The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00143

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
wJewish floridlaihi
Off Pi nc 11 as County
16 Number 19
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, September 20, 1985
ifndSHoclft
Price 35 Cents
Kent JCC To Be Dedicated
, Kent Jewish Community Center will dedicate its
aflding <>n Sunday, Sept. 29, newly elected Center
ent Bob Freeman announced.
dedication will take place at the Center's new site
Lcules Avenue and Virginia Street in Clearwater.
i Center's 5,000 square-foot building is now com-
and will be open for inspection during the
stion.
L orotrram will be held between noon and 2 p.m. and
include entertainment for both children and adults,
iah decorating, a dedication ceremony and
lonstrations of Kent JCC programs. An Israeli lunch
will be served with the,, food being donated by Happy
Hostess Kosher Caterers, Bob, Debbie and Scott
Barnum.
The new Kent Center has been made possible largely
through the generosity of Marshall and Reva Kent, who
donated the property for the center, and Charles
Rutenberg, who donated the buildings which have been
moved to the site and renovated for the Kent JCC
headquarters.
The dedication is free and open to the public. Please
call the Kent JCC at 446-4923 to let us know how many
people will be attending.
The officers of the Kent Jewish Center are Robert
Freeman, president; Reva Kent, vice president; Charles
Rutenberg, treasurer, and Bruce Bokor, secretary.
Board members are: Steven Benjamin, Bruce Bokor,
Rabbi Kenneth Bromberg, Robert Freeman, Loretta
Freifeld, Sophie Glasgow, Dr. Jules Goldstein, Lewis
Gross, Dr. Stephen Igel, Reva Kent, Dr. Harvey Kers-
tein Dr Owen Under, Julius Malkin, Jackee Meddin,
Stanley Newmark, Harold Pawlan, Sharon Rophie,
Gerald Rubin, Charles Rutenberg, Marc Rutenberg,
Theodore Tench and Samuel Winer.
(The Kent Jewish Community Center is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation ofPinellas County.)
Campaign 1986:
Share Commitment
Campaign
Coordinators
Named
eva Kent, Charles Rutenberg
I Stanley Newmark have been
ped as campaign coordinators
(the 1986 Combined Jewish Ap-
campaign for Pinellas
nty.
he campaign is the principal
draising effort by the Jewish
Peration of Pinellas County to
nee the numerous beneficiary
ncies in Pinellas and contribu-
5 to the United Jewish Appeal.
anslated into every day ter-
ry, the Combined Jewish
is the sum total that in-
dual Jews throughout Pinellas
ate to help provide programs
services for themselves and
Jews and to provide
stance for Jews in need in
national and interaa-
illy. including Israel.
he amount of programs and
istance provided depends on
| amount of money raised in the
1 campaign.
Every year is important, but
|year is even more important,"
?mark said in reference to his
as campaign coordinator.
?mark is also president of the
Federation of Pinellas
nty.
Stanley Newmark
"We are trying to increase our
support funding for the various
agencies that Pinellas Jews,
through the Federation, support.
"UJA also needs increased sup-
port and participation, especially
in the area of Project Renewal and
Ethiopian Jews being absorbed in-
to the Israeli economy.
Last year's campaign goal was
$1,000,000. This year the goal has
been increased 30 percent (to
$1,450,000) to reflect the growing
needs.
"This is the year we hope to
double the number of contribu-
tions and double the number of
people involved so aid to Jews in
need can be maintained and ex-
panded through our beneficiary
agencies.
"Our goal is $1,450,000 this
year. It sounds like a lot and it is,
but it's the absolute minimum
which must be raised," Newmark
said.
Newmark said the campaign
leadership hopes Pinellas Jews
will think of the 1986 appeal not
simply as a quest for $1,450,000
but in terms of people of Jews.
If the goal isn't reached, it's not
the campaign falling short X
amount of dollars, it's the decision
having been made that some Jews
in need single parents, the
elderly, children will have to be
turned away, or helped less.
About the coordinators
Federation president
Newmark, 52, of Clearwater,
served as General Campaign
chairperson in 1984 and as an ex-
ecutive committee member for
three years. He has been a
Federation board member for five
years and served as president of
the Kent Jewish Community
Center, until accepting the
Federation presidency.
He is vice president of industrial
management for the Rutenberg
Corp.
Reva Kent is currently vice
president of the Federation, and is
a past president of the Federa-
tion, past campaign chairperson
Continued on Page 2
Reva Kent
Charles Rutenberg
Menorah Manor Becomes
Shelter During Hurricane
During Hurricane Elena, Menorah Manor opened its doors to
more than 50 local residents seeking shelter Some came needing
theSecurity of the care and services offered by the Home while
others who were evacuated came offering their assistance.
Following the storm, the "evacuees" (as they called themselves)
presented In impromptu note of thanks to Executive Director
Edward W. VimJeur. and the staff of Menorah Manor which said
in part, "Menorah Manor was never foreseen or intended to play
quite this role. But our warm reception and the sincere and
generous treatment was a topic of continuous expressions of
gratitude on the part of all of us.
"If we do not choose to remember the anxious hours spent in
vour midst, we will nevertheless never forget the magnificent
"family" treatment the institution extended to a community in
need. You have rendered a public service in its most noble sense.
The Manor was able to provide shelter as one floor was unoc-
cupied. It was not all a vacation for many of the "visitors as they
were called upon to help transport residents, serve MriU^
tain and do the myriad of other jobs needing to be done to meet
the needs of all the residents.
To quote Joyce and Sy Ripps, who echoed the thoughts of
others^We consider this a double Mitzvah because of the way we
were welcomed and treated and also for whatever small help we
may have contributed to Ed, his staff and the residents.
eat The High Holiday Blues
^ spend time with friends.
a Shana
Tovah!
om Kippur
Schedule
Page 6
By IRIS LEE
As I was planning my flight
north to spend Rosh Hashanah
with my parents and siblings, it
occurred to me how many of us in
Pinellas County are far away from
loved ones. My memories of the
holidays are very fond ones; with
homemade gefilte fish and maUoh
ball soup and lots and tote of
laughter. Holiday time for all of us
brings anticipation and longing.
The most difficult time to be alone
is during the holidays.
Those who are alone and who
have family that are far away can
feel particularly lonely at this time
of year. Having run several
groups for widows and widower^
fhave learned a great dea on how
to cope. The main way to avo d
sadness is not to be alone If it is
^possible to be with family, then
spend time with friends.
When I was single and living far
from family, 1 once hosted an "or-
phan dinner." This was one of the
most enjoyable holidays in
memory, because it was spon-
taneous and ^n. Everyone
brought their favorite holiday dish
and we ate from noon until mid-
night. No one at that dinner-a low-
ed themselves to be overwhelmed
by holiday blues.
If family and friends are not
available some people use this
time to travel. They take the vaca-
tion that is always planned and
never done. Cruises are very
popular over major holidays.
One final word, if you are alone
and do not want to be, check your
Floridian many synagogues and
Temples as well as the GoldaMe.r
Center sponsor holiday dinners.
Iris Lee
So don't sit bemoaning your
fate, make plans and get busy and
conquer those High Holiday blues.
Iris Lee is the director of
Counseling/Outreach of Gulf Coast
Jewish Family Service, a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation ofPinellas County.



Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County/Friday, September 20, 1985
/
V.
I
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Jewish
Fact Sheet
'Memo From The Preside,
If you've never heard of the
Jewish Federation or you're not
quite sure what Federation does,
here's something that might help.
The Jewish Federation of
Pinellas County is people. ..
you ... me .. our families, our
neighbors, our organizations, our
institutions ... all the members of
the Jewish community working
together, voluntarily, to share
responsibilities of mutual interest
and concern to ourselves ... to
our fellow Jews... to the
community-at-large.
We are the central Jewish
community organization, govern-
ed and administered by elected of-
ficers and a board of directors. We
are all volunteers.
We serve a broad range of
Jewish needs cultural, religious
education, family welfare, leisure,
care of the aged, inter-faith rela-
tions at home and abroad.
We work for the advancement
of the total Jewish community and
represent it in areas of general
and Jewish interests.
Ethiopians Demonstrate
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ethiopian Jewish immigrants
demonstrated outside the offices
of the Chief Rabbinical Council
last week, charging that the Coun-
cil was not honoring an agreement
to facilitate marriages within the
Ethiopian community.
Leaders of the community met
with Premier Shimon Peres last
week to air their complaints.
