The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
fcJewish florid'fan
,5-Number26
Of Pinellas CowMty
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, December 28,1984
\fr*S/>ocft.(
Price 35 Cents
Hi
De a Partner for Life-Answer the Call
JANUARY 27,1985
\Be A Partner for Life-
Answer the Call
Super Sunday
Jan. 27 '85
per Sunday is a very special
\ All over the nation on that
people will make thousands
hone calls in an attempt to
I every household in the
rican Jewish community.
Super Sunday you will
ve a call from one of your
hbors asking you to help
I in need in Pinellas County,
|rael and around the world.
1 support is essential to the
(ty of life in the years ahead.
p your telephone rings,
er the call.
[lunteers are needed to help
the Pinellas community.
Be A Volunteer
SUPER SUNDAY
JANUARY 27,1985
Be part of the natlonwidaeffort of volunteer
. telephone solicitors to secure contributions from
thousands of Jewish households in Pinellas County.
I PLEASE JOIN THE EFFORT
Mail this coupon to the Jewish Federation
301S. Jupiter Ave., Clearwater 33515
or call 446-1033
[lease INCLUDE ME AS A VOLUNTEER IN THE
985 SUPER SUNDAY
lame
Idress
lome phone
I need transportation
Mark Talisman To Address
Major Gifts Dinner
Mark E. Talisman will address
the Federation-Combined Jewish
Appeal Major Gifts Dinner on
January 13, dinner chairman
Richard Jacobson has an-
nounced. The dinner, open to all
individual contributors of $5,000
or more (and their spouses) to the
1985 campaign, will be held at the
Wine Cellar Restaurant in North
Redington Beach.
Talisman is director of the
Washington Action office of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
representing over 200 federations
in the United States, comprised
of over 800 social service
agencies. He is an expert on
political affairs, and has
oroduced over 40 half-hour prime-
time television shows dealing
with the operation of Congress.
Talisman is a founder and in-
structor of the John Fitzgerald
Kennedy Institute of Politics,
which includes among its
programs a course given every
two years for new congressmen.
He was appointed by President
Reagan as vice-chairman of the
United States Holocaust
Memorial Council. In addition,
Talisman was one of the major
participants in bringing the
Precious Legacy exhibit to the
United States.
Talisman was born in
Cleveland, Ohio, and graduated
with honors from Harvard
University. He spent 14 years on
Congressman Charles Vannick's
staff and was the youngest
person to be appointed admin-
istrative assistant to the House
of Representatives.
The Major Gifts dinner is held
on behalf of the annual Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign. Funds
raised in the campaign support
the United Jewish Appeal, as
well as local agencies such as the
Jewish Community Center, the
Jewish Day School, Gulf Coast
Jewish Family Service and the
Kent Jewish Center.
For information about the
dinner, call the Federation office,
446-1033.
Karpay and Kessler Elected to Menorah Manor Board
Irwin Miller, president, has an-
nounced the election of George
Karpay and Walter Kessler to the
board of governors of Menorah
Manor. Both are prominent
businessmen and are board
members of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, involved in many
aspects of their city's Jewish
community. The problems of our
elder citizens have concerned
them for many years; Kessler is
now the president of the Jewish
Center Towers, a senior HUD
apartment house in Tampa.
Miller pointed out that their
election re-emphasized the
commitment of Menorah Manor
to serve the needs of the aged in
Pasco, Hillsborough, Pinellas,
Manatee, Sarasota and Polk
counties as a philanthropic
Home, meeting the special needs
for Jewish observances, as well as
providing quality long term care,
following the dietary laws of
Kashruth within the framework
of a home-like family atmosphere.
UN Calls for Palestine Homeland
"All we ask is that you feel Jew-
ish, because then you will do
what one Jew does when another
is in trouble. You will help."
MOSHE DAYAN
Join with your friends at the
Jewish Community Center or at
Superior Surgical Manufacturing
Company and be part of Jewish
survival.
Jean and Julie Malkin, Super
Sunday chairs, have announced
that over 110 concerned Jews
have already volunteered their
time and energy to call their
neighbors in Pinellas County.
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General As-
sembly renewed its call for
an international peace con-
ference on the Middle East,
with the participation of
the Soviet Union and the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization and asked Israel
and the United States to
reconsider their opposition
to such a conference.
The call was made in a
resolution adopted by the
assembly at the conclusion of its
debate on the Question of
Palestine. The vote was 121 in
favor to three against Israel, the
U.S. and Canada with 23,
mainly Western countries, ab-
staining.
THE ASSEMBLY adopted
three other resolutions on the
issue of the Palestinians. The
U.S. and Israel voted against all
the resolutions.
One of the resolutions endorsed
the recommendations of the
Palestine Rights Committee,
which includes a call for the
establishment of an independent
Palestinian state and the
recognition of the FLO as the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people. The vote on this
resolution was 127-2 (Israel and
the U.S.), with21 abstentions.
Another resolution expressed
continued support of the United
Nations Division on Palestine.
The vote on this resolution was
130-3 (Israel, the U.S. and
Canada), with 17 abstentions.
The fourth resolution
Israel, Egypt Said To Be Close
To An Exchange of Emissaries
requested the UN Department of
Public Information to continue
disseminating information on the
their implacable antagonism
towards Israel, the Arab
countries had repeatedly con-
tended that the Jews had seized
Palestine from the Arabs who
had lived there for centuries. But.
he claimed, that contention was
not supported by history because
for thousands of years the Jews
had lived in Palestine.
The Israeli ambassador said
that the Palestinian refugee
problem had been created largely
by Arab armies who forced the
Palestinians to leave their homes
when they attacked Israel in
1948.
Netanyahu also charged that
the call for an international peace
conference was a "ploy" to
legitimize the PLO. He said peace
was possible if the Palestinians,
Israel and Jordan come to the
negotiating table as Israel and
Egypt had done. The Arabs
should recognize Israel "by right
and not on sufferance,'' he said.
i
JERUSALEM (JTA)
High level policymakers
here, encouraged by recent
discreet contacts with
Cairo, believe that Egypt
and Israel are at the
threshold of a dramatic im-
provement in their relations
which have been in a deep
freeze since the war in Leb-
anon two years go.
An exchange of emissaries
between Premier Shimon Peres
and President Hosni Mubarak is
expected before the Egyptian
leader's visit to the United States
early next year. This may be
followed by a Peres-Mubarak
summit meeting. Peres attaches
great significance to a meeting
with Mubarak and some of the
behind-the-scenes contact bet-
ween the two countries seem
intended to prepare for a summit.
EGYPT HAS said publicly
that a condition for such a
meeting is that it be "well
prepared" in advance and that
the border dispute with Israel
over the Taba region is resolved
beforehand. Other conditions are
the withdrawal of the Israel
Defense Force from south Leba-
non and some progress toward
resolving the Palestinian issue.
Israeli policymakers believe
the unity government's firm
intention to pull the IDF out of
Lebanon and current measures to
improve the quality of life of the
Palestinians on the West Bank
should satisfy Egypt's con-
ditions.
With respect to Taba, Israel
has proposed joint adminis-
tration of the tiny strip of beach
on the Gulf of Aqaba near Eilat
pending final determination of its
legal ownership through the
processes of conciliation and
arbitration set forth in the Isra-
eli-Egyptian peace treaty of 1979.
Taba, which Egypt maintains is
part of Sinai, is presently inside
Israel's boundaries.
>


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County/ Friday, December 28, 1984
West Coast Regional Dinner
More than 70 persons attended
the first annual West Coast
Regional Dinner held recently at
the Don Ce Sar Hotel in St.
Petersburg. The dinner was held
in behalf of the Jewish Feder-
ations of Pinellas County,
Sarasota, Naples and Tampa.
Also attending were residents of
Lakeland. Over $595,000 was
raised for the Combined Jewish
Appeal Campaigns of the par-
ticipating communities. In
addition, $103,000 was raised for
Operation Moses. These funds
will be used to assist Ethiopian
Jews.
Ambassador Meir Rosenne,
the scheduled guest speaker, was
unable to attend due to urgent
business in Washington, D.C.,
with Yitzhak Shamir. Robbie
Sabel, counselor for public affairs
with the Israeli Embassy, spoke
of the need for Jews to be
knowledgeable and aware of the
world political situation. Alan
Schulman of Palm Beach,
national UJA vice chairman,
spoke of Operation Moses, and
told a moving and inspirational
story of his meeting with
members of Ethiopian Jewry.
