The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00042

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text

Of Pinellas Comity
lolume 2 Number 23
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, November 6,1981
FmdSfiochil
Price 10 Cents
Campaign
Up With Confidence
Let the Old Year End.

The wheels of the 1982 com-
bed Jewish Appeal-Federation
npaign have begun to turn,
fording to Suzanne Schechter,
R2 women's division chairper-
fSuzanne Schechter is well
bwn as a hard worker and a
r," stated Reva Kent, presi
It of the Federation when an-
ncing Sue's appointment.
fcr record in a variety of
Eership roles in federation
lunity service and in cam-
is an enviable one. We can
forward to one of our best
lien's campaigns with Sue in
land."
ie has worked in a variety of
lizations through the years,
notable, in light of her cur-
| position, Sue Schechter was
|first recipient of a special
for outstanding service,
i was presented to her at the
annual meeting. In a per
interview with the Jewish
lian, she shared a few
khts for the 1982 campaign,
economics make it harder to
] funds make it more im-
it than ever to do so. I
this community will re-
if we let them know how
the needs are. I am confi-
}hat the new campaign cabi-
. ill let the community
Ith the help of the leader-
\f our federation I know we
great things this year,"
ided. "I am delighted to
it young women have al-
| been calling asking if they
Ip to find out what they
)." Her goal, she said, "Is
Suzanne Schechter
to involve women from every part
of the spectrum of our Jewish
community, all ages, all profes-
sions, all backgrounds because
it is important to all of our
futures as Jews."
Sue Schechter has served the
total Jewish community in a
variety of ways. She was the
campaign coordinator last year
for the women's division. Sue is
also editor of The Jewish
Floridian.
Prior to living in Florida, she
spent two and a half years as
UJA campaign chairwoman in
Huntington, Long Island, in ad-
dition to her membership on the
campaign cabinet of Suffolk
County. She and her husband
Saul chaired Suffolk Young
Leadership Division. The
Schechters have participated in
two missions to Israel, and are
looking forward to initiating a
Pinellas County Israel Mission.
late Dep't Denies Nixon
Trip to Saudis Official
|y DAVID FRIEDMAN
.SHINGTON -
) The State De-
aent denies that for-
President Nixon had
[asked by Secretary of
Alexander Haig to
means to open con-
with the Palestine
ation Organization
his visit to four
countries in the Mid-
st and North Africa.
. Nixon's visits to Saudi
Jordan, Tunisia and
* "private," State De-
ent deputy spokesman
[Romberg said Nixon was
iked to engage in any dis-
n during the trip. He
a report that while in
!. for President Anwar
I's funeral, Nixon and Haig
jjscussed the need to bring
1.0 into the Mideast peace
1BERG STRESSED that
|S. position on the PLO was
"and it is that the U.S.
"neither recognize nor
e with the PLO" until it
es Israel's right to exist
and recognizes UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338.
Romberg also called newspaper
reports that Haig had kept the
White House in the dark about
Nixon's trip a "tempest in a tea-
pot."
He said that on Oct. 8, the day
the American delegation pre-
pared to leave for Cairo for the
funeral. Nixon told Deputy Sec-
retary of State William Clark of
his plans to make a private trip
after the funeral, and Clark
agreed to his request for briefing
papers on the countries he plan-
ned to visit. Romberg said Haig
learned of the planned trip later
in the day, as did President
Reagan.
Nixon was expected to report
on his trip to the Administration
on his return to the U.S. It is not
known whether he would report
to Reagan or Haig or to both.
Nixon, in a stopover in Paris,
issued a statement calling for an
economic boycott of Libya and a
suspension of oil shipments from
the government of Libyan leader
Muammar Kaddafi. He said the
leaders of the four Mideast coun-
tries he visited expressed concern
about Kaddafi and "an interna-
tional threat requires an interna-
tional response."
And the New Year Begin
"Let the old year and its mis-
fortunes end; let the new year
and its blessings commence."
This is a traditional wish which is
expressive of a common enough
human feeling. The pressures of
life sometimes drive us to the
brink of despair, but the opening
of a new year or a new era gives
us hope for the future.
This feeling, of course, is not
necessarily realistic. Life's
problems do not disappear with
the flip of a calendar's page. Indi-
vidually we will continue to
struggle with many of the
problems of the past year. We
may solve them or find that in
the passage of time, they dissolve
of themselves. New challenges
will arise, and we will have to
contend with them.
On the world scene, mounting
pressures against Medinath
Israel will not vanish. Israel's
raid on the nuclear power plant in
Gerry Rubin
Iraq received unanimous con-
demnation in the Security Coun-
cil; South Africa's invasion of
Angola escaped censure by the
American veto. Afghanis, men,
women and children will suffer
massacre; innumerable rebellions
and civil wars will see terrorist
acts leading to the murder of in-
nocents; but the United Nations
and its agencies will continue to
condemn only Israel because it
will not surrender its right to life.
Eventually the new year may
turn out to be no better than the
old.
Nonetheless we will utter a
blessing in praise of the Creator,
"Who has kept us alive, pre-
served us and enabled us to reach
this season." It seems we can
utter a praise in behalf of the old
year and its "misfortunes." The
fact of life itself is cause enough
to recite a blessing. As we sur-
vived all trials in the past, so may
we survive all trials in the future.
Again, we will say a benediction
feeling that life is worthwhile and
gather new strength for the con-
tinuing struggle.
Say What You Think
The Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion has become very active in
the last few months due to invol-
vement of experienced lay-
leadership. "Our new community
relations leadership really cares
about the type of community our
children, our grandchildren and
our neighbors' children will be
growing up in. They care enough
to give their leisure time and ex-
pertise to many fields of commu-
nity concern in order to help
others," said Dr. Gordon Saskin,
CRC chairman.
The question "who to talk to,"
asked by some concerned indi-
viduals in the community who
are unable to make their voices
heard, is a concern of the CRC
committee. "We wish to correct
this. Of course, we encourage any
community member with an
opinion they feel should be
shared with or heard by govern-
ment officials to call the Commu-
nity Relations Committee
through our Federation office,
446-1033, or contact the responsi-
ble city, state or government
official representative at his place
of business."
For your information, names,
addresses and phone numbers of
public officials are listed below.
Say what you think about
presidential actions to the White
House, 202-456-7639.
Say what you think about fed-
eral matters to U.S. Sen. Lawton
Chiles, Suite 437, Russell Senate
Office Building, Washington,
D.C. 20510 Phone 202-224-
5274; U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins,
1037 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg.,
Washington, D.C. 20510, phone
202-224-3041; U.S. Rep. C. W.
Bill Young, Room 2266 Rayburn
House Office Bldg., Washington,
DC 20515, phone 202-225-5961;
and U.S. Rep. Bill McCollum,
Holiday Office Center, 5800 U.S.
19 N. Holiday, FL 33589, 1313
Longwood Building. Washing-
ton D.C. 20515, phone 202-225-
U76.
Say what you think about
state problems to the following
officials: All may be written c,t>
The Capitol, Tallahassee, 30304;
phone numbers are in paren-
theses; Gov. Bob Graham (483-
4441), Attorney General James
Smith (487-19630, Treasurer Bill
Gunter (488-3440), Comptroller
Gerald Lewis (488-5370), Educa-
tion Commissioner Ralph Tur-
lington (487-1785), Agriculture
Commissioner Doyle Conner
(488-3022) and Secretary of State
George Firestone (488-3680).
Say what you think to your
elected county commissioners.
They include: Chairman Bruce
Tyndall (448-2360), Barbara
Todd (448-2363), Charles Rainey
(448-2365), John Chesnut (448-
2276) and Gabriel Cazares (448-
2278).
The county administrator is
Fred Marquis.
Write to them at 315 Court St.,
Clear-water, FL 33516, phone 448-
2485.
Say what you think about St.
Petersburg City affairs to your
elected city council, including
Mayor Corinne Freeman and Vice
Mayor Peter England, J. W.
Cate, David Welch, BUI Bond,
Sally Wallace and Betty Finley.
The city manager is Alan Har-
vey. Write to them at 176 Fifth
St., N., St. Petersburg, FL 33701.
Say what you think about pub-
lic education policy to your
elected school board members.
They are: A. L. Albers, Jerry
Castellanos, John Espey, Betty
Hamilton, Calvin Hunsinger,
Frank Pesuth and Bert Blom-
quist.
Your appointed school super-
intendent is Scott Rose.
Their mailing address is 1960
E. Druid Road, P.O. Box 4688,
Ckarwater, FL 33518. The school
board telephone is 442-1171.
The Community Relations
Committee is a standing commit-
tee of the Jewish Federation of
Pinellas County.
CJF Issues Statement
On Sadat's Death
The following statement was
issued Oct. 6 by CJF President
Morton L. Mandell:
"The North American Jewish
community is deeply shocked at
the violent assassination of
President Anwar El-Sadat. He
was a man of courage and vision,
who played a monumental and
historic role in bringing about
peace between Israel and Egypt
and a degree of stability to the
entire Middle East.
"The Jewish Federations of
North America have alwavs
dreamt of a time when Israel
would truly be free of the threat
of war and instead could cultivate
the pursuits of peace.
"President Sadat, in his ef-
forts, helped move that dream
closer to reality. The Camp David
Accords will remain as his lasting
tribute.
"We join with all peace-loving
people throughout the world in
expressing to Mrs. Sadat and to
the Egyptian people our deepest
sympathy at the loss they, and
the entire world, have suffered
today."





Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Friday, November 6,1981
After
For nation that has been
tested all too frequently on the
sudden shifts and often violent
eruptions in the Middle East,
Israel was severely jolted by the
assassination of Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat. No other
country, except Egypt itself, was
so directly affected by the shots
that felled the Egyptian leader.
The dislocations in Egypt could
have profound implications for
Israel's foreign and domestic
policies. For Israel, which had
gambled so much on. the peace
process, the day of reckoning
that everyone dreaded arrived
much sooner than this nation
ever anticipated. Underlying the
three-year-old peace process was
the anxiety of what would hap-
pen after Sadat's departure from
the political scene. Much as the
question had loomed over this
nation, hardly anyone was pre-
pared to address it so soon, and
under such adverse circum-
stances.
In the days following the
shooting of Sadat, both Egyptian
and Israeli leaders have re-
peatedly and publicly voiced
their assurances that the peace
process would continue on
course. President-elect Hosni
Mujarak | pointedly delivered this
message in one of his first inter-
views, with the Israeli daily
Ma'ariv, and reiterated the same
theme in his talks with Prime
Minister Begin and U.S. Secre-
tary of State Alexander Haig
during their stay in Cairo. Israeli
government officials, for their
part, have made similar declara-
tions, noting that the treaty was
made not with one man, but with
an entire nation.
But beneath the public pro-
nouncements there is much doubt
and nervous tension in Jeru-
salem. Israel knows that the
course of peace never evolved
naturally. It was orchestrated by
one man who guided it with a
rigid hand through its fits and
starts. Where once there had
been strength of purpose personi-
fied by a dominant leader in
Cairo, there exists now a political
anigma. What worries Israel is
not so much the readiness in
Egypt to continue along Sadat's
path, but the ability of his suc-
cessors to do so.
Hosni Mubarak, despite his six
years as Sadat's deputy, is for all
intents and purposes a question
mark in Israel. He has visited
Israel only once. And during
their several meetings with their
Egyptian counterparts, Israeli
leaders rarely got a close under-
standing of Mubarak who, for the
most part, was overshadowed by
Sadat. Some Israeli observers
found Mubarak to be a hardliner
in the negotiations with Israel
over normalization' and
autonomy. More disturbing is the
role he has played as Egypt's
main political link to the Arab
world. Mubarak is known for his
pro-Saudi leanings and his close
ties with the royal family in
Riyadh. It was Mubarak who
conducted the secret negotiations
last year with the Saudis in order
to explore the possibility of re-
establishing diplomatic relations
with Riyadh, i Unlike Sadat,
Mubarak is thought less likely,
for both personal and political
reasons, to dismiss the Arab re-
jectionists out of hand, an atti-
tude that gives Jerusalem pause
for concern.
Right now, however, it is the
time element and not necessarily
Mubarak's personal outlook that
poses the major problem for
Israel. The Camp David Accords
workable agreement on
autonomy for the West Bank and
Gaza, and strengthening the nor-
malization ties between the two
countries. After a ten-month sus-
pension, the autonomy talks were
resumed in September. A clear
understanding over the nature of
self rule for the Palestinians stil'
remains to be reached. Also,
Israel has several complaints
over the state of bilateral rela-
tions, particularly concerning the
lack of trade and the facilitation
of tourism. Heretofore, it re-
quired the direct and personal in-
tervention of Sadat in order to
break thorugh some of the politi-
cal and bureaucratic logjams in
the negotiations.
Understandably, Mubarak will
be more concerned in the near
future with consolidating his
political base and dealing with
his foes, both in Egypt and in the
Arab world. It is therefore
though unlikely that any
meaningful progress can be made
between Israel and Egypt over
autonomy and normalization.
That leaves the Likud govern-
ment on the horns of a dilemma:
either act out the final with-
drawal from Sinai without exert-
ing any leverage on the peace
process, or postpone the final
pullhack from Sinai, thereby
violating a contractual agree-
ment and risk incurring the en-
mity of the new regime in Cairo
and with it the wrath of the
Western world.
In the coming weeks, Begin
will face an increasing volley of
criticism and challenges, some of
it from within the government
coalition, to unilaterally halt the
peace process. Several leading
Knesset members have voiced
caution and apprehension over
the peace process during this
period of transition. Knesset
foreign affairs committee chair-
man stated that no final moves
should be made until future
Egyptian intentions have been
clarified beyond doubt. Leaders
of the right-wing Tehiya party
find new impetus for their de-
mands that the government
abandon the autonomy talks and
renounce its intentions to quit
Sinai. The "stop the withdrawal"
movement amongst the Sinai
settlers, organized primarily by
the ultra-nationalist Gush
Emunim, who have sent squat-
ters to the settlement region, can
be expected to gain momentum
and broader political support
than it now enjoys. And as the
April deadline appraches, so too
does the grim scenario of violence
marking the evacuation of the
Sinai settlers. The events in
Egypt have girded the opponents
of Camp David with even greater
political conviction in the justice
of their cause. A bloody battle in
the Sinai pitting Jewish soldiers
against Jewish settlers would, in
the opinion of many observers,
shake the fragile coalition in
Jerusalem and possibly spell the
collapse of the Begin govern-
ment.
The killing of Sadat has left
Begin walking a political tight-
rope. Should he postpone the
April deadline, he risks yet
another setback in U.S.-Israeli
relations and the prospect of an-
gering the new Egyptian govern-
ment at a time when Mubarak
salem is Mubarak's control over
the army, the main source of
authority in Egypt. Serious mis-
givings linger here over the ex-
tent of military involvement in
the assassination of Sadat.
Israeli intelligence experts, ac-
cording to some foreign press re-
ports, are convinced that Sadat's
killers received assistance and
support from senior elements in
the army and administration.
True or not, some military
analysts anticipate a purge in the
Egyptian army. But if a purge
takes place this in itself could be
precarious to Mubarak's support
and, by extension, to the peace
process.
Israel is also alert to the im-
pact Sadat's violent fall will have
on the stability of the region. The
jubilant reactions in Libya, Syria
and the PLO augur a fresh at-
tempt to the Arab rejectionists to
undermine the delicate peace.
The Israel Defense Forces are al-
so on the alert to any attempt by
the PLO to take advantage of the
recent events to destabilize the
situation, possibly by terminat-
ing the three-month-old cease-fire
on the Lebanese border and by
stepping up its acts of terrorism.
The Begin government is also
mindful of the effect Sadat's de-
parture will have in the West
Bank and Gaza, where the assas-
sination was greeted with relief
by the Palestinian inhabitants.
Only a few weeks ago, under a
plan drawn up by Defense Minis-
ter Ariel Sharon, Israel had been
loosening its military control
over the occupied territories, a
unilateral move that would form
the de facto basis for Israel's
autonomy scheme. This would
result in restoring civilian rule to
the local populace, while Israel
would retain control of military
and security matters in the terri-
tories. Sharon's plan, however,
may now be aborted as a result of
the assassination. It seems more
doubtful now than ever that a
Palestinian notable in the occu-
pied territories would run the
physical risk of participating in
any autonomy arrangement.
Likewise, no foreign Arab
leader is now expected to come
forth and follow Sadat's foot-
steps. It was noteworthy that the
only Arab heads of state to at-
tend the funeral in Cairo were
from Sudan and Somalia. The as-
sessment here is that Sadat's as-
sassins killed, for the foreseeable
future, any possibility for
oroadening the peace initiative
among Israel's neighbors.
Sadat's murder by men in uni-
form whom the Egyptians claim
were Moslem fanatics, should
serve as a chilling reminder to
other Arab leaders of their own
vulnerability.
Of critical importance for
Israel will be the role the United
States assumes in the Middle
East during the coming weeks
and months. It was significant
that the reaction in Jerusalem
was muted to Yitzhak Rabin's
statement that the Reagan Ad-
ministration's tilt toward Saudi
Arabia, at the expense of Egypt,
was a factor in Sadat's fall. While
Rabin may have crudely over-
stated the case, there is cause to
ask in Egypt, just as there is in
Israel, why old and trusted allies
ment, at a tune wnen Mubarak-----"' "^7'?,*y
will need all the incentive he can "e treato?1 leM favorably than
get for pursuing the course of P*.. ."*.** *> P">ve the
peace. Should Begin fulfill the mettle f t friendship.
contractual agreement to The underlying feeling here is
which he has repeated his al- that since the Reagan Adminis-
legiance since returning from tration took office, the U.S. has
Egypt he risks not realizing an been lagging as a "third partner"
autonomy accord as the Likud in the peace process and, its
would have it, i.e., one that keeps determination to arm the Saudis
specify that Israel must evacuate the West Bank and Gaza firmly with AWACS and other highly
the remainder of the Sinai bv nnrW t<>qi; i,i ..j u Hnnmrnng nmann.^, u ____j
the remainder of the Sinai by
April 28, 175 days. By that time
the Begin government had hoped
to clear up some of the pressing
questions. It is now faced with
the grim prospect of playing its
last, and most important card
wi:... t resolving some major is-
sues. These include extracting a
under Israeli control, and the dangerous weaponry, has played
prospect of his government's fall a counterproductive role in the
over the handling of the Sinai region. Begin, himself, was re-
evacuation, ported as shocked that, in the iin-
Iarael, in the testing period m^te aftermath of the tragedy
that lies ahead, will be carefully J? Cairo'* re"*an Administra-
monitoring Egypt's intent and "on w.ou, U9e ,the assassination
ability to remain on the peace ff a0p rtUyj?K support for
track. Of crucial interest in Jeru- the Saudl arms 8 of Jerusalem officials, if the
Sadat slaying demonstrated any-
thing, it was the tenuous hold
that Arab leaders have on their
nations. The tragedy in Egypt
should serve warning to the U.S.
that providing lethal arms to a
corrupt and unstable regime in
Riyadh could result in even more
dangerous consequences.
Israeli leaders hope that the
U.S. will now step forth and play
a more meaningful and construc-
tive part in advancing the peace
process, and thereby strengthen-
ing America's posture in the re-
gion. The announcement that the
U.S. and Egypt will hold joint
military exercises on Egyptian
soil next month was taken here as
a positive step. Of course, Israel
is anxious for the U.S. to K0
ahead in its commitment to en-
hance strategic cooperation with
the IDF as well. They would also
like to see America notify it.
European allies that their mis-
chievous courting of the PLO and
the Arab rejectionists will no
longer be countenanced.
Sadat's murder has left a gap.
ing void in the Middle Fast,and
some nagging questions in Jeru-
salem. Officials here are con-
cerned that Israel may now be
called upon, by the U.S. and
others, to make concessions to
Egypt in order to shore up
Mubarak's position and relieve
the internal pressures he faces.
But for the time being, the re-
sponse from Israel is to gauge the
situation carefully and proceed
cautiously.
The High Holiday Season Is A
Time of Review and Renewal
By GORDON SASKIN, MD
County Chairman
Community Relations Committee
American-Israel relations,
while maintaining a steadfast
posture of positive good friend-
ship and support, are suffering
the beginning hints of erosion as
differences emerge over certain
Israeli policies and actions. The
ongoing battle for the hearts and
minds of Americans in support of
Israel is being countered by a
small but growing number of
voices and groups critical of
Israel, sympathetic to her ene-
mies, and unhappy with what is
perceived as American Govern-
ment positions too partial to the
Jewish state.
Notwithstanding sometimes
critical comment in the media
and other circles on a specific is-
sue or event, a flourishing
sovereign State of Israel within
secure and guaranteed borders
remains an unbudgeable corner-
stone of American Government
policy, as it is as well, the under-
lying "given" of virtually every
commentator, both critical and
supportive. This, in turn, is a re-
flection of the overwhelming sen-
timent of a vast majority of
Americans.
Maintaining the steadfastness
Gordon Saskin, MD
of friends of Israel in America in
the months and the years ahead
is the special challenge the
American Jewish Community, its
component groups, and each
member must meet in the new
year of 5742. Renewed commit-
ment in strengthened numbers
and efforts calls for ongoing dedi-
cation from all of us. Our "track
record" indicates we will not now
fail to respond, whatever the re-
quirements.
The Diminishing Pledge
The Pledge
Value
$1,000.00
Paid
1 year late
Paid
2 years late
Paid
3 years late
To keep Jewish Agency programs going, the United Israel Appeal
borrows a substantial amount of money each year, which it pays
wnen pledges are collected.
The prime rate is 14.5 percent. UIA loans today are made at .5
percent over prime or 15 percent.
Inflation runs in excess of 10 percent a year.
This adds up to a loss in value on uncollected pledges of no less
than 25 percent each year.
For thousands of men, women and children who depend on the
redemption of our pledges, this is a promise unkepta trust betrayeo
We Can't Afford to Wait
Combined Jewish Appeal-
Federation Campaign
302 a Jupiter Ave.
Clearwater, FL
.....
S11+U
S-11 --1
S11-t-ll