Peres was instrumental in getting
the Chief Rabbinate to agree to
sanction marriages of Ethiopian
couples who could prove they are
Jewish. Otherwise they would
have to undergo ritual immersion,
a religious conversion rite.
The Chief Rabbi originally
demanded that all members of the
Ethiopian emigre community per-
form the ritual and would not
allow them to marry if they refus-
ed. The Ethiopians, all devout
practitioners of Judaism, de-
nounced this as an insult which
cast doubt on their authenticity as
Jews.
The agreement was expected to
end the conflict which has marred
the absorption of the Ethiopian
Jews since their arrival in Israel
last year. The community leaders
now say it has not been honored.
We coordinate planning,
budgeting and operation of Jewish
social and community services,
and reduce and avoid duplications
and overlapping of services
among agencies.
We combat anti-Semitism by
supporting religious liberty and
civil rights for everyone.
We promote cooperation
among Jewish organizations.
We are the nerve center
through which all can act together
to help Jews everywhere.
We plan for the future in
order to keep pace with the expan-
ding needs and demands of our
growing community.
We conduct the annual cam-
paign of the Pinellas Federa-
tion/United Jewish Appeal to fund
services and programs at home,
nationally, overseas and in Israel.
We provide the "Jewish Flori-
dian of Pinellas County," a bi-
weekly English-Jewish
newspaper.
Campaign
Continued from Page 1-
of the Combined Jewish Appeal,
past campaign chairperson of the
Federation and chairperson of the
Jewish Agency Committee.
She also serves on the Board of
Golda Meir Center, the TOP
Foundation board and is past
chairperson of the Lion of Judah
Division.
Mrs. Kent also serves on the
Board of the Kent Jewish Com-
munity Center, named after she
and her husband. Marshall Kent.
The Kents reside in Largo.
Charles Rutenberg of Clear-
water, a nationally known real
estate developer and banking ex-
ecutive, is a past president of the
Federation, current board
member and has held and holds
numerous positions in the Federa-
tion. At the national level, he
holds key posts at Hebrew Union
College, American Friends of
Haifa University, Council of
Jewish Federations and the
United Jewish Appeal.
Jewish Community Center of Pinellas County
R17 ELBOW LANE NORTH ST.
FLA. 33710. PU 81V54W96
A_A
jlL
09
I
f>
CO
I
Frad Mwyoiis
**cutv Olractor
WHY NOT TRY
SOMETHING NEW
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County is now offering
the following classes:
Conversational Hebrew
Mondays 3:30-4:30
Practical Playing of the
Recorder to be announced
Israeli Modern View of the Bi-
ble Mondays 4:30-5:30
Basic Israeli Dance for Adults
of all Ages Mondays 7-9:30
p.m.
Israeli Dance for Children
Mondays 4:30-5:30
Light Exercise and Israeli
Dance for Senior Adults Mon-
days 2-3
Yoga Tuesdays and
Thursdays 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Karate Mondays and
Wednesdays Beginners
6:30-7:30 p.m.; Intermediate
7:30-8:30 p.m.
Ceramics Children Mon-
days and Wednesdays Ages 5-7
3:45-4:30 p.m.; Ages 8-12
4:30-5:30 p.m.; Adults, Thursdays
1-3:30
Tennis Tuesdays and
Thursdays 4-5
SUCCOTH PROGRAM
ATJCC
A Succoth program will be held
at the JCC on Sunday. Sept. 29,
from 1 to 3 p.m. The celebration
will include decorating the sukkah
as well as special art activities for
the children. A highlight of the
day will be participation in Israeli
folk dancing under the direction of
Sarah Mandel.
We invite everyone to join us for
this special day to share in the
festivities. Traditional
refreshments will be served.
Congregation Beth Sholom
1844-54th Street So. Gulf port
In a few short weeks the High Holy Days will be
upon us.
High Holiday Tickets Available
We are also open to accept a limited number of
new members.
We are a CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUE under the
spiritual leadership of Rabbi Israel Ovorkin. We invite
your participation.
Beth Sholom Membership Is Affordable.
For information please call Synagogue 321-3380
or
John Bromwich Bernie Wolk
864-1307__ 360-1956
""Business Card Directory
A BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY for
Professionals and Executives is being
introduced as a regular monthly feature of
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN. If it is successful,
we will continue indefinitely.
Please send your business card, with
payment of $28.56 for the first edition. Future
placement will be invoiced by mail at the
same monthly rate.
Send To:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
2808 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Attn: Pinellas Business Directory Dept.
JEWISH AGENCY
FOR ISRAEL
By STANLEY NEWMARK
President
Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County
At 37, with a population
gathered from 120 nations, Israel
is still a pioneering, developing
country. Vision, energy, in-
telligence and substantial
resources have revived a
wasteland, created over 500 rural
communities and resettled almost
two million refugees.
These accomplishments were in
part made possible by the UJA
supplying funds to the Jewish
Agency for Israel. This is a unique
non-governmental body in
Jerusalem, whose aims are to pro-
vide assistance in the reception,
settlement and absorption of
Israel's immigrants.
The Jewish Agency ac-
complishes its tasks through the
departments of Immigration
Rural Settlement and Youth
Aliyah. Some additional services
include Housing, Education and
Social Programs.
Books have been written about
the accomplishments of the
Jewish Agency.
Today over 10,000 Ethiopian
Jews have reestablished their
roots in Israel. The absorption of
these Jews is the most costly and
difficult process of its kind. Before
they can make their way in-
dependently into Israeli society,
Ethiopian Jews must bridge
numerous health, cultural and
educational gaps.
The task of absorbing Ethiopian
Jews made a brilliant start with
the generous support of American
Jews who contributed to the UJA.
Now Israel enters the second
Stanley Newmark
phase of helping these Jn
become part of Israeli society.]
a monumental task; moving!
shelters to apartments,
jobs and supportive sen
health services and
services.
In addition, many more Etl
pian children than anticip
have reached Israel without I
parents. As it did for the chil
of the Holocaust and
refugees from Moslem
Youth Aliyah will serve a
first home in Israel for
young Ethiopian Jews.
Israel is still absorbing
famine-ridden Jews. It is c_,
that U.S. Jews aid Jews oven
despite needs at home an
good about it.
If we don't provide for
Jewish communities oi
Israel and in Israel who
If you have any comments, :t|
terests andVor denials, please c
tact me through the Federatj
office at 446-1033.
COMBINED JEWISH APPEAL
CAMPAIGN DATES
Major Gifts Dinner, Sunday, Dec. 15, 1985, 6:30 p.m., at the
Wine Cellar, guest speaker. Sen. Frank Lautenberg. Chairman.
Stanley Michels.
Super Sunday, Feb. 2, 1986, at the Jewish Community Center
and Superior Surgical. Chairmen, Julius and Jean Malkin.
The Blue and White Ball, Saturday evening, Feb. 22,1986. at
the Don Cesar Hotel. Chairmen, Dr. Morris and Marilyn LeVine
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Profile: Sidney Werner
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 3
By LOYCE GARON
As a child of a Holocaust sur-
Ljvor, Sidney Werner has a
^y commitment to involve-
gjnt in Judaism and continuing
{he Jewish heritage.
Werner is the 1985-86 Vice
President with Portfolio of the
Executive Committee of Pinellas
County.
JBorn in Vineland, N.J. in 1950,
H'erner was the offspring of
irents who were part of a large
flux of European, mostly Polish,
lews who settled in the
Wicultural town in the 1940s.
Werner's mother arrived there
iefore the war. His father was one
|!f many Holocaust survivors who
lettled there after the war.
"Vineland influenced me in that
was a community that has
Jewish roots," he said. Werner
jecalls he was deeply impressed
then he went to a rally during the
1967 Combined Jewish Appeal
Campaign with his father. The
Uimitment he saw and the
ttrong feeling the community had
lor the Zionist movement have re-
ained in his memories.
Werner understood the link
tith Holocaust survivors had with
brael. Many of the Holocaust sur-
vivors had had nowhere else to go,
or nowhere else that would take
them in, he said.
As a young boy he attended a
Zionist summer camp and was a
member of Young Judea. With his
roots in the past, Werner brings a
responsible dedication to the pre-
sent and future of the Jewish com-
munity in Pinellas County.
For the last two years, Werner
served as treasurer of the Federa-
tion. Last year he was in charge of
the Community Division, which
focuses on contributions between
$100 and $1,000.