A special honor was accorded
Charlie Rutenberg by the United
Jewish Appeal for his many years
of commitment and financial
support to world Jewry, and for
being a motivating force behind
the establishment of a strong
Jewish community in Pinellas
County and the state of Florida.
'The presentation was made by
Kenneth Schwartz, UJA chair-
man of the Florida region.
Dinner arrangements chair for
the event was Elisa Greenberg,
1985 campaign chair of Pinellas
County. Saul Schechter and
Richard Jacobson were co-chair-
men of the dinner, representing
Pinellas County. Attending the
dinner from Pinellas were Mr.
and Mrs. Sidney Albert, Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Benstock, Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Freifeld, Dr. and
Mrs. Lester Greenberg, Mr. and
Mrs. Rouben Halprin, Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Jacobson, Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Rutenberg, Mr. and
Mrs. Saul Schechter, Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Seligman and Mr.
and Mrs. Ted Wittner.
TOP Tax Tips No. 3Did You Know
By JOEL M. BREITSTEIN
Charitable Tax Planning
Endowment Development
Consultant
TOP Jewish Foundation
1. A contribution paid by check
or in cash will be deductible in
1984, if it is delivered or mailed to
the charitable organization prior
to December 31. This is true even
though the non-profit organi-
zation does not deposit the gift
until after the new year.
2. Some charitable and non-
profit organziations allow
contributors to pay a pledge by
credit card. The IRS has ruled
that a charitable contribution
deduction will be allowed in the
year the charge is made, even
though the donor does not receive
his statement or pay the charge
until later on. So, take your
deduction for 1984 but defer your
actual payment until 1985 (too
bad Saks and Bloomingdale's
can't figure out a way to qualify
as non-profit organizations).
3. Gifts of tangible personal
property such as artwork and
jewelry present special problems.
The general rule is that you may
deduct the full, appraised value
of the gift, if the charitable
organization to which you are
making the gift will use it in
carrying out its exempt purpose.
However, if the use of such
property is unrelated to the
purpose or function for which the
non-profit organization's exempt
status was granted, the donor
must reduce the charitable in-
come tax deduction by 40 percent
of the amount of the ap-
preciation. For example:
Dr. Schwartz bought a
painting for $2,000 several years
ago. He would like to donate the
painting in 1984. The appraised
value of the painting today is
$5,000. If he donates the painting
to an art museum, he will be able
to take a charitable income tax
deduction of $5,000. However if
he donates the painting to the
community hospital and it is
determined that the hospital's
use of the painting was unrelated
to its exempt purpose, his
allowable charitable income tax
deduction would be only $3,800
($5,000 minus 40 percent of
$3,000).
4. Corporations may deduct
charitable gifts up to a maximum
of 10 percent of their taxable
income. However, unlike you and
me, corporations using the actual
basis of accounting for tax
purposes catch a real break.
Under IRC 170 (a)(2) such a
corporation may deduct
charitable gifts paid up to 2Vi
months after the close of the
taxable year provided the board
of directors authorized the
contribution before year end.
Menorah Manor Staff Grows
With opening day only a few
short months away, Edward
Vinocur, executive director of
Menorah Manor, announced
several staff appointments.
Barbara Friedman, director of
social services, is a native of
Tampa, and has been involved in
the geriatric field for many years.
She originally began as a voi-
ce
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unteer with the Graham Park
Housing Complex for Senior Cit-
izens. Through this involvement,
she was inspired to return to gra-
duate school at the University of
South Florida, where she earned
her Master of Arts degree in
Aging Studies. Prior to joining
the Menorah Manor family.
Barbara was a case manager for
the Community Care for the El-
derly Program with Neighborly
Senior Services.
David Pagano. director of
nursing services, joined Menorah
Manor with a strong background
in skilled geriatric care and
nursing. He has experience in all
areas of the nursing field through
his previous employment as
nurse's aide, licensed practical
nurse, registered nurse, and
nursing supervisor. Most
recently he was associated with
Morton Plant Hospital.
David received his Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree from
Dyouville College, Buffalo, New
York, and is currently attending
the University of South Florida
for his Master of Science degree
in Geriatric Nursing.
Vinocur further discussed his
search at this time to locate indi-
viduals with similar levels of
expertise to join the Menorah
Manor family in the positions of
directors of housekeeping, food
service, building services,
program department, physical
therapy, occupational therapy,
and medical records consultant
as well as other key personnel.
The securing of additional
capital building funds is still
progressing, and Vinocur added
that there are still many
honoraria and memorials avail-
able. He urged concerned com-
munity individuals to contact
him or Adele Lurie, director of
development, at 345-2775 for
additional information.
Principals Meet At Harvard
Mark Silk, principal of the
Pinellas County Jewish Day
School, joined over 40 Solomon
Schechter Day School principals
for the first Principals' Council
Conference at Harvard Uni-
versity. Collegiality was the
central theme of this conference
held Dec. 9-11, at the Principals'
Center and Harvard Hillel
Foundation in Cambridge, Mass.
Harvard and Jewish
Theological Seminary faculty
members addressed the group on
topics varying from staff super-
vision to teaching of mitzvot. A
framework for sharing curri-
culum materials throughout the
United States was established.
The newly established Princip-
als' Council of the Jewish Educ-
ators Assembly, which organized
this conference, is actively
planning sessions for Jewish Day
School principals at other na-
tional conventions for Jewish
educators.
Silk shared many of the ideas
Mark S. Silk
and materials generate ,,
conference with members,
Tampa Bay Jewish Ed
Council at its December!
The Jewish Day Sch,
beneficiary agency of the J
Federation.
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Mini-Mission 1985

I glad you pledged. It shows you understand the challenges we
[throughout the Jewish world. But pledges made in 1984 won't
> solutions. Cash will. Cash is needed now. Please send your
today: Jewish Federation ofPinellas County, 301 S. Jupiter St.,
water 33515
Lion of Judah To
Honor New Members
new members of the 1985
I Judah division will be the
es at the Lion of Judah
to be held the end of
ary, announced Loretta
eld, chair.
Freifeld said, "We hope
ke the dinner a very special
our very special ladies.
participation in this divi-
evidence of their commit-
1 to the quality of Jewish life
|at home, around the world
i Israel. It will be a pleasure
to welcome them as "Lion," and
present them with the beautiful
gold pin that symbolizes this
division."
The Lions of Judah committee
will be meeting shortly to finalize
plans for the dinner, held an-
nually on behalf of the Women's
Division of the Federation-
Combined Jewish Appeal
campaign.
Co-chairing the division is
Sonya Miller of St. Petersburg.
Would you know where to go if
you needed confidential help with
a family problem? Who can you
turn to for emergency home-
maker care? Where is our Jewish
Day School? Who does our com-
munity center provide programs
for?
These and many other
questions are answered every day
by local Federation-supported
agencies which provide a large
array of vital social services in
Pinellas County.
The 1985 Mini-Mission, spon-
sored by the Women's Division of
Federation, will visit these agen-
cies on Jan. 14 to see their
programs and speak with their
directors. Included will be visits
to the Jewish Community Center,
Jewish Day School, and Gulf
Coast Jewish Family Service.
Chairperson Jean Malkin urges
everyone to participate in the
Mini-Mission, and take the
opportunity to visit the agencies
WOMEN'S DIVISION MINI-MISSION
PASSENGER'S NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE NUMBER
DEPARTING GATES:
Top Of The World Rec. Bldg.
Ahavat Shalom Dunedin
B'nai Israel Clearwater
Superior Surgical Seminole
B'nai Israel St. Pete
AMOUNT ENCLOSED $
PLEASE RETURN BY DECEMBER 31, 1984
( )
I )
I )
( )
( )
that are supported by your gifts
to the annual Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign. Men and
women are invited to attend.
Mrs. Malkin commented, "The
invitations are in the mail. We
can promise an exciting and
educational day, and the chance
to become acquainted with our
local agencies."
Participants will be picked up
at several points in the county,
and travel by chartered buses to
the agencies. Lunch will be
served at one of the visits. There
will be no solicitation of funds.
Cost is $5. For information, call
the Federation office, 446-1033.