Friday. November 6,1981

The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 3
Women's Division
Plans Mini Mission
Elaine Wolstein and Jean Mai- Center, and the Jewish Dav
^ have been appointed chair- School, and meetings with the
women of the Women s Division agency directors. Transportation
Mini-mission, according to Sue and lunch will be provided.
Schechter, women's campaign
chairwoman. The Mini^mission, Mrs. Wolstein and Mrs. Mai-
w be held on Monday, Dec. 7, is km have long been devoted vol-
designed to offer the women of unteers in the Jewish Federation
Pinellas County the opportunity and have served in many capaci!
to see first hand how the dollars
raised by the Combined Jewish
Appeal work. Highlights will in-
clude visits to local agencies such
Gulf Coast Jewish Family
the Jewish Community
Social Service Problems Persist
Within Local Jewish Community
as
Service.
ties. 'We have planned an
spuing and educational day "
said Mrs. Wolstein. "Jean and I
hope that the community will
support us and join with us for
this exciting event.
Mr. L. cannot be left alone in
his apartment and needs a place
to live. Mrs. J. has been hit by a
car and is in the hospital. Her
bouse is a mess, and she cannot
be sent home. Mrs. Y. needs a
nursing home for her mother.
Mrs. K. needs help with her hus-
band who had a stroke. Mr. and
Mrs. X. fight all the time and
need counseling, as does Ms. B.
who just got divorced.
The Gulf Coast Jewish Family
Service Social Work Department
tries to help in all these cases and
most times are very successful.
But like the saying the ups are
great, but the downs are bone
shattering those people
we
CJF and Religious Issues in Israel
During the past year, several
Federations have placed the issue
of religious pluralism in Israel on
their agenda and have asked the
Council of Jewish Federations to
take a public position on this
issue.
The following considerations
should underlie any role to be
played by the CJF on this ques-
tion:
1. Consensus: Federations
and CJF have carefully devel-
oped the communal agenda on
the basis of consensus. This
means that where there is no
clear-cut consensus on an issue
even though it is a matter of con-
cern to the Jewish people, the
issue is best left to specialized,
interested groups to discuss and
to act upon in any way that they
find consistent with their values
and goals.
2. Religious Issues: The basic
activities of Federations in devel-
oping and funding communal
services are rooted deeply in the
Jewish religious tradition and the
communal activities are a vital
and important means for expres-
sion of the Jewish value system.
The strength and unity of the
communal structure rest upon in-
clusion of the broadest constitu-
ency possible and, therefore, it
must exclude from the communal
forum the religious issues on
which groups of Jews choose to
differ. Since the communal pro-
grams are designed to serve K'lal
Israel the totality of the
Jewish people religious dif-
ferences must be handled outside
the Federation framework.
3. Israel: Federations are linked
with Israel and the human needs
of the Jewish people there. Fed-
erations are not linked directly to
the government of Israel, with
the exception of our interlocking
with them around human serv-
ices where appropriate; also,
Federations' link to government
is related to the state of Jews in
crisis, immigration and ab-
sorption, and the appropriate
services required to ameliorate
these conditions. The prime in-
strument of Federation linkage to
Israel and its people is our in-
volvement with the philanthropic
enterprises in which North
American Jewry (along with
other Jewries in the diaspora) has
accepted specific responsibilities.
A vehicle to implement that
linkage for North American
Jewish Federations is the United
Israel Appeal and the UIA of
Canada. The UIA has been con-
cerned with the need to insure
non-discriminatory treatment by
the Jewish Agency of all the peo-
ple it serves and recently passed
a resolution reinforcing this. (See
attached excerpt from UIA
Board of Directors Minutes.)
In the light of the considera-
tions described above, it is con-
cluded that religious issues of
Israel are inappropriate for the
agenda of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
cannot help still have a problem
that concerns us greatly.
There are various reasons for
help not being readily available.
For instance, Mrs. Y. needs a
nursing home bed for her mother
who has not enough money for
private pay so must be amedicaio
patient. Some nursing homes
don't take any medicaid at all.
Other homes take only a small
percentage even though they
promised to take more when they
applied for a license. The law does
not force them to keep their pro-
mise. So with no place to go, Mrs.
Y. will have to agonize and wait
until a bed becomes available.
Mr. L. who needs a place to live
could find one in an adult congre-
gate living facility (ACLF) if he
can afford to pay about $500 per
month. This would include meals,
maid service, and being with
other people. There is little avail-
able in subsidized housing where
he could get this care for less. If
he continues to live by himself,
and his condition worsens, he will
be placed in a nursing home
where the State will pay from
$900 to $1,100 a month for his
care. But the State will not help
pay to keep him out of the
nursing home.
There are no magic wands to
wave. As people become older
they need to become interested in
what is available in social serv-
ices. When they hear about a pro-
gram like homemaker or Meals
on Wheels, thev need to find out
Sam Perlin,
Geriatric Social
Work Assistant
if they have enough service to
satisfy the need and what the re-
quirements are to go into the pro-
gram. If they, themselves
needed, would they be helped, or
.ould they fall between the
racks.?
It is too easy to assume that
oecause something exists, there
is enough to go around.
If you have a problem, feel free
to share it with us. Call Jewish
Family Service at 446-1005 and
ask for Mrs. Iris Lee or Sam Per-
lin. By identifying a need, we can
either fill the need now or work
toward setting up a program for
the future.
Gulf Coast Jewish Family
Services is a major beneficiary
agency of monies raised by the
annual Combined Jewish Appeal.
VIA Board of
Directors Meeting
From The Rabbi's Desk
Before voting on the motion
presented by Mr. Levine, the
Members expressed their appre-
ciation to Charlotte Jacobson.
Herschel Blumberg and the
Chairman for their efforts in
eliciting assurances from Jewish
Agency Department Heads that
their policy is to serve all Jewish
immigrants to Israel without dis-
crimination among the various
streams of Judaism. The Chair-
man indicated that the Resolu-
tion if passed will be handled
with utmost discretion and only
through direct contacts with in-
volved Jewish Agency Leader-
ship. Any further implementing
activity should await actual ex-
perience in Israel.
Education Committee
Establishing County
Speakers Bureau
Motion by Arthur Le-
vine, seconded by Rabbi Roland
Gittelsohn: RESOLVED, that
the UIA expects that each De-
partment of the Jewish Agency
will offer its services and facilities
to those qualified to receive such
services without discrimination
as to their religious affiliation.
Passed, with 16 Members in
favor, three opposed, and one ab-
stention.
New Date
For 'Skokie'
The CBS-TV program,
"Skokie," which chronicles the
conflict triggered a few years ago
by the proposed Nazi march in
Skokie, 111. will be presented on
the CBS network on Tuesday,
Nov. 17 at 8-10:30 p.m. (Eastern
time).
By RABBI
ROBERT P. KIRZNER
Last week we observed Sim-
chat Torah, the Rejoicing of the
Law. We celebrated the comple-
tion and renewal of the cycle of
reading from the Torah. With the
High Holy Days over, and the
festival of Sukkot behind us, our
new Jewish year has begun in
earnest. It is fitting that the last
of the major holiday observances
was Simchat Torah.
In many ways Simchat Torah
is the embodiment of how we may
view Judaism in our own lives.
By rejoicing with the Torah, as
we have done, we visibly demon-
strate the preciousness and perti-
nence of its content. By both
ending and beginning the cycle of
readings at the same moment, we
show our belief that Jewish life
also has no end. Just as with the
Torah there is no moment of
finality, so too, should there be
no end in our commitment to
Jewish life. We can always find
new vigor and new meaning in
our Jewishness. That is the
beauty of Judaism. It is con-
stantly renewing itself and there-
by renewing us.

HHB
The Sidrah for this Shabbat,
Bereshit, is the story of creation.
How beautiful that we should
turn to the Torah at this season
of renewal and begin by reading
about life and the world, kee tov,
"that it was good." The promise
of goodness is yet with us. As we
go forth into the lesson and
words of the Torah on this
Shabbat so that we may make
this a good year for ourselves, our
families and our community.
*

T/uiifcj End Motet
"$m JC...I ./. I./.I..
"The requests come in con-
stantly," said Louis L. Rosen,
chair cation Committee. "The Jewish
federation of Pinellas County re-
vives many calls from organiza-
Jns for knowledgeable speakers
" address their members on
"'Pica of Jewish concern. *'
tJfaS Zie88man' chairperson of
J "edging speakers bureau, is
wmpiling a cadre of informed in-
dividuals who would be prepared
J0 ?peak occasionally to organi-
sations of varying denominations
J subjects of concern to the
>wish community.
"The Speakers Bureau, which
"one of the many committees of
community relations organi-
gj, is of utmost importance to
^Uas County," said Gordon
Saskin. chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Committee, ine
new project will bring to the
residents of Pinellas County a
better understanding of the
aspirations and concerns of the
Jewish community on many
levels, including religious and
political."
"Letters have gone out to the
leadership of all existing Jewish
organizations in the COaHTi
soliciting volunteers for tne
bureau." said Mr. Rosen. In ad-
dition, we hope that should a
Floridian reader feel they have
the expertise to be listed in tne
speakers bureau roster, or know
ofanyone who would qualify,
that they will contact the bureau
chairperson, Yolan Ziessman,
through the federation office.
I*
1*1*1
>y\
JV*r-L
lit
9 BLOCKS TO GULF HEATED POOL
2 BLOCKS TO SHOPPING & BANKS
6 RESTAURANTS WITHIN 2 BLOCK RADIUS
jffn.r---' 9- IN THE HEART OF NAPLES
309 TAMIAMI TRAIL, SOUTH
TELEPHONE 262-6336
NAPLES, oo.th..Gvll FLORIDA
33940
fUf tennis skeet; hunting, fishing; boating, flying; riding, bicycling; smmming, sunbetlung water
SL^SSSS *= *y boat. car. jeep and swamp buggy; beach barbecues; bndge
skiing; WM!*fLggCT, showS; theatrical productions; art classes; community concerts; air-
Sor^ihS^^Xa^heater; SES "*-. dog track and LOAFING.
r


Page 4
Thm.l*,i.h vi
I he Jewish b londianof Pinellas County
Pwday, November 6. im.
C
i:
tx
in,
Tl
Ba
10:
^wisk02rid**n A Non-Romantic IRA Analysis
Editorial Office. 302 Jupiter in South. Cleansaler. Fla J3515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication A-Business Office. 130 N E 6 St Miami. FU S3132
Telephone 3061 373-4606
KKI'K SH.KHKT SUZANNE SCHECHTER
1 '"" and Publisher Editor. Pine I la* County
SIZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
Jewish FlorMUa Docs Not UuarsaUe t*e Kaa.ruth of McrcHaadl.e Advertised
xrood Clau Postage Nats. I 'SPSMy 7<>at M^m. lu l'gW,>iniHi*ntii
1'osimns.er: Forward Form 3579 io Hsni 113171, Miami. Fla. Oltl
County for wh.ch the sum of CMS is pa.d Out of Town Upon Request "'"">
Friday, November 6, 1981
Volume 2
9HESHVAN5742
Number 23
Terrorism in the U.S.?
It was clear that ultimately it would come to
this. A Palestine Liberation Organization officia
Sunday warned American Jews that they will be tar
gets of PLO assassins if the United States extradites
Ziad Abi Eain to Israel for trial on charges that,
alledgedly, he planted a bomb in Tiberias in May
1979, killing two and injuring 36.
Were the issue not the extradition of Eain, it
would be something else at some time in the near
future. The way in which Libya's Col. Khadafy has
been threatening his enemies in the U.S. for quite
some time now should, if nothing else, have been the
tipoff.
Thus, the legacy of unchecked international
terrorism becomes ours, no longer being confined to
Europe and the Middle East.
We must agree with official Israeli statements
this week that the bombing of a synagogue in Ant-
werp on Oct. 20 resulted directly from a growing in-
ternational tolerance of the PLO's dastardly crimes
as colorful freedom-fighting.
The threat this week by Hamed Abu Sitta, a
senior member of the PLO s executive committee in
Amman, that Those (Americans) who have helped
the enemy (Israel) are known to us, and we can reach
them," should be intolerable, not just to American
Jews, but to Americans of all political and religious
persuasions.
All Americans Targeted
A case in point, if Sitta's threat fails to be con-
vincing, is the sudden recalling on Sunday of our
Ambassador to Italy Maxwell Rabb. It so happens
that Rabb, a Reagan appointee to the post, is Jew-
ish. But Rabb's recall from Rome was as a con-
sequence of a reported Khadafy threat to have him
assassinated in retaliation for our shooting down of
two Libyan jets late in the summer.
This sort of terrorism goes beyond the narrow
parochialism of Rabb's religion. It strikes at the
heart of American integrity in the arena of in-
ternational diplomacy. It should anger all
Americans, not just American Jews. Ditto, the
threat by the PLO's Sitta that Palestinian "revo-
lutionary courts" will try American Jews who have
"contributed toward the enemy's (Israel's) war ef-
forts ..."
THE GERMAN newspaper
frankfurter AUgtmeine Zeitung.
came closest the other day to a
realistic assessment of the agony
in Northern Ireland.
The newspaper opined that
"The IRA's success if it can
alk of such in light of ten hunger
deaths is limited to a stream of
weapons and money from Ameri-
ca, where old Irish Republican
romanticism has gained new
impetus."
It is an exaggeration of the
truth to suggest that Irish Amer-
ican 'romantics" are the
dominant source of weapons now
in the hands of the Irish Repub-
lican Army. But the Frankfurter
AUgemeine is correct in its asser-
tion that colorful, which is to say
inaccurate. American public
opinion is the stuff on which the
IRA feeds in its struggle to throw
the British out of Northern Ire-
land.
INDEED COLORFUL Ameri-
can public opinion, which is to
say totally erroneous opinion, is
the stuff on which many political
mythologies abroad feed in their
ideological struggles. A case in
point is the expanding, sloppy
sentiment among Americans to
see Saudi Arabia as a
"moderate" Arab nation. Or PLO
Chief Yasir Arafat as a man for
all reasons that the imperatives
of American Reaipolitik should
muster to stage a dialogue with
him.
Arafat's growth as a romantic
figure is of the same order
as the Irish Republican Army's,
and if we hesitate about accept-
ing this equivalency, there is aJ
ways the manipulative 'fret
press" to help the equivalence
along
For example, an official Arafa
visit to Austria was cancelled in
August when Austrian police un-
j covered a terrorist plot to assas-
sinate him. The story was
reported widely at the time. But
it became grist for the manipula-
tive "non-news" mill of the press
last week again which, in its cam-
paign to make Arafat respectable
and cram him down our throats,
featured a sensational repeat of
the same story in front page
headlines quite as if it had never
been reported in August at all,
indeed as if the uncovering of the
plot had just occurred.
EGYPT'S PRESIDENT
Sadat had just been assassi-
nated, and look what that did for
Sadat s romantic quotient, which
is to say what that did for a sin-
gularly twisted view of Sadat's
life, work and times. The decision
to repeat the Austrian Arafat
scenario was the best possible
way for the propagandists who
masquerade as editors in the
ivory towers of America's sweaty
Fourth Estate to reach into the
hearts of Ivory Soap-minded
Americans and have them em-
brace this scruffy, unshaven
"hero" as another one of those
"freedom-fighters" we are in-
stantly supposed to adore, his
pungent bath towel he wears for a
hat and all.
Besides, hadn't Arafat been
given a bad shake? Wasn't the
Austrian story in August
blanketed into obscurity by
Sadat's visit with President
Reagan in WMhtngtoo, which
tots his headline thunder? If
nothing sice, romantics always
require jus* retribution m order
to maintain the eyuunstiy of
theirlives.
In the case of the Irish Repub
lican Army, there is hardly a need
for the same sort of hard sell. The
AUgemeine Zeitung hit it
squarely on the head when it
made its wry observation about
Irish Americans and their star-
struck but politically dim-witted
sympathizers.
ISNT IT after ail true that
every Irishman looks and sounds
like that old film star curmudge-
on whose career began in
Dublin's Abbey Theatre, Barry
Fitzgerald? Ditto Victor Mc-
Lauglin? Your heart just has to

