in Budapest, the only
one in the Soviet bloc. It would
also consider training rabbinical
students in the United States, he
said, provided the "climate bet-
ween the two countries" permit
such an exchange.
Later, at a news conference at
the Overseas Press Club, Khar-
chev said all but two or three of
the Soviet Union's 110
synagogues had a rabbi. He was
corrected by Rabbi Schneier, who
said only four or five synagogues
in the largest cities had rabbis.
The others are led by laymen, the
rabbi said. Kharchev conceded
that he had not studied the
background of synagogue leaders.
At the news conference, Khar-
chev faced questioning by ac-
tivists on behalf of Soviet Jewry
Continued on Page 16
Writer Uri Greenberg Foresaw Holocaust
In His Poetry Well Before the Fact
poet came to write by sitting
with feet in a river.
By ZEV GOLAN
The underground war for
Israel's independence, the
Holocaust, and the Six-Day
War all appear in the songs
of Uri Zvi Greenberg
(1896-1981). Nothing
unusual about that, you may
be thinking, except that
each of them appeared in
Greenberg's poetry 20 or
more years before they ac-
tually took place.
The great Hebrew poet, Chaim
Nachman Bialik, once asked
Greenberg how he was able to
write of the Holocaust and to
describe the murder of millions of
Jews in 1922. Greenberg
answered that this was simply
"what I saw before my eyes." A
more startling secret is revealed
by Uri Zvi's widow, Aliza: "Many
of the poems in Rekovot Hanahar,
a 1961 volume describing in detail
the atrocities of the Holocaust,
were written the previous decade
before Uri Zvi had read the grim
news reports from Europe. Yet all
the facts we know today corres-
pond to the poems."
GREENBERG, however, does
more thsn prophesy, notes
philosopher Dr. Israel Eldad, a
student of Greenberg's work. In
"Holy of Holies," he imagines he
has carried his mortally wounded
mother to the land of Israel. She
speaks:
Let me touch your body...
your garments are rough, my son,
soldier's clothes
and a rifle on your shoulder ..
good for you my son...
Once I unshed to see you robed only
in silk.
This is no longer what I wish.
While other Hebrew poets ac-
companied the Jewish people on
its way and gave expression to the
struggle for statehood, explains
Dr. Eldad, Greenberg predated it,
commanded it. "His books," says
Eldad, "made history."
Do not nod at my sorrow be you
as sorrowful as I.
And again:
Blessed is the sorrow that leads to
anger. .
and blessed is the anger that leads
to deeds holy and cruel.
The Jewish youth of the 1980's
and 1940's read lines such as these
and understood that their lot was
not silken clothing but rather
readiness for battle. Greenberg's
expressionistic poetry often reads
like Old Testament prose, and oc-
casionally like intensely personal
romantic lyricism, but it always
takes the reader on a demanding
journey through Jewish history,
as well as history yet-to-be-made.
"The lines are sometimes s bit
long," remarked Bialik, "but what
strong expression, pathos, mean-
ing and the main thing, a fabulous
central theme: the redemption of
Israel."
Aliza Greenberg says her late
husband's work was "clearly
religious poetry" in that his soul
was in constant search of a
faraway God. "He attempted to
define existence and he invariably
found God at its base." He was in-
fluenced first and foremost by
Jewish midrashim and prayers,
also by Heine, and he enjoyed
Whitman and Blake, but he was
born a rebel.
Young Uri Zvi's first work fac-
tually describes how he came to
write: sitting with his feet in a
Coatiaeed oa Pag* 11


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 21, 1986
Making Deals
With Terrorism
It would be nice to blame it exclusively on
the French for refusing to promise that
there can be no deals with terrorists. For a
long time, the French have been saying that
they make no deals with Arab terrorist
groups or with countries bankrolling them,
and so there would be no need to sign a com-
mitment proposed by The Twelve the
European Economic Community nations
to that effect in Luxembourg last month.
But for just as long a time, no matter what
they say, the French have quietly done just
that made deals whenever and wherever
they thought it would help keep the peace
from terrorist activity in their own country.
