The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00041

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
vJewish Floridiain
Off Pi in I Ins County
|j_ Number22 I
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, October 23,1981
< FndShoctut
"Price 10 Cents
Moshe Dayan Israeli Hero Dies Suddenly
. *viV. Israel Moshe
S was buried Sunday after-
7,, Nahalal, the collective
\ Where he spent his child-
v,n died last Friday at age
r two heart attacks. Prime
- Menachem Begin
Dayan in a statement
^li radio Saturday night,
him "one of our greatest
* of the ages." Dayan was
ded full military honors and
tU funeral.
Itneral Moshe Dayan. Israel's
ner Foreign Minister, was a
rismatic and outspoken man
I had come to represent the
rit and determination of the
aeli people. Statesman, ar-
ologist. author and military
re, General Dyan continued to
n'e as a member of the Knesset
[til recently, and remains as one
fi most controversial and
mdary figures.
feom in Kibbutz Degania, one
he first Jewish collectives in
jstine. he began his long and
itinguished record of service to
^ country at the age of 14, when
[joined the Haganah.
_ 1939, with the issuance of
i British White Paper favoring
jab nationalism, he was ap-
(ehended with other Haganah
nbers and received a five year
jon sentence. Released in
J41, he served with British and
tench forces in liberating Syria
1 Lebanon. It was then that he
,. his left eye in action and
iopted the black patch that
Id become his trademark.
I In Israel's War for In-
Ipendence (1948-49), he coro-
anded a battalion on the Syrian
pnt and rose to the top corn-
end of the Jerusalem front. Af-
t attending staff college in
ntain, he returned to become
kief of Israel's general staff in
K3. He was supreme com-
ber of Israel's forces during
b Sinai-Suez War of 1956.
leaving the army in 1958,
i studied politics at the Hebrew
Iniversity in Jerusalem until his
lection in 1959 to Israel's
Inessci He served as Minister of
Agriculture from 1959 to 1964,
Men he joined former Prime
Minister David Ben-Gurion and
^^^r^^r
\ \

tj fet_- ^^^^p* ^rB
Egypt's new president, Hosni
Mubarak, cabled condolences to
Israeli President Yitzhak Navon.
Official delegations attended
the funeral on behalf of several
countries.
Attorney General William
French Smith led the American
delegation. The White House
announced. Other members of the
official U.S. delegation were
Sens. Roger Jepsen (R., Iowa)
and Edward Zorinsky (D., Neb.)
and Reps. Richard Cheney (R.,
Wyo.) and Mickey Edwards (R.,
Okla).
Dayan had been admitted to
Tel Aviv's Tel Hashomer
hospital last Thursday night,
complaining of chest pains and
difficulty in breathing.
rl +
Leadership Orientation
At Federation
others to form their own political
party (Rafil.
In 1967, on the eve of the "Six-
Day War." he joined the unity
government as Minister of De-
fense, and went on to play a
crucial role in Israel's third war
with the Arab states. Following
the war, his reputation was
further enhanced by his ad-
ministration of the occupied
territories. As an architect of Is-
rael's "Open Bridges Policy." he
helped to build an effective
foundation for developing Arab-
Israeli relations.
Dayan, as foreign minister,
conducted many secret peace
missions, including one in
Morocco with Eevptian repre-
sentatives, paving the way for
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat's historic 1977 visit to
Jerusalem.
Dayan abandoned his early
Labor Party affiliations in 1977
to join Begin s Likud coalition,
which lasted but a short time.
Tributes poured in to Dayan's
family and colleagues from
around the world.
In Washington, President
Reagan called Dayan a 'symbol
of Israeli resolve to be free and
independent".
'"We are deeply saddened to
learn of the death of Moshe
Dayan a courageous soldier
and a great Israeli statesman,"
Reagan said in a statement re-
leased by the White House.
Board members of Pinellas
County's Jewish Federation
gathered last Sunday to attend a
Leadership Orientation Seminar
at the Clearwater headquarters of
the Federation.
After welcoming remarks by
Federation President Reva Kent,
who noted that 19811982 is "our
eighth and best year ... a year of
renewal," the Board was ad-
dressed by Fred Sichel, National
Vice President of the New York-
based Council of Jewish Feder-
ation.
Other speakers included Board
Vice President Charles Ruten-
burg, Charles Erlich, President of
the Jewish Community Center in
St. Petersburg, Sophie Glascow,
chairperson of Young Leader-
ship, Riva Pearlson. an officer of
the Pinellas County Jewish Day
School, Jim Shipley of UJA in
Orlando, and Murray Jacobs,
President of the Gulf Coast Jew-
ish Family Service Agency.
After the speakers, a light
lunch was served, followed by
Ron Diner
discussion groups on Developing
Community Priorities, Leader-
ship Development and Responsi-
bility for Fund Raising.
"Although it was the first such
Board Orientation Seminar" ac-
cording to Ron Diner, Seminar
Chairman, "it won't be the last.
The high level of attendance
augers well. We expect to make
this seminar an annual pro-
gram."
In Paris
Campaign Director
Arrives At Federation
Israel, France
Freeze to Thaw?
The Jewish Federation of
Pinellas county is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of
Stephen A. Kingson as Cam-
paign Director. Mr. Kingson re-
places Freida Sohon who retired
in June after many years of com-
munity service.
A graduate of Boston Univer-
sity, Mr. Kingson also holds a
Masters degree from Harvard
University in Middle Eastern
Studies. He is highly conversant
with the Arab-Israel conflict.
Mr. Kingson is a professional
fund raiser. He was preY'0"8^
affiliated with Milton Hood Ward
and Co.. Inc. a nationally re-
cognized fund raising firm de-
voted exclusively to providing
campaign counsel for Jewish in-
stitutional clients inlcuding
Congregation B'nai Israel in Bt
Ptersburg. The Tampa Jewish
Community Center, and Temple
B'nai Israel in Clearwater
"Fund raising can be a very re-
warding career" notes Mr. King-
son "but only when you believe
in the cause and understand you
are not asking peP,e, for money
so much as giving them an op-
Stephen A. Kingson
portunity to make a social in-
vestment with an enormous pay-
off' for them, their children and
their grandchildren.
"The Midrash says a com-
munity is too heavy for anyone to
carry alone." And that is precisely
why we have a Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County and over 215
other Federations serving some
800 Jewish Communities in
North America".
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The strains that have
troubled relations between
France and Israel in recent
years seemed to ease per-
ceptibly with the visit here
of Jacques Attali, a special
adviser and close personal
associate of President
Francois Mitterrand.
Attali had a "very friendly"
90-minute meeting with Premier
Menachem Begin at which both
parties stressed that "a new leaf"
must be turned in Franco-Israeli
relations.
ATTALI ARRIVED in Israel
on what was officially a private
trip, but his meetings were of a
political nature, and ht managed
to avoid the press for the most
part. Significantly, France and
Israel announced jointly in New
York that French Foreign Min-
ister Claude Cheysson had ac-
cepted the invitation of his Israeli
counterpart, Yitzhak Shamir, to
visit Israel in December and that
Mitterrand would visit early next
year.
Attali carried a message to
Begin from Mitterrand and
another to President Yitzhak
Navon with whom the French
diplomat also met. Their contents
were not disclosed. He met with
David Kimche, director general
of the Foreign Ministry, and was
scheduled to meet later with
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
opposition Labor Party, before
leaving for Cairo.
When he arrived in Israel,
Attali would say only that
Franco-Israeli relations were very
complex. He was invited here by
the Davis Institute of the
Hebrew University where he
delivered a lecture on "France in
the Mitterrand Era."
He said his discussion with
Begin was "deep and friendly*'
and that they had covered Middle
East problems in detail and re-
lations between their countries.
He said the meeting paved the
way for the visits by the French
President and Foreign Minister.
Begin, for his part, expressed
hope that the days of "splendor"
in Franco-Israeli relations
1954-1967 would return. He
said the people of Israel regarded
France and the French people as
friends despite the "hostile" poli-
cies of former President Valery
Giscardd 'Kstaing.


^
Page 8
|
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tmtiu ei
Page*
Tfc* Jewish Floridian of Pinellas Countx
Frid7. October 23 J
Know Your Legislators
c
t;
tM
in
Tl
16
Ba
10:
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PC
VIC*
C. W. mi' Young
/This begins a series, on out
Florida Legislator*. This infor-
mation is published as a service
by Gordon Saskin. M.D.. Chair-
man of the Community Relations
Committee)
Congressman C.W. "Bill "
Young has been a distinguished
member of the United States
House of Representatives from
the Sixth Congressional District
since 1970. His committee as-
signments include the Appropri-
ations Committee. sub-com-
mittee on Defense, which reviews
the Dept of Defense budget.
Sub-committee on, HUD and
Independent Agencies, and the
Permanent Select Committee on
Intelligence, which oversees the
work of the CIA and other intelli-
gence agencies Congressman
Young was born in Harmarville.
Pennsylvania in 1930. He has
been a resident of Florida since
1945. and lives in St. Petersburg
with his wife and three children
Young has spent most of his
life in public service. He began as
National Committeeman of the
Florida Young Republicans in
1957. and moved up through the
tanks until his election to the
United States Congress
Congressmen Young has been
recognized as a friend of the na-
tion's senior citizens and
veterans. He helped to secure ap-
proval for the SI 10 million new
veterans hospital at Bay Pines,
which has a completion date of
1962. He has been honored bv
C.W 'BUI'-Young
veterans organizations, includ-
ing the Jewish War Veterans, for
his work on their behalf Young
represents more people over 65
than any other Congressman in
the nation, and was the author of
legislation which helped establish
the Select Committee on Aging,
which guards the rights of the
nation's elderly
Congressman Young has stu-
died the defense capabilities of
this country and other nations
He visaed Israel during the 1973
war tn examine the country's mi-
litary power first hand."I have
always been a strong supporter
and admirer of Israel s defense
establishment." he said.
,
CONVENTION AND CONFERENCE DATES
CALENDAR 1981
DATES* PROGRAMS
Noveaaber 1
State of Israel Bonds. Ambassadors Society of Trustees.
National Dinner. New York City
November 1-3
American Mizrachi Women. National Convention PHASE II.
Grosstnger s. NY
November 4_6
National Association of Jewish Vocational Services. Association
of Jewish Vocational Service. Professionals Annual Con-
ference. Detroit, Mich
Noveaaber 5
Svnacotrue Council of America. Covenant of Peace Awards
Dinner. New York City.
November 8
Shaare Zedek Hospital. Annual Maintenance Dmner. New York
Cii> State of Israel Bonds. Prime Minister's Club National
Dinner. New York City.
November 9
American Jewish Congress. Executive Commktee Meeting.
New York City.
November 10
.American Friends of the Israel Museum. Annual Dinner. New
YorkCHy
November 11-15
Noveaaber 11-13
Council of Jewish Federations, General Assembly. Including
Large City Budgeting Conference. St Louis. MO.
November 13-15
Association of Jewish Family Children's Agencies. Quarterly
Meeting 4 including Board and Commit tees). St Louis. MO.
Noveaaber 14
National Committee for Labor Israel Annual Inaugural
Luncheon. New York City.
Noveaaber 15
America-Israel Cultural Foundation. Annual Gala Concert. New
York City.
Noveaaber 15
Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation. Concert at the 92nd
Street YMHA. New York City.
Noveaaber 15
Torah Umesorah. Annual Awards Dinner National Society
for Day Schools. New York City.
Noveaaber 15-19 .
The United Synagogue of America. Biennial Convention. Hotel
Concord. Kiameaha Lake. NY
Noveaabarl7
American Jewish Congress. Stephen Wise Award Dinner. New
York City.
Noveaaber 18- 22
National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods. Executive Board
Meeting. Sarasota. FL.
November 22
State of Israel Bonds. Golds Meir National Tribute Dinner. New
York City
November 22-23
American Zionist Federation. National Board Meeting. New-
York City.__________________ ________________
Jewish Material Claims f
The Conference on Jewish
Material Claims Against Ger-
many called upon all Jewish vic-
tims of Nazi persecution, who
may be eligible to receive grants
from the Claims Conference
Hardship Fund, to file their ap-
plications not later than Decem-
ber 31. More than thirty million
D.M. were paid out already to eli-
gible claimants.
The Hardship Fund is intended
primarily to handle applications
from such Jewish victims of Nazi
persecution who left Eastern
Europe after 1965 when the dead-
line for filing claims under the
German indemnification laws ex-
pired. Other persecutees who
failed for very valid reasons to
file timely indemnification claims
in past years may also apply to
the Hardship Fund.
The Claims Conference as-
sumed the responsibility for the =
administration of the Hardship =
Fund, which is funded by the
German Federal Government and
distributed under German
Government Guidelines. The
Guidelines limit individual pay- =
ments to DM. 5.000 (five =
thousand D.M.I per person.
Applications may be obtained
from the: Claims Conference
HardshipFund.225ParkAvenue =
South. 110th floor). New York. =
NY 10003
0RT Sabbath |
The annual celebration of ORT =j
Sabbath by the St. Petersburg |
Afternoon Chapter will take place I
on Friday. November 6 at 8 p.m.
at Tempfe Beth El. 400 Pasadena
Ave.. S.. St. Petersburg.
Mrs. Mae Malin. President,
will address the congregation
detailing the accomplishrnonts
and goals of The World ORT
movement Sabbath candles will
be inn/iloH by Marion Myers, and
Emanuel Myers will chant the
Kiddush A special Oneg
Shabbat will follow services.
Members, their families and
friends are invited to attend this
beautiful observance by ORT
chapters throughout the world.
Pre-Holiday Crafts Fair
A pre-holiday crafts fair, or-
ganized by the St. Petersburg
Evening Chapter of ORT, will be
held at the Jewish Community
Center. 8167 Elbow La N.. St.
Petersburg, on Tuesday, October
27 at 8 p.m.
Featured at the fair will be
Creative Conspiracy. Paper
Caper. Play n Learn, and Sun-
coast Creations. All special or
personalized orders will be ready
for Chanukkah.
inuingi
Open Letter to Community From'
Senator D.P. Moynihan
OPEN LETTER TO COMMUNITY
Dear Friends,
Thank you so much for your correspondence and con
interest in matters pertaining to peace in the Middle East"!I
thought you might find the following message which I issued
recently, of some interest:
HIGH HOLYDAY MESSAGE
In a few days, millions of Jews throughout the world I
will be celebrating their High Holy days a period of spiritual
self-examination and reflection. This is a time when Jews at-
tempt to measure the spiritual accomplishments of the past year
against the timeless benchmark of their tradition.
It is a time when those who hold dear the cause of I
human freedom offer their prayers for peace in the Middle East
and an end to the tragedy and bloodshed that have plagued that
region for too long. It is a time when the concerns of day to day
living are placed in their proper perspective. It is a time when!
the descendants of Abraham relive the drama of the binding of I
Isaac by sounding the Shofar, thus reminding themselves that]
there exist eternal values in this all-too-confused world.
But above all. the High Holydays are a time of rededi-1
cation and of hope: a time when a three-thousand year old people
pray for an end to human suffering and the dawn of universal
peace. At this time, as Mrs. Moynihan and I wish the Jewish
citizens of our state a meaningful and happy New Year, we join
them in the wish that this will indeed by the year when, as they
pray on their holiest of days, "iniquity shall be silenced, wicked-1
ness shall vanish, and tyranny will be abolished from the earth."
Best,
DANIEL PATRICK MOYNIHAN. Senator j
United States Senate
Washington. DC 20510
Marriotts Sunday Brunch.
The Toast of trie Town.
Uncork something special this Sunday ... the most LAVISH
Sunday Brunch in Town ... featuring an exquisite array of
Fresh Fruits, unique Salads, a variety of specially prepared
Meats, Vegetables, Rolls, Bagels and Cream Cheese
AND a wide assortment of after-breakfast
Desserts. Toasted by complimentary Champagne
served after 1:00 p.m. All you can eat for only &.25
Adults, $5.25 Children 6-11 and no charge for
children under 6. Enjoy our Sunday Brunch
from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Reservations
recommended. Call now at 876-9611.
When Marriott does it, they do it right!
Tampa Marriott Hotel
1001 North VVesrshore Boulevard. Tampa. Florida 33e07 {813) 876-9611



