The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00100

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
& Jewish floriJi&n
Volume 5-Number 2
Of Pinellas County
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, January 27,1984
frtd SKochtl
Price 35 Cents
LATE PRESIDENT ANWAR SADAT
Suez Waters
Never Did Become
'Lake of Egyptian Blood'
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO (JTA) -
Nearly a decade has passed
since the cities of Egypt's
Suez Canal zone saw fight-
ing, but reminders of the six
years of hostilities that once
turned them into virtual
ghost towns are still ap-
parent.
Half-demolished buildings
peering through the rows of
beach white villas that now line
the waterway in Suez, tax the
imagination with suggestions of
a time when this resort area was a
battle /one and the banks of its
placid waters a mass of mine-
fields.
Just a swim's distance across
the canal are yet more poignant
reminders of those years, and a
collective monument to what has
.become one of the greatest
sources of national pride in
contemporary Egypt the sur-
prise attack against Israeli forces
on Yom Kippur in October. 1973.
MARKING the battlefront
today are the scattered remains
f lhe Harlev Line a mammoth
array of Israeli fortifications that
toed the east bank of the canal
from the Mediterranean Sea in
the north, down to the canal's
outlet uithe Gulf of Suez.
It was a spot on this site,
*here some of the old bunkers are
still relatively intact, that a
Prop of students from Cairo
University's Commerce College
recently paused after taking a
detour on a oneday organized
excursion to Suez.
The driver had swung off the
main road, some 17 miles north of
the canal town, into a tunnel built
ty the late President Anwar
Sadat as a symbolic linkage bet*
*een the Egyptian mainland and
'Pacesetters' Luncheon Monday
The 9th annual "Pacesetters" Luncheon will be held Monday,
January 30 t the Belleair Beach home of Sam and Judy Winer,
according to "Pacesetters" Co-Chairpersons Jackie Jacobs and
Edie Seligman. Israeli Dora Roth will be the guest speaker.
The Luncheon is open to all contributors of tl.000 or more to
the 1984 Women's Division campaign. Last-minute reservations
can be made by calling the Federation office at 446-1033.
Bule and White Ball Fever
The Pinellas County Jewish
community is eagerly awaiting
one of the most important events
of the annual Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign.
The Fourth Annual Blue and
White Ball will be held Sunday
evening, Feb. 5. in the great room
of Ruth Eckerd Hall in Clear-
water. It is open to all contribut-
ors (and their spouses) of $1,000
or more to the campaign. Sen.
Howard Metzenbaum is keynote
speaker.
Maureen and Stan Rose water
are Chairpersons of the Ball.
They are being assisted by
Bonnie Rubin (Invitations),
Sandy Freeman and Toni Kindt-
(Table Decorations), Sherry Sch-
wartz and Helene Saskin (Dinner
Arrangements), and dozens of
volunteers on various committees
involved with the Ball.
Mrs. Rosewater commented
"We are doing everything pos-
sible to guarantee everyone
Maureen and Stan Rosewater
present an elegant and inspiring
evening. We want to build on the
success of previous Blue and
White Balls, and continue the
tradition of having the Ball, a
major social event in our Jewish
community."
Stan Newmark, 1984 Cam-
paign Chairman, said "Attend-
ance at the Blue and White Ball
is a reinforcement of ones' Jewish
responsibility. Every one of us
who is able to make a campaign
gift of II,000 should be there."
The Ball will feature cocktails,
dinner, under Rabbinical super-
vision, and dancing to the music
of Bob and Annette.
Senator Metzenbaum (D.-
Ohio) is one of Israel's staunchest
supporters in the United States
Senate, as well as a consume.
protection advocate. He was
active in Cleveland Jewish
Federation where he was Chair-
man of the Community Relations
Committee. He was elected to the
Senate in 1976.
the territory restored to it by Is-
rael in accordance with the peace
treaty of 1979.
CLIMBING DOWN from the
bus, some five miles inland from
the tunnel's exit, the students
found themselves opposite a low
but imposing fortress with a
large gun barrel peering out the
entrance. It carried the weight of
thick concrete blocks and metal
slabs that had fallen from the
roof.
Layers of rock-filled net sacks
covered what remained of the
bunker, and a maze of trenches
leading to and around a line of
similar bunkers appeared from a
distance to be part of a neat
geometrical design that bordered
the surface of the desert.
The fortifications erected bv
the Israelis in response to per-
sistent shelling and commando
raids by Egypt following the
June. 1967 Six-Day War and the
resulting occupation of the Sinai
were, together with the
soldiers who manned them, the
prime target of the late President
Gamal Abdel Nasser's war of At-
trition, launched in March. 1969.
Some half a million residents
were evacuated from the canal
towns of Port Said, Ismailia and
Suez in preparation for the ex-
pected reprisals.
BY MAY, Nasser claimed he
had destroyed 60 percent of the
Barlev Line. Casualties were
heavy and the fortifications
themselves did indeed take a
beating. But the massive artillery
bombardment of the Israeli posi-
tions across the waterway, and
the repeated Egyptian raids into
the east bank, succeeded more
conspicuously in bringing the
canal zone cities, as well as
targets deep within Egyptian
Continued on Page 4
Reagan to Soviets:
Stop Shipping Hi-Tech Weapons to Mideast
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has urged the Soviet Union
to halt sending ords. He
also suggested that the
USSR could work with the
U.S. in easing regional ten-
sions such as those in the
Middle East.
Reagan's remarks were made
in a nationally televised speech in
which he urged the Soviet Union
to resume the dialogue on arms
control. The speech, which was
sent by satellite to Europe, came
two days before Secretary of
State George Shultz is scheduled
to meet Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko in Stockholm.
WHILE NOTING that arms
control is "the most visible area
of Soviet-U.S. dialogues, Reagan
added, "A durable peace requires
both of us to defuse tensions and
regional conflicts.
"Take the Middle East for
example,'' the President con-
tinued. "Everyone's interests
would be served by stability in
the region and our efforts are
directed toward that goal. The
Soviets could help reduce ten-
sions there instead of introducing
sophisticated weapons into the
area. This would certainly help us
to deal more positively with other
aspects of our relationship."
Earlier in his address, Reagan
accused the Soviets and their
surrogates of having "exploited"
local confilcts. "Fueling regional
conflicts and exporting violence
only exacerbates local tensions,
increases suffering and makes
solutions to real social and
economic problems more dif-
ficult." the President said.
'Further, such activity carries
with it the risk of larger confron-
tations."
THE PRESIDENT said it
would be better for the U.S. and
USSR to "work together" to help
find peaceful solutions to regional
problems. But he said that "the
gap in American and Soviet per-
ceptions and policy is so great
that our immediate objective
must be more modest. As a first
stec we should jointly examine
concrete actions we both can take
to reduce the risk of U.S.-Soviet
confrontation in these areas. And
if we succeed, we should be able
to move beyond this immediate
objective.
Efforts to Rescue Foundering
Economy Reported in Stalemate
Later, White House spokes-
man Larry Speakes said he could
not be specific but noted that the
Soviets.J'can be helpful in the
Middle East." He said there can
be a dialogue between the U.S.
and the Soviet Union on the
Middle East and the Soviets
"could use their influence," an
apparent reference to Syria.
Reagan mentioned human
rights as "another problem in our
relationship with the Soviet
Union. He said "Soviet practices
in this area, as much as any other
issue, have created the mistrust
and ill will that hangs over our
relationship."
REAGAN EXPRESSED his
"deep concern over prisoners of
conscience in the Soviet Union
and over the virtual halt; in the
emigration of Jews, Armenians
and others who wish to join their
families abroad.
"Our request is simple and
straightforward, that the Soviet
Union lives up to the obligations
it has freely assumed under
international covenants in
particular its commitment under
the Helsinki Accords. Experience
has shown that greater respect
for human rights can contribute
to progress in other areas of the
Soviet-American relationship."
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Stalemate is reported on
all fronts here in the gov-
ernment's urgent efforts to
rescue Israel s foundering
economy from impending
disaster.
Finance blister Yigal-Cohen
Orgad still sounds optimistic
that his austerity program will be
adopted and spoke of coopera-
tion. But the economic summit he
has been holding with leaders of
Histadrut and the Manufacturers
Association ended without agree-
ment. Its sole result was to
establish a joint committee to
study ways to encourage exports
and economic growth and
prevent unemployment.
THE MINISTERIAL
Economic Committee
scheduled to meet later to discuss
implementing the decision taken
last Friday to reduce government
expenditures by nine percent.
Each ministry has been asked to
submit a list of budget cuts
aimed at that goal
But Aharon Uzan of Tami who
is Minister of Labor and Welfare,
served notice in advance that his
ministry could not possibly
absorb the required cutbacks.
Defense Minister Moehe Arens is
also expected to fight cuts in the
defense establishment. Anns
told Voice of Israel Radio that
the proposed cuts would limit the
procurement of military equip-
ment and reduce manpower in the
armed services. But he said they
would not limit policy options in
Lebanon.


PsgeS
The Jewish Floridian ofPinelku County
******' JMMwy 2*1, H( I


Jewish Day School Wins Broad Appeal
The Pinedas County Jewish
Day School is reaching out to the
entire Jewish Community. The
growing support of the Jewish
Day School in the central and
northern sections of Pinellas
County is reflected in the school
enrollment. While 48 percent of
the school's total population
comes from St. Petersburg, 52
percent comes from central and
northern sections. The kinder-
garten class illustrates the
school's population shift drama-
tically. Over two thirds of the
kindergarten students live in
Seminole, Largo, Belleair Bluffs,
and Clear-water. Only 28 percent
of the kindergarten students
dwell in St. Petersburg.
The school has arranged van
transportation for students living
north of St. Petersburg through
the Jewish Community Center.
For the first time, the school has
two vans this year to provide
transportation to the growing
number of Jewish Day School
families living north of St.
Petersburg.
The membership of the Pinel-
las County Jewish Day School's
Board of Directors also reflects
the school's importance to a
growing number of north county
families. In 1982-83, fully 83
percent of the Board of Directors
lived in St. Petersburg. Currently
50 percent of the Board of Direc-
tors live north of St. Petersburg.
The Pinellas County Jewish
Day School will hold an informa-
tive Enrollment Tea at the school
on Sunday, Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m.
The school is located at 301 59th
St. North, St. Petersburg. Please
call the school office (381-8111). if
you would like to attend this
Enrollment Tea. An Enrollment
Tea was held in Clearwater last
December.
The Pinellas County Jewish
Day School is a beneficiary
agency of the Combined Jewish
Appeal of the Pinellas County
Jewish Federation.
Report Shows That The Lowest Number of Soviet Jews
In 20 Years Will Have Emigrated By Year's End
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry (GNYCSJl last
month announced that 1,307
Jews will have emigrated from
the Soviet Union by the end of
1983, the lowest number in 20
years.
At a press conference in the
Roosevelt Hotel. Assistant Sec-
retary of State for Human Rights
and Humanitarian Affairs Elliott
Abrams announced that as of
Dec. 22. only 1.284 Soviet Jews
were granted emigration visas.
Abrams pointed out that this
represents a drop of 98 percent
from 1979. when 51.320 Jews
were allowed to emigrate.
Herbert Kronish. GNYCSJ
chairman, projected the 1983
emigratioin total of 1.307 based
on the numbers released by
Abrams.
