The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00129

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
Th
dar
tfewfo/7 florid Ian
Of Pinellas County
Number 5
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, March 8,1986
-fndShochmi
Price 35 Cents
lenorah Manor to
iSet Cornerstone
liller, president of
|anor, "Our Home for
ng," has announced
itment of Sylvan
learwater, as the
of the committee
>r the cornerstone-
nony of the Manor to
lay afternoon, March
rther reported that
littee would be
ye of the entire area
|ed by the Jewish
nursing home
en in early May.
lready appointed to
tee the following:
Broff, Mary Anne
)r. Philip Benjamin
las County; Lee
rley Solomon and
of Hillsborough
ell as Alyce and Ed
arasota County. He
pe additional ap-
i they are made.
littee anticipates
[the acceptance as
aker by one of the
Bmen who will ex-
halations to the
lunities of West
Ja for meeting the
aged and infirm as
[Guard of the Abe
246 of the Jewish
will present the
the direction of
iWisotzky, and
J for one of the local
Irs is being made.
Sylvan Orloff. coordinator,
cornerstone ceremonv.
Orloff and his committee
extend an open invitation to all
residents of the area to par-
ticipate in the day's festivities
and to partake of refreshments.
Miller also urged community
members to join with others in
the community in supporting the
Capital Building Fund for
Menorah Manor. For further
information concerning
dedication opportunities, or
regarding residency at the home,
please contact the Menorah
Manor office at 255 59 Street
North. St. Petersburg. 33710 or
call (813) 345-2775.
lue and White Ball
Enjoyed By All
and South County
her in a show of
make the fifth
land White Ball a
[success, reported
John Joseph,
of the event. Over
attended the ball,
cocktails, dinner,
the Buddy Verde
I a keynote address
Bam Gejdenson (D.-
Bt-iime attendees
Ith community
I veteran ball-goers
event a social and
cess
lign chair Elisa
the presence of
I. Arthur Baseman,
Irs. Jan Bresky,
Mrs. Kenneth
bbi and Mrs.
netz, Rabbi and
[Luski. Rabbi and
sskind, and Rabbi
Youdovin. Also,
ents Harry Green,
rk, and Gordon
Heir spouses were in
Yehuda Ben Arieh, Jill
li and Mrs. Arthur
Mid Behr, Dr. and Mrs.
pi. Mr. and Mrs. Gerald
Benstock. Mr. and Mrs. Michael Ben
stock, Mrs. Lillian Berni. Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Bernstein, Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Bershow, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Bokor,
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Bragin, Rabbi
and Mrs. Jan Bresky, Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Brody. Rabbi and Mrs. Ken
neth Bromberg. Orin Cohen.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Diner,
Mollie Emple, Dr. and Mrs. Irwin Entel.
Mr. and Mrs. Mel Estroff, Mr. and Mrs.
William Fleece, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Fins, Mr. and Mrs. Roland Fox, Dr.
Michael Gallant, Rep. Sam Gejdenson,
Dr. and Mrs. Gordon Gilbert, Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Gitis, Mr. and Mrs. Mor
ton. Gold, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice
Goldblatt, Dr. and Mrs. Gordon
Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Green,
Dr. and Mrs. Lester Greenberg, Mr. and
Mrs. Lewis Gross, Mr. and Mrs.
Emanuel Gurin, Mr. and Mrs. Rouben
Halprin, David Halprin, Michael
Halprin, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Harris,
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Hunter, Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Igel, Dr. and Mrs. Stephen
igei, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jacobson,
Mr. and Mrs. John Joseph, Deborah
Joyce.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Kallman,
Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Kent, Dr. and
Mrs. Allen Katx, Mr. and Mrs. Mark
Klein, Rabbi and Mrs. Morris
Kobrinetz, Dr. and Mrs. Max
Koenigsberg, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Kramer, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Krug, Dr.
and Mrs. Philip Lerner, Dr. and Mrs.
Morris LeVlne, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Levine, Dr. and Mrs. Fred Lieberman,
Dr. and Mrs. Owen Linder, Mr. and
Continued on Page 3
SAVE THE DATE!
Women's Division
Tribute Luncheon
Tuesday, April 16
Rally for Operation Moses \
Members of the Pinellas
Jewish community will have the
opportunity to participate in
Israel's historic ingathering of
exiles: the reuniting of the Jews
of Ethiopia with their fellow Jews
after 2,500 years of isolation.
A community wide
mobilization day is planned for
March 18, when two rallies in
support of Ethiopian Jewry will
be held in Pinellas County, one at
Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater,
and the other at Temple Beth El,
St. Petersburg, both at 7:30 p.m.
The rallies are sponsored by the
Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County, in cooperation with the
Board of Rabbis. Sylvan Orloff is
chairman of Operation Moses.
The entire Jewish community
is urged to attend to learn about
the long history of Beit Yisrael,
the Jews of Ethiopia, and the new
immigrants' absorption into
Israeli life. Elaine and David
Ravich of New Jersey will be
guest speakers at the rallies.
Saul Schechter, president of
the Jewish Federation, said,
"Israel has undertaken an
enormous financial burden in
resettling and absorbing the
Fthiopian Jews, many of whom
suffer debilitating illnesses,
speak no Hebrew, and have few
skills that can be used in a
modern industrial society. We
can be proud that despite its
economic crunch, Israel is once
again proving itself a haven for
the world's Jews."
Elisa Greenberg, 1985 Cam-
paign chairman, said, "Israel's
magnificent life-saving mission
does not come without a high
price tag. The process of ab-
sorption, feeding, clothing,
housing, and training the new
residents, will run into tens of
millions of dollars. We must all
Ethiopian Jewish children in Israel.
come together at the rallies and
demonstrate our support for this
latest effort for Jewish survival."
Elaine and David Ravich are
well qualified to enlighten our
community about Ethiopian
Jewry. Both have been to Israel
and have visited the absorption
centers housing the Ethiopians.
Mrs. Ravich is past president of
her Sisterhood and her
synagogue in New Jersey, as well
as the Central New Jersey branch
of Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism. She is
currently a member of the
national board of Women's
League for Conservative
Judaism, president and cam-
paign chair of the Central New
Jersey Jewish Federation
Women's Division, and a
representative for Endangered
Jews to the Leadership Con-
ference of Major Jewish Women's
Organizations.
David Ravich is a former
campaign chair of the Jewish
Federation of Central New
Jersey. He is presently on the
national boards of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
and the Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
In addition, Ravich is a
member of the executive com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation
of Central New Jersey, and
chairman of the Board of the
Jewish Community Endowment
Fund of Central New Jersey.
He is a senior partner in the
New Jersey law firm of Shevick,
Ravich, Koster, Tobin, Oleckna,
and Reitman.
The Pinellas County Rallies on
behalf of Ethiopian Jewry will
take place at Temple Beth El and
Temple B'nai Israel at 7:30 p.m.
The entire community is urged to
attend. For information, call Jill
at 446-1033.
Gov't. In Religion Threatens
Judaism In America
SAN FRANCISCO -
"The creche on the cour-
thouse lawn" and the
prayers in the public
schools that mark the
weakening of church-state
separation "threaten the
integrity of Judaism itself
in this land," Theodore R.
Mann, constitutional
lawyer and American
Jewish Congress president,
charged as he addressed
450 Jewish leaders from
across the U.S. here.
The leaders were gathered at a
four-day plenary session of the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
meeting at the Fairmont Hotel.
FOCUSING ON the
psychological impact and
theological implications of
growing governmental in-
volvement in religion, Mann
called the current erosion of the
constitutional principle of
church-state separation
potentially "devastating,"
threatening to transform
American Jews into "outsiders"
and "strangers in their own
land."
Rev. Charles V. Bergstrom,
executive director of govern-
mental affairs for the Lutheran
Council in the United States of
America, shared the podium with
Jewish community, asserted that
Justice Sandra Day O'Connor
had correctly stated that
government endorsement of
religion "sends a message to non-
adherents that they are out-
Continued on Page 8-
Theodore R. Mann
Mann at a plenum session on
"Church-State Separation: The
Wall Under Attack." Pastor
Bergstrom denounced the current
assault on the separation
principle, terming it an "attempt
to Christianize America."
NJCRAC is the national
coordinating body for the Jewish
community relations field, and is
comprised of 113 local and 11
national Jewish community
relations agencies throughout the
United States.
MANN, who has argued
church-state cases before the
Supreme Court on behalf of the


^
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday, March 8,1985
I
w
r
I
;
Legislative Breakfast Held
Pacesetter-Chai Luncheon Nea
A legislative breakfast was
held Tuesday. Feb. 19. at Las
Fontanas to acquaint legislators
with the Jewish community and
its needs. Ted Tench chaired the
meeting. The breakfast was
sponsored by the Government
Affairs Committee which is part
of the Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish
Federation of Pinellas County.
Ben Bush is the chairman.
"The breakfast serves many
purposes. It helps us to get to
know legislators on a personal
level and it gives us the op-
portunity to express our concerns
to our elected officials. We want
legislators to see the Jewish
Federation as a resource for
information and expertise on
human services and in the Jewish
community," said Ellen
Classman. Government Affairs
Committee member.
Saul Schechter, president of
the Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County, told the group that "the
Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County is the umbrella
organization of the Jewish
community, which has 4,500
family units."
After breakfast, Michael
Bernstein, president of Gulf
Coast Jewish Family Services,
was the featured speaker. Ber-
nstein spoke of his concern for
the elderly in the Jewish com-
munity and their needs. "We are
committed to and are responding
to their specific needs. There is a
gap in social services and it is our
responsibility to provide the
necessary programs to fill that
gap," Bernstein said.
"Gulf Coast Jewish Family
Service has a budget of S2.1
Ben Bush, chairman. Govern-
ment Affairs Committee.
million and is proud to be a
beneficiary agency of the
Federation," Bernstein said.
Bernstein then explained the
needs of this community for
programs for the elderly. "Next
to Phoenix, Arizona, we have the
second highest concentration of
older Jews," Bernstein said.
"This high concentration of
elderly people is a concern of the
entire community, not just the
Jewish community."
After presenting the issues to
the legislators and Jewish
leadership at the breakfast,
Bernstein proposed a possible
solution to the problem.
A program called Group Home
Alternative Living Plan
(GH ALP) could provide a facility
for the elderly who do not have
Why A Women's Division
A question frequently
raised during our campaign is
"Why a separate Women's
Division, and why should I make
a gift apart from my husband's
gift to campaign?"
We give to the Women's
Division because women are a
part of the community, we live in
the community, and we have a
responsibility to the community.
We assume the responsibility
because we are concerned with
the Jewish survival of our*
children and our grandchildren.
In the traditional Jewish
family one never heard the ex-
pression, "My husband gives."