In the Lerner-Lowe classic "My Fair Lady,"
one of the lyrics declares that the French
don't actually care what you do so long as
you pronounce it correctly.
So much for the French, including Prime
Minister Jacques Chirac, who this week
passed along the story allegedly told him by
West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher at
that meeting of the EEC Council of
Ministers in Luxembourg to the effect that
Syria was not to blame for the bombing at-
tempt of an El Al jet in London on Apr. 17.
No, according to Chirac's retold tale, it
was the Israelis. Presumably, the Prime
Minister pronounced his words very
beautifully indeed as he reported what the
Germans now insist is a lie.
The Reagan Involvement
But what about the Greeks, who want
nothing whatever to do with an organized
war on terrorism?
Moreover, what about Ronald Reagan,
President of the United States, who now, it
is clear, has been engaging in a covert opera-
tion these last two years to trade American
arms to Iran for terrorist hostages in
Lebanon, as a three-part series ending in
The Jewish Floridian last week appears now
to have so accurately reported?
This is the same President Reagan who
has time and again made public utterrances
that he would never deal with terrorist
hostage-takers. This is the same President
Reagan who has been twisting the arms of
our so-called European allies, all of whom
except Great Britain, have refused to enter
enthusiastically into a war on terrorism
except to make nice speeches about such a
war.
So we are back again to pretty words
beautifully pronounced, the French ideal of
the rightness of things. Only it is not just the
French who are hypocrites. So are the other
European nations for whom there are no
enemies, only customers. So is President
Reagan who, it appeared, just about con-
vinced the Europeans last week to join him
and the British in isolating Syria over the
Apr. 17 attempted bombing of the Israeli jet
at Heathrow.
That is, until the story about the U.S
arms deal with Iran finally emerged.
Deception in Government
Now that the President's own duplicity is
a national scandal, what is there left to ex-
pect in the war on terrorism?
We can say of the French that they have
learned nothing from history, their own
especially. We can say that they did not take
the
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German Nazism seriously in the 1930's,
allowing Nazi and Fascist groups to flourish
freely in their country. We can say that they
fought like paper tigers against the Ger-
mans in World War II. We can say of France
that, now that it has been holding Klaus Bar-
bie, the notorious "butcher of Lyon," in jail
for the past few years, it drags its feet in
trying him.
But the French can take care of their own
wickedness. They have always been able to
do that. But in the wake of our own national
scandal, there is so much more to be said
about stealth, secrecy, deception and
outright lies in the halls of our own
government.
Serious Talk Needed
For us, there is something sad in observ-
ing Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.)
telling a Jewish gathering m New York the
other night that he will continue his efforts
to get the United States Embassy in Israel
to move from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
It takes two to tango Sen. Moynihan to
make the promise and the Jewish gathering,
in this instance guests of the Fourth Annual
Defender of Jerusalem Award ceremony, to
listen to him. Both are to blame for such a
wasteful presentation.
The fact is that su&h a move would be ab-
solutely unrealistic at this time or even in
the foreseeable future. Those who know
something about the Realpolitik of the area
also understand that the United States
operates a consular office in Jerusalem
which actually serves as an Arab affairs
center with the specific purpose of soft-
soaping Arab Israelis and even Jordanians
in the West Bank territories. This is not
what a U.S. consular office is supposed to be
doing. The purpose of a consular office is as
a regional adjunct to its embassy in the
capital of the host nation, with its specific
services to Americans not to citizens of
Israel.
Insiders have long witnessed a tug of war
between the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv and
the consular of ice in Jerusalem, which has
powers beyond just about any other or-
dinary consular office operated by any other
nation anywhere else in the world. Behind
the scenes stories abound that embassy per-
sonnel in Tel Aviv regard consular personnel
in Jerusalem as "enemies" and that the con-
flicting political, and therefore ideological,
purposes of these two offices make in-
telligent cooperation between them essen-
tially impossible.
This state of affairs symbolizes the ab-
solutely schizophrenic attitude that our
State Department has toward the status of
Jerusalem, let alone Israel, its Arab citizens,
and Arab nations nearby. In the face of such
a situation, can anyone honestly anticipate a
U.S. move of its embassy to Jerusalem soon?