8
I
Leo
I Mindlio
go out to people who speak
English so that it sounds like an
opera. Or who agonize that it is a
long, long way to Tipperary and
"the sweetest girl I know." Think
of Pat O'Brien as the priest of the
"Fighting Sixty-Ninth," or as
Knute Rockne. In either case, the
war is the same, and you must
love the cause equally with its
heroes.
This kind of sentiment rates
high in the world order of, say,
someone like New York Times-
man Pete Hamill, whose view of
Britain'8 Prime Minister Mar-
garet Thatcher is almost unprint-
able. Hamill won't forgive
Thatcher for having failed to give
into the IRA hunger-strikers who
succumbed in Northern Ireland
prisons in their campaign to
wrest political status from her.
She sees the IRA as a band of
terrorists in the same way that,
say, Mr. Reagan sees the PLO. or
at least says he sees the PLO.
I hold no brief for Thatcher. I
agree with Hamill that, in what
he calls "this bitter winter of
British collapse Thatcher is in-
competent to handle it and that
she "is never more thorough in
character than when she is driven
by hatred," although I'd be more
inclined to substitute for
"hatred" what Martin Luther
King. Jr. once described as the
white moderate's nemesis: the
need to confuse justice with "law
and order."
BUT IT is rank sophistry to
suggest, as the romantics are
doing, that all the IRA wants is
for Britain to get out of Northern
Ireland so that it can get on with
the business of unifying Ulster
with the rest of the country. The
equivalent would be that all Yasir
Arafat wants is a separate Pales-
tinian state, however tiny.
The most corrosive force in the
Ulster struggle is the Catholic
Protestant issue, which spokes-
men for both sides assure us. as
they have since Elizabeth Tudor,
would come to dialogue, peace
and love given the chance.
But anyone acquainted with
Ireland's modern home rule
movement that began in earnest
in the middle of the 19th Century
knows this is nonsense. The
Catholic Church betrayal of
Charles Stewart Parnell for
reasons of his adultery pales be-
side Ireland's earlier betrayal of
the Protestant Englishman,
Wolfe Tone, who came to Dublin
at the end of the 18th Century to
help organize Irish resistance
gainst the occupation by his
own countrymen. The med-
dlwsomenes. of Catholic Church
activism in the political arena
knew bounds than no more
dearly thanlit does now this
fro*" Church today that
deplores the growing seculariza-
tion of its faithful. *"*"
. THE IRISHMAN, many
unportant Irish artiste iS
writes have observed of their po-
litical agony since baton Sinn
Fein, is self-destructive. The
Irish immortal. James Joyce,
said of his country that ''Ireland
is an old sow that eats its far-
are the IRA', principal arms ,Up.
pliers. The exaggeration is S.
intended; it is merely a romanti.
cizing of fact. In this sense the
AUgemeine falls victim of tue
very thing that it correctly
identifies as corrupting Irish
American opinion.
The truth is that the IRa u
about as closely linked tn tk!
PLO these day. as annrungt
anyone can possibly be If (risk
Americans send money to sup-
port the IRA cause, and in thu
the AUgemeine is correct, the fact
is that the money goes to buy
guns and bombs which come in.
directly from Moscow through its
Middle East client states and
agents, including the PLO itself.
THIS MEANS that if the
Catholic-Protestant impasse is
Ireland's most corrosive issue,
the IRA's ties to international
terrorism, clearly documented for
all to see but the sentimental, is
the country's most life-
threatening issue.
Union between north and
south under IRA direction is not
the ultimate aim of this group, no
matter what its spokesmen say
here or in Ireland to the contrary
after all. Arafat says the same
thing when he calls for "nothing
more" than a new Palestinian
state in Gaza and on the West
Bank. Not to mention what the
Republic of Ireland (the south),
with its duly-constituted govern-
ment seated in Dublin and in
which the IRA can play no polit-
ical role whatever,would have to
say about it.
The ultimate aim of the IRA is
in fact the establishment of a
Marxist state in Ireland with ir-
revocable ties to Moscow, in the
same way that Arafat's new Pal-
estine would be tied to Moscow.
That is what people like Berna-
dette Devlin are all about. Fur-
thermore, the IRA is pert of an
international network having
more in mind than a Dublin-
Belfast takeover. Its members
include, in addition to the PLO.
the Red Army Faction in West
Germany, the Red Brigade in
Italy, the progeny of Japan's
Zengakuren, and more and more.
IT WAS sentiment that had us
embrace Fidel Castro in 1959,
when his "freedom-fighter"
forces took over from Batista in
Havana. Now, we are on the
brink of the very same disaster
with Yasir Arafat; American
foreign policy translates the
Sadat assassination to mean that
Arafat is the logical successor to
Sadat as spokesman for Araby
I said at the beginning that the
Frankfurter AUgemeine exagger-
ates in its opinion about the
rorqantic Irish Americans who
And while Ulster is still pre-
dominsntly Great Britain's hot
potato, there are the sentimental-
ists among us who perceive that
the IRA is nothing but a clear-
toned Irish tenor, a poet speaking
symphonies, the bicycle-rider in
the Irish Spring soap commercial
longing only for peace, clean skin
and a sweet-smelling colleen.
But, as with Arafat and the PLO,
the IRA's devastating record of
terrorism says otherwise.
Beth Sholom
Events
The Adult Hebrew Classes at
Beth Sholom, Qulfnort, will be-
gin on Monday. Nov. 16, and
continue ussklj through March
1982. Besides Hebrew, the
classes wil include explanation of
the Prayer Book, Both elemen-
tary and mterrnediate classes will
be offered.
The Rabbi's lecture aeries will
commence on Jan. IS. and' con-
tinue every Wednesday following
until the hgfry'"g of March,
from 2-4 p.m.
The Yiddish group will meet
Saturday evening, Jan. 16 at 7
p.m and every month following
Refreshments will be served and
all are welcome.


Friday- November 6,1981
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page5
Divorce Seminar Held Hadassah Combined Meetings
A seminar on being Jewish and
divorced in Pinellas County was
u|d on Sunday, October 18, at
he JCC. It was co-sponsored by
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Serv-
ice the Jewish Community Con-
v\ and the Board of Rabbis.
The speakers were Mrs. Iris
Lee psychiatric social worker at
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Serv-
ice Mr. Stefan Alpert, cultural
jrti director at the JCC, and
Mrs. Judith Meisner, a therapist
in private practice.
The program featured a work-
shop offering help with feelings
md practical problems surround-
ing divorce, as well as some alter-
natives, to help meet the needs of
the divorcee.
The participants in the work-
shop indicated that they found
the program informative and
useful stressing that there
should be more programs like
this in the community. One per-
son commented that so often
"divorce and widowhood are
lumped together, and they are
separate issues." She appreciated
Mrs. Iris Lee
the opportunity to deal with the
problems of divorce with others
struggling with the same issues.
Issues discussed were feelings
of loneliness, frustration, anger
and loss of self-esteem. Other
areas of discussion were money
problems, child care difficulties
and relationships with other peo-
ple, in-laws and friends. Helpful
suggestions were made to aid
people to begin to develop a posi-
tive direction in their life.
The St. Petersburg Hadassah
Chapter will hold a combined
meeting 0f its daytime groups on
Wednesday, November 11, at
Congregation B'nai Israel, 301
59th Street, N., St. Petersburg,
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Coffee
and danish will be served from 10
to 10:30 a.m.
Hadassah is fortunate to have
as its guest speaker, Edith
Zamost (Mrs. Benjamin) of
Highland Park. New Jersey, re-
cently elected national vice presi-
dent of Hadassah.
Mrs. Zamost is currently coor-
dinator of Hadassah services.
She was the co-chairman of
Hadaasah's 1978-79 and 1979-80
national conventions. Her previ-
ous national portfolios were
chairman for membership,
leadership development and
fund-raising for youth activities.
for twelve years.
She has two daughters who are
life members of Hadassah.
Mrs. Zamost was a Hadassah
delegate to the 29th World Zion-
ist Congress held in Jerusalem in
February, 1978 when she was
elected Hadassah deputy to the
Zionist General Council of the
World Zionist Organization
Mark your calendar for
November 11 and let's give Mrs.
Zamost a kingsize Hadassah turn
out. We can do it!
Board of Rabbis Expresses
Sadness on Sadat's Death
The Pinellas County Board of
Rabbis is shocked and saddened
by the senseless death of
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat.
President Sadat, a courageous
statesman, was one of the archi-
tects of the present Middle-East
peace process. He opened the
possibilities for peace between
Egypt and Israel, which we pray
continue to emerge in the days to
come, to better all the peoples of
that part of the world.
We, as the Synagogue Jewish
community of Pinellas County,
are grieved by President Sadat's
death, for he represented a stabil-
izing force in the volatile Middle
East.
May he rest in peace, knowing
that he tried to move the world in
the direction of achieving peace.
Feigelstein to Speak on
Terrorism and Extremism
International terrorism and
domestic extremism will be
among the issues discussed by
Scott M. Feigelstein, assistant
director of the Florida Regional
Office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith to the
Clearwater Jewish community on
Tuesday evening, Nov. 10, at 8
p.m. at a meeting of the Clearwa-
ter Lodge 2603 at the Golda Meir
Center, 302 S. Jupiter Ave..
Clearwater.
Feigelstein is responsible for
implementing ADL's programs
in Florida, which encompass
teacher-training seminars, the in-
vestigation and counteraction of
extremist group activity, the res-
olution of complaints of discrimi-
100th Year
Then And Now
The idea that was to become
ORT was first articulated in a
ttr dated April 10, 1880, and
sent over the names of five prom-
inent Russian Jews to the towns
and villages of the Pale of Settle-
ment and to communities
throughout Russia. That letter
became, in effect, the founding
document of ORT.
In language that now seems
antiquated, that message spelled
out a need that waa addressed to
the single universal problem that
most critically oppressed a popu-
lation of some five million Jews
the need to provide liveli-
hood.
It called for the establishment
of a fund "the income from which
could be used to aid in the further
development of already existing
trade schools for Jews, for assist-
ance towards the opening of new
trade schools, for facilitating the
movement of artisans from one
Pce to another. .
For membership information
call 797-8809. Tuee. Wed. -
Tours., 9 a.m. to 1p.m.
nation, race relations, education,
and interreligious cooperation.
For 68 years, the AD L has
been actively engaged in the de-
fense of the civil rights for all
groups, regardless of creed or
ethnic background. Its preoccu-
pation with the underlying
concept of democracy has made
the League one of the largest
agencies of its kind in the world,
with 27 regional offices in the
United States, and offices and
correspondents in Israel, the
Vatican, Paris, and South Amer-
ica.
Edith Zamost
Edith Zamost w as president of
the Southern New Jersey Region
and the New Brunswick Chapter
(now called the Raritan Valley
Chapter). She entered Jewish
organization life in 1943 and has
visited Israel many times.
Along with her many years of
devoted service to Israel, Mrs.
Zamost is active in other Jewish
community affairs. She has been
an officer of the YMH A Women's
Division and was chairman of
Women's Division of the UJA in
her area.
In addition to her volunteer
services, she has been a profes-
sional pianist and singer appear-
ing with such orchestras as the
New York Philharmonic
Orchestra as a piano soloist and
has conducted her Temple choir
By MORRIS B. CHAPMAN
Copyright Morris B. Chapman
Reagan is a man of his word ... He promised to turn the
economy around and he did from depression to recession.
Many delegates to the UN Assembly cook up deals at the
lunch table ... We trust they come up not with half-baked no-
tions, but with fully-digested programs.
The rapidly escalating cost of health services is inducing a
change in folk-wisdom ... It used to be "if you have your
health, you have everything" and today it's "if you have your
health, you may have nothing else left."
For reasons of security, Reagan dispatched Nixon, Ford
and Carter to Sadat's funeral While we wouldn't put any
crime past Nixon, the other two are amiable non-entities.
Viewings in funeral homes are popular ... In fact, they
have a descriptive name, "remains to be seen."
The life-expectancy of the average Russian male has
diminished some four years since 1966 ... If the decline is too
slow, there is always the Gulag Archipelago to speed the pace.
Rosalyn Carter struck a simultaneous blow at both foreign
and domestic Administration policies She was highly critical
of the fuss over the White House china.
Mubarak has a lot of running to do to catch up with Sadat's
popularity Sadat used to poll 99 plus percent while his
successor could poll only a 98 plus percent.
Reagan used to be a cowboy shooting from the hip .
the AWACS deal, he is still a cowboy shooting from the lip.
On
Gov. Edmund Brown, may lose his senatorial bid by delay-
ing action on the medfly infestation Any insect that can
wreak so much damage cannot be dismissed as a fly-by-night
menace.
Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County
302 SOUTH JUPITER ST.
CLEARWATER. FLORIDA 33B16
We Need More Than Your Pledge
To Support Humanitarian Programs in Israel,
at Home and Around the World
Only Cash Will
Coverting pledges to cash now is crucial.
The regular cash flow to the Jewish Agency
in Israel keeps the Agency from having to
borrow at exorbitant interest rates in order
to provide vital services. The Jewish Agency
is currently struggling with an escalating
debt obligation which ruthlessly cute into
services for our Israeli brothers and sisters.
YOUR PLEDGE 18 NOT TAX
DEDUCTIBLE. ONLY CASH 181
Remember, a charitable deduction is the
easiest tax deduction to take this year.
Your pledgee have made it possible for us
to plan and build and achieve and help our
fellow Jews. That is why we ask you to please
remember the pledge you made in 1981, and
to honor it at this time.
Saul Schschter
Gonaral Campaign Chairman
Combined Jewish Appeal
Pinellas County


