The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00040

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
Off Pinellas County
tolume
2 Number 21
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, Ottober 9.1981
FndSOochit
' "Price 10 Cents
Community Response to 1981 Combined Jewish Appeal Campaign In Final Stages
Appeal For Cash Increased A* Workers Appreciation Night Plans Take Shape
|Fund8 Still Urgently Needed
Cash collections for the com-
Ibined Jewish Appeal of Pinellas
Icnuntv are currently running
lihead of last year, due to inten-
sive efforts of the cash collections
committee of the Jewish federa-
Itinn. reported F.lli Mills. Trea-
surer.>fth.'^deration.
The positive reaction from the
Icommunity is in response to
Inumerous requests made by Saul
ISchechter. campaign chairman,
who repeatedly throughout the
[campaign urged all members of
the Jewish community to ac-
celerate their payments to the
Icurrent combined Jewish Appeal
[campaign and to make every ef-
llort to complete payments to
[past campaigns in response to se-
Ivere cuts in funds previously ear-
Inurked for life enhancing pro-
ams and services, both here in
|Pinellas County and in Israel.
"Its a striking example of what
[we can accomplish when we work
Itogether totmeet the very real
I needs of the people in Pinellas
[and Jews thorughout the world."
I Charles Rutenberg, chairman of
Ithe budget fend allocatins com-
Imittee of the Jewish Federation,
[emphasise that equal monthly
payments to the United Jewish
Appeal for transmission oversees
is vital to sustain the ongoing aid
I program funded by the combined
[Jewish Appeal.
eiumuu
Mr. Mills cited the fact of "the
diminishing pledge" in which
Israeli inflation, coupled with the
weakened purchasing power of
the dollar, adversely effects the
pledges. For example, he said, "A
SI,000 pledge paid one year late
has a value of $750; two years late
$500; three years late S25Q.''
All members of the Jewish
community are reminded "Your
pledge is your promiseredeem
your pledge now."
Letter To The
Community
Dear Members of the Pinellas
Community,
During this High Holiday
season. I would like to share with
you. the following message:
The Heavens belong to the
Lord, but the earth He gave over
to mankind. Ps 115:16
Wake up! It is Rosh Hashanah
- the birthday of the world. "On
the seventh day Cod finished His
work which He had been doing'*
But so much remains to be
done The hungry need to be fed.
the illiterate need to be taught.
the old as well as the voung need
to be loved. We all "need relief
from the stress and anxiety of
personal and global conflicts that
are ravaging us.
God is perfect. Surely He could
have created a perfect world.
Why didn't He? He deliberately
eft the world unfinished because
He expects each generation
every man. woman, and child to
be His parner in the continuous
tt of creation.
. The tradition tells us that this
rjhat il means be human.
"jod endowed us with unique
8's. perception, compassion,
inventiveness. It is our job to use
hem to improve the world. We
teach our children that every-
Uung they do makes a difference.
*e need to start believing it
about ourselves to act as
though our actions change the
*orld a little. Because they do.
Prayer, ritual and study can
make us sensitive to moments of
change and choice. They give us a
renewed vision of our goal. It is
when we take that vision out into
the world and act on it that we
really become partners in crea-
tion.
What can we do?
Help worthy students stay in
school. Read for the blind. Tutor
in overburdened schools. Share
our talents where they are
needed. All of us can take steps
to guard the water, the air. the
soil that are entrusted to us. We
can respond when people around
us are in pain Visit the sick
and the grieving and really
listen.
In a world of gossip we can
respect privacy. In violent times
we can deal gently with our chil-
dren and our aged. We can take
the chance of reaching out to a
stranger. We can refuse to stand
idly by while our neighbors
blood is shed.
Wake up. Accept your role as a
partner in creation. Rosh Hasha-
nah is the time and wherever you
are is the place to begin.
My sincerest 'wishes for a
healthy and happy New Year.
Shalom.
RABBI JACOB LUSKI
(Editors Not* Rabbi **<*
the President of the Pinellas
County Board of Rabbis.)
Campaign leaders have indi-
cated that the 1981 Combined
Jewish Appeal Effort is in its
final stages, attempting to meet a
community commitment of
$780,000 approved by the budget
and allocations committee on be-
half of all beneficiary agencies.
The campaign to date has sur-
passed $750,000. showing an in-
crease of more than $200,000
based on pledges made by the
same individuals in 1980. Saul
Schechter, combined Jewish Ap-
peal .General Campaign Chair-
man, indicated that both his
campaign leaders and individual
contributors through out Pinellas
County can now take pride in the
fact that we have accelerated the
pace of the campaign by several
months. By doing so. we are able
to give the necessary thought to
planning and coordinating to the
1982 Campaign effort. The 1982
Campaign is already in its plan-
ning stages.
Although the '81' Campaign is
in its final stages, The "HOME
STRECH" OFTEN PROVES
TO BE THE MOST DIFFI-
CULT. Reva Kent. President of
the Community's Federation,
called on all community minded
citizens who have not yet made
their pledges to help meet the
challenge. "We have no intention
of stopping until every man and
woman is successfully and
thoughtfully solicited for their
1981 pledge "
Although the '81' Campaign
is in its final stages, the "home
strech" often proves to be the
most difficult. Reva Kent. Presi-
dent of the Community's Federa-
tion, called on all community
minded citizens who have not yet
made their pledges to help meet
hte challenge. "We have no in-
tention of stopping until every
man and woman is successfully
and thoughtfully solicited for
their 1981 pledge."
Meanwhile plans are now being
unfolded for a workers apprecia-
tion night, which will be held
shortly after the Jewish holidays.
The Federation will pay tribute
to the more than 300 men and
women who assisted the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal effort. Geral
Rubin. Director of the Jewish
Federation, added that the best
way to say thank you to its de-
voted volunteers is by achieving
our community goal and in-
creasing the level of funding
which the Jewish Community of
Pinellas County provides.
Mr. Schechter informs us that
'our community has to be re-
minded that to achieve our goals
will not give us an abundance of
funds. It may not even allow us
to keep pace with inflation, but at
least we will be able to maintain
both our commitment to overseas
Jewish in need and our hish
standards and caliber of services
that our Jewish community has
come to expect.
Mr. Schechter informs us that
"our community has to be re-
minded that to achieve our goals
will not give us an abundance of
funds. It may not even allow us
to keep pace with inflation, but at
least we will be able to maintain
both our commitment to overseas
Jewish in need and our high
standards and caliber of services
that our Jewish community has
come to expect. The simple fact is
that we can not provide more
than the community is willing to
give."
Special 'Jewish Laws'?
