The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00022

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
MLM BIACH
COUNTY
"Jewish floridian
>^^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 12 NUMBER 7
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14,1988
PRICE 35 CENTS
**
ADL Chairman Discusses Shcharansky Situation
(EITOR'S NOTE: At press
time Anatoly Shcharansky had
been released and was waiting
in West Germany for a flight to
Israel.)
Amid press reports that
Soviet Jewish dissident Anato-
ly Shcharansky will soon be
free to leave the Soviet Union
as part of a spy-swapping
agreement, Burton S. Levin-
son, chairman of the National
Executive Committee of B'nai
B'rith Anti-Defamation
League, spoke with The Jewish
Floridian last week to assess
the situation.
Levinson was in the Palm
Beaches to participate in a
meeting of the ADL National
Executive Committee at The
Breakers.
Evaluating Shcharansky's
present status, Levinson, a
past national chairman of the
Burton S. Levinson
possibility."
However, Levinson express-
ed concern that last week's
media reports may have been
premature.
"The concern we have is that
the early publicity may
frighten the Soviets and
National Conference on Soviet negate everything," Levinson
Jewry, said, "The only con- "d- "It is important to keep
crete information we have is
that a deal is pending. This
seems to be a legitimate
in mind that the assumption
that the Soviet Union is
monolithic, that everything
they do has the approval of
every official, is erroneous.
The Soviet government has
hardliners and liberals, and the
hardliners may be upset at the
proposed release of Shcharan-
sky before he completes the
last five years of his 13-year
sentence. It's even possible
that the premature release of
information may have been
leaked by some Soviet officials
in order to thwart his release."
Responding to recent
rumors that the Soviets added
a $2 million price tag to
Shcharansky's. freedom,
Levinson called the reports
"totally unverified and
preposterous."
"There was a tremendous in-
ternational uproar 12 years
ago," remembered Levinson,
"when the Soviets tried to im-
pose an 'education tax' on
Jews leaving the Soviet
Union."
The proposal stipulated that
in order to emigrate, Jewish
citizens would have to reim-
burse the State for the value of
their education.
"The Soviets backed down
after adverse publicity,"
Levinson said. "If they are go-
ing to ransom people, they are
asking for more intense inter-
national criticism."
Moreover, Levinson argued
that the Soviets as a whole are
too proud to stoop to such
mercenary measures.
"The Soviet government
would be lowering itself and its
international image if they
even suggested that they have
to sell Jews to bolster their
sagging economy," he said.
Levinson rejected the notion
that Shcharanskys' release in
a spy exchange would cor-
roborate his conviction as a
spy, long denied as a valid
legal ruling by Western
nations.
"It will never be recognized
by the United States that
Shcharansky was involved in
spying.'' Levinson claimed,
and he argued that it would be
pointless to object to the ex-
change based on that premise.
He went on to say that there
is no indication that the U.S.
government is directly involv-
ed in any exchange negotia-
ContinuedonPnge20
Federation Hires
Executive Director
Community Dinner Dance
Ellis Island and The American Dream
By LLOYD RESNICK
On Saturday evening, Feb.
22, the Jewish community is
invited to spend an evening
"Beside the Golden Door," as
we join together at the Hyatt
Palm Beaches for the 1986 Gala
Community Dinner Dance in
support of the 1986 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
campaign. ($1,200 minimum
commitment.)
The theme of the dinner-
dance, encapsulated in the
phrase "Betide the Golden
Door," revolves around Ellis
Island and New York's Lower
East Side, the first and
sometimes final stop for
millions of Jewish immigrants
from all over the world who
sought freedom from persecu-
tion and the opportunity for
prosperity.
The dinner-dance will be
staged by Bruce Sutka, who
will recreate the turn-of-the-
Brandes remembered. "Lucki-
ly, they never reached our
street, but in other
neighborhoods entire families
were wiped out. I was quite
young then and the gravity oi
the situation didn't sink in, but
Continued on Page 19
Erwin H. Blonder, president
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, has an-
nounced the appointment of
Jeffrey L. Klein to serve as the
Federation's new Executive
Director. Mr. Klein, who is
currently Planning and
Budgeting Director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, will assume his duties in
early spring.
Having earned Bachelor's
and law degrees from Case
Western Reserve University,
Klein has extensive experience
as an attorney and
businessman and a long and
varied history of activity in
Jewish communal service.
Continued on Page 2&
Jeffrey L. Klein
Inside
Update/Opinion...
page 7
Royal Palm Beach
Cocktail Reception...
page 9
Jewish Community
Responds To Needs of
Mentally Handicapped
.. .pages 12 A 13
David Branded
century ambiance of Ellis
Island and New York City.
However, to truly get a sense
of the reality for early 20th cen-
tury immigrants. The Jewish
Floridian, with the co-
operation of the Comprehensive
Senior Service Center of the
Jewish Community Center, sat
down with a member of our
local community who himself
entered the United States many
years ago through Ellis Island,
settled in New York and pur-
sued the "American Dream."
David Brandes, 93,
emigrated from Russia in 1910
at the age of 17. Unlike many
Russian immigrants, David
already had sisters living in
America, so his adjustment to
a new life was somewhat
easier.
Life in Russia for Mr.
Brandes had become full of
uncertainty and fear, as the
pogroms spread like a virulent
infection over the country.
"There were massacres in
Kishenev, where I lived,"
In Attempt to Halt Terrorism
Israeli Jets Intercept Libyan Plane
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel Air Force jets intercepted a private Libyan plane
bound for Damascus last week and forced it to land at a military airfield in nor-
thern Israel to check out its passengers for possible terrorists. None were found
and the aircraft was released at 6:30 p.m. local time, after four and a half hours,
and allowed to proceed to its destination, the Israel Defense Force announced.
Syria demanded an immediate meeting of the United Nations Security Council
to take up the incident, which it described as piracy. Tripoli Radio in Libya also
branded the incident as an act of piracy and accused the United States of abet-
ting it.
Israeli officials said the aircraft was intercepted because there was reason to
believe dangerous terrorists were aboard. They claimed Israel had a legal right
to force the plane to land for interrogation as part of the internationally sanction-
ed campaign to combat terrorism.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, addressing delegates to a meeting of the
Zionist General Council in Jerusalem, said the interception was "one of the
means we have to resort to in order to defend ourselves."
He said that since Libya is a known "center of international terrorism" and the
Libyan government aids terrorists who perpetrate acts of violence against
Israelis and Jews, "when reports reach us of such dangers, Israel has the right to
take steps to prevent acts of murder and terror."
In the event, only Syrian political figures were aboard. One was identified as
Abdallah El-Akhmer, deputy secretary general of the Syrian Ba'ath party. The
passengers and crew were well treated, the IDF said.
Israel admitted the error, which, it said, occurred because the Libyan pilot ig-
nored internationally recognized signals to land and appeared to take evasive ac-
tion, leading Israeli jets to believe the aircraft was in fact military.
In Washington, a State Department spokesman said, "There was no U.S. in-
volvement of any kind." A Defense Department spokesman also said there was
no basis for a Libyan news agency report that U.S. warships in the Mediterra-
nean used electronic surveillance methods to guide the Israelis to their target.


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Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Boynton Happening
Community Luncheon To Feature Distinguished Professor
The Boynton Beach Cam-
paign Committee, working on
behalf of the 1986 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
Campaign, has anounced that
a special community luncheon
for Boynton Beach residents
wil be held at Streb's
Restaurant in Boynton Beach
at noon on Wednesday, Feb.
26. Professor B.Z. Sobel, Dean
of the Faculty of Social
Sciences of the University of
Haifa, will be the guest
speaker, and Luz Morales will
provide the entertainment.
This $50 minimum commit-
ment luncheon is a community
B. Z. Sobel
happening for the Boynton
Beach communities not having
their own Federation cam-
paign event. These areas in-
clude Banyan Springs, Bent
Tree, Boynton Lakes, Chan-
ticleer, Colonial Club, Green-
tree, Leisureville, Lime Tree,
Mirror Lakes, Oakwood, Palm
Chase, Parkwalk, Pinetree,
Rainbow Lakes, Estates of
Silverlake and Lakes of Sher-
brooke, a Lake Worth com-
munity invited to the Boynton
luncheon to help residents
there become a part of the
Federation activities.
Because of the tremendous
growth in Boynton Beach, the
campaign committee is seek-
Dora Roth To Speak At Buttonwood,
Buttonwood West Breakfast
Israeli Holocaust survivor
Dora Roth will be the featured
speaker on Tuesday morning,
Feb. 18, as the Buttonwood
and Buttonwood West com-
mittees of the 1986 Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County/United Jewish Appeal
campaign sponsor their second
annual breakfast at Temple
Beth Sholom, 315 North A
Street in Lake Worth.
Buttonwood campaign chair-
man Harold Sher and Button-
wood West co-chairmen
Harold Rose and Seymour
Rosen are anticipating record
attendance as these two Lake
Worth communities carry on
their .tradition of generous giv-
ing to the local Jewish com-
munity and to Jews in need in
Israel and around the world.
Originally from New
England, Buttonwood chair-
man Harold Sher was formerly
involved with the Jewish
Federation in Portland, Maine,
and he also served there on the
boards of Temple Beth El and
the Jewish Community
Center.
While a resident of Port-
smouth, New Hampshire, Sher
was elected president of Tem-
ple Israel and helped organize
the first Federation/UJA cam-
paig.i in that city. A current
memoer of the Lucerne Lakes
lodge of B'nai B'rith, Mr. Sher
helped organize the Golden
Lakes Federation/UJA drive
and was one of the orignal
organizers in the Buttowood
area. Assisting Mr. Sher this
year will be co-chairmen Hy
Berson and Len Barnett.
Buttonwood West co-
chairman Harold Rose has liv-
ed in South Florida for 14
years. Continually active in
Jewish affairs, Mr. Rose was a
board member of the Com-
munity Relations Council of
the Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Federation, and he served as
president of the Fort Lauder-
dale chapter of the Zionist
Organization of America. A
dedicated member of Temple
Beth Sholom, Mr. Rose visited
Israel in 1979 and has been a
faithful Super Sunday
volunteer over the years.
Originally from Hartsdale,
New York, Seymour Rosen,
the other Buttonwood West
co-chairman, was founder of a
Jewish temple in Riveredge,
N.J. Having resided in Florida
for eight years, Mr. Rosen has
visited Israel once and has
been an organizer in several
Federation/UJA campaigns.
Assisting Rose and Rosen in
spearheading the Buttonwood
West campaign are committee
members Sidney Laichtman,
Irving Perkin and Ray
Solomon.
Guest speaker Dora Roth is
Administration Backs Down
On Jordan Arms Sale
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration
formally notified Congress last
week that it was suspending
its efforts to sell a proposed
arms package to Jordan and
promised that no Jordan arms
deal would be made before
Congress has had "adequate
time to further review and
debate fully the issues
involved."
Notification of the decision
reached the House just in time
to avert a vote by the Foreign
Affairs Committee on a resolu-
tion disapproving the proposed
package. In a letter from
Secretary of State George
Shultz, the Administration
said it would not conclude the
proposed deal with Jordan
without giving Congress writ-
ten notification 30 days in
advance.
Shultz said the decision was
based on his belief "that fur-
ther Congressional action and
a resolution of disapproval at
this time would severely
damage the ongoing (peace)
process."
The decision is being viewed
as a graceful retreat from an
effort that was widely regard-
ed as futile almost since Con-
gress was informed of the Ad-
ministration's plans last fall.
In a last-minute compromise
meant to avoid an embarrass-
ing defeat of the proposed
arms package in October, Con-
gress passed a resolution barr-
ing the President from pro-
viding Jordan with arms sales
until March 1, "unless direct
and meaningful peace negotia-
tions between Israel and Jor-
dan are under way."
With increasing indications
that recent meetings held by
Assistant Secretary of State
Richard Murphy with Israeli
Premier Shimon Peres and
King Hussein of Jordan had
achieved no real progress in ef-
forts to find a formula for
peace negotiations, Sen.
Richard Lugar (R. Ind.), chair-
man of the Foreign Relations
Committee, informed the
White House that more than
80 Senators could be expected
to vote to block the sale and
that a Presidential veto would
be easily overriden.
After apparently failing to
win support for an extension
of the March 1 deadline, the
Administration moved to save
what face it could by suspen-
ding its pursuit of the sale at
this time rather than pronoun-
cing the issue entirely dead.
Members of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee
welcomed the Administra-
tion's decision but indicated
that only tangible signs of pro-
S'ess toward peace in the Mid-
e East would break the con-
tinued resistance in Congress
to a new arms deal with
Jordan.
Calling the Administration's
move "an appropriate deci-
sion," Rep. Lawrence Smith
(D. Fla.), who had vigorously
opposed the sale, observed
nevertheless that the language
of Shultz's letter "is not fully
clear" and expressed hope that
in any case, no further at-
tempts would be made to pro-
vide Jordan with the arms un-
til direct peace talks with
Israel are actually under way.
The Administration had
been under no legal obligation
to give Congress advance
notice of its arms sales plans
since the Supreme Court ruled
the legislative veto unconstitu-
tional in 1983. The decision
swept away the procedure that
the Administration had been
required to follow with regard
to Congress in order to con-
clude an arms deal.
But the White House has
assured Congress that it would
Continued on Page 19
ing to serve the rapidly in-
creasing population more
directly by giving them the op-
portunity to learn about
Federation programs and ser-
vices and to become involved
in the 1986 Federation/UJA
campaign, with the ultimate
goal of establishing individual
campaigns in each of these
areas.
Last year's Community Lun-
cheon attracted 75 people,
almost double the attendance
of the prior year. The commit-
tee hopes to attract at least
100 people this year.
Members of the 1986 Boyn-
Dora Roth
an articulate and impassioned
spokesperson on behalf of the
people and State of Israel. Ris-
ing out of the ashes of the
Holocaust, Mrs. Roth became
a registered nurse and
emigrated to Israel where she
married and raised two
children who now serve in the
Israel Defense Forces.
Dora Roth has a clear and
perceptive understanding of
the economic, political and
social situation in Israel, and
her straightforward and
unflinching presentations have
made her one of the most
popular and effective speakers
to address audiences in the
Palm Beaches.
For more information regar-
ding the second annual cam-
paign breakfast for Button-
wood and Buttonwood West
residents, please call Dr.
Lester Silverman at the
Federation office at 832-2120.
ton Beach Campaign Commit-
tee are Eunice and Sidney
Brodsky (Bent Tree West),
Sylvia and Andy Cohen (Ba-
nyan Springs), Minette
Deutsch (Leisureville), Hilda
Fately (Leisureville), Jerome
Gross (Bent Tree West),
Siebert Kastan (Colonial Club),
Lillian and Nick Lenovits
(Leisureville), Ida and Joseph
Linsenberg (Leisureville) and
Edie and Henry Tevelin (Mir-
ror Lakes).
The Boynton Beach Com-
munity Luncheon, in addition
to providing opportunities for
involvement, will also allow
neighbors to socialize and
develop friendships.
Guest speaker B.Z. Sobel
was born and educated in New
York City. He left a faculty
position at Brandeis Universi-
ty in 1969 to assume the post
he presently holds at the
University or Haifa.
The recipient of numerous
awards and honors for disser-
tations and research in
sociology and philosophy, Pro-
fessor Sobers works have been
published in various profes-
sional and general journals, in-
cluding "The American
Sociological Review," "The
Jewish Journal of Sociology,"
"Midstream," and "The
American Jewish Historical
Quarterly."
Sobel's latest book is entitled
"Hebrew Christianity: The
13th Tribe, and he was recent-
ly appointed a member of the
Israeli Board of Higher
Eduation.
Luz Morales is a Filipino
singer who performs her
repertoire of ethnic songs in
Hebrew, Yiddish, Italian,
Spanish, Polish and English.
She has performed in night
clubs in New York, Chicago,
Los Angeles and throughout
Florida and has appeared on
the NBC Tonight and Today
TV shows.
Couvert for the Boynton
Beach Community Luncheon
is $10 per person. To obtain
more information or to receive
an invitation if you have not
yet received one, please call
Jack Karako, assistant direc-
tor of the Federation's Boyn-
ton Beach office, at 737-0746.
lA/ome.Tz.5 2Ji
IU^ t.O?Zs
of ualfc Jje&cn. Cccucfy
Cordially Invites You To Their
Open Board Meeting
Wednesday, February 19,1996- 7:30 p.m.
Hyatt Palm Beaches
Special Guest Speaker
SHEILA FINESTONE
Member of Parliament In Ottawa, Canada
Who Will Address:
"PATHWAYS TO POLITICAL POWER"
Sandra Rosen
Open Board Chairman
Women's Division
$5.00 includes dessert and Coffee
Mollle Fltterman
President
Women's Division


Local Contingent Numbers 27
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian. of Palm Beach County, Page 3
Thousands To Attend UJA Young Leadership Conference
NEW YORK, N.Y. Three
thousand young Jewish
leaders from more than a hun-
dred communities throughout
the United States will attend
the United Jewish Appeal's
Fifth National Young Leader-
ship Conference in
Washington, D.C., March 2-4.
The theme of this year's con-
ference is "Reaching the
Dream." In making the an-
nouncement, Conference
chairmen Peter Alter of
Detroit and Maria Gilson of
Washington, D.C., stated that
those planning to attend
should make immediate reser-
vations due to the severe shor-
tage of available hotel rooms.
Speakers addressing the
conference will include
Senators Gary Hart and
Howard Metzenbaum and Con-
gressman Jack Kemp. Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, Israel's Am-
basador to the United Nations,
will lead a discussion on ter-
rorism and Meir Rosenne,
Israel's Ambasador to the
United States, will analyze re-
cent Middle Eastern events.
Through a series of high
level briefings, seminars,
workshops and study sessions,
participants will take part in
discussions and dialogues with
Cabinet members, high rank-
ing State Department
diplomats and strategic plan-
ners from the Defense Depart-
ment and the National Securi-
ty Council.
Morris Abram, chairman of
the National Council for Soviet
Jewry, will brief the par-
ticipants as they conduct a
candlelight march past the
Soviet Embassy,
demonstrating support for
their brethren who are unable
to lead a free Jewish life
behind the Iron Curtain.
Workshops will cover a wide
range of activities and topics
including "Israel," "Soviet
Jewry," "Terrorism," "The
Media and the Holocaust,"
"Intermarriage," "The
Federal Budget, "The Third
World," and "Prospects for
Peace."
There will also be a gala buf-
fet and dance including a Mary
Travers concert which will be
broadcast to the Soviet Union
by the Voice of America.
Conference co-chairmen are
Nancy Beren, Andy Eisenberg
and Robert Shulman. Michael
Adler is chairman of the
Young Leadership Cabinet
and Ann-Louise Levine is
chairman of the Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet.
Participants in the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County's Leadership Develop-
ment program who will be at-
tending the conference are
Howard Berman, Sue
Benilous, Dr. Edmund David-
son, Caryn Doniger, Director
Ronni Epstein, Bobbie Fink,
Mindy Freeman, Sandi
Heilbron, Michael Hyman,
Marshall Isaacson, David and
Rosemarie Kantor, James and
Soni Kay, Mark Levy, Mark
Mirkin, Scott Rassler, Marvin
and Sandra Rosen, Robert
Rubin, Steven and Ellen
Shapiro, Carol Shubs, Jane
Sirak, Liz Slavin, Reva
Steinberg, And Eric Weiner.
Morse Geriatric Center
Women's Auxiliary Plans First Annual Luncheon-Fashion Show
The Women's Auxiliary of
the Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center is sponsoring its First
Annual Luncheon and Fashion
Show on Monday, March 31 at
the Hyatt Palm Beaches.
Frances Schnitt, chairper-
son of the luncheon, is plann-
ing a premier fashion show to
be presented by Vera Sachs of
Palm Beach. "In addition to
the fashion show and our infor-
mative speakers; we plan a
drawing at the event for a
TV/VCR console, gold
jewelry, art, dinner and hotel
accommodations plus many
door prizes. This First Annual
Luncheon and Fashion Show
of the Women's Auxiliary is
not to be missed," stated
chairperson Schnitt.
are expected to attend the af-
fair to hear from Auxiliary
president Sylvia Berman and
Anita Anton, president of the
Resident Council at the
Center.
Frances Schnitt
Over 450 Auxiliary members
Media Center Open
House Planned
Children growing up in the
1980*8 are constantly being in-
fluenced and educated by
television. Studies have shown
that students retain more in-
formation if a teacher uses a
film or other audio-visual for-
mat, as well as the usual
pedagogical methods. People
in genera) are more apt to
grasp a subject when they are
shown in addition to being told.
Responding to the changing
needs of students and utilizing
current technology, the Jewish
Education Department of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County has created the
Comunity Media Resource
Center to provide valuable
learning tools for the entire
Jewish community.
"The purpose of creating the
Media Center was to give
religious school teachers, as
well as staff members of the
Federation's beneficiary agen-
cies and the leaders of local
Jewish organizations, the op-
portunity to enhance their
educational programming by
utilizing the hardware and
software we've assembled,"
said Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum,
Media Center director.
In order to acquaint the
Jewish community with the
equipment and media library
holdings available, an Open
House has been scheduled for
Sunday, Feb. 16, from 2-4 p.m.
at the Media Center, which is
located at the Jewish Federa-
tion's West Palm Beach office,
501 South Flagler Drive, Suite
305.
"We'll be available on that
day to demonstrate the use of
various types of equipment,"
said Cantor Rosenbaum, "and
to show interested community
members how audio-visual
media can significantly
enhance their educational
activities."
Hardware available through
the Media Center includes a
16-millimeter self-threading
movie projector, three VHS
video cassette recorders, two
televisions, two slide projec-
tors with built-in screens and
optional wall-projection
capabilities, two fUmstrip pro-
jectors with the same features,
and a portable ovehead projec-
tor which folds up to briefcase
size.
Accessories available at the
Media Center also include ex-
tension cords on easy-winding
reels and portable projection
stands.
"In addition," said Cantor
Rosenbaum, "we've acquired a
thermofax machine, which can
produce ditto masters for
reproduction or transparen-
cies for use with the overhead
projector, and a 25-inch
laminator machine capable of
sealing anything from a flash
card to a poster in a protective
sheet of clear plastic."
The use of both machines for
valid educational purposes will
be provided to the community
at no charge.
In addition to the hardware.
Continued ob Page 17
The donation for the lun-
cheon is $25 per person,
prepaid. All proceeds from the
event will benefit the Morse
Geriatric Center.
For those women who nre
not as yet Auxiliary members
and would like to attend the
First Annual Luncheon, please
call the Center at 471-5111.
Deadline for reservations is
March 10.
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I will be happy to work from:
( ) 8:45 AJn. to 11 JO A.M. ( ) 245 PM. to 5 JO PM. (Babysitting services will be provided at this shift)
( ) 10:45 AM. to IJO PM ( ) 4:45 PM to 7JO PM.
( ) 12:45 PM to 330 r ( )6:45 PM to 930 PM
( ) I will be happy to at any time. Please let me know when you need me.
-Vok** -- k. m-m h. <' I9S6 *i p. "rlpwfi on 'Sui Sut*_v .* ilwv Km not -m-v *> -