Abrams said that this "drastic
decline in Jewish emigration is
clearly the result of deliberate
Soviet policy and not the conse-
quence of a steep decline in appli-
cation's. There are hundreds of
thousands of Soviet Jews who
would leave the USSR if they
were free to emigrate. Yet Soviet
authorities now publicly proclaim
that the Jewish emigration
question has been solved, and
that there are no longer any
Jewsih refuseniks in the Soviet
Union."
Abrams pointed to alarming
reports of anti-Semitism in the
Soviet Union, stating: "The
Jewish community in the Soviet
Union was targeted for annihila-
tion by both the Nazis and Stalin.
For it now to be subjected to
renewed anti-Semitism, persecu-
tion and abuse is indeed an un-
mitigated act of evil and deserves
to be condemned as such."
Kronish. in releasing the
GNYCSJ status report entitled
"Soviet Jewry: The Realities in
1983," declared: "Not only have
the Soviets virtually barred its
doors preventing hundreds of
thousands of Jews from
emigrating, but under the leader-
ship of Andropov, they have pro-
ceeded to deal even more harshly
with the Soviet Jewish popula-
tion. At the current rate, the last
of the more than 400.000 Jews
now in the process of seeking to
leave the Soviet Union can expect
to see freedom three centuries
from now."
The Soviet Anti-Zionist
Committee, formed in 1983, "has
viciously mocked the hopes of
more than 20.000 refuseniks by-
announcing that almost all of the
Soviet Jews who wanted to leave
have left.' I have met with many-
Soviet Jewish refuseniks. some
who have been waiting to
emigrate for 10 or 15 years. This
claim of the Anti-Zionist
Committee is a blatant lie."
declared Kronish. as he held two
thick computer lists containing
the names of over 20,000 Jews
who have been officially denied
permission to leave the USSR.
According to the GNYCSJ, the
situation for Soviet Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience, of whom
there are currently 19, has
seriously deteriorated. Anatoly
Shcharansky. who began this
year on a hunger strike in
Chistopol Prison protesting his
total isolation from family and
friends, is suffering from a
serious heart problem which
Soviet-American relations may ^d7deUued"in^ern'al report on Eg? urgenl medical at-
benear the meeting would be sent tentK>n
"THE WJC has made clear, shortly to the entire leaders hip of His mother in Moscow received
during these as well as our other the WJC American Section. a letter from him this month in
which he described the chronic
Concern, Cooperation and Tzedukaha ,* &iT&l3n;
tention he has requested and
Bronfman Mum on Talks
With Soviet's Dobrynin
NEW YORK (JTA) discussions, that we expect an
Edgar Bronfman, president improvement in East-West rela
of the World Jewish Con-
gress, has met privately
with Soviet Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin at the
Soviet Embassy in Wash-
ington and had meetings
later with Secretary of State
George Shuitz at the State
Department and National
Security Adviser Robert
McFarlane at the White
House.
No details of these meetings
were disclosed. A WJC spokes-
man confirmed, however, that
East-West relations and the
latest Middle East developments
were discussed and suggested
that positive movement on
tions which is objectively
desirable should also have a
beneficial impact on the Soviet
Jewry question." the spokesman
said. He stressed however that
there should be no expectation
that a dramatic breakthrough is
imminent.
Bronfman and a small dele-
gation of Jewish leaders were
briefed by McFarlane during
their 90-minute meeting at the
White House, on current and
future policies of the Reagan
Administration in Lebanon,
general Middle East issues and
the state of Soviet-American
relations.
The WJC spokesman said Mc-
Farlane was "extraordinarily
forthcoming" in his remarks. He
Is The Name of the Game
thanks for thinking of and
Through the unselfish efforts providing for those less for-
of some of the local Jewish tunate. Bernice Bressler, Gulf
service and community organ- Coast Jewish Family Service,
izations. Thanksgiving. Inc. Social Worker expresses her
Hanukkah baskets and food appreciation to all those
market gift certificates have providers for their unsolicited
made it possible for Gulf Coast dedication to the precept of the
Jewish Family Service, Inc. to teachings of Judaism,
provide additional help to people
in need.
How can we adequately thank
The Abe Adar Jewish War
Veterans and Ladies Auxiliary?
How can we adequately thank
The Paul Surenky Jewish War
Veterans Post and Ladies Auxil-
iary? How can we adequately
thank the Girl Scouts, Troop No.
677? Without the individual and
collective help of these
organizations many of our Jewish
families in Pinellas County would
not have been able to enjoy the
holidays. To these dedicated and
caring people goes our heartfelt
there is reason to fear for his life
if he does not receive appropriate
medical care immediately. Alek-
sandar Paritsky, Feliks Kochu-
bievsky, and several other
Prisoners of Conscience are also
seriously ill. Paritsky, who has a
heart condition, and Kochubiev-
sky, who suffers from serious
kidney problems, are both in
almost constant pain.
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Know Your Federation
The Jewish Federation of PfaeOaa County is th central id.
dress of the organized Jewish community.
The Combined Jewish Appeal is the annual fundraisiog
campaign of Federation on behalf of Jewish needs here and
overseas. Contributions to the campaign are tax deductible
The United Jewish Appeal (UJA) is the chief beneficiary of
the campaign. Its agencies are:
United Israel Appeal (85 percent of UJ As funds) Supporu
humanitarian programs in Israel through the Jewish Agency
Maintains immigration and absorption centers, provide
housing., vocational training, schooling and social services to
immigrants.
Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Provides basic life-
supporting services to needy Jews in Eastern Europe, Asia and
North Africa Maintains programs in Israel for the aged and
handicapped Allocates funds to ORT for its worldwide
vocational training programs.
HIAS Aids Jewish immigrant8 in countries other than
Israel.
New York Association For New Americana (NYANA) -
Helps to resettle Jewish immigrants in the greater New York
area.
Iocal campaign beneficiaries include:
Jewish Community Center (JCC) Conducts a variety of
programs for children, adults and seniors Provides a setting
for senior citizen Kosher lunch programs. w
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Service Assists over a thousand
families in Pinellas and Pasco counties through counselling,
homomakor ser\ ices and geriatric programs.
Jewish Day School Offers a full-day general and Jewish
cducat ion to all Jewish children regardless of means.
Neighborly Senior Servicee Provides a multitude of ser-
vices to the elderly, including hot Kosher lunches to over a
hundred senior citizens.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Of Florida Offers religious, social and
cultural programs to Jewish students at Florida s major
rnntpuscfl
"The Jewish Floridian" The bi weekly newspaper of the
Pirn II.is Count} Jewish community.
Community Relations Committee (CRCl Represents the
.lew isli community on issues affecting Israel, Soviet Jewry and
.lew i*li people everywhere.
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STAFF INQUIRIES NOW


pnjay, January 87,1964
Tht Jewish Plmidian of Pine lias County
Page 3
Super Sunday
The Bells Were Ringing
One hundred and forty-three
I communities across the country
participated in Super Sunday,
the United Jewish Appeals
annual telephone marathon. Here
Pinellas County, over 260
I volunteers gathered at Superior
Surgical Manufacturing Com-
pany in Seminole, and the Jewish
Community Center in St. Peters-
hure and in a day-long effort
raised $41,000 for the 1984 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal Campaign.
Joe Charles, Chairman of Super
Sunday on behalf of the JCC
Board, said "Thousands of phone
calls were made to our friends
and neighbors in Pinellas
County, in order to give them the
opportunity to participate in this
great humanitarian effort. The
response was overwhelmingly
positive, to help meet Jewish
needs here at home, in Israel, and
around the world."
Vice-chairmen of Super
Sunday were Mel Fergenbaum
and Lou Mellitz. Super Sunday
past Chairperson Sophie
Glasgow, was advisor. Other
committee chairpersons were
Jean and Julius Malkin (Recruit-
ment and Facilities), Lea Barlis
(Records) and Joel Goetz (Food
and Drink). Joel Beller was the
photographer.
Menorah Monor To Form Guild
Irwin Miller, President, an-
nounced the formation of a Guild
for Menorah Manor, and stated
that a meeting will be called
within the next few weeks.
He further stated that "Now
that the construction of the 120-
bed, non-profit Kosher nursing
care facility is well under way, it
is essential that the entire Jewish
communities of the Florida West
Coast be involved with their sub-
stance as well as their effort."
Menorah Manor will afford the
finest care available to our elderly
and will be a "Home for Jewish
Living" for the Jewish residents
New Port Richey and Pasco
county from Lakeland and
Polk County from Tampa
and throughout Hillsborough
County, plus Bradenton and
Sarasota, all the way to Clear-
water and St. Petersburg.
Cutback Yes
The goals of the Guild will be
to establish rapport and lines of
communication with the general
community, to coordinate acti-
vities of specific area, i.e. library,
gift shop, chapel, beauty salon
and barber shop, and to formul-
ate a group of interested and in-
volved men and women.
A full volunteer program will
be an integral part of Menorah
Manor when operational. Only
through the commitment and
dedication of many individuals
can the needs of the residents be
met.
President Miller urged all to
visit the site at 250 58th Street
North, St. Petersburg, and to
share in the excitement of
construction or, to call Adele
Lurie, Volunteer Director, at 345-
2775 for further information and
to have their name placed on the
mailing list.
Mr. Goetz, of Specialty Food
Sales, secured donations of all the
refreshments. Bounty Caterers
and Creative Catering donated
their expertise in all food
preparation, delivery and serv-
ing. Food was supplied by Parad-
ise Bakery, Bagel King, Hebrew
National, Bernard's, Sinai 48,
Classic Deli, Mel Dinsfriend,
Lovett's Bakery and King
Salmon.
Volunteers for Super Sunday
were Elaine Belkin, Ben Bush,
Iris Bush, Mrs. Bert Cohen, Ruth
Cohen, Ron Diner, Ethyl Ferkel,
Edna Glassman, Ellen Glassman,
Florence Goldstein, Elisa Green-
berg, Emanuel Harris, Rosa
Harris, Morris Kahana, Anne
Kahana, Ted Kramer, Shelley
Lynn, Frances Olitzky, Anne
Panush, Bernard Panush, Bob
Kline, Sharon Silver, Lois
Pardoll, Jerry Paul, Reva Pearl-
stein, Jean Rosenbaum, Charles
Rutenberg, Joel Shrager, Mark
Silk, Elaine Stern, Joe Stern, Bill
Wolf son and Sue Wolfson.
But No Freeze on Settlements Planned
By DAVID LANDAU
AND GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Premier Yitzhak Shamir
has said that the reduction
of government expendi-
tures will include a cutback
of settlement activity on
the West Bank, but there
will be no "freeze."
He gave the assurance in a
television interview during which
he discussed the urgent measures
being taken by his government to
restore economic health. The
Ministerial Economic Com-
mittee, he noted, decided to cut
the budget for the 1984-85 fiscal
year by 58 billion Shekels (nearly
SMX) million).
"Settlements are not ex-
cluded." he said. But the
government would never order a
settlement "freeze" on the West
Hank because "that would be a
political act, not an economic
measure," Shamir said.
HE GAVE no indication of the
extent of the cutback on settle-
ments and in fact there is no
information yet as to what
specific economies are planned
throughout the government. But
the Premier seemed buoyed by
the fact that the Economic Com-
mittee succeeded at least on
paper in meeting the
Treasury's demands for budget
reductions without precipitating
a coalition crisis.