The Gun Control Argument
By BARBARA FINKELSTEIN
A pudgy young boy with a look
of excitement in his eyes balances
a rifle in his hands. Behind him
stands his coach, a young man
not yet out of his twenties.
Nothing unusual here at a firing
range near Texas Canyon, Calif
except that both individuals are
Jewish.
Lately, various organizations
have appealed to American Jews
to arm themselves. Why do gun
rights campaigns include special
outreach publicity to Jews? Do
the campaigns manipulate Jew-
ish sensitivity valid or ex-
aggerated to anti-Semitic
sentiment in this country? Or do
they play on Jewish embarrass-
ment about "Jewish passivity"
during World War II?
ONE PITCH for Jewish gun
ownership argues that "it can
happen here.' Another urges
Jewish businessmen to defend
themselves against inner city
crime. The first approach is
specifically Jewish; the second
appeals to Jews as members of
the white middle class, often
frustrated by the inefficiencies of
a bureaucrat*: legal process.
Occasionally, an organization like
the Seattle-based Second
Amendment Foundation will cite
both reasons as incentives to buy
guns.
The posture of the major
Jewish defense organizations
contrasts sharply with the gun
lobby position. B'nai B'rith, the
American Jewish Congress, the
American Jewish Communtiv
Relations Advisory Council all
endorsed their respective gun
control proposals in the early and
mid-seventies. This organi-
zational consensus stems less
from any liberal political
agenda than trom a cultural
revulsion towards guns which
many Jews have inherited. Jews,
it was said long ago, are not
hunters.
According to a U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice poll, 11 percent of
American Jews owned a handgun
or pistol in 1980. Twenty percent
owned a long-barrelled gun. By
contrast, 29 percent of
Protestants owned handguns and
40 percent owned rifles; 18
percent of Catholics owned
handguns and 29 percent, rifles.
With Jewish gun ownership so
far below the national average,
why has special attention been
focused on the idea of Jews and
guns?
ONE REASON may be op-
portunistic: anti-gun control
image that the JDL relies on is
the defeated European Jew who
'consented'' to his own
destruction. Occasionally the
JDL draws some rather shaky
parallels. For example, JDL
national chairman Irving Rubin
cites the legitimacy of Ku Klux
Klan candidates in recent Cali-
fornia and North Carolina elec-
tions and desecration of syna-
gogues as precursors to another
round of Nuremburg Laws and
groups may view Jews as an
untapped reservoir of supporters.
Another is the increasing
seriousness with which American
Jews have been discussing anti-
Semitism. And judging by the
space devoted to it in the Jewish
press, the subject makes com-
pelling reading. Often in such
articles the Jewish Defense
League is mentioned or quoted.
"The JDL always knew how to
use the press," says one former
member. "It was an organization
that replied on images." The
mass pogroms. If you don't want
to end up like the Jews of Europe,
the JDL states, boy a gun.
"The fact is," says the former
JDL member, "the argument
that the present is an insecure
time for Jews has at least some
validity. For example, it's
become acceptable in the past
decade to think of Jews as Zionist
aggressors worthy of UN con-
demnation."
WHILE JDL influence may be
far less wide-reaching today than
it was ten years ago, JDL
rnsored target practices still
w non-JDL members. A
recent appeal is directed at
Russian Jewish immigrants who
are warned: "There are Nazis in
America! It CAN happen here.
Prepare to defend yourself!''
Many Jewish target shooters,
however, are less concerned with
right-wing extremists than with
self-defense against crime. "This
business about a Nazi resurgence
is bull," Philadelphian Ernest
Brydon told Philadelphia's
Jewish Exponent. "If Jews have
turned to guns it's because they
feel the judicial system has failed
and the streets are full of
recidivist criminals. The public
has lost faith in the law but
this applies to everyone, not just
Jews.
Brydon's opinion raises an
important question: Just who is
supposed to be the enemy? Is it
the various Klan and Nazi parties
with their poorly attended yet
much publicized anti-black and
anti-Jewish demonstrations? Or
is it the urban criminal who
assaults a Jew in hie store or on
the street maybe not as a Jew,
but as a vulnerable touch?
"Gun Control Works: Holo-
caust." expounds a bumper
sticker, leapfrogging over cause
and effect. The message is clear,
albeit glib: Buy a gun or be a
. victim. A Jewish wtim.



Page 6
ragez
The .J;-i> -
The Jewish Floridian ofPineUas County
Friday. Octobers,;
Jewish High Holidays of 5242
By RABBI
SHERMAN P. KIRSHNER
As the Jewish High Holiday
season rapidly makes its ap-
proach upon world Jewry, thus
ushering in the year 5742 (since
creation) into our midst, I as a
rabbi for my people, am always
awe stricken at the solemnity, the
mood and the prayer-tone which
is ever present during these
"Days of Awe" more commonly
referred to as Rosh-Hashana
(Head of the Year) and Yom
Kippur (Day of Atonement).
I cannot help but make the
consistent comparison to
Januury 1st. the secular New
Year, when there is rampant cele-
bration taking place everywhere,
and noisemakers, flagrancy and
oftimes over intoxication are
prevalent upon the scene.
Judaism, refers to its New
Year by the Biblical terminology
of Yom T'Ruah, the day of the
sounding of the Ram's Horn,
reminding us of our forefather
Abraham's abounding devotion
to Almighl G-d, wherein he was
ready to sacrifice his only son
Isaac upon the alter until G-od's
angel stayed his hand, and a ram
appeared in the thicket as a
substitute. It is also known as
Yom Ha-Zikaron-The Day of
Remembrance when the Al-
mighty remembers all of our
virtues and our bad traits which
we portrayed in the year just
passed, and we plead for his
forgiveness to us and our com-
munity, on the merits of
Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.
Finally, it is refered to as Yom
Hadin The day of Judgement,
when G-d sits upon his throne on
high, and tenders judgement to
all of his people. The liturgy on
both Rosh Hashana and Yom
Kippur is so rich in its vividly
descriptive phraseology "Who
shall live and who shall die. who
by water and who by fire, who by
natural means and who by un-
natural means but repen-
tance, prayer and righteousness
will avert the evil decree!
Based upon the Biblical in-
junctions in Numbers 29: 1-11
the Jew, some of whom may be
observant, while others are not.
manage to find their way into a
synagogue whether in Pine'las
County, New York City, or
Smalltown. U.S.A. during these
High Holidays. There is some-
thing so magical, so moving and
so peaceful about the melody of
Kol-Nidrei and the entire evening
service of Yom Kippur. that it
has been known to entrance Jews
who oftimes forget their humble
IUIIIIMIIIIIIillllllllHMMMMWIIIHIIIIlTI(
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ByMtehaalBer/tstatn
Michael Bernstein is Executive Director of Gulf (oast Jeuish
Family Sen hi Inc He has extensive professional training m
treating individual and family problems and will be happy to
answer all letters received in this column. Please address all
letters to (iulf (oast Jeuish Family Service. Inc.. 304 South
Jupiter Avenue, Clear water, Florida 33515.