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
More Weapons For Saudis? I Still Waiting
The Reagan Administration
is reportedly planning to sell
Saudi Arabia additional
American military equipment
worth in excess of $1 billion.
The Saudis are to be provided
thousands of missiles,
upgrades for their F-15
fighters, helicopters, and elec-
tronic warfare systems.
In 1985, the Congress
codified the Presidential com-
mitments made on the eve of
the 1981 AWACS sale as a
condition for delivery, namely,
that the Saudis must provide
"substantial assistance to the
United States in promoting
peace in the region. But this
weapons sale is being con-
sidered despite the fact that
Saudi Arabia has helped to
undermine every American
peace initiative in the region
and continues to do so today.
Most recently:
The Saudis repeatedly con-
demned American efforts to
curb the outlaw Khadafy
regime in the aftermath of the
terrorist bombings at the
Rome and Vienna airports,
and they proclaimed their
"categorical solidarity" with
Libya.
Rather than support King
Hussein in direct negotiations
with Israel, the Saudis
reportedly offered Jordan free
oil supplies to repair relations
with Syria, leader of the Arab
rejectionist camp.
The Saudis continue to
replenish the PLO coffers, to
the tune of $28.5 million last
year alone, to allow the PLO to
continue its "armed struggle"
(a euphemism for terrorism)
long after most of the Arab
world has ceased to do so.
Instead of talking about
peace with Israel, Saudi
Defense Minister Sultan told a
PLO audience in Jeddah that
"the Saudi Army is a Palesti-
nian army."
Indeed, Saudi Arabia con-
tinues to fan the flames of
hatred against Israel at home,
in the region, and at the
United Nations.
Crown Prince Abdullah
declared that "once Moslems
achieve unity of will and ac-
tion, Israel will be annihilated
and disappear." King Fahd,
after his meeting with Presi-
dent Reagan in February,
1985, told Arab ambassadors
in Washington that "armed
struggle against Israel is still
an existing necessity."
At the recent Islamic Con-
ference Organization meeting,
the Saudis affirmed their com-
mitment to "severance of all
political, military, economic,
cultural, and other relations
with the Zionist enemy."
At the United Nations, the
Saudis voted to "isolate Israel
in all fields" and proclaim that
"Israel is not a peace-loving
nation," thus laying the
groundwork for expelling the
Jewish state from the United
Nations.
Moreover, the Saudis have
acted against American in-
terests in other vital areas:
They obstructed an
American strategic presence
in the Gulf by acquiescing in a
Kuwaiti-led effort to bribe
Oman to cancel its access
agreements with the United
States. And, they continue to
refuse to provide written
assurances of American access
to Saudi bases in the event of a
crisis.
They have subsidized
massive Soviet arms pur-
chases by Syria and Iraq. At
the same time, they have
cancelled aid to Egypt because
it made peace with Israel and
threatened Jordan with
economic sanctions for daring
to contemplate following
Egypt's example.
They tried to maintain ar-
tificially high oil prices by
drastically cutting their own
production and by pressuring
other producers to follow suit.
Hoping Against Hope
By M.J. Rosenberg
The Reagan Administration
is hoping against hope that
something positive will come
out of Assistant Secretary of
State Richard Murphy's latest
round of shuttle diplomacy. It
has been more than three
years since the White House
Bit out the word that King
ussein was ready for negotia-
tions but, so far, he remains
on the fence. Nevertheless, the
Administration keeps trying to
entice him into direct talks
with Israel. It deserves credit
for that although not when
its enticement would come in
the form of weapons Jordan
could use against Israel.
It is not easy reading the
conflicting signs emanating
from Amman. On the one
hand, Hussein tells U.S.
diplomats and reporters that
this year could represent the
last chance for a Mideast set-
tlement and that he is anxious
for negotiations without
preconditions. On the other, he
is cozying up to Syria and en-
dorsing Hafez Assad's view
that no separate Jordan-Israel
peace is possible.
Will the real King Hussein
please stand up? Not likely.
The Jordanian monarch
prefers offending no one
neither Washington, nor
Damascus, nor Jerusalem, nor
Moscow. Jordan is a small
country and it is understan-
dable that Hussein would
rather keep more powerful
players guessing about which
way he will go especially if
each offers inducements to
join its respective side.
Still, there are pieces of
evidence that Hussein is not
quite ready to normalize rela-
tions with Israel. The
government-controlled Jorda-
nian press is one place to look
for them. On Jan. 16, the Am-
man Sawt Al Sha'b ran an
editorial on a subject fairly
remote from Jordan's con-
cerns, the Taba dispute which
Israel and Egypt have just
agreed to submit to arbitra-
tion. The editorial warns
Egypt not to "once again ...
be a victim of the Zionist con-
cept of peace." It refers to
Israel not by name but
repeatedly as "the enemy." It
expresses outrage at Israel's
demand for compensations by
Egypt to the families of the
victims of the Sinai massacre
in which six Israelis were
murdered by a deranged
policeman. "This cannot be ac-
cepted, nor can its logic be ac-
cepted by any rational
person."
It concludes that the Taba
arbitration process is designed
so that Yitzhak Shamir will be
prime minister at the time of
any change in Taba's status. It
calls this "a clever ploy"
because the "terrorist
Shamir... (is) an intransigent
negotiator to whose mind the
map of greater Israel is still at-
tached just as it is attached to
the wall of the Zionist
Knesset."
The slam at Shamir is
nothing new but it is worth
questioning how the Jorda-
Continued on Page 8
the
Jewish floridian
of Palm Beacn Count*
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Advertising Director Slaci Lesser Phone MliiS?
eZHTZT'mZZyj"'0!? ''"'" ***" of Palm Beacn County, mc Officers President
S.iRirBiprintTorrcc ?"" *2?$ ".' flu"","' **""> of Me. nand.se MstrhtaM
F *V. ?o o S lC" *'" U *"""" l? v"' """"" *' SO' o-O* memoe.sh.p je*,v
Fed.-at.on of Pa.m Beach Coimtv 501 S Fi,g,e. D- West Pa.m Bra.-n. FU Jjaoi PWUj2 7t7
Friday, February 14,1986 5 1ADAR 5746
'lume 12 Number 7
Regular readers of Near East Report may note that this
is not the first time that an NER editorial has carried the
headline "Still Waiting." We don t use it again today
because it is a catchy phrase it isn't but rather because
it expresses our continuing frustration over King Hussein's
reluctance to sit down and negotiate with Israel.
Perhaps the latest round of meetings in Europe will
result in an announcement of the King's determination to
join Israel in negotiations. But, so far, there is no evidence
to that effect. On the contrary, the King seems to be conti-
nuing along the path toward rapprochment with Syria
rather than Israel. We still do not know what transpired
dining that meeting last month between Hussein and
Hafez Assad. We do know, however, that Damascus was
not dismayed about its outcome. That in itself is a reason
for pessimism.
Nevertheless, Israel's Prime Minister Shimon Peres re-
mains committed to the Jordan-Israel peace process
Speaking on television recently, Peres was upbeat. He con-
ceded that King Hussein has not committed himself to
peace but asserted that he would continue to work with the
United States to bring Hussein around. Asked if Hussein
was incapable of making peace, Peres said: "Such
statements were made about all sorts of people including
Sadat, but it turned out that he hedged until the moment
that he stood up on his own two feet and walked," He said
that he would not give up on Hussein or peace. "I will pur.
sue this," he said.
It surely has not escaped Hussein's notice that, in Shimon
Peres, Israel has a prime minister who is dogged in pursuit
of a peace settlement with Jordan and is ready to make con-
cessions to achieve it. On Oct. 1, however, Peres' term as
prime minister will end. He will be replaced by Vice Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir as committed to peace as Peres
but far more skeptical about the "Jordan option" and Hus-
sein's intentions. Moreover, he and Peres have very dif-
ferent views about the future of the West Bank. For Hus-
sein then, this is the moment for some hard choices. He can
come forward now or he can let the months go by and then
try to blame Shamir's alleged "inflexibility" for stalling the
peace process.
| One can see the pattern re-emerging. In 1947 the Arabs
j: rejected the United Nations Partition Plan which would
:j: have created both a Jewish and a Palestinian Arab state.
:|: After 1947, Arab spokesmen indicated that they should
I have acceted that plan, as the Jews did. Today, Arab
: leaders think that they are making major concessions when
" they hint at accepting Israel in its "pre-'67" borders. Their
claim is that they only want the "occupied territories"
ft back. They pass over the fact that they vehemently refused
;: to accept Israel or peace back in those pre-1967 days when
I they controlled the West Bank, Gaza, and east Jerusalem.
:j:j For the Arabs the grass has always been greener a decade
I ago, or maybe two. They seem unable to recognize oppor-
$ tunity when it still exists in the present tense.
This, then, is a moment of opportunity and it is one that
:: King Hussein should seize now. If he refuses to do so he will
I be left with nothing but nostalgia about those hopeful days
I of 1986 when peaceful compromise with Israel seemed a
jij: possible dream. It is his choice. Shimon Peres, joined by
::j: Yitzhak Shamir and the National Unity Government as
jjj: well as the Reagan Administration await his response.
(Near East Report)
Jewish Federation/UJA
Campaign
Calendar of Events
1986
Palm Beach Division Cocktail Reception at
Beachpointe/Stratford/2600
Wellington Dinner
High Ridge Golf Tournament
Community Dinner Dance
R^l DLVSi0n Ccktaa ^P*0" ** May** House
ooynton Beach Happening
Women's Division $365 Event
Hunters Run Dinner-Dance
Eastpointe Country Club Dinner
Ketubah Luncheon for Project Renewal
February 13
February 13
February 14
February 22
February 25
February 26
March 6
March8
March 11
March 16
March 20
April 17 ;