That accomplishment is pre-
cisely what raised skepticism
among economic analysts that
the budget cuts are little more
than cosmetic. While Shamir said
consultations were continuing
with the Tami Party over the
Welfare Ministry budget, the
Ministerial Economic Ministry
has in effect acceded to most of
Tami s demands. It was reported
to have increased the welfare
budget by 400,000 Shekels,
resolving to cut more deeply into
budgets of other depart-
Tami, which represents a low
income, largely Sephardic consti-
tuency, had threatened to quit
the coalition if its demands were
not met. If it did, Shamirs
parliamentary majority would be
reduced to one. Shamir said that
he was "sure" Tami would not
bolt.
THE PREMIER said he was
"very sensitive" to the economic
hardships of low paid civil service
workers. He noted they have
always been badly off. He
maintained that the next cost-of-
living allowance, to be paid this
month, would compensate all
wage-earners for the erosion of
their income by inflation, now
at an annual rate of
running
the
ments.

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about 200 percent. Independent
economists say the compensation
would be partial at best.
Shamir stressed that Israel,
unlike other economically
troubled countries all over the
world, would not combat in-
flation by inducing unemploy-
ment. Israel is different, he said,
because "we want to attract aliya
and prevent yerida," the
emigration of Israelis who take
up permanent residence abroad.
But many economists believe
that the budget cuts proposed by
the government, if implemented,
would result in the loss of 30,000-
50,000 jobs.
Also, Pauline Rosenberg,
Morris Weisbord, Natalie Silver,
Jack Cohen, Helen Eichen, Terry
Kahan. Milton Kahan, Bernie
Lunie, Hal Pawlan, Jean Black,
Orin Cohen, Florence Fayer,
Leah Glasgow, Marcia Glasgow,
Mildred L. Guttman, Jennie
Kleinfeld, Caroline Mallah. Helen
Salkin, Freida B. Sohon, Bea
Steinberg, Ted Tench, Yolanda
Washer, Clara Zunder, Rabbi Ira
Youdovin, Jack Jenkins, Mike
Philips, Edith Greenberg,
Blanche Shelton, Stan Newmark,
Elihu Berman, Bernice Bressler,
Harold Bressler, Jack Brossman,
Bill Cohen, Betty Cohen, Muriel
Cohen, Ruth Gewurz.
In addition, Betty Goodhart,
Marvin Goldman, Renee
Goldman, Michael Goldfield.
Louis Goldstein, Edward
Gurevitz, Anne Gurevitz, Paul
Hochberg, Roslyn Hochberg,
Meni Kanner, Ruth Gewurtz.
Sylvia Klein, Joel Klein, Iris Lee,
Harriet. Morris, Henry Mbrris,
Lenore Pearl, Owen Linder,
Marcia Pretekin, Hilda Saper-
stein, Edward Schultz, Evelyn
Schultz, Wendy Scholl, Robert
Serbell, Jules Silverman, Harold
Salkey, Rebecca Silverman,
Herbert Strauss, Bernice Trout-
man, Leon Troutaoan, Carol
Ungerleiter, Marilyn Levin,
Gordon Saakin, Edith Bedrick,
Jack Avery, Mollie Avery,
Naomi Berg, Fred. Hollander,
Ruth Ellen Dennis, Adam
Schechter, Saul Schechter, Sue
Schechter, Ellen Goetz, Michael
Goetz, Anne Belkin, Joe Belkin,
Ellen Bander, Herman Morse,
Lillian Daniels, Sandy Mellitz,
Myma Fergenbaum, Florence T.
Lippman and Lee Colbert.
Also, Bessie Grusmark, Ruth
Dickman, Jeanne Kallman,
Helene L. Lesser, Harry Weiss,
Sam Vogel, Sonya Olitzky,
Morris Olitzky, Min Snider, Ted
Snider, Ruth Watnick, Morris
Watnick, Ethel Wisotzky, Ben
Wisotzky, Jennifer Sternberg,
Margie Green, Jeanne Charles,
Isabel K. Kamin, Ruth Lucido,
Drew Lucido, Carolyn Stone,
Sylvia Mellitz, Abe Mellitz, Chris
Cony, Lillian Friedman, Ida
Cahn, Chuck Weiss, Dorothy
Book, Bess Rosenthal, Robert
Goldman, Myrna Bromwich,
John Bromwich, Marge Hare,
Pauline Cunix, Charlotte Green-
berg, Helen Hersh, Louis Hersh,
Pauline Silverman, Irving Silver-
man, Sophie Goldstone, Aaron
Goldstone, Morris Talmanson,
Bertha Friedlander, Mollie
For man, Len Leeb, Hugh Leeb,
Charles W. Ehrlich, Rhoda Poll,
Rachel Poll, Morty Poll, Dorothy
Yoels, Rose Pullman, Dorothy
Klein, Rae Lackey, Hy Lackey,
Lt. Col. and Mrs. J.W. Burke,
Lee Gingold, Derry Glen, Harvey
Glen, Gail Bonneville, Fred
Margolis, Artie Bonnardi,
Michael Sasser, Christina
Crandell, Lois Verona, Myra
Gross, Sylvia Mayover, Dave
Mayover and Charles Ehrlich.
The Super Sunday Grand Prize
Poster Winner is Mindy Pardoll
from the Jewish Day School.
Other winners are Sarah Cutler
(Jewish Day School), Missy
Pardoll (Jewish Day School),
Mamie Levin (Temple Ahavat
Shalom*,' "and' Josh* teldin
(Temple B'nai Israel). Poster
judges were Dr. Michael Phillips,
Ted Kramer and Sue Schechter.
Watch our next edition for
Super Sunday photos.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, January 27, |
Israel's Economic Crisis Disproves Anti-Semitic Proverb
The old anti-Semitic proverb is that Jews
are good with money. But you couldn't
prove this in the State of Israel.
Security problems are one thing.
Failure to be able to establish an
economy that is run on a sound fiscal basis
is quite another.
Perhaps Israel's most pressing problem
today is its runaway level of inflation
somewhere near 200 percent in 1983. It
should not be too difficult to conceive of
this single statistic as more threatening to
Israel than the hostile nations surrounding
it.
One key to Israel's future lies in cutting
down yerida at the same time that it en-
courages newer and more energetic levels of
aliya. But this is hardly likely in a country
where savings are lost to inflation over
night where Germany's post-World War
I experience of needing a wheelbarrow to
take money for a shopping trip to the
market is already close to becoming a
reality for the average Israeli.
Still, the government can hardly be
expected to deal with its fiscal crisis when
that average Israeli has a taste for the kind
of expensive consumer goods that he can
not really afford. Nor can the nation afford
them, because that taste contributes to the
imbalance in foreign trade that results in a
precious outflow of currency, thus com-
pounding the crisis even more.
In the end, it is not a question of blaming
either the everyday citizen or the gover-
nment. Indeed, blame is neither con-
structive nor a cure in itself..If the fiscal
crisis is not solved, the greatest threat yet
to Israel's survival will surely be at hand.
Painful TV Debate
There was something painful about
watching and listening to the Democratic
presidential candidates on television last
weekend. The issue is not so much that the
1984 campaign, at least as of now, already
seems run and lost so far as the Democrats
are concerned.
More to the point is that, except for
former Vice President Mondale, there is a
sense of repetitive listlessness in the others
- for example, Senators Alan Cranston
and John Glenn. And even Mondale fails to
project himself as a ball of fire, clear though
it is that he is a chip off the old Hubert
Humphrey block.
But perhaps for that very reason, one
tends to feel that in Mondale one has heard
it all before old panaceas,but for new
problems that plague us and that seem to
cry out for newer solutions.
Only in the Rev. Jesse Jackson is there a
sense of vitality, mainly of course, because
of his coup in Syria. But Jackson preaches,
because that is what he is. In this sense,
one isn't irritated with him as one may
have been with the preachments of Jimmy
Carter. But preaching is not the stuff of a
potential President of the United States -
or, at least, ought not to be.
Furthermore, the sentiments voiced
publicly by Jackson, and even his aides, are
such that they worry Jewish voters,
especially when they are frankly racist.
Take, for example, the comment by the
Rev. Wyatt Walker that the United States
government would have done more to free
U.S. Navy pilot Lt. Robert Goodman had
he been 'white or Jewish."
This is enough to turn anyone away from
the Rev. Jackson, even if his anti-Israel
sentiments had not already done so.
So what did the televised "debate" of
last weekend tell us? Perhaps the most
vital of the Democratic hopefuls is Jesse
Jackson, who largely is incomprehensible
when he sounds like a gospel preacher.
And who, when a Jewish voter does
understand him, fills that voter with frank
fear.
ft^WSft^:::ftWS5^^
Suez Never Did Become
'Lake of Egyptian Blood'
Israel Dissociates Self From
Visiting Irish Protestants
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) The
Israeli government has disa-
ssociated itself from a visit to
Israel by hardline Protestant
leaders from Northern Ireland. A
statement by the Israel Embassy
said that the visit, by five
members of the Rev. Ian
Paisleys Democratic Unionist
Party, including two Members of
Parliament, was "'completely
private" and that none of the
meetings they held in Israel were
sanctioned or approved by the
Israeli government.
The statement was made
following claims in Belfast that
the delegation had had "every
cooperation" from the Israeli
government.
The Democratic Unionist Par-
ty said the delegation paid a six-
day visit during which it met
members of the Israeli govern-
ment and opposition and visited
the West Bank. They also toured
the Lebanese border and spoke to
manufacturers of frontier
security equipment which they
thought might be suitable for
preventing terrorists from infil-
trating across the Irish border.
The Israel Embassy here,
which also represents Israeli
interests in the Irish Republic, is
embarrassed by the visit for
political, as well as security
reasons. It said that Israel
discusses security matters only
with governments and not with
private interests from foreign
countries.
Unofficially, the Embassy is
also worried that too close an
association between Israel and
Northern Ireland Protestants
could provoke the IRA terrorists
into actions against Israeli
property or personnel. "I have
enough on my mind without
that," an Israeli official said here.
The Northern Irish group
visited Israel at the invitation of
Labor MK Michael Bar Zohar,
who was in Belfast last month.
' eJewish Floridian
OF PINELLAS COUNTY r,ishocr,.,
Editorial Office. 302 Jupiter Ave South. Clearwater. FU 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication & Business Office. 120 N.E. 6 St.. Miami. Fla. 33132
Telephone (305) 373-4605
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Postmaster: Forward Form 3579 to Box 012973. Miami. Fl 33101
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annual mambanhip pladga lo Jaouh Faoarallon of Pinallaa Counly lo> which lha turn ol S2.JS it
paid Oul of Town Upon Raquasl
Friday, January 27, 198-1
Volume 5
23SHEVAT5744
Number 2
Continued from Page 1
territory, some of the same and
stronger.
By August. 1970, when a U.S.-
sponsored ceasefire temporarily
ended the fighting, Israel had
demonstrated its continued mili-
tary superiority by hitting at
strategic targets putatively
protected by Soviet ground-to-air
missiles, and the fortifications
across the canal remained more
or less intact. The expulsion of
Soviet military personnel by the
still novice President Sadat made
the chances of an Egyptian
attack appear yet slimmer.
Consequently. Egypt stunned
the world, not least of all the Is-
rael Defense Force. when,
together with the Syrians on the
Golan Heights, it launched the
Yom Kippur War, with its
surprise crossing of the canal and
the penetration of what had come
to be called "the impregnable
Barlev Line."
Egypt has never acknowledged
that by the war's end the military
tables had almost entirely tur-
ned, and its Third Army was
completely surrounded by Israeli
forces, cut off from its sources of
supply. Many of those familiar
with Western accounts of the war
still maintain that Egypt never-
theless emerged victorious be-
cause it shattered the "myth of
Israeli invincibility," creating an
atmosphere in which it could
negotiate with Israel from a posi-
tion of strength.