Page 6
The Jewish Flofidian ofPinellas County
Tribute to a Martyr for Peace
Friday, November 6. m,,
Sermon
Robert
Beth
1961.
delivered
P. Kirzner
by
at
Rabbi
Temple
El on Friday, October 9,
I must, at the outset, tell you
that this is not the sermon that I
had intended for this Shabbat. I
had planned that this sermon
continue in the mood of the
Holiday season. I had wanted to
speak of renewal, thansgiving
and celebration. But there are
times when events occur sudden-
ly that change our world. As we
all know, one such event took
place this week and I would like
to share with you the thoughts
and feelings I had on Tuesday
when President Anwar Sadat of
Egypt was cut down by a
dastardly act of cowardice.
As I wrote this, I along with
other stunned Americans and
people around the world, was
waiting for confirmation of the
assassination of President Anwar
Sadat of Egypt. At that momerv
I was swimming in a sea of con
flirting thoughts and emotions, i
was saddened, dejected and
angry. I was anxious and con-
cerned and even a little
frightened. When the confirma-
tion had officially been an-
nounced that President Sadat of
Egypt had been slain, I was close
to tears, but they were tears of
frustration. I was flooded with
memories.
I was living in Israel in the fall
of 1970 when Gamal Abdul
Nasser died. I remember wonder-
ing what the new leader Sadat
would be like. Then I remember
where I was and what I was
doing at the moment in 1973
when we learned that the Yom
Kippur war had broken out. At
that time I felt that Sadat was no
different from other Arab leaders.
Then, how clearly I remember
that evening news broadcast with
Walter Cronkite when President
Sadat indicated his willingness to
go to Jerusalem. Menachem
Begin shortly thereafter issued
the appropriate invitation and I
remember that historic moment
when, in 1977, the Egyptian
airliner with Sadat aboard came
to a stop on the taramac at Ben
Gurion Airport. How the tears of
joy and hope flowed at that mo-
ment. Now I found myself
suddenly admiring and respect-
ing the same Sadat for whom
only four years earlier I had felt
contempt. But there he was, an
Arab head of state standing on
Israeli soil; an act of courage that
only days before we had thought
as being impossible. Of course I
disagreed with much of what
President Sadat said that day,
but I was overjoyed at the action
he had taken; action that spoke
more loudly and clearly than
anything he could have said. For
whatever his motivation, eco-
nomic or otherwise, Sadat was
the first Arab leader to conclude
that peace was better than war.
With this belief Sadat broke with
other Arab heads of state and
began to actively pursue peace. I
remember the day on the lawn of
the White House in 1979 when
President Sadat, Prime Minister
Begin and President Carter
signed the first Peace Treaty be-
tween Israel and an Arab state.
Again the tears of joy and hope
flowed freely. It seemed that
peace had finally become a reality
for two tired and struggling na-
tions. It was a step, a first step,
toward a real reconciliation be-
tween Arab and Jew. It was a
real attempt, by both sides, to
recognize the natural kinship be-
tween two Semitic peoples. It
was a day of such hope and such
vision. I did not always agree
with all of Menachem Begin s
positions in his subsequent deal-
ings and negotiations with Presi-
dent Sadat, nor did I always
agree with Sadat's point of view.
But both of these men, with the
help of an American President,
had managed to put personalities
and generations of suspicion
aside in order to accomplish
something bigger than them-
selves. Finally, I hoped, finally
there had been some sanity, some
morality injected into the nor-
mally cold and amoral arena in
which world politics is played.
But the hope was short-lived.
Other Arab leaders and extrem-
ists vowed to do their utmost to
destroy the historic move toward
lasting peace. Not one other Arab
statesman had the courage or
farsightedness to join Anwar
Sadat in his quest. He stood
alone in a world dedicated to vio-
lence and disruption. Yet he per-
sisted in the pursuit of his dream.
He genuinely felt that peace was
more important than his own
personal safety and that it would
endure beyond his own time.
Sadat was a man of vision, one of
the only leaders of an Arab coun-
try to gain international stature
and to be accorded international
honor.
But our experience has taught
us to be wary of people of vision.
We have been taught well the les-
sons of fear and violence. How
many of us watched Sadat de-
scend onto Israeli soil for the first
time and said perhaps to our-
selves, perhaps to others, "his
days are numbered." What a sad
commentary that so many of us
now felt that Sadat's death was
imminent.
Like all of you, I have been
witness to much death and de-
struction. During only the past
2o years, how many times has our
faith in humanity been tried?
Hew many times have we placed
our hopes in the leadership of one
statesman or another only to
have those hopes dashed by the
act of a mad man? We have
suffered such anguish over the
murders of John Kennedy,
Martin Luther King, Jr., and
Robert Kennedy. In recent years
and months we have been witness
to attempts against the lives of
President Ford, President Rea-
gan and Pope John Paul II. Now
we must endure tragedy yet
again, for now we have lost a man
who was our hope, our rock of
sanity in a part of the world
where insanity is the norm.
There is a current, popular
songwriter and singer by the
name of Billy Joel. Not too long
ago he wrote a song entitled:
"Only The Good Die Young." Is
this what we have come to expect
and believe in our topay turw
world? Can we do not better than
to throw up our hands in despair
and calmly await for the moment
when an assassin will cut down
our leaders before their times? Is
this the definitive commentary
on our times?
President Sadat's death
revealed more than the amorality
of world politics. It revealed the
perversions which we are forced
to endure in the name of national
sovereignty. When the death of
President Sadat was announced,
so-called Palestinians and PLO
leaders fired their weapons in
Beirut in celebration. And this is
the band of hoodlums which has
been invited to take its place a-
mong the family of nations. A
jubilant Col. Muammar Khaddafy
of Libya broadcast the news of
Sadat's death to his people in a
state of euphoria, calling for na-
tional celebration. This from a
man who finances terrorist
groups and operations around the
world. And the world tolerates
this animal, this criminal,
because he has oil. Where is the
sense of justice and moral out-
rage in the face of economics? Do
you remember seeing bumper
stickers during the oil embargo
following the 1973 Yom Kippur
War that read: "We need oil not
Jews?" The support of the late
President Sadat notwithstand-
ing, how, at a time like this, can
our government seriously pro-
pose to sell sophisticated military
aircraft, the AWACS, to Saudi
Arabia? Forget for a moment
that Saudi Arabia has financed
the PLO and other terrorist fac-
tions of what is known as the
"Reject ion is t Front." Forget for
a moment that Saudi Arabia has
called for "Jihad," a holy war
against Israel. Consider only
how fragile is the endurance of
the Saudi royal family. Consider
the morality of placing such
capabilities in the hands of a na-
tion that has all but said to us:
"Do this or else." And yet, with-
out even so much as a guarantee
that Saudi Arabia will continue
to be an American ally in the
Middle East, the Administration
would have us believe that this is
precisely the time to make such a
sale.
When a great parson dies
under violent circumstances,
there is always much wringing of
hands and many expressions of
soul searching. There are always
many comments about the pur-
pose and vision of that in-
dividual's life. And there are also
condemnations of the per-
petrators of the act. We may add
our own condemnation but we
can do so with action. If you have
not concluded that the sale of
AWACS to Saudi Arabia is
wrong, 1 urge you to do so now.
Such a sale not only does not
benefit the Middle East, but I
also believe it runs counter to the
long range plans for America's
security. Now is the time to write
Congressmen and Senators to ex-
press our opposition.
We have seen so much violence
and pain in this generation. So
many great men have been killed
or almost killed and our society
has come to feel as if we literally
live under the gun. Although it
did not happen in America, the
murder of Anwar Sadat must
serve as a certain impetus for us
here at home. In the early 1960's,
Bob Dylan was a prolific writer of
American folk songs. In one of
the most famous of these songs
he asked the question: "How
many deaths will it take 'til he
knows; That too many people
have died?" And he concludes
with the chorus: "The answer my
friend is bio win' in the wind, the
answer is blow in' in the wind."
Jewish Book Fair
Sunday Nov. 22
In honor; of National Jewish
Book Month, the Clearwater
Chapter of Women's American
ORT will be hosting a book fair.
There will be for sale a large
selection of timely and traditional
ooks of Jewish interest and sub-
jects, fiction, and non-fiction, for
adults as well as for children. The
selection will also include other
books which are not of a strictly
Jewish subject matter, but are
best sellers or classics. There will
also be posters, cards and gift
items.
Where: The Golda Meir Cen-
ter, 302 South Jupiter Avenue,
Clearwater, Florida 33515.
. When: Sunday, November 22,
From 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
Special Events: The winners of
the National Jewish Book Month
poster contest will be presented
with a gift certificate from the
Coffee House Book Store in
North wood Plaza on McMullen
Booth Road who is providing us
with our books. Children who are
interested in entering this contest
may contact Susan Segal at 784-
1215.
The director of the Clearwater
Public Library will be on hand at
1 p.m to receive a donation of
important books on Judaism
which our chapter has been
soliciting from publishers, and
from private sources. We hope to
up-date and enlarge their collec-
tion of Jewish literature, and
thus provide Jews, as well as the
general public with the oppor-
tunity to obtain information
about Judaism through
public library system.
our
This will be a perfect time for
parents, grandparents, children,
aunts, uncles, cousins, to pur-
chase Chanukah and holiday
gifts. In addition, and proceeds
will be supporting the scholar-
ship fund of ORT. This will be
something special. Fellow book-
worms come and join!
jtf MMI'ti Iflltlli '!M'IMH!IMi|i|HHimnMmttt!!j,
teUtttmimimmmi"
w
Orson Skorr
Orchestras
Serving AH of florid* Siine INI
= TAMPA 813-872-4243
| W MIAMI HI \< M )-, -.in ->M|
''lUUIlUlUUlUHUlLiMUlMMUiUllUUUUUli--'
My friend, here at horn,
many people have di* -r00
many ofthe great, the net J?
Md the a*mm fit"
killed, it is ^rsjhs
courage and support the
ment for gun control h,Sa?
try It is time to stand u^?-
world-wide terrorism JuTd1* }
"Enough!" It ia time toj*
back from the blaclanaVoft
money and to insist on the !
ject.on of morality into Mfcfa
and economics. If Anwar ffi
life is to have meaning then^!
2 fUow W example. -Z
rabbis of our tradition said 'l.
place where there are no men
strive to be a man." Sadat wMl
deeply religious person and it U
as if he knew our tradition for in,
place and time when there were
no men he strove to be a man He
had courage where others hid
none. He had vision where others
were blind. He had a dream where
others merely closed their eyes
He acted while others waited. We
can best honor his memory by
following his example. We mu
do our part to keep his dream
alive. In these troubled and un-
certain days ahead we must, in
the words of the Psalmist, "seek
peace and pursue it." Anwar
Sadat was truly a man of peace
and of vision. May that be his
legacy to us and may we have the
strength of purpose to encourage
others to take up his challenge. I
pray that the world may come to
be the place that Anwar Sadat
dreamt and others like him dream
it can be. Yehi zichrono I'vracha,
may we always remember this
man of peace in blessing.
Amen.
Bernard's tu?d one mmmmm
"'Kosher Butchery p^. Bernard marks
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November 8,1981
.
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Page 7
'Ilhe Certer P^ef
JCC Programs And ActivitiveS
How To Enjoy The
Later Years Of Life
pCC Playgroup
|The JCC Playgroup has cele-
,ted the new year with many
citing activities. Lawrence
drier, our gourmet chef, pre-
i breakfast for all of us daily,
j Amanda Stokfisch sets the
jj. Our champion puzzledoer
ky Kanner also enjoys sliding
side, as does Jeremy Luski
Shari Obrentz. Stacy Rout-
Tn and Adam Jenkins outdo
E other competing for toddler
jinast of the year. All of us en-
Led our trip to the Sukkah and
Ipreciated the beautiful
orations provided by the
ush Day School. The fall
on has provided us with
|t-e!y leaves (paper, of course)
bich we pasted on trees. Good
irk. Morgan Freeble and Alli-
Englander! Megan Patrick,
literary light, also enjoys
as does Allison Savage
Id Scott Jay. We have all been
llighted to add Connie Higgins
[our Staff as assistant teacher
look forward to a continua-
of the warmth and good
ng permeating our current
fcygroup.
|Regis!ration is being accepted
r the second session starting in
ouary. For further informa-
|r, call Ann Lardner, program
ctor 344-5795.
ildretiH Theatre
shop at JCC Growing
iThe Jewish Community Center
' Pinellas County, 8167 Elbow
ne North, St. Petersburg, is
nducting a very special theatre
brkshtip for the children of the
nunity. The all inclusive
se covers the basics of
atre craft, the use of improvi-
tions and theatre games for
veloping different characters,
ne, puppetry, and performng
; children's classics for all chil-
fcn of the community. AU chil-
*n are welcome to participate in
unique theatre experience. A
bliminary meeting with the
lldren is requested, as it is a
part of their theatrical dev-
pment. The theatre class is
bwing. There is room for three
we students. Each class will
ptain only eight students. For
ther information, please con-
SteDhen Alrjert. cultural
i director, at 344-5795.
nter ( mm Kadima
Registration is now being ac-
ted for seven fun filled days
Camp Kadima at the Jewish
nmunity Center of Pinellas
only. 8167 Elbow Lane North,
f Petersburg.
)ate8: Dec. 21, 22, 23, 24, 28,
[80.
Time: 9:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
extended day care is availablt
working parents from 8 a.m.
15 pm. Fee: $2 per day per
riper.)
Lunch: Cold lunch, drinks and
r^ks included.
fees:
ndercamp: Full day Ages
I to pre-kindergarten, 7 days
per day- $12.50;
dercamp: V day until 1
- Ages 2'/i to pre-
loergarten, 7 days $66, per
iima: Ages kindergarten to
'grade. 7 days $80, per day
14;
*ri: Ages 6th grade to 8th
5 5o y" ~ ,90, P" ^y -
ders in Training: Ages 9th
^ to 14 years. 7 days $46,
May $9;
Punaelora in Training: Ages
Fh grade to 15 years, 7 days -
J.perday-$7.50;
Option:
Horseback riding for Kadima:
f included for Safari)
The Jewish Community Center of Pinellas County is a
major beneficiary of funds raised in the annual Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
Transportation: From:
Temple Ahavat Shalom,
Dunedin: 7 days $25, per day
$5;
JCC Jupiter St., Clearwater: 7
days $20, per day $4;
Congregation Beth Shalom,
Clearwater: 7 days $15, per
day $3;
Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwa-
ter: 7 days $15, per day
$3;
For registration and more in-
formation, please contact Ann
Lardner 344-5795.
For Teens Only
If you are between the ages of
13 and 18 and want to enjoy the
friendship of other teens as well
as helping others in the commu-
nities, the Jewish Community
Center of Pinellas County, 8167
Elbow Lane N., is holding its
first organizational meeting of
the Jewish Center youth group
on Tuesday Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. To
start off our group, we are going
to have a pizza party with plenty
of pizza, snacks, and coke.
JCY is a youth group for teens
who want to better both them-
selves and their community by
coordinating and running social
events such as teen dances, the
boat ride, the Purim carnival, etc.
The youth group will also do vol-
unteer work for such organiza-
tions as Bay Pines hospital, the
JCC and will be involved in many
more interesting activities. For
more information, call 344-5795.
Senior Friendship Club
The Senior Friendship Club of
the Jewish Community Center of
Pinellas County have several
planned activities for this coming
season:
Thursday, Nov. 12 Speaker
"The Economic Recovery Act
of 1981"
Sunday, Nov. 15 County
Playhouse Dinner Theatre
Gateway Mall, "Naughty
Marietta"
Sunday. Jan. 3, 1982 New
Years Weekend Party -
Kosher sit-down full course din-
ner, free set-ups. 5:30 p.m.
Dancing, music, entertainment.
Members $9, non-members
$10.
Contact Alma Gertner 345-
0690.
A seminar on aging sponsored by
v.ie Jewish Family Service, the
Jewish Community Center and
the board of rabbis, will be
presented at the Jewish Com-
munity Center on Friday,
November 13, from 11-2. This
meeting will be in the form of a
brunch, and there will be a $2 ad-
mission charge.
The speakers will be Dr.
Samuel Siegel, internist, who will
discuss health issues and answer
questions; Mr. Bill Richards, of
Pinellas County consumer af-
fairs, who will discuss problems
and offer solutions to consumer
issues; and Mr. Bruce Mills of In-
formation and Referral services,
who will talk about services
available in Pinellas County.
We expect this seminar to be
an extremely rewarding one, of-
fering much needed information
for our senior citizens. It's a
chance to get all the information
a person needs in one place.
The later years of life can of-
ten be the most rewarding and
enjoyable years a person has.
This is only possible, however,
when the health and financial
needs are met. We hope this
seminar will answer some of the
questions that seniors have about
their life style and about prob-
lems that might have cropped
up in their lives.
A delicious brunch will be
served, at a cost of only $2 per
person. We are requesting that
people RSVP by November 6, by
calling Mrs. Ann Lardner at the
JCC, 344-5795, or Gulf Coast
Jewish Family Service, at 446-
1005.
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Frklay. November.
Reprint from New York Daily
News.
WASHINGTON Thret
Jewish employees of a suburban
Maryland insurance firm took
Thursday off to observe the holy
day Yom Kippur and lost their
jobs in the process.
The three accounting
manager Jay Luber, underwriter
Mindy r eldman and underwriter-
trainee Steven Litt say they
were dismissed this week by
Eastern Indemnity of Bethesda
for insisting they get Thursday
off. The firm, they were told, does
not acknowledge the holy day.
Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day
of Atonement, is considered the
holiest day of the year to Jews.
Jewish Day School News
At the Jewish Day School,
Sukkot has been the subject of
several weeks activities. Before
the High Holy Days ended, chil-
dren were already asked to
submit shoe box sized model suk-
kot (booths) for the second
annual Day School Miniature
Sukkah Contest. All participants
were given award certificates at a
prize ceremony held on Hoshane
Rabba, Oct. 19. In cooperatior
with the Pinellas County Jewish
Community Center, the student
body decorated the JCC commu-
nal sukkah as a school trip on
Erev Sukkot, Oct. 12.
Day School students visited
the sukkot of Steve and Linda
Grau, Rabbi Jacob and Joanne
Luski, and Edwin and Debbie
Frankel on the second dav of
Choi Hamoed Sukkot, Oct.' 16.1
By touring the family sukkot,
students were greatly impressed.
Several expressed their desire to
build sukkot at their homes.
In other news The Day
School has made great strides
recently in building its secular
program. New formalized courses
in science and social studies have
been improved and made part of
the core curriculum. Students are
now provided with SRA reading
cards to supplement the excellent
Houghton Mifflin reading books
that are already featured.
The Pinellas County Day
School receives financial support
from funds raised in the annual
local Combined Jewish Appeal
Campaign.
Rabbi to Lecture
At St. Leo College
Rabbi David J. Suss kind of
Temple Beth El in St. Peters-
burg, will address several classes
at St. Leo College, St. Leo, on the
subjects of "Scripture" and "The
Jewish Religion" on November
10-11. The rabbi's visit is spon-
sored by the Jewish Chautauqua
Society.
Rabbi Susskind received his
BA degree from Yeshiva Univer-
sity. He was ordained a rabbi by
Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion (HUC),
earning a Master of Hebrew Let-
ters degree while in attendance.
In 1974, he was awarded the
honorary degree of Doctor of
Divinity from HUC, for service
consistent with the highest
tenets of Reform Judaism.
He is a member of the Execu-
tive Board of Religions United
for Action in the Community in
Pinellas County. He serves on
advisory committees for United
Way, Police Chaplaincy, and
Young Women's Residence.
Rabbi Susskind lectures on
college campuses under the
auspices of the Jewish
Chautauqua Society. JCS is the
educational project of the Na-
tional Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods and is dedicated to
the improvement of interfaith re-
lations. This goal is partially ac-
complished through the endow-
ment of courses and lectures
about Judaism at universities
throughout the United States
and Canada.
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The three, all hired by the firm
in the last seven months, bowed
to company pressure and worked
Roah Hashanah last month but
said they were drawing the line at
Yom Kippur.
"Either work Thursday or
resign," Jay Luber said he was
told by company president C.
Graham Perkins last Monday.
Luber said he was given until 5
p.m. to change his mind. When
he did not, he said Perkins "told
me I was fired and should clear
out my things."
Feldman said she was also
fired Monday by the company's
assistant vice president when she
told him she would not be in on
Yom Kippur. Litt got the ax
Wednesday morning for similar
reasons.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith where the three
took their complaint, labeled the
dismissals "a classic case of
religious discrimation." The
league said it may take legal
action against the firm if it is un-
able to settle the issue.
Letter to the Editor
Dear Friends of the American
Technion Society,
Throughout the years, with the
approach of the High Holidays
and the New Year, it has been the
custom for friends to review the
outgoing year and to hope that
the coming year will hold only
good in store for us.
This past year has been a diffi-
cult one in Israel, mainly as a
result of the atmosphere created
by the Knesset elections. There is
no doubt that this atmosphere
raised doubts and confusion,
effecting our daily lives and ex-
tending into our academic life as
well.
The destiny of our people has
been such that we are not un-
familiar with difficult times
and even the political system
cannot destroy the faith we have
in our academic potential. Our
primary task is clear that is to
raise a new generation of out-
standing physicians in the
service of our nation and to en-
courage and help them to achieve
new heights in medical research.
In a few weeks time, another
class of students will be awarded
the MD degree. This will bring
the total number of graduates of
our school to 350. The feedback
we have received thus far on our
graduates has given us ample
reason to be proud of the physi-
cians we are turning out in our
school.
This year, with your help and
with the help of our scores of
friends here and abroad, and with
the understanding of our many
friends of the Technion Societies
throughout the world we have
stood fast and met the challenges
facing us.
We do not expect the year at
our threshold to be an easy one
for us. Nevertheless, it will find
our school in the new building,
The B. Rappaport Family Medi-
cal Sciences Building. Our re-
search program is being for-
mulated, and our Faculty is doing
its utmost to maintain the mo-
mentum in teaching and re-
search. In the field of Medical
Science, any delay in progress is
tantamount to retrogression and
this we can not afford.
We look forward to the New
Year with faith and confidence
and we are convinced that your
support will be unwavering -
and that you will stand by us
sharing in our progress and de-
velopment so that our combined
efforts will continue to be a
source of pride to the Technion in
general and the Medical School in
particular.
DEAN DAVID BARZILAI. MD
Profeeaor of Medicine
and Endocrinology
I
Three Jews Fired in Yom Kippur Dispute j
| Nissim Etiad To Speak at
i
i
ARZA November 16
The Association of Reform
Zionists of America (ARZA} will
present the Honorable Nissim
Eliad On Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m.
The program will be held at Tem-
ple B'nai Israel, 1685 South Bel-
cher Road, Clearwater. The
public is invited.
Nissim Eliad, chairman of the
Israel Movement for Progressive
(Reform) Judaism, was born in
1920 in Tiberias. His family, long
established in Palestine, includes
Rabbi Ya'akov Shealtiel Ninio, a
noted Jerusalem rabbi of the
early 19th century.
Growing up in a religiously-
oriented Sephardi home, Mr.
Eliad studied Torah in Hebrew
and Arabic. He is able to quote
exunded biblical passages by
heart in both languages, as well
as in English, which he learned
while a university student.
Mr. Eliad received degrees in
Middle Eastern Studies and Law
from the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
Established as a successful
attorney in Tel Aviv, Mr. Eliad
entered the world of public af-
fairs. In 1966, he was chosen
secretary-general of the Indepen-
dent Liberal Party. Two years
later, he was elected to the Knes-
set (Israel's parliament), where
he served until 1977.