This year, as Vice President
with Portfolio, he is focusing on
the $1,000 to $5,000 category. He
hopes to bring the Premier Divi-
sion pledges up to "a level that
will have a significant effect on
the larger goal of this year's
board, which is over a 30 percent
increase over last year's
campaign."
Last year's campaign goal was
$1,100,000. This year's goal is
$1,450,000.
"We very much need additional
monies if we are going to bring
the campaign to a new plateau,"
he said.
Citing some of the local needs.
Werner said the St. Petersburg
Jewish Community Center needs
rejuvenation and more operating
funds.
Because his children, Gerry, 7,
and Aaron, 5, attend the Jewish
Day School, Werner has a per-
sonal interest in the quality of
Jewish education here. Stressing
the value of quality education in
the Jewish Day School (a
beneficiary agency of the Federa-
tion), Werner said, "If you can
build a solid youth foundation,
then it seems logical that you'll
have a solid leadership foundation
for the future.
Werner is looking forward to
Super Sunday (Feb. 2) when the
contacts made, he hopes, will
show the care and commitment of
the Jewish community.
"Some things are priorities.
Some things are obligations and
responsibilities. The campaign
needs are something that is taken
care of before your discretionary
priorities are taken care of for
me. Some people don't feel that
way. It depends on a person's
background or on his spouse. For
some, it takes a visit to Israel to
St. Petersburg Synagogues to Participate
In Israel Bond High Holy Day Appeals
St. Petersburg synagogues will
ke part in a nationwide effort by
Lre than 1,100 congregations in
he United States and Canada to
elp mobilize funds to assist Israel
i overcome its current economic
risis and to provide jobs in
evelopment towns and research
and development funds for high
technology industries.
Participating congregations in
our community include: Con-
gregation B'nai Israel of St.
Petersburg, Rabbi Jacob Luski;
and Temple Beth El, Rabbi Ira
Youdovin.
Shamir Visits Japan
By DAVID LANDAU
IJERUSALEM (JTA) -
oreign Minister Yitzhak
[lamir left for Japan recently
l the first official visit to that
kuntry by an Israeli diplomat
I his rank. He took with him
eh hopes that his trip will
to a significant warming
relations with Japan in the
teas of business and com-
erce as well as diplomacy.
IShamir. who also is Deputy
femier. was accompanied by
veral prominent Israeli in-
strialists, among them the
rectors general of Tadiron,
bad's electronics giant, and
"l-0p, another high-tech
pmpany.
While in Tokyo he was to
onfer with Foreign Minister
|hintaro Abe and Prime
Sinister Yasuhiro Nakasone.
pere was a possibility he
fould be received by Emperor
?irohito.
Japan traditionally has been
autious in its political and
conomic relations with Israel,
nainly because it is totally
pependent on the Arab Gulf
ates for its oil. The coolness
Wends to the commercial
Phere. Japan's top auto-
kers, Nissan, Toyota and
suzu, have remained aloof
rom the Israel market for fear
W encountering the Arab
oycott.
Nevertheless, Japanese cars
l popular here and the
pbaru Range, manufactured
one of the smaller com-
Nes, is the best-selling vehi-
s in Israel. Recently, another
Japanese car-maker, Daihatsu,
T>ored the boycott and began
;''>ng to Israel. The boycott
"not deterred the major
onics companies, Sony,
Sanyo and Sharp, which have
been selling their products in
Israel for years.
Shamir will leave again
shortly after Rosh Hashanah
to accompany Premier Shimon
Peres to the opening of the
United Nations General
Assembly in New York.
The theme of this year's Appeal,
"If Not Now, When?", taken from
Rabbi Hillel, dramatizes the
urgency of providing loan funds in
this year of the economic crisis.
In announcing this year's Bond
Appeal, Don Silverberg, president
of Congregation B'nai Israel, and
Maurice Rothman, president of
Temple Beth El, said, "Our goal is
to obtain a Bond purchase from
every family in every par-
ticipating congregation in this
community. They continued:
"Unemployment is rising,
especially in the development
towns. The people of Israel are
making great sacrifices. Travel is
restricted; wages for government
jobs have been frozen; the value
added tax has been increased, as
have rents for tenants in public
housing."
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PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE
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KENT JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Sunday, September 29,1985
12-2 p.m.
Sidney Werner
understand the need. For others,
it doesn't."
"It is important for us in the
United States and for so many
Jewish communities around the
world that there must be a safe
harbor. It is important to support
Israel. As a child of Holocaust sur-
vivors, one learns that politics is a
very fragile thing. Governments
come and go. A constant must be
there so that what happened to
the European communities won't
happen to other communities in
oij- time or in the future. History
has a short memory a memory
of two generations. Impact
dissipates after that," Werner
said.
Werner said his involvement
with Federation has been a "good
experience" emphasizing the com-
mitment in Pinellas for an ongo-
ing, growing Jewish community.
He expressed admiration for his
co-workers, the chairpeople of the
various committees and subcom-
mittees and the leadership of the
campaign.
Werner is on the Young Leader-
ship Advisory Committee of the
Federation, an organization for
those up to age 40 with potential
for leadership. It is a two-year
program just begun by the
Federation.
Werner earned his bachelor's
degree from the University of Pit-
tsburgh in 1972 and graduated
from Stetson College of Law in
Gulfport in 1975. He married his
wife, Phyllis, from Newcastle,
Pa., and worked as a law clerk
here before establishing his own
law practice in Seminole.
The Werners are members of
Temple B'nai Israel in Clear-
water. He has held many positions
at Congregation Beth Chai where
he also taught.
He and his wife have three sons,
two at the Jewish Day School and
son Bruce, 5 months. Mrs.
Werner teaches at Walsingham
Elementary and is a member of
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Dr. l-gon Mayer has studied
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'Mayer's findings puncture several
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H^B^^BHi Ha^aMa^BiBB^B^B^BB^B^B^BB^a^a^BBB^p^
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas Coqnty/Friday, September 20, 1985
i
Prime Minister's Message to the Jewish Communities in the Diaspora For the New Yd
On the threshold of the New
Year 5746,1 should like to convey
to you my sincere good wishes
from Jerusalem, our eternal
capital.
During the first year of the na-
tional unity government, we set
ourselves four major goals, which
we vowed to carry out respon-
sibly, patiently and faithfully.
We decided to bring home our
fighting sons from Lebanon, and
to ensure the peace and security
of our northern towns and villages
from within our own borders.
We declared war on rampant in-
flation, and we formulated an
economic program that, while
reducing our dependence on
foreign aid, will lead to renewed
economic growth and to the
strengthening of Israel's political
position.
We have undertaken to redou-
ble our efforts to revitalize the
peace with Egypt. Both Israel and
Egypt must breathe new life into
Beth Chai Welcomes New Rabbi
Congregation Beth Chai, in
Seminole, has announced the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Stuart L.
Berman.
Rabbi Berman was born and
raised in Allentown, Pa. He is a
graduate of Yeshh a University in
New York City, and attended the
Post-Graduate Center for Mental
Health-Pastoral Counseling
Program.
Rabbi Berman is a prolific
author of numerous publications
and articles. He was the host of a
weekly television talk show on
WFAN-TV in Washington, D.C.
He was appointed to the
Republican National Committee,
and served on the White House
staff. His appointments also in-
clude the Presidential Transition
Committee, The White House
Conference on Children and
Youth, as well as The White
House Conference on Aging.
Rabbi Stuart L. Berman
His professional affiliations in-
clude Who's Who in American
Religion, National UJA-Young
Leadership Cabinet, Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies-
Commission on Synagogues Rela-
tions, North Broward Board of
Rabbis, Chaplain. Sunrise Health
Center, and Chaplain, Florida
Medical Center.
Rabbi Berman has served con-
gregations in Allentown, Pa.,
Washington. D.C, and Upstate
New York, and the Jewish Center
of Ocean Harbor in Oceanside,
N.Y. He was a New York City
Hospital Chaplain and Chaplain
for the Department of Corrections
at Rikers Island. He comes to
Seminole from the West Broward
Jewish Congregation in Planta-
tion, Fla.
He and his wife Audrey have
two children and will reside in
Seminole.
ORT Chapter to Promote Preschool Child
Abuse Prevention Program In St. Pete
The St. Petersburg Evening
Chapter of Women's American
ORT (Organization for Rehabilita-
tion through Training) recently
received funding to promote a
preschool child abuse prevention
>Tam entitled "Happy Be;ir "
Financing was provided in large
by Mel Gross, president Diver-
sified Health Services, with addi-
tional support from Red Lobster
Restaurant at 2773 66th St. N.,
St. Petersburg, and Ted P. Win-
ner, president, Wittner and Co.