^.October 23,1961
TAg Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
PageS
Undemocratic Saudis Unworthy of AWACS Deal
to GORDON SASKIN, M.D.
" Chairman
(^auaHj Relations CocB
The concerns about the sale of
a. AWACS and F-16 offeneive
J^ent p^kage to Saudi
ttt i88ues' "^ tho*e 5
iHb-Iareel confrontation. The
STSdBdM five AWACS (Air-
JJle Warning and Control Sys-
Jml radar aircraft No country
^iide the United States owna
iWACS. The AWACS has been
dacribed as "the greatest break-
(jjough in command and control
jb my entire military career" by
the chairman of the Joint Chiefs
rf Stiff-
NATO has 18 AWACS but
bow flies without at least a one-
third American crew. The
I AWACS include the most
jophisticated, jam-resistant
radar in the world, with the
1 ability to "look down" and
identify friend from foe and track
240 separate aircraft over land or
se. and can see over the horizon
from 300 miles away. Included in
the sale are 1,777 Sidewinder, air-
to-air missiles, considered the
I United States' best, which can
shoot down enemy aircraft from
my direction. They were recently
used to down two Libyan jets.
Twelve U.S. Air Force pilots
from NeUis Air Force Base sent a
letter to Congressman Tom
Lantos, thanking him for his
fight to prevent the sale of the
Sidewinders to the Saudis in light
of the massive amounts of sensi-
tive material lost after the fall of
the Shah of Iran.
The sale also includes 101
conformal fuel tanks and eight
KC 707 aerial refueling tankers,
both to increase the range of the
previously purchased F-15s.
Finally, the arms sale includes 22
ground radar units that are
computer-integrated to supply
additional data from ground level
to help coordinate the response
on information obtained from the
I AWACS.
Saudi Arabia is a vast country
governed by a 4,000-member
royal family of the Sauds ideo-
logically aligned with the right-
Dr. Gordon Saskin
fundamentalist Islamic Wahabis.
All key government posts and
offices are run by members of the
royal family. The population of
the country is unknown and is
guessed at somewhere between
three and a half million to eight
million people. The literacy rate
is around 15 percent and the life
expectancy is about 38 years. The
largest single item in the govern-
ment budget is defense at $24-
billion, the sixth largest in the
world. Yet, when fanatics took
over the Mecca Mosque, the
Saudi Armed Forces and Na-
tional Guard performed
miserably and the French were
called in to rout the fanatics. Ac-
cording to the Wall Street
Journal, there are tremendous
stresses within Saudi society;
greed and rampant hypocrisy
have replaced famed Arab hos-
pitality.
These inherent stresses plus
vast numbers of foreign workers
further weaken security around
the AWACS, the F-lBs and the
enhancement material.
In the 1978 arms
Israel, Egypt and the Sai
was specifically stated in
hearings and letters to Congress
that the F-15 enhancements and
AWACS sale would not occur if
Klanwatch
Intelligence Report
The Jewish Federation of
Pinellas County supports Klan-
watch ar I receives information
monitoring the Klans activities.
Htre incidents from around the
country
KLAN GROUPS HOLD
JOINT RALLY IN
MONGOMERY
Members of at least four KKK
groups held a "unity" rally in
Montgomery on August 22.
Some 75 robed kluxers repre-
senting Alabama, Tennessee,
Georgia, Florida and South
Carolina were present. The Klan
groups involved were the Invisi-
ble Empire, Knights, New Order
Knights and the KKK of Ala-
bama.
The speakers included Roger
Handley of the Invisible Empire
and Don Black of the Knights,
both convicted criminals, Ed-
* Fields and Frank Johnson
of the New Order Knights and
the National States Rights
Party, Stanley McCollom of the
Knights and Joe Patterson of the
KKK of Alabama. The rally was
Kid "to show that the white
supremacy movement is not aa
fragmented as people say." Al-
noet aU of the Klan members at-
tending wore the stripes indi-
cting Klan offices. The usual
Ucks were made on blacks,
Jews, busing, affirmative action,
He.
Following a cross-burning at
the end of the rally, the top Klan
officials present held a brief pri-
vite meeting, then departed in a
motorcade which proceeded
hroujrh'Montgomery led by a car
the 1978 package were passed. It
had been stated that the Saudis
were going to moderate oil prices
if they got the F- 15s. In 1978, a
barrel of Saudi oil was 812; now it
costs $32. (It costs the Saudis
only $2 to get each barrel out of
the ground.) In 1978, it was
hoped that the Saudis would join
the Middle East peace initiative
if they got the F-15s.
Instead, they have rejected the
Camp David Accords, led the ex-
pulsion of Egypt from the Arab
League, stopped their financial
support of the Egyptian govern-
ment, called for holy war against
Israel, increased their funding of
the terrorist PLO to $360-miwon
a year, and have led Third World
and Arab harassment of Israel at
the United Nations.
In addition, they led the chorus
of Arab condemnation of the
downing of the two Libyan jets
this past summer. Saudi Arabia
has refused the stationing of the
Israel Bonds to
Honor
Jackie and
Murray Jacobs
with an electrically lighted cross
on top. There were no incidents
during the rally and only a hand-
ful of non-robed spectators at-
tended.
One contingent of Klansmen
from Tennessee arrived in a
Franklin County school bus
owned by Donald Hill of Estill
Springs. In that county, buses
are owned by individuals who
work as independent contractors
to the school system.
"Togetherness" rallies of this
variety are not that unusual. In
April of last year, Klansmen and
Nazis assembled in North
Carolina to celebrate Hitler's
birthday. In Texas in the spring
of this year, members of several
Klan and Nazi groups and of the
Aryan Nations attended a rally
to show support for Klan inter-
vention in a local shrimping
dispute. Other rallies linking
Klansmen, Nazis and members of
other extremist groups have
taken place recently in Louisiana,
Mississippi and other states. Al-
though some national Klan
leaders do not cooperate with
each other because of personality
conflicts and competition for
members and money, the plain
fact is that most Klansmen and
Nazis do get along. As one
speaker at the Montgomery rally
U.S. Rapid Deployment Pores to
protect the vital oil supplies and
has likewise discouraged other
Arab countries from allowing the
stationing of U.S. troop*. The
Saudis have forced delays and
almost stopped the United States
from filling America's strategic
oil reserves, which are still only
30 percent filled.
In the current anna package,
there would be no United States
control over the AWACS or on
any of the arms supplied. The
Saudis have said that Israel is a
more tangible and worse enemy
to them than communism,
although the Reagan ad-
ministration is selling the
package on the threat of Soviet
expansionism into the Middle
East. The Saudis are believed by
some to be oil price moderates by
not raising their price beyond $32
per barrel. However, Sheik
NEW YORK (JTA) For
eign Minister Josef Zcyrek of Po-
land and Foreign Minister
Yamani stated that the f 32-per-
barrel price has been maintained
to keep the United States
jajsjajnf on oil instead of ac-
tively pursuing synfuels, other
energy forms or stringent conser-
vation.
The Saudis have made the sale
a tost of the United States-Saudi
relationship. A message should
be asnt to the Saudis that
America prefers working with
democracies, not primitive,
feudal monarchies. America
seeks peace in the Middle East,
while the Saudis/ have been
financially and politically sup-
porting war and terrorism.
America needs reliable stra-
tegic allies to help secure and
maintain the Western economy,
while Arab governments, radical
and conservative, have continued
to threaten the use of the "oil
weapon." Finally, America
should not succumb to the
simplicity of the concept of
'arms for oil" or to oil or petro-
lollar blackmail.
Jackie and Murray Jacobs
One of the most active couples
in the St. Petersburg Jewish
community, Jackie and Murray
Jacobs, will be honored by State
of Israel Bonds in cooperation
with Congregation B'nai Israel at
a Testimonial Brunch on Sunday
morning, November 1, at 10 a.m.
at the synagogue, it was an-
nounced by Mr. and Mrs. Stan
Marsh, Chairmen.
Ruth Gruber, who has distin-
guished herself as an author, for-
eign correspondent and lecturer,
will be the featured guest speaker
at this festive event.
The Jacobs' joined Congrega-
tion B'nai Israel in 1948 and both
have served in numerous capaci-
ties, including President, House
Committee Chairman, Sisterhood
President, Building Committee,
and many others positions. Both
have also received many awards
through the years and will be re-
cognized by the State of Israel
with the distinguished City of
Peace Award. The cost of the
brunch is $7 per person and re-
servations may be made by call-
ing the congregation office at
381-4900.
Shamir, Polish
Minister Met
Empire Klan. other Klans
groups like the Nazi Party. We
do share some of the same ideas
about the white race. And I be-
lieve that if it came down to it, we
would be fighting side by side
with the American Nazi Partv
mfl
YiU-
llllllllllllllllllll
Pen
Points
Copyright Morris B. Chapman
Israel is disenchanted with the USA's deferred delivery of I
[the planes she had contracted to buy This is a highly
[questionable form of arms-twisting.
Czechs are alarmed by the rising divorce-rate Marriage I
not a frivolous game with the goal of Csechmating your j
spouse.
is
A juicy scandal in modem church history is developing
| before our eyes in Chicago Now we may teem the essence of
ia cardinal sin.
Not all who call themselves rebels are to be take
word Many are simply revolting.
at then-
There is only one foreign policy plank that Reagan has
clearly espoused And that is the imperative need for a White
House china program.
Reagan is considering very modest cuts in the huge defense
budget ... He is not biting the bullet but is merely scratching
its polished surface lightly.
Reagan is withdrawing his recommendation on the school
lunches ... In eating his words, he must realize how
appetizing and unsavory they are.
un-
The Pentagon's publication of a study describing Soviet
armed might may be self-defeating ... The grim picture of
almost invincible power may discourage efforts to match or i
I overtake it.
Iran-Iraq fighting flares up anew with each claiming mas- |
| sive victories And yet these same Islamic states regard Is- |
H reel as the enemy to be destroyed.
Reagan promises to cut and cut the budget again and again
1. If you cut into the same piece frequently, the law of
3 diminishing returns soon sets in.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
naTno^d. when asked about the gm. g^-ft,*[met for an
links between his own .Invisible J*^ -J wmUtt General of
Poland. The two diplomats dis-
cussed Polish-Israeli relations
and each government's foreign
policy Poland broke diplomatic
relations with Israel after the Six-
Day War.
MASTRO SUBARU
'Largest Volume Dealer In Southeast'
6402W.HIIIsborough
Tampa, Fla. 33614
884-7513
Jack Herman welcomes you to drive the No. 1 selling car In Israel.
;



