The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County the voice of the Jewish community of Palm Beach County
Uniform Title:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
West Palm Beach, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Palm Beach

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 11, no. 27 (Sept. 13, 1985)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Feb. 20, 1987 called no. 4 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Mar. 31, 1989 called no. 12 in masthead and no. 13 in publisher's statement.
General Note:
"Combining Our voice and Federation reporter."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44605643
lccn - sn 00229551
ocm44605643
System ID:
AA00014309:00009

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Preceded by:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE VOICE OF
THE JEWISH
COMMUNITY OF
PALM BEACH
COUNTV
"Jewish florid Jan
-^^ W OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
VOLUME 11 NUMBER 36
PALM BEACH, FLORIDA FRIDAY; NOVEMBER 15.1985
PRICE 35 CENTS
FndSMoehl
itterman To Serve As Acting Exec.
Erwin H. Blonder, president
fthe Jewish Federation of
L Beach County, has an-
Lced that Robert Fitter-
L will assume the position
acting executive director of
Federation until the
-rth Committee and board
jirectors complete the inter-
im and selection process for
lermanent replacement.
|I am very pleased that Bob
kerman has agreed to serve
a temporary basis,"
Blonder said. "His years of
leadership experience will pro-
vide continuity and maintain
stability within our Federation
until a permanent replacement
is found."
Mr. Fitterman, whose wife
Mollie is president of the
Federation's Women's Divi-
sion, served for over 30 years
as the executive vice-president
of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Dayton.
Having served on the boards
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County and the
Jewish Family and Children's
Service, Mr. Fitterman is cur-
rently a member of the En-
dowment Fund Committee of
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County and president of
the Federation of Retired
Executives.
Fitterman, who received a
BA degree from Bates College
and an MSS degree from the
Graduate School of Jewish
Social Work, was the regional
director of the New York State
and New England Regions of
the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, and he has conducted
organizational surveys in
various communities as a na-
tional consultant, acting as
coordinator of the Activities
Study of the Jewish Communi-
ty Center of the Palm Beaches
in 1981-1982, which was co-
sponsored by the Jewish
Federation and the JCC.
Robert Fitterman
)nly Rumors
No Progress Seen In Soviet Jewish Emigration
NEW YORK (JTA) -
spite rumors of an ac-
lerated rate of emigration
Imthe USSR, only 124 Jews
|m the Soviet Union arrived
|the Wesl during October,"
brding to Jerry Goodman.
tcutive director of the Na-
onference on Soviet
p.Tv(.\ he N'CSJ Research
Bureau, retlects the norm
established in 1984. when 896
Jews left the Soviet Union.
According to the NCSJ.
"there is no evidence, based on
performance, of any changes
in Soviet practices, despite
rumors and statements made
by Secretary General Mikhail
Gorbachev in Paris last
month." The organization
noted that only three weeks
ago Leonid Volvovsky of
Gorky was sentenced to three
years in a labor camp, for cir-
culating material allegedly
"defaming the Soviet State."
Volvovsky is one of the
prime advocates of Hebrew
teaching and study, a cause
which is assumed to be his
"real crime." In the last year,
one Jewish activist per month
was sentenced to prison or
labor camp. Virtually all of
them from among the
unregistered Hebrew
teachers, the NCSJ reported.
While there is a great deal of
speculation about the move-
ment of Jews from the Soviet
Union, "this cannot be
documented at this time,"
Ooodman'"isald. He elfpressed
hope, however, that the
me Restrictions
[ouse Caucus Votes To Postpone Arms Sale
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
Washington (JTA)
1 The House Democratic
hcus has agreed on a
solution postponing the
fcagan Administration's
Pposed $1.9 billion arms
|e to Jordan until Mar. 1,
It with more restrictions
p contained in the
pate resolution adopted
T24.
While the House resolution has
not been made public, a Congres-
sional aide told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that among
several additions to the Senate
resolution is one requiring Presi-
dent Reagan to resubmit his Oct.
21 notification to Congress of the
proposed sale.
THE HOUSE Foreign Affairs
Committee was to have acted on
the resolution, but after a
30-minute delay, its chairman,
Rep. Dante Fascell (D., Fla.).
postponed the meeting because he
said that several members who
wanted to participate could not be
present.
The Senate resolution, which
was adopted by a 97-1 vote, man-
dates that before Mar. 1 "no letter
of offer shall be valid with respect
to any of the proposed sales to
Jordan of advanced weapons
systems, including advanced air-
craft and advanced air defense
systems" described in Reagan's
Oct. 21 notification letter "unless
direct and meaningful peace
Continued on Page 14
estimated 15,000 Jewish
refuseniks would soon receive
permission to leave, a develop-
ment which "would be well
received in this country,"
Goodman said.
NCSJ submitted a list to the
State Department of over 200
Jewish families waiting more
than 10 years to leave the
USSR, orwho remain divided
by Soviet policy. The NSCJ
pointed out that Gorbachev
had indicated in interviews, at
the time he met with French
President Francois Mitterrand
in Paris last month, that if
there is a problem of family
reunion, it will be solved.
Gorbachev was also quoted
as saying that "we prevent
such a solution only if state
secrets are involved Even
to these people we give the
possibility (of waiting) five or
ten years." Goodman said that
"we have prepared the list of
such persons. It is now
Moscow's decision."
atholic-Jewish Conference Rejects
Zionism-Racism Equation
By DAVID MARKUS
|A0 PAULO (JTA) The
T Pan-American conference on
PMic-Jewish relations conclud-
\ re Wlth the adoption of a
pment recognising that
JJjn is an expression of the
P* people's wish for liberty
fO'suncontaminated by racism
I dpotism.
Inside
Negation's Boynton
"chExpo...pag2
{Ports from the Board
,re. pages 3,6,10-11
Nate Opinion...
fle7
But the delegates to the two-day
conference declined to pass a mo-
tion to condemn the infamous UN
resolution equating Zionism with
racism, whose 10th anniversary
was on Sunday. The motion was
introduced by Brazil's former Am-
bassador to Israel, Jose Oswaldo
Meira Pena
NOR DID the conference sup-
port the appeal made at its con-
cluding session by Rabbi Henry
Sobel of the Israelite Congrega-
tion here, that the Vatican official-
ly recognize Israel.
The two-day conference, held at
the Hebraica Center here, was
aimed at evaluating the impact on
Catholic-Jewish Relations in the
Western Hemisphere of Vatican
Council IPs Nostra AetaU, the
declaration on the Jews, and com-
memorate its 20th anniversary.
The conference condemned anti-
Continued on Page 18
The Joseph L. Morse Geriatric Center of the Jewish Home for
the Aged of Palm Beach County thanks those organizations and
individuals in the community who signed its petition for a Certificate
of Need to add 160 long term care beds to the existing facility.
As a result of this all-out effort, 10,000 signed petitions will be
presented to officials of the Florida Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services at a local public hearing.
The Center calls upon members of the community to attend this
hearing on its behalf and demonstrate continued support of its
application for additional beds.

TIME: 9:00 a.m.
DATE: November 22,1985
PLACE: Salvation Army Citadel
Activities Meeting Room
2122 Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
YOUR PRESENCE IS URGENTLY NEEDED!
The Center asks that persons carpool wherever
possible; limited number of buses will be available
at Center.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 15, 1985
wmm
Erwin H. Blonder, president
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, gives
reasons for the need for
solidarity and involvement in
the Jewish community.
Arnold Lampert, campaign
chairman, describes the pro-
found changes that have
taken place in Hod
HaSharon, our Project
Renewal twin community.
Federation board member
Marilyn Lampert explains
the value of missions to
Israel to two interested par-
ticipants in the Expo.
Part of the audience of over 100 at last month's Boynton
Beach Expo listens attentively to a presentation on Israel.
Boynton Beach Expo
Attracts Over 100
On Thursday. Oct. 31. over 100 interested Jewish
citizens were informed about Jewish Federation
activities and programs at the Federations
Boynton Beach office.
After a mezuzah-affixing ceremony led by Rab-
in Avrom L. Drazin of Congregation Beth
Kodesh. participants heard from Federation ex-
ecutives, department heads and agency directors
who explained the services they provide, their
needs for the future and different possibilites for
community involvement.
Other subjects covered included local mini-
missions and missions to Israel, Project
Renewal, a campaign overview, and addresses by
the presidents of Federation and Women's
Division.
Peres: Israel Ready
For Soviet Immigrants
i
NEW YORK, (JTA) -
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
of Israel told North American
Jewish leaders, in a
teleconference from a studio in
Jerusalem, that he and other
Israeli leaders had no fears
about whether Israel could
handle an influx of newcomers
from the Soviet Union, if such
a development occurred.
The live television program
was relayed by satellite from a
I

I
NOTICE TO
THE COMMUNITY
The offices of the
[ Federation's Community
Relations Coun-
1 cil/Chaplain's Aides Pro-
| gram, under the direction
I of Rabbi Alan Sherman,
land the Department of
Jewish Education,
directed by Ann Lynn Lip-
ton, have moved to 501 S.
Flagler Drive, Suite 305.
These offices may be
reached by calling
832-2120.
studio in Jerusalem to a panel
of leading Jews in a Manhattan
studio and to an audience
estimated at 10,000 listeners
in New York and other cities.
Most of them watched in
synagogues linked to the
Satellite.
The Premier was responding
to a question from Charlotte
Jacobson, president of the
Jewish National Fund, who
asked, "Given the situation in
Israel and the very high
unemployment, how does
Israel see itself able to absorb
large numbers of immigrants
from the Soviet Union or even
the smaller numbers from the
United States?" She asked,
"We have a great deal of con-
cern that even our small aliya
is threatened by the prospect
of not having employment in
Israel" for the immigrants.
Peres responded that "more
than the country building the
immigrants, the immigrants
are building the country." He
said there were times when
Israel was taking in
"thousands of immigrants"
daily when Israel was "really
poor, in a terrible shape. We
didn't have a penny in our
pocket."
Peres added that he was
"sure" that if immigration
started again, "optimism and
more optimism will be in-
troduced in our country. And
what is actually an economy if
not the spirit of the people?"
He declared also that he
believed "our economy is now
on the way to recovery. The
people of Israel are ready to
make important sacrifices to
bring order to our house and
all indications are that we are
returning to the right way."
A viewer in Pittsburgh ask-
ed: "What do you see as the
three main challenges for
Israel in the 21st century as
we look to the future?"
The Premier replied: first,
"to make our country true to
its heritage, namely, a country
that is based on moral values,
and demonstrates that spirit,"
asserting it was not necessari-
Contiaued aa Page 17
News Briefs
Hussein: PLO Must Participate But It Mu
Abandon Terrorist Activities
WASHINGTON (JTA) King Hussein of ]nrAa
.:.*_j u.. u~ d_i__*;__ Jordan
lUSt
dicated that to do so the PLO must abandon its terrm-i".
reiterated that the Palestine Liberation Organization m
be a participant in Middle East peace negotiations, but?1
activities.
"It is obvious, for the PLO to participate in a peace oro.
cess in the future then they obviously have to deter
mine what action they have to take to enable them to nlav
their part," Hussein said in an appearance from Amman 1
NBC-TV's "Meet the Press" program. on
While Hussein was vague about his talks two weeks am
with PLO chief Yasir Arafat, he said they did discuss the
recent "cycle of violence" in the Middle East.
Hussein said that "our mutual view" is that these events
represented "setbacks" in which the Palestinians were
"adversely affected more than any other." He indicated
that Jordan expected some agreements on a future course
from the PLO. "I am expecting some answers soon," Hus-
sein said.
Klarsfeld Calls For Deportation To West
Germany
PARIS (JTA) Nazi-hunter Serge Klarsfeld has call-
ed for Alois Brunner's arrest and deportation to West Ger-
many. Klarsfeld, whose wife, Beate, had twice already
gone to Damascus to try and obtain Brunner's expulsion
from Syria, said that the time seems "now ripe" to obtain
Brunner's expulsion from Syria.
Brunner, now 73, is considered to be the highest-ranking
former Nazi still alive. As an aide to Adolf Eichmann he is
believed to have been personally responsible for the depor-
tation of 150,000 Austrian, German, Greek, French and
Slovak Jews who had been put to death in Nazi death
camps. Brunner has been living under the name Georg
Fischer in Syria for the last 20 years.
For Klarsfeld, a recent 12-page interview in which Brun-
ner said he was prepared to leave Damascus and go to Ger-
many to stand trial, was a clear indication that Damascus
now want him to go.
Brunner said in the interview that his only condition on
leaving is "not going to Israel, as I don't want to become a
second Eichmann."
Barbie Reported Dangerously 111
PARIS (JTA) Klaus Barbie's French lawyer said
here that the Nazi war criminal was dangerously sick and
that the French authorities are voluntarily depriving him of
medical assistance to prevent his trial from taking place.
The lawyer, Jacques Verges, charged in a local radio in-
terview broadcast in Lyon that the prison authorities "are
doing their best to obtain either Barbie's death or to bring
him to a point where he will be intellectually unable to de-
fend himself and testify at his trial."
Barbie, who served as Gestapo chief in the city of Lyon
during the Nazi occupation of France is scheduled to go on
trial early next year on charges of crimes against
humanity.
Several former resistance fighters have charged that the
government is reluctant to put Barbie on the stand lest he
compromise former resistance leaders suspected of having
caused the arrest and ensuing death of France's war time
resistance leader Jacques Moulin. Verges' interview is the
first time the authorities are charged with trying to bring
about Barbie's death.
West German-Israel Relations Improving
BONN (JTA) The projected visit of Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres here at the begmnng of 1986 reflects steadily
improved relations between Israel and West Germany, ac-
cording to aides of Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who extended
the invitation to Peres during a recent meeting between
the two leaders at UN headquarters in New York.
Kohl's aides, trying to put behind them Israeli irritation
over Bonn's vigorous condemnation of the bombing of PLO
headquarters in Tunisia, pointed to the steady progress in
contacts between the two nations since Kohl took office in
1982. They recalled as well, that Kohl had put an end to
years of misunderstandings and hesitations that had
characterized the regime of former Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt, who had demonstratively rejected an Israeli in-
vitation to visit Jerusalem.
At the same time, German officials here revealed that
Israeli President Chaim Herzog is also likely to visit Bonn
next year. He was invited, they said, by West German
President Richard von Weiszaecker, who visited Israel
recently despite objections of the Foreign Ministry, which
was concerned about Arab reactions following the Tunis air
aid.
Peres will be the second Israeli Prime Minister to visit
Bonn.


Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 3
Cardin, Kahn Address Board Retreat
8v LLOYD RESNICK
leaking at the Federation
1 !S Retreat on "The State
the Jewish World -
Ulenge tor Jewish Leader-
L- Bill Kahn, executive
K'president of New York's
deration of Jewish Philan-
Copies. began by reviewing
V historical challenges
hich faced the Jewish people
tar World War II: to save the
Lnants of the post-
Wocaust Jewish population,
[build a Jewish state, to pro-
Lje religious and social
Gfare institutions which
Ud meet community needs,
[translate concepts of social
Ltice into real social change,
u to preserve the rich
Irish cultural heritage.
fin terms of accomplishments
ler the last 40 years, Kahn
lid, "Our record is unparallel-
fwe did save that rema-
[nt; we did create the State
[Israel; we have hundreds of
kncies and houses of wor-
lip which serve our people;
I were counted in the fight
\: social justice and we work-
to realize the democratic
eal."
iKahn admitted, however.
Lat in preserving our Jewish
kritage for coming genera-
bns, "we still have a big job
Seadof us."
ICalling the 20 years between
W5and 1985 times of "crises
pd emergencies," Kahn refer-
to the Six-Day War and
le Yom Kippur War as turn-
Ig points in the world's
Yrception of Israel and Jews
general. "We showed the
orld that we won't waffle,"
isaid. "That's where I'm get-
ng a sense of confidence. '
I Kahn said that he notices to-
py a "resurgence and growth
pride among Jewish peo-
le," and he praised our ability
) cohere and accomplish great
lings in times of distress.
Today, the Jewish world is
hited on issues such as Soviet
fewry," Kahn said.
[Referring to the miracle of
eration Moses, made possi-
le by the generous efforts of
laspora Jewry, Kahn said,
[That mini-state of ours saved
housands of lives in one of the
ruly legendary feats of
hodern man."
[Comparing the pre-
lolocaust Jewish con-
piousness to that of today's
few, Kahn said, "We once sat
nivering, unable to assert
:lves; we won't allow that
1 happen today. We're asser-
|ve_now, involved in PACs
increasingly expressive of
ur political aims. There's a
aturity within us today. We
now we can't back off,
cause we've seen that a
^treating or backing down
"I been non-productive."
I Kahn claimed that the
hwish community is
PPected today for its political
pertiveness. Praising the
T>und leadership of those pre-
*nt, Kahn said, "You repre-
sent an avant garde group; the
pay you assert yourselves as
wnmunal leaders has had and
continue to have signifi-
M impact. People like you
ave helped us come out of the
poset."
Kahn then noted statistics
nat suggest great challenges
n preserving the Jewish
Mntage lie ahead: One of
J* Jewish children will be
klf*-v a sinK'e parent; one-
P" of today's Jewish college
Bill Kahn
students will marry out of the
faith; one out of three Jewish
couples will have only one
child, and two out of five
Jewish children in the coming
years will have no Jewish
education.
Faced with the challenge of
maintaining Jewish identity in
the face of modern reality, the
Jewish community, according
to Kahn, "cannot permit a
division between fund-raisers
and service-providers."
Kahn insisted, "No one can
afford to say, 'The campaign
isn't my thing.' All the good
that has happened occurred
because people have hit the
trenches and raised the
funds."
Kahn claimed that Jews will
continue to survive as a peo-
ple, but he expressed concern
regarding the quality of that
survival, and the key to that,
he said, is young people.
Noting that the nature of
family life today necessitates a
re-evaluation of Jewish pro-
gramming for youth, Kahn
claimed that "quality day care
is imperative; we must find
better ways to engage our
young people. We need strong
Hillel groups with quality
staffs on college campuses,
and our Federations should in-
vest in offering scholarships
for travel and study in Israel."
Kahn even suggested the
idea of creating a "Junior
Federation" so that Jewish
youth could express their ideas
and programming needs in an
organized forum.
Asked about the apparent in-
crease in anti-Semitism in the
U.S., Kahn said, "We can
never sit back on our laurels;
we must continue to battle and
to be alert. Nothing
gratuitously will ever come to
us.
CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP
While speaking on "Leader-
ship Responsibility in the Cam-
paign," Kahn again stressed
the importance of fostering
Jewishness in the family.
"Because the Jewish family
is under the most hostile at-
tack in its history, outreach
must be made a communal
priority. Unaffiliated people
need to understand now they
can connect with the Jewish
community," Kahn said.
In light of the threat to the
traditional Jewish family,
Kahn remarked that increased
giving to Federation cam-
paigns is essential to provide
quality pre-school programs,
expanded agency services,
senior citizen outreach pro-
grams, and communication
skills groups for families."
Kahn also suggested that
local synagogues be utilized
more effectively as service
delivery systems, that the
Jewish press feature outstan-
ding Jewish families and that
parents discuss tzedakah and
campaign gifts with their
children.
Federations need to review
their own internal operations,
Kahn said, and utilize pro bono
work available from the com-
munity in order to hold down
costs.
Kahn suggested that
beneficiary agencies be trained
in internal fund-raising techni-
ques which won't adversely af-
fect the general campaign. Ac-
cording to Kahn, agencies
should maximize their fee
structures to improve their
fiscal outlook for the future.
Adding that Federation-
sponsored missions, domestic
and overseas, are vital to pro-
moting campaign giving, Kahn
concluded, "only through ef-
fective campaigning and sound
utilization of funds raised will
we be able to effectively con-
trol the destiny of our Jewish
communties."
Knesset Unit Urged to Forbid Racist
Resolutions
JERUSALEM (JTA) Knesset Speaker Shlomo
Hillel recently urged the Knesset House Committee to
speed up the passage of regulations that would forbid racist
bills.
Hillel warned that it would be a black day for the
legislature and the nation if the Knesset allows a series of
"Nuremberg laws written in the holy tongue," drafted by
Kach MK Meir Kahane, to be introduced and thus become
"formal Knesset documents."
As Hillel took his parliamentary action, several hundred
Jerusalemites, led by Mayor Teddy Kollek, and several
leading intellectuals demonstrated outside the Knesset
against what they called the Knesset's vacillation over
passing anti-racist legislation. A government bill specifical-
ly outlawing racism is currently moving through its com-
mittee stages.
The demonstration outside the Knesset turned raucous
when Kahane himself sought to wade into the crowd and
disrupt a speech by Koliek. Knesset guards had to in-
tervene to prevent him from disrupting the speech.
Kollek said that while there was awareness nationwide of
the racist danger, and while educational action had been
taken on various levels, the legislature was being tardy and
remiss in taking the vital action that was required on the
legal plane.
Leading rightwing ideologue Prof. Yosef Nedava said
Kahane's doctrines were "an alien fire in our sanctuary.
Samir El-Darwish, mayor of the Israeli Arab town of Baka
El-Gharbiye. laid the blame for the rise of Kahan.sm upon
Jews who treated Israeli Arabs as "unwanted guests, and
upon Israeli Arabs who "nursed stupid illusions that Israel
is transient."
"We meet at a very exciting
time in your life as a Federa-
tion," began Shoshana Cardin,
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, "and at a
very challenging time in the
life of the North American
continental Jewish
community."
Mrs. Cardin went on to
describe that excitement and
outline those challenges in an
articulate and inspirational
presentation focused on the
importance of developing uni-
ty and human resources.
After briefly recounting the
history of the Federation
movement, which she said
"preceded any other national
service delivery system and
which today has evolved into
much more than a mechanism
for service delivery," Cardin
observed, "Palm Beach is
tomorrow. You are facing the
problems and recognizing
changes and acquiring the
ability to plan your future."
Cardin emphasized that
"Jewish destiny" is a concept
entailing Jews locally and
around the world.
Stressing the idea that the
annual campaign itself is a
means to an end, Cardin
remarked, "Fund-raising is
the primary tool of Federa-
tion, not the primary func-
tion," which she described as
"acting to enhance the quality
of Jewish life and strengthen
the Jewish community."
Mrs. Cardin then addressed
the issue of inter-Federation
relationships and Federation-
agency relationships. "Each
Federation can learn from the
other in our attempt to
establish a creative continuum
of committed Jews and ad-
vance Jewish values."
On the other hand, Cardin
suggested that "there should
be a healthy, creative tension
between Federation leader-
ship and agency leadership."
As a result of this dialectic,
Cardin said the Federation will
be better able to assess the
needs of the community,
prioritize them and act to
fulfill them.
"Federations and agencies
must trust each other, or the
system will not work. Cardin
observed. "We in Federation
also need to be flexible enough
to agree to help agency leaders
in a crisis, if, for instance,
there's a rapid influx of Soviet
immigrants.
Further defining the role of
Federation and its leadership,
Cardin said, "The Federation
doesn't have to run
everything; there are other en-
tities, and Federations can and
should limit their control. But
they should not relinquish
their authority in helping
shape the future."
"While we must recognize
that there might be other part-
ners that can be brought into
our effort," Cardin added, "we
must also be unafraid to make
decisions, and our leaders, who
should know that all people
Shoshana Cardin
and all needs can't be satisfied
at one time, have to learn to
accept criticism."
Cardin then emphasized the
human, ingathering concept of
Federation. "Money without
people to implement the ideas
will not serve the future," she
began.
"AU humans in the com-
munity," she insisted, "should
be regarded as resources.
There is room for everyone
who has been intimidated or
who has hidden. We cannot af-
ford to lose even one Jew."
The sharing of these human
resources with other non-
Jewish groups is also impor-
tant, said Cardin. "The
Federation in Palm Beach can
help teach the non-Jewish com-
munity to deal with the pro-
blems of the entire communi-
ty; effective human resources
should be shared at all levels,
amongst all organizations. It is
our responsibility to repair and
heal the problems of the world,
not just those we call ours."
Admitting that "problems
don't disappear; they simply
change shape," Cardin spoke
optimistically of the
"convergence of opportunity"
that exists for Jews today.
"We have the freedom to
move, the ability to mobilize,
the freedom to be Jewish open-
ly, a spirit of volunteerism and
a cohesive group of private
citizens who care about socie-
ty," she said.
With all this going for us,
Cardin claimed, "We have the
capacity to raise $1 billion and
to meet the needs that are far
different today then they were
10 years ago.
In conclusion, Shoshana Car-
din called Federation work
"the most exciting opportuni-
ty for human service that ex-
ists today. Federation is the
essence of mispacha, of com-
munal unity."
Shortsightedness and
mediocrity are anathema to
Shoshana Cardin's perception
of Jewish communal work. "I
urge you to remember that the
goal is not 1990 alone; the goal
is to maintain the integrity and
continuity of a creative Jewish
people in the 21st century. As
we advance Jewish values, as
we promote the beauty of
togetherness, we must all
reach beyond our immediate
grasp."
Are You Working in Your Interest
Area?
A free job seminar will be held on Monday,
Dec. 2, at the Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Palm Beach County, Inc., located
at 2250 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 104.
Topic: How To Get The Job I Want!
For more information and advance reserva-
tion, please contact Carol Roth-Barack, M.A.,
Vocational Guidance Counselor, at 684-1'Wl,
9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday,


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 15, 1985
S
Closing Window?! Intelligence Boss On The Recor
I
It still isn't happening. Despite the sunny predictions
that King Hussein would respond to Prime Minister Peres'
generous peace initiative by moving away from the PLO
and toward negotiations, events point to a continuation of
the status quo. Even the PLO seems pleasantly surprised
by the King's hesitation. Speaking of the Oct. 28 meeting in
Amman between Hussein and Yasir Arafat. PLO deputy
Abu Iyadh (Salah Khalaf) said: "I had prepared myself for
some very tough talks but they weren't."
Instead, representatives of the PLO and Jordan met and
discussed neither the PLO's recognizing Israel's right to
exist nor its renouncing terrorism. Hani al-Hasan. another
Arafat aide, said that both sides agreed not to "carry out
any act that could hurt the Feb. 11" PLO-Jordanian accord
that stale formula which envisages a PLO state on the
West Bank linked to Jordan. A Jordanian official told the
Associated Press that Amman "cannot even imagine that
one side could have peace with Israel." This last statement
was an echo of the October Jordanian-Syrian communique
in which the two countries each rejected a separate peace
with Israel.
All this is good news for the terrorists after a month of
setbacks. They had feared that Hussein might kick them
out of the negotiating process or even out of their new
bases in Jordan. But the King seems as reluctant as ever to
do anything at all.
Good news for the PLO is, of course, bad news for the
peace process. Even as the PLO remains in Hussein's good
graces, its spokesmen say that it intends to step up its ter-
rorist operations. Neither Prime Minister Peres nor any
other Israeli leader is going to negotiate with a Jordan
allied with terrorists who kill Israeli and Jewish civilians
worldwide. Nor will Peres accept a terrorist mini-state on
the west bank of the Jordan, a basic PLO demand. King
Hussein knows all this, as he must also know that continu-
ing his alliance with the PLO will abort the current peace
process even before it gets off the ground.
Recently, Assistant Secretary of State Richard Murphy
told a House subcommittee that this "is one of those
moments" when the peace process "can be substantially
advanced." But, he added, "the window of opportunity is
fast" closing. Once again, it is King Hussein who in keep-
ing the window open to the PLO seems to be shutting it
to peace.
(Near East Report)
%
::

where ha* -me l< Gotfe*
"Jewish floridian
In a rare public interview,
the chief of intelligence for the
Israel Defense Forces (IDF)
declared that Yasir Arafat
himself has been involved in
the recent wave of anti-Israel
terrorism. Maj. Gen. Ehud
Barak also detailed Syria's
latest arms acquisitions and
criticized the proposed U.S.
weapons sale to Jordan. He
described Egypt's President
Mubarak as "still in control"
despite internal ferment.
Barak told reporters on
Israel Television that Syria is
still trying to reach a level at
which it can "deal with the
IDF on its own." In the com-
ing vear Damascus will receive
MiG-29's, "the most
sophisticated aircraft the
Soviet Union exports They
are the Soviet answer to the
(U.S.) F-15's and F-16's."
Syria also expects to receive
submarines this vear and is
deploying surface-to-sea
missiles which Barak claimed
could be fired from Syrian
positions north of Lebanon and
hit targets off Haifa or
Ashdod. He warned that the
Soviet SAM-5 anti-aircraft
missiles now under full Syrian
control might be able to hit
planes flying over Tel Aviv.
"Today the Syrians have a
regular army of 500,000 men,
compared to a little fewer than
300,000 in 1982," Barak
noted. He doubted that the
Hafez Assad regime planned
to launch a war soon, but said
it will try to undermine any
"dramatic development" in
the peace process between
Israel, Jordan and Palestinian
Arabs. Syria could do this bv
attempting to assassinate
King Hussein and Arafat or
their top advisers, by subver-
sion or the massing of troops
along their border with Jor-
dan. Should that fail it might
escalate a confrontation with
Israel.
Barak said the main danger
in a delay in political
developments between Israel,
Jordan and the Palestinian
Arabs and between Jerusalem
and Cairo was a "gradual
denuding of the substance of
the peace treaty with Egypt
and ... a possible gradual
slide of Egypt into the circle of
hostility; it may not lead it but
it may be driven to it."
Nevertheless, his assess-
ment of Hosni Mubarak's posi-
tion was hopeful. "Mubarak
has a problem with the (Sunni)
fundamentalists ... He has
many other problems, both
economic and social, and I do
not envy him. At the same
time, he continues to maintain
democracy in Egypt at a level
unprecedented^ since the
revolution. In my opinion, the
bottom line is that he is still in
control of the situation."
Supplying American F-16's
or F-20's, mobile HAWK anti-
aircraft batteries and other
equipment to Jordan is "very
serious," Barak said. "An F-16
can take off with three tons of
bombs from a Jordanian air
base and be over .. any loca-
tion in the center of Israel
within a matter of minutes ..
In our opinion, the Jordanian
army does not need tk
(mobile) batteries for anv
other than aggression. 3L
stationary HAWK bat
Jordan can cover and A
the central sector of its er,
try, 90 percent of its *
tion and almost its \?
infrastructure."
Barak noted that Abu
bas, planner of the Achfl
Lauro piracy, "is one of th
men closest to Arafat Hel
a member of the supreme PL
operational body, the el
ecutive committee, which I
10 members With r<
to some of the latest at*,
abroad and other attacks
know with absolute certain]
that Arafat knew about thj
before and during their in
plementation." Barak sa
that, based on knowledge,
how the PLO operates, "it|
not reasonable to assume tk
at such a sensitive tin
politically, Arafat would i
know about every action wh,
they begin to carry it out."
The intelligence chiJ
predicted more PLO at
"if only to erase or
revenge for the number
failures it has suffered reca
ly." He said Arafat continu
to play the double game ,
diplomacy and terrorisij
simultaneously and "gets <
of or releases himself from |
contradiction between tit,
two channels by a systemati
attempt to avoid shoulder
responsibility for the att
themselves."
(Near East Report)
Student Activists Back
LLOYD RSNK>
o' Palm Beecn Count,
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Comtwung Out Vo.ce end Federation Rerorlr-
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Friday, November 15,1985
Volume 11
2 KISLEV 5746
Number 36
The PLO's recent image
problems were far from the
minds of 25 Jewish students
from campuses around the
country who gathered at
the PLO's Washington "in-
formation" offices. They
were there to mourn Leon
Klinghoffer and to demand
that the U.S. government
shut down PLO offices in this
country. Rabbi Morris Gor-
don of Potomac, Maryland
stood before a wooden casket
and a wheelchair and prayed
that Klinghoffer's death "not
be in vain." He asked that the
world "take heed that he was
murdered by the PLO. May
the world rid itself of ter-
rorism." Then the rabbi and
the students chanted the
Jewish prayer for the dead
which they followed with a
Hebrew song extolling peace.
Many of the same students
who protested PLO ter-
rorism were out again to pro-
test Soviet oppression of
Jews. This time the students
really put their money where
their mouths are. Twenty-
two of them were arrested
and face maximum sentences
of six months in jail and a
SI00 fine. (Unlike the South
African government, the
Soviets do press charges
against those who
demonstrate at their
embassies.)
Jonathan Cohen, a student
at the University of
Maryland, said that he
organized the protest in
response to Soviet Premier
Gorbachev's statement that
Jews in the Soviet Union
have more rights than Jews
do anywhere else. "Gor-
bachev appeals to the West
with smiles and kind words,
but we will not let him cover
up the heinous crimes against
humanity which take place in
his country every day."
The 22 students, who were
charged with demonstrating
within 500 feet of an em-
bassy, will have to return to
Washington for trial and
judgment. For many of them,
the costs of transportation to
the capital and of room and
board there will make a ma-
jor dent in their finances. In
the long term, all of them will
have to live with the perma-
nent effects of having an ar-
rest and a possible convic-
tion on their records.
But Cohen and his activist
friends aren't daunted. "We
spent a few hours in jail. But
what we have experienced
pales in comparison to what
our fellow Jews, and others,
endure in the Soviet Union.
All we are sacrificing is some
convenience. Our Soviet
brothers and sisters put their
lives on the line."
The spirit of these students
is heartening. For the L_
few years, it has become com-1
monplace to argue that stu-l
dent activism is dead thai
it died after the 1960's. But!
now we see students who are I
willing to do far more thanf
engage in mass demonstra-l
tions. They organize and I
demonstrate in the sure I
knowledge that their ac-
tivism will have conse-
quences. On the negative
side, they may spend time in
jail and may carry the perma-1
nent stigma of arrest.
However, on the positive side
is the sense of accomplish-1
ment they feel. Says Cohen,
"Look, the story of our!
demonstration was carried
on Radio Liberty and Voice
of America. That means that |
some of the people we are do-
ing this for actually know
about it. If it gives them en-
couragement and lets the
Soviet government know
that we are not giving up on
Soviet Jews, we will be ac-
complishing a lot. We intend
to continue the struggle."
M.J. Rosenberg
Court Rules In Favor Of Kahane
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Supreme Court ordered the
Knesset Presidium to allow Rabbi Meir Kahane, leader of
Kach, to introduce two bills it had previously rejected on
grounds that they included racist statements. One bill
stated that only Jews could become citizens of Israel. The
other forbade marriages between Jews and non-Jews.
The court ruled that the Presidium was not authorized to
bar the introduction of a bill which aimed to implement the
platform of a Knesset member. The judges added that they
had no choice but to follow the law strictly even if the price
for doing so involved the expression of detestable news.
The judges said they understood the reasons the
Presidium had turned down the bills. They concurred that
the bills triggered horrible memories, and could damage
Israel's democratic character.