For reservations, return
coupon to the Jewish Federation,
301 S. Jupiter St., Clearwater
33515.
Shiite Villages Near Tyre Put Under Curfew
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Several Shiite villages in the area
of Tyre, south Lebanon, were
placed under curfew after two
Israeli soldiers were slightly
wounded in a small arms attack
on their convoy east of Tyre.
Another attack on an Israel
Defense Force truck near Tyre
caused no casualties.
Background on Ethiopian Jews
more than 2,000 years, a
lunity of devout Jews living
highlands of Ethiopia has
red. They call themselves
Yisrael" (the House of
, and believe themselves to
^scendants of King Solomon
"ueen Sheba. Some sources
that they were origin-
part of the lost tribe of Dan
separated from Moses on
|journey to Israel. Others
ve they were migrants from
bn or that they fled ancient
1 after the destruction of the
Temple. Despite the uncer-
over their exact origin,
Jewishness has been con-
by the highest rabbinic
ities. Over the generations,
Ethiopian Jews have held
to their Jewish beliefs,
iing their compelling desire
to Zion. Today, there
nore than 7,000 Ethiopian
living in Israel.
Dm the 10th to 16th century,
in Ethiopia formed an
endent kingdom with a
tion reaching 500,000. But
32. their independence was
their land confiscated,
fhey were reduced to second-
citizenship. They became
ts of severe persecution and
Bemitism which continues
f The present government's
lunist-inspired anti-
policies have especially
sized the Jewish minority
ii imprisoning religious
forcing conversions, and
ving religious observances.
fg the revolutionary terror
1977 to 1979, many
ppian Jews were caught in
rossfire and are thought to
been murdered, tortured,
I. and forced into slavery.
opia is one of the poorest
ies on earth. The devastat-
^mine and drought, which
ined worldwide attention,
i mounting in the country
arly ten years. The average
in Ethiopia is 36 years,
- country suffers from an
mortality rate of 16
p. Consequently, the Jews,
[with other minority com-
have found themselves
oorest of the poor" in the
Rescue and aliyah of large
numbers of Ethiopian Jews did
not become possible until after
the revolution in 1979 when they
began to flee with other
Ethiopians to refugee camps.
Once in the camps, the govern-
ment of Israel and the Jewish
Agency have rescued large
numbers of Ethiopian Jews and
brought them safely to Israel.
Those remaining in the camps are
threatened with disease, famine,
and drought, as well as dangers
caused by the internal battles of
warring political factions. They
live under cover in the camps be-
cause discovery of their Jewish
identity could lead to imprison-
ment ... or worse.
Once in Israel, the Ethiopian
immigrants have participated in
an extremely difficult and costly
absorption program undertaken
by the Jewish Agency. The
transition to modern Israeli
society is a drastic adjustment
from their more than 2,000-year-
old culture. Numerous health,
cultural and educational gaps
must be bridged. Many of the
Ethiopian immigrants are now
leading proud, productive lives in
Israeli society, as others are
struggling to adjust while under
direct supervision.
A comprehensive rescue, relief
and absorption program for
Ethiopian Jews has been an
ongoing priority of the Israeli
government and the Jewish
Agency.
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THE CHARLES AND ISADORA RUTENBERG
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and
THE GOLDA MEIR CENTER
presents with Brandeis, Hadassah and
The Safety Harbor Spa
YIDDISH FILM SERIES
Sunday. January 6.............Mame Loshn/Bent Tree
Sunday. February 17.....................Green Fields
Sunday. April 14..............The Singing Blacksmith
Admission: $9.00 per series
or $3.50 at door for each film
Time: 2:00 P.M.
Place: Safety Harbor Spa
For further details see Qolda Melr Page 5 ______
The IDF, operating with the
South Lebanon Army, detained
14 residents of the villages for
residents of the villages for ques-
tioning in connection with recent
attacks on IDF and SLA sol-
diers.
Meanwhile, a spokesman for
the United Nations Interim Force
in Lebanon (UNIFIL) corrected
an earlier report by UNIFIL that
two Lebanese civilians were
killed and 14 wounded when Is-
raeli troops entered a Shiite
village in search of terrorists. Ac-
cording to the spokesman, the
two men were killed in a family
quarrel.
U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State Richard Murphy was back
in Israel over the weekend. He
met with Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin at the hitter's Tel
Aviv office to report on his recent
visits to Damascus and Beirut.
Minister-Without-Portfolio
Moshe Arens, a former defense
minister, was present at the
meeting along with Chief of Staff
Gen. Moshe Levy and senior
Foreign Ministry and Defense
Ministry officials.
Murphy apparently had no
progress to report on efforts to
break the deadlock in the Israeli-
Lebanese talks at Nakura on
withdrawal and security. He left
later for Egypt and Jordan and
was expected to return to Israel
at the end of the week.
The 10th meeting of the Israeli
and Lebanese negotiating teams
at Nakura was postponed
because bad weather grounded
the Lebanese deleeates'
helicopter from Beirut.
Bay Area Jewish National Fund
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Pinellas 392-8181
Hillsborough 933TREE
8405 N. Himes Ave., #209
Tampa, FL. 33614
\
nls provldwl icluiniy through
Kim Intamattonal Corporation, agont IATA"


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The Promises We All Kept
From lunch at the Youth
Aliyah school to the festive
Project Renewal neighborhood
group meeting to the caucus in a
kibbutz in the Galilee 10 days
later, the promises were all kept.
The Tampa-Pinellas mission to
Israel participants were promised
a return to their roots, a redis-
covery of their traditions, and the
opportunity to touch not cold
stones but warm hearts. They
did. The mission returned at the
end of October with everyone
exhausted from their intensive
travel, but inspired by their
experiences.
The 44 participants. 22 from
Pinellas and 22 from Tampa, met
Israelis of all ages in a wide range
of UJA-funded program settings.
The reciting of the Shehecheyanu
on a hilltop overlooking Jeru-
salem set the pace for the gamut
of emotions that were felt
throughout the mission. A com-
munity center and a Youth
Aliyah School were visited, and
the smiles on faces of the people
showed the care and love that
Israel bestows on its very young
and very old A trip to a high-
tech industry which manufac-
tures medical lasers illustrated
Israels advances in science and
technology. The experience of
Masada. in contrast, provided a
sense of history and the strength
of our ancestors' determination
to live as free men.
A ceremony at Yad Vashem
was unforgettable. After going
through the museum and coping
with the horrors of the Holocaust
individually, a memorial service
was held in which the entire na-
tional mission participated.
Roses were placed at the monu-
ments marking Matthausen.
Auschwitz. Bergen-Belsen and
the other places symbolizing
man's inhumanity, and then all
350 people present said Kaddish.
together, as one family. This
moment, through eyes wet from
tears and heavy with overwhelm-
ing emotion, crystallized for
everyone the fact that Jews are
indeed one family, bound by our
heritage. From that somber
setting, thev walked outside into
Be o Partner fcx Life-Answer the Call
JANUARY 27,1985
Canadians Want Jewish
Museum in Dublin
MONTREAL (JTA)
A Canadian Society of
Friends of the Irish-Jewish
museum, which is sched-
uled to open in Dublin next
March, has been started in
Hamilton. Ontario.
Dr. Gerald Tolkin. chairman,
made the announcement during a
visit to the Dundas. Ontario.
home of his daughter. Dr. Trish
Tolkin-Eppel. and her husband.
Dr. Alan Eppel The Canadian
chairman will be Bernard Morris
of Toronto, according to the
Canadian Jewish News.
The museum will be housed in
the 100-year-old Wahrorth Road
Synagogue, which has been
empty for about 30 years. Tolkin
said. The original synagogue will
be retained on the upper floor as a
historical showplace. Memo-
rabilia of the Irish Jewish
community, dating from the
early 19th century to the present,
wul be shown on the ground floor.
TOLKIN SAID the museum
project was started about eight
years ago by Asher Benson, now
the official archivist. The first
Jews are reported to have come
to Ireland from Normandy in
1079 and there is evidence of
Jews living in Ireland until their
expulsion in the 19th century, the
News reported.
In the 16th and 17th centuries
Sephardic Jews settled in Ireland
but eventually left for Britain.