P*ge4
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
is*r
Frktay. October 23,1981
Jewish Floridian They Came to Praise Caesar, Not Bury Him
OFPINELLAS COUNTY fntSttoch* ________...., "^MOBOOWCWWWWSWatfSSSPfPSWSJ^fft'y i i_:*.j o_
*'aSroc')#'
Editorial Office. 302 Jupiter Ave South. Clean* atsr. Fla S3515
Telephone 44* I OSS
Publication Business Office. 110 N.E SSt Miami. Fla S3132
Te lephone i SOB I 373-4*06
1-KKHK SMUCHET SUZANNESCHECHTER
I .in..i ..ii.l Publisher Editor. Pinedas County
SI /ANNK SHOCHET
Executive Edit. '
Jrwtsa FturMtaa I>es No* Ouaxaatee Mm Kaaaruta of Merraaaalse Advertised
. Srrond I'Ism Posts** Rsai l'Sf*S.S41M7il at Miami Ki.i I'uh4ih1 H. torvSI, -
NilllsT! Forward Form 3579 to Masi MSt7|. Mi.imi. Ha. ISItl
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area Annual MM) J Year Minimum Suu
script ion I? SO or by annual membership plsdoe lo Jewish Federation of Pinallas
County lor which the sum of S2.2S is paid. Out of Town Upon Request
Friday. October 23. 1981
Volume 2
25 TISHRI 5742
Number 22
(
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VICl
Tragedy of Sadat
The tragic assassination of Egypt's
President Anwar Sadat is made even more
tragic by the tacit acceptance of Mr. Sadat's
murder without a sense of genuine outrage
that international terrorism is beginning to
shape the foreign policy of the nations of the
world.
Surrogates mainly attended the funeral
for Mr. Sadat in Cairo rather than heads of
state themselves, including President Reagan
who stayed home on the advice of his security
chieftains. In this sense, the delinquents were
saying that the PLO's, the IRA's and the Red
Army Brigades of the world are telling us how
we shall comport ourselves.
We do not mean to single out President
Reagan for special criticism, but only as an
example; after all, he was the target of an as-
sassination attempt himself last March, if of
an entirely different order.
Still, he and others Britain's Prime
Minister Thatcher, France's President Mit-
terrand, West Germany's Chancellor Schmidt
were guilty of negligence of their duty as
leaders of the free world when they stayed
away from Cairo on Saturday. By their
inaction, they were saying that they no longer
make policy either for their countries or for
their international principles.
This did poor service to President Sadat,
whose effort to achieve peace in the Middle
East with Israel as a member of the family of
nations there is what led to his assassination.
At this moment, it would also serve Mr.
Sadat poorly if we engaged in speculation
either about Mr. Sadat's past or whether he
had any motives other than his stated ones
when lie flew to Jerusalem in November,
1977. The fact is that he did fly there. The
fact is that this opened up a dialogue that
enraged his Arab bethren, who ultimately
helped kill him.
The fact is that this dialogue continues to
this very day, past the death of Mr. Sadat; it
continues in the vow by Egypt's new Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak to pursue the peace
initiative of his predecessor. And, if there is
any credibility in the report this week by
ABC-TV's Barbara Walters, it continues in
Mubarak's promise to Prime Minister Begin
to visit Israel in the near future as a sign of
Egypt's determination not to swerve from his
country's commitment to peace with Israel.
EVEN AS the likes of newspa-
per columnist Garry Wills is ac-
cusing Prime Minister Begin of
"creating facts" through the ea- '
tablishment of Israeli settle-
ments on the West Bank that
make the Palestinian autonomy
talks "insoluble," Wills is himself
creating facts.
According to Wills, the object
of Begins policy was to embar-
rass President Sadat and force
Sadat to opt out of continuing
the autonomy talks after all,
Sadat had called it quits on the
talks before. According to Wills,
this would give Begin the excuse
he has been allegedly looking for
to renege on Israel's final with-
drawal from the Sinai next April.
WILLS APES the fool from
Plains, Puddin'head Jimmy
Carter, who said the same thing
on his way over to the Sadat
Funeral in Cairo. Carter is re-
ported as having declared that if
Israel reneges, it would be a
''suicidal" decision, which was
not foolish, only meddlesome.
Also, incidentally, that Begin
should not have gone to the
funeral because bis presence in
Cairo kept other Arab leaders
away who might otherwise have
come to the funeral too, which
was more than foolish it was
bigoted and reprehensible.
Which Arab leaders? Carter
didn't say. Of course not when
did he ever make sense? But what
he did say shows him to be as
predictably muddle-brained as
Wills is himself in this instance.
Talk about the pot's calling the
kettle black. In the world of
Araby, one would be hard-
pressed to decide who is the
greater pariah Jimmy Carter
or Prime Minister Begin.
That Carter did not see this is
leas a mark of his incredible
egotism than it is of his absurdly
romantic nature, which Wills
dearly shares hare, and the rest
of the Western claque as well, so
tar aa Anwar Sadat is concerned
WILLS' OWN capacity to
create facts a priori is if anything
a more serious wea knees than it
is in Carter, who is a discounted
political entity to begin with be-
cause he is such a spongy, indeci-
sive thinker. But many people
will take Wills seriously because
he is a brilliant thinker and a pel-
lucid writer. When Wills makes a
pronouncement, many people
listen. In the and, he is not just a
newspaper columnist; his pro-
nouncements also appear in such
distinguished and intellectual
organs as The New York Review
of Books; and the intellectuals
these days, Jews among them,
are nothing if not anti-Israel.
Still, his charge against Begin
as a manipulator of history is the
predicate upon which ha
pyramids a panegyric to Presi-
dent Sadat. And the unutterable
truth in the wake of Sadat's
tragic assassination is that in the
20th Century, Anwar Sadat was
one of the moat successful mani-
pulators of the facts of history of
all manipulators, past and
present; this includes the Nazis,
who thrived on the great he, and
who failed, but not merely be-
cause they war* liars; and the
Communists, who appear to ba
successful, just as Sadat was, but
who are rarognited for what they
are. If their lias bscooM the offici-
al view of things in some parts of
the world, it is only that no one
has yet figured out how to atop
ths Communists, abort of war, as
was the case with the Naxia.
In ths case of Sadat, a corrsc
tion of history is not only dssir
able: it is an emergency But with
-he arpaosion of the hand
grenades and gunshots that slew
him still ringing in our ears, it Is
not yet fashionable, or tasteful.
to help others ass Sadat aa he
truly
1
Leo
Miiiriliii
WH&Wtt
after all the stuff of their metier.
They are as fanciful in their
reporting as any creator of facts
aspires to be. Particularly in the
case of the TV glamor cadre, who
adore themselves without end,
there is a need for the super-star
to adore some external object as
hero, as Nietzschean Uber-
mensch, even more. In symbiosis
is their survival. Approaching
Anwar Sadat as an equal gives,
say, a Tom Brokaw the feeling
that he is as heroic as he would
have us, and himself, believe.
This is a significant issue be-
cause President Sadat cast him-
self in the role of hero to begin
with. Now that hypocritical
politicians, of whom Carter and
Gerald Ford are mere examples,
have joined hands with star-
struck reporters who fail to dis-
tinguish between themselves as
observers of events (which they
are) and creators of events (which
they are not), as a unity they
compound the problem that Wills
describes as "creating facts."
By his own admission, Sadat
was an assassin. By his own
deeds, he was a dictatorial op-
pressor of contrary opinion, in-
cluding religious opinion. By his
own judgment as a "war hero,"
this self-professed lover of God,
women and children launched a
sneak attack on a neighboring
country at the moment of that
country's most holy religious ob-
servance, Yom Kippur. By the
priority of his own judgments, he
has since celebrated that sneak
attack as an annual event. By his
own declaration, he was vic-
torious in that war, a war he lost
so overwhelmingly that only the
threats of an American president
and his ax-wielding secretary of
state forced the Israeli enemy to
relent in its punishment of his
cowardly effort.
IT WAS then that Sadat
found transcendental love. Be*
ginning at the war's end, Sadat
was successful in making the
Western claque and its journal-
istic hangers-on believe in his
glorious view of himself because
it has been pragmatic for every-
body concerned to believe in that
view. Translated into today's
currency, the following is the
result. Even as late as Hosni
Mubarak's visit with President
Reagan in Washington one week
before Sadat's assassination, the
(United States was cool to Mubt
rak's purpose a quick arms fix
Now, we are prepared to invest
our Middle Eastern stake in
Egypt's own future a decision
that is ludicrous reckoned in
terms of the experience in Iran
and our fears for the stability of
the Saudi Arabian royal regime.
In the wake of the Sadat assassi-
nation, can Egypt be far behind?
The Western claque, led by a
trio of past Presidential ghouls,
came to Cairo to praise Caesar
not to bury him. They came to
invest tomorrow's history in the
bank of today's legend according
to the legacy of Anwar Sadat. By
the circuitous reasoning charac-
teristic of him, the man from
Plains came closest to the
ultimate Western anguish post-
Sadat not that Israel was
there at the funeral in the person
of Menachem Begin, but that
Israel is there in the Middle East
at all. If the West were em-
powered to redo 1948, if it were
entitled in 1981 to throw the rem-
nants of the Holocaust back into
the tender hand of the United
Nations in order to delegitimize
its existence, it would do so as
quickly and as off-handedly as
Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford
on their way back from Cairo de-
manded U.S. talks with the ter-
rorist PLO the PLO whose
delegitimizing of Israel is its
primary intent.
The likes of Garry Wills would
never call for any of this because
he does not believe it. To him,
Israel is not anathema, but bis
coy comments about Begin give
others justification to think ths
thoughts of the Carters and
Fords among us. Indeed, with the
Western claque now passionately
obsessed with fixing blame for
the Sadat assassination, the
story is long since out that the
U.S. indifference to Sadat's
"patient" struggle with Israel
over autonomy is what isolated
him even further from his fellow-
Arabs and led to his death at ex-
tremist hands.
FROM THIS reasoning, it is
but a short hop to Col. Qaddafi's
funeral oration for Sadat: He
lived like a Jaw and died like a
Jew." What Qaddafi meant
doesn't matter. No anti-Semitic
statements are logical.But there
will be many to harbor Qad-
dafi's feeling as they mull over
Jimmy Carter's observation
about Prims Minister Begin,
which was of the same order as
Qaddafi's. There will be many to
say of the Jews that they have
killed Christ a second tuna.
And no one will bother very
much either to recall the lie of
just what Anwar Sadat was
doing at the moment be died
his ultimate triumph as a creator
of facts.
Saudis Stay Back as Israel
Rescues Stray Ship
THAT NEWSPAPER
reporters and television stars of
the journalistic trade contribute
to Sadat's own angabc assess-
ment of his lire's purpose is to be
expected Ths non-story" is
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
An Israeli Navy missile
boat ran aground on the
Saudi Arabian coast
triggering an alert in Saudi
and Israeli armed forces.
But the vessel was freed
after 62 hours by Israeli
salvage crews who were not
mterfered with by the
Saudis.
At ths time of ths mishap. U-
raet rushed word to ths Saudi
governrnsnt through the US.
Embassy that ths presence of the
boat in their waters was due to
mechanical braaksdown and not
hostile intent
ISRAELI MILITARY corres-
pondents wars aware of ths in-
ridsnt several days ago. but it
waa not mads public, reportedly
at ths request of ths Saudis.
Riyadh apparently wanted to
avoid embarrassment m other
Arab states for remsining pas-
sive while Israel performed
salvage work on the Saudi coast.
According to military sources
here, ths Franch-built missile
boat sailed from Haifa last month
on a routine voyage to Eilat via
ths Suez Canal While in ths Gulf
of Aqaba 50 muss south of Eilat,
the electric ssnarating system
failed Wnn^ariwj oyt ths craft's
radar and gyro compass. The
vessel veered off course by W
degrees and raced at about 27
knots toward ths Saudi coast,
grounding on a coral rssf within
ight of a Saudi mikiary position
Saudi troops wstwnastoedtotbe
scene but did not opan lira. Israel
Army hesdquartsra sad the De-
fense Ministry promptly ex-
plained ths situation to the
Saudis through ths US.
Embassy in Tel Aviv but at the
same time 1st ths Saudis know
that all measures would be taken
to protect ths boat and its craw


c^v, October 23.1961
The Jewish Floridianof PineUas County
NAAM: Who, How, and What
yfcWe Are
ufe have been defined by the 27
,h Zionist Congreea meeting in
iSSm in June 1968 as
, the framework for pros
pJtive immigrants among the
B in the Diaspora/" The
fnneress went on to specify that,
the Aliyah Movement.
.tough forming an integral part
0f the Zionist Organization, will
be autonomous.'
We are committed to unite and
organize individuals and groups
ho desire to make Aliyah.
Furthermore, we consider it our
duty to promote Aliyah on a per-
,onal basis among those still un-
committed. Our task is to edu-
cate and prepare, on a do-ityour-
K|f basis, all those who have
made the decision to move to
Israel, so that each will be suc-
cessfully integrated and absorbed
into Israeli society.
Through our sister organiza-
tion, AACI (Association of
Americans and Canadians in
Israel), a support network has
been set up. This network assists
iur members in adapting them-
elves to life in Israel and helps
hem to establish contact with
olleagues in their professions.
rlow We Work
Approximately sixty local
Chapter! (Chugei Aliyah) exist in
North America.
They are formed by individuals
in the community or students on
campus who are interested in in-
formation and assistance relating
to their preparations for Aliyah.
The Chug Aliyah also serves as a
social framework for those who
have made Aliyah to remain in
contact with their former com-
munities.
Garinim. jrroups that plan
Bat Mitzvah
Jennifer Michelle Bialow
JENNIFER BIALOW
Jennifer Michelle Bialow,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Martin
Bialow, will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah on
October 24 at Temple B'nai
'"ael, Clearwater. Jennifer
Attends the Temple B'nai Israel
Religious School, and is vice-
president of the Temple's Junior
Youth group. She is an eighth
grade student at the John F,
Kennedy Middle School where
she is an honor student and
member of the Kennedy Tele-
vision News, Team, where she is
*n anchor person.
Dr. and Mrs Bialow will boat
the Oneg Shabbat following
services in honor of the occasion,
*od a luncheon reception will be
held at the Temple. Special
guests celebrating with Jennifer
will include he grandparents, her
unt Tina and Uncle Mandy
Gordon, cousins Brian, Matthew,
end Jenny from New Hampshire,
*nd other relatives from New
England and Sooth Florida.
their Aliyah together, are also
considered Chugei Aliyah. These
garinim intend to settle on kib-
butzim, or moahavim or else plan
to establish new communities in
Israel.
Other Chugei Aliyah are or-
ganized on a common profes-
sional basis. These chugim deal
with the problems unique to indi-
viduals establishing themselves
in their profession in Israel
Americans Retiring in Israel is
the National Retirement Com-
mittee of NAAM. It is devoted to
dealing with the special problems
and interests of those above the
age of fifty who are considering
early retirement in Israel.
What We Offer
We at NAAM wish to provide
services which address, as closely
as possible, the specific needs of
our members. Membership in
NAAM provides:
1. A subscription to Aliyon."
our bi-monthly magazine.
2. A copy of the book "Coming
Home"; an excellent practical
planning guide for living in
Israel.
S. The opportunity to join two
or three week seminars in Israel
which include visits to absorption
centers and towns throughout
the country, as well as discus-
sions with government officials
and American Olim.
4. Automatic membership in
AACI, providing help in all
aspects of Klitah (absorption)
and guidance for the new Oleh.
5. A subsidy for attendance to
anUlpan.
6. A discount for the Jerusalem
Post International Edition.
7. Informal talks with Ameri-
can Olim who are here to visit
and share their knowledge, ex-
periences and advice.
8. Workshops and conventions.
9. Lectures and audiovisual
presentations.
10. Ombudsman for anyone
who has a problem receiving ap-
propriate consideration.
(Some benefits are not available
to Garin or Youth Movement
members who receive free NAAM
membership).
We have access to an informa-
tion that provides current, com-
prehensive and effective informa-
tion, so that prospective resi-
dents of Israel gain an under-
standing of Israel, its problems.
and their role in its future.
Our Role in the Community
It is our inherent duty to in-
volve the Jewish Community and
encourage its participation in
Aliyah activities. We strive to
have Aliyah recognized as a legi-
timate force in the Jewish com-
munity. Once that is accom-
plished, the community cannot
ignore the potential oleh, but
must support him as a member of
that community. The Chug
Aliyah serves as the means
through which personal involve-
ment is improved and increased
between Israel and the local com-
munities.
St. Petersburg NAAM Chug
Aliyah
For information on the St.
Petersburg NAAM Chug Aliyah,
contact Rivy Chapman 360-1229.
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Page 6
The Jtustimk Dl---->-'
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, October 23
C
u
bi
In.
Tl
is
Ba
10:
Congregation Beth Shalom Will
Honor Marvin Betz On Oct 25
Congregation Beth Shalom in
Clear-water will honor Marvin
Peltz at a testimonial dessert re-
ception on Sunday, October 26,
at 7:30 p.m. at the synagogue, it
was announced by Bernard
Panush, committee chairman.
Marvin Peltz has been heavily
involved in the community and
synagogue life of Clearwater
since his arrival 20 years ago. He
and his wife. Ethel, are members
of Congregation Beth Shalom
and he has served on the board of
directors of the synagogue and
has held numerous chairman-
ships.
Mr. Eddie Schaffer, noted
raconteur and toastmaster will
entertain that evening.
Reservations may be made by
calling Mr. Bernard Panush at Marvin Peltz
536-7432.
Congregation Beth SholomTo Honor
Doris Kushner Geller On Oct. 25
Congregation Beth Sholom, in
cooperation with State of Israel
Bonds, is honoring Doris Kush-
ner Geller at a testimonial
luncheon on Sunday. October 25.
at 12 noon, at the synagogue, it
announced by Sam Vogel.
committee chairman.
Mr. Vogel also stated that
Eddie Schaffer. one of America's
outstanding humorists. will
entertain at this event
Mrs. Geller, who was active in
Philadelphia in many different
Jewish endeavors until her resi-
dency in Florida, will receive the
City of Peace Award, given by
the State of Israel to a recipient
who has exemplified the highest
ideals and traditions of Jewish
life.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Those wishing to make reser-
vations to this strictly Kosher
luncheon should phone Mr. Sam
Vogel at 345-8750.
Eddie Schaffer
Begin Guarantees Promises
JERUSALEM (UTA) Premier Menachem
Begin assured the Aguda Israel that his government
would honor all the promises he made to the ultra-Ortho-
dox party as a condition for its support of his coalition.
Begin met Monday with the party s four-man Knesset
faction after the Aguda's ruling Council of Sages dis-
played impatience over the government's alleged delays in
implementing their demands.
THE SAGES reportedly concentrated on the contro-
versial archaeological dig at the City of David in Jeru-
salem. They are demanding that the government invoke
Article 45 of its coalition agreement which would give the
Chief Rabbinate Council sole legal authority to determine
whether the excavations involve the desecration of an an-
cient Jewish cemetery, as the Orthodox establishment
contends.