The Jewish mother classically
accepted it as her obligation, not
as a woman, but as an individual
in her own right, to help fellow
Jews. In fact, it was she, rather
than her husband, who filled the
"pishke" boxes that hung on the
wall and which were for Israel
and the poor.
The Women'8 Division is
a modern expression of this
ancient womanly involvement.
We must not overlook the fact
that through a woman's in-
volvement comes the education
of her family, and that often a
woman has a profound influence
on her husband.
Our Women's Division is
an arm of the Pinellas Jewish
Federation, operating its own
educational programming and
conducting its own fundraising
for the annual Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaign. When we are
asked "Why a separate Women's
Division?" we answer in typical
Jewish fashion with another
question: "How can women not
give of themselves and their
funds for Jewish survival?"
Federal Block Grant Augments
Software At Pinellas County
Jewish Day School
Colorful fat "bibbits"
and tall thin "gribbits" thrill
students at the Jewish Day
School, thanks to a recent
Federal block grant. The Pinellas
County Jewish Day School was
awarded several hundred dollars
worth of computer software and
related textboks. This award
compliments the school's ex-
tensive software collection, which
focuses on logic and problem-
solving skills.
popop Bibbits and gribbits
challenge Jewish Day School
students to discriminate among
various attributes through
engaging games in Moptown
Hotel and Moptown Parade.
Other software packages
acquired through the grant
develop logical thinking skills,
circuitry, and graphics,
popop Each classroom .(grades
K-6) at the Pinellas County
family in the area, and who are
not considered dependent enough
to be put in nursing homes, he
said. This type of home would
save the state about a third more
than the traditional nursing
home. Bernstein described group
homes as "cost effective and
humanitarian."
Rep. Dennis Jones of the 54th
District said he was a strong
advocate of the adult living plan.
"Every year the legislature deals
with issues concerning the aged.
This plan would save the tax-
payers hundreds of thousands of
dollars," Jones predicted.
Jones mentioned the Seminole
Nursing Pavilion as being a
model for this type of care for the
elderly. "It is state-of-the-art in
adult living care," Jones said.
"The nursing facility provides
care for the elderly but does not
require the number of personnel
that a total care nursing home
would need.
"The major problem with
initiating these types of facilities
is creating a new category in
elderly care and revising current
licensing procedures for the
state," Jones went on. "Distinct
requirements need to be
established so that we can decide
who would be treated in the new
alternative living plan."
"Steps are being taken, but it's
going to take time," Jones
concluded.
Sen. Mary Grizzle, who was
also on hand at the breakfast and
serves on the Swanholme
Nursing Home Board, said that
she realizes that elderly care is a
responsibility in which everyone
must share.
Paraphrasing Eleanor
Roosevelt, Bernstein closed by
saying, "If we each light a
candle, we don't need to curse the
darkness."
Elected officials attending the
breakfast included Rep. Dennis
Jones. Rep. Tom Woodruff and
Sen. Mary Grizzle.
March 14 is the date for the
annual Pacesetters-Chai Lun-
cheon held on behalf of the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation-Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaign. Margie Green.
Jackie Jacobs, and Edie
Seligman are chairwomen of the
event.
All women who make an in-
dividual gift of $1000 or more to
the 1985 campaign are eligible to
I
attend, and those womeo,
make an individual gift o(,
become members of the
division.
The luncheon will be U
the home of Sonya Milk i
Petersburg Beach.
Maxine Kronick will be,
speaker, and will gjve
presentation documenting
recent travel in Kastern Er-
D'Amato, Canadian Police
Deny Mengele Ever Entered
TORONTO (JTA) -
Recently released documents by
U.S. Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R.,
N.Y.) and the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police (RCMP) indicate
that Josef Mengele did not apply
to come to Canada and was never
in this country, contrary to
allegations made last month by
the Simon Wiesenthal Center's
Canadian representative, Sol
Littman.
Littman dropped a bombshell
at a news conference here last
month by stating that documents
obtained by the Center through
the U.S. Freedom of Information
Act indicated that Mengele had
applied for the papers at
Canada's embassy in Buenos
Aires in 1962. Littman said
Mengele used the alias Joseph
Menke, and that security checks
showed he was really Mengele.
However. Littman had
the U.S. side of the con
dence between Canada .
U.S. government on this'i
The Canadian side w
released until Feb. 15
Washington needed pen
from Canada to do so.
Documents involving
countries cannot be
under the Freedom of
mation Act without their i
mission. The con
correspondence makes
that Mengele never can*
Canada.
Littman his acknowli
that the Canadian gove
received assurances in
again during a recent
vestigation. that the mani
was living in southern
and using the name
Menke was not Mengele.
Army Sets Up Task Force
To Help Find Mengele
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Army has j
nounced that Secretary of the Army John Marsh I
up a high level task force to help the Justice Depa
track down fugitive Nazi war criminal Dr. Josef Me
The task force will be headed by the Army's ]
General Counsel Darrell Peck. The announcement!
day after Lt. Gen. William Odum, Assistant Chief of I
for Intelligence, was criticized by a Senate subcon
for not having sought further information on the Me
case on his own initiative.
TRADITIONS
Jewish Day School is equipped
with its own Apple I Ie computer,
popop The Pinellas County
Jewish Day School is a
beneficiary agency of the
Combined Appeal of the Jewish
Federation of Pinellas County.
Dimensions
Gulf stream Cable:
Tarpon Monday, 11 p.m.
Dunedin Tuesday, 10 p.m. and
Friday, 8:30 p.m.
Vision Cable:
Pinellas Sunday, 4:30p.m.
Dimensions is brought to you
by the Jewish Media Relations
Council.
P.O. Box 88. Dunedin, Fla.
34296.
The memories of Passover's gone by. The reading of The Haggadah-
The Kiddush-The Matzoh-The MaNishtanah-The stories of the Exodus,
the Aficomin, and above all the singing of the traditional songs and
melodies that are part of the Passover seder.
However, there is still one more tradition which has become a part
of the family Seder table-Manischewitz wine. Manischewitz wine always
graced every holiday table, particularly the
Passover Seder table. It spans ^ fF1.
generations and somehow symbolizes the
continuity of the family Seder.
The "flavor" of Passover would not be
the same without Manischewitz Kosher Wine.
h/lanischevbitzj
Produced and bodied under strict Rabbinical supervision
by Rabbi Dr. Joseph I Sinner k Rabbi Solomon B Shapiro.
Manischetiu Win.- Co.. .V York, y V llili .
kashrulh Certificate available upun rcqMM


Sid Werner Thanks
lommunity Division
Friday .March 8,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 3
Working as general
n of the Community
of this year's Federation
was a real pleasure,
o'uld like to give credit to
derful people whose heart
l0e leather made our
s work run so smoothly.
often the case, not only
r division leaders hard
they were very gracious
jonable individuals who I
getting to know better.
Lou and Lillian Rosen
the South County
..inium Division, and
Panush chaired the North
General Division, as well
rvising the North County
inium Group. Being the
veterans that they are,
as never any question
eir divisions would be
ful. Likewise, after
years of chairing the
at Top Of The World,
Elliott had the system
volunteers to run a very
ul campaign again, all of
years of organizational
New York are now
our local community.
One of the goals we had
r was the organizing of a
dominiums. so that the
s nf a condominium could
r own internal campaign.
Ihanks go to Ethel
pan and Rae Peilman for
dership in the Imperial
ille and Bay Cove
imums; to Ben Smigell
ganizing Five Towns
inium; and to Madeline
* ho did a herculean job in
ng a large majority of the
residents at Townshores
rt along with Herman
And speaking of
efforts, my special
i Jeanne Kallman who is
lovely individual. Her
1 disposition and the
grapefruit she grows in
yard were always ap-
There is not room to
}11 of the Joel Schragers,
Richmans,. Richard
Sid Werner
Community Division Chairman
Lanes, Hank Morrises and the
many, many volunteers who
helped us to collectively achieve
our goals, but I know that the
division leaders have personally
thanked all of the people who
have worked with them.
I would be remiss,
however, if I did not mention the
energetic support the entire
Community Division received
from Jill Bailin and Paul Levine,
our Federation's assistant and
executive directors, as well as
Carol VanWagoner, Enid
Newmark and the rest of our
Federation's staff.
A Community Division
dinner is currently planned for
April 18th for those who have
pledged $100 or more. We will
have a very fine speaker and it
should be a lovely end to this
year's Community Division
campaign. I hope everyone will
be able to attend.
Sidney Werner
Community Division Chairman
Blue and White Ball
Hwar
Dtinui'd from Page 1
Pus Lovitz, Rabbi and Mrs.
Uski, Mr. and Mrs. Bruce
FredMargolis.
fcr. and Mrs. Stanley Michels,
(Irs. IrwinMiller.Mr.andMrs.
Her. Elll M.A. Mills, Dr. and
*a Mokototf, Mr. and Mrs.
lyers, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley
|. Mr. and Mrs. Scott Nicoletti,
rtrs Robert Norins, Mr. and
i Novak, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan
and Mrs. Harold Pawlan,
rtrs. Marc Perkins, Mr. and
Permesly, Mr. and Mrs.
p'nick, Loren Pollack, Dr. and
Mel Rauchway, Evalyn Rein,
Pchman. Dr. and Mrs. John
and Mrs Roger Rolfe, Dr.
|Stanley Rosewater, Mr. and
fies Rutenberg, Dr. and Mrs.
enberg, Dr. and Mrs. Gordon
and Mrs. Saul Schechter.
rs Alan Schwartz, Mr. and
Schwartz, Dr. and Mrs.
artz, David Seidenberg.
*r, and Mrs. Leonard
I Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Sem
MM Mrs. Steve Sembler, Mr.
parties Shapiro, Mr. and Mrs.
avlan, Mr. and Mrs. Cralg
[and Mrs. Lewis Sher, Dr. and
Shrager, Mr. and Mrs.
>'lberman, Mr. and Mrs.
er, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Smith,
p. James Soble, Dr. and Mrs.
ern. Dr. and Mrs. Sam
and Mrs. Carl Suchar,
Mrs. Davis Susskind, Mr.
|>cal Sisters
'erform
I'chelle and Hylah
Performed at Ruth
Fll on Feb. 22 with the
P*y Music Festival.
[Played the flute and
P Hylah played the
." Birenbaum sisters
eived gold medals at
i competitions. They are
*<*" of Barbara and
fnbaum, Clearwater.
and Mrs. Theodore Tench, Nona Dawes
Tepper, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Van
Wagoner, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Wein
man, Mr. and Mrs. Hy Weintraub, Mr.
and Mrs. Sidney Werner, Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Winer, Mr. and Mrs. Ted Wittner,
Dr. and Mrs. David Wolstein, and Rabbi
and Mrs. Ira Youdovin.