Jewish migration to Ireland
faded until the end of the 19th
century, when Jews from
Lithuania. Russia and Poland
began to arrive. They settled in
Dublin. Belfast and Cork, and
there were, at the peak, about
5.000 Jews in Ireland.
the beautiful Jerusalem sunshine.
Shabbat at the Western Wall
was profoundly moving, not only
for its religious significance, but
for the sense of tradition and
history it conveyed. Watching
the men and women, separated
by a low wall, praying, listening
to the singing of the Yeshiva
students, smelling the delicious
aromas of the Shabbat meals
prepared in the homes in the
Jewish quarter assailed the
senses, leaving a feeling of being
a part of history, and being a part
of today, of our oneness with our
past, and our future as a people.
The mission visited the Golan
Heights and saw the
geographical necessity for safe
borders and felt the determina-
tion of the new pioneers in re-
cently created settlements.
The group visited an air force
base, where an air show was pre-
sented for mission participants.
Watching the Kfirs taking off
and landing and talking with the
men and women at the base, and
seeing their confidence in them-
selves and their military, con-
veyed to all a feeling of respect
and pride, for "our boys and our
planes.''
A visit to an absorption center
was a unique experience.
Ethiopian Jews were there,
receiving sensitive and costly
training to ease their transition
into the mainstream of Israeli
life. Classes in Hebrew were
being given to the women, tht
children were in school, and the
men were being taught skills
necessary to integrate into
modern Israeli society.
The Pinellas-Tampa mission
lasted ten days. In those ten
days, friendships were made, the
Jewish nation was seen, both
from an historical perspective
and a modern one and the hopes
and aspirations of a people were
felt. In addition, each individual
felt his own commitment, his own
responsibility, his own identity to
the Jewish state. It is true that
we are linked. Israel and Amer-
ican Jewry, and that we are part-
ners, responsible for working
toward a creative and viable
future for the Jewish nation, and
for all Jews, in our home com-
munities and around the world.
There is a saying on the en-
trance wall of Beit Hatefutsoth,
the Diaspora Museum in Tel
Aviv: -This is the story of one
people, scattered all around the
world, who remained one family.''
It's true. We did.
SUMCMTTION MATES (Loci Ana ...... MM 2 Yaw _
""V '*9' *'* BaHI at "inilii CMMy lor ajtacft m*
Shown are Pinellas mission participants, seated /left to rightm
Dubbin, Elisa Greenberg, Sue Schechter, and Lester Gnm
Standing 'left to right) are Loretta Freifeld, Stan Freifeld, U.
Weissman. Edie Seligman, Len Seligman, Ida Michels, M
Dubbin. Iruin Miller. Sonya Miller, Irving Weissman. Harryl
uartz. Dell Krug. Mavis Schwartz, Larry Krug. Herb Schixam
Fisher Fred Fisher, and Saul Schechter. Not shown. Julia Schumfi
fi BLUE RIDGE ft
f/fl CAMP and RESORT FOR BOYS & GIRLS 6-16 fl\l
I Q YOUR MOUNTAIN OF FUN Where Spring H
I jA Comes A Spends the Summer
I ^ ONLY 2 HOURS NORTH OF ATLANTA
^"J^** MOUNTAIN CITY g*
All Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Canoeing Mt Trail HiKes Tennis
Arts & Crafts Sailing Skiing Gymnastics and
Dance Go Carts Computers Roller Skating
Rock Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological & Science Program
Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS & SHEILA WALDMAN
STAN & BARBARA MINTZ
Miami Beach Phone 305-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla. 33140 ,
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
*& Telephone (81
31 866-8855
8**
Specialists in Jewish Cooking
Facilities for 20-1200 People
Bar Bat Milzvahs Weddings
Receptions Banquets
Our Restaurant Is Open 7 Days A Week
For Breakfast Lunch Dinner.
3600 34th Street South St. Petersburg. Florida 3371!
~ .~ OF P4NEUAS COUNTY ;WMM
Editorial Office. 301 S. JupiUr Ave.. South. Clearwatar. Fla. 31615
Telephone 446-1033
Publication Busumm Office. 120 N.E. 6 St. Miami. Fla. 33132
Telephone (3051373-4605
FREDKSHOCHET SUZANNE SCHECHTER SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Editor. Pinellas County Executive Edito,
FlomfaB Dot. Not CarwUe lie Kmbrmth of McrcfcaBdW Adrot-ed
Second Cam Pnlas Pad DSPS S4S470 at M------FV Pahlnil BiKatly
Postmaster: Forward Form 3579 to Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101
mmokhiw Waaaaap
Triday. December 28.1984
,'olume 5
(X S2.2Sit
4TEVETH5746
Number 26
See your travel agent or call toll-
free: 800-223-0888 (in New York
State: 800-522-5455 or 212-841- II11).
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On room only. From I/I 'til 2/28.
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I' rHECARLTON HOTEL
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planning a trip to Israet Tht **
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Laromme eiiat hotel
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V Laromme hoteis (mt'i) ito


> Beth Lesser
L.
Marc Jordan Himelhoch
s
tmy Schulman
Marci Erin Daniels
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
CARRIE LESSER
ie Beth Lesser, daughter
and Mrs. Jason Lesser,
ailed to the Torah as a Bat
tan on Dec. 15 at Temple
[Israel, Clearwater.
rie is a student in the tern-
eligious school, and is a
of the Junior Youth
She attends the Oak
i Middle School where she is
8th grade. In addition to
| an honor student, Carrie is
liber of the yearbook staff, a
:r of the National Junior
Society, and secretary of
ludent Council. Her hobbies
\ tennis, piano, and dance.
and Mrs. Lesser hosted a
lion at the temple in honor
occasion.
kcial guests included
\s grandparents, Sam and
Lesser and Ben and
in Jacobs.
IARC HIMELHOCH
\c Jordan Himelhoch, son
and Mrs. Paul E.
hoch, celebrated his Bar
in on Dec. 25 at Congrega-
et Kmet. Rabbi Sherwin T.
Birmingham Temple of
ngton Hills, Mich., of-
is a student in the con-
^ion religious school and is
in the Association of
Humanistic Youth. He is
(nor roll student at the
Harbor Middle School,
| he is in the 7th grade. Marc
and acts and has been a
er of a local TV show. He is
?mber of the American
era Association.
HELP WANTED
Administrator Large reform temple Business
Jriented, with a commitment to Judaism. Some
evenings and weekends.
Send letter of application with all details to:
^r. Abraham Levine,
chairman of Personnel Committee,
remple B'nai Israel, _..
1685 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater, PI. 33546
eir Center
CHARLES RUTENBERG
PRESIDENT
MARCIA J. PRETEKIN. MSW
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
302 South Jupiter, Clearwater, Florida 33515 813-461 0222
Mr. and Mrs. Himelhoch
hosted a reception following the
ceremony. Celebrating with Marc
were his grandparents, Mr. and
Mrs. Sam Kaplan, and B.
Himelhoch, Michigan.
JEREMY SCHULMAN
Jeremy Schulman, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Dennis Schulman, cel-
ebrated his Bar Mitzvah on Dec.
22 at Congregation Beth Shalom,
Clearwater.
Jeremy is recording secretary
of Kadima. He attends the Hillel
School of Tampa, where he is in
the 7th grade, and an honor
student.
Mr. and Mrs. Schulman hosted
a Kiddush luncheon following
service* at the synagogue.
Special guests included grand-
parents Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Schulman, Omaha, Nebraska,
and Mr. and Mrs. James Kraft,
N. Miami Beach, as well as aunts,
uncles and cousins from
Colorado, Michigan and Cali-
fornia.
MARCI DANIELS
Marci Erin Daniels, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome H.
Daniels, was called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah on Dec. 22 at
Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater.
Marci is a student in the
temple religious school and is
active in the Junior Youth
Group.
She attends the Seminole
Middle School where she is in the
7th grade. Marci is especially
interested in the performing arts.
Her hobbies include singing,
dancing, acting and sailing.
Mr. and Mrs. Daniels hosted a
reception in Marci's honor at the
temple.
The Charles and Isadora
Rutenberg Family Foundation
invites you to "An Afternoon of
Yiddish Folktales," Jan. 24 at
the Gold Meir Center.
An afternoon of Yiddish
Folktales will be presented at the
Golda Meir Center on Thursday,
Jan. 24, at 1 p.m. Peninnah
Schram, assistant professor of
speech and drama at Stern
College of Yeshiva University in
New York, will be presenting
proverbs and folktales of the
Jewish people.