The "Happy Bear" program,
recognized as one of the leading
preschool programs nationwide, is
geared to two- to -six-year-olds
children who have not yet achiev-
ed reading or writing skills (skills
which many other prevention pro-
grams require), and it is a live
presentation. This program was
produced by the Kansas Commit-
tee for Prevention of Child Abuse
and was developed by Helen
Swan, a noted authority on child
sexual abuse. The live presenta-
tion is considered the moat effec-
tive method i if teach in,; preven-
tion subji
T. present the program re
quires two adults one who
speaks to the children and one,
dressed in a bear'.- costume, who
does not speak but is understood
by his actions. The two together
teach preschoolers about good and
bad touching and how to protect
themselves from sexual assault.
The St. Petersburg Evening
Chapter has purchased three sets
of materials necessary to present
this program. Each set includes
one video cassette training tape
(an educational tool to be used by
teachers performing the program
and to be previewed by parents at
Menorah Manor Fund
Committee Appointed
Just reinstalled as Chairman
of The Board of Menorah
Manor, Ted P. Wittner an-
nounced the appointment of
Sigi Strauss of St. Petersburg,
Marshall Linsky of Tampa and
Saul Schechter of Upper
Pinellas to head the Fund Rais-
ing Committee.
They have been charged
with the responsibility of com-
pleting the Capital Building
Fund of the Manor and to plan
for future funding.
They have urged every
member of the community to
respond to the needs of the
Manor and to be certain to
stop by and view the Founders
Wall which is being installed in
the Lobby. This Wall will be a
permanent record of all those
contributing at the Builders
level and above for future
generations to recognize and
honor.
For additional information
contact them or call Edward
W. Vinocur, executive direc-
tor, at (813) 345-2775.
an orientation); one training
manual; and an adult-size bear's
costume (costumes are in the pro
ces- of being made now).
The ORT chapte*- wi
ndinn rar

interest! esenting U .
'li. Duni: I Oc
ter is recommen
ling the use of the ta| the
pools' initial open house to
lucate the parents and teachers
<..d make them aware of the
program.
On Nov. 21 the chapter will br-
ing the "Happy Rear'' program to
the bimonthly meeting of
SPACUS (Southern Pinellas
Association for Children I'nder
Six). The directors and staff from
approximately 110 preschools and
day-care centers in Pinellas Coun-
ty, south of Ulmerton Road,
belong to this association. The
tape will be previewed and a panel
will discuss and recommend how
to best present this program to
preschoolers.
It is not the intention of the St.
Petersburg Evening Chapter, at
the moment, to perform this pro-
gram themselves. However, if
there are any organizations in-
terested in doing so, or if there
are any schools who are not
SPACUS members but are in-
terested in this program, please
contact Vivian Lurie. project
chairperson, at Kreative Kids
Learning Center 393-7000.
BROWARD
IJAPER a
[Packaging
eJewisli Floridian
OF PINELLAS COUNTY *>**
Editorial Office. 301 S. Jupiter Ave.. South. Clearwater. Fla. 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication & Business Office. 120 N.E. 6 St.. Miami. Fla. 33132
Telephone (3051373-4605
FRED K SHOCHET KAREN WOLFSON UAWKI.SS.JIM DAWKINS SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publiahar Editor* PinaUaa County BaaruUva Editor
Jewiaa Florirfiaa Doea Not Goaraatae the Kaaarwtk of Marcfcaadtat Advertised
Sarood CUm BbbbBJI Pud. USPS MMMat Muu. Fla. Pubuaaad B< Wativ
Postmaster: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Araa Annual S4.00) 2 yaar MMaaaa latlcrlaBm ll.H ar <
annual ililirihla alHai la JaaWi Faaatatlan ot HnaHaa County tor ontoh Ma awn at S2.2* la
aid. Out of Team Upon Waajuaat
Friday. September 29.1985 5 TISHRI 5746
Volume 6 Number 19
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 tOO 432 37M
HROWARD
Qaper I
IJACKAGING
the existing agreement; time does
not stand still and we cannot
allow cynicism, hesitation and
stubbornness to dictate the course
of events.
At the same time, we must seek
to open channels of peace with
Jordan and the Palestinian Arabs.
JNF Offers
Toll Free
Number
The Jewish National Fund, with
its regional office in Tampa, has
recently made available a Toll
Free 800 number to be used by
people who want to plant trees
through the organization.
According to Executive Direc-
tor Lawrence D. Wasser, "The
toll free number was instituted in
order to make it more convenient
for individuals throughout the
state to order trees which will be
planted in Israel in honor of
friends and family during special
occasions or to be planted in
memory of a loved one. The JNF
felt it was very important that
anybody who wanted to plant a
tree could do so as easily as possi-
ble, and thus, the toll free
number."
Anyone who is interested in
planting trees or obtaining more
information about the JNF and its
work in Israel should call the
Regional office in Tampa by dial-
ing 1-800-282-4198 (tone) 8733
(for use with touch-tone
telephones only) or (813)
933TREE (for people with dial
net)
Terrorism will not make u.,
and will not deter us frJ"
sincere efforts. Hum.J
aspirations not n_f
pressures have bee/
keystone of our national stm,
throughout our history. Andi
with this belief that we shall
tinue to live.
With the commencement J
new Jewish year, there goes fj
from here, from Zion, a fen
call to all our brethren, when.
they may be. to come arid gj
with us, to be partners with,.
our great task: the building,
state that strives tn base its &
duct not only on strength, but,
on justice.
The beginning of the J
year is an appropriate
remember our oppressed I
in the Soviet Union, in Syria. |
in Iran and to voe that wei
not rest until we succeed in I
ing them and restoring then]
their historic homeland.
This year we have proved, o
again, that the .Jewish peopiei]
responsible for one another'
great mission for the salvatjoil
the Jews of Ethiopia is dm
a close, and this remote
wonderful tribe has been i
to our midst. In the face of i|
tical world, we demon
spiritual and practical
Let us continue to bear
that in routine times, as in I
of trial, we are capable off
tioning as a single people, i
hearts beating as one.
May the prayers of all
forefathers he realized in
time.
Shana Tova!
Shimon Peres
Jerusalem.
Kosh Hashana
9
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Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Pag 6
INISMEL, m
SOMETHBsfeS
EVEROWNGE
?m
*Wv-~
......"
*<*4*MM
"
ms"* *

In Israel, there are certain things you
A^^^%^ can always count on.
Nil J []kc the sunny beaches and the
? ^T^-11 warmth ol our people.
^ ^^ And vou can count on E Al, the air
line of Israel, for vacation packaees that
make it easy to exp^^SL ire from
We'll dive vou round tnp airfare nw
Jerusalem or lei Aviv at a choice ol bxun
Kls -Or, if you'd rather Say with friends, we'll give you a rental
f >oty Sb, our Eilat package irtdud* **g&^
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For S249 you can explore the ancient l^^nVgB i
bus Nile. Our Cairo package otters round tnp f J Tmore
o. three nights atthe cfeluxe Ramses Hilton and a lot more
"SUNS/TION/C
i ISRAEL PACKAGES.
NOVEMBER 111985-
M4RCH15.1966.
As always, there are free movies and drinks on every El Al flight.
Isn't it nice how some things never change?^ _______
Fonnore information call voTIr travel agent or El Al toll free at
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For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, wnte E Al Israel
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H^'lv, I4.N85 bn 5.1W6inchiw rheirf**ubec,locw


*------------------'--
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of PineUas County/Friday, September 20, 1985
Congregations, Organizations Events
UNIVERSITY OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
School of Extended Studies
Mythology and Archaeology
Of the Bible
To be taught at KJCC
The Book of Genesis is often
shrouded in mystery, and there is
little that the archaeologist has
oncovered that can shed light on
ts Old Testament stories. Results
jf archaeological excavations in
ancient Babylonia have, however,
demonstrated a high level of
culture with literature and law
that parallels the Creation, Flood,
and Patriarchal narratives.
The first part of the Mythology
and Archaeology of the Bible
course deals with the study of this
literature and its counterparts in
Genesis. Scholars use this
literature to demonstrate the
historicity of the Bible.
The continuing portion of the
course deals with the history of ar-
chaeology as a discipline and in-
cludes discussion of new "high
tech" applications in the field.