Radio/TV/ Film
MOSAIC Sunday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m. WPTV Channel
5 with host Barbara Gordon This week's guest, Debbie
Berger, describes Project Interchange.
L'CHAYIM Sunday, Feb. 16, 7:30 a.m. WPBR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub The Jewish
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
TRADITION TIME Sunday, Feb. 16, 11 a.m. -
WVCG 1080-AM with host Ben Zohar This weekly
variety show features Israeli and Yiddish music and humor.
SHALOM Sunday, Feb. 16, 6 a.m. WPEC Channel
12 (11:30 a.m. WDZL-TV 39) with host Richard
Peritz.
ISRAELI PRESS REVIEW Thursday, Feb. 20, 1:15
p.m. WLIZ 1380-AM A summary of news and com-
mentary on contemperary issues.
HERITAGE: CIVILIZATION AND THE JEWS -
Thursday, Feb. 20,10 p.m. WXEL-TV 42 Repeated Sun-
day, Feb. 23 at 1 p.m. "The Search For Deliverance" ...
Focusing on the experiences of European Jews, this pro-
gram describes the thriving Jewish communities in
Eastern and Western Europe and their interaction with
the intellectual, social, political, and religious currents of
the surrounding culture the Renaissance, Reformation,
and Enlightment.
ISRAEL: A SEARCH FOR FAITH Wednesday, Feb.
19 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Palm Beach County Library at
Palm Beach Gardens, 8895 N. Military Trail.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Bech
County. _______________
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Fjoridian of Palm Beach County. Page 5
Civilization And The Jews
Community Calendar
February 14
Jewish Federation Campaign Cabinet Meeting at Air-
port Hilton 8 a.m. Jewish Federation Women's Divi-
sion Leadership Briefing noon Jewish Federation
Leadership Development Program Oneg Shabbat 8
p.m. Brandeis University Women Lake Worth Valen-
tine Day Book Fund luncheon noon Free Sons of Israel -
board 10:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3015 board
Jewish Federation Young Adult Division Task Force
Meeting 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Poinciana -
Valentine dance 7 p.m.
Febraury 16
American Technion Society dinner/dance and national
board meeting at The Breakers 8 p.m. Parents of North
American Israelis -1 p.m. Temple Beth El Men's Club -
10 a.m. Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club 9:30 a.m.
Jewish Community Center Men's Day at Camp Shalom 9
to 5 p.m. Jewish Federation Media Presentation 2-4
p.m. at Federation Office Israel Bonds at B'nai Jacob
February 17
Jewish Family and Children's Service board 7:30 p.m.
Hadassah Tamar lunch Hadassah Tikvah 1 p.m.
Pioneer Women Ezrat board Hadassah Z'Hava -
board Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood card party noon
Jewish Community Day School executive board 7:45 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Yachad board 10 a.m.
February 18
Jewish Federation Leadership Development Committee
- 8 p.m. Jewish Federation Leadership Development
Washington Briefing 7 p.m. Women's American ORT -
Boynton Beach 1 p.m. Jewish Federation Button-
wood and Buttonwood West Breakfast at Temple Beth
Sholom 9:45 a.m. Yiddish Culture Group Century
Village 10 a.m. Women's American ORT Lakes of
Poinciana board 12:30 p.m. Congregation Anshei
Sholom Sisterhood 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta
Szold 1 p.m. Jewish Federation Soviet Jewry Task
Force -1:30 p.m.
February 19
Jewish Federation Women's Division Executive Com-
mittee 10 a.m. National Council of Jewish Women -
Palm Beach -10 a.m. Brandeis University Women Lake
Worth board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith Women CHam -
board 10 a.m. National Council of Jewish Women -
Evening 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Shalom 12:30 p.m.
Women s American ORT Willow Bend Meed 1 p.m.
Jewish Community Center board 8 p.m. Hadassah -
West Boynton board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith No. 3015
Women's American ORT Mid Palm theatre Temple
Emanu-El Study series 9:30 a.m. Jewish Federation
Women's Division Open Board 7:30 p.m. Jewish
Community Day School cocktail party 5-7 p.m.
February 20
United Jewish Appeal-New York Federation Palm Beach
dinner at The Breakers National Council of Jewish
Women Okeechobee 12:30 p.m. Hadassah Rishona -
study workshop Hadassah Yovel noon B'nai B'rith
Palm Beach Council board -10 a.m. Hadassah Z'Hava
Hadassah Golda Meir "festival of prizes" noon Joseph
L. Morse Geriatric Center Women's Auxiliary Annual
Meeting -1:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Executive Com-
mittee 4 p.m. Jewish Federation Communications
Committee 7:30 p.m. Jewish Federation Young Adult
Division 7:30 p.m.
For information on the above meetings call the Federa-
tion office 832-2120.
Filmed in the part of the old Jewish quarter
in Cracow, Poland (left). The Search For
Deliverance, episode five of Heritage:
Civilization and the Jews, encoring on WX-
EL TV 42, Thursday, Feb. 20 at 10 p.m., en-
compasses the complex Europeon Jewish
experience from the expulsion from Spain
in 1492 to the French Revolution in 1789.
Shown above are two followers of
Haaidism, a Jewish movement founded by
Ba'al Shem Tov in the 18th century. In con-
junction with this encore presentation of
the Emmy Award-winning series, jour-
nalist Bill Moyers will host two all-new in-
terview programs discussing issues raised
in the original 1984 broadcast. This pro-
gram is sponsored by Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County.
Teller To Address TAU Associates
Even before the event has
taken place, the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
consider it a major feather in
their cap: the guest speaker
for their Seminar Associates
meeting in February will be
Dr. Edward Teller, one of the
most prominent scientists in
the world.
Dr. Teller will address a
breakfast meeting of the
Seminar Associates on Friday,
Feb. 21, at 7:30 a.m.
Teller's name is probably
most familiar to people as one
of the scientists who developed
the atom bomb during World
War II. He is also known as a
staunch proponent of what he
insists be properly called the
Strategic Defense Initiative,
though the press and the
public have come to use the
euphemism "Star Wars."
Born in Budapest in 1908,
Dr. Teller was educated in
Germany and received his PhD
from the University of Leipzig
in 1930. In the early 30's he
taught and did research work
in Germany and Denmark, but
with the rise of the Nazis to
power he left Germany, going
first to London, then to the
U.S., where he became a
citizen in 1941.
After World War II, Dr.
Teller became professor of
physics at the University of
Chicago but the threat of
Soviet technological
developments prompted him
to return as assistant director
to the Los Alamos Scientific
Laboratory. In 1952, after in-
itiating substantial progress
toward thermonuclear ex-
plosives, he became consultant
at the Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory in
California, which he also
directed in 1968-60. From
1S60 to 1975 he continued as
associate director there, while
also serving as professor of
physics at the University of
California. He has been a
senior research fellow at the
Hoover Institution in Stan-
ford, California ever since.
Dr. Teller has served the
country in many ways, in-
cluding as member of the ad-
visory committee of the
Atomic Energy Commission,
as chairman of the first
Nuclear Reactor Safety Com-
mittee, as member of the
USAF Scientific Advisory
Board, on the President's
Foreign Intelligence Advisory
Board, and board member of
the Defense Intelligence
School. In 1982 he was ap-
pointed to the White House
Science Council.
His awards and medals are
numerous, and include such
prestigious ones, among
others, as the Enrico Fermi
Medal, the Albert Einstein
Award, The Harvey Prize, the
Joseph Priestly Award and the
National Medal of Science. He
has written several books and
numerous articles both scien-
tific and of general concern,
and is currently working on a
book dealing with the in-
fluence of technology on
warfare.
While some people in the
peace movement tend to think
of Dr. Teller strictly in terms
of his contribution to nuclear
warfare, his broad expertise.
Continued on Page 6
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
*A Promise for the Future'
The Endowment Fund Of The Jewish Federation Of Palm Beach County
Tax Reform Update
tax
the
IRS
By ARNOLD
I. SCHWARTZMAN
Endowment Director
Before continuing with our
outline of currently available
charitable giving vehicles
through the Endowment Pro-
gram, it would be inap-
propriate not to make mention
of the fact that from the time
of our last article to date a tax
reform bill has been passed by
the House of Representatives
and is now being considered by
the Senate Finance Commit-
tee. In the House bill, charities
were able to avoid significant
problem areas because (1) no
deductibility floor for
itemizers was enacted,
(2) there will be continued full
fair market value deductions
for gifts of appreciated proper-
ty, and (3) non-itemizers will
be able to deduct gifts in ex-
cess of $100.
However, the House bill left
charities a bitter pill to
swallow. For those taxpayers
who contribute appreciated
capital gain property, that por-
tion of the gift which
represents the appreciation in
the value of the property
would be included as a tax
preference item under the
Alternative Minimum Tax for
both corporations and in-
dividuals. If this language is
allowed to stay and become
part of a final tax reform
package, there are
econometric studies which
suggest that such a change,
subjecting appreciation to the
Alternative Minimum Tax,
could impact charitable giving
significantly. Needless to say,
efforts are being undertaken
to mount a campaign in order
to overcome this provision and
fully preserve the charitable
deduction for gifts of ap-
preciated property.
As a recent Wall Street
Journal article pointed out, the
Internal Revenue Service has
been cracking down on tax-
payers who inflate the value of
non-cash gifts.
Handled correctly, however,
such charitable contributions
can still be beneficial for both
the donor and recipient,
The biggest changes this
look around for property that
has appreciated in value since
they have acquired it and con-
sider using it to help a favorite
charity and reduce their out-
of-pocket tax costs. Ap-
year are a"new IRS Form 8283 predated securities would
which must be used to claim seem a good choice. Many in
less than $10,000). Many
experts have expressed
opinion that "when the
flags something it means thejr
think people are abusing it.
One such advisor, David b.
Rhine, a tax partner in the
New York office of Seidman
and Seidman, views this same
flag as an opportunity. Rhine
says "a new IRS form is also,
in effect, an advertisement
that 'here's a good thing.'
Rhine suggests that taxpayers the government with the sell-
healthier deduction.
It makes sense to pick a
qualified appraiser to make a
Ehysical examination of the
ig-ticket items. (The IRS has
its own panel, for example, of
art experts and others on call
to counter check the disputed
deductions.)
Experts say that an ap-
praisal can also come in handy
if the market takes a sudden
dive, leaving a once-valuable
art work selling at a depressed
price. Under the new IRS
rules, charities that elect to
sell donated items valued over
$5,000 within two years after
they are received must let the
government know and provide
deductions for non-cash dona-
tions of more than $500, and
the requirement that ap-
praisals be attached for nearly
all gifts of property valued at
more than $5,000. (Appraisals
dividuals do not coordinate
management of their
securities portfolio with their
charitable donations and as a
result some sell stock, then
contribute the proceeds to
are not required for publicly charity. Under present law, in
traded stock and for non-
publicly traded stock valued at
Weizmann Institute Elects New President
Prof. Aryeh Dvoretzky, a
distinguished mathematician
at Israel's Hebrew University,
has been elected president of
the Weizmann Institute of
Science, succeeding Prof.
Michael Sela who was presi-
dent of the Institute for 10
years.
Prof. Dvoretsky, the Chief
Scientist of Israel s Ministry of
Defense from 1968-72 and
former president of the Israel
Academy of Sciences and
Humanities from 1974-80, is
the seventh president of the
Institute during its 51-year
history.
The Institute, located at
Rehovot, Israel, 15 miles
southeast of Tel Aviv, was
founded in 1934 by the late Dr.
Chaim Weizmann, the In-
stitute's first president and
also the State of Israel's first
president.
In a related announcement,
the Weizmann Institute named
Morris L. Levinson to succeed
Lord Sieff of Brimpton as
chairman of the board and
elected Lord Sieff as Institute
chancellor, a position previous-
ly held by the late Mever
Teller
Continued from Pace 5
in fact, has contributed a great
deal in the areas of quantum
mechanics and energy
research and he has strong
arguments to make on the
Strategic Defense Initiative
and the relationship between
defense, technology, and
foreign policy. His talk should
be of particular interest at the
Seminar Associates, since he
will undoubtedly relate these
issues to the Middle East and
Israel in particular, including,
perhaps, discussion of the role
Israel might play in future
U.. defense developments.
Fo further information on
the Seminar Associates and
the lecture by Dr. Teller,
please contact the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
at 2200 N. Federal Highway,
Suite 229, Boca Raton, FL
33433.
Wisgal, a former president of
the Weizmann Institute.
Three new governors
emeriti, including Miami
Beach resident Gottlieb Ham-
mer, were named by the In-
stitute. Mr. Hammer is a
founder of the Weizmann In-
stitute and the author of a new
book, "Good Faith and
Credit," which graphically
describes the philanthropy and
support in the United States
for the State of Israel from its
infancy to its present
development.
The Institute's board of
fwernors also elected Prof.
hmuel Shaltiel, a leading In-
stitute researcher and former
Dean of the Feinberg
Graduate School, as Prof.
Dvoretzky's deputy and the In-
stitute's first senior vice
president.
At the swearing-in
ceremonies at the Institute,
Israel President Chaim Her-
zog stated that "the Institute
not only enjoys a respected
place among leading research
centers of the modern world,
but has been, as Dr. Weizmann
thought it should be, an instru-
ment of nation-building, the
very basis of the Zionist
Prof. Aryeh Dvoretiky
endeavor in this land."
The Institute today employs
2,500 scientists, engineers,
technicians and others who
work on more than 700 basic
and applied research projects.
Its current annual operating
budget is $62 million.
Recognized as one of the
world's foremost centers of
scientific research, the Weiz-
mann Institute has achieved
its prominence by making im-
portant contributions in the
study of cancer, multiple
sclerosis, children's diseases,
aging, neurological and im-
munological disorders, plant
genetics, solar energy, com-
puter science and industrial
research, to name a few.
most cases, it's smarter to con-
tribute the stock directly to a
charity instead of selling it and
then making your
contribution.
For example, under present
law, consider a taxpayer in the
50 percent bracket who owns a
stock held more than a year
that appreicated from $2,000
to $12,000. If the stock were
sold, the taxpayer would end
up paying capital gains tax on
the appreciation. That would
leave $2,000 less to donate and
shrink the deduction as well.
By giving the stock directly to
the charity, the taxpayer
would avoid the capital gains
tax, making it possible to make
a larger donation and take a
ing price by filing a Form 282
(an informational return.)
It's too soon to make any
reliable estimate of how much
effect the proposed new tax
package may have on
charitable giving. But donors
who regularly give large
amounts of stock and get
big deductions in return
would likely see cuts in the size
of those deductions if some of
the proposed provisions men-
tioned above were enacted.
Of course, by the time a tax
overhaul is actually signed into
law, the rules of the giving
game could be considerably
different. As a result, many
tax advisors are urging clients
to go slow before taking any
major steps.
We will be sure to keep our
readers posted throughout the
year as developments in the
pending tax legislation take
place.
In the interim, should there
be any questions with regard
to the proposed legislation,
please do not hesitate to get in
touch with me and, by all
means, discuss your personal
situation with your tax
advisor.
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The observance of tra-
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Cantor Herman
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at the Services and
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Outstanding leaders
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Great films. Music day and
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
Update/Opinion
By TOBY F. WILK
In Jerusalem, thousands of
visitors from the Soviet Union
have been made to feel
unwelcome. The unwanted
visitors are starlings which arrive
annually in great flocks and stay
until spring. The birds lack house-
training and hold rowdy parties at
night. The Society for the Protec-
tion of Nature in Israel contends
the starlings are charming and
educational for children.
Veterinarians respond they carry
diseases that may infect poultry.
Residents say charmshmarm,
there will be no welcoming smiles
for them until the starlings learn
to control their bodily functions
and to sleep at night. This con-
travenes instructions of the
Israeli Tourism Minister that
Israelis must smile more for
tourists.
Israel now has a forest for
kosher "hams." A JNF forest was
recently dedicated to amateur
radio enthusiasts from among
whose pioneering members were
drawn the radio operators on the
Hagana's immigrant ships and the
nucleus of the Israel Defense
Forces' Signal Corps. The Inter-
national Amateur Radio Union is
the "ham's" world body.
Britain's Home Secretary has
banned the entry into Britain of
Louis Farrakhan because "his
presence would not be conducive
to the public good, in the light of
Farrakhan's public statements."
This decision was warmly welcom-
ed in Parliamentary circles as well
as in the Jewish community.
Despite protests by a Black Peo-
ple's Association, a very good
relationship exists between the
Black and Jewish community.
The Austrian Embassy in Lon-
don is drawing to the attention of
the Jewish community the fact
that it has a complete list of all the
art treasures stolen by the Nazis
and housed in a depot in Mauer-
bach. The Austrian Ambassador
stated that his government is
making new attempts to restore
the treasures to their rightful
owners.
An unprecedented "month of
Judaism" took place in Paris in
collaboration with the Sorbonne
and the Rashi Center, and under
the patronage of President Mit-
terand. Many internationally
known personalities participated.
Included were Prof. Elie Wiesel,
American writer Philip Roth, ac-
tress Catherine Deneuve, writer
Francoise Sagan, and playwright
Eugene Ionesco.
Professor Safran resigned as
director of the Center for Middle
Eastern Studies at Harvard
University because he failed to in-
form the University that the CIA
contributed money towards the
costs of a symposium he organized
on the subject of Islamic Fun-
damentalism. Safran's recent
book Saudi Arabia: The Ceaseless
Quest for Security was also sub-
sidized by the CIA. Harvard does
not ban CIA funding, but insists
that each instance must be disclos-
ed. Safran remains as Professor
of Government at Harvard.
Half of the 164,000 Soviet Jews
who arrived in Israel since 1968
are University graduates. They
form the backbone of Israel Air-
craft Industries and Tel Aviv
University's Institutes of
Mathematics and Physiscs, where
the lingua franca is Russian.
Every other engineer in Israel to-
day is from the Soviet Union, as is
every third physician. This is true
as well among the players in
Israel's orchestras.
During a past visit of Henry
Kissinger to Saudi Arabia, the
U.S. delegation members and
journalists accompanying him
found copies of the infamous
forgery "The Protocols of Zion"
in their hotel rooms in the Saudi
capital. When Kissinger met with
King Faisal, the Saudi ruler
Teen Study Tour Of Israel
A Once-in-a-Lifetime Experience
The Education Committee
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County is par-
ticularly proud of its Scholar-
ship Program, which enables
teens from our county to par-
ticipate in their choice of some
25 different Israel programs
run by organizations such as
United Synagogue Youth
(Conservative movement). Na-
tional Federation of Temple
Youth (Kelorm movement),
High School in Israel,
Hadassah, Masada, World
Zionist Organization, etc. The
amount of scholarship
assistance offered is based
upon three criteria: past merit,
future potential and financial
need. These scholarships are
available in addition to the
Midrasha-Judaica High School
scholarships of $500 granted
to every teen who makes the
commitment of attending
Midrasha in the 9th, 10th and
11th grade and completes all
courses satisfactorily.
The evening to hear all about
the various programs will oc-
cur on Wednesday, Feb. 19,
from 7-8:45 p.m. in the Merkaz
of the Jewish Community Day
School, 5801 Parker Avenue,
West Palm Beach.
Not only will there be an op-
portunity to receive brochures
on more than 25 programs
that are available, but former
teen participants will share
their experiences with their
classmates. "We are par-
ticularly proud of these 'Israel
returnees,'" stated Nat
Kosowski, chairman of the
Federation's Jewish Educa-
tion Committee, "who have
reached out to organizations
all over our community and
shared their excitement about
their study and travel with
them. We are confident these
young people will always be
leaders and an asset to any
Jewish community they live
in."
The brochures available that
evening provide detailed
descriptions, cost, itinerary, as
well as applications for
students to apply directly. In
addition, at this even', jtudents
can receive forms to apply for
the Federation scholarships.
Ann Lynn Lipton, Jewish
Education director, noted that
studies indicate that teens who
are able to participate in a
summer program in Israel
become the most committed
Jewish young adults on the
high school and college cam-
puses. "The impact of these
programs cannot be matched
by any other single Jewish ex-
perience, and we recommend
that all families encourage
their teens to consider an
Israel program in High
School," Lipton said.
Don't miss this exciting
evening, open to all teenagers
in our community regardless
of affiliation. For further in-
formation, call the Jewish
Education Department at
832-2120.
Milton and Lillian (Sis) Gold
will be the honorees at a
Royal Palm Beach Israel
Bond Testimonial Dinner
Dance on March 2. The Golds
will receive the most
prestigious Heritage Award
from the State of Israel for
their deep commitment, in*
volvement, and dedication to
their people, their communi-
ty and to the State of Israel.
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stressed ne was receiving Kiss-
inger "not as a Jew, but as a
human being." To which Kiss-
inger replied: "That is quite all
right. Some of my best friends are
human beings."
Herut Party members in Israel
are hopeful Menachem Begin may
come out of seclusion. Begin has
filled in the necessary forms for
those seeking to be delegates to
the Herut Party convention.
Whatever his decision may be,
there will be a Begin at the Con-
vention his son Benyamin, a
geologist. Insiders say he has
taken to politics and is prepared to
become active in the party his
father led from 1948 until his
resignation.
In Haifa, now and then, there is
an influx of thousands of U.S.
sailors from the American Sixth
Fleet. They can be seen from posh
hotels to dives and from cultural
centers to discotheques. At a
favorite night spot, they drink
beer and sing Israeli songs of the
1950's, in disco style. Although
they don't know the Hebrew
words, the sailors join in with
gusto.
For the first time, Protestant
churches in Italy joined the Italian
Jewish community in protesting a
document signed by the govern-
ment and the Italian Bishops'
Conference which sets rules for
teaching the Roman Catholic
religion by priests in Italian State
schools for pupils ages 3 to 18.
The protestant and Jewish protest
stated that this was
discriminatory and would violate
the principle of equality and
freedom of conscience.
There are doubts Israel will
have sufficient qualified man-
power to train the next genera-
tion of computer experts. Tech
won in Haifa, Israel's central
training facility for top-grade
computer experts, is suffering a
terrible "brain drain." Because
Technion is unable to pay the
minimum for a decent living,
senior faculty members have left
for highly paid positions in
American Universities and in
research departments in com-
puter conglomerates. The
teacher-student ratio in the Tech-
nion has fallen to 1 in 40, com-
pared with 1 in 10 in most
Western countries seeking to pro-
mote advanced computer studies.
Senior lecturers in Technion take
home about $600 a month.
There is good news for those
who tremble at the thought of the
dentist's drill. It may soon be
possible to discover cavities
before they get big enough to
need drilling, thanks to an easy-to-
use kit used by Tel Aviv Univer-
sity's School of Dental Medicine.
Cavities will be spottable before
the dentist himself can detect
them. Initial results suggest the
kit may also be able to predict the
sites of future cavities.
On the rare occasions when an
exit visa is issued to a Soviet Jew,
often it is to divide a family in
order to pressure members to
stay. Wives may be allowed to
emigrate, but husbands are not;
parents can leave, but their
children must stay. A family must
choose freedom or family. Is
that a choice? A united Jewish
movement and sustained action is
essential to free our oppressed
Soviet brethren who seek to
emigrate. Jewish emigration from
the Soviet Union is a litmus test of
the Kremlin's sincerity about
arms control and reducing the
danger of nuclear war.
19 year old Louisa Weizmann,
great grand-daughter of Israel's
first President, has just settled
permanently in Israel. At her first
media interview, she stated her in-
tention to become politically ac-
tive in the Labor party. When so-
meone exclaimed, referring to Mr.
Weizman, "But surely he was on
the other side," she replied:
"Well, now he's a dove."
Jerry Falwell's "Moral Majori-
ty" will now be known as the
"Liberty Federation." This is
nothing more than the same old
product in a shiny new package.
People for the American Way is
working hard to make sure the
American public doesn't buy it.
Though the name has changed,
the song remains the same. They
are a dangerous force that must
be reckoned with.
A FallsyikwSi mmkr.
Wu. GxM.Y>rR Boi>yAm) V&rm
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So this summer, come to where the atmosphere is as im iting as the
weather I he Fallsview
THE FAUSVIEW ELLENVILLE, NY
CALL TOLL FREE 800-431-0152