H Radio/TV/ Rim ^js
nel 5. v^th host Barbara Gordon On Location Jth Pro-"
t Renewal in Hod HaSharon fPart in
MOSAIC Sunday, Nov. 17, 9 a.m.
nel 5 with host Barbara Gordon On L
ject Renewal in Hod HaSharon (Part II).
I/CHAYIM Sunday, Nov. 17, 7:30 a.m WPRR
1340-AM with host Rabbi Mark S. Golub -TheJewUh
Listener's Digest, a radio magazine.
SHALOM Sunday, Nov. 17, 6 a.m. WPEC Chanel
12 (8:30 a.m. WFL* TV-29) with host Richard pS
ISRAEL PRESS REVIEW Thursday, Nov 21 115
p.m. WLIZ 1340-AM A summary of news and'com-
mentary on contemporary issues.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Community
Calendar
November 15
Jewish Federation General Assembly Thru 11/17
November 16
Temple Judea "Goodtimers"
General Assembly Thru 11/17
Jewish Federation
November 17
Jewish Federation General Assembly Jewish Federa-
tion In-Service Teacher Workshop, 9-3 p.m. Jewish
Federation Century Village Campaign Kick-Off
Meeting, 10 To 12 Noon Congregation Anshei Sholom
Men's Club dance and collation 6 p.m. Temple Beth El
Men's Club 10 a.m. Temple Beth David congregational
picnic Temple Beth Sholom Men's Club 9:30 a.m.
Jewish Community Center Jewish book fair and open air
market 10 a.m.
November 18
Jewish Federation Women's Division Business and Pro-
fessional Meeting 5:30 p.m. Jewish Family and
Children's Service board 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Tikvah -
1 p.m. Pioneer Women Ezrat board Women's
American ORT: Palm Beach homecoming luncheon noon
Temple Emanu-EI Fashion show noon Jewish Com-
munity Day School executive board 7:45 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Vac-had board 10 a.m. Pioneer Women -
Theodore Herzl spa at Regency thru l'/^l Jewish
Federation Kxecutive Committee 4 p.m.
November 19
Jewish Federation Leadership Development Committee
- 8 p.m. Temple Beth El Sisterhood paid up membership
dinner X p.m. Women's American ORT Boynton Beach
-1 p.m. Yiddish Culture Group Century Village 10 a.m.
women's American ORT Lakes of Poinciana board -
12:30 p.m. Congregations Anshei Sholom Sisterhood -
12:30 p.m. Hadassah Henrietta Szold 1 p.m.
Haiiassah Lee Vassil noon Jewish Federation Soviet
Jewry Task Force 1:30 p.m. Jewish Federation -
Board Retreat Committee 5 p.m.
November 20
Jewish Federation Women's Division Jewish Women
Assembly Meeting 10 a.m. Jewish Federation
Women's Division Executive Committee 12 noon
Hadassah Shalom 12:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Women Olam
board -10 a.m. Women's Ameican ORT Golden Rivers -
12 noon Women's American ORT Willow Bend MEED -
1 p.m. Jewish Community Center board 8 p.m.
Hadassah West Boynton board 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith
No. 3015 Jewish Federation Community Planning
Meeting 4 p.m. Central Conservative Synagogue con-
gregational meeting 7:30 p.m.
November 21
National Council of Jewish Women Okeechobee 12:30
P-m. Golden Lakes Temple Men's Club 9:30 a.m.
Hadassah Rishona study workshop Hadassah Yovel -
noon B'nai B'rith Palm Beach Council board 10 a.m.
Hadassah Z'hava National Council of Jewish Women -
Event 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Golda Meir noon
Women's American ORT West Palm Beach board 1
P-m. Israel Bonds cocktail reception 5:30 p.m.
by
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Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 5
JCDS Holds Barbecue
Over 300 people attended
the Jewish Community Day
School's Ninth Annual
Barbecue and Raffle on Sun-
day, Oct. 27, making it the
most successful in the history
of the school. The wet weather
did little to dampen the en-
thusiasm of everyone there,
and a break in the rain provid-
ed an opportunity for an in-
tense softball game between
parents of grades K-3 and
parents of grades 4-8. Ip addi-
tion to the softball game there
were clowns, a volleyball game
and enough food and drink to
accommodate everyone.
The climax of the Barbecue
was a raffle with the holder of
the winning ticket receiving a
prize of $5,000.
Under the co-chairmanship
of Joan Tochner and Robert
Abrams, a record number of
tickets were sold. The
Barbecue was not only a finan-
cial success for the JCDS but
also a wonderful day of family
activity and socialization.
Parents battled it out on the
softball field during the 9th
annual JCDS barbecue.
A clown was on hand to paint the faces of the youngsters,
whose enthusiasm was not dampened by the inclement
weather.
Why Aunt Sadie missed
her sister Ida's funeral.
It could have been different with
The GUARDIAN PLAN, program.
It's not easy for a seventy-five year old woman to travel over 1200
miles from New York to Florida for a funeral. So, when Ida died suddenly,
in Florida, Sadie couldn't get there. She was heartbroken. It could have
been different. Ida had bought a cemetery plot in Florida instead of using
the family property up North. She thought it would be too expensive and
too much trouble to hold funeral services back home.
But the fact is. It's not.
Funeral service between Florida and the New York metropolitan area
can be accomplished at surprisingly low cost. And in a manner that
makes it as easy as possible for the family. In fact, RIVERSIDE and the
other members of the guardian family of Jewish funeral directors
BOULEVARD-PARK WEST, SCHWARTZ BROTHERS and JEFFER have
been helping families in this way countless times each year.
So before you make a decision, talk to The GUARDIAN PLAN
counselor In your area. He'll tell you about The GUARDIAN PLAN
insurance funded prearranged funeral program. He'll compare services
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of riorida. the Initial face amount of Ike Benefit
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funerals In excess of S5.000.00 shall be funded through a trust established In
Chapter 639 Da. Stats