We will continue with our study
of the archaeology of the Exodus,
the conquest and the New Testa-
ment. The discussions will be
augmented with documents and
slides of actual excavations as well
as authentic artifacts. Books and
articles will be offered for perusal
and projects available to
volunteers will be mentioned. Fee,
$90.
The course will be taught by
Joan Keller, MA. Mrs. Keller is a
veteran of eight years of ar-
chaeological excavations in the
Holy Land and has recently
returned from her latest season in
the field.
The course will be held Tuesday,
Oct. 1-Dec. 3, 7 p.m. at the Kent
Jewish Community Center. Her-
cules at Virginia Avenue,
Clearwater.
To enroll, contact the School of
Extended Studies. University of
South Florida, Tampa. FL 33620;
telephone 974-2403.
Young people's interest in ar-
chaeology goes well beyond
"Raiders of the Lost Ark!" During
this five-week course, young ar-
chaeologists aged 10-14 will han-
dle actual artifacts and pottery
dug by USF professors in Israel.
They will make their own artifacts
of contemporary American
culture to bury, recover and
catalog.
Movies, slide lectures and books
about actual excavations will
demonstrate methods and
materials archaeologists use to
make judgments about ancient
cultures, especially those of Old
and New Testament Biblical
times.
The instructor, Joan Keller,
MA, has spent eight summers on
two different archaeological ex-
cavations in Israel. She has taught
Biblical Archaeology and In-
troduction to Religion at the
junior high and senior high levels
as well as at USF and is a popular
guest speaker at schools.
The fee for the course is $55. To
enroll, contact the Program
School of Extended Studies.
High Holiday Schedules
The Jewish Federation of
PineUas County and the Board of
Rabbis encourage all PineUas
County Jews to join a congrega-
tion and attend service during
these Days of Awe
TEMPLE BETH-EL
ST. PETERSBURG
Yom Kippur Eve, Tuesday,
Sept. 24, 8 p.m.
Yom Kippur Day, Wednesday,
Sept. 25, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
GULFPORT
Yom Kippur, Kol Nidre, Tues-
day, Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m.
Yom Kippur, Wednesday. Sept.
25, 9 a.m.
Yom Kippur Yizkor, Wednes-
day, Sept. 25, (approximately)
11:30 a.m.
A limited number of tickets are
available for purchase by non-
members. Telephone 321-3380.
864-1307, 360-1956.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
- ST. PETERSBURG
Shabbat Shuva Services
Sept. 20, 8 p.m.; Sept. 21, 9 a.m.
Kol Nidre Services, Sept. 24, 7
p.m. (seating by 6:30)
Yom Kippur Services, Sept. 25,
8:30 a.m. (Sermon and Yizkor)
1 p.m. (following Musaf).
Minha-Neila Services, Sept. 25,
4:45 p.m.
Kever Avot Memorial Services,
Sept. 22 Menorah Gardens
(10:30 p.m.), Royal Palm (11:30)
(Separate Youth Services
scheduled).
CONGREGATION
BETH CHAI
SEMINOLE
Kol Nidre, Sept. 24, 6:30 p.m.
Yom Kippur, Sept. 25, 9 a.m.
Neilah Concluding Service,
Sept. 25, 6:15 p.m.
CONGREGATION
BETH SHALOM
CLEARWATER
Shabbat Shuvab, Friday Eve,
Sept 20, 8 p.m.
Shabbat Shuvah, Saturday Mor-
ning. Sept. 21, 9 a.m.
Kol Nidre, Tuesday Eve, Sept.
24, 6:45 p.m.
Yom Kippur, Wednesday Morn-
ing, Sept. 25, 8:30 a.m.
TEMPEL B'NAI ISRAEL
CLEARWATER
Sylvan Abbey, Sept. 22. 12:30
p.m.
Curlew Hills Memorial Park.
Sept. 22, 1:15 p.m.
Kol Nidre Eve, Sept. 24 (early),
6 p.m.
Kol Nidre Eve, Sept. 24 (late),
8:30 p.m.
Yom Kippur, Sept. 25, 10 a.m.
Children's Service, Sept. 25, 2
p.m.
Afternoon Service. Sept. 25, 3
p.m.
Yizkor Service. Sept. 25, 4:45
p.m.
Neilah Concluding Service.
Sept. 25, 5:30 p.m.
TEMPLE
AHAVAT SHALOM
DUNEDIN
Friday. Sept. 20. Shabbat
Shuva, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 24, Kol Nidre-
Yom Kippur Eve, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25 Yom
Kippur Morning Service, 10 a.m.;
Personal Prayers, 1:30-3 p.m.;
Children's Services, 3 p.m.;
Yiskor, 4 p.m.; Neila, 5 p.m.
HILLEL
UNIVERSITY OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
UC BALLROOM
Yom Kippur, Sept. 24, 6:45
p.m.
Yom Kippur, Sept. 25, 10 a.m.
Yom Kippur, Sept 25, 5 p.m.
(Yizkor services following morn-
ing and prior to services on Yom
Kippur) (Call 988-7076).
GULFCOAST SOCIETY
FOR
HUMANISTIC JUDAISM
Yom Kippur, Wednesday, Sept
25, 11 a.m. luncheon Kapok
Tree, Clearwater to follow. (Non-
members $20 adult, $10 children
each holiday including luncheon.
Reservations: 2781 Cottonwood
Ct, Clearwater. 33619)
University of South Florida, Tam-
pa. 33620; telephone 974-2403.
NCJW
Suncoast Section Introduces
Highway Emergency Banners
Responding to a concern for the
safety of motorists especially for
women traveling alone, NCJW
Suncoast Section has introduced
Highway Emergency Banners.
The three-foot-long iridescent
banners read "CALL POLICE"
and attach by double sided tape to
the rear window of the disabled
vehicle. Motorists no longer need
to leave their vehicle in pursuit of
assistance and risk personal
danger. NCJW recommends that
in event of emergency, the
motorist should lock all car doors,
affix "CALL POLICE" banner to
rear window, and wait for police.
Proceeds from this community
service project help support other
NCJW community programs, like
the on-going, county-wide KIDS
fingerprinting program and the
now-formulating sexual abuse
awareness program for children.
Banners can be purchased for
$3 per banner or $5 for two ban-
ners. For further information,
please call Joanne Bokor at
530-9110 or Emily Gurtman at
397-6767.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
New JWV Post Formed
The Jewish War Veterans at
their annual convention held in
Orlando last month, voted and ap-
proved a charter for the newly
organized JWV post meeting at
Temple Ahavat Shalom. Palm
Harbor.
Leon Glassman, Commander of
the Gulf Coast District Council.
JWV, reports that the new post
will be known as the Samuel D.
Kety Post No. 542. and welcomes
all honorably discharged veterans
of our wars and also friends of the
Jewish War Veterans.
For membership information,
please call the Temple office.
785-8811.
Ruth Eiseman, president of the
Gulf Coast Counties Council.
JWVA Auxiliary, reminds all of us
in the community, that the JWV is
the oldest active veterans
organization in the United States.
It will celebrate its 90th Anniver-
sary with a gala dinner-dance at
the Officers Club, MacDill Air
Force Base on Nov. 10.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
To Hold Membership Party
The Friendship Club of B'nai
Israel meets even,' Thursday at
the Temple at 1 p.m. Every month
the group has a special program of
entertainment consisting of a lec-
ture, film or musical program.
The club honors birthdays and an-
niversaries of members once a
month. The weekly meetings also
include games of Mah Jongg.
cards, etc.
On Oct. 3, the club will have a
Paid-Up membership Party, with
all kinds of desserts and
beverages. Admission is paid up
dues for the coming year. Guests
are welcome.
For any information about club,
please call President Hilda
Schwartz at 799-3026.
CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
Sukkot Services
Sunday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m.; Mon-
day, Sept. 30, 9 a.m.; Monday,
Oct. 7-9 a.m. (includes Yizkor
Service), Monday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m.;
Tuesday, Oct. 8, 9 a.m.
Kiddush will be enjoyed in the
Succa following each service.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
ST. PETERSBURG
Rabbi Laaki
Holds Stady Groap
Neighborly Senior Services
Kosher Congregate Dining Pro-
gram has just completed the
study of the Book of Genesis with
Rabbi Jacob Luaki of Congrega
tion B'nai Israel in St.
Petersburg.
Rabbi Luski meets with the par-
ticipants of the Congregate Din-
ing program on a monthly basis to
study a chapter or two of Torah. A
joyful celebration took place on
Aug. 15 to mark the conclusion of
the study of Genesis. The
graduates" immediately began
studying the Book of Exodus.