CONSEQUENTLY, Sadat is
honored on Oct. 6, the day of the
canal crossing and of his assas-
sination eight years later, as
much for the crossing of the canal
as for the peace which, Egyptians
stress, the war was designed to
achieve. As relations between the
two countries continue to deter-
iorate, the Oct. 6 achievement
seems to play a far more promin-
ent part in memorializing Sadat
than does the peace with Israel.
The sentiment which the tone
of this official panegyric to Sadat
appears to be addressing, became
unsettlingly clear before the
remains of the Barlev fortifica-
tions. Hearing the Egyptian
guide describe the engineering of
the Israel bunkers each of
which had been replete with a
large ammunition and supply
store and wired up for electricity
and air conditioning could
force even the most cynical
observer of Egyptian public rela-
tions tactics to concede that if
Egypt was defeated in the war,
she lost, to some extent,
triumphantly.
The spectacle of students
clamoring to be photographed at
the entrance of the bunker or by
the charred remains of an Israeli
tank sitting not far from it.
brought a strange feeling of deja
vu to one whose travels in Israel
have included the routine lours of
Arab bunkers and trenches on
the (iolan I leights and other sites
in the .Jewish State whan
vestiges of war have become not
only a source of awe. mourning
and national pride, but a catchy
setting for tourist snapshots rja
well.
ADDING TO the strangeness
was the presence of two Egyptian
Hebrew language students whose
acquaintance with this writer
made possible her participation
in the excursion and the unex-
pected detour. They, too,
hastened to be photographed,
calling out their request in a
competent Hebrew that made
more than a few heads turn
inquisitively at the foreigner with
the camera who was being ad-
dressed.
They had situated themselves
directly beneath a sign painted
over one of the metal slabs that
bore a quotation attributed to the
late Gen. Moshe Dayan and
translated into English and
Arabic. "The waters of the
Bun," the inscription read, "will
Ik- turned into a lake of Egyptian
blood if they consider launching
an assault on the canal."
The inside walls of the bunkers
offered testimony of another kind
the graffiti of Egyptian
soldiers who had taken the place.
Looking at the clutter of names.
must of which were identified as
"fighter in October," a student
could In heard commenting thai
Egypt would "never allow Sinai
In In- taken again."
One of the Hebrew students.
who had grown up in Suez and
been evacuated with his co-
inhabitants after the 1967 war.
remarked in Hebrew, These
bunkers caused us a lot of suffer-
ing, you know." There was little
hostility in the tone of his com-
ment, and the reactions of other
students, who by this time had
surmised that the incongruous
foreigner among them was Jew-
ish, indicated neither resentment
nor the delight of a victor con-
fronting the vanquished with his
defeat.
FrenchBelieve Carlos
Was Behind Bombing
PARIS (JTA) French authorities believe that
the international terrorist known as Carlos may have been
responsible for the bombing of the Marseilles railway
station and a passenger train in the south of France, in
which four people were killed and 54 injured, and the
French Cultural Center in Tripoli in north Lebanon.
THE LINK EMERGED because Carlos is known to
have led the "Arab Armed Organization," a terrorist
group which claimed credit for the bombings. The man
who calls himself Carlos tops the wanted list of assassins in
France where he carried out or masterminded a series of
terrorist outrages and murders between 1975-1982. He has
been identified with Arab terrorists.
A mysterious figure who barely eluded capture on
several occasions, Carlos is believed to be Ilyitch Ramirez
Sanchez, born 34 years ago in Venezuela and said to be
living in recent years in Syria and Libya.


r, January 27,
1964
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Pae5
\ShuM Vows
He'll Raise Jewish Emigration Issue
BxJTA Services
WASHINGTON Secretary
' State George Shultz is ex-
cted to raise the question of
ewish emigration from the
oviet Union when he meets
oviet Foreign Minister Andrei
jromyko at the 35-nation
European Conference on
jisarmament in Stockholm this
Keek, according to the head of
National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
"In recent meetings that I
ave had with Secretary of State
Shultz. he made very clear that
whenever any other issue is
liscussed with the Soviet Union
._ issues of Soviet Jewry are
on our agenda." Morris Abram.
NCSJ's chairman, said at a
press conference here in which
the organization presented its
|report on conditions for Soviet
Ijews in 1983. Abram said the
I report would be transmitted to
Ishultz and President Reagan. At
Ithe same time he suggested that
[leaders of the peace movement
[bring up the issue in their con-
[tacts with people from the
I Warsaw Pact countries,
I especially the Soviet Union. He
noted that President Kennedy
had said that peace is actually "a
matter of human rights."
Cost of Living
I Rises by 11.6 Percent
TEL AVIV The coat of
I living index rose by 11.6 percent
during December, bringing the
[ annual inflation rate for 1983 to
190.7 percent, the Central Bureau
I of Statistics announced. The
December figure was the highest
ever for that month, even though
it was lower than the 15.2 percent
in November.
The 1982 inflation rate was
131.5 percent, and at this time
last year the Finance Ministry
was promising that last year
I would I* a "two-figure inflation
less than 100 percent."
Histadrut Secretary General
Yeruham Meshel has demanded
monthly payments of C.O.L.
increments, pointing out that the
January index increase would
probably be even more than the
December figure as prices had
risen by about seven percent
during the first two weeks of the
month.
1 Jackson Aide Rapped
For Racist Remark
NEW YORK The national
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith has
labeled as "racism" the
statement by a top aide to the
Rev. Jesse Jackson that the U.S.
government would have done
more to free U.S. Navy pilot Lt.
Hubert Goodman had he been
"white or Jewish."
Nathan Perlmutter rebuked
the Kev. Wyatt Walker for the
remark made just before
Jackson's successful trip to free
Goodman from Syria. Describing
>s "the first and to date the only
intrusion of racism into this
Goodman case," Perlmutter said:
Alas, there are mind-frames
among minority as well as in
dominant groups which more
readily don fabrications of pre-
judice than they wear com-
fortably the reality of our
nation's race relations progress."
Herzog to Visit
Zaire, Liberia
JERUSALEM President
J-naim Herzog left for Zaire on
luesday where he will spend five
days and then go on to Liberia for
a two-day visit. This is the first
J/s't to Africa by an Israeli
'resident since the African
nations severed diplomatic
relations with the Jewish State
after the Yom Kippur War.
Herzog was invited to Zaire by
^resident Mobutu Sese Seko and
to Liberia by President Samuel
Doe. Both Presidents visited
Israel last year, following the
resumption of diplomatic ties
with Israel.
One of the highlights of
Herzog's visit will be his meeting
with the Jewish community of
Zaire. There are presently some
150 Jewish families in Kinshasa,
the capital, and in Lubumbashi.
Holocaust Was Hoax'
Teacher Faces Charge
TORONTO Jim Keegstra, a
high school teacher and former
Mayor of Eckville, Alberta, who
taught his classes that the
Holocaust was a hoax, has been
charged by Alberta's Attorney
General with wilfuU disse-
mination of racial hatred. He was
summoned last week to appear in
court in Red Deer, Alberta on
Feb. 1 to choose trial by judge or
by jury.
Keegstra was dismissed from
his teaching post last year after
parents complained that he was
indoctrinating their children with
racism. He contended that Jews
were the root of all evil and were
conspiring to control nations and
the world economy.
Charges of violating Canada's
anti-hate laws were brought
against Keegstra as the result of
an invetigation by the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, the
national police force, begun last
August. He was charged under
Section 231, subsection 2 of the
criminal code. The law is on the
books since 1970 but there have
been no convictions to date.
Keegstra faces a maximum
penalty of two years imprison-
ment.
Assad Urged To
Let Jews Leave
NEW YORK Harry Abadi,
the brother-in-law of Lillian
Abadi, the 25-year-old pregnant
Jewish mother who was brutally
murdered along with her two
small children in Aleppo, Syria
last month, has appealed to
President Hafez Assad of Syria
to allow the surviving members
of the murdered woman's family
to emigrate.
He was joined in his appeal by
Rep. Charles Schumer (D., N.Y.)
at a press conference co-
sponsored by the New York
Jewish Community Relations
Council and the Legal Coalition
for Syrian Jewry.
Adolfo
of the
for his
human
is
ac-
According to Harry Abadi,
when his brother, Chaim Victor
Abadi, returned home the day of
the tragedy, he found his wife
dead, her breasts cut, her
stomach slit open and her body
mutilated. The hands of her six-
year-old son, Joseph, were cut,
and the body of her three-and-a-
half year old daughter, Sandy,
hacked to pieces and her head
severed.
He said the Syrian Jewish
community is "in great danger,"
and noted that the perpetrators
of the vicious murders have not
been apprehended. He said that if
Syrian Jews were allowed to
emigrate, "eighty percent, at
least, will leave." Abadi urged
the Syrian authorities "to appre-
hend those responsible for the
evil murders so that it will not be
repeated against other members
of the Jewish community in
Syria."
Nobel Prize Winner
Raps Anti-Semitism
BUENOS AIRES
Perez Esquivel, winner
1980 Nobel Peace Prize
struggles on behalf of
rights, stated that there
"systematic anti-Semitic
tivity in Argentina which "must
be overcome" in an article in
Argumento, the news organ of
President Raul Alfonsin's
Radical Party.
The World Jewish Congress-
Latin American Branch reported
that this article is one of a
number of such pieces included in
an unprecedented feature section
in the newspaper on Argentinian
anti-Semitism.
Perez Esquivel described the
long history of anti-Semitic
persecution around the world,
noting that "till today humanity
is moved by the massacre of
millions of Jews in concentration
camps, the Warsaw Ghetto and
the moving witness of Anne
Frank."
Museum May
Have to Close
TEL AVIV (JTA) Beth
Hatefutsot, the prestigious
Museum of the Diaspora located
on the Tel Aviv University
campus, may have to close by the
end of this month unless the
Treasury withdraws its decision
to withhold the monthly govern-
ment allocation of over 10 million
Shekels ($100,000) which covers
some 40 percent of the museum's
operational expenses.
YOSEF BEGUN HONORED BY JNF IN ISRAEL A recent
mission of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry led by Chairman
Morris Abram and Jewish National Fund President Charlotte
Jacobson planted a grove of trees in the Soviet Jewry Forest near
Jerusalem as an act of solidarity with Yosef Begun, the Hebrew
teacher recently given a cruel prison sentence in the Soviet Union.
Participating in the ceremony were (left to right) Jerry Goodman,
Executive Director National Conference on Soviet Jewry; Mrs.
Jacobson; Avigdor Eskin, a Soviet Jewry activist and friend of
Begun; David Prital, Chairman of the Israel Public Council on Soviet
Jewry; Mr. Abram; Rabbi David Hill, a member of NCSJ; and
Raphael Rothstein, Director of Public Relations of the JNF.
Bonn Wants Jewish Youth
BONN (JTAI West Ger-
many's Jewish community is
seeking an end to the long
standing arrangement by which
Jewish youths of military age are
exempt from the draft. The ar-
rangement is a tacit understand-
ing derived from Germany's past
rather than a legal waiver.
Defense Ministry sources say
that, except individual cases,
Jewish youth avoid recruitment
on grounds that it is morally im-
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possible for them to serve in a
German army.
But this argument has been
questioned in recent years
because not all Jews who reach
the age of 18 are from families
who suffered under the Nazi
regime. The Jewish communal
leaders have emphasized
repeatedly that the community
cannot indefinitely enjoy full
rights under German law without
contributing to the country's
defense.