Prof. Schram has traveled
across the country performing
and giving storytelling work-
shops. A professional storyteller,
she has worked as the resident
storyteller for New York City's
'92nd Street Y," and has
produced two radio series and a
record album, "The Storyteller's
Journey," which has received
many awards. In addition, Prof.
Schram has produced plays for
children and adults with her
companies, Theatre a la Carte
and the Jewish Heritage Theatre.
Admission will be $2. The cost
will include refreshments.
Patrons to the Golda Meir
Yiddish Film Series will be
admitted free. Children over the
age of five are welcome free. For
further information, please call
the Golda Meir Center at 461-
0222.
Beginning Jan. 8, a new class
is Beginning Hebrew Reading
Only will follow the Prayerbook
Hebrew Class. Class will be held
on Tuesdays from 12:30 to 1:30.
Cost will be $10. Classes will be
held at the Gold Meir Center. For
further information, please call
461-0222.
YIDDISH FILM SERIES
January 6:
Place: Safety Harbor Spa
Cost: $3.50 at door; $9 series
The Bent Tree Made in the
U.S.A. 1980 Color.
A popular Yiddish Folksong
Itzik Manger's "Afn veg shteyt a
boym" tells of a child's
longing and a mother's respon-
sibilities. As the song is sung in
Yiddish and repeated in English,
it is represented visually in the
flowing shapes and colors of sand
animation.
Yiddish: The Mame Loshun
1980 Color (In English)
A documentary reflection on
the strength and richness of the
Yiddish language; the literature,
theatre, and the values for which
Yiddish has served as a medium,
and the prospects for the survival
of Yiddish in today's world.
Among those offering their
thoughts are author Leo Rosten,
comedian David Steinberg, actor
Herschel Bernardi, linguist
Joshua Fishman, and editor
Simon Weber. Made for public
television, this film received the
Los Angeles Emmy Award for
"Best Informational Special."
Important Seminar Sunday,
January 13.
The librarians and volunteers
at the Golda Meir Center are
planning the second program in
this year's CIRFF series to be
held on Sunday, Jan. 13, entitled
"The Aging Process Challenge
and Opportunity."
Dr. Sue V. Saxon, professor of
gerontology at the University of
South Florida, Tampa, will
keynote the seminar with a
discussion of the psychological
aspects of aging. Dr. Saxon is a
very dynamic speaker and will
set an exciting tone for the day's
program.
*
If fc
Robert Marinoff leads "Rock of
Ages."
A "mini-lunch" will follow,
after which there will be a panel
discussion covering the biological
and psycho-social problems
facing the elderly. Dr. Saxon will
moderate the panel and will be
joined by Dr. Jan S. Hirschfield,
gastro-enterologist, and Dr.
Robert L. Davis, gerontologist.
There will be questions from the
audience following the speakers'
presentations.
Dr. Hirschfield works with the
elderly and lectures on nutrition
and health. Dr. Davis has been
involved for over four decades in
teaching and research in many
aspects of the quality of life.
11 a.m. Keynote and
Introduction
Noon Mini-Lunch
12:45-2 p.m. Panel
Discussion
Lunch: $2 per person. For
reservations call 536-7309
Anna Kletzel lights the Menorah.
(Rosalie), 536-0890 (Rivian) or
536-6195 (Ann).
BOOKMARK
Readers wanted at the
Golda Meir Center Library.
Reward: pleasure in reading such
new books as: Illusions of Love
by Cynthia Freeman and Love
and War by John Jakes (sequel
to North and South), an epic
which spans the five fiery years
of the Civil War. These two books
will be developed into a major
television mini series.
Strong Medicine by Arthur
Hailey is the story of a strong
woman whose career involves her
in the facscinating business of
pharmaceuticals.
Added bonus The New York
Times Book Magazine a
weekly publciation is available in
the library for reference use.
ONCE IN A LIFETIME
33 Day Cruise Tour Files Out Mirch 4th to Haifa For a Week's Stay
Before 24 Day S.S. Rotterdam Return Cruise To Florida. Reg. N/A
CELEBRATE PASSOVER WEEK
Cruising on board the "Amerikanls" out of San Juan, Departing
April 1. Enjoy traditional dinners especially prepared for the 1st &
2nd nlte of Passover. Participate In the delightfully conducted
Seders. As low as $699 p.p. plus tax incl. 2 lowers, & R/T Air to
San Juan. Reg. Panama
HONG KONG 14 DAY PACKAGE $1599
Daily departures Including airfare, New World Hotel, 13 meals, sight-
seeing and transfers. Inquire stopovers West Coast, Honolulu and
Tokyo. "Kosher" Meals also available.
ATTENTION ALL FUND RAISERS
& GROUP ORGANIZERS
WE SOLICIT YOUR REQUESTS, REST ASSURED YOUR GROUP WILL
TRAVEL WITH COMFORT, QUALITY & CONFIDENCE.
19 DAY HIGH HOLY DAY CRUISE TOUR
Depart Sept. 11 Return Sept. 29, Celebrate & Observe the 1985
Holidays Aboard the Royal Viking Sky visiting Greece, Black Sea.
Turkey, Yugoslavia, & Italy. As Low as $3352 p.p. Reg. Norway.
OFFICIAL TRAVEL CENTER
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<%BP
Boston
University
Ben-Gurion
University
oftheNegev
Israel
Master of Science In Management
Full time degree studies in Israel
One Year Program Taught in English
Joint Degree Full Campus Facilities
Mail Inquiry to:
Director, MSM Program in Israel
Boston University Metropolitan College
755 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
Tel (617) 353-2987
Please send information
about (he MSM program
in Israel
Tetcphmc
Boston I'niveTSity is an Equal Opportunity Institution
i




Congregations/Organizations Events
CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
GULFPORT
The Sisterhood will hold its
monthly membership meeting on
Tuesday, Jan. 8, at 1 pm.
There will be an address by
Mrs. Patricia Broad, director of
the St. Petersburg Public Li-
brary. She will speak about some
of the marvelous contributions
from Jewish authors and
musicians, which she considers to
' be among the most precious gifts
that have passed from generation
to generation.
Members and guests are in-
vited for the program starting at
1:45 p.m. Refreshments will be
served.
The Men's Club will hold its
monthly breakfast at the syna-
gogue social hall on Sunday, Jan.
6, at 10 a.m. The speaker will be
announced at a later date. A
donation of $2 per person can be
made at the door.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
ST. PETERSBURG
Mitzvah Men's Club: With a
membership of over 100, the
Mitzvah Men's Club is in full
swing. A general membership
meeting was held in November
where there was much discussion
on the many future activities:
three more brunches January,
February and our famous
"Mother's Day" brunch; the
Chanukah Block Party (which
was a tremendous success) and
Mep's Club Shabbat (coming up
in March).
The next brunch will be Sun-
day morning, Jan. 27, with the
guest speaker, Rabbi Jacob
Luski, whose topic will be "The
Separation of Church Syna-
gogue and State." Call the syna-
gogue office for reservations at
381-4900.
Representatives of the Mit-
zvah Men's Club will be attend-
ing Regional Meetings of the
National Federation of Men's
Clubs. The first will be at Con-
gregation Beth Shalom in Clear-
water on Sunday, Jan. 6. The
second will be in the Jewish
Center in Lehigh Acres near Ft.
Meyers, on Sunday, Jan. 13. Vice
president of the Federation's
Region, Phil Redisch, will lead
the group. Abe Mellitz and Cal
Goldstein are Regional Board
members.
Filmester to begin. The Adult
Studies Commission of Con-
gregation B'nai Israel is proud to
announce a series of films for
January. Dr. Robert Steinberg,
Adult Studies Commission chair-
man, urges attendance by
members and non-members alike.
The Theme is "Jews Around The
World" and the schedule is as
follows:
Wednesday, Jan. 9 8 p.m.,
"The Arab Jews" and "The
Dhimmis" (to be a Jew in an
Arab land)
Wednesday, Jan. 16 no film
Reguesh Concert!!!