REFUSENIK FAMILIES
APPEAL FOR
MEDICAL SUPPLIES
An urgent request has
gone out from several
refusenik physicians for
medical supplies to treat
refusenik families.
"These families ap-
parently do not trust the
medical care given to them
by local Russian
physicians," reported Bruce
Epstein, M.D., a St.
Petersburg physician who
learned of the problem. "The
refusenik physicians treat
the families free of charge
and usually supply the
patients with drugs from
samples that they obtain
from outside sources."
The two most common
ailments suffered by the
refusenik families are peptic
ulcers and heart conditions.
Dr. Epstein said, "I have a
list of the 25 drugs most
needed by the refusenik
physicians. They also need a
neurology kit of instruments
as well as textbooks of in-
ternal medicine."
Dr. Epstein has requested
that any local physician who
would like to contribute
medication should contact
him at his office in St.
Petersburg (321-1515).
Prime Minister Shimon Peres will
address 300 delegates to the
Jewish National Fund's National
Assembly in Israel, March 3 to
12. He will speak at the gala
dinner culminating an intensive
10-day program of visits to JNF
projects and installations
throughout the country.
On the occasion of his
moth Birthday
(113.1- 1M5)
St:FARAD TOURS
INTERNATIONAL
presents
The
Maimonides Year
In Spain, Egypt. Israel and
Morocco
DELUXE TOURS-BI-WEEKLY DEPARTURES________
SEFARAD (Two weeks) .......... .........S. 215 plus air fare
SEFARAD AND ISRAEL (Two weeks)..........S .315 p us a* are
SEFARAD AND MOROCCO (18 Day.)..........5MSS.SS,
'SEFARAD. ISRAEL AND EGYPT(18 Days) SI.S19 plus au fare
SPECIAL DEPARTURES ESCORTED BY:
Dr. Moshe Uzar, (University of Southern California) 1*1**+*
Dr. Zioni Zevit, (University of Judaism)........May 6 ... 10 A .My I
Dr Norman Roth. (University of Wisconsin).........May 20 & June 10
SPECIAL RATES APPLY
FOR BROCHURES. INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS:
Contact your Travel Agent or call (TOLL-FRr-h).
1.(800)421-4105 Continental U.S.A. except California
Sefarad Tours International
a ovooi > cnf 6399 Wilshire Boulevard. Suite 110
Los Angeles, California 90048
'J~j["- Telephone: (213)658-6226
>** Land Operator: Politur. Madrid
TOP Creates Maimonides
Founders Club
At the TOP Jewish Foun-
dation's January meeting the
trustees from Tampa, Orlando
and Pinellas County authorized
the establishment of the
"Maimonides Founders Club."
In order to become a Maimonides
Founder an individual will be
required to make a gift of $10,000
or more to establish either an
"Advised" or "Designated"
Philanthropic Fund and make a
gift of $2,500 or more to the
General-Unrestricted Fund for
the benefit of his-her com-
munity's endowment fund. As a
Maimonides Founder the donor
will receive a limited edition
bronze bust of Moses
Maimonides set atop a solid
marble base. The artist who
designed the piece was Ken
Triester of Miami.
"This is a very special
recognition piece," said Joel
Breitstein, Charitable Tax
Planning and Endowment
Development Consultant to the
Foundation. "First of all, TOP
only has access to a limited
number of these works of art.
Second, Moses Maimonides was
dedicated to the very highest
order of tzedakah and is known
for his philosophy on the eight
levels of charity. It is the
Foundation's intent to recognize
^
Joel Breitstein
Endowment Consultant
those who reflect the tradition ot
Maimonides through their
commitment to the endowment
fund program." According to
Breitstein each community will
plan its own special event for
making presentations to the
Maimonides Founders.
For more information about
the TOP Jewish Foundation and
your community's endowment
fund program you may contact
Joel Breitstein, Charitable Tax
Planning-Endowment
Development Consultant,
through your local Federation
office or through the TOP ad-
ministrative offices at (813) 253-
3569.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday. March 8,1985
Mubarak's Slipping
Favor With Reagan
There are profound and serious divisions
of opinion between Shimon Peres and his
deputy prime minister, Yitzhak Shamir,
over the significance of the Hussein-Arafat
accord. Now that Egypt's President
Mubarak has entered the act and is willing
to meet "anywhere" that Israel, Jordan
and a Palestinian entity not necessarily
the PLO would agree upon, suddenly
Mr. Peres believes that his government
ought to study the accord and see if it
would be worthwhile to take Mubarak up
on his invitation.
Shamir, in Paris early this week, con-
tinued to call the accord what Peres also
called it from the beginning: an op-
portunistic agreement by which Hussein
hopes to improve his relations with the
Palestine Liberation Organization, and
Mubarak expects to find favor with the
Reagan Administration when he arrives in
Washington for a meeting with the
President next week.
As we see it, the problem is less either
the division of opinion between Peres and
Shamir or Hussein's ambitions with the
Palestinians. It is, indeed, more a matter of
Mubarak's plummeting favor with the
Reaganites, all of whom by now know him
for what he is, and all of whom are out to
get him on Capitol Hill.
Buttering Up Capitol Hill
What is Mubarak?
He is a man who has betrayed both the
letter and the spirit of Camp David, not to
mention Anwar Sadat, his assassinated
precedessor and one of Camp David's
architects. Against the specific injunctions
of the accord, Mubarak withdrew his
ambassador to Israel when Prime Minister
Begin launched his Operation Peace for
Galilee in June, 1982.
/ He has stood by without protest while
the Egyptian press engages in vitriolic
attacks on Israel many of them frankly
anti-Semitic.
,\ He has done nothing to establish
normal relations with Israel on the
contrary doing everything he possibly can
to "delay" them.
/He has been silent and failed to
repudiate his most trusted aides when they
were repeatedly quoted in the international
press that now that Egypt has the Sinai
back, friendship with Israel is hardly an
imperative.
x He has been increasingly cozying up to
the Kremlin with an eye on a renewed
Egyptian-Soviet relationship.
In the face of all of these things,
President Mubarak will arrive in
Washington next week determined to
increase the $2 billion-plus in foreign aid
Egypt will receive in 1985.
Worthless Generosity
But the Reagan Administration is laying
for him, and some observers are betting
that, far from an increase in aid, Egypt will
be lucky to survive congressional scrutiny
of the foreign aid budget allocating the $2
billion-plus to Egypt in the first place.
These, in effect, are the facts behind
President Reagan's increasing adamance
about the Arab nations which suddenly are
pressing for an international conference
ostensibly aimed at peace in the Middle
East.
Recognize Israel, and then well join you,
the President says repeatedly. Yon "',*
talk about peace with Israel if you aren t
yourself a friend of Israel a diplomatic
partner.
Hosni Mubarak knows about the climate
of opinion into which he will be flying. Any
wonder, then, that suddenly he's willing to
go "anywhere" to talk peace with Israel in
the presence of Jordan and Palestinians
who, now he says, need not necessary be
PLO? And any doubt that Mubarak's
primary aim is less peace than cosmetic
propaganda?
All of this is not by way of saying that
Mr. Shamir is right in his refusal to see
anything worthy in the Hussein-Arafat
accord, and Prime Minister Peres is wrong
in his suggestion early this week that the
accord may well be offering something
"interesting" for Israel. But Israel has
already traded the Sinai away for a mess of
mottage. Its leaders must now be super-
careful not to engage in such worthless acts
of generosity a second time.
HutteiNTHe^wir^e^
U^jTAO
The Souring of Egypt
U.S. Has Rough Time With Caiii
"eJewisla Floridian
OF PINELLAS COUNTY I***saoc/w
Editorial Office. 301 S. Jupiter Ave.. South. Clearwater, Fla. 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication & Business Office. 120 N.E. 6 St., Miami, Fla. 33132
Telephone (305) 373-4605
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNE SCHECHTER SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Editor, Pinellas County Executive Editor
Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee the Kaahruth of Merchandise Advertised
Second Clau Poatage Paid. I 'SPS 549-470 .1 Miami. Fla. Publiahad Bi-Waakly
Postmaster: Forward Form 3579 to Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area Annual U 00) 2-Vaar Minimum Subscription 7 50 oc by
annual mambarahip piado* to Jawuh Fadoratlon ol Plnallaa County lor which tha aum ol S2.25 la
paid. Out ol Town Upon Raquast.
Friday, March 8,1985
Volume 6
15ADAR5745
Number 5
By London Chronicle
Israel is not alone in
currently going through a
rather rough period in its
relationship with Egypt.
U.S. relations with Egypt
are not exactly wonderful
right now either.
Egypt's overall image in
Washington has seriously
deteriorated since the
assassination of President Anwar
Sadat in 1981 and the rise to
power of his successor, Hosni
Mubarak. There is widespread
disappointment among Reagan
administration officials, as well
as many influential members of
Congress, in Mubarak's policies
toward the United States, Israel
and other countries.
THIS INCREASINGLY
angry mood is likely to be
conveyed quite sternly to
President Mubarak during his
talks in Washington next month.
His foreign minister, Esmat
Abdul Meguid, heard some
preliminary opening shots during
his preparatory talks in
Washington last week.
Reagan Administration of-
ficials are clearly becoming
irritated with President
Mubarak's attitude. They charge
that he has been less than for-
thcoming in responding to the
impressive U.S. economic,
military and political support for
Egypt in recent years.
After dragging his feet for
many months, the Egyptian
leader has finally stopped
cooperating with the United
States in longstanding plans to
build major naval facilities at Ras
Banas in the Gulf of Suez. That
joint project, which has now
finally been dropped altogether,
was once warmly promoted by
Sadat as a reflection of Egypt's
close association with and
support for an expanded U.S.
military presence in the region.
EVEN EARLIER, President
Mubarak had informed
Washington that there was no
desire in Egypt to go ahead with
the construction of U.S. radio
transmitters for use by the Voice
of America, Radio Free Europe
and Radio Liberty. That is one
reascn why the Americans have
turned to Israel with the request.
President Mubarak
Simultaneously, President
Mubarak has been steadily
warming up Egypt's relations
with the Soviet Union a
development not exactly
welcomed by the cold warriors in
the Reagan administration.
As a result, U.S. plans to see
Egypt emerge as a major U.S.
strategic asset in the Middle East
are today history. No one even
talks about it any more.
Mubarak is no Sadat as far as
Washington is concerned. The
Egyptian president is widely
depicted in the U.S. capital as
simply too fearful of being seen in
the Arab world and elsewhere as
overly aligned with the United
States.
THAT DOES not mean to
suggest that Mubarak wants to
see an actual rupture with the
Americans. Absolutely not. But
just as he is walking a delicate
tightrope in balancing his of-
ficially cool relationship with
Israel with his apparently
overriding desire to regain ad-
mission into the bigger Arab fold,
so, too, is he seeking some middle
ground between Washington and
Moscow.