.
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
JCDS Science Fair
The Merkaz of the Jewish Community Day
School was filled to capacity on the night of Jan.
SO as students and their parents perused dozens
of fascinating science projects created by enter-
prising Day Schoolers. Executive director Bar-
bara Steinberg greeted the audience and asked
for a moment of silence in memory of the seven
shuttle astronauts who died while pursuing
scientific knowledge.
Projects were judged on the criteria of creativi-
ty, scientific thought, thoroughness, skill and
clarity.
First-place winners in each grade will receive
a book on a scientific subject or a subscription to
a science-related magazine. First-, second, and
third-place winners are eligible to compete in the
upcoming regional science fair.
As Patricia. Walker, science fair coordinator,
said, "Tonight, everyone was a winner."
FIRST GRADE: Michael Adler, third place; Scott
Penner, first place. (Not pictured: second place
winner Matthew Kwasman.)
A special presentation was made to the
Kindergarten class, which worked on various pro-
jects as a group.
FOURTH GRADE: Robert Ipp, third place; Jeremy
Berg, second place; Joseph Rosen, first place.
SECOND GRADE: Joshua LeRoy, first place; B.J.
Rosen, second place; Rachel Needle, third place.
THIRD GRADE: Erica Dardashti, third place; Jen-
nifer Maclvor, second place; Gregory Abrams, first
place.
FIFTH GRADE: Rachel Klein, third place. Joshua
Perrin, first place. (Not pictured: David Slonim, se-
cond place.)
SIXTH GRADE: Adam Schrager, first place;
Shayna Chazin, third place tie; Tamara Hyman,
honorable mention. (Not pictured: Shayna Bloom-
Bershad, second place; and Tamir Goldstein, third
place tie.)
SEVENTH GRADE: Clint Ehrlich. third place;
Karen Glorsky, second place; Michael Gordon, first
place.
Hoping Against Hope
Continued from Page 4
nians know that he is an "in-
transigent negotiator" in-
asmuch as they never agreed
to negotiate with him when he
was prime minister. As for the
"map of greater Israel. ... on
the wall of the Zionist
Knesset," there is no such
map. That map existed only in
pre-Camp David Egyptian pro-
paganda and now in Syrian
propaganda. The Jordanians
may know better but, like the
Syrians, are mouthing tired
lies about Israel with convinc-
ing zest.
It is easy to dismiss a single
article in a single Jordanian
newspapaer as not represen-
tative of the prevailing Jorda-
nian view. However, as the
Jerusalem Post reported on
Jan. 8, anti-Israel attitudes
suffuse the Jordanian media.
Two Amman newspapers Ad
Dustur and Ar Ray report
news from Tel Aviv, Hiafa,
and Jerusalem under the
headline "The Occupied
Land." Sawt at Sha'b uses the
headline "The Conquered
Homeland." The image of
Israelis in editorial page car-
toons are right out of the Nazi
newspaper Der Sturmer. Ac-
cording to the Post, Israelis
are portrayed as having
"crooked, humped noses and.
the image of a monster."
In short, Jordan's press is
making no effort to sell the
Jordanian people on the idea of
peace with Israel. On the con-
trary it continues to peddle
anti-Israeli and anti-Semitic
stereotypes stereotypes
which can help energize a
peole into going to war rather
than to accept former enemies
as friends. Anwar Sadat used
to say that 90 percent of the
Arab-Israeli conflict was
psychological. If nations stop-
ped viewing each other as
enemies, agreements could be
reached and peace attained.
He was right. King Hussein
may have personally accepted
Israel's right to live in peace
and security. But his govern-
ment has made no attempt to
bring the Jordanian people to
that same conclusion. Until it
does it will be hard to believe
that Jordan-Israel peace is
anything more than a wish and
a prayer.
EIGHTH GRADE: Joshua Weingard, first place;
David Simon, second place; Matthew Brown, third
place.
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Friday, February 14,1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
Christian Leaders Convicted After
Soviet Jewry Demonstration
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Four more Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists this time Christian
community leaders were
convicted recently of violating
a District of Columbia statute
by demonstrating in front of
an Embassy.
Women's Division
Campaign Cabinet
In what has become a virtual
ritual since the trials of pro-
testors arrested at the Soviet
Embassy began last
December, the judge handed
down a 15-day suspended
prison sentence, six months'
probation and a $50 fine. But
he agreed, as he did in another
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Cypress Lakes Lodge No. 3196 have organized with the
Tropical Sands Christian Church an Interfaith
Brotherhood Convocation to take place on Feb. 20 at the
church located at 2726 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens.
Dr. James Hilton, Pastor, Tropical Sands Christian
Church; Father Gerald Grace, Professor of Theology at St.
Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary; Reverend Derek King,
Pastor Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church and Rabbi
Joel Chazin, Rabbi, Temple Emanu-El of Palm Beach, are
the guest speakers. The combined choral group of the
Tropical Sands Christian Church and the Tabernacle Mis-
sionary Baptist Church will entertain. Ed Stuart will play
and sing. The community is invited.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Palm Beach Lodge No. 221 will meet on Friday, Feb. 28
at 1 p.m. at the American Savings Bank (West Gate of
C.V.) The Century Village Mandolin Ensemble will enter-
tain and the Federation of Senior Citizens will give a short
talk on changes in Medicare for 1986. Pompano Harness
Races March 12 and a Cruise is planned for May.
HADASSAH
Aliya Lake Worth Chapter will hold their annual Youth
Aliyah Luncheon on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 11:30 a.m. at the
Royce Hotel. Donation for this luncheon is $22. The pro-
ceeds go to the Youth Alilyah division of Hadasash which is
dedicated to rescuing children from all over the world who
are victims of war, hunger and political persecution. They
are brought into Israel fed, clothed, housed and educated
so that they can be integrated into the mainstream of
Israeli life as healthy, productive citizens.
Members who have participated in the IMA (Mothers'
program) will be honored. It costs $270 for the medical,
physical, scholastic and spiritual care of one child for a
year. A program has been initiated where a member can
donate l/10th of the amount, or $72, thereby enabling more
members to participate.
Entertainment will be by the Lee Vassil Group, under the
able direction of Goldie Bernstein.
All are welcome to attend.
Golda Meir-Boynton Beach will hold their general
membership meeting on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 12:30 p.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom, 315 North "A" St., Lake Worth.
A musical program will be presented by Tony
Simone, following the drawings of the Festival of Frizes.
Anyone still wishing to "Save a Life" may purchase more
tickets by contacting Pearl Reich.
Members and friends are invited to attend.
Feb. 27 Luncheon and card party at Kristine's.
The Lee Vassil Chapter will meet on Tuesday, Feb. 25,
at Temple Beth Sholom 315 No. "A" St., Lake Worth, at
12:30 p.m. Entertainment will be "I Remember My Yid-
dishe Mama," assisted by the Lee Vassil Choral Group
under the direction of Goldie Bernstein.
The Rishona Palm Beach Chapter will hold its 10th an-
nual H.M.O. Card Party and Mini Lunch on Wednesday,
Feb. 26 at noon at the Palm Beach Ocean Hotel, 2830 South
Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach. In addition to lunch and an after-
noon of card playing, there will be raffle and door prizes.
Non-members as well as members may attend for a $5 tax
deductible donation.
Monies raised at this function will be allocated towards
Hadassah's Medical Organization facilities at its two
hospitals and vast medical and dental teaching institutions
in Israel. Hadassah is renowned throughout the world for
being in the forefront in medical teaching, research and
healing.
Tikvah Chapter West Palm Beach next event Feb. 13
"Brigadcon" at the Royal Palm Theatre. Feb. 17, member-
ship meeting at Anshei Sholom at 1 p.m., guest speaker
Tom Kelly, editor of the Palm Beach Post who will show
slides of Israel from his last visit.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Okeechobee Chapter is having a Duplicate Bridge Game
on Feb. 16, with the Three B's (Bridge, Brunch, Bagels) at
11 a.m. in the Old Pubic Library Building on Camilha Park
Drive, Royal Palm Beach. Donation is $3.50. Play the game
and you will also support ORT.
hearing last month, to
postpone the sentences pen-
ding appeal.
The four demonstrators con-
victed included a Catholic
priest, a Lutheran minister
and two lay leaders. For the
Rev. John Steinbruck, the
Lutheran minister, it was the
second conviction since
December, when he was given
the same sentence for par-
ticipating in a similar rally last
May.
The arrest took place on
Yom Kippur, and the four had
volunteered, as they and
others in the Christian com-
munity have done for years on
Jewish holidays, to conduct the
15-year-old daily vigil for
Soviet Jewry across the street
from the Embassy.
Only Steinbruck had come
with the intention of getting
arrested. But the police sud-
denly moved in and arrested
all three for carrying protest
placards in an Embassy area.
Attorney Frank Campbell,
who, like the lawyers for the
other groups of
demonstrators, has taken the
case without fee, argued that
the charges should be dropped
because no warning had been
given to disperse and because
the placards were not of a
nature that would violate the
District statute.
But once presiding Judge
Joseph Hannon rejected those
arguments, Campbell
presented the same defense as
that put forward in the
previous hearings that the
protestors had a moral im-
perative to violate the statute
in an effort to aid victims of
Soviet persecution.
Again, the judge rejected the
defense and consequently
refused to hear any testimony.
But he did accept a written ac-
count of what the proposed
witnesses would have said, not
only about Soviet persecution
of Jews but of Christians as
well.
The Campaign Cabinet of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Women's Division met on Tuesday, Jan. 28.
The Campaign Cabinet meeting was highlighted by presenta-
tions by Nancy Lipoff, Women's Division regional Campaign
Cabinet chairperson, and Barbara Goldman, regional UJA
Women's Division director.
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Page 10 The Jewish P.oridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
At Weizmann Institute
Drug Reduces Organ Damage Following Heart Attack
A promising new phar-
maceutical drug for treating
cardiovascular and inflam-
matory disease, and for use in
organ transplantation, is now
being developed following in-
itial research at the Weizmann
Institute of Science in Israel.
Utilizing recombitant-DNA
(Deoxyribonucleic acid, the
bacterial mass production of
the purified form of the human
enzyme), the drug, human
superoxide dismutase (SOD),
reduces organ damage follow-
ing a heart attack or stroke in
animals and speeds recovery
from kidney and other organ
transplants.
In humans, the drug has
markedly reduced the pain and
inflammation associated with
arthritis, the aftermath of
radiation therapy and various
traumatic injuries.
The genetically-engineered
bacterium carrying the human
DNA responsible for produc-
ing superoxide dismutase was
constructed by Professor
Yoram Groner and others at
the Weizmann Institute during
basic research into molecular
biology of Down's Syndrome, a
chromosomal disorder
associated with retardation.
Experimental quantities of
the new material have already
been distributed to the Johns
Hopkins University School of
Medicine in Baltimore and the
State University of New York
(SUNY) Downstate Medical
Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. Ap-
plication for drug approval has
been submitted to health
authorities in the United
States, and safety and efficacy
trials are already underway.
Until now, the most inten-
sive application of SOD in
human therapy has been an
anti-inflammatory drug, con-
sidered by some clinicians to
be the best such phar-
maceutical developed to date.
The natural enzyme is also
longer-lasting and free of
severe side effects.
In a second, more arcane ap-
plication, superoxide
dismutase has been found to
reduce by two-thirds the in-
cidence of lung complications
in premature babies kept on
mechanical respirators.
Due to the limited supplies of
the bovine superoxide
dismutase, its full potential in
human therapy has not yet
been realized. The initial quan-
tities of the human enzyme
produced by bacteria and
developed thanks to the joint
efforts of the Weizmann In-
stitute and Biotechnology
General, should simplify this
task as it has already provided
practically unlimited amounts
of enzymes to researchers.
The Weizmann Institute,
ranked among the top ten
Midrasha-J udaica High School
ITS NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER
Choose from classes Wednesday evenings
or Sunday mornings
Participate in Extracurricular Activities
DANCES
SOCIALS
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ISRAEL SCHOLARSHIPS PROGRAMS
ANDMORE...
For Information call the Jewish Education
Department, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County-832-2120
(Midrwh. Judaic High School ia apouorad by the Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County in cooperation with local Synagogues. The
Jewiah Community Day School and the Jewish Commanity Center.)
The Women's Division
Business and Professional
Women's Group
of the
Jewish Federation
of Palm Beach County
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NETWORKING FORUM
Giving you an opportunity to explore ways
in which Networking can benefit you
both professionally and personally
Tuesday, March 11.1986
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West Palm Beach
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includes program
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scientific research centers of
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devoted to cancer and disease
research projects.
The Institute, named in 1949
in honor of scientist-statesman
Chaim Weizmann, Israel's
first president, is an
outgrowth of the Daniel Sieff
Research Institute at Rehovot
15 years previously.
For further information
regarding the Weizmann In-
stitute's activities write the
Florida Region of the
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of
Science, 1550 NE Miami
Gardens Drive, Suite 405,
North Miami Beach, FL 33179
or telephone 940-7377 in Dade
County and 462-3722 in
Broward County.
New Chairman
NEW YORK (JTA) Josh
Weston of Montclair, N.J., presi-
dent of Automatic Data Process-
ing, has been elected chairman of
the board of the Boys Town
Jerusalem Foundation of
America. The election was an-
nounced by Joe Nakash, the
organization's president.
Rabbi Named
MADISON, Wis. (JTA) -
Rabbi Jan Murray Brahms of
Nashville has been named the
spiritual leader of Temple Beth El
in Madison.
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ANNOUNCEMENT
The nominating committee of the Joseph L. Morse
Geriatric Center informs and advises that the following
slate of officers and board of directors was submitted at the
regular January 22nd meeting of the board and will be
presented on February 23, 1986.
OFFICERS
President......................................................Bennett M. Berman
Vice President...................................................Stanley Brenner
Vice President.....................................................Norma Grabler
Vice President.........................................................Saul Kramer
Vice President........................................................Herman Stall
Treasurer.........................................................Charles Jacobson
Assistant Treasurer..........................................Nathan H. Monus
Secretary.............................................................Marlene Burns
Assistant Secretary....................................Anne Marie Kaufman
TRUSTEES:
Three-Year Term Beginning February 1986
Alec Englestein Marilyn Lampert
Heinz Eppler Robert List
Arthur Gladstone Mortimer Weiss
Two-Year Term Beginning February 1986
Sylvia Berman Myron Roberts
Herbert Ralston Dr. Albert Shapiro
Corky Ribakoff
One-Year Term Beginning February 1986
Rev. Martin Adolph Berenice Rogers
Abe Bisgaier Julius Sankin
Murray Kern Alan Shulman
Joseph Mandel Charles Singer
NEW TRUSTEES:
One-Year Term Beginning February 1986
Ralph Birnbaum H. Bert Mack
Alan Cummings Sam Mittleman
Alan D. Gordon Myron Nickman
Florence Greenberg Dorothy Rautbord
Jeanne Levy Rita Taca
Dr. Harry Lotman Alvin Zises
TRUSTEES:
Continuing to Serve by Prior Elections
Evelyn Blum Dr. Elliot Klorfein
Richard Galvin Robert Levy
Alex Gruber Bernard Plisskin
Arnold Havenick Ben Roisman
Detra Kay Dr. Ernest Weiner
Immediate Past President
Erwin H. Blonder
Respectfully submitted by the Nominating Committee,
Nathan Monus, chairman
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
Royal Palm Beach Cocktail Reception Women % mUiUm
Worker Training
A worker training meeting for the Women's Division $S65 event
was held at the home ofMarcia Shapiro on Thursday, Feb. 6. The
luncheon event, which will explore "Images of Contemporary
Jewish Women," is scheduled for Thursday, March 6 at the
Garden Club in Palm Beach.
On Thursday, Jan. 30, more than 100 people
attended the recent Royal Palm Beach
Cocktail Reception in support of the 1986
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach Coun-
ty/United Jewish Appeal campaign. In
terms of contributions and commitment, it
was the most successful event Royal Palm
Beach has ever held. "We are very pleased
with the increased involvement this year
and the inclusion of new people in our ef-
fort," said Royal Palm Beach chairman
Milton Gold.
Marcia Shapiro and Deborah Schwarzberg, co-chairs of the
Women's Division $365 event.
Alan Shulman, national vice-chairman for the United Jewish
Appeal and the guest speaker for the day's event; Milton
Gold, chairman of the Royal Palm Beach campaign; Roz
Freedman, special gifts co-chairperson; Dr. Jack Guides,
cocktail party o-chairman; Bernard Berk, special gifts co-
chairman. (Not pictured: Henry Kaufman, cocktail party co-
chairman. Other campaign cabinet members are Thelma Alk,
Syd Auspitz, Leah Berk, Maury Boehm, Irving Burten,
Michael Cohen, Samuel Cohen, Mischa Davidson, William
Deutsch, Peter Eider-Orley, Clifton Einhorn, Leon Fichman,
Dr. Joseph Goodfriend, Harry Hait, Melvin Hershenson, Dan
Jatlow, Karl Kalman, Rabbi Melvin Kieffer, Rose Landy,
Harry Lerner, Ben Lieber, Morris Lipstein, George Michaels,
Merlin Rosenbaum, Jack Ruby, Harry Seidman, Ann Shiller,
Jerome Steinmetz, Nathan Super, Harold Weiss, and Herbert
Woolf.
Leah Berk (right), the first
woman from Royal Palm
Beach to become a Lion of
Judah, joins her husband
Bernard, who presented her
with membership in the ex-
clusive Lion of Judah
category as an anniversary
present.
Netanyahu To Address Technion
Gala In Palm Beach
Ambassador Benjamin
Netanyahu, Israel's Perma-
nent Representative to the
United Nations, will be the
principal speaker at the
American Society for
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology gala dinner-dance
to be held on Sunday evening,
Feb. 16, at the Breakers Hotel
in Palm Beach. The dinner will
climax a series of national
meetings and events in Palm
Beach attended by American
Society for Technion (ATS)
leaders from throughout the
country, according to Gilbert
S. Messing, ATS Palm Beach
County Regional president.
Joan Callner Miller will be
honored at the dinner for her
outstanding leadership on
behalf of Technion and ATS.
Mrs. Miller serves as an ATS
national vice president, on its
national board of directors,
and on Technion's interna-
tional board of governors. A
member of the ATS Palm
Beach regional board, Mrs.
Miller also serves as its vice
president. She is a past reci-
pient of the prestigious Albert
Einstein Award and was nam-
ed an Honorary Fellow by
Technion in 1984.
Internationally acclaimed
Israeli actor Mike Burstyn will
entertain at the gala dinner,
which is being chaired by Palm
Beach board member Arnold
J. Hoffman.
Ambassador Samuel Lewis,
immediate past U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel, will be the
special guest speaker at
several related regional fun-
draising cocktail receptions
hosted by ATS "snowbirds"
and Palm Beachers alike to
benefit Technion, Israel's sole
comprehensive technological
university, and source of 70
percent of that nation's scien-
tific and engineering
brainpower.
For more information, con-
tact Robert Schachter, ATS
Regional director, 319
Clematis Street, No. 212,
West Palm Beach, FL 33401.
Syd Schwartz, Ethel Farro, Women's Division associate cam-
paign chairperson Marilyn Lampert, and Terri Kurit.
Martha Nadelman, Women's Division outreach vice-president
Adele Simon, and Esther Szmukler.
Event co-chairs Deborah Schwarzberg and Marcia Shapiro
were joined by guest sneaker Dr. Elizabeth Shulman and
Women's Division president Mollie Fitterman.


Fage 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986

The World Of
The Retarded
By LLOYD RESNICK
"The most common myth we
deal with is the assumption
that mental handicaps and
mental illness are the same,"
said Joyce Laird, executive
director of the Association for
Retarded Citizens (ARC) in
Palm Beach County.
"Years ago, these people
were automatically institu-
tionalized. Thankfully, we've
come to recognize that retard-
ed people can learn a great
many things and become pro-
ductive citizens in the
community."
In order to help dispel that
myth, educate and tram those
people who are mentally han-
dicapped or developmentally
disabled, and provide support
for families of the retarded,
the ARC coordinates a variety
of programming spanning in-
fancy to adulthood.
"If retardation is discovered
at or soon after birth, we start
with the infant intervention
program," said Mrs. Laird,
"where the primary focus is on
the parents. The teachers
teach the parents how to work
with the children, to stimulate
them and help them begin lear-
ning at the earliest possible
age," Laird said.
The infant intervention pro-
gram also helps parents cope
with the commonly felt grief,
denial and guilt of having
borne an "abnormal" child,
the ARC director pointed out.
Four ARC sponsored pre-
schools serving two-to-five
year olds help retarded
iroungsters maximize their
earning potential at a critical
time, helping prepare them for
public or private school place-
ment at age 5.
"Eighty percent of what a
child ever knows is learned in
the first three or four years of
life," said Laird. "We have
terrific teachers, a three to one
child/teacher ratio, and in-
dividual educational plans are
written for each child."
A visit to any ARC pre-
school will reveal caring, pa-
tient teachers working with in-
dividuals or small groups on
basic skills such as language
development, physical
therapy, self-help skills (dress-
ing, feeding, toilet training),
socialization and pre-academic
skills (shape and color
discrimination, for example).
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Joyce Laird, director of the
Association for Retarded
Citizens.
"Our pre-schools are not just
day care centers," insisted
Joyce Laird, a claim evidenced
in the fact that last year 15
children left the pre-school for
specialized programs in the
public schools. One child was
even "mainstreamed" into a
non-specialized public school
situation.
ARC social workers work
with the school system to en-
sure the proper placement of a
pre-school graduate and to
follow up on the student's
progress.
"We certainly have not
cured retardation; we are
ameliorating the situation,
though," said Laird. However,
as with most successful social
services, the demand is
greater than the supply. "We
have a monstrous waiting list
for places in the pre-school,"
Laird admitted.
In addition the ARC runs
three group homes for adults,
with one more being readied in
Delray Beach.
"People in our group homes
are basically moderately
retarded," explained Laird.
"Most attend sheltered
workshops, such as the Palm
Beach Habilitatioh Center and
the Regional Achievement
Center, during the day. There
is still a need for other types of
group homes, especially for
the severely retarded.
Hopefully, the ARC will run a
more varied array of group
homes, but for now we feel
obligated to meet the most
broadly based needs," she
added.
Resembling an immaculate
and quiet college dorm, each
group home has house-parents
in residence and a director and
two social workers working
out of the ARC office.
Residents make their own lun-
Devoted and well-trained teachers at the youngsters an early start in the process of
ARC pre-school help give retarded training and education.
:::::::*:;:::::;:*:;:-xw^
As past issues of The Jewish Floridian have suggested, the Jewish community
does not live in a vacuum, but rather as part of a larger community. Social pro-
blems which affect the community at large also affect us. This week, we will ex-
amine mental retardation, with the intention of exploding some myths and
discovering some truths. As Jews, we are neither above nor beneath the social and
health problems that affect the rest of humanity.
*:**::*:w^
ches and participate in mon-
thly democratic house
meetings. Most residents
utilize public transportation
when available.
At the co-ed Ellen
Trachtenberg group home in
West Palm Beach, 10 retarded
adults, five of whom happen to
be Jewish, live together in a
peaceful, loving atmosphere.
An early evening visitor might
see one young man watching
the news, another sitting
reading a book, and two young
women arriving home talking
about their days at work.
"We are trying to get our
residents ready for indepen-
dent living," said Jan Lord,
who, along with her husband ""** of the Eleanor Trachtenberg group home live
Steve, is a house parent at the comfort*My "<* work well together.
Trachtenberg residence, which
overprotective and afraid to
recently completed its first
year of operation.
"We emphasize skills that
everybody can do. For some,
living here forced them to do
many things for the first
time," Ms. Lord added.
"Fifty years ago, these peo-
ple would've been institu-
tionalized for life," said Steve
Lord, and he noted that in
strict economic terms, running
a group home is less expensive
per capita than running an
institution.
"One year ago, we had to
watch everybody do
everything," Jan Lord
remembered. "It took three
hours to clean the kitchen and
we had to shower with them to
show them how to wash their
hair."
"We're mom and dad, and
they're 10 teenage brothers
and sisters," explained Steve,
and his description aptly
characterized the ambience at
the home.
The Lords remembered the
attitudes of the resident's
parents when the home first
opened. They tended to be
let go of their children, some of
whom had never lived away
from home.
Yet, according to the Lords,
after only one year "eighty
percent of the parents have
done 180s. The kids have
shown the parents that they
can do many more things than
was ever imagined, including
learning to make responsible
decisions." Nevertheless,
Steve LiOrd said that many
parents of retarded
youngsters are afraid to visit
adult group homes. "I wish all
teachers and parents of retard-
ed children could see this
place. It would give them a
shot in the arm and a lot of
hope."
Every Monday, adult educa-
tion classes are offered at the
home, and residents spend the
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9