Wednesday, Jan. 238 p.m.,
"The Spark" (Hasidim) and "The
Last Journey" (Soviet Jewry)
Wednesday, Jan. 30, 8 p.m.,
"The Falashas" (a study of a
people who trace their lineage to
the son of King Solomon) and
"The Samaritans" (a study of a
people who consider themselves
Hebrews, not Jews)
This fascinating film series of
Jews around the world is one you
won't want to miss. Admission is
$3 per evening or $6 for the series
(member), or S3 per evening or $8
for the series (non-member). All
films to start at 8 p.m. promptly
in the congregation's Teen Room.
For further information call the
synagogue at 381-4900.
Singles Shabbat. The next
Singles Shabbat will be held on
Friday, Jan. 11, at 8 p.m. at Con-
gregation Beth Shalom, 1325
Belcher, Clearwater. This series
of Singles Shabbat services is
sponsored by the Pinellas County
Board of Rabbis, with the cood-
JAY MERMELSTEIN, M.D.
PROUDLY ANNOUNCES THE ESTABLISHMENT OF HIS OFFICE
TO BE IN ASSOCIATION WITH
RAYMOND E. P. ZIMMERMAN. M.D.
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
FAMILY MEDICINE
800 TARPON WOODS BOULEVARD
SUITE A-2
PALM HARBOR. FLORIDA 33963
TELEPHONE
(BI3) 783-6779
OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT
home care amer^ba
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For a FREE consultation by our Director of Nursing
eration of the synagogues of
Pinellas County.
On Jan. 16 Congregation B'nai
Israel will present the Conjunto
Reguesh Israeli folklore ensemble
of Buenes Aires, Argentina, con-
sisting of 45 musicians and
dancers. This outstanding dance
group is currently on an extended
tour of the United States. Re-
guesh was considered to be the
"Revelation of 1983" in the
Carmel International Israeli folk-
lore festival in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Admission is $10 for adults (18
and over) and $5 for children (17
and under). Call the synagogue
office for further ticket informa-
tion 381-4900.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El Sisterhood be-
gins 1985 with an outstanding
program at its monthly luncheon
meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 2,
at 12:30 p.m.
Gabe Cazares, former mayor of
Clearwater and former county
commissioner, will speak on
"Cults in our Society." His in-
depth discussion will cover a
subject of vital importance in our
present society. Reservations
must be made by Dec. 31. Dona-
tion is $4. Please call Anne
Rubinstein, 546-6726; Gussie
Coltun, 360-5687; Fannie Sills,
360-1291.
The next board meeting of the
Brotherhood of Temple Beth El
will be held Wednesday, Jan. 3,
at 7:30 p.m. in room 5. All
Brotherhood members are
cordially invited to the meeting.
Edward Vinocur, executive di-
rector of Menorah Manor, St.
Petersburg, will be guest speaker
at the Sunday breakfast of the
Brotherhood of Temple Beth-El,
Sunday morning, Jan. 13,10 a.m.
Donation for the breakfast is
$3 per person. No reservations
are necessary and everyone is in-
vited.
to have Bared for the'Adult
Education Program. She will
speak at Shabbat Services on
-Global Insights." At special
Havdalah service and buffet she
will discuss "The Holocaust, Is It
a Dead Issue?" At the Sunday
morning Brotherhood breakfast,
Barad will give a "Human Rights
Update."
All are welcome to attend but
reservations are necessary for the
Hav dalah buffet and the
Brotherhood breakfast. For res-
ervations for the buffet call 392-
3243, and for the breakfast call
442-3462.
At its next monthly meeting,
Jan. 8, Sisterhood will have as
its special guests Rabbi and Mrs.
Samuel Silver. They will enter-
tain with a program entitled
Jewish Music is Not Sad. For
luncheon reservations, call 796-
7429 by Jan. 3. Donation is $3.
SUNCOAST JEWISH
COMMUNITY CLUB
The Suncoast Jewish Commu-
nity Club meets every Wednes-
day afternoon from 1 to 4 in the
Social Hall of Congregation Beth
Shalom, 1325 South Belcher Rd.,
Clearwater.
Bridge, Mah Jongg, occasional
theatre parties and luncheon
outings are held.
New members and visitors
welcome.
GOLDA MEIR
FRIENDSHIP CLUB
There will be a New Year's
party on Dec. 31 at 1 p.m. with
music, punch and hors d'oeuvres.
There will be an important
business meeting on Jan. 7.
On Jan. 14 there will be a social
with cards and games.
The Golda Meir Friendship
Club paid-up membership dinner
will be held on Jan. 28 at the
Golda Meir Center, 302 S. Jupiter
Ave., Clearwater. The dinner,
which will cost $2.50 per person,
will begin at 5:30 p.m. For
reservations, call Lil Gross, 398-
1900 or Florence Shevelenco, 797-
1372. Reservations must be made
by Jan. 13.
HADASSAH
Aviva Group
Aviva Group of Hadassah will
hold a meeting on Jan. 9, at 8
p.m. at the home of Mary Lou
Goldstein, 5900 Shore Blvd.
South, Town Shores, Embassy
Bldg. No. 205.
Linda Gail Grau will review
"The Haj" by Leon Uris and "If
I Forget Thee" by Brenda Segel.
Both books deal with our fight
for the land one in modern day
Israel, one in second-century
Palestine.
There will be a board meeting
at 6:30 p.m. preceding the
general meeting.
Rhonda Barad
aearwBHr^
North PinelUg
Chapters
The Clearwater ann
Pinellas Chapters are nL
luncheon, "Hadassah q^
Las Vegas program, anHfl1
show featuring clothes f7!i
Hadassah Retail Shop M
held at the City Hall An" "fj
Missouri Ave., Clear*.^.
11:30 a.m., on Jan. 9. ffil
three fiUedS and HGrSS1
Books, or $6. For rSS
call Betty, 393-8486 or Gn
2004. tVm
WORKMAN'8(
The Southern Region of W
men's Circle, America's old
and largest Jewish cultural,
fraternal organization, arum,
a charter celebration fotj
newest branch, No. 1053
meets each month at the I
Meir Community Cent"
Clearwater.
Joseph Jacobs, Southern I
gion chairman from Atlantic
will be the installing officer,
Sunny Landsman, Yid4
anthologist from Ft. Laud
will present a program on
Joy of Yiddish. Member!
guests will celebrate at t n,
luncheon, Jan. 6 at the Easts
Country Club in Largo. All iq
ested persons may call LI.
Brescia (577-3105) or fl
Schoenbaum (725-43631 for!
ervations and more informatioil
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF I
CHRISTIANS AND JEWS |
Can you imagine being
prisoned for possession of i
gious literature, or for organi-
children in church? Thousanil
Baptists, Lutherans, Jr.
Orthodox and other .,
people are behind bars in L
Bloc and other nations for L
and other "crimes against i
State."
You can help! Join
Letters, sponsored by
National Conference of
tians and Jews, Bay
Chapter. We will supply youi
names of persecuted people I
faith, as well as guidelinesout
most effective ways to
behind the Iron Curtain.
Call the NCCJ today
2721), or pick up a St. Peten
Evening Independent whidi|
publishing the Lifeline
project in December.
In a direct and personali
you can contribute to son
else's freedom and faith.
CANDLELIGHTING
JANUARY
45:31p.m.
11 5:36 p.m.
18-5:42 p.m.
25-5:48 p.m.
Oil) only SaAvicsi&Qafdnq
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
CLEARWATER
Rhonda Barad Comes To
Temple B'nai Israel
Rhonda Barad, director of
community relations for the
Simon Wiesenthal Center in New
York, will be the Gom Visiting
Scholar the weekend of Jan. 11
through Jan. 13 at Temple B'nai
Israel in Clearwater. Barad is a
graduate of Stern College for
Women of Yeshiva University
and has a master's degree from
New York University School of
Public Administration.
Barad coordinated the first
Simon Wiesenthal Humanitarian
Laureate Dinner honoring United
States Ambassador to the United
Nations Jeane J. Kilpatrick. She
also chaired the fundraising
campaign for the Stallone Fund
for Autism Research. Prior to
joining the Wiesenthal Center,
Ms. Bared coordinated the
Jewish Heritage Week Program
for the New York City School
System. She is a member of the
Association of Outstanding
Young Professional Women of
America.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL Reform
400 8. Pasadena Ave.. 81 Petersburg 33707 Rnbbl Dnvld 9u"Ul,d1'lj|,l
Irm 8. Youdovln
Morning Sabbath Service
34?.SIM.