Dear Mr. Bernstein:
I recently moved from up North and was hoping that the
Pinellas area would provide Jewish programming on local radio
shows.
Mr.L.
Dear Mr. L.:
On Sunday. Radio Station WMNF offers Judaic music. In
addition. WPLF on the AM dial features Rabbi Baseman on al-
ternating Sundays hosting a talk show dealing with Jewish is-
sues.
Mr. Bernstein
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services is a major beneficiary
agency of monies raised by the annual Combined Jewish Appeal
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Kosher Kitchen
SHANGHAI FISH IN SOY SAUCE
There are many fish recipes to prove that a fish meal does
not have to be boring. From a friend on Long Island, comes this
recipe for such a dish.
1 medium whole fish 1' < or 1' lbs.
(sea bass is best)
' tsp. salt
'/i cup cooking oil
2 slices ginger root
1 bunch stallions cut in 5 inch sections
1 cup black dry mushrooms, softened and sliced
1 Tbsp. dry sherry
5 Tbsp. soy sauce
2 Tbsp. light brown sugar
1 cup water
one third cup sliced bamboo shoots
Scale and clean whole fish leaving head and body intact.
Rinse in cold water and dry. Make a slash crosswise on each side
along backbone, making two or three diagonal cuts for even
cooking. Dust both sides with M tsp. salt and set aside for 10
minutes. Heat oil in skillet, and put in ginger root. Gently add
fish and fry over medium heat 3-4 minutes on each side Cover
pan to prevent oil from splashing. Remove from burner and turn
carefully. Add scallions, bamboo shoots, mushrooms and return
to stove.
When fish is golden brown, pour off excess oil and add
remaining ingredients to pan. Cover and bring to boil. Boil over
low heat 3 minutes. Remove cover, increase heat, and baste for 3
minutes until little more than M cup liquid remains. Serve hot or
co'.d or jellied, but never reheat. Use the vegetables to cover fish
body and serve.
beginnings. Magical, because it
possesses the craft to transcend
the world and society we live in,
and to take us back to childhood
days, into small synagogues in
the teeming cities of New York,
Chicago and otners, where ob-
servant Jews with long flowing
beards stood swaying to and fro
with tear stained eyes to the
intonation of the Kol Nidrei and
the many heart stirring prayers
during the holy day of Yom
Kippur.
It is precisely on this 10th day
of the Hebrew month of Tishrei
(October 8. 1981) that world
Jewry "afflicts their souls" with
a 24 hour fast, from Sundown the
7th of October, until sundown the
8th of October. A fast day in
Judaism, implies that no food or
water passes one's lips, unless
one is under medical supervision,
and must have nourishment to
sustain life. Yom Kippur is
reminiscent of Moses's descent
with the second set of Tablets of
the I.aw. on the 10th day of Tish-
rei. Upon his descent, the Jewish
people were found to be repenting
and aloneing for the sin of the
Golden Calf, and Moses pro-
claimed that this would be a day
of Atonement for all generations
to come.
1 ask you to think about the
hilarity of January 1st. the
secular New Year, and the Jewish
New Year which is filled with a
time of deep and personal intro-
spection, soul searching and a
questioning of one's behaviour
personal attitudes and a quest for
constant improvement in the
year ahead
Yes. there are family gather-
ings, wherein family and friends
will join together during Rosh
Hashana and prior to and imme-
diately following Yom Kippur to
breakfast together The feeling
however, is not one of boisterous
ness. but rather of "May the Al-
mighty inscribe us all in the Book
of Life."
I pray, that as the Jewish New
Year enters our midst, it will
bring- with it a greater sense of
security, good health and happi-
ness for all peoples, and that Al-
mighty G-d in His infinite wis-
dom, will see fit to bless us all
with His most precious and
sought after blessing the
blessings of peace!!
Rabbi Sherman Philip Kirshner
Congregation Beth Chai
Seminole, Florida
Know Your Legislators
Senator Lawton Chiles
(This is the second in a series
on our Florida Legislators. This
information published as a serv-
ice by Gordon Saskin, M.D.
chairman of the Community
Relations Committee)
Senator Lawton Chiles has
been a distinguished member of
the U.S. Senate since his election
in 1971.
His current committee assign-
ments include the appropriations
Committee, Special Committee
on Aging, Governmental Affairs
Committee. Budget Committee,
and the Democratic Steering
Committee.
Senator Chiles was born in
Lakeland. Florida in 1930. He
and his wife, Rhea, now reside in
Holmes Beach. Fla. The Chiles'
have four children.
Chiles has devoted his life to
public service. After a two year
stint in Korea as an Artillery
officer in the U.S. Army (1953-
19541. Chiles completed his law
degree at the University of Flor-
ida. From 1959-1966. he served in
the Florida House of Representa-
tives. He was a member of the
Florida Senate from 1966 until
his election to the U.S. Senate
Senator Chiles has shown him-
self to be a strong supporter of
Israel. A check of his voting, re-
cord in 1980 alone proves this
point
6-80 Voted in favor of tabling
an amendment which proposed
$150 million be withheld from
economic aid for Israel.
6-80 Voted in favor of the
Foreign Assistance Authoriza
tion Act for the fiscal year 198i
This bill authorized worldwide
military and economic assistance
including 81.4 billion in military
aid and $785 million in economic
aid for Israel.
7-80 Signed a letter to Presi
dent Carter urging his denial of
Saudi Arabian request for addi-
tional offensive equipment for F-
15s.
12-80 Voted in favor of the
Foreign Assistance Authoria
tion Act Conference Report
FY81. This report authorized I
$1.4 billion in military aid and
$785 million in economic aid for
Israel.
He also signed the Packwood
Jackson letter of June 17, igg|
which asked the President not to
send the sale of the F-15 enhance-
ments and AW ACS to Congress
Commenting on the possibility
of the sale to the Saudis, he said
"If the US. sells the enhance-
ment package to Saudi Arabia. I
believe it would amount to break
ing a solemn promise, not only to
the U.S. Senate, but more impor
tantly, to the government and
the people of Israel. Our friends
deserve better treatment than
that."
Senator Chiles Washington
address is: Russell Building.