a
Honorable Nissim Eliad
In addition to his dedication to
building Reform Judaism, Mr
Eliad is a leader of the Israeli Se-
phardi Federation. Among his
primary interests are Israeli-
Arab relations; integration of
Diaspora cultures; Jewish
theology; and the renewal of
Jewish tradition in a contempo-
rary idiom.
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, November 6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Page 9
B'not Mitzvah
BETH HEIDI ISM ARK
Heidi Ismark, daughter
JTwd Mrs. Martin Ismark,
I oiled to the Torah aa a Bat
v,h on October 31 at Temple
j Israel, Clearwater.
geidi is a student in the Tem-
i Religious School and ia a
obcr of the Junior Youth
up. She attends the Seminole
fle School where she is in the
_ grade. Heidi ia a member ,
[the Seminole synchronized
iteam.
Ax. and Mrs. Ismark hosted '
iKiddush following services in
or of the occasion. A re-
on was held at the Wine
. Celebrating with Heidi
her grandparents Mr. and
Is. Louis Gollinger, Grand-
Hher Nellie Ismark from New
. and Great Aunt and Great
icle Mr and Mrs. Henry
on. also from New York.
SCOTT LAWRENCE WINER
Scott Lawrence Winer, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Winer, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah on
November 7 at Temple B'nai Is-
rael, Clearwater.
Scott is in the Bar Mitzvah
class at B'nai Israel and is the
president of the Junior Youth
Group. He attends the Largo
Middle School where he is in the
eighth grade. Scott is an Honor
Roll student and a Little League
All Star.
Mr. and Mrs. Winer will host a
Kiddush luncheon at their home
following services. A dinner
dance will be held Saturday eve-
ning at the Wine Cellar. Special
guests will include relatives from
Richmond, Va., Petersburg, Va.,
Philadelphia, Hartford, Conn.,
and San Antonio, Texas.
Kosher Kitchen
One of our loyal readers sent this recipe for an easy cabbage
oup. If you have a favorite recipe, please share it with our
Ireaderb Send it to the Jewish Floridian, 302 S. Jupiter Ave.,
Clearwater, Fl. 33615.
CABBAGE SOUP
piece of meat, 1-1'/i lbs.
a few soup bones
1 medium onion, whole
2 cans tomato soup
2 pieces or V* tap. sour salt.
Add more to taste if desired.
14 cup sugar
1 small head cabbage, cut up or chopped.
Salt can be omitted or added.
Cook the meat, bones, and whole onion for one hour. Skim
loff the film on the top when the water first starts to boil. Add
Ithe cut up cabbage, tomato soup, sour salt, and sugar. Cook
linother half hour.
I
i a.
CORRECTION
The Judaica Shop of Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater, is
Iopen on Fridays from 7-8 p.m. and 9-9:30 p.m. before and after
I services. Incorrect hours were given in our last edition.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL-Reform
|400 S Pasadena Ave., St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi David
[Susskind Rabbi Robert Kirzner Sabbath Services: Friday evening
III 8 p.m. Tel. 347-6136.
Congregation BETH SHALOM-Conaervatlva
|1844 54 St. S.. St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi Sidney Lubln Sabbath
[Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday, WO a.m. Tei. as*
13380
Iconflragatlon B'NAI ISRAEL-ConaervatWa
|301 A sf N., St. Petersburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Uiaki 8abbath
|8*vice: Friday evening S p.m.; 8aturday, a.m.: Sunday 9usm:
' nd.y-Frlday 8sm: and evening Mlnyan Tel. 331 -4900,381-4901.
1
)NO REG ATION BETH CHAI-Conaeivattae
i-OO 125 St. N Seminole 33642 Rabbi Herman Klrshner s**'"
Devices: Friday evenings 8 p.m.: Saturday, WOajn. Tel. arosce.
>NQREdATK>N BETH SHALOMCenaervatlva
1325 S Belcher Rd.. Oiearwater 33818 Rabbi Peter Mehler Sap-
h Services; Friday evening 8 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.ra. Sunday morn-
I Minyan 9 a.m. Tel. 531-1414.
JEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL Reform .
PW5 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Arthur
Mercian Sabbath Servlcea: Friday evening at 8 p.m.. Saturday
^0:30 a.m. Tf 1.531 -5829
JEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM Reform
0 Box 1098, Dunedln 33528 Rabbi Jan Breaky Sabbath Ser-
fcss Friday evening 6 p.m. Tel. 734-9*28.
KEVIN FRYE
Kevin Frye, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Frye, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
November 7 at Congregation
B'nai Israel. St. Petersburg
The celebrant is in the pre-
confirmation class at the Temple,
and is the treasurer of the St.
Petersburg Kadima. He is an
eighth grade student in the
Riviera Middle School and plays
first trumpet in the band. Kevin
received the key to the city of St.
Petersburg for playing the Star
Spangled Banner at a city dedi-
cation.
Gail and Mike Frye will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following services in honor of the
occasion. A luau reception will be
held Saturday night at their
home. Celebrating with Kevin
will be his grandparents Rose and
Carl Frye. and Julius and Ann
Pearlstein, all of St. Petersburg,
brother Marc, and many aunts,
uncles, cousins and friends from
all over the country.
Help
Needed
In the September 25 issue of
The Jewish Floridian, an article
appeared describing a new
federation program of giving as-
sistance to incapacitated mem-
bers of the Jewish community.
This article (on page 3) was en-
titled "We Must Serve Every-
body."
Reva Kent, president of the
Federation, appointed Dr. Joel
Shrager as chairman of the newly
formed Human Relations Com-
mittee, whose purpose wul be
that of a catalyst in coordinating
this service so as to encompass
the total community. We are very
much aware that most synago-
gues and organizations have
some type of similar program
presently in effect, but it was felt
that a coordinated effort would
service more people more ef-
fectively.
Since the establishment of the
expanded program emanating
out of Temple Beth El, many
"cases of need" for transporta-
tion to synagogue services,
organizational meetings, etc.,
have emerged, where the indivi-
duals ware not aware that they
could receive aeeietance from
their affiliated organization.
This new Federation commit-
tee ia receiving support and as
sistance from Gulf Coast Jewish
family Services, the Jewish
Community Center and other
autonomous membership organ!
rations. This ia a direct appeal to
all organizations to contact Dr.
Joel Shrager to coordinate your
own activities in this area with
that of the total community, and
to give input to the committee on
your experience and efforts in
that area of providing transpor-
tation to the incapacitated. For
more information on this fledging
committee enterprise, Dr.
Shrager can be reached at 867-
9659. Your support on this
. humanitarian endeavor would be
greatly appreciated.
Community Calendar
Monday, Nov. 9
Sen.or Friendship Club, JCC 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Sholom, Gulfport, Rummage Sole ORT, Clearwater Evening
Chapter, Membership Tea.
Tuesday, Nov. 10
B'nai B'rith Women, Clearwater, Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Sisterhood, Beth Sholom, Golfport, Board Meeting 10:30o.m.,
Regular Meeting 12:30 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth Shoiom,
Gulfport, Breakfast, Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Men's
Club, Beth Sholom, Gulfport, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hodassah,
Golda Meir Chapter, Meeting 12:30 p.m. JWV, Paul Surenky
Post 409, Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.. Regular Meeting -8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Men, Olan Lodge 1246, Meeting 8 p.m. ORT,
Gulfport Afternoon Chapter, Meeting 12 noon ladies
Auxiliary, JWV, Paul Surenky Post 409, Board and Regular
Meeting -7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 11
Beth Shalom, Clearwater, Executive Meeting 8 p.m. Suncoast
Social Club, Clearwater 1 p.m. Hebrew High School, B'nai
Israel, St. Petersburg 7-9 p.m. Hadassah, Clearwater-Safety
Harbor, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hadassah, Aliyah, Meeting 10
a.m. Hodassah, Golda Meir, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hadassah,
Aviva, Meeting Hadassah, Shalom, Board Meeting 10:30
a.m.. Regular Meeting 12:30 p.m. NOW, St. Petersburg,
Board Meeting 10 a.m. Ladies Auxiliary, JWV Abe Ader Post
246, Board Meeting 8 p.m. Hadassah, Shoshana, Meeting -
7:30p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 12
Senior Friendship Club, JCC Meeting 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood,
B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, Card Party 1 p.m. Adult
Education, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, 8-10 p.m. NCJW,
Suncoast, Boutique Ship-A-Box, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 13
ORT, Sabbath, Clearwater Evening Chapter, B'nai Israel,
Clearwater Ladies Auxiliary, JWV Abe Ader Post 246,
Memorial Service.
Saturday, Nov. 14
JCC Dinner Theatre -7 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 15
JCC Dinner Theatre 7 p.m.. Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater,
Israel Bond Affair Men's Club, Beth Shalom, Clearwater,
Dinner 7 p.m. USY, Beth Shalom, Clearwater 7 p.m.
Symphony, Dunedin Sisterhood, Beth Chai, Kitchen Shower
luncheon.
Monday, Nov. 16
JCC Executive Board 7 p.m.. Board Meeting 8 p.m. Senior
Friendship Club, JCC, 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood, Temple Bern El,
Board Meeting 10 a.m. ORT, Clearwater Evening Chapter,
Board Meeting- 7:30 p.m. ORT, West Wind, Meeting- 1 p.m.
Symphony, St. Petersburg, Symphony, St. Petersburg
Womens Division of Federation Cabinet Meeting 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 17
ORT, St. Petersburg Afternoon Chapter Meeting Brotherhood,
B'nai Israel, Clearwater, Meeting 8 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Shalom, Clearwater, Meeting 7:30 p.m. B'nai Israel, St.
Petersburg, Board Meeting 8 p.m. ORT, St. Petersburg
Evening Chapter, Meeting.
Wednesday, Nov. 18
Suncoast Social Club, Clearwater 1 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Chai, Meeting 8 p.m. Beth El Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Hebrew High School, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg 7-9 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 19
Senior Friendship Club, JCC, Birthday-Anniversary Party 1-4
p.m. B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, Adult Education, 8-10 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 21
JCC Dinner Theater 7 p.m. Brotherhood, Beth El, Blood Bank
Kadima Congregation, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg 10:30 a.m.,
Havdala 5-6 p.m., grade K, 1 and 2.
Seadey, Nov. 22
JCC Dinner Theater 6 p.m. USY, Beth Shalom. Clearwater 7
p.m. Temple Beth El Thanksgiving Dinner Beth Shalom,
Gulfport, Dinner-Dance. Wine Cellar I p.m. ORT, Clearwater
Evening, Book Fair.
Certified Surgical Model
Rabbi Seymour P. Klrshner
Congregation Bath Chal-Seminole
22 yrt. of nnownil experience
Serving the West Coast k Central Fl.
813-393-5525
813-398-1984
813-398-1995