We all look forward to continu-
ing to study Torah in the days
ahead
Sukkot Dinner Planned
Congregation B'nai Israel of St.
Petersburg will hold the fifth an-
nual Congregational Sukkot Din-
ner on Sunday. Sept. 29 at 7 p.m.
Chairman Libby Weinberger in-
vites all interested persons to wor-
ship together at Erev Sukkot ser-
vices in the main sanctuary at 6:30
p.m. The services will be followed
by a Kiddush in the Sukka, as are
all services followed by a Kiddush
in the Sukka during the Festival
of Sukkot. Then, those with reser-
vations for dinner will proceed in-
to the Fellowship Hall for a
delicious, traditional Yom Tov
dinner.
Donations are as follows:
Adults, $12.50; children ages
7-12, $5.50 and children under six:
$4.25. Reservations are required
and checks must be received by
the Synagogue office no later than
Sept. 23. For further information
call the synagogue at 381-4900.
Mitzvah Men's Club
Elects New Officers
Newly elected officers of the
Mitzvah Men's Club are Abraham
Mellitz, President; John Som-
mella. First Vice President; Eric
Schaaf, Second Vice President;
Leon Glassman, Third Vice Presi-
dent; Colman Goldstein,
Secretary; Philip Redisch,
Treasurer; William Dolgoff, Louis
Mellitz, and Isadore Wexler,
Elected Board Members. Ap-
pointed Board Members are
Meyer Bernstein. Dr. Paul Cohen,
Jonathan Fuss. Jack Goldberg,
(Jerald Levin, Morton Sherman,
and Maurice Goldblatt.
An October Giant Flea Market
on the Synagogue Parking Lot is
planned as a joint venture by the
Men's Club and the Sisterhood.
All saleable objects will be picked-
up. Please call Abe Mellitz
(577-4532) or the Synagogue Of-
fice (381-4900) for further
information.
Sunday morning. Nov. 3. will be
our First Brunch. Mark your
calendar for one of the Men's Club
best Fellowship Programs in the
Nation. Our First Place Award
was for our Brunches.
We need our usual working
crew and others who are willing to
sj*"nd an hour or two to set-up the
Sukkah on Thursday ,
(U^" Jhn'
USY Summer ft
Participants To m
At Shabbat sJrJ
USY Summer pr
ticipants will speak
evening on Fridav
7:30 p.m. a, Sj*f-
Israel. 301,59thT^
w3 will be shann* highlight
summer experiences ,
Congregational Family a
Kay. bteven S.^er ^
Howard S,mk,TM?
Israel Seminar: and P '
mond, USY on Wheels
CHABAD
Holds First Clan
Chabad Lubavitch of
County held their first
Sept. 5. Rabbi Si
Sawilowsky spoke on the
tion of the World" base
Chassidic discourse of a
Sage of Israel Mrs. Sai
served food and drink to
ticipants after the class
will be holding classes for
singles and couples weekij
entire Sawilowskv famih
you a "Chativa V'Chatum
L'Shonah Tova U'Mitukah'
good and sweet year. For
information call 584-7756
CHAI CLUB
Begins Eighth Year
As Chai starts its eighth;
an Auxiliary of Temple
Israel, we thought it would
good opportunity to let the
munity know what Chai is."
a social club for youngish L
and provides a means for J
couples to get to know eachi
We also extend a welcome,
for newcomers in the area,
through our socials make
cultural shock of mo
somewhat easier
Some of the fanctjenj
had in the past are: square
sock hop. mystery bus
Chanukah party, progressm
ner. Olympics, dinner !f"
family picnics, scavenger
road rally, bowling part)
games, weekend trips.
sweetheart breakfast. We
hosted some information"
including Marriage Er
and CPR Training
Anyone interested in
more information please
President. Nam Weiss(7
or our Meml>ership Chau^
Helene Deb<>*>ky |,i93-580|
CORRECTION
To Story On Page*
On August 23
Susan and Thane Cornell
Continued on Page'
Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL-Rafan.
?00 S Paaadaaa Aa.. St. PtUrahwf 33707 Rabbi Ira S Vaaaam"'
E*caiaK Sabbath Scrricaa 8 B.B.. Satarda. Morion* Sabbath SnW
Bar H.i Mitavah Sarrie* II Mb Tel. 347-41.II
onarrratioa BETH SHOLOM-Ci-irraUTa
1M4 54 St.. 8.. (.ulfport M707 Kabbi laraal Drortin Bsfffcail FriaV
at 8 p.m.; Satarday. a at T4. 321-3380. 844-4297
CoaTfatiaa B'NAI ISRABL-Ciaairratm
S01 MSt.. N.. St. Patarabvf 33710 Rabbi Jacob Uaki I aator '^*J
Sabbath Sanieo: Friday araaiaf 8 .. Satarday. 9 am: MoaaV-'
a-ai.: Saaday f a.a.: aad eraalBg Miayaa Tal. 381-4800
C*afrfUaa BETH CHA1-CJafaJW a^al
84SI 1U St. N.. SaaUaai* MM Raa*4 Staart Baraaa Sabbath Sar*
day aramiaga 8 p.av; Salarday. 8:30 a.a*. Tai. 383-8SU
C*as?gatiaa BETH SHALOM-CaMirwlha .^1
1328 S. Bakkar Rd.. tlaarwaUr 33818 Rabbi Keaacth *"**' tl\
a*^rrtm\j*imimxtm.m.:S*mrm*jt*.m..Smmm*ymtn>H*m^
Tai. 831-1418.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL-Rafan.
1888 8. Batch*, Rd Oa.rw.4ac 33818 ROM Artbar **^r^
*.- Friday .( at 8 .-.; Satarday 18:38 am Tal. 8114831
TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM Rafan. _, tj. |
P.O. Ba 1178, Na* 3*8* 8JH OariM B4L. "|"*-S
Btaafcj Sabbath Sarricaa Friday eraa-a 8 Tal. T84-a
CULT COAST SOCIETY FOB HUMANISTIC JUDAISM
*-*J if. Adah EaWatia. Call 7*7-4 far taff*0-
CHABAD LL'BAVATCH a-***!
P 0 a.. MM. Lar,.. 34X84-I4M. Tal .884-77*4.- -


Mimunity Calendar
Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page^
CoBUMUMty Calendar
JJSj edition
P?'.Jj Fund Dinner-Dance honoring U.S. Sen. Paula
Kfa Hyatt B*l
1\^""Auxiliary Bay Pines Hospital visit, 1 p.m.
'*, Veterans. U.S.A. post and auxiliary games. Bay
i. cH.vwitil prizes and refreshments. Information:
XvT\ lT- 2 Pm- Workmen"s Circle Branch
'?!f!^in 'SSfo and entertainer Kent JCC Maccabee
m Museum of Science and Industry, noon to 5 p.m.
i B'nai Israel Singles, fifth annual cocktail party,
16 2nd St. N. downtown St. Petersburg. 7-10 p.m.
, B'nai Israel Singles, fifth annual cocktail party,
requested", not required. Information: Congregation
381-4900.
mgregations
Irganizations
ntioued from Page 6
loreographers and actual
instructors for Cocoon.
Lere not at the Sunday.
18 function of Hadassah
j Group and did not give
uctions at the affair was
I by Nicole and Ron Zom-
Mio were selected to be in
tone as extras, by the
aphers.
|Hadassah Aliyah Group ex-
its sincere apologies for
onvenience this may have
LMPA BAY SINGLES
Plans Excursion
(Tampa Bay Singles group
ferine a unique dining ex-
tr. a trip back to the
nl days at the popular
*al attraction in Kissimmee.
[cost is $29 per person which
es bus transportation, din-
Monday, September 23
Zul y>ZXyn?- board "N Sol** Meir Friendship Club
video 302 S Jupiter Ave Clearwater, 1 p.m. North Pinellas
Chapter of Hadassah. paid-up membership luncheon, Temple
Ahavat Shalom. Curlew Road, Palm Harbor, Program. Musical
salute to "Women of Broadway" Senior Friendship Club
Board meeting, JCC, noon
Tuesday, September 24
Golda Meir Center trip to Ybor City State Museum, 1 p.m., cost:
$1.50 Kol Nidre
Wednesday. September 25
Yom Kippur
Thursday. September 26
Golda Meir Center Publix shopping. Post Office trip. 1 p.m.