Reagan administration
policymakers in the White House
- as opposed to career Middle
East specialists at the State
Department are slowly but
increasingly losing their patience.
There is not a whole lot of un-
derstanding for Mubarak's more
evenhanded approach.
The Egyptians, it is r
in Washington, remaii|
anxious to continue tci
large-scale U.S. econm
military assistance, inch
latest state-of-the-art
technology. The Er
military has grown act
to U.S. hardware and
They prefer Americaim
fighters and missiles to i
the Soviet Union.
President Mubarak, i
has already announced!
will be pressing for
economic aid increases
comes to Washington. Hei
parity with Israel on thatr
BUT THE way he tfll
behaving, U.S. officials"
clear during a series of iw
in recent days, he is not)
get his way. The Egyptian
indeed, will have his won"
for him in patching up ur
the senior echelon of tie 1
Administration.
There is an even maj
mood developing on Cf
where lawmakers are g<
for some extremely
questions regarding I }
Reagan's approximawrjj
billion combined econor'
military aid proposal fort
the just-announced l|
year budget.
According to sevefll1
placed Congressional sou
Egyptians will have.1
difficult time merely **
proposal enacted
winning any *
assistance. The only
Egyptians might.J*
problems in Cong* .
sources said, would be N
and demonstratively *
relations with Israel.
frith the return of Uie
ambassador to Tel Avrv
Already, some men**]
House and Senate are
about proposing amencr
the foreign aid bin cot
U.S. assistance on d
readiness to hilly
relations with Iaraa- }
diplomats in Wash""*"',
aware of those trends.
REPUBLICAN SEN-
Specter of PnS>J2l
member of the ApPP^
Subcommittee on
Operations, told Megg,
will be verv difficult f*'
Continued on P"**


Friday, March 8, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 5
Menorah Manor Volunteers Begin to Train
\Ae\e Lurie. Menorah Manor's
rtor of volunteers, announced
I.first training session for the
Lnteer Corps to be held on
K March 11. 9:30 a.m..n
, Menorah Center Apartments
Ration Hall. 250 59 St. No.,
_ Petersburg.
Irhis session will include at-
titudes on aging as well as an
overview of the psychosocial
needs of the elderly in-
stitutionalized resident.
The training session will in-
clude all requirements as
established by HRS as well as
giving the volunteers the
necessary techniques and
assurances to feel at ease while in
the role of Menorah Manor
Volunteers.
Notices will be mailed to all
those previously registered with
the Manor. If you wish to be
included, please call the volunteer
department at (813) 345-2775.
nencan ORT Federation President Alvin
Gray and his wife, Anita, confer with
udenis in a special class for newly-arrived
^hiopian Jews at the ORT school in Kiryat
at during a recent tour of ORT programs
ughout Israel, France and the United
dom conducted as part of the American
?7"Federation winter mission. At the ORT
ograms for Ethiopian Jews in Netanya,
yat Gat, and Carmiel, mission par-
ticipants learned of the difficulties faced by
the latest wave of newcomers to Israel who,
in many cases, have had to make a transition
virtually overnight from the middle ages to
the computer age. ORT programs include
special classes for the new arrivals in fields
such as accounting, draftsmanship,
dressmaking, metal work and orientation in
Israeli industrial practices.
Yiddish Musical Comedy Theater
Chayele Ash and
Abraham Fuhrman In Concert
Chayele Ash and Abraham
Fuhrman. stars of stage. TV and
radio, will appear at
Congregation B'nai Israel on
Wednesday. March 20, at 8 p.m.
Yiddish Musical Comedy theater
at its best! Help celebrate 100
years of Yiddish theater help
keep it alive! Yiddish, Hebrew,
English, humor, folk songs,
sketches, drama and Chassidic.
General admission $5. Tickets
available at Congregation B'nai
Israel. 381-4900, or contact your
synagogue office.
\
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We're offering special _' 8 week Earhhird Packages
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Time,
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Worry
For a limited time, Amtrak has reduced the fare by 25%.
Time: You save 900 miles and 18 hours of hard driving when you take
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Effort: It's hardly any effort at all. You can sightsee in the dome car,
socialize with friends around the piano in the lounge car, or watch a movie. You'll
enjoy a complimentary full course buffet dinner in the evening and a continental
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For more information, call your travel agent or call Amtrak at
1 800 USA RAIL.


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday, March 8,1985
Kent Jewish Community Center
March 31 Open House
The K JCC has planned an open
house on Sunday March 31,
according to Stan Newmark,
president.
Those attending will have an
opportunity to view the Center's
temporary building: see what the
KJCC has planned; meet David
Seidenberg, the Kent Jewish
Community Center's new
director, and chat with the
Center's board of directors.
The open house will run from
10 a.m. to noon. The public is
invited to drop in for bagels and
coffee any time during the two
hours. The open house will be
held at 1729 Rainbow Avenue (at
the corner of Saturn Ave.),
Clearwater.
The KJCC is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County.
RSVP's are requested by
Stanley Newmark, Kent Jewish
Community Center president,
prepares temporary building for
March 31 open house.
March 26 to David Seidenberg at
446-4923.
For more information, call
David at the above phone
number.
Kent Jewish Community Center
Plans Jewish Scouting for Girls
The Kent Jewish Community
Center is planning a full Scouting
program for girls, according to
David Seidenberg, director of the
Center.
The KJCC, in cooperation with
the Suncoast Girl Scout Council,
has planned a meeting for
Tuesday, March 27 at 7 p.m. at
the Golda Meir Center, 302 S.
Jupiter Avenue, Clearwater.
The Center plans to offer a
Daisy Program for Kindergarten
age; Brownies for first, second
and third grades; and Junior Girl
Scouts for fourth, fifth and six
grades.
Parents and their Scouting age
children are invited to the
meeting. Representatives of the
Girl Scout Council will discuss
the Scouting program and an-
swer questions.
The KJCC is a beneficiary
agency of the Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County.
For more information call
David BdoVrbrrg at 446-4923.
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VOLUNTEER
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DON'T MISS a Yiddish treat
on Sunday. March 17. at 1 p.m.
at the Golda Meir Center when
Mildred and Norman Lewis
present an original musical
entitled "A Yiddisher Yontiff." A
Yiddish square dance will be
featured. Following the per-
formance there will be a sing-
along. For more information,
please watch your Newsletter.
The Golda Meir Library would
like to include you in its card-
carrying members. There are
many choices available from
"best sellers" to self-help books.
The library is especially proud of
its books of Jewish interest such
as "The Enigma Of Felix Frank-
furter" by H.N. Hirsch. "Vichy
France And The Jews" by
Michael Marrus and Robert O.
Paxton, "My Mother Golda
Meir" by Menachem Meir, and
"The Abandonment Of The
Jews" by David S. Wyman.
A recent best-seller added to
the library collection is "If
Tomorrow Comes" by Sidney
Sheldon.
Transportation available!
Transportation is available for
many of our events and classes,
simply by calling and making a
reservation.
Special events will include
transportation for events such as
trips to the Yiddish Music
Comedy Theatre on Wednesday
March 20 to B'nai Israel in St.
Petersburg, Operation Moses
Rally on March 18, and
Hadassah's Klezmer Con-
servatory Band on March 31 in
Tampa.
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ismetic Ploy To Help
[Win Parity With Israel?
Friday, March 8, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 7
nued from Page 4
Conti
substantial U.S. aid to
unless it returns the
ador to Israel.
c Egyptian embassy has
, retained the services of a
iriced Washington lobbying
public relations consulting
]to help in better packaging
e to Congress, the ad-
Cration, the news media and
[American public. But a
nt and very serious
j for the Egyptians is that
[their American consultants
dvising them to say to
is not the same
which Mubarak and his
i in Cairo want to project
I Arab world.
Egyptians were deeply
assed last month, for
kit-, when the New York
published some excerpts
Ithe confidential Egyptian
luest presented to the State
jtment in December. That
pent, which was not sup-
to be made public, had
orked on by the Egyptian
/s Washington con-
a. It underscored Egypt's
pTity as an American ally
i Mubarak is not exactly
|ting right now.
ent weeks. Secretary of
George Shultz has
lily expressed his lingering
I at Mubarak for failing to
pp to what Shultz un-
was a clear-cut pledge
ir to send the ambassador
to Israel. Whether
nt Mubarak actually
hich a promise to Shultz is
pght now; Shultz is ab-
r convinced that President
ak failed to live up to his
and cannot really be
Egyptian president is
ohave his work cut out for
Jext month in regaining
Is confidence.
ISIDENT REAGAN,
|House officials said, is also
py at Mubarak for having
I him publicly about the
Irthe U.S. to recognize the
puid Yasir Arafat. That
1 during Mubarak's last
i Washington a year ago
Ihe came together with
Is King Hussein. At a
Tl ceremony in the East
of the White House,
surprised Reagan and
enior U.S. policymakers
ng up the mantle of the
leagan was clearly angry,
Itical aides even more so.
It appeared unseemly to them,
especially on Reagan's own turf.
As seen from Washington,
Egypt has greatly benefited from
the peace process with Israel.
Sure, the Americans point out,
Egypt was quickly isolated in
much of the Arab world, and lost
considerable financial assistance
from Saudi Arabia. But the
benefits for Egypt, they insist,
have more than made up for
those losses.
Egypt, after all, has managed
to open the Suez Canal a
source of considerable foreign
currency every year.
It has emerged as a net oil
exporting nation, thanks to the
return of the Abu Rodeis oil fields
and the even more lucrative ones
in the Gulf of Suez.
Tourism to Egypt has
dramatically increased in the
aftermath of the Camp David
accords with Israel another
source of income for Egypt's
troubled economy. Joint Israeli-
Egyptian tourist packages have
emerged as a vital foundation of
the Egyptian tourist industry.
THERE IS also the matter of
direct U.S. foreign assistance. No
one in Washington believes that
Egypt would receive such
massive annual U.S. grants if it
had not signed a peace pact with
Israel. After Israel, Egypt is
America's largest annual foreign
aid recipient. It probably would
receive something in the neigh-
borhood of the $125 million in aid
slated for Jordan in the 1986
budget instead of the more
than $2.3 billion level recom-
mended by Reagan without
the peace treaty with Israel.
Thus, Egypt can clearly thank
Israel for receiving so much U.S.
assistance.
But Israel and its supporters in
Washington especially in the
politically influential Jewish
community and Congress are
becoming increasingly upset at
Egypt. They have repeatedly
conveyed this message privately
to Mubarak in recent weeks.
That helps to explain why the
pro-Israeli community in
Washington was pleased when
they read Prime Minister Shimon
Peres' open blast against Egypt
on the front page of the New
York Times in early February.