10
The Jewish Ploridian ofPineUas County
rpfry.Nov.ttb.,,,
Congregations / Organizations Events
BETH SHOLOM
AHA VAT SHALOM
The Oct. 3 meeting of the
Par met ii of Temple Ahavat
She lorn starting the
of 1981-82 im a
Bingo was the theme A
good turnout helped us to plea
head for some wonderful gat to-
gether* for the rrmmg months
The next mig wUl be the
Third Annual Package Auction
on Saturday Evening. Nov. 7 at
7:30 p.m at the Temple, 2000
Main St., Dunedin *i rtmiaeann ia
one wrapped package per person
valued no less than S2 each
Please mark the package as to
content, such as; man, woman.
child, household, etc. These will
then all be auctioned off to the
highest bidder. There will be
ty of refreshments and all
and guests are invited
to attend.
HAOASSAH
Avive Group
The evening group of St. Pe-
tersburg Hadassah. A viva, will
join the Clearwster group for an
Education Evening on Nov. 11 al
the Top fo the World Racreation
Center. Edith Zamost. from the
National Hadassah Board, will be
the guest speaker.
On Nov. 15, the Aviva group
will sponsor a garage sale to bt
held all dsy at 6870 12th Avenue
North, St. Petersburg Irma
Marlia is serving as chairman
assisted by Marilyn Krohn.
Betty Damouny and Dorene Ben
Clothing, dishes and furniture
will be featured.
HADASSAH
Clearwater Safety
ary. 1978 whan the was elected
Hadassah deputy to the Zionist
General Council of the World
Zansrist Orgsnnation.
For additional
Pro-
gram Chairman 397-4429
HADASSAH
Art
Edith Zamost
The Clearwster-Safety Harbor
Hadassah will hold an evening
meeting at Top Of The World
Condominium, auditorium 1 and
2, on Wednesday, Nov. 11 at 7:30
p.m. The speaker will be Edith
Zamost, national vice president
of Hadassah.
Edith Zamost is currently co-
ordinator of Hadassah Services.
She was the co-chairman of
Hadassah's 1978-79 and 1979-80
National Conventions. Her
previous national portfolios were
chairman for Membership,
Leadership Development and
Fund raising for Youth Activi-
ties. Mrs. Zamost was president
of the Southern New Jersey
Region and the New Brunswick
Chapter. She entered Jewish or
ganization life in 1948 and has
visited Israel many times.
Along with her many years of
devoted service to Israel, Mrs.
Zamost is active in other Jewish
community affairs. She has been
an officer of the YMHA. Wom-
en's Division and was chairman
of Women'a Division of the UJ A
in her area.
In addition to her volunteer
services, she has been a profes-
sional pianist and singer, appear-
ing with such orchestras as the
New York Philharmonic
Orchestra as a piano soloist and
baa conducted her Temple choir
for 12 years.
Mrs. Zamost was a Hadassah
to the 29th World Con-
held in Jerusalem in Febru-
Safety
Harbor and Shnehana Chapters
in conjunction with Art America
will sponsor an Art Auction the
evening of Nov. 7. at the Palm
State Bank. 1000 US 19. Palm
Harbor Included are numerous
beautiful art works, etching, oils,
sengraphs and lathos. Many out-
standing artists are represented
here, including Chagal. Picasso.
Barrett. Boulanger. Deiacrok.
and Krew]ansky.
Preview and refreshments at
7:30 p.m.. auction 8:30 p.m.
Public invited to attend. Door
prize.
HADASSAH
Golds Meir
The next meeting of Golds
Meir Hadassah will take place on
Wednesday. Nov. 11 at Congre-
gation B'nai Israel. 301 59th St..
St. Petersburg at 10:30 am. This
meeting is very special as the
combined chapters of Hadassah
will join together to bear guest
speaker Edith Zamost. a member
of the national board of Hadas-
sah.
ABE ADER POST 246
At the monthly breakfast of
the Abe Ader Post 246 Jewish
War Veterans of the United
States of America, on Sunday.
Oct. 25. at the post's headquar-
ters 8167 Elbow Lane. St. Peters-
burg, the guest speaker, Mrs.
Ann Can-away nutrition expert,
registered nurse, and holding a
degree in Physical Therapy,
delivered s most interesting and
enlightening talk about nutrition
and vitaminology. stressing the
importance of procuring the
proner vitamins for ones particu-
lar ailment.
Mrs. Cam way's lucid expla-
nation to the questions asked by
post and auxiliary members was
very much appreciated.
The regular meeting held after
the breakfast was very well at-
tended by both the post and aux-
iliary, and as usual, much was ac-
complished.
BETH CHAI
Friday evening services began
at Congregation Beth Chai at 8
p.m., on Friday evening. Sabbath
morning services take place each
Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m.
An Oneg Shabbst of refresh-
ments and socializing follows
each Friday evening and Sabbath
Service. Al! service* are con-
ducted by the Synagogues
spiritual leader, Rabbi Sherman
P Kirshner, assisted by Cantor
Reuben Sabtn. The entire com-
munity is most cordially invited
to attend.
Rabbi Kirshnsr began a He-
brew high school program on
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 4:45 p.m.
All interested teenagers, aged 16
through 17, who would like to at-
tend are most welcome.
The Beth Chai confirmation
class began its meetings for the
year, with Rabbi Kirshner at the
Synagogue on Tuesday, Oct. 27.
The class will alternate between
meeting at the Synagogue
Building, and class members'
homes. For further information,
please call Rabbi Kirshner at 393-
5626.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El's adult educa-
tion study discussion group.
sponsored by the Brotherhood,
and which meets at Temple Beth
EL 400 rasadena Ave.. S.. every
second and fourth Wednesday
7:30-9-30 p.m.. ia now in its
second year. The topic this year
is American-Jewish history from
the 17th century to the early 20th
century.
The session on Nov. 11 will be
on "The Colonial Experience
1654-1800.'' There wfll be a dis-
cussion on the first American
Jewish communities: realities of
economic: political and social
life the Jewish role in the
emerging American nation: and
the lives of colonial Jewish mer-
chants. The session on Nov. 25
will center on, "Great Changes in
America 1800-1840." There will
be s discussion on European
involvement in Americsn
politics: increasing Jewish settle-
ments across America: and the
Damascus affair kinship with
a world people and transforma-
tion of American Jews
These interesting and fascinat-
ing topics will continue until
March 24. 1982 when there will be
a summary of the course and
plans for the future. The course is
free except for books which might
be needed. Those who desire to
join the adult education study
discussion group course at Tem-
ple Beth El are urged to call Es-
telle or Max Halle 864-4211 for
more information.
BETH SHALOM
Men's Ckib
The Third Annual Men's Club
Dinner of Congregation Beth
Shalom will be held on Sunday,
Nov. 15, st 5 p.m. at the Syna-
gogue's social hall. The meal will
be a full-course kosher dinner,
cooked by members of the Men's
Club. After dinner. Hazzan
Jonah Binder will conduct a sing-
a long of Jewish melodies. Each
table will have copies of song
sheets so that all can join in.
The donation will be $7 per
person.Reservations can be made
by calling: Joe Stern or 393-7959
or Ed Gurevitz at 595-5132.
Everyone is invited to spend a
pleasant evening.
BETH SHALOM
Sisterhood News
Beth Shalom Sisterhood in
Clearwater announces an in-
novative program appealing to
one and all, and especially all you
artists! An artist workshop will
be presented on Tuesday, Nov.
17, at the Synagogue social hall.
At 7:46 p.m. area artists will
demonstrate various forms of
artistic media. Demonstrations
will include pottery, stained glass
and weaving. Everyone is cor-
dially invited to attend. For in-
formation call Phyllis Abrams at
796-7840.
BETH SHOLOM
Sisterhood
The Beth Sbolom Sisterhood,
Gulfport, wfll hold its annual
rummage sals on Nov. 8-10, from
9 a.m. at 1844 54th St. So.. Gulf-
port. Great bargains for all are
available.
The Novembsr monthly
meeting will be held on Nov. 17 at
1 p.m. in the social hall. Members
and guests are invited. Dr. David
Rogers, an expert on the subject
of humanistic psychotherapy, Is
the guest speaker. Refreshments
will be served.
B'NAI ISRAEL
CMaStfTaOOQ
Basse*
Temple B'nai Israel Sister-
hood. 1686 Belcher Road, Clear
water, will hold a bazaar on Nov.
8, at 10 a.m. in the back parking
lot of the Temple. A cake sale,
rummage sale and crafts from the
workshop will be featured.
BETH SHOLOM
Men's Club
The Men's Cub of the Congre-
gation Beth Sbolom of Gulfport
resumed its monthly breakfast
meetings on Nov. 1, at 10:30 am.
preceded by services at 10 a.m.
The guest speaker was Mr. Law-
rence Wasser, director of the Na-
tional Jewish Fund.
Hebrew classes at the Congre-
gation Beth Sbolom of Gulfport,
1844 54th St. So.. Gulfport. be-
ginning Monday. Nov. 16, at 10
a.m. to 12 noon and every Mon-
day thereafter. Beginning He-
brew ITsading wfll be taught by
Mrs Doris Kuahner Geller
Intermediate Hebrew and Ex
planations of the Prayer Book
will be taught by Rabbi Sidney I.
Lubin.
Yiddish speaking group (Los
Mir Reden Yiddish) wiQ hold its
first meeting Dec. 12 on Saturday
evening at 7 p.m.
Congregation Beth Sbolom of
Gulfport is proud to announce a
dinner-dance testimonial being
held in honor of Ex-President Hy
Posner st the Wine-Celler. 17307
Gulf Blvd. No., North Redington
Beach, on Sunday. Nov. 22. at
1:30 p.m. Donation is $13.50 per
person. For information call 321-
3380.
It was with great pride that
Mr. Harold Ward, president of
Congregation Beth Sholom of
Gulfport accepted the most
beautiful gift of s sterling silver
breast piste for the Torah
donated to the congregation by
Rabbi Sidney I. Lubin and his
wife Helen
This presentation was made on
Rabbi Sidney and Helen Lubin's
return from Israel.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
Shabbst Workshop
Temple B'nai Israel will hold a
Shabbst workshop on Wednes-
day. Nov. 11 at 8 p.m. and Sun-
day. Nov. 15 at 9:30 a.m. There
will be a $2 materials fee. Please
register at the Temple office.
There will be a Havdalah serv-
ice in honor of new members on
Saturday, Nov. 14 at 3:30 p.m. It
will be held at the Temple. 1685
S. Belcher Rd Clearwater.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
Chai Club
An
What a unique idea!
amusement center party!
CHAI has reserved the entire
St. Pete Beach Amusement Cen-
ter. 7525 Blind Pass Road for
Saturday. Nov. 21. from 6 p.m til
closing. No admission. Pay as
you play. Games include bum-
ping cars, electronic machines,
mini-golf, pool tables, bowling
machines, rifle range and
manymore. Refreshments will be
served, and door prizes will be
given. Everyone "young st
heart'' is welcome to join us.
The CHAI Club is Temple
B'nai Israel's auxiliary of "young
people" (under 40). Additional
information may be obtained
from Mel Fergenbaum 393-4662
or Helene Debowsky 393-5800.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL
Friendship Club
The paid-up party on Oct. 15,
was a huge success. After lunch,
games such aa, cards, mah jongg,
rummy-o, etc., were enjoyed. Th*
November schedule is as follows:
Nov. 12 There will be guest
speakers from the Channel
Markers. This promises to be a
very informative meeting and all
members are urged to attend.
Nov. 19 Social afternoon. -
Nov. 26 There will be a busi-
ness meeting, and a social will
follow.
Dec. 17 A fabulous Hanuk-
kah Party, with the traditional
menu of latkes, applesauce and
sour cream, is in the planning.
Please plan to attend all meet-
ings. Guests are welcomed.
GOLDAMEIR
Friendship Club
Golds Meir Friendship Club
features music from the old coun-
try home. Eli Spivack. vocalist
and guitarist, will entertain the
club members and their guests st
the regular social meeting of the
2^i* Frkmdslup (^
b^YiddSan?^,
Come and jofeusfori,
The Golds Meir Pn
CW> which meets every
""noon et 302 S JsaaZa
i-^ wfll meet K!
non of games or wh,u
your pleasure on MondeT
16 at lpm the Gold, it
aggA.aWa
JEWISH SINGLES
OvereOCIsb
A wine and cheese ptrtu
take place on Saturday nite
7 at the home of Mariam
der at 8 p.m. Comedy em
ment will be presented by -
Posner. New members are
come. For reservation call G
Osher 866-2007 or
Brecis 677-3106.
On Saturday nite Nov. 21 i
dinner theatre is planned at t
Jewish Community Center in <
Petersburg. The presentation w||
be "Butterflies are Free"$10
person.
ORT
Afternoon Chapter
The St. Petersburg Aftemxal
Chapter of ORT will hold its reg-l
ular monthly meeting on Tubs]
dsy. Nov. 17, st Temple Beth-L.
400 Pasadena Avenue Souul
Pasadena, at 12:30 p.m. Al
musical afternoon is planned far I
your entertainment. Members inI
asked to invite their friends.
Mae Malm, president, his i
nounced that the St. Petersburg
Afternoon Chapter of ORT will
sponsor a holiday gift wrapattnl
Tyrone Mall from Nov. 27|
through Dec. 24.
The 26th national biennial cos I
vention of Women: Americas I
ORT (organization for rehabilitaj
tion through training), whinl
focused on the challenges si
ORT's coming second century oil
service as the world's largest n[
governmental vocational
technical education prograal
Mrs. Mae Malin. delegate anaj
president of the St. Peters
afternoon chapter attended UJ
convention, which was held al
New York City. Oct 26 throun
29. Some 1,200 colleagues M
sen ting 145.000 members in man I
than 1.250 chapters from coast u|
coast, participated along wi
distinguished guests from thai
country and overseas, in plenary |
lions, panels and workshops
B'NAI ISRAEL
New Years Eve Party
Join "Congregation B'nai b-j
reel" of St. Petersburg for a gak
fun filled evening. There will bs
an elegant buffet with delkiooi j
kosher dishes, hats, horns and
noisemakers. BYOB; set ups wfl
be provided. Entertainment will
be by "Bob Wilson snd Musk,
the areas finest one nighterbaai
playing everything from show
tunes to rock with plenty of fr
lachs, waltzes, sambas, and Jl
terbug tunes. For reservstioei
call, Zelda KroU 046-3616. Bar-
bars Bleier 384-4862, Anita He-
lend 381-6886. It's only lw
for the whole package per parson
NAAM Chug Aliyah
Jochanan Simon, director
Tenuat Aliyah. Israel, and faro*"
director 6t the French AByJ
Movement, will be taw.jg*
fhTsTpUersburTNAAWg
Aliyah. The meeting wU ""
place on-Novamber 9, *"P*J
the home of Morris end k>vj
Chapman, 5830 Bahama way.
sTpsteraburg Beach. Plf"!""
to confirm attendance, 360-l


The Jewish Floridian ofPineilas County
Page 11
981 CJF General Assembly To Probe
Major Issues On Federation Agendas
hy YORK, NY Over 100
fchops, four major plenariea
fix important forums reflect-
Very major issue facing Jew-
Federations at home and
d are included in the agenda
, 50th General Assembly of
[Council of Jewish Fed-
Ions which convenes
Imber 10-15 in St. Louis.
tliminary registration fi-
indicate an attendance of
lover 2,500 representatives
[ the 200 Jewish Federations
j United States and Canada
l comprise the CJF.
le opening GA Plenary Ses-
on Wednesday evening,
11, will mark the official
bncement of CJF's 50th
Iversary Year. The major ad-
dress of the evening will be
delivered by CJF President
Morton L. Mandel of Cleveland.
The Plenary will also include the
premiere showing of "50 Years,"
an audio-visual review of the past
half-century of North American
Jewish history as seen through
the eyea of CJF past presidents.
"Covenant and Community," an
original musical composition
with narrative, will also highlight
the opening Plenary.
On Thursday evening, the
Assembly will convene again for
a second Plenary session on
"American Foreign Policy and
Jewish Concerns." The Saturday
evening Plenary will be devoted
to a special cultural offering, and
the closing Plenary session on
Sunday morning, Nov. 15, will
Israel Bonds To Honor
Maureen and Stanley
losewater At B'nai Israel
and Mrs. Stanley Rose-
pr, a popular and dedicated
pie, will be honored on Sun-
[evening, November 15, at 8
I. at Temple B'nai Israel in
vater, it was announced by
Bara Rosenblum, Helaine
enfeld and Shirley Fischer,
thairmen.
fate of Israel Bonds, in co-
auon with Temple B'nai
is conferring the "City of
ce' Award on Dr. and Mrs.
rater that evening for their
i commitment to the State of
1 and their fellow Jew.
poth Maureen and Stan come
Ohio with a strong back-
Und of "Yiddiahkeit" and a
sense of awareness of their
ansibilities. They have play-
i active role at emple B'nai
W. Both have been board
nbers. Stan has also served on
I Dues Review Committee, the
Maws Committee, and the
Jlget and Finance Committee
also as secretary. He has also
ked on the Board of the
ation of Pinellas County;
chairman of the Doctors' Di-
for Federation and on the
laws Committee.
'tureen is a member of ORT,
JW and a life member of
issah. In addition to her
i at the Temple, she holds the
Inaction of being a member of
?first adult Bat Mitzvah class.
Pureen plays a key role at
"ration as chairman of the
en 8 Division and is cur-
R president of the Women's
wation.
Rosewaters have three
n Shari, Jimmy and
ue.
Ruth Gruber will be the
speaker that evening. Dr.
P<*r has distinguished herself
C ,uthor, foreign correspon-
F and lecturer and has gained
recognition as a leading authority
on the State of Israel.
Dr. Gruber covered the signing
of the Israel Egypt peace treaty
in Washington, as well as the
conference in Egypt between
Begin and Sadat, for the North
American Newspaper Alliance.
She is the author of 14
books, six of them on Israel. Her
most recent book, "Raquela: A
Woman of Israel," won the Na-
tional Jewish Book Award as the
best book on Israel.
She has made 32 trips to Israel
as Foreign Correspondent for the
New York Herald Tribune and
other periodicals. She has contri-
buted articles to the Readers Di-
gest, Look, The Saturday Re-
view, Commentary and the New
York Times Sunday Magazine.
She has also prepared radio and
television scripts for the National
Broadcasting Co. and "The Eter-
nal Light" program of the Jewish
Theological Seminary.
include videotaped highlights of
the entire 1981 GA.
Six forums are planned to pro-
vide intensive discussion on to-
pics of primary concern to the
Federation community in 1982:
"The Jew in the Non-Jewish
World"; "Ethiopian Jews A
Community in Peril"; "Jews in
the Soviet Union: Managing the
Current Crisis"; "Peace in the
Middle East The Role of North
American Jewry" and "Jewish
Concern for Women's Rights:
Opportunities and Responsi-
bilities for Federations." On
Friday afternoon, November 13,
the final forum, "Jewish Com-
munities in Distress Around the
World," will be preceded by a
march to the old courthouse in
St. Ixmis to demonstrate soli-
darity with all oppressed Jews.
Shabbat observance will in-
clude a Friday night address,
"The Jewish Immigrant Experi-
ence in North America, 1881-
1981." The Saturday Oneg Shab-
bat will be devoted to a public
affairs seminar concentrating on
the Reagan Administration's
policies on key domestic and in-
ternational issues.
Also included in the 1981 G A
program will be sessions on is-
sues such as Soviet-Jewish In-
tegration into North American
Communities; The Needs of the
Jewish Disabled; The 1982 Cam-
paign; Cable Television; The
Jewish Family; The CJF-B'nai
B'rith Study on Hillel; Jewish
Singles in Community Life; De-
clining Federal Dollars for Hu-
man Services; Taxes and Phi-
lanthropy; The New Anti-
Semitism; The Changing Arab
World; Jewish Community
Newspapers, and others.
Women's Division leaders are
planning a variety of specialized
sessions, as is the CJF Leader-
ship Development Committee,
which will host approximately
200 winners of local Federation
Leadership Development
Awards. Student leaders from
campuses throughout North
America will also take part in the
GA.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
and embrace over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States and Canada.
Established in 1932, the Coun-
cil serves as a national instru-
ment to strengthen the work and
the impact of Jewish Federations
through leadership in developing
programs to meet changing needs
in the Jewish community;
through the exchange of success-
ful experiences to assure the moat
effective community services;
through establishing guidelines
for fund-raising and operation;
and through joint national plan-
ning and action on common pur-
poses dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
DAVID C. GROSS
SERVING THE FAMILIES OF PINEU.AS
COUNTY FROM ONI CONVENIENT LOCATION
PH. 381-4911
6366 CENTRAL AVE., ST. PETERSBURG, R. 33707
"Jewish Owned And Operated"
Chatter Box
GLADYS OSHER 866-2007
Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Marder, resi-
dents of Clearwater for three years, who celebrated their 50th
anniversary recently. In honor of the occasion, the Marders
hosted the Oneg Shabbat at Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater.
Family came from California to help celebrate Did you read
the beautiful and touching story (in the last issue of the Hadas-
sah magazine) about a wedding at Masada? The author is
Raphael Rothatein, the talented son of our own Harry
Rothsteina. The story was but a chapter in his soon to be
published book "The Masada Story" Only in Florida. Where
else could Rabbi Suasldnd go out into his backyard and pick a
perfect esrog from his own tree? Then, on Temple Beth El's
grounds, palm fronds were gathered to decorate the succah. The
Mai Berkoa, Sol Markmana, Jim Browne, Doug Byrds, David
Grosaee, and Arnold Epela were seen enjoying the fruits of the
harvest at the succah eat-it, at the temple, and basking in the
sunshine. Four month old Aaron was a perfect gentleman
throughout. He brought his parents, the David Keeeiere, and his
big sister with him Doris and Dick Barnard, who recently
returned from an extended motor trip, confirm that the Blue
Ridge Mountains of Virginia are really sensational to look at.
The gorgeous colors are due to the combination of unusual
natural resources Maze I Too to Cathy and Robert Leeds on
the birth of Andrew's baby sister Joanna ... Its nice to see the
younger generation take over. Newly wed Robin Eldred prepared
the family High Holy Day dinner with great results. As all good
husbands should, and most new husbands do, hubby Tim was
an all around helper. Robin's Mom, Miriam Shroeder, whose
recipes Robin used, was knelling in the background ... A sight
to behold on the beach is lazy Wexler doing his water ballet, and
leading an exercise class in the water at Gulfport Beach .
Judy Elkin, Bev Mitlin, Audrey Greenburg, and Natalie Rubin
were among those who worked many months to prepare the
Public Affairs Day sponsored by the National Council of Jewish
Women, but they were gratified by the tremendous response by
the public. The theme of the day was "Women in Power." Right
on, ladies .
MENORAH GARDENS
Florida's West
Coast's Only True
JEWISH CEMETERY
For People of the Jewish Faith
Many families who own cemetery property
'up north" compared the high costs of doobk
funerals, inconvenience, inclement weather,
shipping and travel. Their decision was to
select in "Menorah Gardens".
For Information and Prices
Call Sue Maraman 531-0475
"Adjoining area available for mixed marriages and
those who prefer cremation."
Bronx* Memeeiah fly Gotham Mtnfor Craftunon
Interested
In A
Career?
tit
Superior Surgical Mfg. Co., Inc., the nation's
second largest manufacturer of uniforms,
career apparel and accessories for the health
care, leisure and industrial markets, is always
in need of motivated people to support our
rapidly growing operations. We offer careers
in the following categories:
Accounts Receivable
Computer Programmer Analysts (370-138, minis)
Personnel
Customer Service
Secretarial
Word Processing
Accounting
We would be pleased to consider your resume sent to
the attention of our Personnel Department or, stop
in for an interview. Superior Surgical is an Equal
Opportunity Employer, publicly traded on the
American Stock Exchange. Our Annual Report is
available on request.
Superior Surgical
Mfg. Co., Inc.
Seminole Boulevard at 100th Terrace
Seminole. Florida 33542
Phone (813) 397 9611


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Full Text
N
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County