*>
**
***
v^
Michael Bernstein *is Executive Director of Gulf Coast Jewish
Family Service, Inc. He has extensive professional training in
treating individual and family problems and will be happy to
answer all letters received in this column. Please address all
letters to Gulf Coast Jewish Family Service, Inc., 304 South
Jupiter Avenue, Clearwater, Florida 33515.
Dear Mr. Bernstein
I an 28 yean old and already divorced. Do yon think that
there is something wrong with considering a computer dating
service in the area to meet other single*.
Dear Writer-
Finding a meaningful relationship lor any single person is
difficult. Please check various dating services to assure that
they are reputable businesses. Perhaps you may also wish to
contact the Tampa Bay Jewish Singles Group at 541-4791.
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services is a major beneficiary
agency of monies raised by the annual Combined Jswiah Appeal.
*f tie Certei Pa^t*
JCC Programs And Activitives
French Class Offered
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County. 8167 Elbow
Lane North, St. Petersburg will
offer a course in Beginning
French. It will be conducted in
St. Petersburg on Tuesday from
7 8 p.m. and in Clearwater on
Friday from 4 5 p.m. Class will
lead to intermediate and ad-
vanced lessons. Classes com-
mence the week of Sept. 14. For
further information contact
Stephen Alpert Cultural Arts
Director-Program Coordinator at
344-5795.
Interior Design Workshop
An Interior Design Workshop
will be offered at the Jewish
Community Center, 8167 Elbow
Lane North. St. Petersburg. The
workshop will cover the basic
theories in color, material and
space planning. For further infor-
mation contact Stephan Alpert.
'.'ultural Arts Director-Program
Coordinator at 344-5795.
"hildren-s Programs
The Jewish Community Center
>f Pinellas County. 8167 Elbow
Lane North. St. Petersburg,
Florida is offering the following
dance classes under the direction
of N'iki Blacker.
Ballet-Tap (beginners) age
2't-4'i Wednesday 4-5 p.m. 37
sessions $125 member, $170 non-
members. Ballet-Tap (beginners)
age 7-10 Wednesday 5-6 p.m.
37 sessions $125 members. $170
non-members. Ballet-Tap (inter-
mediate) age 4-7 Monday 4-5 p.m.
37 sessions $125 members. $170
non-members. Ballet-Tap (inter-
mediate) age 5-8 Monday 5-6
p.m. 37 sessions $125 members.
$170 non-members. Ballet-Toe
(advanced) age 8-14 Monday
6-7 p.m. 37 sessions $125 mem-
bers. $170 non-members.
Teen & Adult Programs
Dancercise Monday 7-8 p.m.
37 sessions $125 members. $170
non-members. Dancercise
Wednesday 8-9 p.m. 37 sessions
$125 members, $170 non-mem-
bers. Procall Monday 8-10
p.m. 37 sessions $220 members,
$280 non-members. Procall
Wednesday 6-8 p.m. 37 sessions
$220 members. $280 non-mem-
bers.
After School Programs for Ex-
ceptional Children
An exceptional program for
exceptional children is being of-
fered by the Jewish Community
Center of Pinellas County, 8167
Elbow Lane North, St. Peters-
burg, under the direction of
Renee Daniels, Educational
Diagnostician for Pinellas Coun-
ty Schools, and Director of the
Special Camp Kadima program
at the JCC.
The after school program will
meet once a week for two hours
and will include arts & crafts,
music, academic reinforcement,
and field trips. Emphasis will be
placed on increasing socialization
and survival skills. Transporta-
tion is available. The program
will run for 10 weeks. Why should
the exceptional child be different?
For further information contact:
Renee Daniels at 344-6796.
Jewish Community Center
Athletic Department Offers
Inatruction
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County, 8167 Elbow
Lane North, St. Petersburg is of-
fering courses in both soccer and
tennis beginning the week of Sept
14. Stan Urguhsrtx, Camp
Kadima's Athletic Director, will
teach soccer and Ken Schhiger
will teach tennis. For further in-
formation, call Ann Lardner.
Program Director at 344-6796.
Children's Gymnastics at the
Jewiah Commaarty Ceater 8197
Lam North. St
The Jewish Community Center of Pinellas County is a
major beneficiary of funds raised in the annual Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
physical activities which include
fundamental skills, mat exer-
cises, gymnastics, cartwheaU,
backbends. stretching and
movement awareness, a fine in-
troduction to physical education
for children. For further informa-
tion contact Ann Lardner, Pro-
gram Director at 344-5795.
Children's Theatre Workshop
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County. 8167 Elbow
Lane North. St. Petersburg will
provide a very special Theatre
Workshop for the children of the
community. The all inclusive
course will cover the basics of
theatre craft, the use of improvi-
sations and theatre games tor
developing different characters,
mime, puppetry, performing the
Children's Classics for all chil-
dren of the community. All chil-
dren are welcome to participate in
thifl unique theatre experience A
preliminary meet inn with the
children Ls requested, as it is a
vital part of their theatrical
development. For further infor-
mation please contact Stephan
Alpert. Cultural Arts Director-
Program Coordinator at 344-
5795.
Teenage Theatrix
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County. 8167 Elbow
Lane North, St. Petersburg is of-
fering a course in Acting and
Theatre Craft for teenagers. The
students will form the nucleus of
the only Theatre Company in
Pinellas County exclusively for
teenagers. The course will
develop professional actors and
actresses for the entire Com-
munity. This ongoing program
will concentrate on channeling
young energies into creative ex-
periences. For further informa-
tion contact Stephan Alpert. 344-
5795.
"Butterflies are Free" in Rehear-
sal
The Jewish Community Center
Players. 8167 Elbow Lane, is
pleased to announce to the com
munity that their Dinner Theatre
Production of Leonard Gershe's
"Butterflies are Free" has gone
into rehearsal. The play will run
for four performances, opening on
Nov. 14. and continuing Nov. 15,
21 and 22. This hilarious comedy
will feature Stephan Alpert,
Sherry Piernick, Sylvia Devey.
and Steve Pearl. Stephan Alpert
will direct. For reservation infor-
mation contact the Jewish Com-
munity Center at 344-5795.
Cultural Arts Department to
Present two Films
Our next event will be showing
of Walt Disney's "Make Mine
Music" and "Melody Time" on
Sunday, Nov. 1 at 2 p.m. The two
short films were chosen for their
superb musical content and bril-
liant animation. They are con-
sidered among Disney's finest
and of course, for the kids, Free
Popcorn!
The next program presented
will be a Puppet Show by
Shamus Alman, who performed
his puppet magic for u- during
the 1981 Camp Kadima summer
Treats will also be served Date
to be announced.
It is our hope that these pro-
grams will be as great a success
as our first, on Sept 27.
There is a need for childrens
and family programming on the
week-ends. Your Community
Center is endeavoring to fill this
need. Please feel free at any time
to call Stephan Alpert. Cultural
Arts Director-Program Coordi-
nator for further information at
344-5795.
JCC Children Enjoy (renting
The children participating in
the Jewish Communit. Center
Kinder-development pr<>gram are
becoming proficient
things. Some of the favorite acti-
vities include gourmet cooking in
the kiddie kitchen, building cities
and highways with our blocks.
adding original art to our ex
panding nursery' gallery and do-
ing puppet shows and creative
dramatics with Stephan Alpert.
Sharon Robyak. Directorofthe
Kinder-development program is
pleased to see that the program
which emphasizes group interac-
tion and communicative skills is
progressing so well.
Rabbi Kobrinetz to Give Classes
at Jewish Community Center
The Jewish Community Center
of Pinellas County, 8167 Elbow
Lane announces that due to the
Jewish Holidays in October, the
courses given by Rabbi Kobri-
netz which began Sept. H will re-
sume Nov. 3. This course starts
with: The History of the Pro-
phets, followed by Bible Study
Each topic will consist of eight
sessions. Registration is still be
ing accepted for more informa
tion contact Ann Lardner or
Stephan Alpert at 344-5795.
Books Needed for JCC Library
Under the chairmanship and
guidance of Rose Sh;-inberg.
work has started on the develop-
ment of a Library' for all partici-
pants of the Jewish Community
Center of Pinellas Cow
Elbow Lane North. St I
burg. This library is being
developed in the Rothman Koom.
a room donated and dedicated by
the family and friends of Thelmi
and Maurice Rothman The
amount of books presently in the
library are limited, therefore, *t
would appreciate donations of
any good reading materials for all
ages. Books by Jewish authors
and of Jewish content, and books
or periodicals with large print
would be most welcome ^our
kindness snd cooperation in this
effort will hasten our Jewish Cen-
ter being able to offer the use of
viable Jewish Library to the en
tire community. JCC telephone
- 344-5796.
Children will
rious
Thi Fimeti MuUU-ol -tht Road MmtK Available
Mum from tht 40'i to Rock 6* Country
QMhtrn
and
"Music"
Alto Availebk Vt Hour Shorn
7419 J1H* Avtmu, North Fmnmmt
St Pttmourt, FL UT09 ^ ^gj TAL
S*~n DeyiAWmh ^ llm fmmhm yfmtk mp


Friday. October 23,1981
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 7
IHIllHlllllllHIIIIINIIHMIimWWIIHWHHIIIHIIIIW
1IIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIBIIIIIIIWIIIIHWIII
iinMniiifHiitiiiiniiiiifftiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHimiimiMiMiwiB^P
Hansel and GretelFind Their Way to JCC
175 children filled the Auditorium at the Jewish Community Center of PineUas children every month, and whenever possible it will be free to the Community Our |
Countv <>n Sunday, September 27 to enjoy the Palasades Theatre Company's Pro- next event will be November 1, Sunday. We are presenting a Walt Disney fita- Andi
duction of Hansel & Gretel. We were told that the parents enjoyed the play as much as Free Popcorn. The following event we are planning will be a Puppet Show, free to the
their children, who were completely enchanted. Community. Our 1.000 In. television will be available to parents for sports, etc.
The Cultural Arts Department of the Center is currently developing a program for Call Stephan Alpert, Cultural Arts Director for information 344-5795.


The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, October 23,1981
Mubarak and Begin
Will Pursue Peace
Egypt's new President Hosni Mubarak, elected in a one-candidate national referen-
dum on Tuesday, promised Prime Minister Menachem Begin to visit Israel in the near
future, according to a report by ABC-TV's Barbara Walters. Both men believe that
such a visit would strengthen in the eyes of the world Egypt and Israel's determination
to continue forward with the peace process as set forth by Begin and the late President
Sadat in the treaty of peace between the two countries signed in March, 1979.
Prime Minister Begin last
weekjwalkedthe half-mile from his
hotel to the funeral of President
Sadat, who was assassinated on
Oct. 6 in a reviewing stand as
part of a national Egyptian holi-
day celebrating Sadat's laun-
ching of the Yom Kippur War in
1973. Begin refused to ride in
order not to violate the Sabbath.
EARLIER, Begin was among
the first of the foreign dignitaries
whom Mubarak met at his home
outside of Cairo. They embraced
immediately^ upon meeting, and
Mubarak reassured Begin of
Egypt's intention to pursue
Sadat's peace policy with Israel.
The Associated Press reported
from Cairo the statement by an
unnamed high-ranking Israeli
source who said following Begins
40-minute meeting with Mubarak
that "Mubarak was very close to
President Sadat, and shares his
view on many issues that affect
relations between Egypt and
Israel. We have full confidence
that his reassurances are sin-
cere."
Mubarak, who greeted Begin
and his delegation at his two-
story villa in Helipolis, told
Begin, "It was so fast. So very
quick," when Begin asked him,
"How did it happen, how?"
IN THE Begin party were
Israel's Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon, Foreign Minister Yitz-
hak Shamir and Interior Minister
Yosef Burg.
Later, Begin went with his
party to visit Sadat's widow,
Jihan. They kissed, and Mrs.
Sadat burst into tears. After
their 46-minute meeting, Begin
declared: "At this time of sad-
ness to Mrs. Sadat, to the chil-
dren, the President-elect, the
government and the people of
Egypt, we mortals can not find
words to console you (Mrs.
Sadat). May God Almighty con-
sole all of you."
AT THE funeral Saturday,
banners strung across streets de-
clared, "The march of Sadat will
continue, the heads of the assas-
sins will never stop it." Ordinary
Egyptian citizens were barred
from attending the funeral, with
security forces walling in the
seme 1,000 diplomats from
v; rious countries abroad, in-
cluding Prince Charles of En-
gland.
Prime Minister Begin was seen
during the ceremonies standing
next to former French President
Valery Giacard d'Estaing, whose
pro-Arab policies caused a rapid
freeze between France and Israel.
Most Arab leaders 'stayed away,
except for representatives from
Oman and Sudan. European
leaders were also noticeably ab-
sent.
The American delegation was
headed by Secretary of State
Alexander Haig and included for-
mer Presidents Jimmy Carter,
Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon.
Also in the delegation was former
Secretary of State Henry Kissin-
ger under Presidents Nixon and
Ford. President!Reagan stayed at
home, obeying the stern advice of
American security agents.
THE ATMOSPHERE in Cairo
was tense. President Sadat's
assassination had been greeted
with dancing in the streets of Tri-
poli in Libya, and in the Palesti-
nian area of Beirut, Lebanon.
Libya's Col. Qaddah" issued a
statement that Sadat had "lived
like a Jew and died like a Jew."
An exiled Egyptian leader, for-
mer Gen. Saadeddin Shazli,
almost immediately upon Sadat's
assassination took responsibility
for the murder in the name of
Egyptian Liberation Organiza-
tion.
He warned that if President
Mubarak continued the policies
of President Sadat, he would suf-
fer a similar fate.
But Egyptian police said that
the assassination was engineered
by Egyptian First Lt. Khaled
Ahmed Shawky el-Istambouli,
whose brother was one of more
than 1,500 anti-Sadat enemies
imprisoned by Sadat in Septem-
ber. An official report said that
Istambouli had been "blinded by
black hatred" and that he
smuggled three civilians into an
army truck in the annual parade
commemorating the Yom Kippur
War, who attacked Sadat when
the truck was made to "stall" be-
fore Sadat's reviewing stand.
FORMER PRESIDENT Ford,
on his arrival in Cairo, said that
"The American people looked
upon him (Sadat) as a beautiful
man." Former President' Carter
said of Sadat that he was "like a
hero" to the American people.
Both men returned to the
United States after the funeral.
Former President Nixon went on
to Saudi Arabia on a "private
visit," although it was under-
stood that he had gone there to
reassure the Saudis about the de-.
bate outcome over the AW ACS
in the Senate.
Secretary of State Haig stayed
on in Cairo and Sunday revealed
that the United States would
accelerate U.S. military supplies
Chatter Box
GLADYSOSHER- 866-2007
Suncoast resident Regina Landea lived in Israel during the'
thirties when it was still called Palestine. Now she is catching up i
on her Hebrew with her grand children who have visited modern
land courtesy of their parents. Dr. and Mrs. Michael Slomka
. New arrival to the Suncoast Lola Hall returned to college to
pursue a degree in social work after raising six children. While
working toward her goal, she had jobs as a registrar, credential
analyst, and Red Cross recruiter. She once visited her daughter
Lynne Scrap, who was a Playboy bunny at the Playboy mansion
in Chicago, but stayed only a short time because Hugh Hefner,
ever the eccentric, had the elevator to the sleeping quarters re-
moved and there was a four flight walk up Bea Rose wrote a
great poem about her talented daughter and it was published in
the Gulf port Gabber. Like mother, like daughter. Some more
recent arrivals to Pinellaa are Emily and Sam Gordon, originally
from Chicago. Sams vocation was always music, and now that
he has the time, he is playing the bassoon with the Clearwater
Bank and the Suncoast Symphonic Band, as well as teaching
music Mazel Ton to Rabbi and Mrs. Luaki on the birth of
their daughter Rachel Esther, on September 16.
to Egypt and the Sudan. This
was precisely what President
Mubarak bad hoped for when he
came to Washington for talks
with President Reagan just one
week before the assassination,
and where he was turned away
essentially empty-handed. The
assassination has apparently
worked a complete turnabout in
U.S. foreign policy in the Middle
East.
HAIG'S ANNOUNCEMENT
Sunday also included a statement
about large-scale joint military
exercises in Egypt in November,
and it was reported that the U.S.
has already sent teams to Egypt
and the Sudan as a "concrete
manifestation" of American sup-
port to both. The Sudan is consi-
dered a likely objective of mili-
tary attack by Libya's Col.
Quaddafi because of the Sudan's
support of Egypt's Middle East
peace diplomacy.
"We're going to have to show
our presence here from time to
time," Haig declared shortly
after the Sudan government
charged on Sunday that Libyan
fighter planes had attacked two
Sudanese border villages killing
several people the previous
Thursday.
One of two U.S. State Depart-
ment teams, in conjunction with
Israel's Early Withdrawal Urged
CAIRO Secretary of State Alexander Haig
apparently echoed the sentiments of former Presi-
dent Jimmy Carter here. He would like Israel to
accelerate its withdrawal date from the Sinai
Peninsula, which is due by agreement under the
Camp David accord in April, 1982.
The Haig request was made as a "gesture of
good will"" that Israel could offer to prove its
commitment to the Egypt-Israel peace treaty now
that President Sadat has been killed.
"There is no room for any gestures," declared
Israel Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, replying
to the Haig feeler. "I don't think what happened in
Egypt should bring anybody to put pressure on
Israel."
Haig hastened to assure both parties of his con-
fidence that Israel and Egypt would continue their
peace process.
teams from the Pentagon, were to
fly to the Sudan this week to
arrange for delivering some $100
million in arms to that country.
On the day of Sadat's funeral,
Haig had met with Sudanese
President Jaafar Numeiri to re-
veal the Reagan Administra-
tion's decision to deliver arms to
his country.
SPEAKING OF the proposed
joint military exercises with
Egypt. Haig said it would be
code-named "Bright Star," but
he insisted it had been planned
months before. He conceded,
however that the exercises would
be "modified and expanded" as a
result of President Sadat's
assassination. To be involved are
B52 bombers in simulation of air
strikes on Egyptian bombing
ranges.
Earlier Sunday, Haig warned
that "The United States intends
to work actively with our friends
in the region, and foremost,
among these is the government of
Egypt and the people of Egypt,
for whom our friendship and re-
spect have been deepened by this
tragedy."
Haig's words brought immedi-
ate response .from the Reagan
Administration in Washington
which was embarrassed by the
apparent slight to Israel. Asked
on CBS-TV's "Face the Nation"
about Haig's statement. Richard
Allen, Reagan's National
Security Adviser, declared that
"I'm sure, though I haven't seen
that particular remark, that the
Secretary of State was un-
doubtedly referring to our friends
among the Arab nations, among
the moderate Arab nations."
AND ON ABC-TVs "Issues
and Answers," Reagan's coun-
selor, Edwin Meese, said: "Well,
Israel is one of our foremost
friends." He explained that what
Haig meant were the Arab na-
tions. "I think there is no ques-
tion that our special relationship
with Israel does have a particular
significance," he declared.
Syria Missiles Not 'Priority'
Habib Says He'll Go Back When Needed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Philip Habib,
President Reagan's special
envoy for the crisis in Leb-
anon, said he would not re-
turn to the Middle East un-
til the Arab League's spe-
cial committee has a chance
to continue its efforts to
solve the problem facing
Lebanon, both internal and
external. Habib also indi-
cated that the missiles
Syria has placed in Leba-
non are not a priority issue
for the United States.
"I think it is in the United
States interest, the interest of the
people of the region, that the pro-
cess of dealing with the complex-
ities of Lebanon go on," Habib
told several hundred people at
the 35th annual conference of the
Middle East Institute at the
Mayflower Hotel. He said that
the need now was to "consolidate
the gains" made in Lebanon and.
to reduce the chances of another
crisis occurring.
HABIB, who had retired from'
the State Department in 1978 as
Assistant Secretary of State for
Political Affairs, was sent to the
Mideast by Reagan last May
after Syria moved SAM-6 mis-
siles into Lebanon and Israel
threatened to remove them by
force.
The retired diplomat's remarks
came in response to a questioner
who asked about Premier Mena-
chem Begin's statement on a tel-
evision program while he waa in
the United States recently in
which the Premier said he ex-
pected Habib to return to the
Middle East soon to get the mis-
siles removed. Habib replied that
he will return to the Mideast
when the President decides there
is "something for me do do."
Habib said that while the mis-
siles are still a major issue, at
least for the contending parties,
the major effort was to conso-
lidate the gains made by the
ceasefire across the Lebanese
border to solve Lebanon's many
internal and external problems.
HABIB, who was the keynote
speaker for the conference, called
for moving ahead swiftly on the
Mideast peace process. He said
the achievements of Camp David
were the beginning of the peace
process, not the end of it. "The
present stiuation is about as calm
as it is ever likely to be, short of a
comprehensive settlement," he
noted. He said this is why pro-
gress must be made to avoid any
new crisis from developing.
He said that the reason that all
sides agreed to the ceasefire
across the Lebanese border was
that they all realized that unless
they worked to "defuse the situa-
tion," they could undo all the
progress they had made.
Habib said that the United
States has a "unique" position
because it is the only major
power than can help bring peace
to the Middle East. He said the
Soviet Union could not do this.
Kosher Kitchen
Cookie enthusiasts will appreciate this recipe for an unusual
chocolate cookie.
CHOCOLATE CHEESE COOKIES
1 Vt Cups Sugar
Vi Cup Butter
IViCupOil
3 oz. Cream Cheese
1 Egg Beaten
2 Tbsp. Milk
1 Tsp. Vanilla
Vt Tsp. Salt
2 (loz) Squares Unsweetened Chocolate
2 V* Cups Flour
1 Vt Tsp. Baking Powder
'/. Cup Chopped Walnuts
nil .r*heat T to m *** CnUD together sugar, butter,
gfigR **e Add egg, milk, vanill! and salt Mix well
flour SZkZ Ver 5' W"t-r' Stir mto *"* Sift together
2Z TOO* Pwder: add to *" Uttle at a time. Stir ii
Smites teMpoon onto *"* *>* ** Bake
in
12
if