Washington. DC. 20510
MASTRO SUBARU
'Largest Volume Dealer in Southeast'
6402 W. Hillsborouqh
Tampa. Fla. 33614
884-7513
Jack Herman we/comes you to drire tha No. 1 tiling car In latatl.
1RAMADAINN
on the gulf
y
'/.
Claims Against Germany
The Conference on Jewish Ma-
terial Claims against Germany
called upon all Jewish victims of
Nazi persecution, who may be
eligible to receive grants from the
Claims Conference Hardship
Fund, to file their applications
not later than December 31. 1981.
More than 30 million D.M. were
paid out already to eligible
claimants.
The Hardship Fund is intended
primarily to handle applications
from such Jewish victims of Nazi
persecution who left Eastern
Europe after 1965 when the dead-
line for filing claims under the
German indemnification laws ex-
pired. Other persecutees who
failed for very valid reasons to
file timely indemnification claims
in past years may also apply to
the Hardship Fund.
The Claims Conference
assumed the responsibility for
the administration of the Hard-
ship Fund, which is funded by
the German Federal Government
and distributed under German
Government Guidelines. The
Guidelines limit individual pay-
ments to D.M. 5,000 (five thou-
sand D.M.) per person.
Applications may be obtained
from the:
Claims Conference
Hardship Fund
225 Park Avenue South
(lOthfloorO
New York. NY. 10003
n^,lt each cJcSriSv.
NAPLES. FLORIDA Uve EntertntS
PleAenti, ^^Po0'
Shelling
A GULFSIDE GETAWAY Tennis Near By
Beautiful White
VACATION Sandy Beach
AVAILABLE ANY TWO DAYS AND NIGHTS
Through December 18,1981
The package includes: %
e Cocktails for two in our Gangplank Lounge.
Rib eye steak dinner for two one evening .
e Continental breakfast for two both mornings.
Double room both nights.
TOTAL PRICE $89.95
(Includes all taxes and gratuities)
Advance reservations required by call-
.ng813-597-315lorby writing to: Reservations,"
11000 Gulf Shore Drive N ., Naples. FL 33940
Children age 18 and under are free in the some
room with parents. Meals will be at menu prices.
GOLF: 20% discount on green fees and cart
rental at Bonita Springs Golf & Country Club,
one of Southwest Florida's finest courses.




PYiday, October 9,19S1
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 3
Bond Dinner to Honor Local Couple
Mayor Cor line Freeman
Barbara Callahan
Public Affairs Day
Sponsored By NCJW
National Council of Jewish
Women, Suncoast Section, will
hold their annual Public Affairs
Day luncheon on Tuesday, Oct.
20. 10:30 a.m., at the Wine Cel-
lar, 17301 Gulf Blvd., N. Reding'
ton Beach.
The focus this year will be
"Women in Power." Panelists
will include television personality
Barbara Callahan. St. Petersburg
Mayor Corrine Freeman. St. Pe-
tersburg dentist Dr. Tamara
Jackson, and President of St. Pe-
tersburg Federal Savings and
Loan Association Jean Giles
Wittner.
These exciting and dynamic
women will share their life expe-
riences and their career achieve-
ments. Reservations are
essential. Cost for the day is
$7.50 with reservation, $8.50 at
the door. Call Beverly Mitlin,
381-9100 or Judy Elkin. 397-6556.
Mr. and Mrs. Mel Gross of St.
Petersburg will be honored at a
dinner on behalf of State of Israel
Bonds on Sunday evening,
Nov. I at Temple Beth-El. Mr.
Lee Samler. chairman, an-
nounced that the 30th anni-
versary of the Israel Bond Drive
dinner occurs on the same day
that Mr. and Mrs. Gross cele-
brate their own 30th anniversary.
Mel Gross has long been in-
volved in endeavors beneficial to
Judaism and the State of Israel.
He has worked on behalf of State
of Israel Bonds for many years,
serving as chairman of the
Temple Beth-El drive several
times. He is a past board member
of Temple Beth-El and a member
of its Brotherhood and B'nai
B'rith
Born in Chicago, Mr. Gross
attended the Univ. of Illinois and
the Univ. of DePaul. He served in
the Navy during World War II.
The couple moved to St. Peters-
burg in 1958.
At present he is serving as 1st
Vice President in the Police
Athletic League and is active in
STRAIGHT. INC.. a drug re-
habilitation program.
Interesting Events
Oct 18 7:30 p.m. Tampa
Jewish Community Center
Theater Party: The Secret Af-
fair of Mildred Wild" performed
by the Tampa Players. A social
with refreshments will follow
show.
Attendance in the past has
been great. Plan ahead and
spread the word we're
growing every week, so come and
join us. For further information
call: Steven Tepper 823-4711 or
ElieneHirsch 541-4791.
Autonomy Talks Resumed
CAIRO (JTA) Af-
ter an 18-month sus-
pension, Israel, Egypt and
the United States resumed
BatMitzvah
Stephani X'ewmark
Stefan i F. New mark, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Stan Newmark,
will be called to the Torah aa a
Bat Mitzvah on Oct. 10 at
Temple B'nai Israel, Clear-water,
atefani i8 an eighth
grade student at the Oak Grove
Middle School where she is an
Honor Roll student and a cheer-
leader. She is a member of the
gymnastics team at the La Fleur
gymnastics Club. Stefan! at-
tends the B'nai Israel Religious
School and is a Board member of
the Junior Youth Oroup.
Mr. and Mrs. Newmark will
host the Oneg Shabbat following
""vices. An afternoon reception
wll be held at the Temple. Join-
mK Stefani for this special oc-
casion will be her grandparents
and Mrs. Curt Mayer of
tlearwater. and Mr. and Mrs.
g" Newmark of Lauderhill,
Florida. Also celebrating with
atefwu will be her aunts and
"ncles from Lauderhill. Madison.
Wisconsin. New York, and New
Jersey, as well as her friends.
Stefani will be the hostess at a
Ba birthday party at her home
n Saturday evening.
negotiations. late last week
on Palestinian autonomy
on the West Bank and the
Gaza Strip. The three dele-
gations, meeting at the
Mena House Hotel near
Cairo, delivered brief open-
ing statements in which
they pledged good will and
redoubled efforts to move
the talks towards
agreement.
The months of spasmodic
negotiations in the aftermath of
the Egyptian-Israel peace treaty,
signed in early 1979. failed to
achieve significant progress. But
the head of the Egyptian dele-
gation. Foreign Minister Kamal
Hassan Ali, said in his opening
remarks that "a new hope" had
now arisen for the success of the
talks "with the new American
Administration and the recent
elections in Israel."