:


weekends bowling or shopp-
ing, usually as a group, but
sometimes in pairs. Once a
week, the residents practice
for Special Olympics competi-
tion, and on Wednesdays,
square dance lessons are
given.
Surprisingly little TV wat-
ching takes place. Residents
spend their precious free time
painting, hooking rugs,
reading or playing video
games.
Everyone chips in with
household chores, and duties in
the laundry room, kitchen and
bathroom are firmly schedul-
ed. At the monthly house
meetings, individual and group
problems are discussed so
nothing festers, and all group
decisions are made according
to the principle of majority
rule.
"We're very open when we
talk about retardation," said
Jan Lord. "The kids know
about the myths that so-called
normal people believe, and
each one deals with it in his
own way."
To help dispel these myths at
an early age, the ARC; spon-
sors the "Kids on the Block"
program, which, through pup-
petry, teaches county school
children that people who are
handicapped have unique
talents to offer society.
The ARC sponsors summer
camp programs, promotes
legislation to help people who
are retarded, provides
speakers for local organiza-
tions, encourages public educa-
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
tion about retardation, and
networks with other agencies
to assure complete services for
the mentally handicapped.
Education is a vitally impor-
tant part of ARC's work,
especially since, as Joyce Laird
observed, "50 percent of all
retardation can be
prevented." Of course, con-
genital conditions such as
Down's syndrome are exclud-
ed from this figure, but Mrs.
Laird insisted that alcohol and
drug abuse, venereal disease
and poor prenatal care are
responsible for almost half of
all cases of mental retardation.
Unfortunately, ARC's
educational outreach efforts in
the public schools have been
stymied by the school board's
hypersensitivitv to any issue
smacking of sexuality.
"We have made informal
presentations in health
classes, where sex per se was
not mentioned," said Laird.
"We've talked instead about
the monumental responsibility
of raising children, about
nutrition and alcoholism. But
the real answer is school
system cooperation on a state-
wide basis.'
The ARC also sends
speakers to church groups and
has been represented during
various radio programs for
young people.
For Joyce Laird, the bottom
line in terms of prevention is
that "women must be under a
doctor's care when they
pregnant."
The 16,000 retarded children
and adults in our community
whose lives have been improv-
ed through the efforts of ARC
are becoming or have already
become productive citizens.
For the thousands who remain
on waiting lists or in institu-
tions, and for the unknown
number yet to be born, there is
only hope that our local, state
and federal government, along
with the private sector, will
more generously support the
efforts of organizations such
as the ARC.
are
Retardation: The Jewish Commitment
Well-Educated and Compassionate, The Jewish Community
Has Helped Lead the Fight For Rights of the Retarded
By LLOYD RESNICK
Perhaps because the Jewish community as a
whole needs to be so concerned with its collec-
tive survival, some of the less noticeable pro-
blems that affect it are placed on the back
burner.
Such is the case with alcoholism and drug ad-
diction, as has been discussed in recent issues.
As the following story attempts to show, mental
retardation is another issue with which the
Jewish community has to grapple.
A surprisingly large percentage of the
children and adults serviced by local organiza-
tions which help retarded people are Jewish.
Equally significant is the fact that the
membership of the most active philanthropic
group in support of programs for the retarded,
Friends of the Retarded, is more than 90 per-
cent Jewish.
Asked why the Jewish community supports
programs for the retarded to such an extent,
Joyce Laird, executive director of the Associa-
tion for Retarded Citizens, hypothesized, "As a
group Jewish people tend to be better educated
and more interested in social services. Since
education has always been valued in the Jewish
community, many Jewish women of the genera-
tion that is recently-retired went into nursing or
education and acquired a sensitivity for others."
Noting that many Jewish supporters of pro-
grams for the retarded do not themselves have
handicapped children, Laird added, "Jewish
people also tend to be more philanthropic, and
when dealing with programs for the retarded,
people can readily see the tangible results of
their generous support."
Mrs. Laird noted that an abundance of retirees
with retarded children, many of them Jewish,
come to Florida expecting to find the level of
social services they were accustomed to up
north.
"When they got here, they were shocked by
the lack of services, and many become active in
stirring community interest," Laird said. "Also,
people, whether Jewish or not, tend to support
organizations that provide services they're
pleased with."
Asked the same question about the dispropor-
tionate Jewish involvement in support for the
retarded, Rose Tenzer, president of Friends of
the Retarded, said, "I can't put my finger on it,
but Jews must be more compassionate. Their
support for the retarded is analagous to their ar-
dent support for Israel and their involvement in
the civil rights struggle. They're always in there
pitching."
When Mr. and Mrs. Tenzer moved to Florida
with their retarded daughter Wendy seven
years ago, they were appalled to find the situa-
tion here so "backward.
"For instance," Mrs. Tenzer said, "in New
York, there are. so many group homes, they are
looking for kids to fill them. But in Florida, the
state is not as willing to fund such things."
When the Tenzers first moved to Florida,
Wendy lived at home and worked daily at the
Palm Beach Habilitation Center. "Before we
moved, we made sure there was a place at which
Wendy could work. At the Hab Center, she is
able to work individually, and she gets varied
assignments. The employees are paid according
to how much work they actually finish, which in-
creases their drive to work diligently."
When the Eleanor Trachtenberg group home
opened about a year ago, there were open places
for six women. Out of 30 women who were vying
for those spots, Wendy Tenzer was one of the
lucky six.
"The separation was more difficult for me
than it was for Wendy, I think," said Rose
Tenzer. "We took Wendy there on a Saturday
and didn't hear from her for over a week. We
were pretty worried until we discovered that she
was too busy and too happy to call. She loves it
there; she's with her peers and they do a lot of
things together."
"A group home is only as good as the
houseparents make it," Mrs. Tenzer added. Jan
and Steve Lord are very good with the kids; they
do a lot with them and take them many places.
A brief interview with Wendy corroborated
her mother's perception of Wendy's group home
experience.
"I like this group home," she said. "I love my
friends here and I love my houseparents.
Everybody gets along together."
Although state funding for programs for
retarded citizens is more common in New York,
all was not easy for Wendy and her family there.
"We didn't know anything about retardation,
having already had a daughter who was bright.
The doctor didn't tell us a thing when Wendy,
who has Down's syndrome, was born. After a
few months, we noticed something was different
and the doctor described her then as
'borderline.' Several doctors advised us to put
Wendy in an institution, but one doctor, Dr.
Snick, gave us hope and told us not to put her
away."
When Wendy was seven years old, the
Tenzers tried to get her into a New York public
school special program. They finally succeeded,
but only after bureaucratic struggles and com-
ments from school personnel such as, "With
children like yours, it doesn't matter if they go
to school or not."
Despite the fact that retarded children of
various levels were kept together while Wendy
learned next to nothing, when she was 16, the
school gave her a diploma and told her she had
graduated.
"But New York State law mandated that she
had to stay in school until she was 21," Rose
Tenzer recalled. "We sued the school board and
won, but we decided to put Wendy into 1
sheltered workshop situation at the time."
"Thankfully, the school systems have chang-
ed, no longer lumping everyone together," Mrs.
Tenzer added.
While still in New York, the^Tenzers and'a
small group of parents with retarded children
began looking for a location for a group Home,
but when they found a suitable location, the
Rose Tenzer, president
Friends of the Retarded.
neighbors threatened to burn the house down.
"Wherever we took her, people would stare,
but we took her everywhere, regardless," recall-
ed Mrs. Tenzer. "Nowadays, people are slowly
starting to realize that retarded people are not
going to murder their children."
In fact, before Wendy began living at the
group home, Mrs. Tenzer considered her a
"good ambassador" with regard to Wendy's
ability to enlighten neighbors.
"Most of our neighbors didn't even know what
a retarded child looked like," said Mrs. Tenzer.
"With Wendy's help, they have learned that a
retarded person is not a monster. They miss her
almost as much as I do."
Speaking *of Friends of the Retarded, Mrs.
Tenzer explained that "our group which consists
primarily of Jewish women, doesn't give money
to anyone. We pay bills. We know exactly where
the money is going."
For instance, in the last two years the Associa-
tion for Retarded Citizens had $27,000 of its ex-
penses paid for by Friends of The Retarded, in-
cluding $10,000 towards the acquisition of the
new ARC building on Australian Avenue and
$10,000 towards the purchase of furnishings for
the facility. Friends of The Retarded also gave
the Palm Beach Habilitation Center, $8,000 for
bathroom renovations.
"So far, we've been able to fulfill most of the
requests," said Mrs. Tenzer. "Our fund-raising
efforts are crucial because not much money is
forthcoming from state agencies."
Asked whether retarded Jewish youngsters
commonly participate in the practices and tradi-
tions of Judaism, Rose Tenzer admitted that in
her case, aside from lighting Shabbut Candles,
she didn't stress Jewishness in the home. Yet
she recalled an incident which indicates that
Wendy has a strong. Jewish consciousness, pro-
bably the result of the services she attended as a
child.
"We were in New York with Wendy at
Christmas time," Mrs. Tenzer recalled, "and we
were looking at the churches decorated for the
holiday. When we were about to enter one, Wen-
dy refused, saying definitively, 'I can't go in
there. I'm Jewish.' We were amazed.
Somewhere, she picked up an awareness of her
Jewish identity."
Mrs. Tenzer is of the opinion that Synagogues
and Jewish organizations could offer more
helpful programs for retarded Jews and their
families. "Retarded Jewish children should have
the opportunity to partake of Jewish things that
other Jewish children do. They can learn and
they can appreciate."
. It seems clear that retarded Jewish citizens
are,ready, willing and able to be enfranchised in-
to the-overall community. Such inclusion into
the mainstream will require mutual understan-
ding and a willingness to abandon myths and ac-
cept the truth.


*.
II
-
Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Israel Bonds Executive Cabinet Formed
The Palm Beach State of Israel Bond
Organization co-chairmen Stanley Brenner
and Robert S. Levy announced the forma-
tion of the Executive Cabinet for the 1986
season. Joining the Executive Cabinet as
associate chairmen are Jerome Tishman,
Dr. Emanuel Newmark, and Dr. Lawrence
Gorfine. The Executive Cabinet is present-
ly filling 16 positions that will comprise the
entire Cabinet. Pictured above are (stan-
ding) Jerome Tishman, Robert S. Levy and
Stanley Brenner, and (seated) Dr. Emanuel
Newmark and Dr. Lawrence Gorfine.
JTS To Honor Bockneks At Anshei Sholom
NEW YORK The Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America will host a testimonial
breakfast at 10 a.m., Feb. 16,
at Congregation Anshei
Sholom in West Palm Beach in
honor of Irma and Jack
Bocknek.
The Jewish Theological
Seminary is currently
celebrating 1Q0 years of
academic and spiritual
excellence.
The guest speaker at the
testimonial breakfast will be
Dr. Allen J. Walder, past
president of the Alumni
Association of the Jewish
Theological Seminary. The
chairman of the event is Oscar
Slutsky, and the spiritual
leader of Congregation Anshei
Sholom is Rabbi Isaac Vander
Walde.
Since their arrival! at Cen-
tury Village in 1973, Jack and
Irma Bocknek have been loyal
members of Congregation An-
shei Sholom. Jack Bocknek has
been a member of Anshei
Sholom's Board of Trustees
for 10 years, serving as
secretary of its Men's Club
since its inception. He has
been recording secretary of
the congregation for seven
years, and was associate editor
of the Shofar for three years,
becoming editor in 1978. Irma
Bocknek is a life member of
Anshei Sholom's Sisterhood
and has served as chairman of
several committees.
Both the Bockneks are in-
volved in numerous charitable
organizatioons at Century
Village. They are being
honored for their deep commit-
ment to the Jewish community
and for helping the Jewish
Theological Seminary secure a
second century of Conser-
vative Judaism.
Drive\For West Point Jewish Chapel
With nearly 90 percent of
the total funds in hand, the
West Point Jewish Chapel
Fund is embarking on a
vigorous effort in early 1986 to
retire the Chapel Fund's re-
maining debt.
A total of $1.5 million is
needed to complete funding.
All funds for building the
Jewish house of worship were
raised through private dona-
tions. It is the intention of the
West Point Jewish Chapel
Fund to present the chapel as
a gift to the military academy.
The West Point Jewish
Chapel, under the direction of
the first military Jewish
Chaplain assigned to West
Point Chaplain (Lt. Col.)
Marc A. Abramowitz has
been serving the academy's
Jewish community since the
Spring of 1984.
The Chapel's gallery holds
exhibitions to educate and
enlighten non-Jewish cadets
and visitors to the academy on
Jewish customs and traditions
and the contribution Jewish
Americans have made to U.S.
defense, statesmanship and
overall way of life.
With 2.5 million visitors to
West Point, annually, the
Jewish Chapel is likely to
become the most visited
Jewish site in the nation.
For more information regar-
ding the West Point Jewish
Chapel Fund please write to:
The West Point Jewish Chapel
Fund, 100 Merrick Road,
Rockville Centre, NY 11570.
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Dorothy Rautbord (left), president of the Palm Beach Round
Table, has been named chairman of the fifth annual Palm
Beach reception in behalf of Bar-Ilan University in Ramat
Gan, Israel, it was announced this week by Mrs. Jane Stern,
President of the University's American Board of Overseers.
The cocktail reception will take place Thursday, March 6, at
5:30 p.m. in the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum and will
honor Lee Lavitt. New York and Palm Beach philanthropist
and a national leader of Bar-Ilan activities. Mrs. Diane Belfer
(right) will serve as co-chairman. Proceeds of the reception
will advance the academic program at Bar-Ilan, Israel's only
institution of higher learning that combines secular studies
with Judaic courses as a requirement of graduation.
JCC Basketball Update
8-man squad broke into the
scoring column. For Green,
Steve Cripps scored 23 and
Bob Bloom added 10.
Results: Jan. 26.
.. .And then there were
none. Blue (3-1) fell from the
ranks of the undefeated, suf-
fering their first loss as Gold
(2-2) Ted all the way in a 57-42
win. Mark Page led the Gold
with 18 points as all nine
players broke into the scoring
column. Steve Schwarzberg
added 12 and Ira Hubschman
scored 8 points. Don Lambe
and Jeff Penner scored 12 each
and Al Jerome 11 in a losing
cause.
Red (3-1) moved into a first
place tie with Blue by
defeating Green (0-4) 51-34.
Dave Jacobson had 16 points,
Elliot Berman had 10 points,
Neil Jagolinzer scored 8 points
and Stuart Gottlieb hit for 7
points, leading a balanced
scoring attack. Green scoring
leaders were Artie Falk, 13
points, Mike Brozost, 12 points
and Joel Levine, 8 points.
Games are played on Sunday
mornings 10 and 11 a.m. at the
Boy's Club of the Palm
Beaches, 1188 Marine Dr.,
West Palm Beach, and spec-
tators are welcome (no
charge). The league features a
double Round Robin schedule
followed by playoffs. The
league champion will be the
winner of the playoffs, and
they will play, the winner at the
Boca Raton JCC Men's League
for the champidnship of Palm
Beach County.
Thirty-four "young" men
have joined together to form
the JCC's version of the NBA.
In December this group met to
workout and tryout and on
Jan. 5 the teams began to play.
Results Jan. 5: Red 64,
Green 45; Blue 56, Gold 50.
High scorers: Red: David
Jacobson 23, Mike Mitchum
12, Mel Grant 10. Green: Joel
Levine 17, Steve Cripps 13.
Blue: Marty Colin 14, Gary
Gerson 13, Jeff Penner 10.
Gold: Mark Page 24, Herman
Sakowitz 10.
Results Jan. 12: Blue 47,
Green 42; Red 56, Gold 40.
High scorers: Blue: Gary
Gerson 16, Jeff Penner 12, Al
Jerome 8. Green: Steve Cripps
15, Bob Bloom 8. Red: David
Jacobson 17, Mel Grant 10,
Mike Mitchum 10. Gold: Her-
man Sakowitz 16, Ira
Hubschman 6.
Results Jan. 19: The first
game of the day featured the
battle of the unbeatens. Both
Blue and Red entered with 2-0
records. The final score was
not indicative of the closeness
of the contest as Blue won
52-39. Jeff Penner led the way
for Blue scoring 14 points; Al
Jerome had 13 and Gary Ger-
son scored 10. For Red, Mel
Grant topped all scorers with
21.
A balanced scoring attack
led by Steve Schwarzberg (14
points) was the difference as
Gold defeated Green 51-16 for
their first win of the season.
Bob Gleiber added 8 points and
Mike Berry had 6 as the entire
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
NJCRAC To Hold 40th Plenum
Four representatives of the
[Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County's Community
Relations Council will join
[delegates of 112 local and 11
national Jewish community
relations agencies in ar-
ticulating American Jewry's
public affairs agenda for
1986-87 when the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council holds its
40th annual Plenary Session at
New York City's Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel, Feb. 16-19,
CRC chairman Helen Hoffman
announced recently.
Along with Mrs. Hoffman,
local participants at the
NJCRAC Plenum will include
Shirlee Blonder, Lester Gold
and CRC director Rabbi Alan
R. Sherman.
"The heart of the NJCRAC
Plenum," said Mrs. Hoffman,
"is joining with other local
CRC and national agency
leaders to identify and
evaluate significant trends and
issues we expect will effect our
community during the next 18
months. The Plenum sessions
will help us develop a consen-
sus on joint policies and
JCC News
AUDITION NOTICE
An invitation is extended to people of all ages who do
variety acts, music, dance, mime, acrobatics, etc. to offer
their talents. Come to the Jewish Community Center, 2415
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, Tuesday, Feb. 25 at 7
p.m. and Monday, March 3 at 1 p.m. to audition.
The show will be presented Sunday, April 13 at the
Center's Spring Festival to be held at Camp Shalom
(Belvedere Rd., one mile west of the Turnpike) starting at 1
p.m. The Festival will include a Youth Circus, Carnival
Booths, Cafe Coffee House which will serve food and live
entertainment.
Prizes will be awarded. Performers must provide their
own accompaniment.
For additional information, please call 689-7700.
WOMEN'S DAY 1986
Michelle Schweiger, chairperson of the Jewish Communi-
ty Center's Sixth Annual Women's Day, announced that it
will be held Sunday, March 9 at Camp Shalom (Belvedere
Rd. one mile west of the Turnpike) and is entitled "Expres-
sions '86."
It will be a day of creative options for all women who
want to try something different. Workshops will be offered
in batik, pottery, stained glass, basketry, quilting, weaving
and much more. Artistic talent not necessary.
The call is out for all female artisans who wish to display
and sell their work for this day.
Jewish women's organizations are invited to co-sponsor
this event.
To be certain to receive a brochure giving full details plus
any additional information, please call 689-7700.
SAT SPRING COURSE
Registration is now being accepted at the Jewish Com-
munity Center for the SAT course in preparation for the
May 3 exam. The first class will be held Tuesday, March 18
and will be on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7-9 p.m.
The course is conductd by the Irwin W. Katz Educational
Consultants and runs for 20 hours.
The fee which includes materials is $120 for JCC
members and $175 for non-members.
For registration form please call 689-7700.
SPECIAL SINGLE'S ONEG SHABBAT
Ron Warren and Ned Goldberg have extended an invita-
tion to Singles from the 20's through the 40's to enjoy a
special Oneg Shabbat, Friday, Feb. 21 at 9:30 p.m. at Ned
Goldberg's home after attending the Temple of your
choice.
For directions please call Ann at the JCC office
689-7700.
YOUNG SINGLES
TO ENJOY A PRINCE'S SPORT
The Young Singles (22-38) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet Sunday, Feb. 16 at 1:30 p.m. for a picnic
lunch. Bring blanket and view the horse show and polo
match at the Polo Grounds. Go west on Forest Hill towards
Wellington. Just pass 441, turn left onto Shore Blvd. about
two miles on the left is the stadium. Meet Alan Bernstein,
host for the day, at the East Grandstand at the far side of
the field. Parking is $2 to $3. Donation: $4.
A TIME TO RELAX
The Young Singles of the Jewish Community Center will
meet Thursday, Feb. 20 at 5 p.m. for the Happy Hour at
the "Speakeasy" on Flagler Dr., about one mile north of
Okeechobee Blvd. Hostess Kathy Miller will be on hand to
greet all.
YOUNG SINGLES BIG PARTY
The Young Singles of the Jewish Community Center ex-
tend an invitation to their "Big Party of the Month" at the
home of Joel Tanen Saturday, Feb. 22 starting at 9 p.m.
strategies we can all use to
maintain and improve Jewish
security at home and abroad."
Among noted experts
scheduled to provide perspec-
tives on current international
and domestic developments
during the four-day Plenum
will be His Excellency Meir
Rosenne, Israel's Ambassador
to the United States, and
Lawrence S. Eagleburger,
former U.S. Under Secretary
of State. They will provide
candid analyses of "The
United States, Israel and the
Peace Process."
U.S. Congressman William
Gray, III, chair of the House
Budget Committee, and Rep.
Newt Gingrich, a leading con-
servative spokesperson, will
join Robert J. Samuelson,
Newsweek magazine economics
columnist, in a panel discus-
sion about "America's Na-
tional Priorities: Are Social
and Fiscal Responsibility Com-
patible?" They will take a hard
look at soaring federal deficits
and the urgent needs of our
country's disadvantaged.
"Post-Summit Prospects for
Soviet Jewry" will be forecast
Enjoy pleasant company, open bar and a fun atmosphere.
Hosts for the evening are Joel Tanen, Eva Kornberg, Alan
Bernstein and Marlene Zeltzer. Donation: $4.
Please call Eva at 832-5157 to RSVP and get directions.
THE PARTY WITH "HEART"
The Single Pursuits (38-58) of the Jewish Community
Center "Party of the Month," entitled "You Gotta Have
Heart," will be held Sunday, Feb. 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the
home of Stella Monchik.
This is an opportunity to use one's imagination and dress
with heart! Stella's special chili will be served. There will be
games and fun for all. Hostesses: Cecy Zivow and Roslyn
Chudow. Donation: $7. Call 689-7700 for reservation and
directions. Mail check to P.O. Box 3666, West Palm Beach
33402.
SINGLES PURSUITS GO "HAPPY"
Thursday, Feb. 20, from 5-7 p.m., the Single Pursuits
of the Jewish Community Center will meet at the New
Parker's Lighthouse at the new Harbour Shoppes Shopp-
ing Center on PGA Blvd. and Prosperity Farms Road,
Hostess: Barbara Prince. Donation: $1 for the tip.
SINGLES SHABBAT SERVICE
On Friday, Feb. 21, the Single Pursuits of the Jewish
Community Center will be greeted by Stella Monchik at
Shabbat Services at Temple Israel, 1901 No. Flagler Dr.
Services start at 8 p.m. All are welcome.
SUNDAY BRUNCH
The Single Pursuits of the Jewish Community Center
will get together for brunch, Sunday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m. at
Toojay's in Loehmann's Plaza.
by Morris Abram, chair of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, and Professor Seweryn
Bialer, noted Soviet expert
and director of Columbia
University's Research In-
stitute for International
Change.
Assessing "The Jewish Con-
nection to the Urban Agenda"
will be New York's Mayor Ed-
ward I. Koch and Jerry
Abramson, Mayor of
Louisville, Kentucky, and a
former chair of his com-
munity's JCRC.
In addition to these formal
sessions, NJCRAC Plenum
forums will focus on church-
state separation, Kahaneism,
Ethiopian Jewry, anti-
Semitism, Catholic-Jewish and
Protestant-Jewish relations,
and cult and missionary
activities.
Among the speakers
scheduled to address the
forums are author Charles
Silberman, Rabbi Arthur Hert-
zberg, State Department
Deputy Assistant Secretary
Princeton Lyman, Yale Law
School professor Abraham
Goldstein, and National Coun-
cil of Churches' official Dean
Kelley.
CRC lay leaders and profes-
sionals will also lead a series of
workshops to share successful
community relations program
planning ideas and technk
Topics to be covered inc^
establishing relationships wil
the media, working with state
legislative offices, and organiz-
ing public relations^eampaigns
to increase CRC'ywbgity. ..
Morton S. Burriipfciar of the -
United Jewish Federation of
MetroWest (N-J.) Community
Relations Committee, and
Peggy Tishman, president of
NewYork City's JewWr Com-
munity Relationaafiolpihcil, are
co-chairs of the l985 Plenum
Program Committee.
The NJCRAC is the na-
tional coordinating body* for
the field of Jewish community
relations in the United States.
For A Minimum Of Only $2,000
AN ISRAEL BOND FOR YOUR I.R.A.
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annually in your Individual Retirement Account, your IRA
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at the same time give you an attractive annual return.
You can now purchase an Israel Bond of the Individual Varia-
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$2,000, or integral multiples of $2,000.
This Israel Bond offers an attractive interest ratea minimum
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Your investment in an IVRI Bond for your IRA works for you
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This is not an offering. For additional information and a pros-
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Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 -Thru March 3t 1986
(305)6864611