Kent JCC Cub Scout planning meeting. 7 p.m. Senior Friend-
ship Club. JCC. birthdays and anniversaries
Friday, September 27
Shabbat Candlelighting: 7:04 p.m.
Sunday. September 29
Marshall and Reva Kent JCC. 1955 Virginia St.. Clearwater,
dedication of center, noon to 2 p.m. Abe Ader ****> jfft
first fall breakfast meeting, Jewish Community Center, 8W
Elbow Lane N.. St. Petersburg. Guest speaker: Jerry Colen.
JCC president. 9:30 a.m.
Monday, September 30 __ rt0fp
Golda Meir Center closed for Sukkoth Westwind ORT
Chapter's Kugel, Koffee Klutch, Ida Ellegant s home, reserva-
tions: 796-3061, noon
Tuesday, October 1
Golda Meir Center closed for Sukkoth
Golda Meir
call center
Wednesday. October 2
Kent JCC Couples Club planning meeting, 7 p.m.
Center Sukkoth Party with Manny Schwartz.
(461-0222). 1 p.m.
Thursday, Octobber 3 _.
Temple B'nai Israel Friendship Club, paid-up membership par-
ty. 1 p.m. Kent JCC Brownies planning meeting. 7 p.m.
Friday. October 4
Shabbat Candlelighting: 6:56 p.m.
Hilda Sachs, Clearwater,
president of the Florida Cen-
tral Region of Hadassah, at-
terAed the 71st annual na-
tional convention in New York
last month.
ner and show. The date is Oct. 6
with the group leaving at 4 p.m.
Payment can be made to the Tam-
pa Jewish Community Center.
2808 Horatio St., Tampa 33609.
For additional information, call
797-3536 (Pinellas) or 873-4451
(Hillsborough).
DAVID C. GROSS
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTOR


4 fM
-a
W/A
'PERSONALIZED FAMILY SERVICE"
XJR JEWISH OWNED AND OPERATED
LAPELS OFFER THE FINEST OF SERVICE
VT THE MOST REASONABLE COST. RE-
GARDLESS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
LOCAL AND OUT OF.STATE ARRANGEMENTS
CHEVRA KADISHA
DIRECTORS AVAILABLE 24 HOURS
PRE NEED CONSULTATION AND PRE PAID
"NFLATION-PROOF FUNERAL TRUSTS
SPACIOUS COMPLETE FACILITIES
F0R FAMILY & FRIENDS
OUR PRICES MEET EVERY NEED
SOCIAL SECURITY AND V A
BENEFITS COUNSELING
REFORM CONSERVATIVE ORTHODOX
381-4911
6366 CENTRAL AVE. / 1045 NINTH AVE. N.
ST PETERSBURG
Kent Jewish Community Center News
KJCC
MACCABEE BRAVES
To Visit Museum Of
Science And Industry
The Maccabee Braves group of
the Kent Jewish Community
Center has planned a trip to the
Museum of Science and Industry
for Sunday, Sept. 22. The Mac-
cabee Braves is a group of boys in
kindergarten, first and second
grades and a parent. The group
has already successfully planned a
fishing trip, a breakfast and bowl-
ing party.
The trip will meet at the new
KJCC for lunch and then carpool
to the Museum of Science and In-
dustry in Tampa. The group will
return to the KJCC approximate-
ly 4:30-5 p.m.
RSVP's are necessary to David
Seidenberg at 736-1494.
KJCC PROVIDES
AFTER-SCHOOL CARE
Did vou know that the Kent
Jewish Community Center has an
After-School Program which
picks children up at Northern
Pinellas elementary schools?
Well it's true. Children are pick-
ed up from schools in the after-
noon and are brought to the KJCC
for classes, gameroom. homework
time, snacks and loads of fun.
Every day children have a choice
if classes in sports, arts and
crafts, Jewish culture, magic and
breakdancing.
If vou are looking for a well
supervised after-school program.
call David Seidenberg at
1494.
KJCC BROWNIES GROUP
The Kent Jewish Community
(enter has formed a new
Brownies group is looking for new
meml>ers. The Brownies will be
holding a meeting for interested
parents on Thursday. Oct. 3 at 1
p.m. at the new Kent JCC.
The group which is open to girls
who are in first, second and third
grades, will provide an opportuni-
ty for its members to make new
friends and explore new
dimensions.
The KJCC is located at 1955
Virginia St. at Hercules Ave.
For more information, please
contact Rea Kety at 725-1355.
CUB SCOUT PACK
TO BE SPONSORED
BY KJCC
The Kent Jewish Community
(enter has announced plans for
the formation of a cub scout pack,
according to David Seidenberg.
Director of the Center.
A meeting has been planned for
Thursday, Sept. 26 at p.m. for
parents and potential scouts. The
E3 ^1 be held a, the new
KJCC at 1965 Virginia St near
Hercules Avenue. Represen-
K of the Scouts of Amenc*
, on hand to answer
pack will be
!
boys, and a complete scouting pro-
gram for girls.
Scouting in a fun and exciting
way helps to foster a sense of per-
sonal achievement, develop at-
titudes of good citizenship,
strengthen interpersonal relation-
ships and develop character.
KJCC AND CHABAD
TO BUILD SUKKAH
The Kent Jewish Community
Center in cooperation with
Chabad Lubavitch will be building
a Sukkah at the KJCC's site on
Virginia Street near Hercules
Avenue on Sunday, Sept. 22 at 1
p.m. The pubic is invited to join in
building the Sukkah. The Sukkah
will be used during the upcoming
Center's dedication on Sept. 29
and Sukkot holiday beginning that
evening.
Historically the Holy Days of
Sukkot commemorate the booths
or huts which the Israelis built
during their sojourn in the desert.
These booths represent the pro-
tective umbrella which encom-
passed the Jews during their 40
years of traveling toward Israel.
For further information, please
call Rabbi Sawilowsky at
584-7756.
COUPLES CLUB FORMS
The Kent Jewish Community
Center has planned organizing a
meeting of its new Couples Club
for Wednesday, Oct. 2 at 7:30
p.m. according to David
Seidenberg, director of the
center.
The group will meet to discuss
plans for upcoming events such as
parties, dinners and many other
activities. The group is designed
for young couples in the Clear-
water area to meet other couples.
The organizing meeting will be
held at the new KJCC at Virginia
Street and Hercules Avenue.
The Kent Jewish Community
Center is a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County.
Ex-SS Member
Severely Injured
PATERSON, N.J. (WNS) -
Tscherim Soobzokow, the 61-year-
old Soviet-born former member of
the Waffen SS is listed, according
to latest reports, in critical condi-
tion at a hospital here after being
injured when a pipe bomb explod-
ed at his home early on the morn-
ing of Aug. 15.
avtJ\
Dedicated to Serving
our Jewish Community
521-2444
Jonathan A. Fuss
Owner
Jewish Funeral Directors
We believe funeral prices have escalated beyond need. In
response, we have estebushed a policy that assures you of
significantly reduced cost We offer complete services, in
comfortable new surroundings, to serve YOUR individual
needs.
24 Hour Emergency Service
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Today's Prices Guaranteed
Your Funds Held in Trust
Nationwide Transfer Arrangements Available
4100 Sixteenth Street North
St. Petersburg, Florida 33703
Th, Only All Jewish Chapel in Pinellas ( ounfy


P*m 8 The Jewiah Floridian of Pinellas County/Friday, September 20, 1985^
/

m
Happy
5746
From The
Airline That
Began In
56SS
Pan Am. You Can t Beat The Experience.


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Friday, September 20, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County__f?A
IN ISB4EL
SOMETHINGS
EVER CHANGE



In Israel, there are certain things you
can always count on.
Like the sunny beaches and the
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And you can count on E Al, the air
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COME TO ISMELCOME SMY WITH FRIENDS.
**


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County/Friday, September 20, 1985
Prime Minister's Message to the Jewish Communities in the Diaspora For the New Year
On the threshold of the New
Year 5746,1 should like to convey
to you my sincere good wishes
from Jerusalem, our eternal
capital.
During the first year of the na-
tional unity government, we set
ourselves four major goals, which
we vowed to carry out respon-
sibly, patiently and faithfully.
We decided to bring home our
fighting sons from Lebanon, and
to ensure the peace and security
of our northern towns and villages
from within our own borders.
We declared war on rampant in-
flation, and we formulated an
economic program that, while
reducing our dependence on
foreign aid, will lead to renewed
economic growth and to the
strengthening of Israel's political
position.