Friday Evening Sabbath Services 8 P-"" *""T
lervlce 10 a.m. Bar Bat Mluvsh Service 11 *
Congregation BETH 8HOLOM Conservative
1844
Sabbath Services: Friday evening at 8 p
343-3404.
CongregationB'NAI I8RAEL-ConservaUve
Ml 8* St.. N., 8t. P
Zummer Sabbath Service: Friday evening 8 p.m. ""S'iitl
Sunday t a.m.; Monday-Friday 8 s-m.; and evening Mlayan T*.
381 4M1.
54 St.. S.. St. Petersburg 38707 a Rabbi Emeritus MorrU Ko"**, j
athServices: Friday evening at 8 p.m.: Saturday. 8a.m l
RAEL-Conservative 1
rsburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Luski C""",^
Service: Fridav evening 8 p.m. Saturday. .. I
Congregation BETH CHAI Cons
8400 ItS St. N.. SemlBole NH1
trvatlve
. Rabbi Sherman P. **
Services: Friday evenlngsS p.m.; Saturday, :30a.m.
slat,*****
Congregation BETH SHALOM Conservative
13U S. Belcher Rd.. Clearwater Mlt Rabbi Kenneth B'a^mtm\
bath Services: Friday evening p.m.; Saturday a.m.
Mln.vantla.ra. s Tel. S81 1418.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL term |
108S 8. Belcher Rd., Clearwaler MM e Rabbi Arthur BmOT"^,
Services: Friday evenlngat 8 p.m.: Saturday 10:Ma.m. s I
TEMPLE AHA VAT SHALOM Re fo rm ,,
P.O. BOI11741, Dunedln 3SSX8 1818Curlew Rd., Fnlm**!?SSs>
JanBresky s Sabbath Service.: rrlday evening8 p-m. s Tol's
Congregation BET FnTFT llianlilli
M70 Nonary Rd., Clearwaler e Service: 1st Friday of every
e Tel. SOt-4731 or 707-MM.
mo*'H


CC News
LOOK WHO'S
COMING TO CAMP
uly smart early-birders who
d up for Camp Kadima 1986
|ude: Randy Moss, Dori Moss,
. Tabb, Shawn Tabb, Ricky
oner, Brian Kanner, Rachel
11, Amy Geffon, Jesse Geffon,
.dsay Geffon, Yona Benstock,
[YaelBenstock.
ye would like your name in-
ded on this list next monthl
CAMP KADIMA
1985 UPDATE
dany of you have already re-
yed your Camp Kadima
chure. If your copy did not
Ive, contact Deny at the JCC
B44-5795 ~ to arrange to have
[mailed to you.
fhis year's early bird specially
uced fees are good only until
\. 31, 1985. Do not be disap-
oted by not signing up by this
and receiving this substan-
savings, in some instances
S100 off the regular summer
s. For further information,
bm- call assistant camp direc-
Sherry Armstrong at the
ISRAELI TRIP
(BENEFIT POSTPONED
chairman Morty Poll an-
|nced that the Israeli trip
efit drawing was being post-
led until Sunday, March 3.
Irandeis university
inational women's
committee
i Saturday, Jan. 5, 8 p.m. in
|Grand Ballroom of the Uni-
lity of Tampa, 401 W. Ken-
' Blvd., Tampa, the Tampa
and Suncoast Chapters of
pdeis University National
jien's Committee will present
J. Robert Greenberg of Bran-
| University department of
^>sophy who will speak on
Media as the New Philo-
Hers."
imission charge will be $3.50
[person and includes dessert
[coffee. For reservations call
aa Langenthal, 796-7429 or
Zunder at 797-7029.
karting with Jan. 9 and con-
ing on the second Wednesday
Tie months of February and
ch will be Adventures in Art.
will meet at the Largo Li-
on East Bay Drive, Largo,
|0 a.m. The first meeting will
lecture and slide presen-
pn by Fran Parsons, docent of
[St. Petersburg Museum of
Arts. The subject will be
bmen as Depicted by 20th
lury Artists."
winning on Jan. 10 and con-
ling for a total of four con-
llive Thursdays from 10-12
lbe Antique Alley conducted
Brace Pawlan 595-0561 and
Bey Fisher 392-8715. The
lings will be held at the home
Jhirley Fischer, 8299139th
Eeminole.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
& Grundwog
llfC
LOCAL & OUT-Of-STATE
ARRANGEMENTS
|WWWMW OHTII00OK
0A8YH. *
SNMK J. WUNDWM
uom mm* mom
[The only firm dedicated
i serving Jewish families
exclusively...
Fred Margolis,
Executive Director
Charles W. Ehrlich,
President
The drawing will take place at the
JCC's annual Purim carnival to
be held from 1-3 p.m.
Mr. Poll announced that many
winter visitors who wanted to be
part of this event would not
arrive in St. Petersburg in time
for the drawing. Many com-
munity members also requested
that the drawing be postponed
due to so many other events
occuring on the scheduled dates
such as boat rides, open houses,
Chanukah party and walk-a-thon.
Mr. Poll advises all ticket
holders to hold onto their tickets
and mark their calendars for the
new drawing date of Sunday,
March 3. Tickets can be pur-
chased at the JCC office up to
that date. For further informa-
tion contact Pat Broden at 344-
5795.
WALK-A-THON
PARTICIPANTS
GIVE THEIR ALL
Chairman Morty Poll reports
that this year's annual Walk-A-
Thon was a rousing success. Our
participants walked, jogged and
ran a combined total of 392 laps
which is over 49 miles!
Prizes were awarded to the fol-
lowing participants:
Children: Michael Cohn,
Kelly Reichle, Rachel Poll
Women Emma Grossman,
Edith Ellman, Dr. Zelda Ullman
Men Lome Sokol, Abe Mel-
litz, Harry Ellman and Jack
Cohen
Our youngest participant was
six years old and our oldest par-
ticipant was 90! Participants
walked from between five to a
winning 85 laps around our JCC
track. All proceeds from this
event go towards providing
scholarships for needy children to
attend Camp Kadima.
Poll especially thanks sponsors
and donors for making this event
so successful and enabling us to
help so many children this
summer.
Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County Page 7
JCC WELCOMES
NEW CHILDREN'S
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County is pleased to
announce the addition to our pro-
fessional staff of Mrs. Debra
Vinochui as the new children's
program duector.
Among Debbie's duties will be
the planning and supervision of
all children's programs including
playgroup, before-after school
program, mini camps, holiday
programs. She will act as Camp
Kadima coordinator, and she will
also provide programming
support in community programs
and senior activities.
Debbie is originally from
Columbus, Ohio, and earned her
BA in education at Kent State
University. She was recently
married (October 21, 1984) to Ed
Vinochur, the new executive
director of Menorah Manor.
Debbie has an extensive back-
ground in the area of childhood
education and gerontology with
special interest in the area of
handicapped services and reha-
bilitation.
We welcome Debbie to our
community and staff.
CHANUKAH PARTY
ENJOYED BY ALL
The entire community came
together at the JCC on Sunday,
d 16 to celebrate Chanukah
with family and friends. Over 150
persons from Clearwater, St-
Petersburg, Largo, Gulfport,
Seminole and the Beaches joined
forces.
Refreshments were truly en-
joyed by all and included deli-
cious latkes with sour cream and
applesauce, prepared by tne
JCC's special chef, Joseph
CharL, and gelt which was
J handed out to everyone by
executive director Fred Margolis.
Special guest was Rabbi Morris
Kobernitz who gave an informa-
tive and entertaining talk con-
cerning Chanukah.
Everyone ended the afternoon
with a feeling of celebration and
warmth in the true tradition of
Chanukah.
PLAYGROUP GIVES
MENORAHS WITH
THE TRUE SPIRIT
OF CHANUKAH
The members enrolled in our
playgroup reached out to the par-
ticipants of congregate kosher
dining recently when they pre-
sented Menorah "Center Pieces"
and art work to brighten the
dining room.
The children worked hard in
preparing the decorations not
only for their older friends, but to
decorate their homes for
Chanukah. Our little persons also
learned the story of Chanukah,
how to play dreidal, and many
Chanukah songs.
Spaces are still available for
children interested in partic-
ipating in playgroup. For further
information call Debbie at 344-
5795.