Page 16___The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986

- - Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title III of the Older Americans Act, provides
transportation to persons 60 years or older, who do not drive
or cannot use the public transportation system, serves Hot
Kosher meals in a croup setting, delivers Kosher meals to
homebound persons and offers daily educational and recrea-
tional programs. Call 689-7703 for further information.
KOSHER MEALS
Every day at the Hot
Kosher Lunch Program at the
JCC you can find seniors doing
everything from sharing ideas,
taking a vital interest in cur-
rent events to listening to
classical music. The center is
open for lunch Monday
through Friday and there is no
set fee. Participants are en-
couraged to make a contribu-
tion at each meal. Daily
transportation is available by
advanced reservation. Please
come. Call Carol or Lillian at
689-7703 for information and
reservations.
Monday, Feb. 17 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Feb. 18 "Exer-
cising in a Light Way"
Wednesday, Feb. 19 Drs.
Cetty and Bradley
Weiss, "Chiropractic
Physicians"
Thursday, Feb. 20 "Cur-
rent Events with Rose
Dunsky"
Friday, Feb. 21 Dr. Mark
Libow "Cardiologist"
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Palm Beach County School
Board Adult Education
Classes
Weight Control and Nutri-
tion "The Gangs Weigh,"
Tuesday, 1:30 p.m. Arthur
Gang, Instructor.
This class is filled. Please
call 689-7703 to be put on a
waiting list.
Stress and Your Life
Thursday, 1:30 p.m. Joyce
Hogan, Instructor
Learn how to cope with
everyday stress and improve
your health and sense of well-
being. Class is open. No pre-
registraton is necessary.
Writers Workshop
Fridays, 1:30 p.m. Ruth
Graham, Instructor
A most stimulating class for
persons interested in learning
how to express themselves.
Class is still open. Please call
for information.
There are no set fees for
the above classes. Par-
ticipants are asked to make a
contribution.
OTHER JCC
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series Wednesdays, 1:45
p.m. Alfred Parsont,
. Instructor
The class runs for five
weeks. There is a $12 fee for
JCC members and $15 for non-
members. New series begins
Feb. 12. Call the center for in-
formation regarding new
series.
The above class requires
advance registration. Please
call 689-7703 for further in-
formation and/or
registration.
Speakers Club Mondays,
2:30 p.m. Frances Sperber,
president
Learn the art of public
speaking.
Timely Topics/Round Table
Discussion Mondays, 2:15
p.m. Leader: Member of the
group
Open discussion of NEWS
and VIEWS. Everyone is
invited.
Second Tuesday Council
First Tuesday of Each Month,
2 p.m. Sabina Gottschalk,
chairperson
A great planning group.
Call Nina at 689-7703 for
information.
AT YOUR SERVICE
Every Thursday afternoon,
at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, represen-
tatives of different agencies
will be "at your service." We
invite you to stop in and com-
municate on a one-to-one basis
with our visiting agency
representatives.
Feb. 13: Senior Employ-
ment Service and Senior
Aides-The National Council
of Senior Citizens An op-
portunity for senior adults to
obtain employment. No fee
required.
Feb. 20: Health Insurance
Assistance Edie Reiter
assists persons with filling out
insurance forms and answers
questions.
Feb. 27: Retired Senior
Volunteer Program
Become A RSVP volunteer.
An opportunity to learn how to
become part of the national
volunteer organization..
AARP Tax Counseling for
The elederly Available
every Tuesday from Feb. 4 up
to April 15. If you need help
with your 1985 Tax Returns,
stop in at the JCC between 2
and 4 p.m. There is no fee.
THE JCC FIRST
TUESDAY COUNCIL
PRESENTS:
Lunch and Card Party at the
Oriental Express, Tuesday,
Feb. 25, noon, $8 includes
transportation.
Reservation and checks
should be made by Feb. 4.
Call Sabina Gottschalk at
683-0852 or Nina at the JCC at
689-7703.
LIDO SPA
GET-A-WAY
Our spring Get-A-Way
to
Lido Spa in Miami Beach, for
four days and three nights will
take place April 6 to April 9.
Fees will include transporta-
tion to and from Miami. Three
gourmet meals daily (diet or
regular) Health lectures by
Dieticians; massages, special
nightly entertainment group
card parties, steam sauna,
whirlpool and much more. Call
Nina at 689-7703 for informa-
tion and/or reservations.
Seniors Enjoy Stretchercize Activity
By JEAN Rl BIN
Shirley Fein Sheriff, MS
Health Educator and Geriatric
Specialist of Richfield, Conn.,
came to the JCC Senior Center
one day and asked if she could
introduce a new program call-
ed "More Life in Your Years."
For the last month and a half
each Tuesday at 11 a.m. Ms.
Sheriff presented to our
Kosher meal participants a
holistic health education pro-
gram which she has created
herself. It consists of mild
stretching, yoga type
movements, incorporating
deep breathing methods and
que of energy and concen-
tration. "The exercise they
love the most" said Mrs.
Sheriff "is the deep breathing
and the exclamation of
"Shalom.* "
The last 15 minutes of each
session has included health
topics that are specifically
geared for seniors, such as
patient-doctor relationships,
stress management and rights
of Medicare and Medicare
patients.
Ms. Sheriff added that the
group was reticent to become
involved at the beginning due
joined in. As they stood at
their tables, they exercised
and began to feel the reaction
of body and mind.
Shirley Sheriffs understan-
ding and empathy for older
adults as well as her fine pro-
fessional background as a
recreational therapist and
Health Educator at The
Hospital and Home for the Ag-
ed in New York City certainly
have been so evident at the
JCC these last few weeks.
How lucky we are that this
lady selected the JCC and
volunteered to share her
knowledge with us. Our older
to lack of space in the JCC din-
relaxation. Our older adults m8 room, some still prefer not adults have certainly benefited
are experiencing body and t participate, but at each ses- from her expertise and
mind relaxation by the techni- s>on more and more persons experience.
Soviet Activist Arrives In Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Yasha Gorodetzky, a Len-
ingrad mathematician and a
leading aliya activist for the
past six years, arrived here
last week from Vienna with his
wife and family. He is the se-
cond prominent Jewish ac-
tivist allowed to leave the
Soviet Union in less than two
weeks. Eliahu (Ilya) Essas,
also a mathematician, arrived
in Israel with his family Jan.
22.
Gorodetzky, 40, accom-
panied by his wife, Pauline, 37,
their four-year-old daughter,
and his wife's mother, told
reporters he did not know why
he was suddenly granted an
exit visa after years of being
denied one. He said it could
herald a change of Soviet
policy toward Jewish emigra-
tion, or it could be a "miracle."
"Jewish history is embellish-
ed by many miracles and I am
one of these, if only a very
small one," he said. He has
been, in recent years, a central
figure in the Soviet Jewry
movement. An outspoken
Zionist since 1980, he was
denied an exit visa in 1983. He
was placed under house arrest
for a time by the KGB on
suspicion he was a spy for
Israel. He was never
imprisoned.
Unlike Essas, a self-taught
Orthodox Jew who headed a
Jewish religious revivalist
movement in the USSR before
coming to Israel, Gorodetzky
is not observant. Nevertheless,
he supported Essas' demands
that Jews in the Soviet Union
be allowed to study Torah.
Other recent emigrants have
described both men as
charismatic figures and sug-
gested the Soviet authorities
granted them visas to be rid of
them because of their con-
siderable influence and in-
spiration to the aliya
movement.
Gorodetzky said he fought
for the right of Soviet Jews to
emigrate to Israel as an act of
repatriation rather than on
grounds of family reunifica-
tion, the only grounds the
Soviets officially recognize
when they grant visas.
Rabbi Takes Pulpit
WORCESTER, Mass. (JTA)
Rabbi Seth Levin Bernstein
assumes the pulpit of Temple
Sinai in March, succeeding Rabbi
Gary Glickstein. Bernstein has
served as associate rabbi at Con-
gregation Rodeph Shalom in New
York.
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
ADL Publishes Report On Holocaust Revisionism
Despite recent setbacks,
Holocaust "revisionism"
the pseudo-scholarly move-
ment that denies tha reality of
the Nazi mass murder of Jews
is still being used as a major
anti-Semitic and anti-Israel
propaganda weapon by ex-
tremists both here and abroad,
according to a report made
public this week by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Titled "Holocaust 'Revi-
sionism': A Denial of History,"
the report was made public at
a closing session of the
League's National Executive
Committee meeting here at
The Breakers Hotel.
In issuing the report to the
Jewish community leaders
gathered for the agency's
policymaking sessions,
Seymour Reich, chairman of
the ADL's Civil Rights Com-
mittee, said the "revisionists,"
in trying to "prove" that the
evidence of Hitler's mass
murder of Jews was falsified
and that the extermination
policy itself was a myth, have
three goals: undermining the
"moral legitimacy" of Israel;
whitewashing Hitler and Nazi
Germany; and perpetuating
anti-Semitism. Their pro-
paganda insists, he said, that
millions of Jews were not
systematically killed but in-
stead died in far fewer
numbers from disease, star-
vation and wartime fighting.
The ADL report named the
so-called Institue for Historical
Review, based in California, as
the leading American
purveyor of Holocaust denial
materials, including books,
video cassettes and even a
bumper sticker that reads,
"Nazi Gassings: A Myth?"
The Institute continues to
operate, according to the
report, despite (1) a court-
approved settlement of a
lawsuit brought by Auschwitz
survivor Mel Mermelstein who
claimed and received $50,000
that the IHR had offered for
"proof of Nazi genocide, plus
$40,000 damages (2) a fire at
the Instituted offices that
hampered its operations and
(3) rejection of its pseudo-
scientific theories by
legitimate scholars it has
sought to influence.
In addition to the Institute's
setbacks, the League noted the
conviction of two Holocaust
denial propagandists in
Canada James Keegstra, an
Alberta high school teacher
who was dismissed after
teaching that the Holocaust
was a hoax, and Ernst Christof
Friedrich Zundel of Toronto,
author of The Hitler We Loved
And Why both under that
country's laws covering the
distribution of hate materials.
Nevertheless, ADL said, the
"revisionists" scored some
propaganda gains. Writers
and promoters of scurrilous
1985 UJA Campaign
Reaches $637 Million
Turning to
paign, Grass
the 1986 Cam-
reported that
NEW YORK (JTA) Alex explained that a special opera-
Grass, national chairman of tional plan was being
the United Jewish Appeal, developed by a task force eight major gifts events under
reported that as of January 16, headed by UJA National Pro- UJA auspices have taken place
the 1985 Campaign has raised ject Renewal chairperson Jane which involved over 1,200 peo-
Sherman to raise $65 million
a total of $637 million com-
pared to $585.9 million pledg-
ed by the same donors last
year. This is a dollar gain of
$51.1 million and a card-for-
card increase of 8.7 percent.
Grass said he anticipated that
the 1985 Regular Campaign
would conclude with $660
million.
"Adding the amounts raised
by Operation Moses and Pro-
ject Renewal," he continued,
"will bring us to approximate-
ly $735 million. This will be a
tremendous achievement and I
am indebted to national and
community leaders for their
outstanding efforts."
Reporting on Project
Renewal, Grass stated that
$163.1 million has been raised
through December 31, in-
cluding $10 million pledged
during the 1985 Campaign. He
raise
that would complete the cur-
rent financial requirements
needed for the inhabitants of
Israel's distressed
neighborhoods.
pie from 60 communities.
Pledges came to $51.8 million,
a 22 percent increase and a
gain updof $9.3 million over
the amounts pledged by the
same donors in 1985.
Media Center
Continued from Pate 3
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Wed April 23-Thure May 1
Cantor
Lawrence Tuchinsky
and the Nadd Choir
Services Sedarim
Dr. Chaim
Israel Etrog
will ofer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday
EOenvtle. Newark 12428
Hotel 914-647-6000
800447-6000
See Your Travel Agent
Cantor Rosenbaum has pro-
cured software which already
constitutes an extensive
library of materials.
"Our library includes the
three most popular and ver-
satile educational media for-
mats," said Rosenbaum.
"Slides with audio cassettes,
filmstrips with audio cassettes,
and VHS videotapes were
chosen because they are effec-
tive and user-friendly audio-
visual aids."
Cantor Rosenbaum pointed
out that workshops to train
teachers and others on the use
of the hardware will be held in
the near future. Only those
certified after completing the
workshops will be allowed to
sign-out hardware.
A simple sign-out system
will be used to keep track of
both hardware and software
materials.
"Our media library catalog is
available at the Federation of-
fice," Rosenbaum continued.
"One can see that we have
tried to cover every facet of
Jewish life, including holidays,
life in Israel, Jewish history
and related theatrical films
such as Exodus, Masada, and
The Diary of Anne Frank."
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, affirming
its commitment to Jewish
education, allocated an initial
sum of $15,000 to establish the
Media Center.
For more information about
the Media Center or the Open
House on Feb. 16, please call
Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum at
the Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
anti-Semitic falsehoods were
accepted in court and in print
as "experts" and Zundel
declared after his conviction:
"I got a million dollars worth
of publicity for my cause."
Holocaust "revisionist" pro-
paganda has been generated in
a variety of ways, according to
the report. These include:
The appearance by Arthur
Butz, a Northwestern Univer-
sity engineering professor and
author of The Hoax of the
Twentieth Century, as a
featured speaker at the 1985
Nation of Islam convention in
Chicago organized by anti-
Semitic Black Muslim leader
Louis Farrakhan.
Rightwing extremist
groups, including neo-Nazis
and Ku Klux Klan organiza-
tions, which distribute such
"revisionist" works as Did Six
Million Really Die? and The
Auschwitz Lie.
"Revisionist" video casset-
tes, including "Tour of
Auschwitz Fakes," promoted
in ads appearing in The
Spotlight, the publication of
the far rightwing,
Washington, D.C., based
Liberty Lobby.
Holocaust denial promoted
through two computerized
hate networks developed by
Louis Beam, who has been ac-
tive in the Ku Klux Klan and
Aryan Nations, and George
Dietz, a onetime Hitler Youth
member in Germany who runs
Liberty Bell Publications,
known for its anti-Semitic pro-
paganda materials.
Eastern European emigre
activists who wage campaigns
to undermine the U.S. Justice
Department program to
denaturalize and deport
suspected Nazi war criminals.
One Eastern European emigre
leader testified that Jewish
Holocaust survivor witnesses
were "pathological liars."
The world Muslim Con-
gress, a U.N. Non-
Governmental Organization"
which is funded by Saudi
Arabia, has distributed
Holocaust denial materials
worldwide, including The Six
Million Reconsidered by
William Grimstad, a former
registered foreign agent for
the Saudis. The materials were
sent to members of the U.S.
Congress and the British
Parliament.
Distribution of "revi-
sionist" materials in England
by The Spearhead, the neo-
Fascist publication edited by
John Tyndall, leader of the
racist British National Party;
and in West Germany by neo-
Nazis, including convicted ter-
rorist Manfred Roeder.
Soviet anti-Jewish pro-
pagandists who, with govern-
ment support, deliberately ig-
nore the fact that Jews were
the chief victims of the
Holocaust and spread the
falsehood that there was
"Zionist-Nazi collaboration" in
the mass murder of Jews.
The ADL report pointed out
although the "revisionist"
movement continues to
operate, a greater public
awareness of the Holocaust
has developed in recent years
through film and TV
documentaries, the increased
use of Holocaust educational
materials in schools, libraries
and churches, the publicity
surrounding legal actions
against Nazi war criminals,
the work of the U.S. Commis-
sion on the Holocaust, and ex-
panded Holocaust research
such as that provided by
ADL's International Center
for Holocaust Studies.
"Despite such increased
public awareness," the report
declared, "there are still many
people whose knowledge about
this period is minimal. Others
find the topic irrelevant. Still
others claim it is being
overemphasized ... Although
the informed public surely
looks upon Holocaust-denial
propaganda in the same way it
views Nazism... it is ig-
norance and apathy which pro-
vide hope for those who
engage in such falsehood."
The report concluded that as
the "advance of time places
the events of the Hitler era
further into the past, effective
education about its painful
lessons becomes ever more
essential."
The ADL report was
prepared by the Research
Department of the agency's
Civil Rights Division.
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I
T
I
Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Ellis Island and The American Dream
Continued from Page 1
I knew I had to leave. Also, if I
had stayed I would have had to
serve in the Russian Army; I
was glad to be able to get out
while the going was good."
Brandes left on a cold
November day in a small boat
which would eventually take
him to the large vessel, The
Mauritania.
"The seas were very rough,
and the chairs in that small
boat were flying all over," he
recalled. "I wrote a note, put it
in a bottle and threw it in the
water just in case I didn't
make it"
But once on the Mauritania,
Brandes said, the trip was
calm and beautiful, a preview
of what he expected life in
America to be.
Upon arrival at Ellis Island,
all the passengers were ex-
amined carefully by doctors.
Brandes found the immigra-
tion officials to be very helpful
and gentle, and his sister pick-
ed him up and he was taken to
her spartan accommodations
near Bleeker Street.
Having worked in the then-
nascent field of photographic
grocessing while in Russia,
randes found work for three
dollars a week in a
photography studio on Avenue
Often working late into the
night to finish the painstaking
process of printing photos for
wealthy and demanding
clients, Brandes said the
techniques back then were
quite primitive.
"The paper was so very
slow," he recalled. "We had to
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annual STOOL examination, as re-
cently shown on CBS-TV
SEND for this stool kit, follow the
easy instructions and return the
specimens in return envelope sup-
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is a licensed medically supervised
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00 YOURSELF A FAVOR
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use natural sunlight in order to
expose the photo, and we
spent a lot of time on the roof
of the building. If it was over-
cast or rainy, we couldn't work
and of course we didn't get
paid."
Since he received no formal
schooling in Russia, Brandes
ardently pursued the educa-
tional opportunities offered in
New York, enrolling in the
Harlem Evening High School
and learning English and math
with little problem.
With dreams of becoming an
engineer, Brandes enrolled in
Cooper Union College, atten-
ding classes for two years
before being forced to drop out
because of the necessity of
working to support himself
and his family.
A stint in the U.S. Army
during World War I found
Brandes stationed in Marion,
Georgia. His company was
preparing to go overseas when
the Armistice was declared.
"Needless to say, I was hap-
py," he said.
Brandes' career expanded
when he returned to New
York, and his wages improved.
Working for a company which
became National Studios,
Brandes helped produce stills
and enlargements for major
movie studios for use in
publicity and set designs. He
married the woman with
whom he shared the next 50
years of his life and stayed in
New York until retiring in
1958. After the death of his
wife, Brandes began wintering
in Florida, and after remarry-
ing, he purchased a con-
dominium in 1977.
Brandes admits that, even
while in Russia, he wasn't
steeped in Jewish traditions or
studies.
"I had many friends in
Russia who were not Jewish,"
Brandes recalled, "but when I
first got to New York, I lived
in a neighborhood brimming
with Russian Jews. My father
was very religious; he was
very proud that my b'ris occur-
red on Yom Kippur in
1893."
Although David Brandes
didn't find American streets
paved with gold as he and
many other immigrants ex-
pected, his story is certainly
one of the more happy ones.
More important than pro-
sperity, however, European
immigrants coming to
America at the turn of the cen-
tury found freedom
religious, educational, and
economic freedom that
allowed and encouraged them
to contribute to the foundation
of the most powerful and
secure democracy in the
modern world.
The Jewish community of
Palm Beach County will salute
these pioneers, our ancestors,
at the 1986 Community Dinner
Dance.
To make a reservation or to
obtain more information about
this exciting event, please call
the Federation office at
832-2120.
Pictured at the recent Congregation Anshei Sholom Israel
Bond Testimonial are (loft to right) Rabbi Vander Walde,
Mona Radonsky, and honoree AI Radonsky receiving the City
of Peace Award from the State of Israel.
On Wednesday, January 22nd, 100 members of the Sisterhood
of the Lake Worth Jewish Center attended a luncheon,
fashion show and card party at the Wellington Country Club.
The luncheon was arranged by Ruth Beilin, chairman of
Fund-Raising for the Sisterhood, and her able associate,
Mary Gootblatt, Rhoda Winters is Sisterhood president. Pic-
tured above are Cynthia Mashioff, financial secretary for the
congregation, and Rhoda Winters, Sisterhood president.
Religious Directory
CONSERVATIVE
CENTRAL CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE OF THE PALM
BEACHES: Services held Friday 8:15 p.m. and Saturday 9:30
am. at The Jewish Community Day School, 5801 Parker Ave.,
West Palm Beach. Mailing address: 5737 Okeechobee Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33409. Phone 478-2922. Rabbi Howard J. Hirsch,
Hazzan Israel Barzak.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI SHOLOM: 5348 Grove Street,
West Palm Beach 33409. Phone 684-3212. Rabbi Isaac Vander
Walde. Cantor Mordecai Spektor. Daily: 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Friday: 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and a late service at 8:15 p.m., followed
by Oneg Shabbat. Saturday: 8:30 am., 5 p.m., Mincha followed by
Sholosh Suedos.
CONGREGATION BETH KODESH OF BOYNTON BEACH:
501 N.E. 26 Avenue, Boynton Beach 33435. Phone 586-9428.
Rabbi Avrom L. Drazin, Cantor Abraham Koster. Monday 8:30
am.; Thursday 8:30 am. Sabbath services, Friday 8:15 p.m.,
Saturday 9 am.
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE: 1470 Golden Lakes Blvd., West
Palm Beach 33411. Phone 689-9430. Rabbi Joseph Speiser. Daily
services 8:15 am. Evening services daily. Call the temple for
times. Sabbath services Friday 8:15 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m., 5 p.m.,
Mincha followed by Sholosh Suedos.
LAKE WORTH JEWISH CENTER: Dillman Road Free
Methodist Church, 6513 Dillman Road, West Palm Beach 33406.
Phone 478-4720. Rabbi Richard K. Rocklin. President Murray
Milrod, 965-6053. Services Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID: 4667 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens
33418. Phone 694-2350. Rabbi William Marder, Cantor Earl J.
Backoff. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10 am.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 2815 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-0339. Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Sabbath services
Friday 8:15 p.m., Saturday 9:30 a.m. Daily Minyan 8:15 am.,
Sunday and legal holidays 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 315 N. "A" Street, Lake Worth
33460. Phone 585-5020. Rabbi Emanuel Eisenberg. Cantor
Howard Dardashti. Services dairy 8:30 am. Friday evening 8:15
p.m., Saturday 9 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM: 224 N.W. Avenue G, Belle Glade
33430. Sabbath services Friday, 8:30 p.m. Phone 996-3886.
TEMPLE BETH ZION: Lions Crab, 700 Camelia Dr., Royal
Palm Beach. Mailing address: PO Box 104,650 Royal Palm Blvd.,
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411. Sabbath services Friday 8 p.m.,
Saturday 8:45 am. Rabbi Seymour Friedman. Phone 793-9122.
TEMPLE B'NAI JACOB: 2177 So. Congress Ave., West Palm
Beach 33406. Phone 433-5957. Rabbi Dr. Morris Silberman, Can-
tor Hyman Lifshin. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m., Saturday
and holidays 9 a.m., Monday and Thursday 9 am.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL: 190 North County Road, Palm Beach
33480. Phone 832-0804. Rabbi Joel Chazin. Sabbath services, Fri-
day 8:15 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.
TREASURE COAST JEWISH CENTER Congregation Beth
Abraham: 3257 S.E. Salerno Road, Port Salerno. 287-8833. Mail-
ing Address: P.O. Box 2996, Stuart, FL 33496. Services Friday
evenings 8 p.m. and first Saturday of each month 10 am.
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION AITZ CHAM: Century Village. West Palm
Beach. Phone 6894675. Sabbath services 9 am. and 5 p.m. Daily
services 8:15 am. and 6:30 p.m.
REFORM
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL: 1592 Floresta, P.O. Box
867146. Port St. Lucie, FL 33452. Friday night services 8 p.m.,
Saturday morning 10:30 am. Phone 878-7476.
TEMPLE BETH AM-THE REFORM TEMPLE OF JUPITER-
TEQUESTA: 759 Parkway Street, Jupiter. Phone 747-1109.
Rabbi Alfred L. Friedman. Services Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL: 4600 Oleander Avenue, Fort Pierce, FL
33450. Phone 461-7428.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM: St Helen's Parish Hall, 20th
Avenue and Victory Blvd., Vero Beach 32960, mailing address:
P.O. Box 2118, Vero Beach, FL 32961-2113. Rabbi Richard D.
Messing. Phone 1-569-4700.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH: at Wellington Elementary School,
13000 Paddock Dr., West Palm Beach. Mailing address: P.O. Box
17008, West Palm Beach, FL 33406. Friday services 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Steven R. Westman. Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum. Phone
793-2700.
TEMPLE ISRAEL: 1901 No. Flagler Dr., West Palm Beach
33407. Phone 833-8421. Rabbi Howard Shapiro, Cantorial Soloist
Susan Weiss. Sabbath services, Friday 8 p.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA: at St. Catharine's Greek Orthodox Church
Social Hall, 4000 Washington Rd., at Southern Boulevard. Rabbi
Joel L. Levine. Cantor Anne Newman. Mailing address: 5154
Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, FL 33409. Phone 471-1526.




Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Candle lighting Time
g^* Feb. 14 5:54 p.m.
s****** Feb. 21 5:58 p.m.
CONGREGATION
AITZ CHAIM
Sisterhood recently had an
installation/luncheon at the
Joseph L. Morse Geriatric
Center. Newly installed of-
ficers are as follows: Presi-
dent, Esther Gersten, Vice-
President, Manya Goldberg;
Treasurer, Rea Berger; Recor-
ding Secretary, Ceil
Berkowitz; Corresponding
Secretary, Ida Schwartz;
Social Secretary, Kate Yudin;
Publicity, Millie Markowitz.
Guest speakers were Harry
Turbiner, president of Con-
gregation Aitz Chaim and
Trudi Wheeler of Royal Palm
Savings Bank.
GOLDEN LAKES
TEMPLE
Events at Golden Lakes
Temple:
A general Membership
Meeting will be held on Mon-
day, Feb. 17 at 12:30 p.m. with
a collation served.
Men's Club will hold a sup-
per/card party on Wednesday,
Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. For ticket in-
formation contact the Temple
office, West Palm Beach.
A gala Israel Bond affair is
being planned for Sunday
evening, Feb. 23 in the Golden
Lakes Temple, co-chaired by
Harold and Sarah Zalesch, at
7:30 p.m. Refreshments will be
served, and Emil Cohen will
entertain. Those persons at-
tending are asked to purchase
Israel Bonds. Tickets are $2.50
each and are available in the
Temple office.
LAKE WORTH
JEWISH CENTER
Lake Worth Jewish
Center, Hazzan Abraham
Mehler will serve as guest can-
tor on Friday evening, Feb. 21
at 8:15 p.m. and on Saturday
morning, Feb. 22 at 9 a.m.
Cantor Mehler served for 20
years at the Homowack Hotel
m the Catskills (New York
State) during all holidays, in-
cluding the High Holy Days.
He is presently living in Pom-
Jobs Of The Nineties
A look at up-and-coming jobs in the next decade is the subject
of a community forum talk at Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Palm Beach County, Inc., on Thursday, Feb. 20, at
4 p.m. Speakers will include Carol Barack, J.F. and C.S.
Vocational Guidance Specialist, and staff of the Florida Job
Service. This is the third of a series of eight Thursday after-
noon talks on a wide range of topics. The J.F. and C.S. office
is located at 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104. The
phone number is 684-1991 and seating is limited. Fee is $3.
Area Deaths
CARLSON
Maurice J.. 76, of Lake Worth. Lavitt-
Weinstein Memorial Chapel, Wast Palm
Beach.
JAGODA
Belle, 74, of Wast Palm Beach. Levitt-
Wemstein Memorial Chapel, West Palm
Beach.
pano Beach.
The Lake Worth Jewish
Center meets at the Free
Methodist Church, 6513
Dillman Road (west off Jog
Road) in West Palm Beach.
Guests are invited.
For information, contact Dr.
Joseph Peyser.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Temple Israel Shabbat Ser-
vice on Friday, Feb. 14 will
celebrate the First Annual
Scholar in Residence Weekend
with Max I. DiMont, Noted
Author and Historian. Mr. Di-
Mont's topic will be: "The In-
destructible Jews." Rabbi
Howard Shapiro will conduct
the service.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited. During
the service child care is
provided.
TEMPLE JUDEA
Rabbi Lewis Littman will be
the guest speaker at Temple
Judea's annual Brotherhood
Sabbath, Friday, Feb. 14 at 8
p.m. at St. Catherine's
Cultural Center. The officers
and Board of the Temple's
Brotherhood will conduct the
Service with Rabbi Joel Levine
and Cantor Anne Newman.
Rabbi Littman is regional
director of the Southeast
region of the Union of
American Hebrew
Congregations.
Members of the Brotherhood
conducting the Service include
President Arnold Chane, Bill
Grushow, Sam Shear, Lew
Bennett, Ed Chain, Jack
Ainbender, Bud Gerson, Herb
Portnoi, Herb Ri, Jerry Trot-
man. Also participating will be
past presidents Marvin Domb,
Marty Golden, and Marshal
Meltzer. Barbara Chane will
kindle the Sabbath lights.
Members of the Sisterhood
will act as ushers that evening.
The regular oneg shabbat
sponsored by Sisterhood will
honor the Temple
Brotherhood.
As part of "Brotherhood
Weekend," the Brotherhood
will sponsor a breakfast at the
Sunrise Bank, Sunday, Feb. 16
at 10 a.m. featuring Richard
Jorandby. The Bank is on
Military Trail and Gun Club
Road. For more information
about Brotherhood, call Bill
Grushow.
Max I. Dimont To Speak
At Temple Israel
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Over the weekend of Feb.
14-16 at Temple Israel's first
annual Scholar-in-Residence
program, Max I. Dimont, well-
known historian, will be the
first Jewish scholar in Temple
Israel's anticipated annual
program.
Dimont, author of Jews, God
and History, which has sold
more copies than any other
book of its kind, has lectured
extensively in the United
States, Canada, and Israel.
Reviewers have praised him
not only for his learning but
also for the excitement he br-
ings to Jewish historical and
biblical subjects.
Dimont's most recent book,
The Amazing Adventure of the
Jewish People, (1984) treats
the 4000-year saga of the Jews
as a fantastic adventure story
highlighting its triumphs and
grandeur, its comedy and
tragedy.
Dimont will speak at Friday
night services at Temple
Israel, 1901 N. Flagler Drive,
WPB; at a special Saturday
Max Dimont
night Lecture, and at Sunday
brunch. Topics will cover
American Judaism, The In-
destructible Jews, and
Background to Danger. For
further information call the
Temple office.
Jordan Arms Sale
Continued from Page 2
continue to abide by the old
procedures of giving Congress
formal notification of plans to
sell arms 30 days in advance of
the proposed sale.
Although the 30-day
notification period will have
long passed by the March 1
deadline, Shultz's letter
pledges to provide another
month's debating time before
reviving the deal.
The bill that was to have
been considered by the
Foreign Affairs Committee
would have barred delivery of
the proposed weapons to Jor-
dan even if an arms deal had
already been concluded.
But most observers ap-
peared confident that the ef-
fort to provide the arms to Jor-
dan would not be revived any
time soon. A State Depart-
ment official said the Presi-
dent still regards the sale as
important to Jordan's security
and would continue to consult
with Congress on the issue,
but declined to gauge its
chances of re-emerging in the
near future.
"One thing that we have
learned not to do is speculate.
We'll just take it as it comes,"
the official said.
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Shcharansky
Continued from Page 1
tions, suggesting that the
East-West spy deal will pro-
bably involve West Germany.
Asked why Shcharansky has
lingered in the Gulag for so
long while other spy ex-
changes have taken place over
the years, Levinson reiterated
that the mood of the Soviets is
not constant or uniform.
"Shcharansky became a
cause celebre and his early
release would have given the
wrong signal to the people who
may have been further incited
to participate in 'anti-Soviet'
conduct," Levinson said.
Levinson also emphasized
that "although Shcharansky is
very important to the world
Jewish community, there are
many others in the Soviet
Union who are also of impor-
tance. There are many who
became refuseniks and
prisoners of conscience before
and after Shcharansky.
Responding to the sugges-
tion that Shcharansky's
release mieht oossiblv lead to a
Soviet policy change resulting
in freedom for more refuseniks
and POC8, Levinson repeated
a maxim heard often amongst
those committed to Soviet
Jewry: "Anyone who can tell
you what that answer is is
misinformed."
Noting that the only con-
sistency in Soviet policy
towards Jews is its incon-
sistency, Levinson emphasized
that, in general, Soviet Jewish
emigration has been greater
when U.S.-Soviet relations
have been friendly.
"Perhaps last year's summit
meeting and the subsequent
relaxation of tensions is a good
omen," Levinson suggested.
He then commented on the
claim by news analysts that
Shcharansky's release would
simply be a good public rela-
tions maneuver by the Soviets:
"I would subscribe to the
view that it would be both
public relations and a gesture
by Gorbachev to President
Reagan and Secretary of State
Shultz," he said.
Admitting that much of the
pressure on the Soviet govern-
ment to let Jews emigrate
comes from American Jewry,
Levinson stressed that "we
must not forget the contribu-
tions of Jewish communities in
France, England, Italy and
The Netherlands. They have
helped the Soviets appreciate
that the movement is truly
international."
However, Levinson regard-
ed "the remarkable contribu-
tion of A vital Shcharansky" as
perhaps the most instrumental
cause of the recent turn of
events:
"There is no one woman in
modern times who has argued
more persuasively or more
devotedly dedicated her life to
the release of her husband.
She has traveled the world for
years speaking out, not just for
her husband, but for Soviet
Jews in general."
Levinson observed that
Shcharansky may be released
before other well-known
refuseniks and POCs because
"his wife Avital made him a
figure of heroic proportions,"
and as a result the Soviets
want to rid themselves of the
problem.
Levinson was quick to em-
phasize the unity of world
Jewry by saying, "The blood
that courses through Avital
and Anatoly Shcharansky is
the same Jewish blood that
courses through us."
He commented that the pro-
blems for modern Soviet Jews
began in the Stalin era, "and
we re still seeing the effects of
it."
"The Jews who lived in the
Soviet Union were relatively
content following the Revolu-
tion, until the modern day
'intellectual pogroms' began,"
he added.
Levinson noted that the
numerous oppressive, anti-
Semitic reprisals taken against
Jews simply "made the Jews
who were not originally involv-
ed in the movement aware that
they were a suspect class,
aliens within their own
nation."
Concluding that the Soviets
also blundered by depriving
some of their most talented
citizens their rightful place in
society, Levinson said that
although some Soviet Jews are
too attached to the
"motherland" to leave, "the
greater proportion of Jews do
want to emigrate."
Most Soviet-Jewish parents
want to emigrate, Levinson
said, if only to give their
children an educational future,
since that is frequently denied
Jewish youngsters in the
Soviet Union.
Even if Anatoly Shcharan-
sky is released, Jews around
the world will be obligated to
continue to speak out for the
freedom of the thousands who
remain there against their will.
For more information about
how you can become more in-
volved with the cause of Soviet
Jewry, contact the Community
Relations Council of the
Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, 832-2120.
Federation Hires
Executive Director