We have undertaken to redou-
ble our efforts to revitalize the
peace with Egypt. Both Israel and
Egypt must breathe new life into
the existing agreement; time does
not stand still and we cannot
allow cynicism, hesitation and
stubbornness to dictate the course
of events.
At the same time, we must seek
to open channels of peace with
Jordan and the Palestinian Arabs.
Beth Chai Welcomes New Rabbi
Congregation Beth Chai, in
Seminole, has announced the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Stuart L.
Berman.
Rabbi Berman was bom and
raised in Allentown, Pa. He is a
graduate of Yeshiva University in
New York City, and attended the
Post-Graduate Center for Mental
Health-Pastoral Counseling
Program.
Rabbi Berman is a prolific
author of numerous publications
and articles. He was the host of a
weekly television talk show on
WFAN-TV in Washington, D.C.
He was appointed to the
Republican National Committee,
and served on the White House
staff. His appointments also in-
clude the Presidential Transition
Committee, The White House
Conference on Children and
Youth, as well as The White
House Conference on Aging.
Rabbi Stuart L. Berman
His professional affiliations in-
clude Who's Who in American
Religion, National UJA-Young
Leadership Cabinet, Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies-
Commission on Synagogues Rela-
tions, North Broward Board of
Rabbis, Chaplain, Sunrise Health
Center, and Chaplain, Florida
Medical Center.
Rabbi Berman has served con-
gregations in Allentown, Pa.,
Washington, D.C, and Upstate
New York, and the Jewish Center
of Ocean Harbor in Oceanside,
N.Y. He was a New York City
Hospital Chaplain and Chaplain
for the Department of Corrections
at Rikers Island. He comes to
Seminole from the West Broward
Jewish Congregation in Planta-
tion, Fla.
He and his wife Audrey have
two children and will reside in
Seminole.
ORT Chapter to Promote Preschool Child
Abuse Prevention Program In St. Pete
The St. Petersburg Evening
Chapter of Women's American
ORT (Organization for Rehabilita-
tion through Training) recently
received funding to promote a
preschool child abuse prevention
program entitled "Happy Bear."
Financing was provided in large
by Mel Gross, president. Diver-
sified Health Services, with addi-
tional support from Red Lobster
Restaurant at 2773 66th St. N.,
St. Petersburg, and Ted P. Win-
ner, president, Wittner and Co.
The "Happy Bear" program,
recognized as one of the leading
preschool programs nationwide, is
geared to two- to -six-year-olds
children who have not yet achiev-
ed reading or writing skills (skills
which many other prevention pro-
grams require), and it is a live
presentation. This program was
produced by the Kansas Commit-
tee for Prevention of Child Abuse
and was developed by Helen
Swan, a noted authority on child
sexual abuse. The live presenta-
tion is considered the most effec-
tive method of teaching preven-
tion subjects to younger children.
To present the program re
quires two adults one who
speaks to the children and one.
dressed in a bear's costume, who
does not speak but is understood
by his actions. The two together
teach preschoolers about good and
bad touching and how to protect
themselves from sexual assault.
The St. Petersburg Evening
Chapter has purchased three sets
of materials necessary to present
this program. Each set includes
one video cassette training tape
(an educational tool to be used by
teachers performing the program
and to be previewed by parents at
Menorah Manor Fund
Committee Appointed
Just reinstalled as Chairman
of The Board of Menorah
Manor, Ted P. Wittner an-
nounced the appointment of
Sigi Strauss of St. Petersburg,
Marshall Linsky of Tampa and
Saul Schechter of Upper
Pinellas to head the Fund Rais-
ing Committee.
They have been charged
with the responsibility of com-
pleting the Capital Building
Fund of the Manor and to plan
for future funding.
They have urged every
member of the community to
respond to the needs of the
Manor and to be certain to
stop by and view the Founders
Wall which is being installed in
the Lobby. This Wall will be a
permanent record of all those
contributing at the Builders
level and above for future
generations to recognize and
honor.
For additional information
contact them or call Edward
W. Vinocur, executive direc-
tor, at (813) 345-2775.
an orientation); one training
manual; and an adult-size bear's
costume (costumes are in the pro-
cess of being made now).
The ORT chapter will serve as a
free lending library to any
preschools ani day-care centers
interested in presenting this pro-
gram. During September and Oc-
tober, the chapter is recommen-
ling the use of the tapes for the
~hools' initial open house to
lucate the parents and teachers
and make them aware of the
program.
On Nov. 21 the chapter will br-
ing the "Happy Bear" program to
the bimonthly meeting of
SPACUS (Southern Pinellas
Association for Children Under
Six). The directors and staff from
approximately 110 preschools and
day-care centers in Pinellas Coun-
ty, south of Ulmerton Road,
belong to this association. The
tape will be previewed and a panel
will discuss and recommend how
to best present this program to
preschoolers.
It is not the intention of the St.
Petersburg Evening Chapter, at
the moment, to perform this pro-
gram themselves. However, if
there are any organizations in-
terested in doing so, or if there
are any schools who are not
SPACUS members but are in-
terested in this program, please
contact Vivian Lurie, project
chairperson, at Kreative Kids
Learning Center 393-7000.
[:]ROWARD
IJAPER &
Packaging
^ewlsla FloridliainL
OF PINELLAS COUNTY > s*ocat
Editorial Office. 301 S. Jupiter Ave., South, Clearwater, Fla. 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication & Business Office. 120 N.E. 6 St.. Miami, Fla. 33132
Telephone (3051373-4605
FRED K SHOCHET KAREN WOLFSON DAWKINS/J1M DAWKINS SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Editors. Pinallaa County Exacuiiva Editor
Jewiah Floridian Doea Not Guarantee the Kaahruth of Merchandia. Advertised
Sacood Claaa Poataaa Pud. USPS S4-470 at Miami. Fla. Publiahad Bi-Waakly
Postmaster Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Ana Annual (4.00) 2-yMr Minimum Subacrtptlon $7 50 or by
annual manaaarantn ptodgo to Jaartah Fodoratton ol PlnaHaa County lor wMch tha sum of S2.2S l>
paid. Out ot Town Upon Raauaat
Friday, September 20,1985 5 TISHRI5746
Volume 6 Number 19
FREE DELIVERY FLORIDA
1 800 432 3708
0ROWARD
IJAPER *
(Packaging
JNF Offers
Toll Free
Number
The Jewish National Fund, with
its regional office in Tampa, has
recently made available a Toll
Free 800 number to be used by
people who want to plant trees
through the organization.
According to Executive Direc-
tor Lawrence D. Wasser, "The
toll free number was instituted in
order to make it more convenient
for individuals throughout the
state to order trees which will be
planted in Israel in honor of
friends and family during special
occasions or to be planted in
memory of a loved one. The JNF
felt it was very important that
anybody who wanted to plant a
tree could do so as easily as possi-
ble, and thus, the toll free
number."
Anyone who is interested in
planting trees or obtaining more
information about the JNF and its
work in Israel should call the
Regional office in Tampa by dial-
ing 1-800-282-4198 (tone) 8733
(for use with touch-tone
telephones only) or (813)
933-TREE (for people with dial
phones).
Terrorism will not make m *
and will not deter us fcJl
sincere efforts. Hum,
aspirations not tang
pressures have been
keystone of our national stru,
throughout our history ArJu
with this belief that we i
tinue to live.
With the commencement of J
new Jewish year, there goes f
from here, from Zion, a fen
call to all our brethren, when-
they may be, to come and liven
with us, to be partners with,,
our great task: the building (
state that strives to base its*,
duct not only on strength, but,1
on justice.
The beginning of the Jei
year is an appropriate tirot
remember our oppressed bretl
in the Soviet Union, in Syria,;
in Iran and to vow that wei
not rest until we succeed in (
ing them and restoring
their historic homeland.
This year we have proved, o.
again, that the Jewish people I
responsible for one another 1
great mission for the salva_._,
the Jews of Ethiopia is draw.ngl
a close, and this remote
wonderful tribe has been i
to our midst. In the face of ad
tical world, we demon
spiritual and practical soli
Let us continue to bear
that in routine times, as in \
of trial, we are capable of I
tioning as a single people, i
hearts beating as one.
May the prayers of
forefathers be realized in
time.
Shana Tova!
Shimon Peres
Jerusalem.
Rosh Hashana .".71*;
*** VtUfit^U.nf* Pa/ray-.. ft V^U-teUiU..
9
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>( tht undr-ttutld prict.'
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