Pag^6 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 15, 1985

JDC, Jewish Agency, Project Renewal,
And Local Needs Highlighted At Board Retreat
Rescue, Relief
And Reconstruction
Heinz Eppler, Federation
board member and presient
of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC),
explained the history, relief
projects and allocations pro-
cess of the JDC.
The JDC, founded in 1914 to
bring relief to Jewish set-
tlements in Palestine and
Eastern Europe which were
caught in the upheaval of
World War I, "has helped br-
ing miracles to pass," said Ep-
pler. "The history of the JDC
parallels the history of our peo-
ple," he continued.
Noting that the JDC provid-
ed more aid to Jews during
and after World War II than
all the world's governments
combined. Eppler observed
that "the JDC has changed as
the needs of Jewish people
have changed. Having worked
over the years in 70 countries,
we now support life-saving and
life-sustaining programs on
every part of the earth."
Eppler then introduced two
JDC-produced films depicting
a wide range of relief, educa-
tional and cultural programs
for the Jews of North Africa
and Eastern Europe.
After the films, Eppler ex-
plained that of the $49.2
million JDC budget in 1985, 72
percent was allocated to relief
and welfare programs and 21
percent was put to work for
Jewish cultural survival
through educational and social
development programs.
Eppler emphasized that
since 1939 the bulk of JDC's
income has come from
American Jews in the form of
UJA/Federation campaign
contributions.
"The scope of our work is
global," Eppler said. "We
have directly helped over
500,000 people, and no com-
munity is too small for our
aid."
Eppler concluded by describ-
ing another JDC function:
"We are the guardians of the
well-being of Jewish com-
munities at risk," and he cited
preventative programs under-
taken in Tunisia, Syria, Iran
and Ethiopia, the latter a coun-
try in which JDC is the only
Jewish organization permitted
to provide aid.
Eppler also described the
JDC sponsored Relief-in-
Transit program, which over
the years has sent 86,000 life-
sustaining packages to the
Jews of the Soviet Union.
Eppler praised the dedica-
tion of the JDC board of direc-
tors and encouraged Jews
everywhere to consider JDC's
important work when making
their '86 campaign pledges.
The Building of a Nation
As a member of the Jewish
Agency's board of governors,
H. Irwin Levy's explanation of
the agency's history, operation
and goals emphasized the ab-
solute necessity of Jewish
Agency work to Israel's
future.
Levy described the original
Jewish Agency as a "shadow
government in Palestine"
created in 1929 to support the
':uv population.
After the creation of the
State of Israel in 1948, many
leaders of the Jewish Agency
became officials in the govern-
ment, and in the early 50's the
decision was made to maintain
the Jewish Agency on a conti-
nuing basis.
The Jewish Agency, like
JDC, receives its money
through the generosity of Jews
around the world as they par-
ticipate in UJA/Federation
campaigns. But what did the
Jewish Agency do with the
$414 million it raised in last
year's campaign?
Levy said that Jewish Agen-
cy funds are divided into
several areas, which he
categorized as "humanitarian
needs and nation-building
programs."
Describing the Jewish Agen-
cy as "the immigration depart-
ment of Israel." Levy noted
that more than 20 percent of
the funds received by the
Jewish Agency are allocated to
Immigration and Absorption,
because successful nliyifi is
imperative to the strengthen-
ing of Israel.
Specifically commenting on
current immigration/absorp-
tion needs, Levy said. "Ethio-
pian absorption will be a multi-
million dollar effort over many
years, and if there is a large in-
flux of Soviet immigrants, as
we hope, the Jewish Agency's
work will become that much
more crucial."
The Jewish Agency also
funds 90 percent of the Youth
Aliyah program and through
its housing company,
Amigour, provides and main-
tains housing for 165,000
Israeli citizens.
The Jewish Agency also
sponsors a myriad of social and
educational programs and an
ongoing rural settlement pro-
ject which helps moshainm
with economic and social
problems.
"We do a great job," said
Levy, assessing the effec-
tiveness of the Jewish Agency.
"Our work has brought and ab-
sorbed 1,800,000 people into
Israel. We have helped build a
nation that in the 50's couldn't
feed itself but which is now
producing twice as much as it
consumes."
In conclusion, Levy said.
"All the things that we have to
do as Jews, all the good causes
in Israel and around the world,
take money. The pie has got to
get bigger; more people have
to give, and those who already
give need to give more."
A Direct Link
The central importance of
Project Renewal is reflected
this year in its name being in-
cluded in the 1986 campaign
title.
Marva Perrin, Project
Renewal chairperson, explain-
ed why Project Renewal is-a
main priority for diaspora
Jewry.
Mrs. Perrin referred to
Menachem Begin's challenge
to diaspora Jewry in the 1970's
to help to solve Israel's social
problems in targeted
neighborhoods where decay,
delinquency and educational
deprivation were rampant.
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, twinned
with the neighborhoods Giora
and Gil Amal in Hod
HaSharon. has helped brin^
about what Mrs. Perrin called
"a refined system of communi-
ty leadership" in these once-
depressed neighborhoods.
Although much physical re-
juvenation has taken place in
Hod HaSharon, Mrs. Perrin
emphasized that ongoing
educational and social pro-
gramming are the keys to Hod
HaSharon's overall
rehabilitation.
"What we had dreamed of, a
tight, functional community,
where the citizens take respon-
sibility for their future through
political and social involve-
ment, is becoming a reality,"
Mrs. Perrin said.
Jeanne Levy, past president
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, remarked
that "our connection with
these people has to be ongoing.
They now have dignity and
hope where they once had
despair."
H. Irwin Levy. Federation
board member, offered con-
crete evidence of Project
Renewal's success: "Before
Project Renewal, not a single
child from our neighborhoods
went to college, and there was
an 80 percent high school drop-
out rate. As of 1985, on the
other hand, 85 percent of these
kids graduated high school and
17 of them are now in college.
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If you multiply this success
many times throughout Israel,
it is easy to see just how impor-
tant Project Renewal is."
Local Needs Examined
Erwin H. Blonder, president
of the Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach County, reminded
everyone that the local com-
munity also benefits from
UJA/Federation campaigns.
In fact, in 1985, 40 percent
of the funds raised in our com-
munity, more than $1.7
million, stayed "in town" to
provide services and programs
which enhance and support
Jewish life here. But Blonder
emphasized that as our com-
munity grows, so does the
pressure to provide services.
He referred to the agencies
and departments which direct
such important social and
educational programs as
"crucial to the survival of our
Jewish community."
Blonder cited plans for
massive expansion of the
Jewish Community Center
facilities as the beginning of
several projects which will
have to be undertaken.
"Our pre-school and
geriatric center have long
waiting lists. We need expan-
sion of our elderly programs,
and our single parent families
should be reached out tn j
care, expanded counsel^
vices, congregate housinf
a broader-based leaded
development program aj
essential priorities," Bin
said.
"People have to be ,fc
that a 1986 campaign cont3
tion will translate itself!
valuable services which J
UL Tay utilize." BloT
added.
Emphasizing the unity of i
Jewish people, Blonder
eluded by saying. "With,,
strong local community
can t have a strong Israel."
Secretary
Needed
The Jewish Federation of
Palm Beach Countvisii
need of a secretary witk
good steno and tvpinr
skills. Permanent "posi-
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Update
Opinion
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 7
ByTOBYF.WILK
|qrae] ranks ^ one of the
nt literate countries in the
Ud despite a six day work
k which allows Israelis less
time than their Euro-
, counterparts. Even
ueti economic times have not
couraged Israelis from buy-
books at this year's
threw Book Week; many
aelis left book stores with
I shopping bags. The tradi-
al value attached to
ding and study persists in
modern Jewish State.
ie gone from being the
people of the Book" to being
lie People of Books.
Iterature, biographies and
Jurnalistic reportage are
Lored. Cookbooks and
Eildren's books have also
Eared themselves. Israeli
Qers are highly discerning
h he Holocaust and the Six Day
Par are read in nearly all sec-
of Israeli society. These
aumatic events foster na-
nnal solidarity and a sense of
bllective identity in much the
ne way as the Bible's
Lrmer function.
| The first International Con-
ess on Maimonide's life was
in Cordoba and attracted
kholars from all over the
The Chief Rabbi of
nee led a service in the tiny
4th Century Synagogue. A
kaimonides Center is to be set
in a beautiful old house in
i heart of the old Jewish
uarter of Cordoba.
[The Israeli Navy unveiled a
pissile-armed Hydrofoil suited
pr coastal defense. It is ex-
cted to be an important ele-
. in the Navy's mission of
eeping the country's
coastline free
terrorists.
of infiltrating
The Italian and British
governments both refuse to
talk with their own native ter-
rorists the Italian Red
Brigade and the Irish
Republican Army, but both
governments sit down with
PLO terrorists and demand
that Israel do the same.
The seven Israelis murdered
by an Egyptian "policeman"
at a tourist site in the Sinai,
were denied medical aid and
died from loss of blood. The
site of the murders was at Ras-
al-Burqa where the presence
of Egyptian soldiers is ex-
pressly banned according to
the Egyptian-Israel Peace
Treaty. A Syrian government
newspaper praised this attack
as a heroic act and referred to
the murders as evidence of "a
new radiant sun" rising in the
sky. The seven killed included
three small children.
The only sovereign Jewish
State from the time of the an-
cient Kingdom of Israel to the
modern State of Israel existed
in India. After Israeli
statehood, half the Bene Israel
community of India 20,000
of them emigrated to Israel
ORT, an organization which
promotes Tradition with
Technology, is celebrating its
20th Anniversary in India
where it administers girls and
boys' schools for over 700
students. ORT-India
graduates boast a 100 percent
job placement rate. This is no
mean feat for a sub-continent
of poverty.
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A distressing scene in
Moscow is young refuseniks
sweeping streets because they
are not allowed to go to
University.
Ariel Sharon is suing Time
magazine's European edition
in a Tel Aviv court. Last year,
a New York Court ruled that
Time's report in 1983 was
defamatory and false, but did
not award Mr. Sharon
damages because, it ruled, the
report had not been published
"with malice."
ORT was given the Interna-
tional Gold Mercury Award for
its outstanding contributions
in the field of Development
and International Co-
operation. The Award is spon-
sored by the Gold Mercury In-
ternational Association which
supports International
Cooperation.
The Simon Wiesenthal
Center has opened a Canadian
office to ensure that the more
than 3,000 Nazi war criminals
still hiding there are brought
to justice.
Intensive Crackdown on Terrorists
HEBRON (JTA) An unusually large force of Israeli
army personnel and border police raided the large Arab
mountain village of Yatta just south of here, conducting a
house-to-house search for arms and suspected terrorists,
demolishing two houses belonging to alleged terrorists, ar-
resting 21 suspects, and imposing a 36-hour curfew.
The raid, unprecedented in its scope, was conducted
under a new IDF anti-terror policy utilizing unconventional
methods and means in the fight against terrorism, military
sources said. One of its purposes, the sources stated, was to
deter potential terrorists by putting entire villages under
curfew and conducting thorough searches for terrorists
and weapons.
Senate Unit Blocks Proposal to Hike Amount
of Cash Transfer Funds Tor Egypt
WASHINGTON (JTA) A proposal to raise the
amount of cash transfer funds designated for Egypt in the
1986 foreign aid bill was blocked in a Senate subcommittee,
reflecting lingering resentment of Egypt's handling of the
Achille Lauro hijacking.
The proposal to grant Egypt double the $100 million
originally requested by the Administration, granting $85
million more than the amount approved in the Foreign Aid
authorization bill last summer, was introduced to the Ap-
propriation Committee's Foreign Operations Subcommit-
tee by subcommittee chairman. Bob Kasten (R., Wis.) and
Daniel Inouye (D., Hawaii).
Although the change would not have added to the total
amount of $815 million in economic support funds already
approved for Egypt, it would have increased the share of
aid that Egypt would receive in direct cash transfers.
The move was blocked by Sen. Arlen Specter (R., Pa.),
who called for a cut in the already approved cash transfer
grant from $115 million to $100 million, as an expression of
anger over Egypt's handling of the Achille Lauro cruise
ship tragedy.
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Haua
15. I
Shultz Reiterates
Direct Negotiations Are The Name of the Game'
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Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 9
The Face Of Violence: 10 Order Members On Trial
By ELLEN MARKS
. SEATTLE (JTA) Ten
Lnbers of The Order, a
Ljoien t anti-Semitic
Northwest-based sect, are on
rial at the federal courthouse
j,ere for carrying out 67
^keteering acts including
ro murders, three armored
Lr robberies, and
[ounterfeiting as part of
heir plot to kill Jews, deport
on-whites, and overthrow the
ederal government. The trial,
LhJch began last month, is ex-
pected to conclude by the end
| [f November, and a verdict
nded down toward the end
^December.
i Prosecutors have chosen to
barge the group with
[iolating the broadly-written
acketeering law, under which
hey must prove that each of
he accused committed at least
jro crimes as part of the con-
spiracy. Charges for specific
Irimes may be filed later by
lute officials.
Former members of The
brder have taken the witness
Itand under plea-bargain
cements. Eleven members
pve pleaded guilty, one faces
nurder charges in Missouri,
ind another is a fugitive who
fas recently placed on the
FBI's Most Wanted List. All
Jie jurors are white and non-
lewish.
Alan Berg, a popular radio
ersonality in Denver, was
ssassinated by The Order,
government prosecutors
(liege. Iwcause he was Jewish
Ind relished baiting anti-
Semitic callers on his talk
Ihow program. The media star
Vas executed in the driveway
\i his Denver home on June
B, 1984. An FBI agent
estified that the murder
Jreapon used to pump 12
plets into Berg's body had
en converted to a fully
Automatic machine gun that
pa capable of firing 960
ounds a minute.
I FBI agents testified they
Inked alleged triggerman
^Iruce Carroll Pierce to the
nurder by matching machine
[un bullets found at the Berg
nurder scene with spent car-
ridges found at a home Pierce
pnted in Troy, Montana.
Although several of Berg's
neighbors said they had heard
the deadly machine gun fire
Including one woman who said
It shook her apartment
there were no witnesses to the
prime. Denver authorities have
pot filed murder charges.
The Berg murder was
Pescribed in graphic detail by
Ws widow Judith Berg, who
N dinner with the victim the
f'ght of his death and had
pelped him prepare for the
pext day's radio show. The
P'c: gun control.
Berg, a non-practicing
M*yer who held liberal
Political views, was featured in
CBS-TV "60 Minutes" seg-
ment that was shown to jurors
V which he acknowledged the
Pager of publicly taking on
Jgntwing leaders. "Hopefully,
W legal training will prevent
ne from saying the thing that
*>" kill me, and I've come
wfully dose," he told the
|nterviewer.
.Peter Boyles, a colleague of
lDerg s for over five years, said
Fe victim was a master at in-
r*tlve and the "acid-tongue"
|PProach of creating con-
poversy to attract listeners.
He would interrupt controver-
sial callers, hang up on them
and then deride their views
after they were off the air.
Government prosecutors
have alleged that Berg was
selected by The Order as a
target for execution at the urg-
ing of defendant David Lane
accused of driving the
gateaway car. A friend
testified that Lane, who lived
in Denver and disliked Berg's
political views, once played her
a tape of the Berg show and
called the radio star "a filthy
Jew." According to Elizabeth
Dracon, Lane "said in one of
his typical cliches: somebody
ought to shoot that guy."
Another motive was provid-
ed by a controversial show in
1983, during which Berg's
guest was Lane's former
employer, the publisher of a
rightwing Colorado farm
publication, prosecutors
allege. The program publiciz-
ing a series of anti-Semitic ar-
ticles published by the
"Primrose and Cattlemen's
Gazette" resulted in a drop of
advertising, which prompted
the paper to cut jobs, including
Lane's position as a security
guard.
Other witnesses including
former Order members have
testified that several neo-Nazis
admitted involvement in the
murder, citing their hatred for
Berg because of his public deri-
sion toward callers who ex-
pressed anti-Semitic opinions.
The prosecution has argued
that Berg was one of several
well-known Jews targeted for
possible assassination by The
Order. On the hit list were
"important figures in society,
either Jews thought to be
detrimental to our society or
white traitors those in
power who went along with
the destruction of the white
race," former Order member
Denver Daw Parmenter
testified at the start of the
trial.
Among them were also
former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, television
producer Norman Lear, the
three national TV network
heads, and Morris Dees, a
southern attorney involved in
monitoring the Ku Klux Klan.
Several members of The
Order had also considered
bombing a Seattle hotel during
a visit by French banker Baron
de Rothschild, but discarded
the plan because they lacked
the time to acquire adequate
explosives, Parmenter said.
According to six main goals
of The Order, assassination of
prominent Jews was necessary
because of its perceived
domination of the U.S. govern-
ment, what members called
ZOG, the Zionist Occupied
Government. Order adherents
believed in the Christian Iden-
tity movement theory, accor-
ding to which "the Jews are
the prophecy of the devil,"
Parmenter said. "The respon-
sibility of the white race is to
destroy the race of the Jews."
Former Order members
testified that leader Robert
Mathews recruited neo-Nazis
who belonged to various
groups across the country and
shared his frustration about a
lack of commitment to putting
their radical beliefs into action.
Mathews died in a shootout
last year after a 36-hour stan-
doff with FBI agents on
Whidbey Island, Washington.
The Order envisoned itself
as the financier of other
rightwing groups, and made
donations from counterfeiting
operations and robberies, in-
cluding a $3.6 million armored
car heist in Ukiah, Calif. The
money was also used to pay
Order members a $20,000
yearly salary, and to purchase
an arsenal of guns and ex-
plosives, many of which were
stored at the group's military
training camp in northern
Idaho, according to reports.
Parmenter testified that one
former member was given
$200,000 in a bizarre plan to
contact scientists who could
develop laser weapons and
thought-control systems for an
Aryan takeover.
At one point, witnesses
testified, the group unsuc-
cessfully sought outside funds
from an Arab student group at
the University of Washington,
and discussed contacting the
Syrian Embassy in
Washington, D.C., because of
a perceived sympathy to The
Order's anti-Semitic cause.
Former members who have
taken the stand have provided
a variety of reasons for taking
The Order oath vowing
violence and hatred. For some,
it was an easy way to earn
money and to attain a purpose
in life.
"I was a very unstable in-
dividual," said Parmenter,
who added he changed his
views after reading the Bible
in his jail cell. "I was looking
for something to (give me) self
worth ... fighting for my
race. It gave me something to
blame my situation on."
Defense attorneys contend-
ed in their opening arguments
that their clients were political
victims. The jurors were in-
structed to judge the defen-
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dants solely on the evidence
without being influenced by
their unpopular white
supremacist views.
The expressed violence of
The Order has prompted un-
precedented security
measures at the courthouse.
Parking is banned around the
downtown building, and
streets are blocked when the
shackled defendants are
brought to and from the daily
proceeding. Marshals keep
vigil by sitting in two rows in
front of the courtroom and
standing guard near the
witness stand.
Miracle of Childbirth
. Experienced By Woman
With Turner's Syndrome
JERUSALEM A 6 lb. 3
oz. baby girl was born Wednes-
day, Oct. 23 to a 36 year old
Israeli woman without ovaries
at Hadassah-Hebrew Universi-
ty Medical Center here as a
result of treatment by the
Gynecology and Obstetrics
Department, headed by Dr.
Joseph Schenker. This is the
first known instance of a
woman born without ovaries
giving birth in medical history.
This birth, the first utilizing
the Hadassah Medical Center's
techniques for ovum donation,
is an even greater
breakthrough than the birth
last year of a healthy baby to a
woman with non-functioning
ovaries at the Queen Victoria
Medical Center in Melbourne,
Australia.
The ramifications of the uses
of this technique include
achieving normal pregnancies
for many women without
ovaries or whose ovaries have
been damaged or destroyed
through radiation, surgery, or
ectopic pregnancy.
The mother, who delivered
by Caesarean section, has a
congenital defect known as
Turner's Syndrome, which is
characterized by an absence of
ovaries from birth. Women
with this condition lack certain
female hormones, do not
menstruate and up until now
could not become pregnant.
Turner's Syndrome affects
one out of every 5,000 women
in the world today. There are
about 300 such women in
Israel at present.
The birth was made possible
by the development of the
technique of ovum donations.
The woman conceived after an
ovum, donated by a volunteer,
was fertilized with her hus-
band's sperm in vitro and im-
planted after 48 hours. Her
uterus had been prepared
previously by the setting up of
a sophisticated artificial hor-
monal cycle which duplicated
the natural cycle of women
with ovaries. Doctors at the
Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical Center continued to
administer hormones after the
successful implantation to
keep the pregnancy viable and
the baby was brought to term.
The ability of achieving
pregnancy in women with
Turner's Syndrome was
described in a scientific paper
given by the Hadassah scien-
tists at the Conference of the
European Society for Human
Reproduction held in Bonn,
Germany in June, 1985.
The Hadassah team consists
of Drs. Joseph Schenker,
Daniel Navot, Neri Laufer,
Rita Kisselowitz, Uri
Margoliot, Abe Levine and
Ronnie Rabinowitz. Four
members of the team, Drs.
Schenker, Navot, Laufer and
Levine, have been invited to
attend an international con-
ference in Australia in
November 1985 to describe the
new technique.
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.
Page 10 The Jewish FToridan of Palm Beach Comity/Friday, Novqriber 15, 1985
Jerome Melman. executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Center, spoke of
plans for a new JCC facility.
Board Retreat Ad\
Barbara Steinberg, executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Day School, focaaed
on educational excellence
and announced the Bar Mitz-
vah celebration planned for
JCDS.
federationI
OFRUau
COUNTY'
Federation president Erwin H. Blonder played an important
role in all of the weekend's activities, including leading a
discussion of local needs.
Acting executive director of
the Jewish Family and
Children's Service. Ned
Goldberg, stressed the need
for increased staffing, voca-
tional workshops and
statistics gathering.
Morse Geriatric Center ex-
ecutive director E. Drew
Gaekenheimer described
plans for facility and service
expansion.
Women- Division president Mollie Fitterman spoke about
the accomplishments ano outreach efforts of Women's
Division.