Mubarak's tough response the
next day, in which he accused
Israel of being too inflexible in
withdrawing from Lebanon and
on other issues, merely irritated
people in Washington further.
Arms to Saudis
62 Senators Sign Solid 'No' on Line
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A letter to
President Reagan signed
by 62 senators opposing
imminent arms sales to
Saudi Arabia was being
credited by at least one of
the senators for the ad-
ministration's decision to
defer any new arms sales to
the Middle East.
A spokesman for Sen. Alan
Cranston (D., Calif.) who. along
with Sens. Robert Pack wood (R.,
Ore.). Alan Dixon (D., 111.) and
Alfonse D'Amato (R., N.Y.),
initiated the letter, said the letter
submitted on Jan. 29 "led the
administration to announce it
was delaying its proposed new
arms sales to Saudi Arabia."
Richard Murphy, assistant
secretary of state for Near
Eastern and South Asian affairs,
told a House subcommittee Jan.
30 that the administration was
deferring all new arms sales to
the Middle East pending a study
of their effect on U.S. security
and strategic concerns.
SECRETARY OF State
George Shultz confirmed this the
next day to the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, although
he stressed that the Saudis will
eventually receive U.S. arms.
In a letter seeking signatures
for the letter to the president
from other senators, the four
senators said they were "par-
ticularly concerned" that the
administration might announce
arms sales to the Saudis "before
undertaking full consultations
with the Congress"
The letter outlined a proposed
multi-billion dollar package
which would include 40 F-15 jet
fighters, in addition to the 62 the
Saudis already have; 3,000
Stinger shoulder-fired ground-to-
air missiles, Maverick anti-tank
missiles, multiple ejection bomb
racks, range extending fuel tanks
and possibly more AWAC
reconnaissance planes.
THE SENATORS noted that
the Saudis already have enough
weapons to "overwhelm" any
threat from Iran and stressed the
sale "would be certain to initiate
a new cycle of costly and
destabilizing arms purchases
throughout the volatile Middle
East, fueling a regional arms race
which further erodes the
technological edge and both the
economic and military security of
Israel."
The letter sent to Reagan by
the 62 congressmen said: "We
are writing to express our deep
concern about reports of an
imminent Administration
decision to sell Saudi Arabia
additional military weaponry. We
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JNF Spring Tour
The Jewish National Fund will
sponsor an open meeting for
anyone interested in learning
about the 1985 Israel trip
scheduled for April 15 through
April 29. This meeting will be
hosted by Saul and Greta Schiff-
man at their home on Thursday,
Jan. 3 at 8 p.m.
Because the JNF through its
land reclamation and develop-
ment is a partner with the State
of Israel, it has been able to
arrange for some very special ac-
tivities not available to many
other groups.
The JNF tour will visit sites
and areas presently under dev-
elopment in the Negev Desert, on
the Egyptian border and in the
Galilee. Everyone will be in Jeru-
salem for the observance and
celebration of Holocaust Remem-
brance Day, Israel Memorial Day
and the festive occasion of Israel
Independence Day. The JNF has
secured tickets to the official
Independence Day preparation
through its international head-
quarters in Jerusalem.
Other highlights include dis-
cussions with newly-elected Is-
raeli Knesset members, military
officers, and a very special
gathering with the world famous
pianist Yitzhak Tavior.
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tact the Jewish National Fund at
8405 N. Himes Ave., Suite 209,
Tampa, FL 33614 or call (813)
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday, March 8,1985
Gov't. in Religion Threatens Jews
Continued from Page 1
siders, not full members of the
political community."
It was not until the early
1960s, with the Supreme Court
decisions disallowing school
prayer and Bible reading, that
government in America became
"truly neutral in matters
religious," Mann said. And, he
continued, it was not until then
that American Jews were able to
feel truly like insiders and full,
confident, participants in the
American political process.
Before that, he declared, even
though American Jews had all of
the essential legal rights, the
"psychological impediments"
flowing from government in-
volvement and endorsement of
the dominant Christian religion
caused American Jews to be "a
timid community, afraid to assert
ourselves too strongly, as people
who regard themselves as out-
siders are likely to be."
MANN CLAIMED that the
earlier timidity prevented "any
sustained and united American
Jewish outcry" to demand
American efforts to rescue Jews
from the Nazi Holocaust. He
contrasted that timidity to the
present-day confidence that has
enabled American Jews "to
convince our government to help
our fellow Jews, in Israel, in the
Soviet Union, in Ethiopia."
But. he declared, the present-
day attack on church-state
separation threatens to destroy
the position that the current
generation of American Jews now
holds. Focusing on the issue of
government sponsorship of
religious symbols, publicly-
funded Nativity scene allowed by
the Supreme Court in last year's
Lynch v. Donnelly decision,
Mann asserted that this poses a
threat as real and immediate as
the attempts of the radical and
religious right to "Christianize"
America.
Terming a creche "a symbolic
reenactment of the birth of a
divine being," he claimed that
"the concept that a divine being
was born" is completely an-
tithetical to Jewish theology.
"The creche and the cross as
governmental symbols, as well as
prayers in public schools, stand
as dramatic reminders of our
differences with Christianity,
thereby making us feel like
outsiders in the way that
minority groups so often feel," he
said.
PASTOR BERGSTROM, who
describes himself as "a born
again Christian Evangelical,"
deplored the current attack on
church-state separation. He
pointed particularly to tie
passage of federal "equal"oCsb"
legislation; the "treachery" of
injecting "secular humanism"
and "a requirement to teach
Judeo-Christian dogma" into the
public schools; and continuing
attempts to "impose prayer on
public education."
"We are seeing an intolerant
attempt to Christianize
America," he charged. "It is
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THE LUTHERAN leader
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Friday, March 8,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 9
{Education Official
Our Local
Apologizes for 'Insensitive' Letter Beneficiary Agencies
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Robert Billings, the
Education Department
official who authored a
jpgech lamenting that
c5essness had taken over
L once "Christian United
States," has acknowledged
Jthat the department was
Insensitive to its Jewish
(constituents when the
Leech was inadvertently
Liled to Jewish schools in
[six western states.
Billings, the department's
or of regional liaison,
lowever, affirmed the depart-
ment prerogative to distribute
ind circulate through the use of
federal funds information to
arious constituent groups that
ould be of interest to them.
"It is wrong to send any kind
If speech to constituent groups,"
Billings said in a telephone in-
trview from Washington with
e Jewish Telegraphic Agency
New York. This particular
speech, mailed from the
department's regional office in
Denver to Jewish schools,
demonstrate "an insensitivity"
to the department's Jewish
constituents, Billings said.
JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS
complained to the Education
Department that the speech, sent
out by Tom Tancredo, the
department's regional
representative in Denver, to
Christian educators, conflicted
with the constitutional guarantee
of church-state separation and
that it was insulting to the
American Jewish community.
Last week the department
issued a formal apology to the
American Jewish Congress,
saying the department "regrets
that this action gave offense to
some members of the general
public, including your con-
stituents." The apology, written
by Thomas Moore, deputy
assistant secretary for public
affairs, and addressed to
AJCongress president Henry
Siegman, said:
"Certain language contained in
the speech, particularly the
reference to a 'Christian nation,'
Volunteers at Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center's
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furim for ailing children. Costumes, masks and performances
' the story of Esther 'Hadassah' in Hebrew by noted
hraeliperformers contributed to the festivities.
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does show an insensitivity to the
very real and legitimate concerns
which have been expressed. Had
this office been consulted, this
particular speech would not have
been distributed."
REP. Pat Schroeder Colo.), meanwhile, complained to
the Education Department that
it was inappropriate for the
Department to use federal funds
for mailing a speech extolling a
"Christian" nation, and called for
a Postal Service investigation.
Aides to Schroeder said she will
continue to pursue the matter
despite Moore's apology.
Billings recalled that he had
delivered the speech some five
years ago to a conference of
Christian Baptist educators
meeting in North Carolina. At
the time he was a Moral Majority
official.
He said that at least two years
ago, Tancredo contacted Billings,
his superior, and asked whether
he had any speeches he had
delivered in the past. He said he
gave Tancredo the 12-page
speech that was eventually
distributed and could have given
him a couple of others, although
he could not recall the exact
number.
of freedom, this Christian
nation?"
Billing said that instead of
using the phrase "Christian
nation," he might have been
"smarter" to have said a
"biblical nation," and that what
he was stressing was a return to
" Judaeo-Christian ethics."
BILLINGS ALSO sought to
clarify the characterization,
contained in an earlier JTA
article, that he received a doc-
torate from a correspondence
school in Tennessee that had
since been shut down by state
officials after being dubbed a
"diploma mill."
According to Billings, the
school. Clarksville School of
Theology, was an accredited
school when he applied to do
graduate work. He said that he
was involved in missionary field
work, and it was necessary that
he study through a correspon-
dence school. He said that it was
after he had left the school that
the institution lost its ac-
creditation and later was forced
to close its doors.
Gulfcoaat Jewish Family
Services: 8167 Elbow Lane
North, St. Pete. 381-2373.
Provides: counseling services,
emergency care, homemaker
services, student loans, and
serves the needs of Jews in
distress.
Jewish Day School: 301 59th
St. North, St. Pete. 381-8111.
Information: 79 students
enrolled, students in every grade
have received the highest scores
on standardized tests, seven
Apple computers are available,
science fairs, and International
week. The school provides a
secular and Jewish education
through the sixth grade.
Jewish Community Center:
8167 Elbow Lane North, St. Pete.
344-5795.
Provides: over 160 senior
citizens participate in the hot
kosher lunch program daily,
social activities for the elderly,
day care and nursery school,
Camp Kadima, the first Jewish
camp to serve handicapped
children in Pinellas County.
Marshall and Reva Kent
Jewish Center: currently located
at the Golda Meir Center at 1729
Rainbow Lane N, Clearwater.
446-4923.
The newest beneficiary,
programs in social group work,
and recreation. A new 11.8 acre
site for the facility will be located
at the corner of Hercules and
Virginia avenues and will be
finished in a few months.
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24 Hour Service Phone 381-2088 7 days a week
Personal Care Division
Home Manager; Laundry,
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Home Attendant/
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Jan'toral Services
RN's. LPN, Live-ins
In Home Beautician
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Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday, March 8, 1985

Congregations, Organizations Events
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
ST. PETERSBURG
Mitzvah Men's Club
"Enriching our Jewish Com-
mitment" is the theme for
Shabbat Hahodesh, March 22-23.
sponsored by the Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs. The Mit-
zvah Men's Club will join its
brethren from all over the United
States and Canada in projecting
this theme throughout the
Shabbat services. At the Friday
evening service, the "Man of the
Year" award will be given to a
member of the congregation who
has exhibited outstanding service
to the synagogue.