Friday, Novembers ip.,
I
Three Jews Fired in Yom Kippur Dispute :
Reprint from New York Daily
News.
WASHINGTON Three
Jewish employees of a suburban
Maryland insurance firm took
Thursday off to observe the holy
day Yom Kippur and lost their
jobs in the process.
The three accounting
manager Jay Luber, underwriter
Mindy b eldman and underwriter-
trainee Steven Litt say they
were dismissed this week by
Eastern Indemnity of Bethesda
for insisting they get Thursday
off. The firm, they were told, does
not acknowledge the holy day.
Yom Kippur, the Jewish Day
of Atonement, is considered the
holiest day of the year to Jews.
Jewish Day School News
At the Jewish Day School,
Sukkot has been the subject of
several weeks activities. Before
the High Holy Days ended, chil-
dren were already asked to
submit shoe box sized model suk-
kot (booths) for the second
annual Day School Miniature
Sukkah Contest. All participants
were given award certificates at a
prize ceremony held on Hosharu
Rabba, Oct. 19. In cooperatior
with the Pinellas County Jewish
Community Center, the student
body decorated the JCC commu-
nal sukkah as a school trip on
Erev Sukkot, Oct. 12.
Day School students visited
the sukkot of Steve and Linda
Grau, Rabbi Jacob and Joanne
Luski, and Edwin and Debbie
Frankel on the second dav of
Choi Hamoed Sukkot, Oct. 16.1
By touring the family sukkot,
students were greatly impressed.
Several expressed their desire to
build sukkot at their homes.
In other news The Day
School has made great strides
recently in building its secular
program. New formalized courses
in science and social studies have
been improved and made part of
the core curriculum. Students are
now provided with SRA reading
cards to supplement the excellent
Houghton Mifflin reading books
that are already featured.
The Pinellas County Day
School receives financial support
from funds raised in the annual
local Combined Jewish Appeal
Campaign.
The three, all hired by the firm
in the last seven months, bowed
to company pressure and worked
Rosh Hashanah last month but
said they were drawing the line at
Yom Kippur.
"Either work Thursday or
resign," Jay Luber said he was
told by company president C.
Graham Perkins last Monday.
Luber said he was given until 5
p.m. to change his mind. When
he did not, he said Perkins "told
me I was fired and should clear
out my things."
Feldman said she was also
fired Monday by the company's
assistant vice president when she
told him she would not be in on
Yom Kippur. Litt got the ax
Wednesday morning for similar
reasons.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith where the three
took their complaint, labeled the
dismissals "a classic case of
religious discrimation." The
league said it may take legal
action against the firm if it is un-
able to settle the issue.
Rabbi to Lecture
At St. Leo College
Rabbi David J. Susskind of
Temple Beth El in St. Peters-
burg, will address several classes
at St. Leo College, St. Leo, on the
subjects of "Scripture" and "The
Jewish Religion" on November
10-11. The rabbi's visit is spon-
sored by the Jewish Chautauqua
Society.
Rabbi Susskind received his
BA degree from Yeshiva Univer-
sity. He was ordained a rabbi by
Hebrew Union College Jewish
Institute of Religion (HUC),
earning a Master of Hebrew Let-
ters degree while in attendance.
In 1974, he was awarded the
honorary degree of Doctor of
Divinity from HUC, for service
consistent with the highest
tenets of Reform Judaism.
He is a member of the Execu-
tive Board of Religions United
for Action in the Community in
Pinellas County. He serves on
advisory committees for United
Way, Police Chaplaincy, and
Young Women's Residence.
Rabbi Susskind lectures on
college campuses under the
auspices of the Jewish
Chautauqua Society. JCS is the
educational project of the Na-
tional Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods and is dedicated to
the improvement of interfaith re-
lations. This goal is partially ac-
complished through the endow-
ment of courses and lectures
about Judaism at universities
throughout the United States
and Canada.
[ LIFE WITH
FATHER
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and dad
remembered
us. Why not
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B'nai B'rith's .
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City _
State ___
Age _
Zip
Phone
Contact:
MOOES C MOCK. C LU
uncock corrta, aunt an
Tmh, Fta. SMM
REMEMBER TO REMEMBER!
672-5588
Pinellas
461-4888
Letter to the Editor
| Nissim Eliad To Speak at I
ARZA November IB
Dear Friends of the American
Technion Society,
Throughout the years, with the
approach of the High Holidays
and the New Year, it has been the
custom for friends to review the
outgoing year and to hope that
the coming year will hold only
good in store for us.
This past year has been a diffi-
cult one in Israel, mainly as a
result of the atmosphere created
by the Knesset elections. There is
no doubt that this atmosphere
raised doubts and confusion,
effecting our daily lives and ex-
tending into our academic life as
well.
The destiny of our people has
been such that we are not un-
familiar with difficult times
and even the political system
cannot destroy the faith we have
in our academic potential. Our
primary task is clear that is to
raise a new generation of out-
standing physicians in the
service of our nation and to en-
courage and help them to achieve
new heights in medical research.
In a few weeks time, another
class of students will be awarded
the MD degree. This will bring
the total number of graduates of
our school to 350. The feedback
we have received thus far on our
graduates has given us ample
reason to be proud of the physi-
cians we are turning out in our
school.
This year, with your help and
with the help of our scores of
friends here and abroad, and with
the understanding of our many
friends of the Technion Societies
throughout the world we have
stood fast and met the challenges
facing us.
We do not expect the year at
our threshold to be an easy one
for us. Nevertheless, it will find
our school in the new building,
The B. Rappaport Family Medi-
cal Sciences Building. Our re-
search program is being for-'
mulated, and our Faculty is doing
its utmost to maintain the mo-
mentum in teaching and re-
search. In the field of Medical
Science, any delay in progress is
tantamount to retrogression and
this we can not afford.
We look forward to the New
Year with faith and confidence
and we are convinced that your
support will be unwavering
and that you will stand by us
sharing in our progress and de-
velopment so that our combined
efforts will continue to be a
source of pride to the Technion in
general and the Medical School in
particular.
DEAN DAVID BARZILA1, MD
Professor of Medicine
and Endocrinology
The Association of Reform
Zionists of America (ARZA) will
present the Honorable Nissim
Eliad On Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m.
The program will be held at Tem-
ple B'nai Israel, 1685 South Bel-
cher Road, Clearwater. The
public is invited.
Nissim Eliad, chairman of the
Israel Movement for Progressive
(Reform) Judaism, was born in
1920 in Tiberias. His family, long
established in Palestine, includes
Rabbi Ya'akov Shealtiel Ninio, a
noted Jerusalem rabbi of the
early 19th century.
Growing up in a religiously-
oriented Sephardi home, Mr.
Eliad studied Torah in Hebrew
and Arabic. He is able to quote
extended biblical passages by
heart in both languages, as well
as in English, which he learned
while a university student.
Mr. Eliad received degrees in
Middle Eastern Studies and Law
from the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem.
Established as a successful
attorney in Tel Aviv, Mr. Eliad
entered the world of public af-
fairs. In 1966, he was chosen
secretary-general of the Indepen-
dent Liberal Party. Two years
later, he was elected to the Knes-
set (Israel's parliament), where
he served until 1977.
Honorable Nissim Eliad A-
In addition to his dedication to
building Reform Judaism, Mr.
Eliad is a leader of the Israeli Se-
phardi Federation. Among his
primary interests are Israeli-
Arab relations; integration of
Diaspora cultures; Jewish
theology; and the renewal of
Jewish tradition in a contempo-
rary idiom.
MASTRO SUBARU
"Largest Volume Dealer In Southeast"
6402 W. Hlllsborough
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Interested In Aliyah?
join Pinellas County's Chug Aliyah
call
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360-1229 4
or 4
Gerry Rubin ?
Jewish Federation of Pinellas County 4
446-1033 4


ks* M k
Page 4
1 he Jewish FloridianofPinellas County
Friday, November 6,1981
^Jewish Floridian A Non-Romantic IRA Analysis
OF PINELLASCOUNTY
FredShochet
Editorial Office. 302 Jupiter Avc, South. Clcarwater. Flu 33515
Telephone 446-1033
Publication* Business Office. 120 NE 6 St Miami. Pla 33132
Telephone (3001 373-4605
I'ltKDK SHOCHKT SUZANNE SCHECHTER SUZANNE SHOCHET
i.iiiii.i aiull'ublishT Editor. Plnellas County Executive Editor
Jewish FlorMUn Does Not Guarantee the Kasarutli of Merchandise Advertised
. Second CsMJ I'oitasr Hsi4. USPS54SM7U at Miami. Pis l*attlsM Hi-Vtrvklv
I'ostmaster: Forward Form 3579 to llpa 0121)73, Miami. Fla. 33101
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area Annual M.00) 7-Year Minimum Suu
tenption S7 so or by annual membership pledge to Jewish Federation of Pinedas
County for which the sum of JJ.2S is paid. Out of Town Upon Request
Friday, November 6, 1981
Volume 2
9HESHVAN5742
Number 23

Terrorism in the U.S.?
It was clear that ultimately it would come to
this. A Palestine Liberation Organization official
Sunday warned American Jews that they will be tar-
gets of PLO assassins if the United States extradites
Ziad Abi Eain to Israel for trial on charges that,
alledgedly, he planted a bomb in Tiberias in May
1979, killing two and injuring 36.
Were the issue not the extradition of Eain, it
would be something else at some time in the near
future. The way in which Libya's Col. Khadafy has
been threatening his enemies in the U.S. for quite
some time now should, if nothing else, have been the
tipoff.
Thus, the legacy of unchecked international
terrorism becomes ours, no longer being confined to
Europe and the Middle East.
We must agree with official Israeli statements
this week that the bombing of a synagogue in Ant-
werp on Oct. 20 resulted directly from a growing in-
ternational tolerance of the PLO's dastardly crimes
as colorful freedom-fighting.
The threat this week by Hamed Abu Sitta, a
senior member of the PLO's executive committee in
Amman, that "Those (Americans) who have helped
the enemy (Israel) are known to us, and we can reach
them," should be intolerable, not just to American
Jews, but to Americans of all political and religious
persuasions.
All Americans Targeted
A case in point, if Sitta's threat fails to be con-
vincing, is the sudden recalling on Sunday of our
Ambassador to Italy Maxwell Rabb. It so happens
that Rabb, a Reagan appointee to the post, is Jew-
ish. But Rabb's recall from Rome was as a con-
sequence of a reported Khadafy threat to have him
assassinated in retaliation for our shooting down of
two Libyan jets late in the summer.
This sort of terrorism goes beyond the narrow
parochialism of Rabb's religion. It strikes at the
heart of American integrity in the arena of in-
ternational diplomacy. It should anger all
Americans, not just American Jews. Ditto, the
threat by the PLO's Sitta that Palestinian "revo-
lutionary courts" will try American Jews who have
"contributed toward the enemy's (Israel's) war ef-
forts ..."
THE GERMAN newspaper,
frankfurter AUgemeine Zeitung,
came closest the other day to a
realistic assessment of the agony
in Northern Ireland.
The newspaper opined that
"The IRA's success if it can
'.alk of such in light of ten hunger
deaths is limited to a stream of
weapons and money from Ameri-
ca, where old Irish Republican
romanticism has gained new
impetus."
It is an exaggeration of the
truth to suggest that Irish Amer-
ican "romantics" are the
dominant source of weapons now
in the hands of the Irish Repub-
lican Army. But the Frankfurter
AUgemeine is correct in its asser-
tion that colorful, which is to say
inaccurate, American public
opinion is the stuff on which the
IRA feeds in its struggle to throw
the British out of Northern Ire-
land.
INDEED COLORFUL Ameri-
can public opinion, which is to
say totally erroneous opinion, is
the stuff on which many political
mythologies abroad feed in their
ideological struggles. A case in
point is the expanding, sloppy
sentiment among Americans to
see Saudi Arabia as a
"moderate" Arab nation. Or PLO
Chief Yasir Arafat as a man for
all reasons that the imperatives
of American Realpolitik should
muster to stage a dialogue with
him.
Arafat's growth as a romantic
figure is of the same order
as the Irish Republican Army's,
and if we hesitate about accept-
ing this equivalency, there is al-
ways the manipulative "fret
press" to help the equivalency
along.
For example, an official Arafa
visit to Austria was cancelled in
August when Austrian police un-
covered a terrorist plot to assas-
sinate him. The story was
reported widely at the time. But
it became grist for the manipula-
tive "non-news" mill of the press
last week again which, in its cam-
paign to make Arafat respectable
and cram him down our throats,
featured a sensational repeat of
the same story in front page
headlines quite as if it had never
been reported in August at all,
indeed as if the uncovering of the
plot had just occurred.
EGYPT'S PRESIDENT
Sadat had just been assassi-
nated, and look what that did for
Sadat 8 romantic quotient, which
is to say what that did for a sin-
gularly twisted view of Sadat's
life, work and times. The decision
to repeat the Austrian Arafat
scenario was the best possible
way for the propagandists who
masquerade as editors in the
ivory towers of America's sweaty
Fourth Estate to reach into the
hearts of Ivory Soap-minded
Americans and have them em-
brace this scruffy, unshaven
"hero" as another one of those
"freedom-fighters" we are in-
stantly supposed to adore, his
pungent bath towel he wears for a
hat and all.
Besides, hadn't Arafat been
given a bad shake? Wasn't the
Austrian story in August
blanketed into obscurity by
Sadat's visit with President
Reagan in Washington, which
Stole his headline thunder? If
nothing else, romantics always
require just retribution in order
to mamtaui the symmetry of
their lives. '

In the case of the Irish Repub-
lican Army, there is hardly a need
for the same sort of hard sell. The
AUgemeine Zeitung hit it
squarely on the head when it
made its wry observation about
Irish Americans and their star-
struck but politically dim-witted
sympathizers.
ISNT IT after all true that
every Irishman looks and sounds
like that old film star curmudge-
on whose career began in
Dublin's Abbey Theatre, Barry
Fitzgerald? Ditto Victor Mc-
Laugiin? Your heart just has to
I jVUo
8
1
'/.
| Maudlin j
go out to people who speak
English so that it sounds like an
opera. Or who agonize that it is a
long, long way to Tipperary and
"the sweetest girl I know." Think
of Pat O'Brien as the priest of the
"Fighting Sixty-Ninth," or as
Knute Rockne. In either case, the
war is the same, and you must
love the cause equally with its
heroes.
This kind of sentiment rates
high in the world order of, say,
someone like New York Times-
man Pete Hamill. whose view of
Britain'8 Prime Minister Mar-
garet Thatcher is almost unprint-
able. Hamill won't forgive
Thatcher for having failed to give
into the IRA hunger-strikers who
succumbed in Northern Ireland
prisons in their campaign to
wrest political status from her.
She sees the IRA as a band of
terrorists in the same way that,
say. Mr. Reagan sees the PLO, or
at least says he sees the PLO.
1 hold no brief for Thatcher. I
agree with Hamill that, in what
he calls "this bitter winter of
British collapse." Thatcher is in-
competent to handle it and that
she "is never more thorougly in
character than when she is driven
by hatred," although I'd be more
inclined to substitute for
"hatred" what Martin Luther
King, Jr. once described as the
white moderate's nemesis: the
need to confuse justice with "law
and order."
BUT IT is rank sophistry to
suggest, as the romantics are
doing, that all the IRA wants is
for Britain to get out of Northern
Ireland so that it can get on with
the business of unifying Ulster
with the rest of the country. The
equivalent would be that all Yasir
Arafat wants is a separate Pales-
tinian state, however tiny.
The most corrosive force in the
Ulster struggle is the Catholic-
Protestant issue, which spokes-
men for both sides assure us, as
they have since Elizabeth Tudor,
would come to dialogue, peace
and love given the chance.
But anyone acquainted with
Ireland's modern home rule
movement that began in earnest
in the middle of the 19th Century
knows this is nonsense. The
Catholic Church betrayal of
Charles Stewart Parnell for
reasons of his adultery pales be-
side Ireland's earlier betrayal of
the Protestant Englishman,
Wolfe Tone, who came to Dublin
at the end of the 18th Century to
help organize Irish resistance
against the occupation by his
own countrymen. The med-
dlesomeness of Catholic Church
activism in the political arena
knew bounds then no more
dearly thanlit does now this
from a Church today that
deplores the growing seculariza-
tion of its faithful.
. THE IRISHMAN, as many
important Irish artists and
writers have observed of their po-
litical agony since before Sinn
Fein, is self-destructive. The
Irish immortal, James Joyce,
said of his country that "Ireland
is an old sow that eats its far-
row."
I said at the beginning that the
Frankfurter AUgemeine exagger-
ates in its opinion about the
rorqantic Irish Americans who
are the IRA's principal arms supJ
pliers. The exaggeration is not]
intended; it is merely a romanti]
cizing of fact. In this sense, thd
AUgemeine falls victim of the
very thing that it corrects
identifies as corrupting Irisri
American opinion.
The truth is that the IRA is1
about as closely linked to th2
PLO these days as anything oS
anyone can possibly be. If Irish
Americans send money to sup]
port the IRA cause, and in this;
the AUgemeine is correct, the fact]
is that the money goes to buj
guns and bombs which come in4
directly from Moscow through it.
Middle East client states and
agents, including the PLO itself.
THIS MEANS that if thej
Catholic-Protestant impasse is
Ireland's most corrosive issue]
the IRA's ties to international
terrorism, clearly documented forj
all to see but the sentimental, is
the country's most life-)
threatening issue.
Union between north and
south under IRA direction is not!
the ultimate aim of this group, no)
matter what its spokesmen sayl
here or in Ireland to the contrary!
after all, Arafat says the samel
thing when he calls for "nothing!
more" than a new Palestinian!
state in Gaza and on the West!
Bank. Not to mention what the!
Republic of Ireland (the south),!
with its duly-constituted govern-]
ment seated in Dublin and in I
which the IRA can play no polit-l
ical role whatever,would have to|
say about it.
The ultimate aim of the IRA is
in fact the establishment ol a
Marxist state in Ireland with ir-
revocable ties to Moscow, in the
same way that Arafat's new Pal-
estine would be tied to Moscow.
That is what people like Berna-
dette Devlin are all about. Fur-
thermore, the IRA is part of an
international network having
more in mind than a Dublin-
Belfast takeover. Its members
include, in addition to the PLO,
the Red Army Faction in West
Germany, the Red Brigade in
Italy, the progeny of Japan's
Zengakuren, and more and more.
IT WAS sentiment that had us
embrace Fidel Castro in 1959,
when his "freedom-fighter"
forces took over from Batista in
Havana. Now, we are on the
brink of the very same disaster
with Yasir Arafat; American
foreign policy translates the
Sadat assassination to mean that
Arafat is the logical successor to
Sadat as spokesman for Araby.
And while Ulster is still pre-
dominantly Great Britain's hot
potato, there are the sentimental
ists among us who perceive that
the IRA is nothing but a clear
toned Irish tenor, a poet speaking
symphonies, the bicycle-rider in
the Irish Spring soap commercial
longing only for peace, clean skin
and a sweet-smelling colleen.
But, as with Arafat and the PLO,
the IRA's devastating record of
terrorism says otherwise.
BethSholom
Events
The Adult Hebrew Classes at
Beth Sholom, aulfport, will be-
gin on Monday. Nov. 16, and
continue weekly through March
1982. Besides Hebrew, the
classes will include explanation of
the Prayer Book. Both elemen-
tary and intermediate classes wiu
be offered.
The Rabbi's lecture series will
commence on Jsh. 13, and con-
tinue every Wednesday following
until the beginning of March,
from 2-4 p.m.
The Yiddish group will meet
Saturday evening, Jan. 16 at '
p.m., and every month following.
Refreshments will be served and
all are welcome.