Calling Palm
Jewish communities
Blonder, president of I
County, announced
Board Retreat in .
ference Center on Frid
"We are here to <
"and to promote betteri
its agencies and the
Jewish people."
At the outset Bio
from the more than 601
sharing of ideas and .
important to the future]
The Federation Board Retreat allowed lay leaders and pro-
fessionals to share ideas, evaluate strategies and plan for the
future.


JCDS board member Max Tochner prepares Schwartz waits at first and Ma
to bat while young t^fff Adam pl*ys off the line.
Erwin H. Blonder makes the ceremonial first pitch during
the First Annual Communitv Softball Game. Playing second
is Robert Levy, who west 3 for 5 with 4 RBIs.
Communications Director
Ronm Epstein, who pitched a
1W shutout, helped herself
y swinging a big bat.
Presidents Erwin H. Blonder and Ms*"
ward to a very successful year.


Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 11
\s Federation Goals
^B1
~*J
Hr^ BL

I / I \ ^'^B P" Hi Ma
^L
l^m _/-*MAMl
I rJ
. p ^H^^Sb -s~<^ Fjfl hi Vv9 i&MHMtflH Main. ^^^ ^^3f*--^^
All the programs at the Board Retreat were well-attended and well-received.
' President Heinz Eppler explained the purpose and func-
i of the Joint Distribution Committee.
|e of the most vibrant
States," Erwin H.
leration of Palm Beach
the 1986 Federation
at Dodgertown Con-
lother Blonder said,
' between Federation,
Icies which serve the
Led total participation
jtendeci. adding that "a
i this weekend will be
knitv."
The Long Range Planning Committee, chaired by Alan
Shulman, discussed future plans in the areas of governance,
human resources. Federation-agency relations and campaign.
Shoshana Cardin and Bill Kahn were the featured speakers
over the weekend.
Robert Levy, Federation board member and chairman of the
Board Retreat, greeted participants at the opening session.
Project Renewal chairperson Marva Perrin described the
Sast achievements and future goals of our "twinning" with
[od HaSharon.
lor-
the history and goals of the Jewish Agency.
i
General campaign chairman Arnold Lampert introduced Bill
Kahn, who discussed campaign leadership.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 15, 1985
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Century Lodge No. 2939 is sponsoring a gala New
Year's Weekend at Harder Hall, Sebring, Fla. on Dec. 29
to Jan. 1. This event will include a special New Year's Eve
Party, unlimited golfing and tennis, gourmet breakfasts
and superb dinners, and a welcome cocktail party. For
reservations call Bernard Friesler, Victor Duke, Louis
Greenstein, West Palm Beach.
Haifa Lodge regular meeting will be held on Sunday,
Nov. 24, 9:30 a.m., at the Royal Palm Clubhouse, 22d Ave.
and North Federal Highway.
Guest speaker will be Nicholas Cassandra, Mayor of
Boynton Beach, whose topic will be The Past and Future of
Boynton Beach.
Lake Worth Lodge No. 3016 has arranged for the show-
ing of "The Golden Years of Second Avenue" at its
meeting on Monday, Nov. 18, 7:45 p.m. at the Poinciana
Golf and Racquet Club in Lake Worth. This film is a
nostalgic and entertaining story of an era and part of New
York known to all. There is no charge for admission. All are
welcomed.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
Masada Chapter regular meeting Tuesday, Nov. 26 at
the Chase Federal Bank in the Cross County Mall at
Military Trail and Okeechobee Blvd. at 7 p.m.
Guest speaker will be Sara Halbert, a New York City
Criminal lawyer, whose very controversial subject will be
"Euthanasia, to be or not to be."
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
BOYNTON BEACH CHAPTER
Coming events:
Tuesday, Nov. 12 Study Group Home of Helen
Milch. "A Jury Of Her Peers" by Helen Glaspel, a short
story and discussion.
Monday, Nov. 18 General Meeting Royal Palm Club
House, 544 NE 22 Ave., Boynton Beach. Guest speaker
Watson E. Duncan III.
Tuesday, Nov. 19 Trip to Lannan Galleries, 601 Lake
Ave., Lake Worth. Tour begins 2 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 25 Book Review "Lords of Discipline"
by Pat Conroy, will be reviewed by Elma DiFiore, at the
Royal Palm Club House at 1 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 3, 4, 5, 6 Regency Spa. For reservations
call Helen Milch or Thelma Adlowitz.
HADASSAH
Aliya Lake Worth Chapter following coming events:
Nov. 27 to 29 Thanksgiving trip. Three days, two
nights. Visit Cypress Gardens; stay at the Ramada Inn in
Cocoa; Celebrity Dinner Theatre in Orlando; sightseeing in
St. Augustine; Happy Hour and deluxe Thanksgiving Din-
ner, with live entertainment and dancing; flea market in
Cocoa and many extras.
Dec. 30 to Jan. 1 New Year's Trip. Three days, two
nights. Stay at Ramada Inn in Clearwater; Golden Apple
Dinner Theatre; Busch Gardens; New Year's Eve Cocktail
Party and Dinner, with live entertainment; visit Tarpon
Springs Spongerama, with lunch at Pappas.
Dec. 22 "Man of La Mancha" Sunday Brunch at the
Burt Reynolds Theater in Jupiter.
Feb. 13 "Brigadoon" Thursday Matinee at Royal
Palm Theatre in Boca Raton.
Chai Hadassah will hold a paid-up membership meeting
on Tuesday, Nov. 26 at 12 noon, in the Poinciana Room of
the Challenger Country Club.
This program will be chaired by Alice Freedman for
"Education Day."
The guest speaker will be Charlotte Jacobson. Ms. Jacob-
son is a former National President of Hadassah and the
current President of the Jewish National Fund of America.
Gold Meir-Boynton Beach will hold their membership
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 21 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth Sholom, 315 North "A" St., Lake Worth.
A paid-up membership tea honoring life members and
associates is the theme for the day.
A musical program will be presented by Pearl Bassiur,
followed by a skit, "Hadassah Rummage Sale," written
and directed by Edith Dumas.
COMING EVENTS
Dec. 1-5 "Las Vegaa" at the Flamingo Hilton Hotel
$489 per person.
Jan. 29, Wednesday Youth Aliyah Luncheon Royce
Hotel, West Palm Beach.
Feb. 13 Luncheon and Card Party at Kristine's.
Feb. 21 Drawing of Ballots Festival of Prizes.
Rishona Palm Beach Chapter has scheduled a combined
open meeting and study group for Thursday, Nov. 21 at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Israel, 1901 Flagler Dr., West Palm
Beach. Rabbi William Marder of Temple Beth David, will
be the guest speaker. His topic will be "Torah and
Democracy: Israel and the Arabs." In addition, there will
be a video cassette presentation of a speech given by Dr.
Samuel Penchas, director general of the Hadassah Medical
Organization. This talk, outlining the medical
achievements at the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem, was
given at the National Hadassah Convention held in New
York City.
Coffee and cake will be served prior to the meeting.
Rishona Palm Beach Chapter will hold its annual Youth
Aliyah Luncheon on Monday, Dec. 2 at the Royce Hotel,
West Palm Beach at 12 noon. Florence Sharpe who has
been named the chapter's Woman of the Year, will be the
afternoon's honoree. The guest speaker will be Charlotte
Wolpe of Miami, a member of the Hadassah National
Board. Entertainment will be provided by Gene Murray,
pianist-raconteur.
The Youth Aliyah Luncheon chairpersons are Mae Levy
and Marjorie Dreier. Reservations must be made in
advance. -------
Shalom W. Palm Beach Chapter will enjoy an extended
Thanksgiving weekend, Nov. 27 to Dec. 1, at the kosher
Waldman Hotel, Miami Beach; also a Thanksgiving cruise,
one day at Surfside Holiday Inn, Miami Beach (meals and
entertainment) and three days on the Galileo to Nassau,.
Nov. 28-Dec. 1 A few reservations still open. Contact
Lil Schack (Southampton C 256) or Florence Siegel (Strat-
ford L-160).
Dec. 9 Rally for Soviet Jewry at Temple Beth-El, W.
Palm Beach. Call Helen Nussbaum.
Yovel Chapter will hold its regular membership meeting
on Thursday, Nov. 21, at Congregation Anshei Shalom at
12:45 p.m. Boutique at noon. A drawing for a kosher
turkey for Thanksgiving will be held, as well as a program
of music and song by Shoshana Flexser.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Chapter will hold its Home coming
Luncheon for Paid Up Members on Monday, Nov. 18, 12
noon, at the John D. Mc Arthur Country Club, Palm Beach
Gardens, off PGA Boulevard. Entertainment will be pro-
vided by members of the Florida Repertory Theater.
Contact Bess Fish man. for reservations and driving
directions.
The Golden Rivers Chapter will have their annual Flea
Market on the parking lot of American Savings Bank on
Okeechobee Blvd. Sunday, Nov. 24 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
There will be bargains at give-away prices books,
clothing, household needs, bric-a-brac items.
Westgate Chapter will meet Monday, Nov. 25, 12:30
p.m. at the American Savings Bank. Coming events: Nov.
27 Thanksgiving weekend. Monday, Dec. 16, card party at
the Red Lobster.
Poinciana Chapter will meet Monday, Nov. 25, 12:30
p.m. at the Challenger Clubhouse. Dr. Bruce Dribbon,
podiatrist, will show slides and conduct a question and
answer period.
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griday^jjoyember 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 13
Community Invited To
Chanukah Songfest
!community songfest
Lfiak) to celebrate
Jukah. the festival of
will take place on
^y, Dec. 11, the fifth
[Jfthe holiday, at 7 p.m.
Jewish Community Day
iZimriah. sponsored by
Jewish Education Depart-
(of the Jewish Federation
Lperation with the Jewish
2ors Council and coor-
\a Jewish Education
jnstrativo assistant Can-
Hliot Rosenbaum and local
^rs will feature holiday
i performed by students
Ijocal Jewish religious
iols. including the Jewish
Imunity Day School; a
parity sing-a-long with
jence participation; a
lp performance by local
ors. and a candle-lighting
nony. The drama class of
isha will also perform a
Chanukah skit.
"We're trying a new concept
this year," explained Cantor
Rosenbaum. "All the students
from all the schools are learn-
ing the same songs within two
age groups, kindergarten
through third grade and fourth
grade through seventh grade.
The idea is to have students
from different schools mingle
and work together with other
children in their age group,"
he said.
The entire community, in-
cluding the families of the par-
ticipants, is invited to join the
celebration. Punch and
sufganyot (jelly donuts) will be
served, the latter being a tradi-
tional Chanukah treat in
Israel. Like latlces, sufganyot
are cooked in oil to symbolize
the miracle for which we
celebrate this eight-day
festival.
"Last year the Zimrah was
the highlight of our
community-wide activities for
children," said Ann Lynn Lip-
ton, Jewish Education direc-
tor, "because not only was
there a great deal of en-
thusiasm by the children in-
volved, but the merkaz was fill-
ed to the rafters with 500
parents, grandparents,
brothers and sisters who
cheered the children on. We'd
like to see even more people
there this year," she added.
All synagogue religious
schools are encouraged to par-
ticipate in the Zimriah, and
more information may be ob-
tained by calling Cantor Elliot
Rosenbaum at the Jewish
Federation, 832-2120.
Phyllis and Dr. Jeffrey Penner were chairpersons of the
Third Annual Dinner Dance of the Jewish Community Center.
Their faces reflect the successful event that was held
September 28.
wish Agency Seeks To
iFoster Galilee Tourism
r GERALDS. NAGEL
JA Watch Desk Editor
|AD. Israel Seeking to
on nature's blessing of
Stic mountains and the
Sea of Galilee, the
Ish Agency Settlement
tment plans to develop
ll's Upper Galilee as a ma-
Was vacation center.
Gourelick, the
key's Upper Galilee Settle-
| director, said in an inter-
[in this ancient city with
JO current residents, that
to 15 tourism-based
rim could be initiated in
bext five years, "more if
iare available."
ur budget is $16 million
Iwe initiate two to three
(settlements a year," said
elick. whose region en-
sses 400,000 acres west
|south of the border with
well within Israel's
1967 borders. "For each
kional $1-1.5 million, we
initiate another settle-
[. We could put $9 million
' to work within a year if
lave it."
fcrelick said tourism's
Mtnent here would pro-
jobs for farm-reared
Pgsters without non-
rian skills; diversify
northern economy,
i is increasingly high-tech
of here and north of
P; increase Jewish popula-
p Israel's North, down to
than 50 percent even
Pg the heavily-Jewish
of Nahariya and Acco;
encourage Israelis to vaca-
[and spend disposable in-
pi at home.
. r'y all the 150 Galilee
laments, including 50
r Agency care, have a mix
economic activity, but
the economy of the
awm is agricultural,
region's tourism pro-
, 'nclude the Sea of
g. weal for boating and
Pnt development, and
FjDy beautiful mountains
r!e to hiking, climbing,
rK|ng and horseback
l'nK- Year-round
matures are usually brisk
to warm and, Gourelick noted,
"There is no rainfall from
Pesach through Succot."
American Jews can help con-
vert blueprints into a vacation
dreamland by contributing
to the Jewish Agency Settle-
ment Department through the
United Jewish Appeal/Federa-
tion Campaign, the main
source of Jewish Agency
funds. Perhaps many of them
will come here to vacation, in
time, and will be able to say
proudly, "I helped make this
dream come true."
Capital Punishment?
JERASALEM (JTA) The
Krtesset Law Committee,
deadlocked on the controversial
issue of whether to institute
capital punishment for terrorists,
has turned the matter over to a
ministerial committee which will
debate the question.
HOLD THE DATE
NOVEMBER 24, 1985
7th Annual
Jewish Women's Assembly