It is noble of Sen. Moynihan that he main-
tains this ultimate purpose as an item on his
personal agenda. But it is of little conse-
quence. Worse, the Jewish organization
which he addressed should also have
understood this. To lend a serious ear to
such talk is demeaning not only of the ideal
that Sen. Moynihan says he espouses. It is
also demeaning to the audience.
Inside Afghanistan
Friday, November 21,1986
Volume 12
19 HESHVAN 5747
Number 36
Larry Greenfield spent this
past Yom Kippur eve lying in
the back of a truck for seven
hours, being driven across
Pakistani frontier country. He
was headed for a rendezvous
which would take him inside
Afghanistan for a week with
the mujahedin, anti-
communist Islamic guerrillas.
In that week he would lose
more than ten pounds, witness
two battles and, he said,
discover that all those lighting
in the name of Allah are not
the same.
Why would a 24-year-old
graduate of Georgetown
University Law School with
a Zionist background under-
take such a journey? Because
Greenfield draws a parallel
between the destruction of the
Jews 40 years ago and the
destruction of Afghanistan to-
day. "I was always taught
never to forget, never to be
silent."
That and a strong interest in
foreign policy led him to the
Washington-based Committee
for a Free Afghanistan. The
committee helped arrange
some contacts and Greenfield
traveled to Karachi, Pakistan,
then on to the wild border city
of Peshawar and finally,
secretly, into Afghanistan.
He said that of the approx-
imately 16 million people who
lived in the country before the
Soviet invasion, one million
have been killed and 4.5
million driven out. The
Russian crime in Afghanistan
must not be shrouded in the
silence of Americans, Jews in
particular, he stressed.
What about the argument
that the mujahedin would, if
victorious, imitate Khomeini
next door in Iran and establish
a fundamentalist Islamic
republic, anti-Western and
anti-Israel? Greenfield
acknowledged the visions
among the guerillas, but noted
that the band of fighters he
traveled with was from the Na-
tional Islamic Front Associa-
tion. It is the most moderate of
the seven groups opposing
Moscow's puppet government
in Kabul.
In conversations through his
guide/interpreter, the Califor-
nian was told that "most mu-
jahedin do not support the
Palestinians or Arafat. They
were brought up to love Arafat
and the PLO, but since he's an
ally of the Soviets ... and has
never done anything for them,
they do not share the (PLO)
cause."
Greenfield did not tell his
companions that he was
Jewish, but "I found a grudg-
ing respect for Israel. The
Moslems respect those who
take care of their own. They
know that the Arabs have 20
states and the Jews only one."
His companions also told him
that they did not like ter-
rorism, that "it was not part of
their interpretation of Islam to
kill women and children. They
don't like Khomeini" whose
regime reportedly is now try-
ing to improve relations with
Moscow and forcing Afghan
refugees in Iran to fight Iraq
"and they despise
Khadafy."
A four-day hike (they rarely
slept more than two hours a
night) took them deep into
Afghanistan to a mountain
ridge overlooking Khost, the
site of a Soviet airbase. Along
the way, moving with a group
of about 50 mujahedin broken
into five squads of ten each,
they encountered hostile fire.
"It sounded very close ...
There was a brief exchange,"
each side trying to intimidate
the other.
But there was a more deter-
mined battle on the ridge at
Khost. Greenfield accom-
panied a squad of about ten
men. "About a kilometer away
we could spot the runway, a
white strip with shadows that
were MI-24 Hind helicopter
gunships." The squad he was
with began firing mortars and
rocket-propelled grenades at
the airfield.
Then for four hours they hid
under rocks while the Soviets
responded with rocket fire.
"You could hear the whistling
sounds and the explosions.'
His companions, used to such
bombardment, smoked
cigarettes, talked, even laugh-
ed. Eventually, Greenfield
said, he joined them.
But more than the battles,
he remembers the destruction
of the Afghan countryside and
especially the wounded, in
Afghanistan and in makeshift
hospitals in Pakistan. Many of
them are children hands.
Continued on Page 18