ctober23,1981
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 9
IIIIIIIIIHIIII
Adult Education Programs Offered
iwwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
By LOU L ROSEN
(Chairman of the Committee on Adult Education of the Educa-
tion Committee of the Jewish Federation ofPinellas County).
The Education Committee of the Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County has announced the following schedule of Adult Education
Programs being offered throughout Pinellas County. It is hoped that
vour interest will be stimulated by the broad view of intellectual reli-
gious, and cultural activities being offered. For further information
call any of the institutions listed. The Education Committee wishes
you and yours the best of all years in 5742.
Congregation B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg Adult Education-
Rabbi Jacob Luski, 301 59 St. N., 381-4900-01.
Three mini-courses will be offered beginning in November as
follows?
Nov. 4Dec. 16
A. The American Jewish Experience A survey of American
Jewish social history from Colonial times to the present. Includes lec-
tures, audio-visual presentations, and a guest speaker. Instructors are
Daniel and Joan Epstein.
Jan. 6 Feb. 10
B. Conservative Judaism An investigation of the roots and
development of the Conservative movement. Lectures and guest pre-
sentation. Instructor isjiabbi Jacob Luski.
March 3 March 31
C. Jewish Mysticism A survey of mystical movements in Jew-
ish histpry. Area academicians will teach specific sessions according to
expertise.
All of these courses will meet on Wednesday evenings from 8
9:30. Fee to congregants is $15 for three courses. Non-members pay an
additional $5.
Registration is Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. A social hour will
follow class meetings.
OTHER EVENTS
Speakers:
Oct. 28 8 p.m. Dr. Stanley Feldstein, American Jewish historian;
Great Ideas Weekend, Feb. 6 7. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, Ameri-
can; Jewish theological Seminary; Dec. 18 Sit Down Oneg
Shabbat, Rabbi Jacob Luski, "Ask The Rabbi"; March 12 Sit
Down Oneg Shabbat, Dr. Max Ben, Sciences Ins.
Films:
Dec. 23 8 p.m. "Bye Bye Braverman"; Feb. 17 8 p.m. "The
Dybbuk"; May 19 8 p.m. "The Fifth Horseman Was Fear."
HEBREW LITERACY CAMPAIGN
The Adult Education Commission will sponsor a Hebrew Literacy
program based on Rabbi Noah Golonkins book, "Shalom Aleichem,"
in addition to regular course offerings. The hope is to offer mornuig,
afternoon, and evening sections most days of the week a total of 13
sections The course consists of twelve two hour sessions held once a
week, beginning in November. The fee is $12 including text. Non-
members, $15.
Congregation Beth Chai Adult Education
Rabbi Sherman Kirshner 8400125 St. N., Senunole 393-5525.
Three classes will be offered. Dates and times were not available
as we went to press.
A. Synagogue Skills Includes the Haftorah chanting.
B. Beginning Hebrew Learn simple vocabulary and reading.
C. Living Jewishly The Jewish life cycle, All classes join
together. Lectures and discussion.
Temple B'nai Israel Adult Education Program
Rabbi Arthur Baseman 1685 S, Belcher Rd. Clearwater. 531-5829.
The following eleven courses will be offered:
. A. Beginning Hebrew Reading One week crash course^ Begins
Sept. 13 9:30 a.m. 12 noon. Moixlay -^ursday 7-10 pm.^
20 9:30 12. This class will be repeated whenever there are 15 people
waiting. Instructor is Xenia Fane.
B. Adult Bar-Bat mitzvah Tuesday evening 7:3-*d
begins Sept. 22 Pre-requisite is readir* knowledge of Hebrew, co-re-
qu^ite is participation In other Adult Education activities. Instructor
is Zena Sulkes. .n
C. Continuing Jewish Education -Thursday mornings at 10,
starting on Sept. 17 Newcomers welcome. Instructor is Zena Sulkes.
D. Beginning Hebrew Vocabulary Thursday W^gvJJS
ning SepT 24. Prerequisite is abUity to read Hebrew. Instructor is Al
Mlllll pq ~~
E." Basic Judaism Second and fourth Wednj^Oci^
8 p.m. Deals w.th principles and practices. Instructors are *ma
Sulkes. Rabbi Baseman, and Xenia Fane.
, F. Shabbat Workshop Wednesday. Nov.[}^*$
Sunday, Nov. 15 at 10:30 a.m. Instructors are Zena Sulkes and xenia
nG. Channukah Workshop Wednesday. Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m.,
Sunday, Dec. 13 at 10:30 a.m. Thursdav
H Basic Yiddish Voad>ulary and Songs Evt*y Thundjj
evening baginning Jan. 7. Instructors are Al Sulkes ana i
^ I8: CoUsgiate Wmterim Weekends r^jgiggfi' ggmj
union Sabbath. Jan. 1-3 Dana ***jK^2iz^ Friday eve-
of the International Peace Af*gbSfcXl2 *S31 "d
ning from the pulpit^ Saturday $*$doming breakfast.
Sisterhood sponsored Oneg, and at a Uunaay mrr~m {
Jan. 8-9 AJ Vorspan. Vice president ^?^$^
the Union of American Hebrew congregations, wul spea
pulpit on Frioay evening and Saturfaymonnng.
Sunday Jan. 17 Elizabeth CaUan, RNBS wul noia
seminar called Life and Transition. omnhases to form a
These four weekends stress widely diversified the
rounded total package, addressing *fJ^DmeJt
Mid-east, social action, and personal ^OP"^ at 10:30 a.m.
J. Purim Workshop Feb. 10 at 7:30 p.m., Feb.
Instructors are Zena Sulkes and Xm-J""^ March 16 at .10:30
K. Passover Workshop March 10 at 7 30 P
a.m
UiWUIUUiHWIIIUHUUIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Congregation Beth Sholom Adult Education
Rabbi Sidney Lubin 1844 54 St. S.. Gulfport 321-3380
Four classes will be offered as follows:
A. Beginning Hebrew Mondays, 10 -12.
B. Intermediate Hebrew Mondays, 1012.
C. Lecture Series Wednesday afternoons 2 4 beginning in
November. A discussion will follow lectures.
D. Yiddish Group Held on Saturday evenings, monthly. Begins
in November.
Refreshments follow all programs. There is no charge.
Congregation Beth Shalom
Rabbi Peter Mehler.1325 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 531-1418.
Two classes are offered.
A. Breakfast Forums Nov. 22, Arnold Breman, Executive
Director of PACT. 10 a.m. Feb. 14, Irving Steinberg, JWV Post Com-
mander, 10 a.m.
B. Rabbis Adult Education Class Current Jewish Issues. First
and third Tuesday nights in month, November to April. 7:30 p.m.
C. Others to be announced.
Temple Ahavat Shalom
Rabbi Jan Bresky 2000 Main St. Dunedin 734-9428.
Adult Beginning Hebrew Learn to read and vocabulary. Mon-
days 1-2:30 p.m.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER ADULT EDUCATION
The following classes are being offered at the JCC, 8167 Elbow
La. N., St. Petersburg 344-5795.
. Dancercise Thursdays. 7S p.m. 30 sessions $65 members,
$97.50 non-members. Instructor is Beth Resnick; Israeli Folk
Tuesdays. 6 7 p.m. 15 sessions $35 members $60 non-members, 30
sessions $60 members $100 non members; Exercise For Pregnant
Women Monday and Wednesday, 10 11 a.m. 15 session $45 mem-
bers $75 non-members, 30 sessions $75 members. $125 non-members;
Jazzercise Wednesday and Friday 9:15 10 a.m. 4 sessions $16
members and non-members; Arobics Tuesday and Thursday
9:15-10:15 a.m. 4 sessions $12 members and non-members; Aerobics
_ Tuesday and Thursday 67 p.m. 4 sessions $12 members and non-
members.
There is a one time registration fee of $10 for non-members.
Talmud Study Tuesday 1012 a.m. 8 sessions $2 members, $3
non-members. Began Sept. 8.
History of the Prophets Tuesday, 10-12 a.m 8 sessions $2
members, $3 non-members.
Starts December 1
Yiddish Tuesday, 1012 a.m. 8 session $2 members, $3 non-
members. Starts Feb. 2; Bible Study Tuesday 10 -12 a.m. 8 ses-
sions $2 members, $3 non-members Starts April 6.
The instructor for the above four classes is Rabbi Morris
KobrinetE.
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Page 10
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, October 23,
1981


UNESCO Condemns New
Excavation in Jerusalem
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS JJTA) The United Nations Ed-
ucational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
(UNESCO) has condemned Israel for its continuation) of
archaeological excavations in the Old City of Jerusalem.
The UNESCO executive committee voted 28-1 to con-
demn Israel for its "persistent and deliberate violations"
of former UNESCO resolutions on this subject.
The United States was the only UNESCO membei
state to vote against the Arab-sponsored resolution.
Among the countries that abstained were all those from
Western Europe, Guatemala, Jamaica and Japan. Israel
is not a member of the UNESCO executive committee.
ITHE RESOLUTION, which was voted on after a
two-day debate and which will now be presented to
UNESCO's general conference for ratification, said that
"the excavations and transformations seriously threaten
the historic and cultural sites of the city." It also claimed
that the digs now in progress "have never reached such a
pitch in intensity and growth as today."
A UNESCO-linked body, the World Heritage
committee, voted ear her this month to include the Old
City of Jerusalem in the world list of sites which enjoy
international, including Jordanian, protection and finan-
cial aid.
Israel opposed the Jordanian-sponsored resolution
but could not vote against it because it is not a committee
member.
High Court Orders
Abu Trial Postponed
JERUSALEM The High
Court of Justice has ordered the
embezzlement trial of Welfare
Minister Aharon Abu Hatzeira
postponed.) The trial had been
due to begin at the Tel Aviv Dis-
trict Court last week with the
Minister entering his plea on
charges of theft and embezzle-
ment from a charitable fund
several years ago.
But the High Court of Justict
ordered the proceedings sus-
pended until the District Court
Judge and the State Prosecutor
"show cause" to the High Court
why Abu Hatzeira's Knesset
immunity need not be lifted.
The prosecution had argued in
earlier proceedings and the Tel
Aviv District Court Judge had
ruled, that the lifting of Abu Hat-
zeira's immunity by the ninth
Knesset remained effective for
the present tenth Knesset. (The
Minister's immunity was lifted
by the ninth Knesset towards the
end of its term. Since then, gene-
ral elections have been held and
Abu Hatzeira was reelected as
head of his own Tami Party.)
THE TEL AVIV Judge, Vic-
toria Ostrovsky-Cohen, and the
State Prosecutor were given
three weeks to answer the "show
cause" order. Until they do so,
and until the High Court has
considered the immunity issue in
depth, the criminal proceeding
against the Minister is
suspended.
Abu stood trial and was ac-
quitted on bribery charges earlier
this year. The new trial relates to
his period, in the mid-1970s, as
Mayor of Ramie, when he admi-
nistered a state-supported chari-
table fund named in honor of his
late father, a leading Sephardic
rabbi The allegations are that he
stole money from this fund for his
private use.
His attorneys argue on the im-
munity issue that having been
reelected to the Knesset, his par-
liamentary immunity, though
lifted by the previous Knesset,
should be considered as automa-
tically restored. In order to try
him, therefore, the state prosecu-
sion must once again request the
(new) Knesset to lift his immuni-
ty-
*

Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL Reform
400 S. Pasadena Ave., St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi David
Susskind Rabbi Robert Kirzner Sabbath Services: Friday evening
at 8 p.m. Tel. 347-6136.
Congregation BETH SHALOM-Conservative
1844 54 St. S., St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi Sidney Lubin Sabbath
Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9:00 a.m. Tel. 321-
3380.
Congregation B'NAI ISRAEL-Conservative
301 59 Sf N., St. Petersburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Luski Sabbath
Services: Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.: Sunday 9 a.m
Monday-Friday 8 a.m.: and evening Minyan Tel. 381-4900,381-4901
CONGREGATION BETH CHAl-Conservative
8400 125 St. N., Seminole 33542 Rabbi Hsrman Kirshner Sabbath
Services: Friday evenings 8 p.m.: Saturday, 9:30 a.m. Tel. 393-5525.
5525.
CONGREGATION BETH SHALOM Conservative
1325 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Peter Mehler Sab-
bath Services: Friday evening 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m., Sunday morn-
ing Minyan 9 a.m. Tel. 531-1418..
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL Reform
865 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Arthur
Baseman Sabbath Services: Friday evening at 8 p m Saturday
10:30 a.m. Tel.531-5829
TEMPLE AHAVAT SHALOM-Reform
P.O. Box 1096. Dunedin 33528 Rabbi Jan Bresky Sabbath Ser
vices: Friday evening 8 p.m. Tel. 734-9428.
S1
They Represent 'Struggle'
France Wants PLO Invited
ByYIZHAKRABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) French Foreign
Minister Claude Cheysson
has called for the inclusion
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization in the Middle
East peace negotiations.
He reiterated the French
position at a crowded press
conference and afterwards
in his address to the UN
General Assembly.
Replying to questions at the
press conference, Cheysson said
"of course" when asked if his
government still believes the
PLO should be associated with
the peace process.
The PLO, he said, "represents
the fight, the struggle of the
Palestinian people" and as such
should be part of the negotia-
tions. At the same time, how-
ever, Cheysson emphasized that
his government has never recog-
nized the PLO as being the sole
representative of the Palestinian
people.
THE FRENCH diplomat said
that any final Middle East peace
agreement should be left to the
Arabs and Israelis themselves.
Asked about the Saudi Arabian
peace plan proposed by Crown
Prince Fahd last month, Cheys-
son said Fahd's statements re-
present "a remarkable progress."
He added, however, that the
statement failed to mention
"selfdetermination" which is an
important aspect of any Middle
East settlement as far as France
is concerned.
Cheysson said that after Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand of
France visited Saudi Arabia
several weeks ago, now more
than ever he believes the Saudi
peace initiative might come to at-
tention once again.
The French Foreign Minister
was pessimistic about the situa-
tion in Lebanon which he said
was extremely grave to the point
of being "unbearable." He ob-
served that Lebanon has "almost
disappeared as a nation and as a
state." He stressed the need for a
peaceful solution to the Lebanese
crisis, which, he said, could be
found only by the parties in-
volved. He said that France
would participate in any plan to
bring peace to Lebanon if asked
to do so by the parties or by the
UN.
IN HIS SPEECH to the
General Assembly, Cheysson
addressed the Middle East pro-
blem in more general terms, de-
claring that "negotiation involv-
ing all of the parties concerned is
the only acceptable means" for
reaching a settlement in the re-
gion. He also warned that "Vio-
lation of the resolutions of this
organization (UN) is not the way
to ensure the necessary security
for the countries, for all the coun-
tries in the Middle East, in-
cluding Israel. War is not the
way the peoples of this region, all
the peoples, including the
Palestinian people, will achieve
their rights recognized, including
the right to a homeland and a
state," he said.
Cheysson declared that "Jus-
tice for people, security for
states, respect for international
decisions, negotiations these
are the principles that will guide
France in the position it takes in
the Middle East and throughout
the world."
The General Assembly was
addressed by the Argentine
Foreign Minister, Oscar Cami-
lion, and Foreign Minister Sunao
Sonoda of Japan. Camilion said
that one of the most serious cases
of insecurity is the persistent de-
lay in resolving the Palestinian
problem
HE ALSO noted that Israel's
occupation of territory since the
.1967 war, its bombing of Iraq's
nuclear installation last June and
the recent attack on a synagogue
in Vienna are all part of the same
problems.
Sonoda said peace in the Mid-
dle East would be achieved
through implementation of Secu-
rity Council Resolution 242 and
338 and the recognition of the
rights of the Palestinian people,
including the right to self-deter-
mination. He also said that it is
necessary for a solution that
Israel recognize the right of tfc.
Palestinian people to 8etf- minatkra and the Palestinians?:
cogrme Israel's right to exist.
The Foreign Ministers of W<
Germany and Italy. Hans rS
the West European approach to!
solution of the Middle East *
flict, have called for mutualt
cognition between Israel and the
Palestinians. *
GENSCHER, addressing the
General Assembly, said, "We
have a vital interest of our own in
a lasting comprehensive and
equitable peace in the Middle
East. Israel's right to live within
secure and recognized boundaries
is just as indespensible for such a
peace as recognition of the right
of self-determination of the
Palestinian people," he said
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Many families who own cemetery property
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"Jewish Owned And Operated"


J Friday, October 23,1981
*,
_____ The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
PKll

Reagan Bemoans Loss of Sadat
Jewish Leaders Join President in Expressions of Sadness
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
U^A) President
Reagan, praising
the late
oyptian"President Anwar
Sadat as a "humanitarian
unafraid to make peace,"
said that the American
bring peace to the world. He
noted that Sadat was "admired
and loved" by the American peo-
ple.
Just a few minutes before the
President's nationally-televised
appearance, Egyptian Ambassa-
dor Ashraf Ghorbal appeared in
front of his Embassy here con-
neople were "horrified" by firming Sadat's death and de-
JhP "cowardly" murder of daring that Egypt would conti-
nue to follow Sadat's path under
the Egyptian President.
"America has lost a close
friend, the world has lost a great
statesman, mankind has lost a
champion of peace, "Reagan de-
dared as he appeared on the
north portico of the White House
accompanied by his wife, Nancy.
THE PRESIDENT did not
make a statement until it was
officially announced in Cairo by
Vice President Hosni Mubarak.
the "leadership" of Mubarak.
Ghorbel said Egypt would ful-
fill "its international obligations"
and will continue to involve
themselves in the Camp David
peace process working in close
partnership with the U.S.
American Jewish leaders,
meanwhile, expressed grief and
shock at the assassination of the
Egyptian leader. Maynard
Wishner, president of the Ameri-
KeaKan also praised Sadat as a can Jewish Committee, said that
ni,,n | courage" who sought to "with the rest of the world, we
Community Calendar
Monday, Oct. 26
Senior Friendship Club, JCC Board Meeting, 12:30 p.m., Regular
Meeting, 1 -4 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 27
B'nai B'rith Women, Clearwater, Meeting, 8 p.m. Sisterhood,
B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg, Board Meeting, 12:30 p.m.
Sisterhood, Beth Shalom, Gulfport, Paid Up Membership Lun-
cheon Sisterhood. Beth Shalom, Clearwater, Paid Up Mem-
bership 11.30 a.m. B'nai B'rith Men, St. Pete, Meeting.
Wednesday, Oct. 28
Congregation Beth Shalom, Clearwater, Board Meeting, 8 p.m.,
Social Club, 1 p.m., Mens Club Board Meeting, 7 p.m. Adult
Educotion Lecture, 8 p.m. and Hebrew High School, 7-9 p.m.,
B'nai Israel, St. Pete NCJW, Afternoon Chapter, Meeting, 12
noon Hadassah, Clearwater-Safety Harbor Chapter, Meeting
Hadossah, Aviva Chapter, Board Meeting Hadassah, Aliyah
Chapter, Board Meeting, 10 a.m. Hadassah, Shalom Chapter,
Board Meeting, 10:30 a.m., Regular Meeting, 12:30 p.m.
Hadassah, Shoshana Group, Regular Meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 29
Senior Friendship Club JCC. Birthday and Anniversary Party, 1-4
p.m. Adult Education, B'nai Israel, St. Pete, 8-10 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 30
Sisterhood, B'nai Israel, St. Pete, Anniversary Shabbat.
Saturday, Oct. 31
B'nai B'rith Women, Clearwater, Halloween Party Hadassah.
Clearwater-Safety Harbor Chapter, Art Auction, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday,Nov. 1
Temple B'nai Israel, St. Pete, Israel Bond Breakfast Temple
Beth El, St. Pete, Israel Bond Dinner USY, Beth Shalom,
Clearwater, 7 p.m. Mens Club, Beth Shalom, Clearwater,
Breakfast Meeting, 9:30 a.m. Mens Club, Beth Shalom, Gulf-
port, Breakfast, 10 a.m.
Monday, Nov. 2
Senior Friendship Club, JCC Meeting, 1-4 p.m. ORT, West Wind
Chapter, Board Meeting, 1 p.m. Beth Shalom, Gulfport, Board
Meeting. 7:30 p.m. ORT, Clearwater Evening Chapter,
Meeting, 7:30p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 3
Sisterhood, B'nai Israel, St. Pete, Meeting,
Afternoon Chapter, Board Meeting, 1 p.m.
Shalom, Clearwater, Meeting, 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 4
Suncoast Social Club, Beth Shalom, Clearwater, 1 p.m.
Sisterhood, Beth Chai, Board Meeting, 8 p.m. s'sorod;
Temple Beth El, Luncheon Brotherhood, Temple Beth El, Board
Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Hebrew High School, B'nai Israel, St. Pete,
7-9 p.m. Hadassah. Clearwater-Safety Harbor, Board Meetmg
9:30 a.m. Hadassah, Aviva, Board Meeting, 10:30 a.m.
Hodassah, Shoshana, Board Meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Tkorsdoy, Nov. S
Senior Friendship Club, JCC, 1-4 p.m. NCJW, Suncoast Board
Meeting, 9:45 a.m. ORT Evening, Board Meeting Adult
Education, B'nai Israel, St. Pete ,8-10 p.m.
today, Nov. 6
ORT, Pinellas Suncoast Morning Chapter, Meeting, 10 a.m.
ORT, West Wind, Garage Sale.
^urday, Nov. 7
Temple Beth El Social Club ORT, West Wind. Garage Sale.
Sunday,Nov. 8
USY, Beth Shalom,
Shalom
12:30 p.m. ORT,
Sisterhood, Beth
Cl
Gulfport,
Clearwater, 7
Rummage Sale
D m Sisterhood. Beth
Sisterhood, B'nai Israel,
earwater, Flea Market, 12 noon
^arwater, Flea Market, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
. Sisterhood, Beth Shalom,
moum the death of a man of
courage and peace. We condemn
those responsible for this
dastardly act of assassination, the
tragic consequences of which can
only be to further destabilize the
Middle East."
HENRY SIEGMAN, execu-
tive director of the American
Jewish Congress, said he hoped
the United States would "fully
absorb the implications of this
latest evidence of the tragic in-
stability endemic" to the Mideast
and that "we pray that the pro-
gress" toward peace between
Egypt and Israel "will not be un-
done" and will remain Sadat's
"great legacy" to Egypt and to
the world.
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman
of the World Zionist Organiza-
tion American section, called
the assassination a "catastrophe,"
praising "the influence and
example of this brave leader and
farsighted seeker of peace." She
said the killing was "a gun-punc-
tuated reminder" of a region
"where the fate of nations hangs
on the trigger finger of the
assassin."
Maxwell Greenberg, chairman
of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, said Sadat "pur-
sued" peace vigorously until he
was "cut down by terrorists
whose very act underscores the
destructivess of hate and the
fragility of peace." He urged, in
addition to suitable mourning,
dedication "to the eradication of
terrorism."
JACK SPITZER, president of
B'nai B'rith International, de-
scribed Sadat as "a singular fi-
gure" who had the courage and
vision to seek peace with Israel
"and to continue on that path de-
spite enormous opposition
throughout the Arab world."
Spitzer said "We can only hope
that President Sadat's successor
will honor his memory and his
dream by continuing to build the
structure of peace" that he
began.
Edgar Bronfman, president of
the World Jewish Congress, in a
telegram to the Egyptian Am-
bassador to the U.S., Ashraf
Ghorbal, said the death of Sadat
"is a loss to the world of a great
statesman and a man of incre-
dible vision and bravery."
Shirley Leviton, president of
the National Council of Jewish
Women, said Sadat's "action
brought a ray of hope into efforts
to achieve peace in the Middle
East." She added that his death
'is a matter of grave concern to
all peace loving people."
Frieda Lewis, president of
Hadassah, described the slain
Egyptian President as "a noble
and courageous leader of his peo-
ple who chose to pursue the path
of peace regardless of the risks
and the obstacles, because he
kept before him the vision of a
better world for all people."
MORTON MANDEL, presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish Fe-
derations, said that the Jewish
Federations of North America
"have always dreamt of a time
when Israel would trulv be free of
the threat of war and instead
could cultivate the pursuits of
oeace. President Sadat ui his
Sorts helped move that dream
closer to reality.'
Joseph Tabachnik, president of
the Chicago Board of Rabbis,
called Sadat "a great world
leader. His words, 'no more war .
rang out with prophetic force as
he signed the Camp David ac-
cords We pray that the Egyptian
P^ple andI the Israelis wUl conti-
nue the peace proceas which wiU
serve aslamemmorialto this great
leader."
Rabbi Joseph Sternstein, pre-
sident of the American Zionist
Federation, said the "tragic
assassination" highlighted the
"fragility" of international pacts
in the context of autocratic re-
gimes, adding that Sadat "will be
remembered as a man of peace."
Harold Jacobs, president of the
National Council of Young Israel,
said "Once again, the forces of
violence and terrorism" have cut
down "another Arab friend of the
United States. He expressed
hope the murder would not un-
dermine the Camp David ac-
cords.
RABBI SOL ROTH, president
of the Rabbinical Council of
America, called Sadat "a great
statesmen" who made "a pri-
mary contribution to the cause of
peace in the Middle East."
Calling the assassination "a ter-
rible shock," he said he hope and
prayed "this terrible act" will not
affect the peace process but
will bring the nations of the area
closer" to the goals of peace.
Ivan Novick, president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
called Sadat "an extraordinary
example of Arab moderation" by
his acceptance of the reality of
Israel. Novick said the Un ed
States must understand that if a
strong nation like Egypt "can be
threatened by fanatic terrorist
elements," the United States
must "exercise extreme caution
before relying on less stable and
more vulnerable nations, such as
Saudi Arabia."
Howard Squadron, chairman
of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, said the murder was that
of "a man of peace, courage and
vision," embodying "the spirit of
reconciliation and rapprochement
among nations."
Rabbi William Berkowitz, pre-
sident of the Jewish National
Fund, said the "shocking death"
dramatized "how fragile" the
peace is between Egypt and
Israel. He said "now the whole
world is wondering if Egypt" will
continue in the path of peace and
reconciliation begun "heroically"
by Sadat.
Rabbi Benjamin K re it man,
United Synagogue of America
executive vice president, said it
was hoped that those who take on
the mantle of Sadat's leadership
"will follow in his footsteps and
seek to carry on" the peace
process he started.
A SIMILAR HOPE that
Sadat's successors would "conti-
nue in the courageous paths to
peace" initiated by Sadat was ex-
pressed by the American Profes-
sors for Peace in the Middle East.
Roselle Silberstein, president
of American Mizrachi Women,
said Sadat's assassination "is a
global tragedy" and that his
death "puts the entire Middle
East into a new perspective." She
added that "We will pray to see
Mr. Sadat's dream of peace ful-
filled. Only then can his death be
given meaning.
Nathan Peskin, executive
director of The Workmen's Cir-
cle, said Sadat's assassination "is
particularly regrettable in view of
his stabilizing influence in the
Middle East, in world affairs and
as a statesman whose guiding
hand will be missed."
Julius Berman, president of
the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America, said
the Orthodox Jewish community
"is shocked and saddened that
the hands of ungodly and un-
disciplined men of violence have
felled one of the great architects
and champions of world peace."
Berman added that Sadat "was a
daring and courageous statesman
of unusual courage and stature
who stood as a wall against the
forces of nihilism and darkness."
Donald Slaiman, president of
the Jewish Labor Committee,
called the assassination of Sadat
"a tragic loss for the cause of
peace and underscores that those
who appease terrorism are under-
mining the survival or organized
society."
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___________


V, >
s.
Fagel2
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, Octob
er 23.K
Congregations / Organizations Events
L