"Jewish and Female:
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County/Friday, November 15, 1985
Jewish Artists To Be
Featured In Music Series
The Regional Arts Foun-
dation has announced that
tickets for its "Music At
Two" and "Music At Eight"
performances are now on
sale at the West Palm Beach
Auditorium box office.
Several outstanding
Jewish artists will be
featured this season.
Nathan Milstein, world-
renowned violinist, opens
the "At Eight" series on
Nov. 19. January will bring
the outstanding Russian
emigre pianist Alexander
Toradze and beloved
violinist Itzhak Perlman.
Violinist Daniel Heifetz
will appear with the Polish
Chamber Orchestra on Feb.
2, and the one and only
Isaac Stern will perform
with the Montreal Sym-
phony Orchestra on March
12 and 13.
For more information
about these performances,
please call the Regional
Arts Foundation or visit the
West Palm Beach
Auditorium box office.
Leadership Development Group
Meets With AIPAC's Nurnberger
Ralph Nurnberger, a legislative liaison for
the American-Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee (AIPAC), recently discussed
AIPAC's function with the 1986 Leadership
Development group. "It is astounding how
little members of Congress know
Middle East," said Nurnberger, who
on to explain how AIPAC interface
Congress and to answer questions frJ
audience.
Jewish Leaders Meet With Chinese Government Offici
1!
MELBOURNE (JTA) -
Representatives of interna-
tional Jewish organizations
have met officially in Beijing
for the first time with two
Chinese government agency
officials to discuss prospects
for establishing further
contact.
The president of the Asia
Pacific Jewish Association
(A F.I A) and the Executive
Council of Australian Jewry,
Isi Leibler, held talks with of-
ficials of the Bureau of
Religious Affairs and the
Chinese People's Association
for Friendship.
Leibler, a member of the Ex-
ecutive of the World Jewish
Congress, was accompanied by
Sam Lipski, vice president of
the Australian Institute of
Jewish Affairs and an ex-
ecutive member of the APJA.
At the Bureau of Religious
Affairs, which has ad-
ministrative responsibility for
all religions in China, they met
Zaho Kuaung-Wei, head of the
Bureau's research office, and
Wane Yi-Bin, head of the
Islamic Office. At the Friend-
ship Association, discussions
were held with Yao Ren-Lui,
the deputy director of
American and Oceanian
Affairs.
In addition to officials from
the agency dealing directly
with religious affairs and in-
ternational relations, the
Jewish representatives met in-
formally with a wide cross-
section of officials from
various government depart-
ments, as well as editors,
writers, academicians and
publishers.
Leibler said the Chinese of-
ficials had been friendly, and
those at the Friendship
Association had promised to
consider proposals for
establishing a basis for arrang-
ing some form of contact with
world Jewish organizations.
It was significant and
Anti-Semitism Flares in
Uruguayan Labor Dispute
NEW YORK (JTA) The
emergence of anti-Semitism in a
strike at a Jewish-owned leather
factory in Faysandu, Uruguay,
has aroused the country's Jewish
community, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith reports.
According to ADL, posters
mounted on the entrance gates
House Caucus Votes
To Postpone Arms Sale
Continued from Page 1
and
V
negotiations between Israel
Jordan are underway."
The Senate resolution was
worked out by Sen Richard Lugar
(R., Ind.), with opponents and sup-
porters of the sale, after it became
clear that the sale would be re-
jected since 74 senators had sign-
ed a resolution to disallow it.
IN THE HOUSE there is a
similar majority with at least 275
congressmen having signed a
resolution to reject the sale of
arms to Jordan. During the
Senate debate, Lugar said the
resolution could not be amended,
since this was the agreement of
both sides and because the Presi-
dent had agreed to accept it in
that way.
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D.,
Conn.) cast the lone vote against
the resolution because he wanted
an additional paragraph that
would "guarantee" the right of
the Congress to reject the sale.
Lugar and Senate Majority
Leader Robert Dole (R., Kans.)
stressed that anytime before Mar.
1, if senators saw a lack of pro-
gress in the peace process, they
could reintroduce the resolution
rejecting the sale.
TESTIFYING before the
House Committee's Subcommit-
tee on Europe and the Middle
East, Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
said this was also the way the Ad-
ministration read the resolution.
But he said that if no action is
taken by Mar. 1, then the sale can
go through.
If the House resolution is dif-
ferent than the one adopted by the
Senate, there would have to be a
conference meeting to work out
the differences between the two
resolutions.
Observers expect this to be com-
pleted by Nov. 21, which is the
end of the 30-day period by which
both Houses must vote to disallow
the arms sales, or the Administra-
tion can go through with it.
and on the walls of the factory car-
ried such anti-Semitic slogans as
"Hitler was right: Too bad he is
not here." The Central Jewish
Committee of Uruguay called
upon the nation's unions and
union leaders to denounce this in-
jection of anti-Semiticand pro-
Nazi propaganda into a dispute
between labor and management.
The anti-Semitic action has been
repudiated by the national leather
workers union even though the
local Paysandu chapter, which
represents 600 employees, has not
yet issued a statement, the ADL
reported.
Luis Brezzo, Uruguay's Direc-
tor of Labor, denounced the
posters in a report to the Labor
Committee of the Uruguayan
House of Representatives in
Montevideo.
In the discussion on a motion for
the House to condemn the anti-
Semitism, Deputy Dr. Pablo
Miller of the Union Colorada y
Batillista declared that "the clear
anti-Semitic content is repug-
nant" and an impediment to the
negotiating process. The motion
to condemn the anti-Semitism was
blocked, however, by the leftwing
coalition party, Frente Amplio
(Broad Front).
The Anti-Defamation League is
monitoring developments with the
LeniT,al Jewish Committee and
the B nai B'rith of Uruguay
precedent-setting, Leibler
said, that the Chinese agencies
had been willing to meet at all
and to accept the formal
greetings extended on behalf
of the World Jewish Congress,
the Asia Pacific Jewish
Association and the Executive
Council of Australian Jewry.
"At the same time, the
Chinese remained wary and
skeptical. We did not expect
any breakthroughs on this
issue, and there were none.
But we have been invited to
return to China for future
discussions and we believe
some doors were opened,
however slightly," Leibler
said.
Leibler said he had asked for
an "address" to which bodies
such as the WJC and APJA
could direct their enquiries."
He had also asked whether it
would be possible to convene a
conference in Beijing, bringing
together Chinese and Jewish
scholars to explore subjects of
mutual interest, such as
Chinese and Jewish
philosophy, wisdom h,,
and the history of the k
Kaifeng, the communitjj
digenous Chinese Jewry J
had flourished for
centuries.
Leibler said they
consider these requestil
added that while it wasj
the Chinese were bound l
sensitive to any approidij
international Jewish.,
tions, so long as there 1
diplomatic relations
China and Israel; there)
been a noticeable _
ment in their willingnal
listen to suggestions of o
on a cultural, non
level.
Compared to an earlier \
in 1981, when he had i
similar issues but only j
non-government level,!
climate had changed I
much greater open!
Leibler said. "This, of t
reflects the noticeable i
sion of China's open
policies in other area,!
said.
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Friday, November 15, l!)8.r>/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Prof. Cites Dangers In Accepting
Opinion Polls On Anti-Semitism
|AVIVA CANTOR
YORK (JTA) -
Yehuda Bauer, head of
brew University's Inter-
Center for the Study
ij.Semitism, said here
gas "dangerous" to re-
eports by recent public
i polls that popular anti-
Sm had declined in the
despite their essential
; reports, he continued,
not lead to the
Istic" conclusion that
i no need to worry about
that are far more
fcant: the continued ex-
of latent anti-
the spread of the
of the Holocaust"
\s, and the potential im-
of Soviet anti-Jewish
anda.
a Prague-born
who has written
(in the Holocaust, ex-
these views in an in-
|w with the Jewish
Bphic Agency following
ce
sm,
pr,
his address to a conference the
two-year-old Center held here
on "Anti-Semitism: Threat to
Western Civilization."
Bauer pointed out that there
were periods in Germany when
public opinion polls could have
shown that popular anti-
bemitism was declining there,
and they would have been cor-
rect. "The Nazi period taught
us that you don't have to have
popular anti-Semitism to
murder Jews."
The vast majority of the Ger-
man people, he continued,
were not anti-Semitic in terms
of "murderous anti-
Semitism"; they were
"moderately" anti-Semitic.
The majority of Europe's Jews
were murdered not by those
holding extreme anti-Semitic
convictions but by supporters
of a regime whose small ruling
elite was convinced that the
major issue before the world
was to free it from the Jews.
So even if there is "moderate
anti-Semitism," he said, "it
can end in genocide."
Of the three major factors
that bear watching in the U.S.,
Bauer said that "latent
cultural anti-Semitism is very
often unconscious and impossi-
ble to measure." Indications of
its existence surfaced in the
anti-Jewish arguments and
"code words" used "quite un-
consciously" by some in the
media during Israel's invasion
of Lebanon in 1982.
Bauer also pointed to the
significance of the continua-
tion of Christian anti-
Semitism. Stressing that the
Catholics had been most
positive in trying to "break"
with Catholic anti-Semitism
tradition following Vatican IPs
Nostra Aetate declaration on
the Jews in 1965, he added
that "there hasn't been a
tremendous push but things
have changed." Some Protes-
tant fundamentalist groups
were anti-Jewish, but some
were pro-Jewish, he said.
Turning to the second factor
requiring alertness, Bauer call-
ed the "denial of the
wish Protesters
Jt Performance Of Controversial Play
DAVID KANTOR reacted so vehemently to what
NN (JTA) The they. considered an anti-
Jsh community of Semitic campaign. Some
Itfurt reaffirmed its Papers warned, however, that
nination to prevent any the Jewish reaction would
attempts to stage
Werner Fassbinder s
f'Garbage: The City of
which it considers
emitic, despite telephone
to its leaders from
nous callers. The callers
that Germany would
llow the Jews to recap-
heir position of power in
ountry.
nwhile, the play's direc-
iuenther Ruehle,
edly announced his in-
i to postpone the official
^re of the play until Nov.
' to begin negotiations
he Jewish community to
Ihim to stage it at that
[Ruehle also reportedly
|ie rescheduled premiere
en cancelled out of con-
iat demonstrations
the play could become
hie had rescheduled the
erformance of the play
original premiere
fsrupted. A group of 30
protesters took over
?e and prevented the
from going on; a three-
"iscussion with and
the audience ensued.
pay. .\v. 4, Michael
nan. a spokesperson for
|mmunity, said that its
)ers had purchased
tickets to all upcoming
lances and would oc-
stage before each
*Kan, the tactic they us-
cessfully at the schedul-
niere.
IWesI Gorman press has
e(' extensively about the
kwen by the Jewish
funity. which some
''"' jever before in West
pys |ms|.War history,
commentators,
and exhausted
mmunity here
touch off a wave of anti-
Semitism in the country.
The conservative daily, Die
Welt, noted that it was Jews
and only Jews who were the
protesters who forced the
cancellation of the premiere of
the play. "Once again they
stood there alone, in the heart
of Germany, in 1985," its
editorial said. The editorial
also attacked Ruehle for in-
sisting on staging the play.
But another conservative
paper, the Frankfurter Allge-
meine Zeitung, which has op-
posed the performance all
along, warned the Jewish com-
munity against taking the law
into its own hands. "The best
protection for the Jews, the
only protection for any citizen
and for any minority, is stick-
ing to the law," its editorial
stated.
The leftwing Frankfurter
Rundschau, in an editorial by
its editor-in-chief, acknowledg-
ed that there were differences
of opinion among the staff as
to whether the play should be
staged. However, in reporting
on the controversy, the paper
gave prominence to opinions
expressed by those who sup-
ported the performance and
who opposed or ridiculed the
Jewish response to it.
The leftwing Die
Tagezeitung of Berlin ran the
story of the Jewish take-over
of the stage on page one,
reporting extensively on the
discussion that took place in
the theater that evening. The
paper's readers are mostly
supporters of the Green Party
and the Young Guard of the
Social Democrats, both of
whom have supported the
play's performance.
Commentators on the state-
owned West German televi-
sion station suggested that the
response to the play was
highly contested among the
members of the Frankfurt
Jewish community. This
assessment was challenged by
a community spokesperson,
who stated that a majority of
more than 80 percent sup-
ported the community's policy
of preventing performances of
the play.
In a related development,
Tel Aviv Mayor Shlomo Lahat
has appealed to his counter-
part in Frankfurt to do all in
his power to insure that the
play not be staged at the
municipally-supported theater.
In a telephone conversation
with Frankfurt Deputy Mayor
Hilmar Hoffman, the city's
director of cultural affairs,
Lahat expressed the hope that
the feelings of the people of
Israel on this issue would be
taken into consideration. Tel
Aviv and Frankfurt have a
twinning agreement and a
friendship and cultural pact.
Holocaust" propaganda a
"dangerous phenomenon"
which has succeeded in
penetrating schools and
universities and is a new
means of spreading anti-
Semitism. It is directed, he
continued, at the
"delegitimazation of the
Jewish people." He continued:
"If the Jewish people argue
that they suffered in the
Holocaust and it turns out that
this whole collective is lying,
then how can you believe
anything they say? Therefore,
the conclusion is that Hitler
was right in attacking the
Jews and that the Hitler
regime is the right kind ol
regime for us."
The third danger, Soviet,
propaganda attacking the
Jews with recycled conspiracy
theories, "sooner or later will
reach Chicago," Bauer told
JTA. He pointed to the huge
propaganda machinery, which
has so far churned out 600
anti-Semitic books whose con-
tents some Soviet science fic-
tion writers have used in
stories "lapped up by millions
of people" and whose
arguments are voiced at the
UN.
Bauer is especially disturbed
by a racist ideology promoting
the superiority of Indo-
Europeans which is evolving in
certain Soviet academic sec-
tors. He suggested a possible
scenario in which this ideology
would be translated into
political terms attacking the
U.S. as the "running dog of
Zionist conspiracy" ac-
cepted by some states at the
UN, followed by propagandiz-
ing in the U.S. He asked,
"Couldn't there then be some
in America who will then think
it's time to cut the Jews down
to size?"
Bauer stressed in the inter-
view that the "core" of anti-
Semitism in the U.S. had not
changed since the early 1940's
when 15 percent of the popula-
tion advocated Hitler's policy
toward the Jews. This 15 per-
cent core, "may develop into
large movements under cer-
tain crisis situations," he said.
Pointing, as well, to the
spread of extreme fundamen-
talists such as anti-choice
and anti-Constitution groups
Bauer said that in the U.S.
there are many social
movements "originating in
alienation" and a "multitude
of social problems" here. It
hasn't all come together in a
major threat, "but the danger
is there."
There is also a "numbing"
toward anti-Semitism,
especially in some university
sectors, which "could turn into
hositility if circumstances
change." One indication of this
indifference, he said, was the
"lack of reaction" by the Black
intelligentsia and leadership to
Rev. Louis Farrakhan's anti-
Semitic utterances.
Bauer believes that
"America is different" in its
"encouraging" commitment
since the 1960's to a multi-
cultural society, in which Jews
are "part of the general
scene." There are in the U.S.
"built-in defenses" against
anti-Semitism, and he does not
see any "major, acute or im-
mediate danger" to Jews here
in the present and foreseeable
future, Bauer said.
But his disagreement with
studies which tout the decline
of popular anti-Semitism in the
U.S. is that they "see things as
givens, and don't look at the
dynamics. They photograph a
situation and say how lovely it
is. It is dangerous to make
such statements," Bauer said,
and not look beneath the
surface.
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'
Page 16 The Jewish Flondian of Palm Beach County/Friday. November 15. 1985
Senior News
FROM THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
The Jewish Community Centers Comprehensive
Senior Service Center is n network of services for seniors
designed to encourage and foster growth, independence
and activity for persons in their later years. Varied services
through a Federal Grant Title III of the Older Americans
Act, awarded by Gnlfstream Area Agency on Aging,
enhnnce the everyday lives of older adults throughout the
community.
KOSHER MEAL
PROGRAM
The Jewish Community
Center, Comprehensive Senior
Service Center provides daily
hot Kosher meals served at the
Center at 12 noon. Before
lunch each day at 11:30 a.m. a
variety of special programs
are offered. Busses to take
persons home will leave by
12:30 p.m. Reservations for
lunch and transportations
must be made in advance. Call
Carol or Lil at 689-7703 for in-
formation and/or reservations.
Following are programs
scheduled through Nov. 22 at
11:30 a.m.
CURRENT EVENTS
Thursday. Nov. 14 Cur-
rent Events with Rose Dunsky
Friday, Nov. 15 Helen
Gold, Nutrition Education
Monday.Nov. 18 Games
with Fred Bauman
Tuesday. Nov. 19 Better
Business Bureau. David
Fancher
Wednesday. Nov. 20 To be
Announced
Thursday, Nov. 21 Cur-
rent Events with Rose Dunsky
Friday. Nov. 22 David
Hart. Psychologist: Special
Senior Shabbot Charles
Kurland
AT YOUR SERVICE
The Jewish Community
Center Comprehensive Senior
Service Center is pleased to
anounce the beginning of a
new program. Every Thursday
afternoon at 2 p.m., represen-
tatives from different agencies
will be "at your service." If
you have a need to discuss a
problem pertaining to what we
are offering, we invite you to
stop in and communicate on a
one-to-one basis with our
visiting agency
representatives.
Nov. 14 Legal Aid Socie-
ty of Palm Beach County a
representative will be
available to discuss your legal
needs (no wills to be
discussed).
Nov. 21 Health Insurance
Assistance Edie Reiter
assists persons with filling out
insurance forms and answer
questions.
Nov. 26 Florida Power
and Light A representative
will help you with any question
regarding your electric bill and
can help you gain information
regarding energy
conservation.
'Tuesday due to
Thanksgiving
Dec. 5 RSVP Retired
Senior Volunteer Program,
Muriel Barry. An opportunity
to learn about RSVP on a one
to one basis and to learn about
becoming a volunteer.
Dec. 12 Senior Employ-
ment Service and Senior
Aides The National Council
of Senior Citizens An oppor-
tunity for senior adults to ob-
tain employment.
PALM BEACH COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD
ADULT EDUCATION
CLASSES
Relaxation Techniques
Bea Bunze, Instructor. This
class is held every Wednesday
at 12:30 p.m. Learn to manage
stress, tension and anxiety
brought on by the daily
traumas of living.
Positive Living Joyce
Hogan, Instructor. Thursdays,
1:30 p.m. Learn techniques in
positive thinking to aid you in
all aspects of everyday living.
You can do anything you wish
to improve the quality of your
life.
Writers Workshop Ruth
Graham, Instructor. Fridays
1 at 2:15 p.m. A vital group of
creative people meet weekly to
express themselves in poetry
and prose.
There are no fees for the
above classes. Participants are
asked to make contributions.
NEW AND ONGOING
CLASSES
Intermediate Bridge
Series Al Parsont, Instruc-
tor. This class will meet on
Wednesdays at 1:45 p.m.
beginning Nov. 13 and is a five
week series. Learn the latest
bridge convention and enjoy
an afternoon of sociability.
There is a $12 fee for JCC
members and $15 for non-
members.
Joy Through Movement
Celia Golden, licensed Dance
Therapist. This JCC extension
class is held at the Challengert
Country Club in Poinciana,
Lake Worth at 10 a.m. Exer-
cise to slim you down and im-
prove your posture, dancing to
help you relax and lose any
awkwardness of movement
and rapp sessions to enable
you to express your feelings on
various subjects. Call Celia at
964-1455 for further informa-
tion and/or registration. A
series of 10 lessons is $25.
Make out checks to the Jewish
Community Center. Attire:
comfortable clothing, polo
shirts, shorts or slacks. Class
is open to men and women.
Thursdays. 9:15-11 a.m.
The above classes require
advance registration. Please
call Didi at the JCC office at
689-7703 for further informa-
tion and/or registration.
ADDITIONAL ONGOING
ACTIVITIES
Speakers Club Mondays,
2:30 p.m. Enjoy learning the
art of public speaking. This
group meets ]
Frances Sperber prjJ
Timely Top^
Discussion u
P-m. Stimulating
on a variety 0f ,
current issues. IfVai,
'ng your own topic li
a lecture program El
participates. '
Second Tuesdi* i
2 P-m. A grit
8P that nSfL
Tuesday each montU
activities and trios a J
ed-.Call SabirT"
chairperson, at &
you'd like to join Z
for further informs*
POSITION AVAILABLE
The UJA of Naples is looking for a ManaJ
Director to assume general duties with
emphasis on Young Leadership
Please write: UJA
Collier County
P.O. Box 8613
Naples, FL 33941
Enclose full resume.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days q weej
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
f
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Sliced or Unsliced.
Baked Fresh Daily
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Onion Bagels
699
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only
Serve with Publix Premium
Vanilla Ice Cream
Apple Pie
8-snclT
size
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake...................ch$169
Tender and Moist
Gourmet Brownies....... SS M*
Great for Dunking
Plain Mini Donuts..........5? 99
Prices Effective
Nov. 14 thru 20,1985
__________ 5
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Perfect to Make Your Homemade Dressing
or Stuffing
Stuffing Bread.............. !5 W
The time for family gatherings and parties is getting into M
swing. Pick up a box of delicious, fast frozen, bake and
serve hors'd oeuvres for your gathering. We now have two
sizes from which to choose. (Available in Our Fresh Dana*
Bakery Department Only)
SOct. pkg...........................................................$11.95
10Pct pkg.....................__________................... $19.95_
Quantity
RlghU Hs*"**