UIA Elects Officers
i
Irwin S. Field of Los Angeles,
was reelected to the office of
Chairman of the United Israel
Appeal at the Annual Meeting of
Trustees, Dec. 5. The following
slate of Officers were also re-
elected: Mrs. Sylvia Hassenfeld
and Mrs. Bernice Tannenbaum,
Vice Chairmen; Jack D. Weiler
and Paul Zuckerman, Treasurers;
Morris L. Levinson, Secretary.
Newly elected members of the
Board of Directors are Irving
Bernstein (former Executive Vice
Chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal. Inc.). Bernard Borine of
Philadelphia. Harry Taubenfeld
of New York City and Mrs.
Sandra Weiner of Houston.
Representing Pinellas County
on the Board of Trustees is
CHARLES RUTENBERG
(Trustee Emeritus). Mr.
Rutenberg is well known within
Pinellas and Nationally for his
philanthropic endeavors. He is
the President of the Jewish
Federation of Pinellas County.
In his remarks, Mr. Field
stated that "the most important
role of the United Israel Appeal is
to strengthen the ties between
the American Jewish com-
munities and Israel. The annual
UJA Campaign is the best
vehicle we have to become in-
volved with Israel in every way."
Next in importance is the need
to provide the Jewish Agency
with the means to continue to
carry out its programs of rescue,
settlement and rehabilitation.
The UIA structurally is an
amalgam of the Zionist move-
ment which turned the dream of a
Jewish homeland into a reality
and the organized Jewish com-
munity through the local Fed-
erations and the National UJA
Campaign.
%WM&$A
*
EXPLORE AMERICA
presents
Another SentimentalJourney
Israel and Spain
35 deys, 3 weeks Israel, 2 weeks Spain
Price Includes
Round Trip Air TransportationFirst Class HotelsBreakfast and
Dinner DallyAII Transfers, Sightseeing, Entrance FeeGuide Ser-
vice* Free Gifts.
HIGHLIGHTS
TEL AVIV Jaffa, Diaspora Museum, Rehovot, Ashdod,
Ashkelon.
JERUSALEM Old & New Cities, Bethlehem, Hebrom,
Dead Sea, Masada, Qumran Caves
NETANYA Golan Heights, CapeMaum, Tiberius,
Jericho, Caesarea, Megiddo, Nazareth, Haifa, Akko,
Roshinkra, Safed, Galilee
MARBELLA Spains Costa/del Sol
$1999.00 per person dbl.occ.
Departure dates March thru December.
For Futher Information, Call Your SentimentalJourney
Representative at Explore America 576*7318
For aacri Plnetlaa participant, a contribution will be
Plnallaa County.
made to tha Jewlan Federation of


i
Page6

*,_----------
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
,11 li'.l I I1,' I I S3=
PW^ff.JiyyWHn

Congregations/Organkations Events
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS
"Precious Legacy"
Lecture
The "Art at Leisure" program
at the Museum of Fine Arts,
Friday, Feb. 17, at 10:15 ajn.,
will feature an illustrated lecture
on "The Precious Legacy"
exhibition Judaic Treasures
from the Czechoslovak State Col-
lections, Prague which is
currently on view in th Bass
Museum, Miami Beach.
Art objects and documents
which reveal Jewish life from the
Middle Ages to the Nazi domina-
tion will be discussed by Museum
docent Max Halle. The history,
artistry and cultural memories
embedded in these artifacts
speak to all who respond to the
need for preserving tradition. ,
The program is open to the
entire community. Refreshments
will be served. A $1 donation is
appreciated. Reservations in
advance (896-2667).
CAMP BLUE STAR
Herman Popkin, owner direc-
tor of Camp Blue Star, in its 38th
consecutive season, will be in this
area for the annual get together
of campers and friends to be held
at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Peter
Pardoll, 6445 4th Avenue North
on Tuesday, Feb. 14 at 7 p.m.
There will be a film showing of
1983 summer camp activities and
Mr. Popkin will interview pro-
spective campers and potential
staff members.
Florence Lippman, camp
representative for the past 20
years is accepting reservations
and is available for information.
Please call her at 822-2238. You
may also call Dr. and Mrs.
Pardoll at 345-0412 or 384-2016.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
St. Petersburg
Camp Ramah Information
Night Jan. 31. A representa-
tive from Camp Ramah in New
England will meet with all
parents interested in obtaining
more information about Camp
Ramah ("the camping arm of
conservative Judaism") at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. Michael
Slomak.
Adult Studies Program.
Spring Semester for Adult
Education at B'nai Israel begins
Wednesday, Feb. 1. Torah Study,
Contemporary Jewish Issues and
Beginning Hebrew will be offered
on Wednesday evenings; Jewish
Crafts; Wood Blocks and
Linoleum Prints will be offered
on an afternoon to be announced;
Yiddish Vinkle will meet on the
third Sunday of each month; and
Adult Pat Mitzvah classes will
meet weekly on a morning to be
announced. Call the synagogue
office at 381-4900 for more in-
formation.
Heh Class Family Luncheon.
The members of the Heh class
will participate in the Shabbat
morning services on Saturday.
Feb. 4, followed by a Family
Class Luncheon at the
synagogue.
Lunch with the Rabbi. Lunch
with the Rabbi will be on
Wednesday, Feb. 8 at the Fish
House, 1080 Pasadena Ava.
South, at 12 noon.
"Great Ideas Weekend"
The adult studies commission
of Congregation B'nai Israel of
St. Petersburg proudly presents
its Great Ideas Weekend, 5744,
Jan. 27-29. Rabbi Baruch
Frydman-Kohl of Congregation
Ohav Shalom in Albany, N.Y.
will be the "Scholar in
Residence" for the weekend.
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl is president
of the Capital District Board of
Rabbis, vice president of the
Empire State Region of the Rab-
binical Assembly, and a member
of the editorial board of Conser-
vative Judaism magazine. Friday
evening's subject, "God and
Evil" deals with the response to
the perennial problem of "When
Bad Things Happen To Good
People." Saturday morning's
subject "Reading The Bible:
Rashi And Spinoza" will contrast
the rabbinic and modern methods
of studying Bible. Over Sunday
morning brunch, Rabbi Fryd-
man-Kohl will provide a slide
presentation depicting "What's
Jewish About Jewish Art?"
The topics promise to be sti-
mulating. The brunch promises
to be delectable. Be certain to
attend!
Jewish Singles
"Town Meeting"
And Brunch'
The CBI Singles are planning a
Jewish Singles "Town Meeting"
brunch for Sunday, Feb. 12,
beginning at 11 a.m. at Congre-
gation B'nai Israel, 301 59th St.
North, St. Petersburg, followed
by volleyball outside.
Please spread the word and
join in on this event where you
can "Speak Your Mind" enjoy
a bagel brunch and meet other
Tampa Bay area Jewish singles.
$3 payable at the door. Come one!
Come all! Call 381-4900 for
further details.
Singles Shabbat Service
The Pinellas County Board of
Rabbis with the cooperation of
the Synagogues of Pinellas
County, invite the Jewish singles
of the Tampa Bay area to Friday
evening services, Feb. 10, at 8
p.m. Congregation Beth Shalom,
1325 South Belcher Road, in
Clearwater. will be hosting the
singles Shabbat service this
month, which will be followed by
an oneg shabbat.
Sisterhood and Men's Club
Square Dance
Congregation B'nai Israel of
St. Petersburg's Mitzvah Men's
Club and Sisterhood presents a
"Real Swinging Hoe-Down"!
Mosey over about 8:30 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 11, to the Old
Corral (B'nai Israel Fellowship
Hall). The evening will feature
famous caller Jack Evans and
"The Beary Patch Cloggers."
Reservations are a must by Feb.
6 (RSVP 381-4900) and the cost is
$7.50 per person.
Teenage Dance
B'nai Israel and the Pinellas
County Youth CommisiOn invite
all teenagers, grades 9-12, to the
annual youth event, Saturday,
Jan. 28. 6-10 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m. A presentation
by Great Ideas Weekend scholar
Rabbi Baruch Frydman-Kohl.
6:30-7 p.m. Havdalah.
7-10 p.m. Dinner-Music-
Dancing.
All teenageers are welcome to
join us and meet other Jewish
youth from the Tampa Bay area.
TEMPLE BETH EL
SISTERHOOD
The Annual Luncheon of Sis-
terhood of Temple Beth El. to be
held on Feb. 1, will celebrate its
30th Anniversary with a festive
luncheon catered by the Wine
Cellar. Also featured will be a
Fashion Show sponsored by
Slimer's and modeled by Sister-
hood members.
CONGREGATION
BETH SHALOM
CLEARWATER
This is the second semester of
Beth Shalom's Sisterhood's adult
education program for the second
of four semesters.
All women in the community
are welcome to join us for all or
any portion of the classes.
For further information you
may call: Diane Bernstein, 536-
8292 or Lila Rosentraub at 536-
4911 or Johanna Bromberg at
535-2595.
Women's Institute
For Living And Learning
Semester II Feb. 19 through
June 1.
9-9:50 a.m. Hebrew II: Conti-
nuation of Beginner's Hebrew.
For those with a basic reading
ability of Hebrew. Our aim will be
to achieve greater familiarity and
comfort with a primary text of
the Jewish People: The Siddur,
by increasing facility in reading
and understanding, and by
learning a basic vocabulary of
prayer Hebrew. Instructor:
Johanna Bromberg.
Coffee 10-10:50 a.m. "The
Fruit Of Her Hand": The Jewish
Home Throughout The Year.
" Alright, then, from a practical
point of view, how do we in-
troduce traditional Jewish living
in a modern spirit into our
homes?" Instructor: Johanna
Bromberg.
11-11:50 a.m. A History of
the Jewish Experience II: The
Emergence of the Jews in Biblical
Times
Having examined the contem-
porary period in Jewish history,
we now go back to our origins as
a distinct people, the bearers of a
radical new religious faith; the
story of the Jews and of Judaism
in their forHmative stages. In-
structor: Rabbi Kenneth Brom-
berg.
Men's Club
The Men's Club of Congrega-
tion Beth Shalom, 1325 Belcher
Road, will have an Open Game
Night on Jan. 29 at 7:30 p.m.
There will be cards, scrabble,
and any other games you wish to
play. This is a social and fun
evening for friends to get
together and socialize. Refresh-
ments will be served. Door prizes
will be awarded to the lucky
holders of tickets. Donation will
be $2 per person. Please call the
synagoue for reservations at 531-
1418.
CONGREGATION
BETH SHOLOM
GULFPORT
A new film on "Israel Today"
provided by the Jewish National
Fund will be presented at Con-
gregation Beth Sholom, 1844
54th St. South, on Wednesday,
Feb. 8, at 2 p.m. following the
movie Colonel Arie Shacham.
member of the Israeli Defense
Forces, will give a talk on the
"Relationship of Military and
Jewish National Fund." Refresh-
ments will be served. Guests are
invited and there is no charge.
The second program of Yiddish
humor, songs, and stories will
take place at the Synagogue on
Saturday, Feb. 18. at 7:30 p.m.
Congregation Beth Sholom will
sponsor a trip to Israel on Nov. 1.
For further information on the
trip, please contact the
synagogue at 321-3380. Arrange-
ments must be made no later
than May 1.