CONVERSATIONAL
HEBREW CLASS
TO BE OFFERED
We have the space, we have the
teacher, we have the dates, now
all we need are students.
The JCC will be offering a class
in beginning conversational
Hebrew in January. Depending
on the wishes of the students,
this class will be scheduled for
either the morning or evening.
We need five students to begin
and already have three we
know there are two more commu-
nity members in our area who
would enjoy learning this beauti-
ful language or who need to brush
up a bit.
For more information, contact
Sherry today at 344-5795.
SENIOR FRIENDSHIP
CLUB NEWS
The Senior Friendship Club re-
minds everyone that the deadline
for getting tickets and making
reservations for the SFC's annual
New Year's Day dinner-dance is
approaching. This gala event will
be held at the JCC on Tuesday,
Jan. 1 with doors opening at 5:30
p.m., dinner beginning at 6 p.m.
and dancing to a band following
until ?? BYOB, set ups will be
available. Tickets are on sale
now. prices are $12 for members,
$14 for guests. For information or
reservations contact Max
Neuman at 823-6447 or Irving
SUverman at 821-6483.
AFTER SCHOOL NEWS
Many of the children enrolled
in our before-after school
program participated in a pre-
sentation at the Fountain Inn
Nursing Home in St. Petersburg.
The theme of their presentation
was Chanukah. The residents and
staff received this program most
enthusiastically and many noted
that the children had helped them
understand the meaning of
Chanukah and how it is cele-
brated. Mazel Tov, after-school
children, for bringing a smile and
a bit of cheer to these elderly
people.
The children have been busy
working on Chanukah deco-
rations not only to take home but
to decorate the center with. Our
main hall looks beautiful thanks
to the colorful and huge menorah
the children made out of con-
struction paper chains you
owe it to yourself to come by and
view this masterpiece.
Spaces are still available for
children ages five through 15 who
are interested in enrolling in this
program. Hours are from 7-9 a.m.
and then from 12:30-6 p.m.
Transportation can be provided
by the JCC and scholarships are
available from Latchkey Services
for children and for handicapped
children from the Juvenile Wel-
fare Board. For further informa-
tion please contact the children's
program director at 344-6796.
NEW YEAR'S EVE
CHILDREN'S
OVERNIGHT PARTY
We have only a few available
spaces left for children to partic-
ipate in this exciting program.
Children may come as early as
4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 31 with
their sleeping bag, PJ's and
toothbrush. Activities include
dinner and video games at Chuck
E. Cheese, movies and popcorn
back at the JCC and then our
own New Year's Eve party before
going to bed for the last time in
19841 Breakfast will be served the
next morning before beginning a
full morning of fun activities.
Call Sherry Armstrong, 344-
5795, if you are interested in your
child participating in this
program. Enjoy yourself New
Year's Eve without worrying
about your children's health and
safety.
CALLING ALL
TEEN-AGERS
The JCC is looking for boys
and girls ages eight through 18
who would like to share the fun of
Super Sunday by serving as
volunteers at either the JCC or
Superior Surgical in Seminole.
Super Sunday is scheduled for
Sunday, Jan. 27 and volunteers
are needed from the hours of 9:30
a.m. until 8:30 p.m. Most volun-
teers sign up for two and a half
hour shifts.
Among the duties our young
volunteers will be involved with
are: helping serve refreshments
to workers, picking up telephone
cards and bringing to main
check-in stations, greeting volun-
teers at the door, blowing up
balloons and having lots of fun.
If you would like to be part of
Super Sunday and help out not
only your community but Israel,
too, please contact Sherry at the
JCC today.
CAMP KADIMA REUNION
OFFERS LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
Calling all Camp Kadima
alumni we need you all for our
annual Camp Kadima reunion on
Sunday, Jan. 6 from 1 until 3
p.m.
Besides seeing all your old
friends and counselors from years
gone by, we will be offering the
best in entertainment the
state's best Michael Jackson
complete' with limousine, body
guards, and a real, live show.
"Michael" will be doing his own
singing and will be staying for an
ahour after his performance to
talk with you, help you learn
those tricky Jackson dance steps
and provide each of you with an
autographed photograph. We will
also be making ice cream sun-
daes, too.
Cost will be $1 for campers, $2
for parents and anyone who is
signed up before or on that day
for Camp Kadima 1985 will get in
for free! Don't forget, this is one
of the last chances to sign up for
the early bird fees higher fees
go into effect Jan. 31.
PLAYGROUP
IS EXPANDING .. .
AND YOU'RE INVITED!
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County, 8167 Elbow
Lane North, is forming a new
Early Childhood playgroup.
Playgroup will begin Monday,
Jan. 14 and is available Monday
through Friday, two through five
days a week. Participants in the
full day playgroup will also par-
ticipate in "Lunch Bunch" at 12
noon and must bring a dairy
meal. The morning snack is pro-
vided.
For further information call the
Jewish Community Center, chil-
dren's program coordinator, at
344-5795.
CHILDREN LEARN
ART OF CERAMICS
As the days of celebration ap-
proached, the children in our
before and after school program
were busy brainstorming ideas
for gifts to give to their family
and friends. What better gift,
they said, than one from then-
hearts made by hand!
These talented children
designed and created pots, ash-
trays, candlestick holders, and
many other pieces of art in
ceramics.
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter's ceramics class is offered to
the entire community on
Wednesdays between 4 and 5
p.m. The class is taught by Mari-
lynn Diehl, a professional
ceramics instructor.
1
There's so little
time now.
I wish
we had
taken
the time
then.\
*m
For many people, the first moment they think about a
funeral and its related costs is when they have to. But by
then, they may be neither emotionally nor financially
equipped to deal with the situation.
To eliminate this problem, more and more families
arc coming to us today for information on pre-arranged
funerals and pre paid plans. One such monetary plan is
called a funeral trust agreement, by which the money
allocated in trust, which is deposited in an insured
financial institution, still belongs to you and may be
withdrawn at any time.
Feel free to ask us for the facts on funeral planning
prior to need, available now without cost or obligation.
DAVID C. GROSS
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTOR
CENTRAL AVENUE CHAPEL
6386 CENTRAL AVENUE
ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33707
(13) M1-4I11
NINTH AVENUE CHAPEL
1045 NINTH AVENUE NORTH
ST. PETERSBURG, FL 33706
(813) 822 2024


r-Mtru >
| .,._---
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of Pinellaa County / Friday, December 28,1984
NOOTHB*
COUNTRYOI
IN/WKE
THISOFFffi.
JERUSALEM. FOR 6 D>4YS.
Or Tel Aviv. Choose one. Only Israel offers the timelessness of
Jerusalem. And the pulsating excitement of Tel Aviv. But you must
flv now. An offer this good won't last forever.
Until Februarv 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives sou its
"Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. lockage price includes
round trip airfare from Miami, six days/five nights in a first class
hotel, including breakfast and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five days.
And El Al is the onlv airline that flies direct from Miami to Tel Aviv.
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra S100, the
deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hilton.
You can alvvavs add extra davs. (Package not available 1214-84 thru
1/5/85.)
HIT aALGMES YOU EHAI
Just Sill and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv
to the beautiful Red Sea resort of Eilat.
Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. We also
include two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
nental breakfast. Plus a complimentary drink on arrival. This spe-
cial package is available thai March 15,1985. (Not available 12QI|
thai 15 85.) The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available tor $144
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thai March 15,1985. Now the airline of
Israel flies vou round trio from Tel Aviv to Cairn to spend three!
ulous davs in Egypt at the beautiful Ramses Hilton. All for only
This package also includes being met at the airport by tng
speaking representatives and transfer to and from the Ramses.
Now vou can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
Only Israel and El Al can make these offers, but only for a
limited time. Don't miss out, call today
For more information call vour travel agent or El Al toll free at
1-800-223-6700.
For a free, detailed color bnxrhure on our packages, write El A
Israel Airlines, Tour Brochure. PO. Box 10777, Long Island Ut
New York 11101.
Name_____________________________________
Address .
Citv____
Suite.
-Zip
ELZIMJ7
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"n,.k
L
The airline of Israel.
r.fckj.. pn.. isjm^..j
i adpMlWr.a>lS k.)H* Cmi *>.I %.<***&-*****
"N*W''l">*i

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