Continued from Page 1
As an attorney Klein
specialized in real estate, cor-
porate and labor law, and his
expertise in management was
exemplified during tenures as
president of an automobile
dealership and as chief ex-
ecutive officer of a profes-
sional recruitment bureau.
While a resident of
Cleveland, Klein was a
member of the Speaker's
Bureau of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation, and he also
served as chairman of the
Cleveland Federation's
Domestic Anti-Semitism Task
Force. As a board member of
the Bureau of Jewish Educa-
tion of Cleveland, Klein also
held a position on the bureau's
Finance Committee.
After moving to Florida,
Klein was active as a member
of the Fort Lauderdale
Federation's Community Rela-
tions Council, and he served on
the board of trustees of
Broward County's Jewish
Family Service.
In his role as Planning and
Budgeting Director, he had
the principal responsibility for
the Jewish Federation's rela-
tionship with 32 local and 20
national agencies. He also was
responsible for the supervision
of Miami's Project Renewal
program. In the area of cam-
paign, Klein has worked with
the Westview Country Club
campaign in Miami and the
Miami Chazak program, a
leadership program which in-
cluded an intensive 10 day mis-
sion to Israel.
Mr. Klein is married and has
three children.


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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, February 14, 1986

- -*v
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Comprehensive Senior Center, through a Federal
Grant Title HI of the Older Americans Act, provides
transportation to persons 60 years or older, who do not drive
or cannot use the public transportation system, serves Hot
Kosher meals in a croup setting, delivers Kosher meals to
homebound persons and offers daily educational and recrea-
tional programs. Call 689-7703 for further information.
KOSHER MEALS
Every day at the Hot
Kosher Lunch Program at the
JCC you can find seniors doing
everything from sharing ideas,
taking a vital interest in cur-
rent events to listening to
classical music. The center is
open for lunch Monday
through Friday and there is no
set fee. Participants are en-
couraged to make a contribu-
tion at each meal. Daily
transportation is available by
advanced reservation. Please
come. Call Carol or Lillian at
689-7703 for information and
reservations.
Monday, Feb. 17 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday, Feb. 18 "Exer-
cising in a Light Way"
Wednesday, Feb. 19 Drs.
Cetty and Bradley
Weiss, "Chiropractic
Physicians"
Thursday, Feb. 20 "Cur-
rent Events with Rose
Dunsky"
Friday, Feb. 21 Dr. Mark
Libow "Cardiologist"
CLASSES AND
ACTIVITIES
Palm Beach County School
Board Adult Education
Classes
Weight Control and Nutri-
tion "The Gangs Weigh,"
Tuesday, 1:30 p.m. Arthur
Gang, Instructor.
This class is filled. Please
call 689-7703 to be put on a
waiting list.
Stress and Your Life -
Thursday, 1:30 p.m. Joyce
Hogan, Instructor
Learn how to cope with
everyday stress and improve
your health and sense of well-
being. Class is open. No pre-
registraton is necessary.
Writers Workshop
Fridays, 1:30 p.m. Ruth
Graham, Instructor
A most stimulating class for
persons interested in learning
how to express themselves.
Class is still open. Please call
for information.
There are no set fees for
the above classes. Par-
ticipants are asked to make a
contribution.
OTHER JCC
ACTIVITIES
Intermediate Bridge
Series Wednesdays, 1:45
p.m. Alfred Parsont,
Instructor
The class runs for five
weeks. There is a $12 fee for
JCC members and $15 for non-
members. New series begins
Feb. 12. Call the center for in-
formation regarding new
series.
The above class requires
advance registration. Please
call 689-7703 for further in-
formation and/or
registration.
Speakers Club Mondays,
2:30 p.m. Frances Sperber,
president
Learn the art of public
speaking.
Timely Topics/Round Table
Discussion Mondays, 2:15
p.m. Leader: Member of the
group
Open discussion of NEWS
and VIEWS. Everyone is
invited.
Second Tuesday Council
First Tuesday of Each Month,
2 p.m. Sabina Gottschalk,
chairperson
A great planning group.
Call Nina at 689-7703 for
information.
AT YOUR SERVICE
Every Thursday afternoon,
at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Center, represen-
tatives of different agencies
will be "at your service." We
invite you to stop in and com-
municate on a one-to-one basis
with our visiting agency
representatives.
Feb. 13: Senior Employ-
ment Service and Senior
Aides-The National Council
of Senior Citizens An op-
portunity for senior adults to
obtain employment. No fee
required.
Feb. 20: Health Insurance
Assistance Edie Reiter
assists persons with filling out
insurance forms and answers
questions.
Feb. 27: Retired Senior
Volunteer Program
Become A RSVP volunteer.
An opportunity to learn how to
become part of the national
volunteer organization..
AARP Tax Counseling for
The elederly Available
every Tuesday from Feb. 4 up
to April 15. If you need help
with your 1985 Tax Returns,
stop in at the JCC between 2
and 4 p.m. There is no fee.
THE JCC FIRST
TUESDAY COUNCIL
PRESENTS:
Lunch and Card Party at the
Oriental Express, Tuesday,
Feb. 25, noon, $8 includes
transportation.
Reservation and checks
should be made by Feb. 4.
Call Sabina Gottschalk at
683-0852 or Nina at the JCC at
689-7703.
LIDO SPA
GET-A-WAY
Our spring Get-A-Way to
Lido Spa in Miami Beach, for
four days and three nights will
take place April 6 to April 9.
Fees will include transporta-
tion to and from Miami. Three
gourmet meals daily (diet or
regular) Health lectures by
Dieticians; massages, special
nightly entertainment group
card parties, steam sauna,
whirlpool and much more. Call
Nina at 689-7703 for informa-
tion and/or reservations.
Seniors Enjoy Stretchercize Activity
By JEAN RUBIN
Shirley Fein Sheriff, MS
Health Educator and Geriatric
Specialist of Richfield, Conn.,
came to the JCC Senior Center
one day and asked if she could
introduce a new program call-
ed "More Life in Your Years."
For the last month and a half
each Tuesday at 11 a.m. Ms.
Sheriff presented to our
Kosher meal participants a
holistic health education pro-
gram which she has created
herself. It consists of mild
stretching, yoga type
movements, incorporating
deep breathing methods and
relaxation. Our older adults
are experiencing body and
mind relaxation by the techni-
que of energy and concen-
tration. "The exercise they
love the most" said Mrs.
Sheriff "is the deep breathing
and the exclamation of
"Shalom.' "
The last 15 minutes of each
session has included health
topics that are specifically
geared for seniors, such as
patient-doctor relationships,
stress management and rights
of Medicare and Medicare
patients.
Ms. Sheriff added that the
group was reticent to become
involved at the beginning due
to lack of space in the JCC din-
ing room. Some still prefer not
to participate, but at each ses-
sion more and more persons
joined in. As they stood at
their tables, they exercised
and began to feel the reaction
of body and mind.
Shirley Sheriffs understan-
ding and empathy for older
adults as well as her fine pro-
fessional background as a
recreational therapist and
Health Educator at The
Hospital and Home for the Ag-
ed in New York City certainly
have been so evident at the
JCC these last few weeks.
How lucky we are that this
lady selected the JCC and
volunteered to share her
knowledge with us. Our older
adults have certainly benefited
from her expertise and
experience.
Soviet Activist Arrives In Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Yasha Gorodetzky, a Len-
ingrad mathematician and a
leading aliya activist for the
past six years, arrived here
last week from Vienna with his
wife and family. He is the se-
cond prominent Jewish ac-
tivist allowed to leave the
Soviet Union in less than two
weeks. Eliahu (Ilya) Essas,
also a mathematician, arrived
in Israel with his family Jan.
22.
Gorodetzky, 40, accom-
panied by his wife, Pauline, 37,
their four-year-old daughter,
and his wife's mother, told
reporters he did not know why
he was suddenly granted an
exit visa after years of being
denied one. He said it could
herald a change of Soviet
policy toward Jewish emigra-
tion, or it could be a "miracle."
"Jewish history is embellish-
ed by many miracles and I am
one of these, if only a very
small one," he said. He has
been, in recent years, a central
figure in the Soviet Jewry
movement. An outspoken
Zionist since 1980, he was
denied an exit visa in 1983. He
was placed under house arrest
for a time by the KGB on
suspicion he was a spy for
Israel. He was never
imprisoned.
Unlike Essas, a self-taught
Orthodox Jew who headed a
Jewish religious revivalist
movement in the USSR before
coming to Israel, Gorodetzky
is not observant. Nevertheless,
he supported Essas' demands
that Jews in the Soviet Union
be allowed to study Torah.
Other recent emigrants have
described both men as
charismatic figures and sug-
gested the Soviet authorities
granted them visas to be rid of
them because of their con-
siderable influence and in-
spiration to the aliya
movement.
Gorodetzky said he fought
for the right of Soviet Jews to
emigrate to Israel as an act of
repatriation rather than on
grounds of family reunifica-
tion, the only grounds the
Soviets officially recognize
when they grant visas.
Rabbi Takes Pulpit
WORCESTER, Mass. (JTA)
Rabbi Seth Levin Bernstein
assumes the pulpit of Temple
Sinai in March, succeeding Rabbi
Gary Glickstein. Bernstein has
served as associate rabbi at Con-
gregation Rodeph Shalom in New
York.
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FILES


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
ADL Publishes Report On Holocaust Revisionism
Despite recent setbacks,
Holocaust "revisionism"
the pseudo-scholarly move-
ment that denies thy reality of
the Nazi mass murder of Jews
is still being used as a major
anti-Semitic and anti-Israel
propaganda weapon by ex-
tremists both here and abroad,
according to a report made
public this week by the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Titled "Holocaust 'Revi-
sionism': A Denial of History,"
the report was made public at
a closing session of the
League's National Executive
Committee meeting here at
The Breakers Hotel.
In issuing the report to the
Jewish community leaders
gathered for the agency's
policymaking sessions,
Seymour Reich, chairman of
the ADL's Civil Rights Com-
mittee, said the "revisionists,"
in trying to "prove" that the
evidence of Hitler's mass
murder of Jews was falsified
and that the extermination
policy itself was a myth, have
three goals: undermining the
"moral legitimacy" of Israel;
whitewashing Hitler and Nazi
Germany; and perpetuating
anti-Semitism. Their pro-
paganda insists, he said, that
millions of Jews were not
systematically killed but in-
stead died in far fewer
numbers from disease, star-
vation and wartime fighting.
The ADL report named the
so-called Institue for Historical
Review, based in California, as
the leading American
purveyor of Holocaust denial
materials, including books,
video cassettes and even a
bumper sticker that reads,
"Nazi Gassings: A Myth?"
The Institute continues to
operate, according to the
report, despite (1) a court-
approved settlement of a
lawsuit brought by Auschwitz
survivor Mel Mermelstein who
claimed and received $50,000
that the IHR had offered for
"proof of Nazi genocide, plus
$40,000 damages (2) a fire at
the Institute's offices that
hampered its operations and
(3) rejection of its pseudo-
scientific theories by
legitimate scholars it has
sought to influence.
In addition to the Institute's
setbacks, the League noted the
conviction of two Holocaust
denial propagandists in
Canada James Keegstra, an
Alberta high school teacher
who was dismissed after
teaching that the Holocaust
was a hoax, and Ernst Christof
Friedrich Zundel of Toronto,
author of The Hitler We Loved
And Why both under that
country's laws covering the
distribution of hate materials.
Nevertheless, ADL said, the
"revisionists" scored some
propaganda gains. Writers
and promoters of scurrilous
1985 UJA Campaign
Reaches $637 Million
Turning to
paign, Grass
the 1986 Cam-
reported that
NEW YORK (JTA) Alex explained that a special opera-
Grass, national chairman of tional plan was being
the United Jewish Appeal, developed by a task force eight major gifts events under
reported that as of January 16, headed by UJA National Pro- UJA auspices have taken place
the 1985 Campaign has raised feet Renewal chairperson Jane which involved over 1,200 peo-
Sherman to raise $65 million
a total of $637 million com-
pared to $585.9 million pledg-
ed by the same donors last
year. This is a dollar gain of
$51.1 million and a card-for-
card increase of 8.7 percent.
Grass said he anticipated that
the 1985 Regular Campaign
would conclude with $660
million.
"Adding the amounts raised
by Operation Moses and Pro-
ject Renewal," he continued,
"will bring us to approximate-
ly $735 million. This will be a
tremendous achievement and I
am indebted to national and
community leaders for their
outstanding efforts."
Reporting on Project
Renewal, Grass stated that
$163.1 million has been raised
through December 31, in-
cluding $10 million pledged
during the 1985 Campaign. He
raise
that would complete the cur-
rent financial requirements
needed for the inhabitants of
Israel's distressed
neighborhoods.
pie from 60 communities.
Pledges came to $51.8 million,
a 22 percent increase and a
gain updof $9.3 million over
the amounts pledged by the
same donors in 1985.
Media Center
Continued from Page S
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation
Passover
Wed April 23-TTiurv May 1
Cantor
Lawrence Tuchinsky
and the Nadei Choir
Services Sedarim
Dr. Chaim
Israel Etrog
will offer a program of
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seminars during the holiday
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Cantor Rosenbaum has pro-
cured software which already
constitutes an extensive
library of materials.
"Our library includes the
three most popular and ver-
satile educational media for-
mats," said Rosenbaum.
"Slides with audio cassettes,
filmstrips with audio cassettes,
and VHS videotapes were
chosen because they are effec-
tive and user-friendly audio-
visual aids."
Cantor Rosenbaum pointed
out that workshops to train
teachers and others on the use
of the hardware will be held in
the near future. Only those
certified after completing the
workshops will be allowed to
sign-out hardware.
A simple sign-out system
will be used to keep track of
both hardware and software
materials.
"Our media library catalog is
available at the Federation of-
fice," Rosenbaum continued.
"One can see that we have
tried to cover every facet of
Jewish life, including holidays,
life in Israel, Jewish history
and related theatrical films
such as Exodus, Masada, and
The Diary of Anne Frank."
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, affirming
its commitment to Jewish
education, allocated an initial
sum of $15,000 to establish the
Media Center.
For more information about
the Media Center or the Open
House on Feb. 16, please call
Cantor Elliot Rosenbaum at
the Jewish Federation,
832-2120.
anti-Semitic falsehoods were
accepted in court and in print
as "experts" and Zundel
declared after his conviction:
"I got a million dollars worth
of publicity for my cause."
Holocaust "revisionist" pro-
paganda has been generated in
a variety of ways, according to
the report. These include:
The appearance by Arthur
Butz, a Northwestern Univer-
sity engineering professor and
author of The Hoax of the
Twentieth Century, as a
featured speaker at the 1985
Nation of Islam convention in
Chicago organized by anti-
Semitic Black Muslim leader
Louis Farrakhan.
Rightwing extremist
groups, including neo-Nazis
and Ku Klux Klan organiza-
tions, which distribute such
"revisionist" works as Did Six
Million Really Die? and The
Auschwitz Lie.
"Revisionist" video casset-
tes, including "Tour of
Auschwitz Fakes," promoted
in ads appearing in The
Spotlight, the publication of
the far r igh t w i n g,
Washington, B.C., based
Liberty Lobby.
Holocaust denial promoted
through two computerized
hate networks developed by
Louis Beam, who has been ac-
tive in the Ku Klux Klan and
Aryan Nations, and George
Dietz, a onetime Hitler Youth
member in Germany who runs
Liberty Bell Publications,
known for its anti-Semitic pro-
paganda materials.
Eastern European emigre
activists who wage campaigns
to undermine the U.S. Justice
Department program to
denaturalize and deport
the Saudis. The materials were
sent to members of the U.S.
Congress and the British
Parliament.
Distribution of "revi-
sionist" materials in England
by The Spearhead, the neo-
Fascist publication edited by
John Tyndall, leader of the
racist British National Party;
and in West Germany by neo-
Nazis, including convicted ter-
rorist Manfred Roeder.
Soviet anti-Jewish pro-
pagandists who, with govern-
ment support, deliberately ig-
nore the fact that Jews were
the chief victims of the
Holocaust and spread the
falsehood that there was
"Zionist-Nazi collaboration" in
the mass murder of Jews.
The ADL report pointed out
although the "revisionist"
movement continues to
operate, a greater public
awareness of the Holocaust
has developed in recent years
through film and TV
documentaries, the increased
use of Holocaust educational
materials in schools, libraries
and churches, the publicity
surrounding legal actions
against Nazi war criminals,
the work of the U.S. Commis-
sion on the Holocaust, and ex-
panded Holocaust research
such as that provided by
ADL's International Center
for Holocaust Studies.
"Despite such increased
public awareness," the report
declared, "there are still many
people whose knowledge about
this period is minimal. Others
find the topic irrelevant. Still
others claim it is being
overemphasized ... Although
the informed public surely
looks upon Holocaust-denial
propaganda in the same way it
views Nazism... it is ig-
suspected Nazi war criminals. w- K _
Apntn-, c.,~... .;~~i norance and apathy which pro-
One Eastern^European emigre iAo Krtru, X rW* whn
leader testified that Jewish
Holocaust survivor witnesses
were "pathological liars."
The world Muslim Con-
gress, a U.N. Non-
Governmental Organization"
which is funded by Saudi
Arabia, has distributed
Holocaust denial materials
worldwide, including The Six
Million Reconsidered by
William Grimstad, a former
registered foreign agent for
vide hope for those who
engage in such falsehood."
The report concluded that as
the "advance of time places
the events of the Hitler era
further into the past, effective
education about its painful
lessons becomes ever more
essential."
The ADL report was
prepared by the Research
Department of the agency's
Civil Rights Division.
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