The installatioin of officers of
Congregation Beth Sholom of
Gulfport, was held at the Syna-
gogue on Sunday. Jan. 8. Newly
elected officers are:
President. John Bromwich;
First Vice President, Nathan
Tauber; Second Vice President,
Louis Hersh; Treasurer, Hyman
R. Posner; Assistant Treasurer,
Albert Meisner; Financial
Secretary, Herman J. Robitshek;
Corresponding Secretary,
Bernard M. Wolk; Recording
Secretary, Rose Vogel; and
Gabbai, Harry Rothstein.
BETHCHAI
SYNAGOGUE
Havdala
Everyone is cordially invited to
participate in services which
takes place monthly at various
Congregation's homes. On Jan.
28, it will be at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Hirschfield and
on Feb. 25, at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Josseph Elias.
For further information kindly
call the synagogue office at 393-
5525.
take place at Beth Chai in honor
of Brotherhood month on Friday
evening Feb. 24 at 8 p.m.. at
which time the members of St.
Dunstan's Episcopal Church and
their pastor, the Reverend
George Gentry, will join with
Rabbi Kirshner and the Beth
Chai membership in an interfaith
service.
Everyone is cordially invited to
attend.
ESP Sabbath
ESP (early Sabbath Prayers) is
returning to Beth Chai on Friday
evening, Feb. 10 at which time
Early Sabbath Prayers com-
mence at 6:15 p.m. followed by a
delightful, traditional Sabbath
dinner complete with grace after
meals. Sabbath songs, and a
beautiful Sabbath atmosphere.
For reservations call Linda
Goldfarb, or the synagogue of-
fice, 393-5525.
HADASSAH
Shalom Group
The Shalom group of the
Hadassah Chapter of St. Peters-
burg will hold its regular meeting
on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 12:30
p.m. at the Jewish Community
Center, 8167 Elbow Lane North.
A very interesting program is
being planned.
Alliyah Dime Bank Lunch
The aliyah group of Hadassah
will hold its annual Dime Bank
lunch on Wednesday, Feb. 8 at
10:30 a.m. The luncheon will be
held at the home of Thelma Gil-
bert, 301 61st N. The program
will feature Dr. Brian Kagan, pe-
diatrician, who will speak on
child safety.
There is a charge of two dime
banks or its equivalent of $10.
Full donor credit will be given for
all returned dime banks. There is
also a $2 charge (no donor credit)
to help defrv expenses. RSVP
Marilyn BenDjamin 345-3544 or
Gail Frye 522-6751.
TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM
Temple Ahavat Shalom
Sisterhood presents a fashion
show for men and women. Cock-
tails and dinner with music will
be held at the safety Harbor Spa
on Thursday, Feb. 16, at 6:30
p.m. for cocktails, with dinner
following at 7:30 p.m. For a
seated dinner.
The fashions will be presented
from: I.oehmanns and Surreys'
Mens Store of Countryside.
The price of admission is: $15.
Please send your check to Lenore
Ward, 462-2 Lakeview Drive,
Palm Harbor. Florida 33563.
Checks received by Feb. l n*
reserve Uble up to eight pertoo,
On Thursday, Jan. 26, at 11-30
a.m. The Sisterhood will host 1
"Brown Bag With the Rabbi."
Rabbi Jan bresky will lead,
discusion on "Changing Role, ol
Women in Reform Judaism."
Bring your lunch and coffee and
dessert will be served.
On Jan. 24, the religious school
will be dedicated in honor of
Frank and Helen Weaner. A very
special Oneg Shabbat will folio,
service. The Tree of Life for the
temple will also be dedicated that
same evening.
BRAN DEIS UNIVERSITY
National Women's Committee
Suncoaat Chapter
Cynthia Shulman, National
President of the Women's Com-
mittee, will be the honored guest
at a special Workshop-Confer-
ence Luncheon. This event will
take place on Monday, Feb. 13
from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the
Bay Harbor Inn, Courtney
Campbell Causeway, Tampa.
Admission of $10 will cover
registration, morning coffee,
luncheon and workshops. Please
call Joyce Weissman (397-59281
or Belle Goldstein (785-3992) for
reservations.
DONT FORGET Bring
your used books and magazines
to the Golda Meir Center Library
box the Brandeis Womens First
Annual Used Book Sale. For
pick-up and information call
Clara Zunder. 797-7029. or
Rosalie Cohn. 796-7303.
GOLDA MEIR
FRIENDSHIP CLUB
On Monday Feb. 6 we will have
a business meeting. A nominat-
ing committee will be appointed
to select a slate of officers to be
presented at our March 5 meet-
ing. F.lection of officers for the
ensuing year will be held at our
April 2 meeting. It is very im-
portant that we have good at-
tendance at these meetings
CANDLELIGHTING TIMES
FOR FEBRUARY:
February 3
5:55 p.m.
February 10
6:00 p.m.
February 17
6:05 p.m.
February 24
6:10 p.m.
Interfaith Service
A special interfaith service will
Religious Directory
UFAPLE BETH [L Reform
400 S Pasadena Ave., Si. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi David
Susskind Friday Evening Sabbath Services 8 p.m., Saturday
Morning Sabbath Service II a.m. Tel. 347-6136.
Congregation BFTH SHOLOM Conservative
1844 54 St., S St Petersburg 33707 Rabbi Sidney Rockoff
Sabbath Services Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday. 9a.m.
Tel. 321-3380
Congregation B'NAI ISRAEL Conservative
301 59 St., N., St. Petersburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Luki Cantor
Irving Zummer Sabbath Service: Friday evening 8 p.m.
Saturday, 9 a.m.; Sunday 9 a.m.; Monday-Friday 8 a.m.; and
evening Minyon Tel. 381-4900, 381-4901.
Congregation BETH CHAI Conservative
8400 125 St. N., Semmole 33542 Rabbi Sherman P. Kirshner*
Sabbath Services: Friday evenings 8 p.m.; Salurday, 9:30a.m.
Tel. 393-5525.
CMfrtfttiM BE TH SHALOM Conservative
1325 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Kenneth
Bromberg Sabbath Service*: Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday9
a.m.; Sunday morning Minyan9a.m. 531-1418.
TEAiPLE BNAI ISRAEL Reform
1685 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Arthur Baseman
Sabbath Service*: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday 10:30o.m.
Tel. 531-5829.
UMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM Referm
P.Ot Box 1176, Dunedin 33528 1575 Curlew Rd., Palm Harbor
33563 Rabbi Jan Bretky Sabbath Service*: Friday evening 8
p.m. Tel. 785-8811.


Wd>y,jMMMty27,1964
The Jewish Fktaiian ofPin*Uas County
.
Coo* and take part in electing
your officers.
On Monday Feb. IS we will
l^ve a social. We are planning to
have music and refreshment* for
Valentines day.
On Monday Feb. 20 we will
have a social with cards and
games of your choice. Refresh-
ments.
JEWISH WAR VETERAN8
Abe Ader Poet 246
February Calendar
Sunday, January 29 Break-
fast meeting, Post and Auxiliary
9:30 a.m. at the JCC, 8167 Elbow
Lane, St. Petersburg. Guest
speaker, The Honorable Mayor of
St. Petersburg, Corinne Free-
man.
Sunday, January 29 Bingo
at Bay Pines 2:30 p.m., Monte
Carlo at Bay Pines 7 p.m. Vol-
unteers please call Jack A very
391-4416.
Wednesday, February 8
Regular meeting, Post and
Auxiliary 8 p.m. at JCC, 8167
Elbow Lane, St. Petersburg.
Sunday, February 12 Card
Party and Bingo 7 p.m. at the
JCC, 8167 Elbow Lane, St.
Petersburg Coffee, Surprise
dessert. Snacks, and fantastic
door prizes. Donation $2.50. Join
us for fun.
Tuesday, February 14
Valentine Party for the Veterans
at Bay Pines VA Medical Center,
volunteers call Jack Avery 391-
4416.
Tuesday, February 14
Valentine Party at Happy Day
Workers Nursery for the
children, given by the Ladies
Auxiliary, volunteers call Anne
Belkin 381-8045.
Sunday, February 26
Breakfast meeting. Post and
Auxiliary 9:30 a.m. at the JCC,
8167 Elbow I^ne, St. Petersburg.
Guest Speaker Sheriff of Pinellas
County. Mr. Jerry Coleman.
Guest Auxiliary President of
gulf Coast County Council
Minnie Posner.
Sunday, March 11 Keep this
date open for a delicious Kosher
Chinese Dinner by Super-Chefs
Jeanne and Joe Charles, (kosher
Chinese dinner???)
Paul Surenky Poet 409
Feb. 7 Auxiliary Board
meeting to be held at Sylvia
Blumenthal's home 277 Kent
Place Safety Harbor.
Feb. 13 "A Day at the
Races" Tampa Bay Downs
planned by the Auxiliary. Inter-
ested parties contact Fran
Fhrenpreis 736-5102.
Feb. 14 Regular meeting of
the Post and Auxiliary to be held
at Golda Meir Center 302 S.
Jupiter Clearwater at 7:30
p.m.
Feb. 26 The Post and Auxd-
ry"s regular monthly commit-
nnt to service the veterans at
Bay Pines Hospital with bingo,
refreshments, etc. Anyone who
can help in this endeavor, please
contact commander Paul Hoch-
*rg 796-0960.
Page 7
Golba/iielrCent
The Golda Meir Center's New Year's
'Cf~ Party Ushered In 1984 In Grand Style
Among the Celebrants Were:
302 SOUTH JUPITER
CUARWATtR, FLORIDA 33515
&5-4bl-0222
GOLDA MEIR CENTER FOUNDERS
THE CHARLES AND ISADORA RUTENBERG
FAMILY DOUNDATION, INC.
MR. AND MRS. SALU DEVNANI
MR.AND MRS. BEN GELBART
DR. AND MRS. LESTER GREENBERG
MR. AND MRS. AL HOFFMAN
* MR. AND MRS. MARSHALL KENT
MR. AND MRS. ELLI MILLS
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM MORRISON
* MR. AND MRS. CHARLES RUTENBERG
MR. MARC RUTENBERG
* MRS. MARY RUTENBERG
MR. AND MRS. HERBERT SCHWARTZ
MR. AND MRS. SAMUELSILBERMAN
MR. ANDMRS.SIGMUNDSTROCHLITZ
Golda Meir Center Field TOP
Field of Interest Fund Contributors.
MA MCI A 1. PBCTnUN.
EXECUTIVE MBECTOR
Arthur Brosman singing his
favorite song Autumn Leaves
?33=?3<)
*& ?
COMING ATTRACTIONS
LIFE EXTENSION PROS ANDCONS
PANEL DISCUSSION AT GOLDA MEIR CENTER
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12. 1984 2:00 P.M.
SPEAKERS: Dr. Robert Davis Visiting Professor
University of South Florida since 1960, Fellow Gerontological
Society.
Gene V. Chenoweth Columnist for St. Petersburg-
Clearwater Times.
Gladys Ross Octogenarian, active at the Golda
MeirCenter.
Following the panel discussion, questions will be entertained
from the audience.
For information call: Anne Blatt, 536-6195; Rivian Morris,
f.Ui 0890 or Curt Mayer, 531-5477.
Wiesel, In the hand of Israel by
Amos Oz, My Mother, Golda
Meir by Menachem Meir, A
Vanished World by Roman Vish-
niac, Rabbis and Wives, by
Chaim Grade, and Schindler's
List by Thomas Keneally.
The librarians of the Golda
Meir Center urge you to read
these and other books available
in the library.
Flo Grunnet, talented singer and
entertainer
LIBRARY HOURS
MONDAY-FRIDAY
10:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M.