Sisterhood. Mazel tov to Mrs.
Pearl Brook, who was recently
named School Relations
Chairman for a 2-year term for
the Florida Branch of Women's
League for Conservative
Judaism. Sisterhood is spon-
soring a Purim "Phantom Ball."
Call Mrs. Joan Esrick 345-2080
for further information.
Sisterhood will also be having a
"Sisterhood Purim Bazaar" at
the USY-Kadima Purim Car-
nival, which will be held at
Congregation B'nai Israel, on
Sunday, March 10, from 11:30
a.m.-2:30 p.m. The Bazaar will
feature Sisterhood's Judaica
Shop, with many new items, as
well as "Second Hand Rose's
Table of Bargains."
Pauline Rivkind Talmud
Torah. The students of the Daled-
Hey class will have their annual
Shabbat luncheon on Saturday
March 9, immediately following
Shabbat morning services.
March 15 is the date of next
Family Shabbat. The children of
the Kol Choir will sing under the
direction of Cantor Irving
Zummer. Prior to services, the
children of the Alef-Bet class will
have their annual Shabbat
dinner. Kabalat Hasidur to the
students of the Alef Class will be
featured during the service.
Youth Activities. Don't forget
to stop by for lots of Purim fun
and carnival fun USY-Kadima
will hold its annual Purim
Carnival on Sunday, March 10,
from 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., at
Congregation B'nai Israel, 301-
59th St. North.
CONGREGATION
BET EMET____
GULF COAST SOCIETY
FOR
HUMANISTIC JUDAISM
March 9 Purim celebration
includes dinner and animated
film, "The Point," about
prejudice. Come in costume of
any contemporary or historical
Jewish hero. Adult, $5.95, Child
6-12 $3.95, Children 5 and under
$2.
There will be a Pesach Seder on
April 6 at 6 p.m. Seating is
limited so reserve by March 25.
Non-members reserve from
March 26-April 3. Adult, $10.50,
Children 6-12 $5.95, Children
under 6 and additional non-
member adult $2.
For details, call 797-3224.
TEMPLE BETH-EL
PRESCHOOL
Preschoolers at Temple Beth-
El are exposed to a variety of
learning skills encompassing the
social, emotional, physical and
intellectual development of
children three, four and five years
old. Language Arts, Music, Art
Activities and pertinent concepts
are carefully planned and geared
to the level of the young child.
Small manipulative as well as
gross motor skills are improved,
and individual attention is given
to those preschoolers whose
development may be lagging.
Field trips and visits from
community helpers and
specialists are an important part
of the program. Parent par-
ticipation is encouraged. A
relaxed atmosphere, transmitted
by caring teachers, provides the
children with a happy school
experience.
Enrollment is open to children
who will be three before Jan. 1,
1986.
For additional information, call
Cynthia Adler at Temple Beth-
El, telephone 347-6136.
Banquets
Dinners
Parties
<*
Bar Mitzvahs
Weddings
Receptions
adam's mattlc
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Phone number year
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CONGREGATION
BETH SHALOM
CLEARWATER
There will be an Israel Bond
luncheon at the synagogue on
Sunday, March 31, at 12 noon.
Irv Kety, president of the
synagogue for the past two years,
will be the honoree. Emil Cohen,
noted entertainer, will be
featured. Erwin Abrams is
chairman.
Admission is $4 p.p.
Babysitting available.
MEN'S CLUB
' A Sunday morning breakfast
will be held March 10 at 10 a.m.
Guest speaker will be Judge
Bar Mitzvah
Harry Fogle of the Pinellas
County Court.
Admission is $2 and the public
is invited.
For reservations, call 531-1418.
TEMPLE
AHA VAT SHALOM
The membership of Temple
Ahavat Shalom voted to pur-
chase ground for their own
cemetery at Sylvan Abbey
Memorial Park in Clearwater.
Rabbi Jan Bresky, spiritual
leader of Temple Ahavat Shalom,
will conduct the consecration
service at 12:30 p.m. on March
17.
The Sisterhood, announced
President Nancy Maza, will
present a Fashion Show and
Dinner at the Countryside
Country Club on March 14.
Cocktails at 6:30 and dinner
thereafter.
"Fashion and Fantasy" will be
the theme with the script written
by Lillian Fox. Members of
Sisterhood will model fashions
provided by R. David of Nor-
thwood Plaza and St. Petersburg
Beach. The chairwomen for this
event are Ellen Morris, Lana
Cohen and Leah Bergoffen. The
donation is $18 per person, and
tables may be reserved by
mailing your check payable to
Sisterhood-Temple Ahavat
Shalom, to Mrs. Raymond Behar,
1732 Hickory Gate No., Dunedin,
FL 33528.
Arnold Krouk was appointed
acting commander and Raymond
Brozovich acting quartermaster
of the newly formed unit of the
Jewish War Veterans Victor L.
Brown Post in Palm Harbor, to
be quartered in Temple Ahavat
Shalom, with Rabbi Jan Bresky
serving the Post as chaplain. The
Post was formed through the
effort of Mortimer Ringler, who
invites all eligible veterans and
patrons of the JWV to join the
Post now as charter members.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
There will be a UJA-
Federation breakfast at the
temple on Sunday, March 17, at
10:30 a.m. Temple members Saul
Schechter, Federation president,
and Elisa Greenberg, 1985
campaign chair, will address the
group. A guest speaker will be
announced. Bobbie Keiden and
Marilyn Sapperstein are co-
chairwomen of the breakfast.
HADASSAH
EDUCATION DAY
Clearwater chapter Hadassah,
and the Sisterhoods of Temple
B'nai Israel and Congregation
Beth Shalom are sponsoring an
educational day on March 12 at
Temple B'nai Israel, 1685 S.
Belcher Rd., from 9:30 a.m.-3
p.m. Topics include "Never
Bored." "Recognizing Today's
Family," "Fighting Fair
"When the Marketplace Becon
the Casbah.
Registration and coffee 9 J.
For details call Shirley 3fjrjnl
or Helaine, 585-6317. "8715!l
Attendees will have the 1
portunity to learn about 1\
Federation, its local beneficial
agencies, and the humanitWj
efforts it supports throuehZI
the world. For information '
the temple office, 531-5829.
The breakfast is sponsored J
the Synagogue Outreacil
Committee, chaired by jJI
Shrager of the Jewish Federation!
in cooperation with Rabhil
Baseman at Temple B'nai Israel
CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM-GULFP0RT I
A Sisterhood meeting will \\
held on Tuesday, March 12, at 11
p.m. The program portion wiBi,,I
a review of the book "Blue HjaI
ways," written by William Leas j
Heat Moon. J
The book will be reviewed J
Joyce Weissman. '
Refreshments will be served it I
12:30 p.m. Members and gumi
are urged to attend.
SINGLE SCENE
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles wifl [
hold a dance at Ruth Eckerd Hill
at 7:30 p.m. en March 10. Lrvtl
entertainment and dancing will
be featured. Cost is S12.50 p.p. [
The Tampa Bay Jewish Singles j
Council was formed by the I
merger of several singles groups, I
and has the support of all am I
synagogues. It has a membershipI
of 1,100.
For further information, call |
Terry Abrahams at 872-4451
SINGLES
TO HOST BRUNCH
Singles invite the Tampa Bajl
Area Jewish singles to a buffet]
brunch on Sunday, March 17.atI
11 a.m. The brunch will be I
followed by a program vital
Rabbi Jacob Luski of)
Congregation B'nai Israel,
"What Does Judaism Say About)
Reservations can be mailed to: |
Congregation B'nai Israel,
59th St. North, St. Petersburg,!
FL 33710. The cost is $3 with 11
advanced reservation; $4 at thel
door. Call the synagogue office
381-4900 for further information
Congregation B'nai Israel is 11
supporter of the Tampa Ban
CANDLELIGHTING
MARCH
March 8 6:18
March 14 6:22
March 22 6:25
March 29 6:29
KEVIN FISHER
Kevin Raymond Fisher, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Fisher, was
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on March 2 at Temple
Ahavat Shalom, Palm Harbor,
popop Kevin is active in the
Youth Group, and is vice
president of Kinder Knesset. He
is in the 7th grade at Palm
Harbor Middle School, where he
is on the Honor Roll, and
chairman of the Student Council,
popop Kevin's hobbies include
tennis, jogging, baseball, and
basketball.
popop Mr. and Mrs. Fisher
hosted a reception in Kevin's
honor at the Rusty Pelican
Restaurant.
popop Special guests included
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Salida
from London, England; gran-
dparents Mr. and Mrs. David
Kalisher; Elliot Fisher; Mr. and
Mrs. Davis Kalisher and friends
from Ohio, Texas, California and
New Jersey.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL Reform
400 S. Pasadena Ave., St. PetersburgSS707 Rabbi David BOSSkM*g
Irs 8. Voudovin Friday Evening Sabbsth Services 8 p.m., ss '
Morning Sabbath Service 1* a.m. Bar Bat Mltsvah Service 11 am.
S47-C1M.
Congregation BETH 8HOLOM-Conservative
1844 54 St., S., St. Petersburg 88707 Rabbi Emeritus MorrU rtobrtneu
SahhHth Servlr- Vrtrinu unt B n m Saturrlav.Ba.nl rel.'-**"
Sabbath Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday. am
343-8404.
Congregation B'NAI ISRAEL Conservative
SOI St St, N., St. Petersburg 88710
Zummer s Sabbath Service: Friday
Sunday t a.m.; Monday Friday 8 a-m
S81-4M1.
rvatlve
. Rabbi Jacob Luskl <*nWr'"
lay evening 8 p.m. /**.-
n.; and evening Mlnyan .TeLW*- j
Congregation BETH CHAI-Conservative
Stf*
84M US St. N., Semlnole (SMt s Rabbi Sherman P- IUrW,f,r,,,
Servicea: Friday evenings 8 p.m.; Saturday, :30 a.m. Tel. bWSW
Congregation BETH SH ALOM-Conservative ( ^
ISIS 8. Belcher Rd., Clearwater SSS1S Rabbi Kenneth "'""J^'JrtW
bath Services:
MlnyanSa.ni.
Friday eventag 8
Tel. SSI 1418.
Saturday t a.m.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL-Reform
.Srf
1MB 8. Belcher Rd.. Clearwater SS61S Rabbi Arthur B**ejn*.'Mf).
Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.: Saturday 10:S0a.m. t Tel."
TEMPLE AHAVAT SH ALOM Reform
P.O. Box 117S, Dunedin SUSS 1878 Curie* kg., rmu- -""
Jan Bresky Bab hath Servicea: Friday evenings p-m. s Tel.)