Convention delegates left to right Roberta Frankel Chairwoman,
executive committee; Susan Bummer President, Tampa Bay Re-
gion; Susan Kanengisir delegate. Bay Horizons Chapter; Joannah
Barat delegate, Tampa Chapter.
26thBienniell
Convention
Representatives from the
Tampa Bay Region; of ORT will
be attending the 26th Bienniel
Convention Oct. 26-29 in New
York City. All delegates to ORT
are invited to attend. For infor-
mation, call 586-4961.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
Hebrew Literacy Campaign
The Adult Education Commis-
sion of Congregation B'nai Israel,
St. Petersburg, is launching a
massive Hebrew Literacy Cam-
paign this month. The intent is to
train every congregant and in-
terested outsider, unable to
actually read the Friday night
service, to do so. The program is
based upon an innovative text b>
Rabbi Noah Golinkin of Arling
ton, Virginia titled Shalom
Aleichem. In this book, the text
of the standard Friday night
service is presented in conjunc-
tion with short, challenging pro-
nunciation drills drawn from ele-
ments of the text. There is im-
mediate application of new skills
in the next exercise fostering in-
stant satisfaction and success.
Mastery of the service and of
basic reading skills is achieved
after twelve sessions.
At least ten weekly sections of
the course are being scheduled
during convenient morning,
afternoon and evening hours.
This should allow even the busi-
est of people to enroll, as well as
to make up or review sessions.
Each section will meet once a
week for twelve weeks beginning
in November.. Class size will be
limited to ten for optimum effec-
tiveness. Interested non-congre-
gants may take the course for a
fee of $17 including textbook. Re-
gistration will take place at 7:30
on Wednesday, Oct. 28, but pro-
spective students may place their
names on class lists previous to
chat date by calling the synago-
gue office at 381-4900.
Nearly a hundred congregants
have pre-registered for the
course. It is hoped that that
many or more will participate in a
group led service and graduation
ceremony in February. If you
have never learned to read
Hebrew, have learned and could
use improvement or have learned
a lot and have forgotten as much,
consider joining them.
Adult Education
On Wednesday evening, Oct.
28, the Adult Education Com-
. Mission of Congregation B'nai
trael. St. Petersburg, will kick
ff its 8 '. '82 program with a lec-
ire by noted American Jewish
stu Dr. Stanley Feldstein.
,)r. Feldstein, a New York City
itivc with a Ph.D. from New
York University, teaches at The
New School for Social Research
Nt York and is the author of
he acclaimed book, The Land
hat I Show You Three Cen-
iriss of Jewish Life in America.
soc hi orian with broad in-
rests and unusual narrative
>ility, he has written other sue
ssfull books on racial prejudice
id ethnic identity. His lecture,
.tied "It Didn't Start With Ellis
land." promises to be stimulat-
ing and amusing. The public, of
course, is invited to hear him free
of charge at 8 p.m. on the 28 in
the B'nai Israel sanctuary. He
has been made available to the
community through the JWB
Lecture Bureau.
Dr. Feldstein's lecture will in-
troduce a topic to be pursued in a
mini-course called The American
Jewish Experience scheduled to
meet on six Wednesday nights
from Nov. 4-Dec.l6. A more de-
tailed investigation of American
Jewish social history will be con-
ducted with the help of audio-vi-
sual materials and slides from
The American Jewish Historical
Society and printed materials
from the Unviersity of South
Florida. Dr. Samuel Proctor, a
Southern historian at the Univer-
sity of Florida, will speak on Dec.
16 about Florida's Jewish his-
tory. A showing of the film Bye
Bye Braverman on Dec. 23 will
cap the series of events. Instruc-
tors will be Daniel Epstein, direc-
tor of honors English at Lake-
wood High School, and his wife
Joan, a professor at Eckerd
College.
Two other mini-courses will
follow this first one. Rabbi Jacob
Luski will present a course on
Conservative Judaism from Jan.
6-Feb. 10. Efforts are under way
to engage noted religion profes-
sor Theodore Gaster as a kick-off
speaker for that course. Jewish
Mysticism will be the title of a
third course to run from March 3-
March 31. Guest lectures by Dr.
William Heim of USF and by
local Chasidic authorities will
constitute the bulk of that
course.
Registration for these courses
as well as for Hebrew literacy
classes and a Yiddish Vinkle will
take place in the synagogue
lobby at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday,
Oct. 28, preceding Stanley Feld-
stein's lecture. The cost to non-
congregants for the three mini-
courses and or membership in the
Yiddish Vinkle will be $20. The
Hebrew literacy program is of-
fered at a cost of $17 to non-
members.
B'NAI B'RITH
Dinner Meeting
After a most successful dinner
meeting, B'nai B'rith Clearwater
Lodge No. 2603 is planning an in-
formative and thought provoking
evening on Tuesday, Oct. 27 that
nobody should miss.
The Nov. meeting, under the
chairmanship of Elihu Herman,
the ADL chairman, will be held
on Nov. 10. This program is a
must for the entire Jewish com-
munity. Mark your calendar. The
place -Golda Meir Center, 302 S.
Jupiter Ave., Clearwater, the
dates; Tuesday, Oct. 27 and
Tuesday, Nov. 10, the time8
p.m. For more information,
please call Ben Lefitz at 585-5863.
ORT
Slave Auction
The Clearwater Chapter of
Women's American ORT, the
giant international school system
embracing five continents that
frees people from dependence on
charity is having a Slave Auc-
tion. It is sponsored by Clear-
water ORT. This Slave Auction
will be held on Saturday, Oct. 24
at 7:30 p.m. It will be held at Bill
Irle's Restaurant 1310 N. Fort
Harrison Ave. Admission is $9
per person.
If interested, call 784-5504.
Membership Tea
Clearwater Chapter of
Women's American ORT will be
holding a Membership Tea on
Monday, Oct. 26 at 7:30 p.m. If
interested in joining a group that
helps people help themselves, call
461-1873 or 577-0768 or 725-3462.
HADASSAH
Golda Meir Chapter
The Golda Meir Chaptei
)f Hadassah will hold its Paid
Jp Membership Luncheon on
Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 12 at
Upham Hall, 7701 Boca Ciega
Dr., St. Petersburg. Guests and
prospective members are wel-
come and may pay at the door.
General Meeting
The Clearwater-Safety Harbor
Chapter of Hadassah will hold
their general meeting on Wed-
nesday, Oct. 28 at 12 noon at
Freedom Federal Saving and
Loan (North side of East Bay
Dr.) between Keene and High-
land.
At this meeting we will have
the opportunity of meeting Rabbi
and Mrs. Sherman Kirshner.
Rabbi Kirshner is the new spiri-
tual leader of Congregation Beth
Chai, Seminole.
Rabbi Kirshner will be
speaking on a topic of interest to
all Hadassah women. Please plan
to attend. For further informa-
tion please contact Jean Malkin,
Program Chairman, 397-4429.
Evening Meeting
The Clearwater-Safety Harbor
Hadassah will hold an evening
meeting at Top Of The World
Condominium, Auditorium 1 and
2, on Wednesday, Nov. 11 at 7:30
p.m. The speaker will be Edith
Zamost, National Vice President
of Hadassah.
Edith Zamost is currently Co-
ordnator of Hadassah Services.
She was the co-Chairman of
Hadassah's 1978-79 and 1979-80
National Conventions. Her previ-
ous national portfolios were
chairman for Membership,
Leadership Development and
Fundraising for Youth Activities.
Mrs. Zamost was president of the
Southern New Jersey Region and
the New Brunswick Chapter. She
entered Jewish organization life
in 1948 and has visited Israel
many times.
Along with her many years of
devoted service to Israel, Mrs.
Zamost is active in other Jewish
community affairs. She has been
an officer of the YMH A Women's
Division and was Chairman of
Women's Division of the UJA in
her area.
In addition to her volunteer
services, she has been a profes-
sional pianist and singer, appear-
ing with such orchestras as the
New York Philharmonic
Orchestra as a piano soloist and
has conducted her Temple choir
for twelve years.
Mrs. Zamost was a Hadassah
delegate to the 29th World Con
gress held in Jerusalem in Febru-
ary, 1978 when she was elected
Hadassah deputy to the Zionist
General Council of the World
Zionist Organization.
For additional information,
please contact Jean Malkin, Pro-
gram Chairman 397-4429.
BETH SHALOM
Mens Club
The first breakfast meeting of
the season sponsored by the
Mens Club of Congregation Beth
Shalom, Gulfport, will be held at
the synagogue on Sunday, Nov. 1
at 10 a.m. Lawrence Wasser,
director of the Jewish National
Fund will be the guest speaker
and will talk on the "Development
of Israel." A film will also oe
shown.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Breakfast Forum
Sunday morning, Oct. 25 the
first breakfast forum will feature
a talk by Oded Ben Chur, an offi-
cial representative of the Israeli
Consul Generals office in
Atlanta. He will speak on "Thei
Middle East and Israels Pro-
blems." Fee is $2.50 for Temple
members and guests. Monday
evening, Nov. 2 at 7:30p.m.
Brotherhood members and
guests are invited to hear Jack
Ford ham speak on "Social Se-
curity." Refreshments will fol-
low. Non-members and guests, $1
Sunday monring, Nov. 29 at 10
a.m. Marc Perkins will speak
about the Anti-Defamation
League How it Handles
Problems It Faces." Fee is $2.50.
Breakfast will be served.
Musical Entertainment
A series of four concerts in the
sanctuary of Temple Beth-El,
sponsored by the Sisterhood and
Brotherhood, will be initiated
Monday evening, October 26, by
David Syme, brilliant piano vir-
tuoso. Internationally acclaimed
by audiences and critics he has
made triumphant appearances all
over America and Europe.
On Monday evening, February
22, 1982, the St. Petersburg
Opera Company's Workshop,
starring lyric soprano Rosaline
Posno and other opera stars will
make its fifth annual appearance
at Temple Beth-El. A full chorus
will feature light opera, show
tunes, and operatic selections.
On Wednesday evening, March
17, 1982, Thomas Palmer, vi-
brant premiere baritone will
make his appearance. His suc-
cessful operatic career was culmi-
nated with his debut at the
Metropolitan Opera as Silvio in
Pagliacci. Palmer has distin-
guished himself with outstanding
opera companies, in films, and
television.
Sunday evening, April 4, 1982,
Cantor Harold Orbach, a lyric
tenor, will sing a varied reper-
toire. He has scored triumphs all
over America and gave the first
performance of a Jazz Service in a
Synagogue. He is Cantor of Tem-
ple Israel in Detroit.
Subscription prices for the four
concerts are $20 per person or
tickets may be purchased singly
for $6 per person for each concert.
For tickets call Irving Finkel-
stein at 381-5231 or the Temple
office. Sylvia Danto is Chairman
of the Concert Series.
Brotherhood News
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth-El, 400 Pasadena Ave.,
South, announced the opening of
its autumn season on Monday
evening, Oct. 5, for Brotherhood
members and their spouses.
Jack Larrison, prominent tax
expert, spoke on tax changes be-
ing phased in the next four years
and the dramatic changes in fi-
nancial and estate planning for
individuals and how it may be
possible for taxpayers to keep
more of what they've got. There
was a question and answer
period, followed by refreshments.
The first of Sunday morning
breakfasts will take place Oct. 25,
10 a.m. in Rothman Social Hall.
There will be a talk by an official
representative of the Israeli Con-
sul General's office in Atlanta,
Obed Ben Chur. His topic will be
The Middle East and Israel's
Problems. A question and answer
period will follow.
The breakfast menu will be a-
la-Abe Olansky. A donation of
$2.50 each for Temple members
and guests is requested.
Speak to Members
and Spouses
Jack Fordham, manager of St.
Petersburg's Social S urity of-
fice will speak to Brotherhood
members and their spouses at
Temple Beth-El, 400 Pasadena
Ave. S., on Monday evening,
Nov. 2, 7:30 p.m.
Fordham is well versed to
phases of Social Security andi
discuss the newest regulatio
There will be a question and,
swer period followed by reft-
ments.
Fordham is a florida native a
resides in St. Petersburg with]
wife and family. Prior to his agf
ciation with the Social Secu3
Administration in 1973, he 1
worked in law enforcement at I
municipal'state and federal U
and since 1979 has managed
St. Petersburg Social Sect
Office.
ABE ADER POST JWV I
Hears James Stern
James Stern of HolywJ
Fla., will be the guest speakej
the Sunday Morning Break]
Social sponsored by thei
Ader Post 246, JWV on OctJ
at the Jewish Community Cei
8167 Elbow La., N., St. Pet
burg. The meeting will begU
9:30 a.m. and breakfast wil
served. The fee is $2. Prool
will go to the Veterans BuilJ
Fund. The public is invited
tend.
Mr. Stern has been a meii
of the Jewish War Veteran!
36 years, and is a prom^
speaker on its affairs. He
all offices of his post.
Miami 223, all offices of the]
partment of Florida, and s
the former unit known as
fourth Region of
United States, as judge adv^
and commander. He is prea
a member of the national
tive committee, and the
committee. He is a membtf'
Wm. Kretchman Post 730 inl
Lauderdale.
Monthly breakfast
With the resumption o[
monthly breakfasts served 1
Abe Ader post No. 246. Jj
War veterans at the Jewish|
munity Center at Elbow
North, St. Petersburg on Sj|
Sept. 26, we were again inc
to our Chairman of
Speakers, Morris Watnicl
despite the fact that he
covering from a very
operation, managed to
Bruce Tyndall, Chairman
Board of County Cor
sioners, to be our speaker.
Force veteran, graduate
University of Florida, anc
dent of St. Petersburg fo
past 33 years, Mr. Tyndal
vered a very interesting ad
formative talk not only oj
coming election, but on sul
vital to both home ownerjj
apartment dwellers as well
explanation of the planned [
disposal unit was inform
and to the point, as wer
views in regard to the dra
system. All in all it was a|
enjoyable morning.
NCJW
Business Meeting
The October business me
of NCJW, St. Petersburg,
on Wednesday. Oct. 28 JCC Elbow LA. N., at 12 T
cal Awareness" is the topic"
program.
This is the annual Menibe
social. Please bring a browi|
lunch. Dessert and beverag
be served. Bring donatiorj
baked goods or a specialty t|
home made for the annual
sale. This will benefit toil
Ways and Means.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAI
Clearwater Friendship<''
Clearwater Friendship
held a paid up luncheon Oct.
the Temple in the Social
Chairpersons for the affairI
Lisl Stern and Ruth Dunir.t: |
On Oct. 22, there Wi
meeting and the raguli
meeting will be on i'.
for a talk by speakers of CnJ
Markers are scheduled
12. Marvyn Stern if
the club.