WANT AD
HELP NEEDED: Volunteers
who would be interested in work-
ing on a monthly newsletter from
the Golda Meir Center. Publicity
cha. persons of the organizations '
which meet at the Center are
welcome to join this committee to
offer ideas and input, also. No ex-
perience in writing is necessary
. just the desire to be involved.
BarMitzvah
BRIAN WEISS'
Brian Weiss, son of Mrs. Terri
Weiss Vogel and Mr. Gerald
Weiss, will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah on Feb. 4 at
Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater.
The celebrant is a student in
the B'nai Israel religious school
and is in the Junior Youth Group.
He attends Safety Harbor Middle
School, where he is in the 8th
grade. Brian is on the honor roll
and has received many trophies
for tennis. He has also played in
many State Tennis tournaments.
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Vogel will
host a reception on Feb. 4 at Bon
Appetit. Special guests will
include his father, Gerald Weiss,
from New Jersey, and his grand-
parents, George and Florence
Silver from Millburn, N.J. Also
an uncle from Louisville, Ky.
and ... Stephanie Newmark,
helping with refreshments
*
FUNERAL DftECTORS
Arnold & Gnmdrwt
Inc.
LOCAL & OUT-OF-STATE
1 ARRANGEMENTS
CaNSaNA1M4B0B4RTM0OQK
GARVN.MMU)'
smbmn j. mmutM
LKBfK) fUNBUl DSKcroas
521-2444
4im it* n. unrniR nm
. ..The only firm dedicated
to serving Jewish families
exduaivcly..

The Jewish Monthly of
January 1964 published a Jewish
Best-Seller List. This list was
based on information from a
sampling of Jewish bookstores
across the country of best-selling
recently-published books of Jew-
ish interest. Of the ten books on
the list the Golda Meir Center
Library has these seven books
available for circulation: Ben-
Gurion: Prophet of Fire by Dan
Kurzman. The Golem by Elie
WHEN A JEWISH FAMILY NEEDS A
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTOR
THEY CALL
DAVID C. GROSS
MENORAH GARDENS
T
Florida's West Coast
Only True
Jewish Cemetery
T
Call 531-0475
Bronze Memorials by
Gorham Master Craftsmen
LOCAL AM OUT Of STATE ARRANGEMENTS
CHEVRA KA0ISHA
DIRECTORS AVAILABLE 24 HOURS
ME NEED CONSULTATION ANO PRE PAH).
INF LA TKW-PROOF FUNERAL TRUSTS
SPACIOUS COMPLETE FACILITIES
FOR FAMILY t FRIENDS
OUR PRICES MEET EVERY NEED
SOCIAL SECURITY ANO V A
BENEFITS COUNSELING
REFORM CONSERVATIVE ORTHODOX
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
WEST CHAPEL
EAST CMAr>EL
I 381-4911
822-2024
I CENTRAL AVENUE
(4 ilKS. CAST OP PASADENA AVE.)
1045 tth AVENUE NO.
(1 BLOCK FROM ST. ANTHONYS HOSPITAL)



Page 8
The Jewish Fbridian ofPinellas County
Friday, January 27,1984
Jewish Community Center of Pinellas County
8167 ELBOW LANE NORTH ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 33710 PH. 813/344-5795
Heath Boksen, Ian Tabb, David Stem.
Matthew Hlrach. Jodl Berman, Steven
Rubin. Nicky Delgado. Melissa Little.
Jace Castle;
Jordan Rubin, Jeremy Rosott. Randy
Moss. Amy Gross. Becky Kramer,
Jenny Kramer. Justin Steinberg,
Danny Satlnoff, Evan Satlnoff, Jody
Pearlsteln, Michael Johnson;
Sarah Armstrong, Cynthia Cohn. Mi-
chael Cohn, Eddie Rodriguez. Eric
Lynn. David Radoff, David Adler,
Sammy Heller. Mitch Heller. Abby
Coyle. Kyle Cohen. Andrew Baker. Todd
O'Day; ______
Andrew Dresdner. Lawrence Dres-
dner. Stephanie Dresdner, Jennifer
Butler, Wendy Slegel. Scott Jay. Jen-
nifer Stark. Gavin Stark, Cory Resnlck;
Erin Sembler. Mandy Yaeger. Dinah
Yaeger. Marc Silver, Cheryl Sliver,
Elaine Rodriguez, Maurice Brown,
Dana Alexander, Aaron Awerback,
Elyse Miller Julie Miller;
Brian Fox, Marlssa Fox. Nathaniel
King. Jessica Sher, Jamie Bloom.
Mclanle Lawlor. Rachel Poll, Elyse
Silver, and Coleen Dalton.
JCC Senior Friendship Club monthly Birthday and Anniversary1
Party.
JCC Senior Friendship Club
The JCC Senior Friendship
Club has a busy calendar for the
months ahead.
Feb. 16 Guest Speaker, Jack
Fordham will speak
New Developments
Security and Medicare."
Feb. 21-22 Senior Friend-
ship Club trip to the Butt
Reynold's Dinner Theater and to
Miami's Bass Museum to view,
"The Precious Legacy."
Feb. 23 Monthly birthday
and anniversary party.
March 1 Golden Circle
Party.
March 8 The Club's Anni-
versary Party, held at the
Dolphin Beach Resort. Please call
Susan Shapiro at 344-5795 for
further information.
Children's Programs
We still have a few openings
left in our Before and After
School Program. Child care is
available (along with transporta-
tion) from 7:30 to 9:3 a.m. and
from 12 noon until 6 p.m. We are
fully licensed and do have funds
availabe from both the Juvenile
Welfare Board (for exceptional
children) and the Latchkey
Program.
Flea Market at the JCC
The Jewish Community Center
will be holding a Flea Market on
Sunday. Feb. 5, from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. We need all members and
"The participants of the Center to help
in Social us by donating articles for sale.
Do your spring cleaning early
this year and put aside any
unused articles for our sale (good
condition only please). Articles
such as White Elephants. Books
(Paperbacks), Kitchen Goods,
Toys, Funiture, Baby Goods, etc.
. will be greatly appreciated.
(No Clothes please).
The Center will pick up articles
if you can't deliver.
The Jewish Community Center
wil also need volunteers on the
day of the sale.
Please call the Center at 344-
5795 if you wish to donate ar-
ticles or volunteer your time.
JCC Camp Kadima
The JCC held their annual
Camp Kadima Reunion on
Sunday, Jan. 8. Campers, coun-
selors and parents enjoyed a
magic show, balloons, ice cream
sundaes and memories of fun
times at Camp Kadima '83. Reg-
istration for Camp is in full
swing, enroll your child today for
a fun-filled summer at Camp
Kadima.
^J,
JCC Playgroup tnis January. I would like to wel-
Happy New Year to all! Play- come back Rachel Luski and in-
group is off to a really good start troduce two new members. Jodi
Feed Margolis
Executive Director
Berman and Sarah Ramsey. I
must also say good-by to Yona
Benstock, who started her new
schooling at the Temple, and also
wish Melissa Terrin and her
family the best of luck as they
move to New Jersey. They will be
dearly missed!
Even though there is no
SNOW in Florida, the Playgroup
children will be busy making
"Cottonball Snowmen." snow-
flakes, coloring Smurf pictures
and fingerpainting during the
month of January.
There are still quite a few
openings for Playgroup-age chil-
dren, especially for those who
turned two beteen the months of
October. November and
December of 1983. For more in-
formation call the JCC at 344-
5795 and arrange for a one day
free visit to the Playgroup.
Israelis Barred from Holding Bank Accounts Abroad
We also offer varioius move-
ment classes for children in-
cluding aerobics, ballet and
modern dance along with both
beginning and intermediate
karate instruction. Our Toddler -
cise Program, which is very
popular, is beginning again on
Jan.ll.
For more informatioin on any
of these programs, please contact
Sherry Armstrong, Children's
Program Director at 344-5795.
New Children's Program Director
Announced
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County has an-
nounced the promotion of Mrs.
Sherry H. Armstrong from Teen
Director to Director of Children's
Programs. Sherry joined the staff
at the JCC in March of 1983 as
Unit Head for Safari-Caravan
and took over as Teen Director in
September of that year.
She has lived in Pinellas Coun-
ty for 28 years, coming here from
her native Alabama. She has a
strong community background
and has served as a volunteer for
the American Cancer Society,
American Heart Fund, Suncoast
Arthritis Foundation, Bayfront
Medical Center, Girl Scouts of
America and has been involved in
the local, county and state PTA.
She is currently serving her
second year as a member of the
PTA County Board of Managers.
Sherry was employed by the
Pinellas County School Board for
the past several years and has
served on many educational
committees.
Stop by and meet Sherry and
watch for many new and exciting
changes in our Children's Pro-
grams at the Center.
LOOK WHO'S
COMING TO CAMP:
Cory Resnlck, Ellssa Graham,
Heather Boksen, Shawn Tabb, David
Seller, Joel Berman, Sharon Grau,
Marcla Rubin, Mark Little, Tim Heft,
Derek Cralg;
Amy Geffon, Ira Rosoff, Dor! Moss.
Adam Greene. Nicole Greene. Eitan
Pearl, Teresa Okun, Jessica Okun.
Daniel Rosen. Marc Bergoffen. Sharon
Goetz;
Lisa Robblns, Jessica Dalton, Daniel
Lupa Stacle Lynn. Jason Frederick.
Jamie Frederick. Brian Applefleld.
Amy Moore. Melissa Moore. Ricky
Kanner, Erica Greenberg;
Sarah Mokotoff. Yona Benstock.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The government has
banned Israelis from hold-
ing bank accounts abroad
and imposed a series of
other severe foreign cur-
rency restrictions aimed at
controlling runaway infla-
tion and reducing the coun-
try's growing foreign trade
deficit. Critics immediately
denounced the moves as in-
effective and unenforceable.
Foreign bank accounts must be
closed within one month under
the new regulation! which took
effect Tuesday morning. In
addition, Israelis are banned
from holding or dealing in foreign
securities, except those of Israeli
companies traded on the New
York or other overseas stock ex-
changes. Officials here estimate
that Israelis hold some $700 mil-
lion worth of stocks and shares
abroad.
OTHER MEASURES an-
nounced are a reduction from
$3,000 to $2,000 in the currency
an Israeli may take on a trip
abroad; a ban on dealing in gold
which applies to Israelis and
foreign nationals who use money
in Israel for such dealings; a
drastic reduction in the amount
of assets that Israelis who
emigrate may take with them.
Yosef Sarig, Controller of
Foreign Currency at the Bank of
Israel, told a radio interviewer
that he was not prepared to say
that additional restrictions will
not be applied. His remarks
caused widespread concern over
Dollar deposit accounts.
Government officials said the
new measures would help narrow
the balance of payments deficit
by decreasing the amount of hard
currency Israeli can spend
abroad.
But a leading economist, Prof.
Assa Razin, a former adviser to
the government said that the
restrictions would make "no
meaningful difference" to the
trade balance. He said most of
the measures could not be en-
forced and predicted that people
would circumvent them by re-
course to the black market.
THIS IS Just of nuisance
value. It will increase the public's
nevousness, but little else,"
Razin said. He criticized the
government for its "incapability
of cutting its own budget mean-
ingfully."
Labor MK Gad Yaacobi, also
an economist, said the new
currency measures were a final,
belated clearing of the "last ruins
of the so-called economic revolu-
tion: instituted by the Likud
government when it was first
voted into office in 1977.