Curlew Rd.. Palm Harbor!jMH
Congregation BET EMET HumaalsUr
847S Nursery Rn., Clearwater Service: 1st Friday of every
s Tel. SM-4781 or 7S7-SXM.
moots. r


* Singles Council, and
J,es members and non-
bbers to attend.
o money will be accepted at
[door Reservations, $b.50.
| HADASSAH SHALOM
ladassah-Shalom will meet
13, 12:30 p.m. at
nation B'nai Israel. Rive
' Jn Will speak about her
friences as a volunteer at an
,eii army base.
ORT
tr. PETE AFTERNOON
meeting will be held on
-day March 19.12:30 p.m. at
Lie Beth El, 400 S. Pasadena
I Janet Toplin and ORT
|bers will present a skit.
teshments will be served.
GOLDA MEIR
FRIENDSHIP CLUB
|arch 11 and 18 Social with
sand games.
125 Video movie.
Ipnl 1 Election of officers.
tril 5 Passover Seder.
s to follow.
Lril 16-17 Tour and cruise
If Jungle Queen. Cost is $108
fall inclusive. Call Florence,
372.
kril 18 Golden Apple
ier Theater to see "Desert
tn't forget the S and H Green
En to be used toward a van.
Ibrandeis women
ch 11 Board meeting,
Goldman's house. Call
48 for information.
xh 13 Last Adventures
ft, Largo Library.
trch 18 Pot Pourri with
[Keller, at the home of Judy
Call 397-6556 for in-
ation.
ch 19 Myths of Stress.
ch 21 Visit to Dali
turn by Art on Wheels.
Ition of $1 requested, leave
1:30 a.m.
JWV
lABE ADER POST 246
pch 13 Regular meeting,
ch 17 Games and Monte
! Bay Pines Hospital.
irch 24 Talent Show and
er Dinner at the JCC, 8167
La. N., St. Pete, at 3 p.m.
tainment by Pearls of
from Dolphin Beach
Donation is $8 p.p. For
Rations, call Harold. 546-
or Estelle, 345-1002 or
391-4416 or Lou, 577-
h 31 Breakfast
g. 9:30 a.m. Guest speaker
ate Attorney James T.
8LE CLASS OFFERED
BYUSF
i Keller will offer a 10-week
I in mythology, archeology
|the Bible, beginning
ay, March 5 and continuing
day 7. The course is offered
USF's Continuing
Department, and may
ken for credit. Classes will
Bd at St. Paul's School,
pater, 7 p.m. The first six
will be a repeat of last
Iter's seminar, and the final
rill be a continuation, open
nyone enrolled in last
f er's class.
(details, call Joan, 531-2923
ttinuing Education at USF,
103.
flBLICAL VILLAGE
AT USF
. Biblical Village,
|w*n of an ancient
with people dressed in
es and portraying the life
W crafts of a village 2,000
!> m Israel, will be
I on March 17, 12:30-5
1 USF, Tampa.
[J^ing Center for Biblical
pneological Studies, under
Section of Dr. James
sponsoring the
P exhibit.
Njion is free. Parking is
PWe entrance to USF on
fAve.
Friday, March 8, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 11
Rabbinical Assembly To Tap First Woman Member
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Rabbinical Assembly (RA) the
international organization of
Conservative rabbis has
cleared the way for the ac-
ceptance of its first female
member. She is Amy Eilberg, 30,
who is scheduled to be the first
woman to graduate from the
Rabbinical School of the (Con-
servative) Jewish Theological
Seminary and be ordained in
May.
The roadblock to the ac-
ceptance of Eilberg and other
Conservative women rabbis
following in her footsteps was
cleared by the passage of an
amendment to the RA's con-
stitution, the assembly an-
nounced at a news conference last
month.
ACCORDING to the amen-
dment, all graduates of the JTS
will automatically become RA
members upon ordination. The
amendment passed by a vote of
636-267 conducted in a recent
mail ballot of the RA mem-
bership.
Previously, graduates had to
be voted into RA membership
individually by 75 percent of the
delegates to an RA convention
which remains the procedure for
non-JTS rabbis who apply. The
amendment was conceived to
avert a possible floor fight on
such a vote on Eilberg's ac-
ceptance into the RA mem-
bership, according to sources
familiar with Conservative
movement politics.
Behind the concern was the
fact that at floor fights for two
years in a row RA conventions
rejected the application of Rabbi
Beverly Magidson, who was
ordained as a Reform rabbi in
1979, while accepting into
membership several male Reform
rabbis.
AT THE 1983 convention, held
in Dallas, the vote on Magidson's
application was 210 in favor to 75
opposed only four votes short
of the 75 percent required. At the
1984 convention, held in April in
Kiamesha Lake, New York,
Magidson received 230 votes to
99 against or 17 votes short.
The repeated rejection of
Magidson's application and the
seeming decline in support for her
admission to the RA largely were
attributed by knowledgeable
sources to the feeling in the
organization that the first woman
it admits should be a JTS
gradute. This would then pave
the way for the acceptance of
women rabbis who were not JTS
graduates, such as Magidson, in
the future.
What made possible the ap-
plication of a woman ordained by
JTS was the decision of its
Faculty Senate to accept women
as rabbinical students, reached
by a 34-8 vote in October 1983
after over 10 years of heated and
often bitter debate within the
Conservative movement.
IN KEEPING with the
decision, 18 women were ad-
mitted as students in the JTS
rabbinical school's incoming
(1984-86) class comprising
approximately 50 percent of the
students. Several of the women
students, who had taken courses
at JTS during the past few years,
will now receive credit and be
ordained before the end of the
usual six-year period of study.
Philadelphia-born Eilberg
holds a master's degree in
Talmud from the JTS. She also
holds a BA in Near Eastern and
Judaic Studies from Brandeis
University, and an MSW from
Smith College. She is the
daughter of former Rep. Joshua
Eilberg and Gladys Eilberg, a
social worker.
At a news conference, Eilberg
called the RA vote "a momen-
tous, historic event" and "a great
day for American Judaism and
for American Jewish women."
The Conservative movement, she
said, "has declared in a
resounding voice that it is
dedicated to an ideal of a fully
egalitarian community."
Referring, as well, to the JTS
decision to admit women as
rabbinical students, Eilberg said
that for American Jewish women
"the long vigil is over and the
wait was fully justified." She
added:
"AS OF today, Jewish women
need never again feel that their
gender is a barrier to their full
participation in Jewish life. They
need never again doubt the
commitment of the Conservative
movement to complete equality
for women." But the process, she
said, "is only beginning." She
continued:
"Only now can we begin the
long-term process of
acknowledging the special
contributions that women can
make to Judaism, of exploring
women's unique and hitherto
ignored perspectives on Jewish
tradition, and of incorporating
those vital insights and con-
tributions into the mainstream of
Jewish life."
Rabbi Alexander Shapiro,
president of the RA, told the
news conference that, with the
decision, "the Conservative
movement as a whole is now
about to enter into an entirely
new era in its development," with
women as well as men able to
"enrich Jewish life throughout
the world."
THE DECISION, he added,
"represents a recognition that all
of us, both men and women, are
created in God's image and that
the potential for spiritual
greatness exists in all human
beings."
Dr. Gerson Cohen, chancellor
of the JTS who had suc-
cessfully pressed for the ac-
ceptance of women as rabbinical
students there expressed the
hope that "all concerned with the
health of Conservative Judaism
will join together in a renewed
spirit of cooperation and look
toward the future."
This was an obvious reference
to a group of rabbis within the
Conservative movement who
have long been opposed to
women being ordained as rabbis.
David Novak, a spokesman for
the Union for Traditional
Consrevative Judaism, called the
RA decision "contrary to Jewish
law" and warned that it would
divide the movement.
MEANWHILE, the National
Council of Young Israel, a
modern Orthodox organization.
condemned the KA decision as an
"abandonment" by the Con-
servative movement "of all
respect for the Divine authority
and authenticity of our religious
heritage" and called it a
"heresy."
NCYI president Harold Jacobs
called upon all Orthodox
organizations to sever their ties
with both Conservative and
Reform organizations and end
their participation in umbrella
bodies such as the Synagogue
Council of America.
Begin Said To Be Considering
Making Return to Political Arena
LONDON (JTA) Former Israeli Premier
Menachem Begin was quoted here as saying there was a
likelihood that he would return to active politics, but that
he had not finally decided on a date.
In an interview with the Jewish Chronicle, Begin also
spoke freely on a number of Middle East issues, including
Lebanon, and possible new peace talks.
HE DECLARED HIMSELF unhappy over present
Israeli government policy on troop withdrawals from
Lebanon, flatly opposed PLO chairman Yasir Arafat's
participation in negotiations, and said talks with Jordan
should be held only in the framework of Camp David.
Chronicle foreign editor Joseph Finklestone, who
interviewed Begin by telephone from London, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that the former premier
sounded well and cheerful, even giving the occasional
chuckle. Begin, 71, has spent the past three years living in
seclusion in a Jerusalem apartment, reportedly suffering
from depression at the death of his wife.
THE 15-MINUTE INTERVIEW followed Israeli
press reports that Begin was contemplating a political
comeback.
Finklestone said he gained the impression that Begin
was serious about such a move which., if it happened,
would be reminiscent of the late David Ben Gurion's
return to politics from retirement in a Negev kibbutz.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County-/ Friday, March 8,1985
NO OTHER
COUNTRYd
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Until February 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives you its
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round trip airfare from Miami, six days/five nights in a first class
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And El Al is the only airline that flies direct from Miami to TeiAviv.
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra $100, the
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You can always add extra days. (Package not available 12/14/84 thru
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Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. We also
include two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
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$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
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^ae*
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County / Friday. March 8,1986
Mubarak's Slipping
Favor With Reagan
There are profound and serious divisions
of opinion between Shimon Peres and his
deputy prime minister, Yitzhak Shamir,
over the significance of the Hussein-Arafat
accord. Now that Egypt's President
Mubarak has entered the act and is willing
to meet "anywhere" that Israel, Jordan
and a Palestinian entity not necessarily
the PLO would agree upon, suddenly
Mr. Peres believes that his government
ought to study the accord and see if it
would be worthwhile to take Mubarak up
on his invitation.
Shamir, in Paris early this week, con-
tinued to call the accord what Peres also
called it from the beginning: an op-
portunistic agreement by which Hussein
hopes to improve his relations with the
Palestine Liberation Organization, and
Mubarak expects to find favor with the
Reagan Administration when he arrives in
Washington for a meeting with the
President next week.
As we see it, the problem is less either
the division of opinion between Peres and
Shamir or Hussein's ambitions with the
Palestinians. It is, indeed, more a matter of
Mubarak's plummeting favor with the
Reaganites, all of whom by now know him
for what he is, and all of whom are out to
get him on Capitol Hill.
Buttering Up Capitol Hill
What is Mubarak?