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Friday, October 23,]
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Mubarak and Begin
Will Pursue Peace
Egypt's new President Hosni Mubarak, elected in a one-candidate national referen-
dum on Tuesday, promised Prime Minister Menachem Begin to visit Israel in the near
future, according to a report by ABC-TV's Barbara Walters. Both men believe that
such a visit would strengthen in the eyes of the world Egypt and Israel's determination
to continue forward with the peace process as set forth by Begin and the late President
Sadat in the treaty of peace between the two countries signed in March, 1979.
Prime Minister Begin last
weekjwalkedthe half-mile from his
hotel to the funeral of President
Sadat, who was assassinated on
Oct. 6 in a reviewing stand as
part of a national Egyptian holi-
day celebrating Sadat's laun-
ching of the Yom Kippur War in
1973. Begin refused to ride in
order not to violate the Sabbath.
EARLIER, Begin was among
the first of the foreign dignitaries
whom Mubarak met at his home
outside of Cairo. They embraced
immediately upon meeting, and
Mubarak reassured Begin of
Egypt's intention to pursue
Sadat's peace policy with Israel.
The Associated Press reported
from Cairo the statement by an
unnamed high-ranking Israeli
source who said following Begins
40-minute meeting with Mubarak
that "Mubarak was very close to
President Sadat, and shares his
view on many issues that affect
relations between Egypt and
Israel. We have full confidence
that his reassurances are sin-
cere."
Mubarak, who greeted Begin
and his delegation at his two-
story villa in Helipolis, told
Begin, "It was so fast. So very
quick," when Begin asked him,
"How did it happen, how?"
IN THE Begin party were
Israel's Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon, Foreign Minister Yitz-
hak Shamir and Interior Minister
Yosef Burg.
Later, Begin went with his
party to visit Sadat's widow,
Jinan. They kissed, and Mrs.
Sadat burst into tears. After
their 45-minute meeting, Begin
declared: "At this time of sad-
ness to Mrs. Sadat, to the chil-
dren, the President-elect, the
government and the people of
Egypt, we mortals can not find
words to console you (Mrs.
Sadat). May God Almighty con-
sole all of you."
AT THE funeral Saturday,
banners strung across streets de-
clared, "The march of Sadat will
continue, the heads of the assas-
sins will never stop it." Ordinary
Egyptian citizens were barred
from attending the funeral, with
security forces walling in the
s. me 1,000 diplomats from
virious countries abroad, in-
cluding Prince Charles of En-
gland.
Prime Minister Begin was seen
during the ceremonies standing
next to former French President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing, whose
pro-Arab policies caused a rapid
freeze between France and Israel.
Most Arab leaders 'stayed away,
except tor representatives trom
Oman and Sudan. European
leaders were also noticeably ab-
sent.
The American delegation was
headed by Secretary of State
Alexander Haig and included for-
mer Presidents Jimmy Carter,
Gerald Ford and Richard Nixon.
Also in the delegation was former
Secretary of State Henry Kissin-
ger under Presidents Nixon and
Ford. President I Reagan stayed at
home, obeying the stem advice of
American security agents.
THE ATMOSPHERE in Cairo
was tense. President Sadat's
assassination had been greeted
with dancing in the streets of Tri-
poli in Libya, and in the Palesti-
nian area of Beirut, Lebanon.
Libya's Col. Qaddafi issued a
statement that Sadat had "lived
like a Jew and died like a Jew."
An exiled Egyptian leader, for-
mer Gen. Saadeddin Shazli,
almost immediately upon Sadat's
assassination took responsibility
for the murder in the name of
Egyptian Liberation Organiza-
tion.
He warned that if President
Mubarak continued the policies
of President Sadat, he would suf-
fer a similar fate.
But Egyptian police said that
the assassination was engineered
by Egyptian First Lt. Khaled
Ahmed Shawky el-Istambouli.
whose brother was one of more
than 1,500 anti-Sadat enemies
imprisoned by Sadat in Septem-
ber. An official report said that
Istambouli had been "blinded by
black hatred" and that he
smuggled three civilians into an
army truck in the annual parade
commemorating the Yom Kippur
War, who attacked Sadat wben
the truck was made to "stall" be-
fore Sadat's reviewing stand.
FORMER PRESIDENT Ford,
on his arrival in Cairo, said that
"The American people looked
upon him (Sadat) as a beautiful
man." Former President' Carter
said of Sadat that he was "like a
hero" to the American people.
Both men returned to the
United States after the funeral.
Former President Nixon went on
to Saudi Arabia on a "private
visit," although it was under-
stood that he had gone there to
reassure the Saudis about the de-
bate outcome over the AWACS
in the Senate.
Secretary of State Haig stayed
on in Cairo and Sunday revealed
that the United States would
accelerate U.S. military supplies'
Chatter Box
GLADYS OSHER 866-2007
Suncoast resident Regina Land lived in Israel during the'
thirties when it was still called Palestine. Now she is catching up i
on her Hebrew with her grand children who have visited modem
Israel courtesy of their parents, Dr. and Mrs. Michael Sloanka,
. New arrival to the Suncoast Lola Hall returned to college to j
pursue a degree in social work after raising six children. While
working toward her goal, she had jobs as a registrar, credential
analyst, and Red Cross recruiter. She once visited her daughter
Lynoe Scrap, who was a Playboy bunny at the Playboy mansion
in Chicago, but stayed only a short time because Hugh Hefner,
ever the eccentric, had the elevator to the sleeping quarters re-
moved and there was a four flight walk up Baa Rose wrote a
great poem about her talented daughter and it was published in
the Gulfport Oabbtr. Like mother, ike daughter. Some more [
recent arrivals to Pinellas are Easily and Sam Gordon, originally
from Chicago. Sams vocation was always music, and now that '
he has the time, he is playing the bassoon with the Clearwater
Bank and the Suncoast Symphonic Band, as well as teaching
music Mar*/ Ton to Rabbi and Mrs. Luski on the birth of
their daughter Rachel Esther, on September 16.
to Egypt and the Sudan. This
was precisely what President
Mubarak had hoped for when he
came to Washington for talks
with President Reagan just one
week before the assassination,
and where he was turned away
essentially empty-handed. The
assassination has apparently
worked a complete turnabout in
U.S. foreign policy in the Middle
East.
HAIG'S ANNOUNCEMENT
Sunday also included a statement
about large-scale joint military
exercises in Egypt in November,
and it was reported that the U.S.
has already sent teams to Egypt
and the Sudan as a "concrete
manifestation" of American sup
port to both. The Sudan is consi-
dered a likely objective of mili-
tary attack by Libya's Col.
Quaddafi because of the Sudan's
support of Egypt's Middle East
peace diplomacy.
"We're going to have to show
our presence here from time to
time," Haig declared shortly
after the Sudan government
charged on Sunday that Libyan
fighter planes had attacked two
Sudanese border villages killing
several people the previous
Thursday.
One of two U.S. State Depart-
ment teams, in conjunction with
Israel's Early Withdrawal Urged
CAIRO Secretary of State Alexander Haig
apparently echoed the sentiments of former Presf
dent Jimmy Carter here. He would like Israel to
accelerate its withdrawal date from the Sinai
Peninsula, which is due by agreement under the
Camp David accord in April, 1982.
The Haig request was made as a "gesture of
good will" that Israel could offer to prove its
commitment to the Egypt-Israel peace treaty now
that President Sadat has been killed.
"There is no room for any gestures," declared
Israel Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir, replying
to the Haig feeler. "I don't think what happened in
Egypt should bring anybody to put pressure on
Israel."
Haig hastened to assure both parties of his con-
fidence that Israel and Egypt would continue their
peace process.
teams from the Pentagon, were to
fly to the Sudan this week to
arrange for delivering some $100
million in arms to that country.
On the day of Sadat's funeral,
Haig had met with Sudanese
President Jaafar Numeiri to re-
veal the Reagan Administra-
tion's decision to deliver arms to
his country.
SPEAKING OF the proposed
joint military exercises with
Egypt, Haig said it would be
code-named "Bright Star," but
he insisted it had been planned
months before. He conceded,
however that the exercises would
be "modified and expanded" as a
result of President Sadat's
assassination. To be involved are
B52 bombers in simulation of air
strikes on Egyptian bombing
ranges.
Earlier Sunday, Haig warned
that "The United States intends
to work actively with our friends
in the region, and foremost
among these is the government of
Egypt and the people of Egypt,
for whom our friendship and r*
spect have been deepened by this
tragedy."
Haig's words brought immedi-
ate response jrom the Reagan
Administration in Washington
which was embarrassed by the
apparent slight to Israel. Asked
on CBS-TV's "Face the Nation"
about Haig's statement, Richard
Allen, Reagan's National
Security Adviser, declared that
"I'm sure, though I haven't seen
that particular remark, that the
Secretary of State was un-
doubtedly referring to our friends
among the Arab nations, among
the moderate Arab nations."
AND ON ABC-TVs Issues
and Answers," Reagan's coun-
selor, Edwin Meese, said: "Well,
Israel is one of our foremost
friends." He explained that what
Haig meant were the Arab na-
tions. "I think there is no ques-
tion that our special relationship
with Israel does have a particular
significance," he declared.
Syria Missiles Not 'Priority'
Habib Says He'll Go Back When Needed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Philip Habib,
President Reagan's special
envoy for the crisis in Leb-
anon, said he would not re-
turn to the Middle East un-
til the Arab League's spe-
cial committee has a chance
to continue its efforts to
solve the problem facing
Lebanon, both internal and
external. Habib also indi-
cated that the missiles
Syria has placed in Leba-
non are not a priority issue
for the United States.
"I think it is in the United
States interest, the interest of the
people of the region, that the pro-
cess of dealing with the complex-
ities of Lebanon go on," Habib
told several hundred people at
the 35th annual conference of the
Middle East Institute at the
Mayflower Hotel. He said that
the need now was to "consolidate
the gains" made in Lebanon and
to reduce the chances of another
crisis occurring.
HABIB, who had retired from
the State Department in 1978 as
Assistant Secretary of State for
Political Affairs, was sent to the
Mideast by Reagan last May
after Syria moved SAM-6 mis-
siles into Lebanon and Israel
threatened to remove them by
force.
The retired diplomat's remarks
came in response to a questioner
who asked about Premier Mena-
chem Begins statement on a tel-
evision program while he was in
the United States recently in
which the Premier said ha ex-
pected Habib to return to the
Middle East soon to get the mis-
siles removed. Habib replied that
he will return to the Mideast
when the President decides there
is "something for me do do."
Habib said that while the mis-
siles are still a major issue, at
least for the contending parties,
the major effort was to conso-
lidate the gains made by the
ceasefire across the Lebanese
border to solve Lebanon's many
internal and external problems.
HABIB, who was the keynote
speaker for the conference, called
for moving ahead swiftly on the
Mideast peace process. He said
the achievements of Camp David
were the beginning of the peace
process, not the end of it. "The
present stiuation is about as calm
as it is ever likely to be, short of a
comprehensive settlement," he
noted. He said this is why pro-
gress must be made to avoid any
new crisis from developing.
He said that the reason that all
sides agreed to the ceasefire
across the Lebanese border was
that they all realized that unless
they worked to "defuse the situa-
tion," they could undo all the
progress they had made.
Habib said that the United
States has a "unique" position
because it is the only major
power than can help bring peace
to the Middle East. He said the
Soviet Union could not do this.

Kosher Kitchen
Cookie enthusiasts will appreciate this recipe for an unusual
chocolate cookie.
CHOCOLATE CHEESE COOKIES
1 i Cups Sugar
11 Cup Butter
1 Cup Oil
3 oz. Cream Cheese
1 Egg Beaten
2 Tbsp. M ilk
1 Tsp Vanilla
'/. Tsp. Salt
2 (lox) Squares Unsweetened Chocolate
2 '/4 Cups Flour
I '/, Tap. Baking Powder
II Cup Chopped Walnuts
a HZ*"1 T to 38 ** Cream together sugar, butter,
oil and cream cheese Add egg, milk, vanilla and salt. Mix well.
Melt chocolate over hot water. Stir into batter. Sift together
flour and baking powder; add to batter little at a time. Stir in
nuts. Drop from a teaspoon onto araanj cookk shift Bake 12
mmutae.


.....


L October 23. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Page 9
Adult Education Programs Offered
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By LOUL ROSEN
(Chairman of the Committee on Adult Education of the Educa-
Committee of the Jewish Federation of Pinellas County).
The Education Committee of the Jewish Federation of Pinellas
County has announced the following schedule of Adult Education
Programs being offered throughout Pinellas County. It is hoped that
your interest will be stimulated by the broad view of intellectual, reli-
gious, and cultural activities being offered. For further information,
call any of the institutions listed. The Education Committee wishes
you and yours the best of all years in 5742.
Congregation B'nai Israel, St. Petersburg Adult Education:
llabbi Jacob Luski. 301 59 St. N., 381-4900-01.
Three mini-courses will be offered beginning in November as
follows?
Nov. 4Dec. 16
A. The American Jewish Experience A survey of American
Jewish social history from Colonial times to the present. Includes lec-
tures, audio-visual presentations, and a guest speaker. Instructors are
Daniel and Joan Epstein.
Jan. 6 Feb. 10
B. Conservative Judaism An investigation of the roots and
development of the Conservative movement. Lectures and guest pre-
sentation. Instructor isjiabbi Jacob Luski.
March 3 March 31
C. Jewish Mysticism A survey of mystical movements in Jew-
ish hisUpry. Area academicians will teach specific sessions according to
expertise.
All of these courses will meet on Wednesday wvenings from 8
9:30. Fee to congregants is tl 5 for three courses. Non-members pay an
additional $6.
Registration is Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. A social hour will
follow class meetings.
OTHER EVENTS
Speakers:
Oct 28 8 p.m. Dr. Stanley Feldstein, American Jewish historian;
Great Ideas Weekend. Feb. 6 7. Rabbi Yaakov Rosenberg, Amen
can; Jewish theological Seminary; Dec. 18 Sit Down Oneg
Shabbat. Rabbi Jacob Luski. "Ask The Rabbi ; March 12 Sit
Down Oneg Shabbat, Dr. Max Ben, Sciences Ins.
Films:
Dec. 23-8 p.m. "Bye Bye Braverman"; Feb. 17 8 p.m. "The
Dybbuk'; May 19-8 p.m. "the Fifth Horseman Was Fear.
HEBREW LITERACY CAMPAIGN
The Adult Education Commission will sponsor a Hebrew Literacy
program based on Rabbi Noah Golonkins book, "Shalom Aleichem,
m addition to regular course offerings. The hope is to oer tnornmg
afternoon, and evening sections most days of the week a total ot id
sections. The course consists of twelve two hour sessions held once a
week, beginning in November. The fee is $12 including text. Non-
members, $15.
Congregation Beth Sholom Adult Education
Rabbi Sidney Lubin 1844 54 St. S -, Gulfport 321-3380
Four classes will be offered as follows:
A. Beginning Hebrew Mondays, 10 12.
B. Intermediate Hebrew Mondays, 10 12.
C. Lecture Series Wednesday afternoons 2 -4 beginning in
November. A discussion will follow lectures.
D. Yiddish Group -Held on Saturday evenings, monthly. Begins
in November.
Refreshments follow all programs. There is no charge.
Congregation Beth Shalom
Rabbi Peter Mehler.1325 S. Belcher Rd., Clearwater 531-1418.
Two classes are offered.
A. Breakfast Forums Nov. 22. Arnold Bremen, Executive
Director of PACT. 10 a.m. Feb. 14, Irving Steinberg, JWV Post Com-
mander. 10 a.m.
B. Rabbis Adult Education Class Current Jewish Issues. First
and third Tuesday nights in month, November to April. 7:30 p.m.
C. Others to be announced.
Temple Ahavat Shalom
Rabbi Jan Bresky 2000 Main St. Dunedin 734-9428.
Adult Beginning Hebrew Learn to read and vocabulary. Mon-
days 1-2:30 p.m.
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER ADULT EDUCATION
The following classes are being offered at the JCC, 8167 Elbow
La. N., St. Petersburg 344-6795.
Dancerdse Thursdays. 7-8 p.m. 30 sessions $66 members,
$97.50 non-members. Instructor is Beth Resruck; Israeli Folk -
Tuesdays. 6 7 p.m. 15 sessions $35 members $60 non-members, JO
sessions $60 members $100 non members; Exercise For Pregnant
Women Monday and Wednesday. 10 -11 a.m. 15 session $45 mem-
bers $75 non-members, 30 sessions $75 members $125 non-members;
lezzerciae Wednesday and Friday 9:16- 10 a.m. 4 sessions $16
members and non-members; Arabics Tuesday and Thursday
9:1ft 10:16 am. 4 sessions $12 members and non-members; Aerobics
_ Tuesday and Thursday 67 p.m. 4 sessions $12 members and non-
members.
There is a one time registration fee of $10 for non-members.
Talmud Study Tuesday 1012 a.m. 8 sessions $2 members, $6
non-members. Began Sept. 8.
History of the Prophet. Tuesday. 10 -12 a.m. 8 sessions $2
members, $3 non-members.
Starts December 1
Yiddish Tuesday, 1012 a.m. 8 session $2 members. $3 non-
members. Starts Feb. 2; Bible Study Tuesday 10 -l* am. 8 ses-
sions $2 members. $3 non-members Starts April 6.
The instructor for the above four classes is Rabbi Morris
Kobrinetx.
Congregation Beth Chai Adult Education
Rabbi Sherman Kirshner 8400126 St. N.. Seminole 393-5525.
Three classes wiU be offered. Dates and times were not available
as we went to press.
A. Synagogue Skills -1 ncludes the Haftorah chanting.
B. Beginning Hebrew Learn simple vocabulary and reading.
C. Living Jewishly The Jewish life cycle, All classes join
together. Lectures and discussion.
Temple B'nai Israel Adult Education Program
RabbiArthur Baseman 1685 S, Belcher Rd. Clearwater. 631-5829.
The following eleven courses will be offered:
. A. Beginning Hebrew R~<^ r^^^TnTm^*
Sept. 13 9*30 a.m. 12 noon. Monday -Thursday 7-104J .Se*.
20 9:30 12. This class will be repeated whenever there are 15 people
waiting. Instructor is Xenia Fane.
B Adult Bar-Bat miUvah Tuesday evening. 7:30-8-JO
begins Sept. 22 Prerequisite is reading knowledge of*%*
quSite is JarticipatiorTln other Adult Education activities. Instructor
isZenaSulkes. ., ,n
C. Continuing Jewish Eduction -.T^SSSSs
starting on Sept. 17 Newcomers welcome. Instructor is Zena Sulkes _
D. Beginning Hebrew Vocabulary Thursday evenings.begin-
ning Sep? llPrtrequisite is ability to read Hebrew. Instructor is Al
SU E Basic Judaism Second and fourth Wednesday in October at
8 pi BD1. wtrprinclples and practices. Instructors are Zen.
Sulkee, Rabbi Baseman, and Xenia Fane. ,,-.,,
, F. Shabbat Workshop Wednesday, Novell g*fi
Sunday, Nov. 15 at 10:30 a.m. Instructors are Zena Sulkes ana Aema
^ O. Channuiah.Workshop Wedneeday. Dec- 9 at 7:30 pm..
Sunday, Dec. 13 at 10:30a.m. TWadav
H Basic Yiddish Vocabulary ^Jong. I^Th^
evening begiiining Jan. 7. Instructors are Al Sulks, ana muoreu
seminar called Life and Transitn. w *itma
Instructors are Zena Sulkes and Xenia fane.
iunuu. w_K in at 7- K. Passover Workshop March 10 ai 7 do F
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