THE KEY FIGURE on- the Is-
raeli team is the new Defense
Minister, Ariel Sharon. His
evolving new policies on the West
Bank have aroused the interest of
both the Egyptian and American
delegations, which apparently
share Sharon's intentions.
In recent weeks there has been
a wave of reports in the Israeli
media, inspired by Defense Min-
istry circles, to the effect that
Sharon proposes to introduce
major liberalising measures on
the West Bank with the avowed
aim of wooing moderate local
leaders into the peace process.
Israel radio and television
elaborated on Sharon's plan to
separate between purely military
security affairs on the West
Bank, which will remain in the
hands of the army, and civilian
control with as many m pMabta
Palestinian civilians in high ad-
ministrative positions.
Greta Gross was born and
educated in Montreal. Canada.
She had been a member of
Temple Beth-El Sisterhood and
the Esther Group of Hadassah.
At present she is serving on the
Board of Directors of
STRAIGHT, INC. The couple
have four children: David. Scott.
Susan and Robert.
The guest speaker at the
dinner will be Dr. Ruth Gruber.
author of "Requela: A Woman of
Israel". Dr. Gruber was a former
correspondent for N.Y. Herald
Tribune. She covered the Israel-
Egypt Peace Treaty in Washing-
ton as well as the conference in
Egypt between Begin and Sadat.
Mr & Mrs. Mel Gross
EGYPT'S Minister of State.
Butros Ghali. a key presence
throughout the peace process
with Israel, publicly welcomed
Sharon's moves. In a statement
here. Ghali called on Israel to
provide "confidence-building
measures" that would "give
hope" to the Palestinian and
thereby improve the negotiating
atmosphere.
Asked if sich measures should
include the return of the two ex-
iled West Bank mayors, Mo-
hammed Mil hem of Halhoul and
Fahd Kawasme of Hebron, to
their homes, the Egyptian diplo-
mat said this was "certainly" the
kind of thing we have in mind.
Speaking for the U.S. at the
formal session, Alfred Atherton,
the U.S. Ambassador to Egypt,
reemphasized "the commitment
of the Reagan Administration to
remain ... a full partner" in the
peace process. "We are here to
play a full role," he said, "to do
all we can to help the process
move forward."
HIS REMARKS apparently
sought to allay concerns voiced in
Israel over the fact that Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig
neglected to refer to the Camp
David process in his address to
the United Nations General
Assembly
Atherton also sought to allay
concerns felt both in Israel and
Egypt that the U.S. had
weakened its interest in the auto-
*nomy talks by not designating a
special envoy to head its dele-
gations, as waa the case under
the Carter Administration. He
said that he and the Ambassador
to Israel. Samuel Lewis, were co-
chairmen of the U.S. team and
this showed that "we are re-
doubling our efforts we're
here with two of delegation
From the
Rabbi's
Desk
By RABBI
MORRIS KOBRINETZ
1
"SUKKOTTHE SHELTER
OF PEACE"
The threat of nuclear war and our holiday of "Sukkot."
have one thing in common; they point to the inadequacies of our
homes. Nuclear war tells us that our homes cannot protect us
from the horrors of the bomb and its radiation. To survive this
madness, we must build thick-walled shelters; deep beneath the
surface of the earth where the heat and harmful rays cannot
penetrate.
Sukkot tells us that our home provide too much protection.
To appreciate this week of Sukkot., we must return to the flimsy
walls and thatched roof of the "Sukkah."
What is this lesson? It teaches us that the future of man-
kind depends upon the Sukkah, Not the shelter. It does seem
strange that we speak of the fall-out shelter and Sukkah in the
same breath. This has a logic all its own.
I recall when erecting a Sukkah at a neighbor, a non-Jewish
playmate of my neighbor saw what was abuilding. Asked what
is being built. Their son a first grader answered, on the Holiday
we eat in the Sukkah. The playmate smiled and said; "I get it
... A Bomb Shelter.
We witness in these days that all new Synagogues,
Churches. Apt. buildings, include in their plans "Fall-out Shel-
ters" Why? To survive. Against this background, Judaism
teaches, that the Sukkah; is the salvation of mankind; NOT the
shelter. The Sukkah IS the salvation of mankind. The shelter is
its destruction. Why? Because the shelter represents man's de-
pendence upon his own strength for "survival." If a nation
builds bigger and deadlier bombs then the answer of the
shelter philosophy is to dig deeper; make the walls thicker; in
order to live.
The Sukkah teaches us that to survive; we must depend
upon God. Every moment of our lives are in His hands. In the
flimsy Sukkah, with its roof of leaves snd grass, we are unpro-
tected against the whims of nature. When it rains; it "pours"
into the Sukkah. When the wind blows; it seems to howl and
beat the thin walls with hurricane velocity. Precisely, as we are
unprotected against the ravages of nature in the Sukkah; we
recognize our dependence upon God.
The Shelter; is a symbol of War, so terrible it staggers the
imagination of man.. The Sukkah; is the symbol of Peace Of
peace so perfect, that every Shabbat we pray; Ufros Oleynu
Sukkat Shlomech. "Spread over us the Sukkah, of Thy peace.
More than ever, the Sukkah represents the hope of mankind. It
teaches us; To Return to God.
If we put forth as much effort and spent as much money
and determination; "to save the world" as we do '"to destroy it,"
How beautiful life might be. Develope the world's resources; ad-
vance education and health; we should live by the Torah and re-
vere God. We must make this effort so that the world "might
endure."
To dwell in the' Sukkah, learn its lesson and to build an en-
during world, "requires effort." It takes imagination, planning,
dedication and money which we now waste for the destruction of
mankind.
Too often we think of the Festival of Sukkot as a "relic" of
the past. It is a review of the 40 years our forefathers wandered
in the desert after their Exodus from Egypt 3600 year ago. Sud-
denly, Sukkot takes on a new meaning in this "nuclear age,"
what is it?
The Sukkah stands in sharp contrast with the Fall-out
Shelter. The Sukkah protests against the madness of the world.
The Sukkah is the lesson of the 20th Century; It is the Symbol
of Hope. Just as the Fall-out Shelter is temporary, so too is the
Sukkah temporary. Bat the Sukkah was the prelude to
" permanence."
So too do we hope and pray that mankind will seek the
"permanence" and that is Freedom and Peace for all the
peoples of the earth. Chug Somayach


TheJmu^u pi.