'He is a man who has betrayed both the
letter and the spirit of Camp David, not to
mention Anwar Sadat, his assassinated
precedessor and one of Camp David's
architects. Against the specific injunctions
of the accord, Mubarak withdrew his
ambassador to Israel when Prime Minister
Begin launched his Operation Peace for
Galilee in June, 1982.
/ He has stood by without protest while
the Egyptian press engages in vitriolic
attacks on Israel many of them frankly
anti-Semitic.
i He has done nothing to establish
normal relations with Israel on the
contrary doing everything he possibly can
to "delay" them.
/He has been silent and failed to
repudiate his most trusted aides when they
were repeatedly quoted in the international
press that now that Egypt has the Sinai
back, friendship with Israel is hardly an
imperative.
He has been increasingly cozying up to
the Kremlin with an eye on a renewed
Egyptian-Soviet relationship.
In the face of all of these things,
President Mubarak will arrive in
Washington next week determined to
increase the $2 billion-plus in foreign aid
Egypt will receive in 1985.
Worthless Generosity
But the Reagan Administration is laying
for him, and some observers are betting
that, far from an increase in aid, Egypt will
be lucky to survive congressional scrutiny
of the foreign aid budget allocating the $2
billion-plus to Egypt in the first place.
These, in effect, are the facts behind
President Reagan's increasing adamance
about the Arab nations which suddenly are
pressing for an international conference
ostensibly aimed at peace in the Middle
East.
Recognize Israel, and then well join you,
the President says repeatedly. You can ft
talk about peace with Israel if you aren t
yourself a friend of Israel a diplomatic
partner.
Hosni Mubarak knows about the climate
of opinion into which he will be flying. Any
wonder, then, that suddenly he's willing to
go "anywhere" to talk peace with Israel in
the presence of Jordan and Palestinians
who, now he says, need not necessary be
PLO? And any doubt that Mubarak's
primary aim is less peace than cosmetic
propaganda?
All of this is not by way of saying that
Mr. Shamir is right in his refusal to see
anything worthy in the Hussein-Arafat
accord, and Prime Minister Peres is wrong
in his suggestion early this week that the
accord may well be offering something
"interesting" for Israel. But Israel has
already traded the Sinai away for a mess of
mottage. Its leaders must now be super-
careful not to engage in such worthless acts
of generosity a second time.
HUeiNTWe$WlrJ$6R,
/
uTAffix
The Souring of Egypt
U.S. Has Rough Time With Cain\
"cjewisli Floridian
OF PINELLAS COUNTY lAMftoM
Editorial Office. 801 S. Jupiter Ave.. South, Clearwater, Fla. 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication & Business Office. 120 N.E. 6 St.. Miami. Fla. 33132
Telephone (305) 373-4605
FRED K. SHOCHET SUZANNESCHECHTER SUZANNESHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Editor. Pinedas County Executive Editor
Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee the Kaahruth of Merchandaw Advertised
Second Claea Postage Paid. ISPS M9-470 .1 Miami. Fla. Published Mi-Weekly
Postmaster: Forward Form 3579 to Box 012973. Miami, Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area Annual 14.00) 2-Year Minimum Subscription 17 50 or by
annual membership pledge to Jewish Federation ol Pinellas County lor which the aum ol $2 25 is
paid Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, March 8, 1985
Volume 6
15 ADAR5745
Number 5
By London Chronicle
Israel is not alone in
currently going through a
rather rough period in its
relationship with Egypt.
U.S. relations with Egypt
are not exactly wonderful
right now either.
Egypt's overall image in
Washington has seriously
deteriorated since the
assassination of President Anwar
Sadat in 1981 and the rise to
power of his successor. Hosni
Mubarak. There is widespread
disappointment among Reagan
administration officials, as well
as many influential members of
Congress, in Mubarak's policies
toward the United States, Israel
and other countries.
THIS INCREASINGLY
angry mood is Likely to be
conveyed quite sternly to
President Mubarak during his
talks in Washington next month.
His foreign minister, Esmat
Abdul Meguid, heard some
preliminary opening shots during
his preparatory talks in
Washington last week.
Reagan Administration of-
ficials are clearly becoming
irritated with President
Mubarak's attitude. They charge
that he has been leas than for-
thcoming in responding to the
impressive U.S. economic,
military and political support for
Egypt in recent years.
After dragging his feet for
many months, the Egyptian
leader has finally stopped
cooperating with the United
States in longstanding plans to
build major naval facilities at Ras
Banas in the Gulf of Suez. That
joint project, which has now
finally been dropped altogether,
was once warmly promoted by
Sadat as a reflection of Egypt's
close association with and
support for an expanded U.S.
military presence in the region.
EVEN EARLIER, President
Mubarak had informed
Washington that there was no
desire in Egypt to go ahead with
the construction of U.S. radio
transmitters for use by the Voice
of America, Radio Free Europe
and Radio Liberty. That is one
reason why the Americans have
turned to Israel with the request.
President Mubarak
Simultaneously, President
Mubarak has been steadily
warming up Egypt's relations
with the Soviet Union a
development not exactly
welcomed by the cold warriors in
the Reagan administration.
As a result, U.S. plans to see
Egypt emerge as a major U.S.
strategic asset in the Middle East
are today history. No one even
talks about it any more.
Mubarak is no Sadat as far as
Washington is concerned. The
Egyptian president is widely
depicted in the U.S. capital as
simply too fearful of being seen in
the Arab world and elsewhere as
overly aligned with the United
States.
THAT DOES not mean to
suggest that Mubarak wants to
see an actual rupture with the
Americans. Absolutely not. But
just as he is walking a delicate
tightrope in balancing his of-
ficially cool relationship with
Israel with his apparently
overriding desire to regain ad-
mission into the bigger Arab fold,
so, too, is he seeking some middle
ground between Washington and
Moscow.
Reagan administration
policymakers in the White House
as opposed to career Middle
East specialists at the State
Department are slowly but
increasingly losing their patience.
There is not a whole lot of un-
derstanding for Mubarak's more
evenhanded approach.
The Egyptians, it is i
in Washington, remap
anxious to continue to(
large-scale U.S. econn
military assistance, indu
latest state-of-the-art
technology. The En
military has grown
to U.S. hardware and I
They prefer American-!
fighters and missiles tot
the Soviet Union.
President Mubarak,
has already announced I
will be pressing foil
economic aid increases i
comes to Washington. Htj
parity with Israel on thasij
BUT THE way he I
behaving. U.S. offid-l
clear during a series of I
in recent days, he is not||
get his way. TheEgy[ '
indeed, will have his woy
for him in patching up,J]
the senior echelon of Haf
Administration.
There is an even
mood developing on I
where lawmakers ire I
for some eitremeJy
questions regarding
Reagan's PProx^l
billion combined w^T
military aid proposal tafi
the just-announced
year budget. i
According to se*1
placed Congressional!
Egyptians will hive |
difficult time merely I
proposal enacted P
winning any .'
assistance. Thei only
Egyptians might j*l
problems in OMPJ
sources said, would bejfj
and demonstrative.)rT
relations with I**
with the return of *'
ambassador to Tel Avn
Already, somemeoj]
House and Stsnitt*
about proP08^.??;
the foreign aid <
U.S. assistance on m
readiness to MA
relations with gW
diplomats in w""
aware of those trend*.
REPUBLICAN jj|
Specter of rV"
member of the
Subcommittee m
Operations. toWM
an be very difficult
Continu
edooM'


Friday, March 8, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 5
Menorah Manor Volunteers Begin to Train
I Adele Lurie, Menorah Manor's
Lector of volunteers, announced
L first training session for the
lolunteer Corps to be held on
londav. March 11. 9:30 a.m. in
C Menorah Center Apartments
ecreation Hall. 250 59 St. No.,
Petersburg.
I This session will include at-
titudes on aging as well as an
overview of the psychosocial
needs of the elderly in-
stitutionalized resident.
The training session will in-
clude all requirements as
established by HRS as well as
giving the volunteers the
necessary techniques and
assurances to feel at ease while in
the role of Menorah Manor
Volunteers.
Notices will be mailed to all
those previously registered with
the Manor. If you wish to be
included, please call the volunteer
department at (813) 345-2775.

nertcan ORT Federation President Alvin
Gray and his wife, Anita, confer with
tyients in a special class for newly-arrived
hiopiun Jews at the ORT school in Kiryat
\t during a recent tour of ORT programs
oughout Israel, France and the United
ftgdom conducted as part of the American
IT Federation winter mission. At the ORT
fgrams for Ethiopian Jews in Netanya,
vat Gat, and Carmiel, mission par-
ticipants learned of the difficulties faced by
the latest wave of newcomers to Israel who,
in many cases, have had to make a transition
virtually overnight from the middle ages to
the computer age. ORT programs include
special classes for the new arrivals in fields
such as accounting, draftsmanship,
dressmaking, metal work and orientation in
Israeli industrial practices.
Yiddish Musical Comedy Theater
Chayele Ash and
Abraham Fuhrman In Concert
Chayele Ash and Abraham
Fuhrman. stars of stage. TV and
radio. will appear at
Congregation B'nai Israel on
Wednesday, March 20, at 8 p.m.
Yiddish Musical Comedy theater
at its best! Help celebrate 100
years of Yiddish theater help
keep it alive! Yiddish, Hebrew,
English, humor, folk songs,
sketches, drama and Chassidic.
General admission $5. Tickets
available at Congregation B'nai
Israel, 381-4900. or contact your
synagogue office.
\
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This summer ai the Kallsview. theeariybird
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you flying high.
At the Kallsview. you'll find indix>r and outikxtr
tennis and swimming. ,i Robert lrcnt Jones goll
course, racquctball. boating, fishing and so much more.
lim you'll also find .i sufl who will make you feel like one "I ,i
^ kind, instead of one <>t the crowd.
Si it you're i oming north lor the summer, come i>> the resort
, thai lives up to .ill vour expectations. I he Killsview.
I
. Mil I UISVIHV I III N\ III I. \^
IKI I lull l Alls
HOU-HI-0152
Save
Time,
Effort
Worry
And
25%.
For a limited time, Amtrak has reduced the fare by 25%.
Time: You save 900 miles and 18 hours of hard driving when you take
the Auto Train. It transports you and your car from Sanford, Florida, near Orlando,
to Lorton, Virginia, near Washington.
Effort: It's hardly any effort at all. You can sightsee in the dome car,
socialize with friends around the piano in the lounge car, or watch a movie. You'll
enjoy a complimentary full course buffet dinner in the evening and a continental
breakfast in the morning.
Worry: You won't have a care in the world. You don't have to
search for a decent restaurant or a comfortable motel. Or worry about
your car and belongings.
For more information, call your travel agent or call Amtrak at
1 800 USA RAIL.
k.'*""~
ABOARD
AMTRAK

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