At that time, the government
rescinded all foreign current
controls, some were recently re- ,
imposed. But the measures an-
nounced are a total reversal of
Likud's original commitment to
laissez-faire economics.
Radio Station
Picks Begin
PARIS (JTA) Listeners
of a French radio station voted
former Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin "Man of the Year" for
1983. Several thousand listeners
took part in the poll conducted by
Radio Community, which is
operated by the French Jewish
Welfare Fund in Paris. The poll
showed that more than two-
thirds of the participants sup-'
ported Begin.
Passover- 1984
universal kosher tours inc
Cordially invites you to Lelemate
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
at the {Diplomat Motel
cHollywood, 2la.
APRIL 16-APRIL 24,1984
Comptate Ho).day Program
From $799 to $1099 par parson doubt* occupancy
Plus 18% taxaa and gratuities
? JUJituHial .%fo\n,olton Contact
Univttsal uiosht'i -FouM One.
i iftni ulata
%m 212J94-08J6 800-221 2791
Exduavc OpeuTMt fon DIPLOMAT HOTH.
TRADITION
My Grandfather served
your Grandmother
(if you come from New York city.)
Papa Julius served the best Kosher food In
New York City. He gave the best portions
and he was dedicated to satisfying his
customers.
As a tribute to Papa Julius we at Bounty
Catering Pledge to you, the best food and
service anyone could give, and all our em-
ployees give their most to make your af-
fair Batam.
Good Food and Service at
Bounty is Tradition
Call Ron today
Bounty catering
1890 B Drew Street Clw.
1-446-8474


Full Text
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/


Pwre8
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Friday, January 27]
Jewish Community Center of PineUas County
---------------8167 ELBOW LANE NORTH. ST. PETERSBURG, FIX 33710. PM. 813/344-5795
Heath Bokaen. Un Tbb. U.via sum.
Matthew Hlnch. Jodl Berm*n. Steven
Rubin Nicky Dlgdo. MelUaa UtUe.
JaceCaatle
Jordan Rubin. Jeremy Rosoff. Randy
Mom Amy Groea. Becky Kramer
jenny Kramer. JuaUn Sterner*
Danny Satlnott. Evan SaUnoff. Jody
Peartateln. Michael Johraon
Sarah Armstrong Cynthia Cohn. Ml
chael Cohn. Eddie Rodrtguex. Eric
Lynn. David RadoH. David Adler
Sammy Heller. Mitch Heller Abby
Coyle. Kyle Cohen. Andrew Baker. Todd
ODay
Andre* Dresdnr. La*~nJ[*_
dner Stephanie Dreadner. Jennller
Sr We*ndy Siege.. Scott Jay. Jan-
mterSlart Gavin Stark.Cory Reanlck.
Erin Sembler. Mandy Vaegr Dinah
Y.eger. Marc Sliver. Cheryl Silver.
Elaine Rodriguez Maurice Brown
Dana Alexander. Aaron Awerback.
Elyae Miller Julie Miller;
Brian Fox Marina Fox Nathaniel
King. JeaUca Sher. Jamie Bloom
Melkn.e Lawlor. Rachel PoU. Elyae
Silver and Coleen Dalton
JCC Senior
Party.
Friendship Club monthly Birthday and Anniversary
JCC Senior Friendship Club
The JCC Senior Friendship
Club has a busy calendar for the
months ahead.
Feb. 16 Guest Speaker. Jack
Fordham will speak on. "The
New Developments in Social
Security and Medicare."
Feb. 21-22 Senior Friend-
ship Club trip to the Burt
Reynold's Dinner Theater and to
Miami's Bass Museum to view.
"The Precious Legacy."
Feb. 23 Monthly birthday
and anniversary party.
March 1 Golden Circle
Party.
March 8 The Club's Anni-
versary Party, held at the
Dolphin Beach Resort. Please call
Susan Shapiro at 344-5795 for
further information.
Children's Programs
We still have a few openings
left in our Before and After
School Program. Child care is
available (along with transporta-
tion! from 7:30 to 9:3 a.m. and
from 12 noon until 6 p.m. We are
fully licensed and do have funds
availabe from both the Juvenile
Welfare Board (for exceptional
children) and the Latchkey
Program.
We also offer varioius move-
ment classes for children in-
cluding aerobics, ballet and
modem dance along with both
beginning and intermediate
karate instruction. Our Toddler-
rise Program, which is very
popular, is beginning again on
Jan.ll.
For more informatioin on any
of these programs, please contact
Sherry Armstrong. Children's
Program Director at 344-5795.
New Children's Program Director
Announced
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County has an-
nounced the promotion of Mrs.
Sherry H. Armstrong from Teen
Director to Director of Children's
Programs. Sherry joined the staff
at the JCC in March of 1983 as
Unit Head for Safari-Caravan
and took over as Teen Director in
September of that year.
She has lived in Pinellas Coun-
ty for 28 years, coming here from
her native Alabama. She has a
strong community background
and has served aa a volunteer for
the American Cancer Society,
American Heart Fund, Suncoast
Arthritis Foundation, Bayfront
Medical Center, Girl Scouts of
America and has been involved in
the local, county and state PTA.
She is currently serving her
second year as a member of the
PTA County Board of Managers.
Sherry was employed by the
Pinellas County School Board for
the past several years and has
served on many educational
committees.
Stop by and meet Sherry and
watch for many new and exciting
changes in our Children's Pro-
grams at the Center.
Flea Market at the JCC
The Jewish Community Center
will be holding a Flea Market on
Sunday, Feb. 5. from 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. We need all members and
participants of the Center to help
us by donating articles for sale.
Do your spring cleaning early
this year and put aside any
unused articles for our sale Igood
condition only please). Articles
such as White Elephants, Books
(Paperbacks). Kitchen Goods.
Toys. Funiture. Baby Goods, etc.
. will be greatly appreciated
(No Clothes please).
The Center will pick up articles
if you can't deliver.
The Jewish Community Center
wil also need volunteers on the
day of the sale.
Please call the Center at 344-
5795 if you wish to donate ar-
ticles or volunteer your time.
JCC Camp Kadima
The JCC held their annual
Camp Kadima Reunion on
Sunday. Jan. 8. Campers, coun-
selors and parents enjoyed a
magic show, balloons, ice cream
sundaes and memories of fun
times at Camp Kadima '83. Reg-
istration for Camp is in full
swing, enroll your child today for
a fun-filled summer at Camp
Kadima.
LOOK WHO'S
COMING TO CAMP
Cory Reanlck. Ellssa Graham.
Heather Bokien. Shawn Tabb, David
Seller. Joel Herman. Sharon Grau.
Marcla Rubin. Mark Little. Tim Heft!
Derek Cralg;
Amy Geffon. Ira Rosoff Dorl Moss.
Adam Greene. Nicole Greene, Eltan
Pearl. Teresa Okun. Jessica Okun.
Daniel Rosen. Marc Bergoffen. Sharon
Goetz:
Lisa Robblns. Jessica Dalton. Daniel
Lupa Stacle Lynn. Jason Frederick.
Jamie Frederick. Brian Applefleld.
Amy Moore. Melissa Moore. Ricky
Kanner. Erica Greenberg.
Sarah Mokotoff. Yona Benstock.
JCC Playgroup
Happy New Year to all! Play-
group is off to a really good start
this January' I would like to wel-
come back Rachel Luski and in-
troduce two new members. Jodi
Fied Margolis
Executive Director
Berman and Sarah Hams.
must also say good-by to ,
Benstock. who started her
schooling at the Temple, and]
wish Melissa Terrin and I
family the best of luck as
move to New Jersey They \
dearly missed!
Even though there i
SNOW in Florida, the Playg
children will be busy ml
"Cottonball Snowmen,"
flakes, coloring Smurf pu
and fingerpainting during
month of January
There are still quite
openings for Playgroup ag
dren. especially for thos
turned two beteen the mon
October. November
December of 1983. For m formation call the JCC
5795 and arrange for a
free visit to the Playgroup. I
Israelis Barred from Holding Bank Accounts Abroa<
ingfully.'
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The government has
banned Israelis from hold-
ing bank accounts abroad
and imposed a series of
other severe foreign cur-
rency restrictions aimed at
controlling runaway infla-
tion and reducing the coun-
try's growing foreign trade
deficit. Critics immediately
denounced the moves as in-
effective and unenforceable.
Foreign bank accounts must be
closed within one month under
the now regulation: which took
effect Tuesday morning. In
addition, Israelis are banned
from holding or dealing in foreign
securities, except those of Israeli
companies traded on the New
York or other overseas stock ex-
changes. Officials here estimate
that Israelis hold some $700 mil-
lion worth of stocks and shares
abroad.
OTHER MEASURES an-
nounced are a reduction from
$3,000 to $2,000 in the currency
an Israeli may take on a trip
abroad; a ban on dealing in gold
which applies to Israelis and
foreign nationals who use money
in Israel for such dealings: a
drastic reduction in the amount
of assets that Israelis who
emigrate may take with them.
Yosef Sarig. Controller of
Foreign Currency at the Bank of
Israel, told a radio interviewer
that he was not prepared to say
that additional restrictions will
not be applied. His remarks
caused widespread concern over
Dollar deposit accounts.
Government officials said the
new measures would help narrow
the balance of payments deficit
by decreasing the amount of hard
currency Israeli can spend
abroad.
But a leading economist, Prof.
Assa Razin. a former adviser to
the government said that the
restrictions would make "no
meaningful difference" to the
trade balance. He said most of
the measures could not be en-
forced and predicted that people
would circumvent them by re-
course to the black market.
THIS IS Just of nuisance
value. It will increase the public's
nevousness. but little else,"
Razin said. He criticized the
government for its "incapability
of cutting its own budget mean
BOaaOBHuu
Passover 1984
universal kosher tours inc
Loidially invites you to Celeoiate
A TRADmONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
at ike ^Diplomat Motel
crlollywood, Jtia.
APRIL 16 APRIL 24, 1984
Comptota Holiday Program
From $799 to $1099 par parson doubt* occupancy
Ptua 19H taxaa and gratufttoa
Uo% JlMtuxial .%foimahon Ctmltl
Univtaal .Koshti Jouu Snc.
5 iPrni Ptato
Jit* %*IC. m,m %,k ,ooo,
212 994-0836 800-221 2791
Bedim Opeuraa foil DIPLOMAT MOTH.
Labor MK Gad Yaacob
an economist, said th
currency measures were
belated clearing of the "la
of the so-called economic i
tion: instituted by the I
government when it wd
voted into office in 1977.
At that lime, the gove
rescinded all foreign
controls, some were rece|
imposed. But the meastl
nounced are a total revl
Likud's original commilij
laissez-faire economics.
Radio Statit
Picks Begii
PARIS (JTAI -
of a French radio stalio|
former Israeli Premier In
Begin '"Man of the Y
1983. Several thousand
took part in the poll conda
Radio Community, w|
operated by the Frencli
Welfare Fund in Paris,
showed that more thlj
thirds of the participa^
|x>rted Begin.
\ V \ N >.>.
TRADITION I
My Grandfather serve!
your Grandmother I
(if you come from New York city.l
Papa Julius served the best Kosher fod
New York City. He gave the best port
and he was dedicated to satisfying
customers.
As a tribute to Papa Julius we at bou
catering Pledge to you, the best food
service anyone could give, and all our i
pioyees give their most to make youi
fairBatam.
Good Food and Service a
Bounty is Tradition
Call Ron today
Bounty catering
1890 BOrew Street aw.
1-446-8474