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Friday, October 9,19i
l

5
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P.C
vie*
OewisH Floridian
OF PINELLAS COUNTY
frraShoc'i
Mmml Fl 3S1S2
Kdiional Office. S02 Jupiter Ave South. Cleanaler. Fla Mi
Telephone 446- 103.1
Publication t, Builnesi Office. 120 N E St
Telephone (30SI 373-4606
J-ltKKK SHlH-HKT SUZANNE SCHECHTER
War Veterans and B'nai B'rith Aid JNF
SUZANNESHOCHK'
Executive Kdil>
***** T\art4Um !>. Not Guarantee the Kaaarvta of Merrhudhie Aaverttaed
Vi'iiiW l li IVulip M I HPHMS 4711 al Miami fl* I'ul.li.hnl III Until -
l'sim lies OI2i7:i. Miami. Fla. Settl
r!2C-,PT,SN "^E$ 'V01*' 2 *"""' Yw Min.mum $.
script ion S7 SO or by annual membership pledge to Jewish Federation ol Pinedas
county for whichthe turn of S2.2 Sis paid. Out of Town Upon Request.
Friday. October 9, 1981
Volume 2
11TISHR15742
Number 21
George Geller. national JNF
chairman for the Jewiah War
Veterans, recently announced
that a new SI00.000 project has
been undertaken by the JVW.
Medal Honors
Nazi Ace
Important Bonds Project
In many ways, it was a meeting as important as
any he had with President Reagan in Washington.
We refer to the Israel Bonds "Canal Founders'*
luncheon which Prime Minister Begin addressed in
New York during his visit to the United States.
The canal, which will provide Israel with a
waterway across the southern part of the country to
the Mediterranean Sea, is as old an idea as the Zion-
ist vision itself. It was a dream in the days of -Theo-
dor Herzl well before the Jewish State became a
reality.
In an address to some 350 Israel Bond leaders
who came from throughout the United States to hear
Mr. Begin, including some from Florida, the
Prime Minister urged the leaders to "continue in-
vesting in this great and historic project, in the
vision of Herzl and its realization." Israel Bonds has
committed itself to $100 million toward completion of
the project.
The blunt truth about the waterway is that it
would have been no less important even if Israel
never had to give back an inch of the Sinai to Egypt
in the cause of pursuing a Mideast place. It would
have provided Israel with its own private Suez
Canal, thus making her independent of the political
whims of its Arab owners.
Considering the painful geopolitical realities
today, the project is more important than ever.
Considering Israel's current financial problems
at home, the country simply doesn't have the
wherewithal to launch the building of the can! at this
time Outside capital is the only answer. And that's
how Israel Bonds has been since its founding in the
early 1950s: the organization is taking the initiative
to show prospective investors the way.
We applaud the 450 "Canal Founders" who have -
thus far purchased a minimum of $100,000 in Bonds
toward the completion of the interseas energy proj-
ect. And who have helped enroll some 1,000 other
participants in the program besides.
BONN IJTAI Neo-Nazi
friends of Germany's wartime
flying ace. Hans-Ulrich Roedel.
are minting a medul in gold and
silver to honor him on the occa-
sion of his 65th birthday. The
former Luftwaffe pilot, German's
most decorated war hero, is a
controversial figure. The medal
will be distributed through the
Munich-based national zeitung, a
neo-Nazi newspaper that has the
largest circulation of any weekly
in the country-
It will be sold to neo-Nazi sym-
pathizers and other right-wing
extremists. The medal will carry
Roedel's portrait and a Nazi mili-
tary symbol, although Nazi Sym-
bols are banned by law in West
Germany.
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR: The Jewish Hondum:
We noted the "Ask Mr. Bern-
stein'' column of Sept. 11 with
special interest. The letter con-
tained therein requested further
i information re. Yiddishikite in
Pinellas County. While we concur
with Mr. Bernstein's response,
we wish to enlarge thereon.
The Judaica Shop operated by
the Sisterhood of Temple B'nai
Israel. 1685 S. Belcher Road.
Clearwater. is the only full-line
walk-in store in the county. We
are open Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
and Thursdays 10 a.m.-4 p.m.;
Fridays 7-8 a.m. and 9-9:30 a.m.
and Sunday mornings 9 a.m.-12
noon when religious school is in
session.-
Thank you smcsrely.
Lynn K del man. Chairman
Judaica Shop
Jule Kroll. President
Sisterhood
The JWV Foreat Recreation
Area," will be located near the
road linking Tel Aviv to Jeru-
salem. The area, known as
Sha'Ar Ha'Guy (gat* to the
valley), is where the Judian Hills
meet the coastline. It was at
Sha'Ar Ha'Guy, that intense
fighting occured during the 1948
War of Independence in an at-
tempt to take control of the
major road leading to Jerusalem.
This marks the third JWV pro-
ject for the Jewish National
Fund.
The proposed Recreation and
Tourist area includes children's
play structures, picnic tables,
and benches in a tree shaded
area. Such recreation areas are
sorely needed by the families
residing in Israel, due to the ex-
treme day to day tensions they
must face.
In addition, B'nai B'rith has
announced the launching of the
fifth section of its' Martyr's
Forest in Israel. The B'nai B'rith
"Forest of Peace" in the Galilee,
will commemorate the signing of
the peace treaty between Israel
and Egypt. It will symbolize
B'nai B'rith's hope that peace
will eventually reign throughout
the entire Middle East.
The Foreat will be planted near
Shefer, a settlement in the Upper
Galilee, situated along the Akko-
Safed road and offering a breath-
taking panorma of Lake Kinneret
and the Mediterranean. It is
easily accessible on a well-
traveled road and a short drive
from Moledet and Ramat Zvi -
B'nai B'rtih settlements de-
veloped on Jewish National Fund
land.
To date, the Jewish War Vet-
erans have contributed over
$500,000 and B'nai B'rith mem-
bers have contributed over
$1,000,000 to their various JNF
projects in Israel. The Jewish
National Fund (Keren Kayemeth
Leisrael) is the land development
authority, and since its inception,
80 years ago, has been respon-
sible for reclaiming over 250.000
acres of land, building 2.500 km
of roads, helping to establish 640
settlements and planting more
than 150 million trees, which
serve as the lifeblood of Israel
For more information, please
contact your local Jewish War
Veterans Post. B'nai B'rith
Lodge, or the Jewish National
Fund Regional Office in Tampa.
Pinellas County
State of Israel Bonds
4601 W. Ksnnsdy Blvd., Tampa
1-679-6850
WILLIAM JACKSON
Director
Yigal Barkan Joins UJA
Project Renewal in Israel
NEW YORK Yigal Barkan
of Jerusalem has joined the I
United Jewish Appeal as UJA
Project Renewal Representative
in Israel. Robert Russell of
Miami. National Project Renewal
Committee Chairman announced
Mr Barkan will add a vital
dimension in our continuing to
attempt to expand services to
communities both in the United
States and in Israel." Russell
said. ''His background and ex-
perience gives us a greater oppor-
tunity to serve the needs of com-
muni'ties in the United States
.twinned with neighborhoods in
Israel."