Special Volunteer
--'

i Mondav the seniors at the JCC Kosher Lunch Connec-
look foward to ^rreat games with Fred Bauman.
j is a warm, gentle man who gives continuously of himself
[seems to enjoy all the good things he does for others. He
finely loves the people and takes pride in his volunteer
k. Fred often provides prizes and comes in with armfuls
jeautiful plants that he grows from clippings. Our special
Iks to you, Fred, for all the joy you brine: to our seniors.
JCC News
I CENTER CONNECTION HITS THE AIRWAVES
[Tune in to Radio Station WPBR, 1340 AM every other
Inday and hear the new Center Connection Talk Show at
r05 p.m. The first show aired Nov. 10.
iostesses Joy Gales and Linda Kalnitsky will feature
|ws and views of local and world events. The pubic will
Ive the opportunity to call in' and ask questions.
Special guests will also be invited and interviewed.
Interested sponsors are invited to call Jerome Melman
1689-7700.
CELEBRATE JEWISH BOOK MONTH
|The Jewish Community Center's Celebration of Jewish
ok Month will be held Saturday evening Nov. 16 at 8
n. and Sunday, Nov. 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Jnter, 2415 Okeechobee Blvd.
are invited to attend two book reviews:
Haj by Leon Uris, which has been described as be-
; "as much a warning as a piece of historical fiction .
f serious study of the Middle East would be comfortable
|thout the perspective of this book," which will be review-
by Ann Lipton, director of Jewish Education of the
Irish Federation of Palm Beach County.
\From Time In Memorium by Jean Peters, which
Js with the question of Jewish legal rights to property in
hat is referred to as the "Land of Palestine" and the basic
rrent legal claims of Jewish rights to live in Israel, will be
|viewed by Martin Pomerance, managing editor of the
ilm Beach Jewish World.
[Refreshments will be served.
jSunday the Chanukah Gift Shop will be open. The public
|invited to browse. There is no admission for either day.
THE CHILDREN'S HOUR
[Programs especially for children will take place at the
vC's Second Annual Book Fair, Sunday, Nov. 17 at the
knter. while parents can browse through the fair.
|A children's Book Walk will be open from 11 a.m. to 3
Tn. Children will enjoy the experience of seeing, smelling,
uching and tasting what is happening in scenes taken
N Maurice Sandak's classic children's book "In The
fght Kitchen."
[At 1:30 p.m. the Children's Story Hour, conducted by
Kressal, the JCC Pre-School director, and Judy
fvore, Early Childhood educator, will offer a variety of
Wren's Jewish Holiday stories and Jewish Tales told
rough puppetry, fingerplay and songs.
jphere is no admission fee.
CHANUKAH GIFT SHOP OPEN
[The Jewish Community Center's special Chanukah Gift
fop will open Sunday, Nov. 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
[May through Friday, Nov. 18 through Dec. 6 from 9
'" to 5 pm. at the Center.
|G'ft items such as Menorahs, wrapping paper, candles,
feidels, tags, cookie cutters, chocolate candy "gelt ban-
p, children's books and much more will be on sale.
I'n addition to Chanukah merchandise, the Gift Shop will
fve mezzuzahs and other items of general interest,
pr additional information please call 689-7700.
EXERCISES FOR WOMEN
Women's Stretchercise classes, conducted by Leslie En-
*' be held Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:30-6:30
" 'or 10 sessions at the Jewish Community Center, star-
Friday. Novemlxr 15. I98.r>/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 17
Leaders Move To Combat
Farm Belt Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish officials from several
Midwestern states will at-
tempt to expand contacts with
mainstream Christian
clergymen and rural area farm
organizations in an effort to
combat a recent rise in the ac-
tivities of racist and anti-
Semitic groups in the nation's
farm belt. Jewish leaders from
the region, concerned by the
growing rise in the activities of
these groups, including the
Christian Identity movement,
also held what was described
as a confidential meeting to
"assess extremism and anti-
Semitism in farm and rural
areas in the Middle West," ac-
cording to David Goldstein, ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish
Community Relations Bureau
of Greater Kansas City.
Goldstein told the Kansas Ci-
ty Jewish Chronicle, that he
hoped mainstream Christian
clergymen would "be able to
create conditions in their com
munities that will make anci-
Semitism unpopular." He said
that the Christian Identity
movement "is also a threat to
mainstream Christian
groups."
According to Goldstein,
"What they (Christian Identi-
ty members) have is an
ideology of anti-Semitism and
a religion based on anti-
Semitism. They combine and
become a powerful message."
He told Chronicle staff writer
Michael Deverey that a major
problem facing Jewish leaders
is that Jews are generally an
urban based group and many
rural residents nave never
even met a Jew.
For example, wrote
Deverey, out
residents of
some 18,000
Dodge Citv.
ting Monday, Nov. 18.
This type of exercise, created by Ms. Ennis is a combina-
tion of calisthenics, stretching and endurance building ex-
ercises, all done to upbeat music.
The fee for JCC members is $25 for the series or $3 per
session and $35 for non-members and $4 per session.
For additional information please call Joel at 689-7700.
BASKETBALL SEASON STARTS
The Basketball season is NOW! The Jewish Community
Center's program for players of all ages and skills is held at
the Boy's Club, 1188 Marine Drive, West Palm Beach.
The Boys' Varsity Team (grades 9-12) and Boys' Junior
Varsity Team (grades 7-9) will meet Sundays at 12 noon to
2 p.m. as well as a weekday.
Men's Intramural League will meet Sundays at 10 a.m. to
noon starting Dec. 8.
Biddy Basketball co-ed (grades 3-6) will start in
December and Pee-Wee Basketball co-ed (grades K-2) will
start in January.
For complete brochure and details please call Joel at
689-7700.
SUNDAY AT THE BEACH
The Young Singles (22-38) of the Jewish Community
Center will be meeting Sunday, Nov. 17 at noon in front of
the Greenhouse on Singer Island to enjoy an afternoon of
sun and surf. Look for the orange and white umbrella.
Hosts: Alan B. and Karen T.
FOR THE JOY OF ICE CREAM
The Young Singles (22-38) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet Thursday, Nov. 21 at 7:30 p.m. at Super
Scoops, 2550 Okeechobee Blvd. (next to Video Xtron in
Spencer Square). Enjoy the fun of eating all the ice cream
you want plus topping. Donation $2.
Call Terrie at 689-7700 to let her know you'll be there.
SUNDAY'S BRUNCH
The Single Pursuits (38-58) of the Jewish Community
Center will be meeting Sunday, Nov. 17 at 11 a.m. at Too-
jay's at Loehmann's Plaza, Palm Beach Gardens for
brunch. Donation $1.
BANQUET CHINESE STYLE
The Single Pursuits (38-58) of the Jewish Community
Center are invited to a unique evening Sunday, Nov. 17. All
come at 7 p.m. to The Singing Bamboo, Luria's Plaza, U.S.
No. 1, Juno Beach for a Chinese Banquet, cost: $12-$15.
Reservations a must! Hosts: Cynthia Katz and Jerry Zell.
For information please call Terrie at 689-7700.
SHABBAT SHALOM
The Single Pursuits (38-58) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet Friday, Nov. 22 at 8:15 p.m. at Temple
Beth El, 2815 No. Flagler Dr. for Friday night services. All
are invited. Barbara Basch, hostess.
DINE AND DANCE
The Single Pursuits (38-58) of the Jewish Community
Center will meet Saturday Nov. 23 at 7 p.m. for a Taste of
France '44 at the 391st Bomb Group. The menu for the
evening will be dinner and dancing. The American location
is Belvedere Rd., west of 1-95 of the north side of the air-
port. Hostess: Harriett Biblin.
DANCE TO BIG BAND STYLE
The Prime Time Singles (55 plus) of the Jewish Com-
munity Center will leave Thursday, Nov. 21 at 6:30 p.m. to
the Lake Worth Senior Center for an evening of ballroom
dancing to a live band, line dancing, games, fun, socializing
plus refreshments.
Call Lottie, 684-8593, for reservations.
Kans., there are only a few
Jewish individuals and no
Jewish families. Dodge City, it
was recalled, is the home of
radio station KTTL-FM, which
was the center of a prolonged
controversy following the
broadcast of racist and anti-
Semitic programs which urged
listeners to kill Jews and other
minorities.
A recently-released report
prepared by Leonard Zeskind,
research director of the Center
for Democratic Renewal,
outlines the far-right fringe
groups. Zeskind found that the
Identity movement serves as
the common ideological tie bet-
ween the various hate groups.
"Identity believes that the
Jews were literally Children of
Satan, the people of color were
'pre-Adamic,' and that white
Christian Aryans were the
'lost sheep of the House of
Israel' and that America was
the Biblical Promised Land.
Identity members began to col-
lect weapons and ammunition
in expectation that the Biblical
'End Times' are near,"
Zeskind wrote in the 10-page
"Background Report on Racist
and Anti-Semitic Organiza-
tional Intervention in the
Farm Protest Movement."
The private meeting of the
27 Jewish leaders included
representatives of Nebraska,
Illinois, Missouri, Kansas,
Iowa, Oklahoma and New
York. They included represen-
tatives of the Jewish Com-
munity Relations bureaus,
representatives of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, American Jewish Con-
gress, and the American
Jewish Committee, and
members of various
Midwestern Jewish
Federations.
Peres
Continued from Page 2
ly true that "expediency can
form a new and a successful
society in our times."
"Secondly," he said, "I
would like really to see Israel
growing culturally, based on a
larger audience of people who
speak, who sing, who read and
who write in the language of
the Bible."
Then, he continued, "I would
like to see peace in our area
and Israel becoming not only a
country that lives in peace
with her neighbors but also a
country that contributes, as
we would like so deeply, to
other countries poorer than we
are with needs more burning
than we have and really show-
ing what we would like to show
generosity in our concepts."
The Premier added, "We
would like, since there is a
possibility that Jewish life will
remain elsewhere, to become
the spiritual center of Jewish
life and really show that
whatever we have suffered
for, is being translated in a
reality which is not disappoin-
ting, by justifying our belief
that every man can better
himself and every society can
become better."