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FILES


Friday, November 6,1981
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 5

Divorce Seminar Held Hadassah Combined Meetings
A seminar on being Jewish and
divorced in Pinellas County was
held on Sunday, October 18, at
the JCC. It was co-sponsored by
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Serv-
ice, the Jewish Community Cen-
ter, and the Board of Rabbis.
The speakers were Mrs. Iris
Lee, psychiatric social worker at
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Serv-
ice, Mr. Stefan Alpert, cultural
arts director at the JCC, and
Mrs. Judith Meisner, a therapist
in private practice.
The program featured a work-
shop offering help with feelings
and practical problems surround-
ing divorce, as well as some alter-
natives, to help meet the needs of
the divorcee.
The participants in the work-
shop indicated that they found
the program informative and
useful stressing that there
should be more programs like
this in the community. One per-
son commented that so often
"divorce and widowhood are
lumped together, and they are
separate issues." She appreciated
Mrs. Iris Lee
the opportunity to deal with the
problems of divorce with others
struggling with the same issues.
Issues discussed were feelings
of loneliness, frustration, anger
and loss of self-esteem. Other
areas of discussion were money
problems, child care difficulties
and relationships with other peo-
ple, in-laws and friends. Helpful
suggestions were made to aid
people to begin to develop a posi-
tive direction in their life.
The St. Petersburg Hadassah
Chapter will hold a combined
meeting of its daytime groups on
Wednesday, November 11, at
Congregation B'nai Israel, 301
59th Street, N., St. Petersburg,
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Coffee
and danish will be served from 10
to 10:30 a.m.
Hadassah is fortunate to have
as its guest speaker, Edith
Zamost (Mrs. Benjamin) of
Highland Park, New Jersey, re-
cently elected national vice presi-
dent of Hadassah.
Mrs. Zamost is currently coor-
dinator of Hadassah services.
She was the co-chairman of
Hadassahs 1978-79 and 1979-80
national conventions. Her previ-
ous national portfolios were
chairman for membership,
leadership development and
fund-raising for youth activities.
for twelve years.
She has two daughters who are
life members of Hadassah.
Mrs. Zamost was a Hadassah
delegate to the 29th World Zion-
ist Congress held in Jerusalem in
February, 1978 when she was
elected Hadassah deputy to the
Zionist General Council of the
World Zionist Organization.
Mark your calendar for
November 11 and let's give Mrs.
Zamost a kingsize Hadassah turn
out. We can do it!
Board of Rabbis Expresses
Sadness on Sadat's Death
The Pinellas County Board of
Rabbis is shocked and saddened
by the senseless death of
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat.
President Sadat, a courageous
statesman, was one of the archi-
tects of the present Middle-East
peace process. He opened the
possibilities for peace between
Egypt and Israel, which we pray
continue to emerge in the days to
come, to better all the peoples of
that part of the world.
We, as the Synagogue Jewish
community of Pinellas County,
are grieved by President Sadat's
death, for he represented a stabil-
izing force in the volatile Middle
East.
May he rest in peace, knowing
that he tried to move the world in
the direction of achieving peace.
Feigelstein to Speak on
Terrorism and Extremism
International terrorism and
domestic extremism will be
among the issues discussed by
Scott M. Feigelstein, assistant
director of the Florida Regional
Office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith to the
Clearwater Jewish community on
Tuesday evening, Nov. 10, at 8
p.m. at a meeting of the Clearwa-
ter Lodge 2603 at the Golda Meir
Center, 302 S. Jupiter Ave.,
Clearwater.
Feigelstein is responsible for
implementing ADL's programs
in Florida, which encompass
teacher-training seminars, the in-
vestigation and counteraction of
extremist group activity, the res-
olution of complaints of discrimi-
100th Year
Then And Now
The idea that was to become
ORT was first articulated in a
letter dated April 10, 1880, and
sent over the names of five prom-
inent Russian Jews to the towns
and villages of the Pale of Settle-
ment and to communities
throughout Russia. That letter
became, in effect, the founding
document of ORT.
In language that now seems
antiquated, that message spelled
out a need that was addressed to
the single universal problem that
most critically oppressed a popu-
lation of some five million Jews
the need to provide liveli-
hood.
It called for the establishment
of a fund "the income from which
could be used to aid in the further
development of already existing
trade schools for Jews, for assist-
ance towards the opening of new
trade schools, for facilitating the
movement of artisans from one
place to another. .
For membership information
call 797-8809, Tues. Wed. -
Thurs., 9 a.m. to 1p.m.
nation, race relations, education,
and interreligious cooperation.
For 68 years, the ADL has
been actively engaged in the de-
fense of the civil rights for all
groups, regardless of creed or
ethnic background. Its preoccu-
pation with the underlying
concept of democracy has made
the League one of the largest
agencies of its kind in the world,
with 27 regional offices in the
United States, and offices and
correspondents in Israel, the
Vatican, Paris, and South Amer-
ica.
Edith Zamost
Edith Zamost w as president of
the Southern New Jersey Region
and the New Brunswick Chapter
(now called the Raritan Valley
Chapter). She entered Jewish
organization life in 1943 and has
visited Israel many times.
Along with her many years of
devoted service to Israel, Mrs.
Zamost is active in other Jewish
community affairs. She has been
an officer of the YMHA Women's
Division and was chairman of
Women's Division of the UJA in
her area.
In addition to her volunteer
services, she has been a profes-
sional pianist and singer appear-
ing with such orchestras as the
New York Philharmonic
Orchestra as a piano soloist and
has conducted her Temple choir

By MORRIS B. CHAPMAN
Copyright Morris B. Chapman
Reagan is a man of his word ... He promised to turn the
economy around and he did from depression to recession.
Many delegates to the UN Assembly cook up deals at the
lunch table ... We trust they come up not with half-baked no-
tions, but with fully-digested programs.
The rapidly escalating cost of health services is inducing a
change in folk-wisdom ... It used to be "if you have your
health, you have everything" and today it's "if you have your
health, you may have nothing else left."
For reasons of security, Reagan dispatched Nixon, Ford
and Carter to Sadat's funeral While we wouldn't put any
crime past Nixon, the other two are amiable non-entities.
Viewings in funeral homes are popular ... In fact, they
have a descriptive name, "remains to be seen."
The life-expectancy of the average Russian male has
diminished some four years since 1965 ... If the decline is too
slow, there is always the Gulag Archipelago to speed the pace.
Rosalyn Carter struck a simultaneous blow at both foreign
and domestic Administration policies She was highly critical
of the fuss over the White House china.
Mubarak has a lot of running to do to catch up with Sadat's
popularity Sadat used to poll 99 plus percent while his
successor could poll only a 98 plus percent.
Reagan used to be a cowboy shooting from the hip ... On
the AWACS deal, he is still a cowboy shooting from the Up.
Goy. Edmund Brown, may lose his senatorial bid by delay-
ing action on the medfly infestation Any insect that can
wreak so much damage cannot be dismissed as a fly-by-night
menace.
Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County
302 SOUTH JUPITER ST.
CIEARWATER. FLORIDA 33615
We Need More Than Your Pledge
To Support Humanitarian Programs in Israel,
at Home and Around the World
Only Cash Will
Coverting pledges to cash now is crucial.
The regular cash flow to the Jewish Agency
in Israel keeps the Agency from having to
borrow at exorbitant interest rates in order
to provide vital services. The Jewish Agency
is currently struggling with an escala ing
debt obligation which ruthlessly cuts into
services (or our Israeli brott YOUR PLEDGE IS NOT TAX-
DEDUCTIBLE. ONLY CASH IS!
Remember, a charitable deduction is the
easiest tax deduction to take this year.
Your pledges have made it possible for ua
to plan and build and achieve and help our
fellow Jews. That is why we ask you to please
remember the pledge you made in 1981. and
to honor it at this time.
Saul Schechter
General Campaign Chairman
Combined Jewish Appeal
Pinellas County


Ljtov. November 6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian ofPineUas County
Page 9
1
i
B'not Mitzvah
BETH HEIDI ISMARK
jeth Heidi Ismark, daughter
[Mr. and Mrs. Martin Ismark,
i called to the Torah as a Bat
zvah on October 31 at Temple
ai Israel, Clearwater.
-{eidi is a student in the Tem-
Religious School and is a
nber of the Junior Youth
oup. She attends the Seminole
ddle School where she is in the
bhth grade. Heidi is a member
the Seminole synchronized
i team.
|Mr. and Mrs. Ismark hosted
i Kiddush following services in
loor of the occasion. A re-
9n was held at the Wine
Celebrating with Heidi
her grandparents Mr. and
. Louis Gollinger, Grand-
other Nellie Ismark from New
irk. and Great Aunt and Great
Incle Mr. and Mrs. Henry
non. also from New York.
SCOTT LAWRENCE WINER
Scott Lawrence Winer, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Winer, will
celebrate his Bar Mitzvah on
November 7 at Temple B'nai Is-
rael, Clearwater.
Scott is in the Bar Mitzvah
class at B'nai Israel and is the
president of the Junior Youth
Group. He attends the Largo
Middle School where he is in the
eighth grade. Scott is an Honor
Roll student and a Little League
All Star.
Mr. and Mrs. Winer will host a
Kiddush luncheon at their home
following services. A dinner
dance will be held Saturday eve-
ning at the Wine Cellar. Special
guests will include relatives from
Richmond, Va., Petersburg, Va.,
Philadelphia, Hartford, Conn.,
and San Antonio, Texas.

Kosher Kitchen
One of our loyal readers sent this recipe for an easy cabbage
I soup If you have a favorite recipe, please share it with our
readers. Send it to the Jewish Floridian, 302 S. Jupiter Ave.,
| Clearwater, Fl. 33515.
CABBAGE SOUP
piece of meat, 1-1'/i lbs.
a few soup bones
1 medium onion, whole
2 cans tomato soup
2 pieces or '/tap. sour salt.
Add more to taste if desired.
3/4 cup sugar
1 small head cabbage, cut up or chopped.
Salt can be omitted or added.
Cook the meat, bones, and whole onion for one hour. Skim
I off the film on the top when the water first starts to boil. Add
the cut up cabbage, tomato soup, sour salt, and sugar. Cook
another half hour.
J
CORRECTION
The Judaica Shop of Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater, is
open on Fridays from 7-8 p.m. and 9-9:30 p.m., before and after
'services. Incorrect hours were given in our last edition.
Religious Directory
ITEMPLE BETH EL-Reform
400 S Pasadena Ave., St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi David
Susskmd Rabbi Robert Klrzner Sabbath Services: Friday evening
t 8 p.m. Tel. 347-6136.
Congregation BETH SHALOMConaorvatlva
11844 54 St. S., St. Peteraburg 33707 Rabbi Sidney Lubln Sabbath
Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday, WX> a.m. Tel. 321-
3380
- jnaiagttlon B'NAI ISrUEL-Contexvatlva -
1 59 s" N., St. Peteraburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Luskl Sabbath
Services: Friday evening 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.: Sunday 9 a.m.:
fonday-Friday 6 a.m.: and evening Mlnyan Tel. 381 -4900,3814901.
CONGREGATION ETH CHAI-Cone*nftt*a
8400 125St.N.,Seminole33642 Rabbi MarmanKlretmerSabbath
Services: Friday evenlnga 6 p.m.: Saturday, 9:30 ejn. Tel. 393-5529.
15525.
I CONGREGATION BETH SHALOMContorvatlve
^1325 S Belcher Rd.. Oiearwatar 33516 Rabbi Peter Mehler Sab-
tri Service* Friday evening 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m., Sunday morn-
ling Mlnyan 9 a.m. Tel. 53M41JL
'TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL-Reform
15 3. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Arthur
Baseman Sabbath Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m., Saturday
10:30 a.m. Tel.531-5829
TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM Reform
p0 Box 1096. Dunedln 33528 Rabbi Jan Bresky Sabbath Ser-
"ices: Friday evening 8 p.m. Tel. 734-9*28.
KEVIN FRYE
Kevin Frye, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Michael Frye, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
November 7 at Congregation
B'nai Israel. St. Petersburg.
The celebrant is in the pre-
confirmation class at the Temple,
and is the treasurer of the St.
Petersburg Kadima. He is an
eighth grade student in the
Riviera Middle School and plays
first trumpet in the band. Kevin
received the key to the city of St.
Petersburg for playing the Star
Spangled Banner at a city dedi-
cation.
Gail and Mike Frye will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following services in honor of the
occasion. A luau reception will be
held Saturday night at their
home. Celebrating with Kevin
will be his grandparents Rose and
Carl Frye, and Julius and Ann
Pearlstein, all of St. Petersburg,
brother Marc, and many aunts,
uncles, cousins and friends from
all over the country.
Help
Needed
In the September 25 issue of
The Jewish Floridian, an article
appeared describing a new
federation program of giving as-
sistance to incapacitated mem-
bers of the Jewish community.
This article (on page 3) was en-
titled "We Must Serve Every-
body."
Reva Kent, president of the
Federation, appointed Dr. Joel
Shrager as chairman of the newly
formed Human Relations Com-
mittee, whose purpose will be
that of a catalyst in coordinating
this service so as to encompass
the total community. We are very
much aware that most synago-
gues and organizations have
some type of similar program
presently in effect, but it was felt
that a coordinated effort would
service more people more ef-
fectively.
Since the establishment of the
expanded program emanating
out of Temple Beth El, many
"cases of need" for transporta-
tion to synagogue services,
organizational meetings, etc.,
have emerged, where the indivi-
duals were not aware that they
could receive aaaiatance from
their affiliated organization.
This new Federation, commit-
tee is receiving support and as-
sistance from Gulf Coast Jewish
Family Services, the Jewish
Community Center and other
autonomous membership organi-
zations. This is a direct appeal to
all organizations to contact Dr.
Joel Shrager to coordinate your
own activities in this area with
that of the total community, and
to give input to the committee on
your experience and efforts in
that area of providing transpor-
tation to the incapacitated. For
more information on this fledging
committee enterprise, Dr.
Shrager can be reached at 867-
9659. Your support on this
humanitarian endeavor would be
greatly appreciated.
Community Calendar
Monday, Nov. 9
Senior Friendship Club, JCC 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Sholom, Gulfport, Rummage Sole ORT, Clearwater Evening
Chapter, Membership Tea.
Tuesday, Nov. 10
B'nai B'rith Women, Clearwater, Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Sisterhood, Beth Sholom, Golfport, Board Meeting 10:30a.m.,
Regular Meeting 12:30 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth Sholom,
Gulfport, Breakfast, Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Men's
Club, Beth Sholom, Gulfport, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hodassah,
Golda Meir Chapter, Meeting 12:30 p.m. JWV, Paul Surenky
Post 409, Board Meeting 7:30 p.m., Regular Meeting 8 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Men, Olan Lodge 1246, Meeting 8 p.m. ORT,
Gulfport Afternoon Chapter, Meeting 12 noon Ladies
Auxiliary, JWV, Paul Surenky Post 409, Board and Regular
Meeting -7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 11
Beth Shalom, Clearwater, Executive Meeting 8 p.m. Suncoast
Social Club, Clearwater 1 p.m. Hebrew High School, B'nai
Israel, St. Petersburg 7-9 p.m. Hadassah, Clearwater-Sofety
Harbor, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hadassah, Aliyah, Meeting 10
a.m. Hadassah, Golda Meir, Meeting 12:30 p.m. Hadassah,
Aviva, Meeting Hadassah, Shalom, Board Meeting 10:30
a.m.. Regular Meeting 12:30 p.m. NCJW, St. Petersburg,
Board Meeting 10 a.m. Ladies Auxiliary, JWV Abe Ader Post
246, Board Meeting 8 p.m. Hadassah, Shoshana, Meeting -
7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 12
Senior Friendship Club, JCC Meeting 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood,
B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, Card Party 1 p.m. Adult
Education, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, 8-10 p.m. NCJW,
Suncoast, Boutique Ship-A-Box, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 13
ORT, Sabbath, Clearwater Evening Chapter, B'nai Israel,
Clearwater Ladies Auxiliary, JWV Abe Ader Post 246,
Memorial Service.
Saturday, Nov. 14
JCC Dinner Theatre -7 p.m.
Svnday, Nov. 15
JCC Dinner Theatre 7 p.m.. Temple B'nai Israel, Clearwater,
Israel Bond Affair Men's Club, Beth Shalom, Clearwater,
Dinner 7 p.m. USY, Beth Shalom, Clearwater 7 p.m.
Symphony, Dunedin Sisterhood, Beth Chai, Kitchen Shower
luncheon.
Monday, Nov. 16
JCC Executive Board 7 p.m.. Board Meeting 8 p.m. Senior
Friendship Club, JCC, 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood, Temple Beth El,
Board Meeting 10 a.m. ORT, Clearwater Evening Chapter,
Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. ORT, West Wind, Meeting- 1 p.m.
Symphony, St. Petersburg, Symphony, St. Petersburg
Womens Division of Federation Cabinet Meeting 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 17
ORT, St. Petersburg Afternoon Chapter Meeting Brotherhood,
B'nai Israel, Clearwater, Meeting 8 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Shalom, Clearwater, Meeting 7:30 p.m. B'nai Israel, St.
Petersburg, Board Meeting 8 p.m. ORT, St. Petersburg
Evening Chapter, Meeting.
Wednesday, Nov. 11
Suncoast Social Club, Clearwater 1 p.m. Sisterhood, Beth
Chai, Meeting 8 p.m. Beth El Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Hebrew High School, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg 7-9 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 19
Senior Friendship Club, JCC, Birthday-Anniversary Party 1-4
p.m. B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, Adult Education, 8-10 p.m.
Saturday, Nov. 21
JCC Dinner Theater 7 p.m. Brotherhood, Beth El, Blood Bank
Kadima Congregation, B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg 10:30 a.m.,
Havdala 5-6 p.m., grade K, 1 and 2.
Miejoay, we v z
JCC Dinner Theater 6 p.m. USY, Beth Shalom, Clearwater 7
p.m. Temple Beth El Thanksgiving Dinner Beth Shalom,
Gulfport, Dinner Dance. Wine Cellar 1 p.m. ORT, Clearwater
Evening, Book Fair.
Certified Surgical Mohel
Rabbi Seymour P. Klrehner
Congregation Bath Chel-Semlnole
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