Born in Jerusalem and edu-
cated in the United States.
Barkan is a graduate of Yeahiva
College and Hebrew Teachers
Institute.of Yeahiva University
in New York City. He received
his Master of Arts degree at
George Washington University
Graduate School of Education in
Washington D.C. '
Mr, Barkan participated in pre-
doctoral studies in curriculum
development at Hebrew Univer-
sity School of Education in Jeru-
salem. He completed his doctoral
program at George Washington
University and will soon be
awarded a PHD in curriculum
design.
Prior to joining the UJA. Mr.
Barkan was a research fellow at
the Van Leer Jerusalem Founda-
tion in Jerusalem. He has also
been the Director of Education
for Congregation Adas Israel in
Washington D.C; coordinator of
'Student Affairs and instructor at
the Center for Jewish Education,
Hebrew University, and program
director far the Jerusalem YM
andYWHA.
Barkan ie the author of Ah yah
' Coming of Age in Israel, co-editor
and educational advisor for Foot-
loose in Jerusalem and curricu-
lum designer for Teaching
MiUvot.
In his .new position with the
United Jewish Appeal.'he will as-
sist in coordinating efforts be-
tween the Jewish Agency Project
Renewal Department and the
UJA headquarters in New York.
He will help to develop a flow of
information and materials' de-
signed to facilitate fundraising in
the United States, and also assist
in arranging community and in-
dividual visits to linked Project
Renewal neighborhoods in Israel.
He will work closely with Ameri-
can community delegations who
come to participate in the Project
Renewal budget consultation
process and UJA Missions to
Israel, as well as coordinate fund
raising for Project Renewal in
Israel
You Are Cordially
Invited To Attend An:
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October 9. 1*1
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 5
U.S. Intellectuals Out to Get Timerman
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
One of the obscenities in
[American Jewish life is the
Lcucle of Jewish rep-
Iresentatives flying down to
Lgentina to get the latest
ogress reports about the;
vish situation there from
government and the
wish community leaders.
From the almost glowing re-
is they deliver upon their re-
_ to this country about the
EJinsh condition in Argentina, it
uld appear that these repre-
__atives go there less for the
kt of assessing the real condi-
i than to disprove the conten-
of Jacobo Timerman that
entina is rife with anti-Semi-
and manifestations of neo-
nazism. They return to proclaim
it there is no Holocaust, that
Itk regime is not a clone of Nazi
|Germany and that Jews are rela-
Itively safe and secure.
THESE representatives com-
Iplettly ignore or deny the maa-
Jjive violations not only of human
(rights generally in Argentina,
but the violation of Jewish rights
fin particular. They return silent
out the estimated 2,000 Jews
ihoare among the 20,000 disap-
I ones and about the count-
lirss numbers of Jews who are in
prison and who undergo torture
In the hands of the jailers and the
|iKurity forces.
Another obscenity is that of
(Jewish and non-Jewish literary
icks staking out their claims as
ibid witch-hunters and equal
ortunity v Differs of Timerman
nd of those who support his con-
ntions about the rampant anti-
nitism in Argentina and the
Itxistence of Nazi-like prison
|camps such as La Perla.
This cabal, which* includes
[Irving Kristol, Benno Weiser
IVaron. Mark Falcoff and William
itept silent when the young, bril-
liant Brazilian Jewish journalist,
[Vladimir Herzog, waa hounded,
jailed and then found dead in his
cell in Sao Paulo in 1975; and
I who support every reactionary
regime in the world so long as
I they can characterize them as
authoritarian" and not "totali-
Itarian
THESE INDIVIDUALS and
[their ilk comprise a neo-Judenrat.
But this Judenrat is far more de-
spicable than the Jewish councils
that were imposed upon the Jews
by the Nazis in the European
countries they occupied. Not all
those ,1udenrate were the same;
some actively collaborated with
L'he Nazis, some refused to do
lueir biddings, some looked the
[other way when Nazis murdered
New, others helped Jews organize
resistance against the Nazi
I hordes
But all the European Juden-
\nte operated under conditions of
powerlessness; they had no
choice; they were under the gun;
and even the moat benign were li-
I mjted in what they could do to
MP save Jews. The neoJuden-
\nt- however, does not operate
lender conditions of powerless
"ess but under conditions where
there are options. They can
speak out and tell the truth about
e plight of Argentine Jewry or
'hey can keep silent or they can
Outort the reality, which Timer-
nan has described.
The neo-Judenrat has opted to
"eat* conditions of powerless-
ness for both the Jews of Argen-
jjn* and the Jews of America by
Buckley, not only vilify Timer-
man by smearing him aa a dar
4'ng of the American left and as a
*nner supporter of left-wing
guerillas m Argentina, but also
ty to deny the validity Of his
suffering as a Jew while he was in
Jau which he described so
Poignantly in his book, "Prisoner
Without a Name, Cell Without a
Number."
JHE DIATRIBES these hacks
Afreet against the former pu-
blisher and editor of La Opinion
are not so much tor his criticism
of the Argentine Jewish leaders
for being silent about the tragedy
which has befallen the Jews in
their country, but more for his
attacks against the Argentine
junta and the Reagan Admini-
stration which seeks to bolster it
as an ally.
To the extent that the Ameri-
can Jewish representatives and
their poison-pen sidekicks
acknowledge that there is anti-
Semitism in Argentina they
claim it is negligible and on an
unofficial level, and take refuge in
the argument that it has occured
before and that it went away, and
if it is recurring again, this too
shall pass. But at what cost in
the meanwhile to the thousands
of Jews caught in the vise of ter-
ror?
Who are these Jewish repre-
sentatives and their sidekicks?
For the most part they are the
same ones who are silent about
the plight of Ethiopian Jews:
who insist that anti-Semitism in
America is declining and is no-
thing worse than a 24-hour virus;
who claim that the United States
is immune to the historical laws
governing the rise and institu-
tionalization of Nazism: who
disseminating disinformation
about the situation in Argentina.
This Judenrat pro pounds the
theme that Argentina is not a
"gulag" for those Jews and non-
Jews who are arrested, tortured
or who disappear merelv a
slight deviation from the Ameri-
can form of democracy.
THUS, THE Argentine regime
is provided with a veneer of re-
spectability and moral and legal
authority in the court of Ameri-
can public opinion. American
Jews are thereby dissuaded from
trying to help Argentine Jewry
and Argentine Jewry is left iso-
lated from American Jewry.
Worst of all, the voices of those
Jews who are victims of the re-
gime's repressions are muffled by
the campaign of disinformation.