-*
-'

Court Orders Extradition
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lagogueNews
Candle lighting Time
ItafL Nov-15 5:12 p.m.
JP* **9 Nov. 22 s-no n m
Nov. 22 5:09 p.m.
LAKE WORTH
EWISH CENTER
Lake Worth Jewish
is sponsoring a Trot-
acing Night on Tuesday,
lat Pompano Park. The
[is invited to participate
Lai cost of $20 per per-
[portion of which reverts
Synagogue's Building
Hrive.
tded are a full course
, fish dinner at the
fay's "Top-O'-Park"
[urant and private
area; free parking;
use admission; program,
hnd gratuities. Dinner is
fat 6:3d p.m. after which
bs will be observed from
able, near betting win-
[Transportation on your
reservations and details
[Philip Goldklang,
m
EMPLE BETH AM
Reform Temple of
b Tequesta has ac-
I a new Hebrew name,
Imeans House of the Peo-
he congregation of 70
s has been progressive-
wing since its formation
three years ago. The
has a religious school
Wo students which pro-
preparation for Bar and
fitzvah. Continuing social
Ims and adult education
pare offerred.
[spiritual leader is Rabbi
Friedman with Mr.
ISchlossberg as the presi-
IServices are conducted
friday evening at 8 p.m.
Dolphin Center, 759
Parkway St., Jupiter.
Temple Beth Am will hold its
annual Auction on Saturday
night, Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at
the clubhouse of the Jupiter
Ocean and Racquet Club, US
No. 1, Jupiter. Objects of art
from The Art Store,
Loehmann's Plaza and The
Wizard of Art, Jupiter Mall
will be auctioned, as well as
goods and services donated
from local businesses. Open to
the public. Free admission.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
The Sisterhood will hold its
annual rummage sale on Sun-
day, Nov. 17, and Monday,
"Nov. 18. Hours for the Fall
"Rummage-a-Rama" from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on both days
with every kind of merchan-
dise for sale lots of fur-
niture, fine adult's and
children's clothing, jewelry,
linens, color TV, microwave,
housewares, dishes, books,
toys, etc. The public is
welcome.
Temple Israel Shabbat Ser-
vices on Friday, Nov. 15, will
begin with the observance of
Jewish Book Month.
Rabbi Howard Shapiro will
review an outstanding new
book: "Jewish and Female" by
Susan Wiesman Schneider, a
collection of essays on dif-
ferent sides of Jewish Life and
how being female impacts
upon them. This will be a two
part series.
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Everyone is invited to attend.
During the service child care
will be provided.
[emple Israel Library Promotes
Jewish Book Month
pie Israel's Library,
p with other Jewish
p and institutions of
| will celebrate Jewish
Month from Nov. 7 to
IJ. Book reviews,
ns story hours, Book
fs well as the publica-
Jnew books will be part
|annual observance.
no accident that a
[out of each year is set
1 celebrate the "written
Universally, Jews are
lor as the "People of the
I a people dedicated to
Prah David Ben-Gurion
Fe have preserved the
ft the book has preserv-
ftion has it that in the
of Eastern Europe
Jewish child entered
Jlschool), usually at four
| he was taken by his
ion the first day to the
l^acher, who welcomed
letting a drop of honey
lclWs first book to
ft? the sweetness of
a"d to encourage a
love of books.
Among the popular
American Jewish writers to-
day, authors such as Bellows,
Roth, Potok, and Doctorow
describe in very diverse ways
the American Jew from im-
migration to assimilation.
No less popular is Isaac
Bashevis Singer or Sholem
Aleichem writers who go
back to the Europe on ex-
perience and the medieval
culture of Kaballa and
mysticism.
These Jewish authors write
about a milieu far from the
usual American's experience
yet they have a wide spread
appeal and are on the "best
seller" lists.
Through the years, both
Christian and Jew those
seeking to know more about
their own religious roots -
have discovered the wide
range of Judaica materials at
Temple Israel and other
Jewish libraries. Please call
the temple office for library
hours.
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 19
Hadassah Plans Israel Bonds Luncheon
The new Florida Atlantic
region of Hadassah, consisting
of 26 chapters from Boca
Raton to Jupiter, is planning a
luncheon to be held on Nov. 26
at the Hyatt, Palm Beaches,
according to Gert Saxe, chair
of the event. "The enthusiasm
and participation of each
chapter has been wonderful,"
said Gert, "and we expect a
fabulous turnout."
After lunch, Jerome Gleekel
will address the gathering. Mr.
Gleekel, a moving and infor-
mative speaker, brings with
him all the up-to-date informa-
tion from Israel and brings the
audience a first-hand involve-
ment with our exciting nation.
Honorees will be presented
with the Israel Leadership
Award, each Chapter having
selected an individual of
stature. (See photo.)
The afternoon will conclude
with an exciting entertain-
ment interlude.
Working closely with the
committee is Claire Braun,
organization vice president.
Florida Atlantic Region of Hadassah Honorees (left to right,
seated): Laura B. London (Tikvah), Myra Ohrenstine (co-
chair of Israel Bonds), Gertrude Saxe (chair), Belle Maslov
(Shalom Delray). (Standing, left to right): Sylvia Lottye
Neuwirth (Ben Gurion), Martha Pincu (Tamar). Toby F. Wilk
'Aliyal, Helen Nussbaum (Shalom West Palm Beach),
Dorothy Mosson Kaye (president of Region), Sydelle B.
Goldenberg (Golda Meir), Rose Rifkin (Boca Raton Aviva),
Bess Appel (Menachem Begin), Selma Schmelkin (Boca
Maariv), Libbie B. Jacob (Shira Delray), Clair Braun
(Organization vice president). Not pictured: Goldie Bernstein
(Lee Vassil).
"Hadassah has an obligation to
stand up and be counted in the
Israel Bond Campaign," said
Claire.
Reservations for the lun-
cheon should be made within
each chapter.
Jewish Migration To
Sunbelt Increasing
Many demographers and
geographers agree that the
Sunbelt, generally considered
to extend south from Virginia
and west across the bottom
tier of states to California, will
lead the nation in population
and jobs by the middle of the
21st century.
Moreover, the Jewish migra-
tion to Sunbelt states has led
the way in a large-scale move-
ment south among America's
minorities.
"The Jewish migration to
California and Florida has
Area Deaths
APPELBAUM
Joseph, 80. of Sheffield 1-199. Century
Village, West Palm Beach. Riverside Guar-
dian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
JAMPOI.IS
Max, 86, of West Palm Beach. Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
KAUFMAN
Anna D., 72, of 8626 Kelso Drive, Lake
Park. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
KLEIN _. .
Moe, 78, of 6270 Olivewood Circle, Lake
Worth. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
KRIEGEL ,
Leila L- 65, of Lake Worth. Levitt
Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
ORKAN1)
Harold of Bedford F-156, Century ViUage,
West Palm Beach. Riverside Guardian
Funeral Home, West Palm Beach.
PATLOVE _. .A
Zelda Sarah. 77, of Delray Beach Riverside
Guardian Funeral Home. West Palm Beach.
DI Tit IN
Rosalind, 63, of 4286 D'Este Court, Lake
Worth. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
SCHORR
Ruth 76, of 2505 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
Michael. 88. of 2773 S Ocean Blvd.. Palm
Beach. Riverside Guardian Funeral Home,
West Palm Beach.
STEINBERG ,
Irving 82, of Century Village, Boca Raton.
Gutterman-Warheit Sentinel Plan Chapel,
Boca Raton.
WEISS
Annette, 86, of Palm Beach Garden,.
Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan
Chapel, West Palm Beach.
been particularly striking,"
said University of Miami pro-
fessor Ira Sheskin.
Sheskin noted that while in
1940 69 per cent of the na-
tion's Jews lived in the nor-
theast, presently that percen-
tage is down to 53.
Sheskin pointed out that bet-
ween 1972 and 1984 New York
lost 661,000 Jews while
Florida's Jewish population in-
creased by 269,000.
The Florida migration,
Sheskin said, has been very
concentrated, with more than
70 per cent of all Jews living in
the South residing in Dade,
Broward and Palm Beach
counties in Florida.
Gilberts To
Receive Israel
Bonds Award
Morton and Bette Gilbert
will be the honorees at a
Temple Israel State of Israel
Bonds Champagne Supper on
Dec. 1, at Temple Israel.
They will be receiving the
prestigious Lion of Judah
Award for their years of
devotion to their people,
their community and the
State of l>rael.
Serving Jewish families since 1900
MEMORIAL CHAPELS
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian q>f Palm Beach Coanty/Fridav. November 15, 1985

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Full Text
Friday, November 15, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County Page 15
Prof. Cites Dangers In Accepting
Opinion Polls On Anti-Semitism
AVIVA CANTOR
YORK (JTA) -
[Yehuda Bauer, head of
brew University's Inter-
J Center for the Study
a-Semitism, said here
was "dangerous" to re-
imports by recent public
L polls that popular anti-
tism had declined in the
despite their essential
I
reports, he continued,
not lead to the
blistic" conclusion that
i no need to worry about
that are far more
pcant: the continued ex-
nce of latent anti-
Jtism. the spread of the
fal of the Holocaust"
jies, and the potential im-
of Soviet anti-Jewish
ganda.
ier, a I'rague-born
rian who has written
on the Holocaust, ex-
I these views in an in-
w with the Jewish
h-aphic Agency following
his address to a conference the
two-year-old Center held here
on "Anti-Semitism: Threat to
Western Civilization."
Bauer pointed out that there
were periods in Germany when
public opinion polls could have
shown that popular anti-
Semitism was declining there,
and they would have been cor-
rect. "The Nazi period taught
us that you don't have to have
popular anti-Semitism to
murder Jews."
The vast majority of the Ger-
man people, he continued,
were not anti-Semitic in terms
of "murderous anti-
Semitism"; they were
"moderately" anti-Semitic.
The majority of Europe's Jews
were murdered not by those
holding extreme anti-Semitic
convictions but by supporters
of a regime whose small ruling
elite was convinced that the
major issue before the world
was to free it from the Jews.
So even if there is "moderate
anti-Semitism," he said, "it
can end in genocide."
Of the three major factors
that bear watching in the U.S.,
Bauer said that "latent
cultural anti-Semitism is very
often unconscious and impossi-
ble to measure." Indications of
its existence surfaced in the
anti-Jewish arguments and
"code words" used "quite un-
consciously" by some in the
media during Israel's invasion
of Lebanon in 1982.
Bauer also pointed to the
significance of the continua-
tion of Christian anti-
Semitism. Stressing that the
Catholics had been most
positive in trying to "break"
with Catholic anti-Semitism
tradition following Vatican II's
Nostra Aetate declaration on
the Jews in 1965, he added
that "there hasn't been a
tremendous push but things
have changed." Some Protes-
tant fundamentalist groups
were anti-Jewish, but some
were pro-Jewish, he said.
Turning to the second factor
requiring alertness, Bauer call-
ed the "denial of the
\ewish Protesters
lit Performance Of Controversial Play
iy DAVID KANTOR reacted so vehemently to what
)NN (JTA) The tnev considered an anti-
fish community of Semitic campaign. Some
irt reaffirmed its PfPer? warned, however, that
nination to prevent any tne Jewish reaction would
to s
touch off a wave of anti-
FassbindePs Semitism in the country.
The City of
tajre
attempts
Werner
"Garbage:
kh," which it considers
^Semitic, despite telephone
ats to its leaders from
ymous callers. The callers
Ded that Germany would
How the Jews to recap-
j their position of power in
country.
hnwhile, the play's direc-
Guenther Ruehle,
tedly announced his in-
i to postpone the official
(liere of the play until Nov.
nd to begin negotiations
the Jewish community to
him to stage it at that
Ruehle also reportedly
he rescheduled premiere
een cancelled out of con-
that demonstrations
nd the play could become
nt.
Jehle had rescheduled the
jperformance of the play
r the original premiere
[disrupted. A group of 30
Bh protesters took over
Stage and prevented the
from going on; a three-
discussion with and
PK the audience ensued.
May, Nov. 4, Michael
pan. a spokesperson for
community, said that its
H)s had purchased
?h tickets to all upcoming
prmances and would oc-
the stage before each
teRan, the tactic they us-
pccessfully at the schedul-
femiere.
"' "681 Herman press has
["ted extensively about the
" taken by the Jewish
"lni,.v. which some
"" termed its "coming-
Never before in West
Post-war history,
commentators,
small and exhausted
|

munity here
The conservative daily, Die
Welt, noted that it was Jews
and only Jews who were the
protesters who forced the
cancellation of the premiere of
the play. "Once again they
stood there alone, in the heart
of Germany, in 1985," its
editorial said. The editorial
also attacked Ruehle for in-
sisting on staging the play.
But another conservative
paper, the Frankfurter Allge-
meine Zeitung, which has op-
posed the performance all
along, warned the Jewish com-
munity against taking the law
into its own hands. "The best
protection for the Jews, the
only protection for any citizen
and for any minority, is stick-
ing to the law," its editorial
stated.
The leftwing Frankfurter
Rundschau, in an editorial by
its editor-in-chief, acknowledg-
ed that there were differences
of opinion among the staff as
to whether the play should be
staged. However, in reporting
on the controversy, the paper
gave prominence to opinions
expressed by those who sup-
ported the performance and
who opposed or ridiculed the
Jewish response to it.
The leftwing Die
Tagezeitung of Berlin ran the
story of the Jewish take-over
of the stage on page one,
reporting extensively on the
discussion that took place in
the theater that evening. The
paper's readers are mostly
supporters of the Green Party
and the Young Guard of the
Social Democrats, both of
whom have supported the
play's performance.
Commentators on the state-
owned West German televi-
sion station suggested that the
response to the play was
highly contested among the
members of the Frankfurt
Jewish community. This
assessment was challenged by
a community spokesperson,
who stated that a majority of
more than 80 percent sup-
ported the community's policy
of preventing performances of
the play.
In a related development,
Tel Aviv Mayor Shlomo Lahat
has appealed to his counter-
part in Frankfurt to do all in
his power to insure that the
play not be staged at the
municipally-supported theater.
In a telephone conversation
with Frankfurt Deputy Mayor
Hilmar Hoffman, the city's
director of cultural affairs,
Lahat expressed the hope that
the feelings of the people of
Israel on this issue would be
taken into consideration. Tel
Aviv and Frankfurt have a
twinning agreement and a
friendship and cultural pact.
Holocaust" propaganda a
"dangerous phenomenon"
which has succeeded in
penetrating schools and
universities and is a new
means of spreading anti-
Semitism. It is directed, he
continued, at the
"delegitimazation of the
Jewish people." He continued:
"If the Jewish people argue
that they suffered in the
Holocaust and it turns out that
this whole collective is lying,
then how can you believe
anything they say? Therefore,
the conclusion is that Hitler
was right in attacking the
Jews and that the Hitler
regime is the right kind ol
regime for us."
The third danger, Soviet,
propaganda attacking th'
Jews with recycled conspiracy
theories, "sooner or later will
reach Chicago," Bauer told
JTA. He pointed to the huge
propaganda machinery, which
has so far churned out 600
anti-Semitic books whose con-
tents some Soviet science fic-
tion writers have used in
stories "lapped up by millions
of people" and whose
arguments are voiced at the
UN.
Bauer is especially disturbed
by a racist ideology promoting
the superiority of Indo-
Europeans which is evolving in
certain Soviet academic sec-
tors. He suggested a possible
scenario in which this ideology
would be translated into
political terms attacking the
U.S. as the "running dog of
Zionist conspiracy" ac-
cepted by some states at the
UN, followed by propagandiz-
ing in the U.S. He asked,
"Couldn't there then be some
in America who will then think
it's time to cut the Jews down
to size?"
Bauer stressed in the inter-
view that the "core" of anti-
Semitism in the U.S. had not
changed since the early 1940's
when 15 percent of the popula-
tion advocated Hitler's policy
toward the Jews. This 15 per-
cent core, "may develop into
large movements under cer-
tain crisis situations," he said.
Pointing, as well, to the
spread of extreme fundamen-
talists such as anti-choice
and anti-Constitution groups
Bauer said that in the U.S.
there are many social
movements "originating in
alienation" and a "multitude
of social problems" here. It
hasn't all come together in a
major threat, "but the danger
is there."
There is also a "numbing"
toward anti-Semitism,
especially in some university
sectors, which "could turn into
hositility if circumstances
change." One indication of this
indifference, he said, was the
"lack of reaction" by the Black
intelligentsia and leadership to
Rev. Louis Farrakhan's anti-
Semitic utterances.
Bauer believes that
"America is different" in its
"encouraging" commitment
since the 1960's to a multi-
cultural society, in which Jews
are "part of the general
scene." There are in the U.S.
"built-in defenses" against
anti-Semitism, and he does not
see any "major, acute or im-
mediate danger" to Jews here
in the present and foreseeable
future, Bauer said.
But his disagreement with
studies which tout the decline
of popular anti-Semitism in the
U.S. is that they "see things as
givens, and don't look at the
dynamics. They photograph a
situation and say how lovely it
is. It is dangerous to make
such statements," Bauer said,
and not look beneath the
surface.
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Uruguayan Labor Dispute

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Lee's Retirement Home
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