Timerman *s account, the neo-
Judenrat claims, is clouded by
subjectivity, by his leftist politi-
cal views.by his obsessive hatred
of the Argentine government.
His assessment of what is hap-
pening to Jewish and non-Jewish
dissidents in Argentina is, there-
fore, according to this neo-Juden-
VOOOOOOGOO
rat. suspect. But even if this
were so and it isn't why the
need for a witch-hunt, a smear
campaign against Timerman?
But let's forget Timerman.
Let's pretend he doesn't exist. Is
the reality of predawn kidnap-
pings, indiscriminate jailings,
torture and the disappearance of
thousands changed in any way?
Is the reality that Jews who are
arrested are treated more bru-
tally than non-Jews changed in
any way? After all. the views,
opinion and contentions of one
person can neither create nor ne-
gate reality.
IF ONE believes that the
reality in Argentina is different
that that descibed by Timerman.
there are other sources to check:
the mothers of the disappeared
ones who gather weekly at the
Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires
seeking to learn the whereabouts
of their loved ones; Amnesty
International: the Council on
Hemispheric Affairs; the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith; and the Inter-American
Commission on Human Rights,
an agency of the Organization of
American States.
If these sources are also su-
spect, perhaps another source
would be considered more objec-
tive and reliable James Neilson,
the editor of the English-lan-
guage Buenos Aires Herald.
Writing in the August-Septem-
ber issue of Hadassah Magazine,
he states:
"Jews, it was generally be-
lieved received far harsher
treatment from the military than
Christians or atheists did if cap-
tured by the security forces.
Such reports as have leaked out
from the military's half-hidden
prison system make it plain that,
as far as the army is concerned,
being Jewish is tantamount to an
admission of political guilt.
Some people who were held for a
time and then released have
testified that they saw portraits
of Hitler on the walls of the tor-
ture chambers and that one of the
first questions they had to an-
swer was, 'are you a Jew'?"
According to the neo-Judenrat,
the security forces carry extra-
legal activities which are not
authorized by the government.
But if this is so, why aren't any of
them arrested? Why don't the
legal authorities end this reign of
terror? But forces do not operate >n the framework of a political
in a vacuum They operatg with1 system__
Pen
Points
By MORRIS B. CHAPMAN
Copyright Morris B. Chapman
Carter says he might have remained a farmer were it not for
Rosalynn ... We think he'll go down in history as a peanut pre-
sident. ---------
Sadat wins the endorsement of 99.45 percent of Egyptian
voters for his takeover of 40.000 mosques America's fair-
haired boy turns out to be just another Moslem tin-horn dicta-
tor. ---------
A Palestinian faction, backed by Syria, is using terror tac-
tics, to fight Arafat ... It approves the terror of his ways, but
wants to go it one worse.
The air-controllers strike has enabled airlines to eliminate
unprofitable routes For them, it is a "blessing in the skies"
or a "blessing in disguise."
Saudia's Crown Prince offers a plan for Mideast peace that
sounds like a good beginning Israel though finds it less a
good beginning than a sombre dead-end.
The two-day Polish newspaper strike was highly successful
. You know, "no news is good news."
The Administration in their eagerness to sell the AWACS
to Saudia are making monkeys of themselves They neither
see nor hear nor speak the evil about the ugly Saudis.
Nancy Reagan has a yen for China in general .
Apparently she makes no distinction between Taiwan and the
Mainland.---------
Nutritionists contend that half the adult population in the
U.S. is malnourished The Reagan school lunch program
treats children as adults.
Nancy Reagan may have an ingenious use for her expensive
china She will use it to serve her swanky guests school
lunches as a sign of solidarity with the needy-
The Pimtl MMIexflhr Road Music Available
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all the favorite Jewish songs.
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The./!- i "-
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16
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Page6
The Jewish Flondian of Pinellas County
Friday, October 9,
Mobil Oil Ad is Pure Saudi Propaganda
WASHINGTON Mobil Oil advertisement.
The widely-circulated The U.S. Stake in Middle
Community Calendar
Monday, Oct. 12
S< mor Friendship Club JCC Meeting. 1-4 p.m. ORT. Clear-
.. it#r Evening Chapter. Membership Tea ORT Afternoon St
I e Chaoer Paid Up Luncheon Erev Sukkot Federation offices
M at j p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 13
S .o< Federation off ices closed
Wednesday, Oct. 14
S oi Federation off >ces closed
Thursday, Oct. 15
M Fnendshio dub. JCC. Meeting. -4 p m Hadassah
-3 Meir Chapter Meeting 12:30 p m Congregation B'nai
5l peie Aduit Educat.on 8 p.m
Friday, Oct. 16
gregation B'noi Israel St Petersburg Young Family shabbat
Saturday, Oct. 17
C -rgrega'on B noi s'aei S< Pete Cabaret Night ORT. Clear
iti E.enmg Chapter Bar-B-Q Sisterhood, Temple B'nai
srae C'earwater Aestern Party 8 30 p m
Sunday, Oct. 18
^c'ego'ic 3e*h Shalom, Oeorwater, 7 p.m. USY
HeDreA a- $: Ereo*tast Congregation B'nai Israel. St.
Pete
Monday, Oct. 19
$eo.c. ; e--aship Club JCC Meeting 1-4 p.m. Sisterhood.
Temp e Beth E Si Pe'e Board Meeting: 10dm ORT West
Mooting 1 p" OVT Cleor*vater Evening Chop-
rer ee'^g ~ 30 o rr
Tuesday, Oct. 20

Ave-e1 cedera"ion ciosed
Wednesday, Oct. 21
Simchat Toran Feae'don closed
Thursday, Oct. 22
Senior Fr.endship Club, JCC Meeting 1-4 pm NCJW Suncoast
Chapter Public Affairs Lunch Jewish Community Center.
Patron Cocktoil Party and Preview, 7 30 p.m. Congregation
B'nai wool. Si Pete Adult Education 8-10p m.
Friday, Oct. 23
Art Auction. Jewish Community Center Public showing 1 0 a.m.-
4 p.m. Congregation B noi Israel. St Pete Heh Class Forrnly
dinner.
Saturday, Oct. 24
Art Auction, Jewish Community Center, 7:30 p m. Symphony,
St Pete ORT. Clearwater Evening Chapter. Slave Auction.
Sunday, Oct. 25
Congregation Beth Shalom. Clearwater. USY 7 p.m. *
Sisterhood. Temple Beth El. Breakfast Meeting Ladies
Auxiliary, Jewish War Veterans, St. Pete, Breakfast Meeting
Symphony. Dunedm Mens Club Israel Bond Drive Benefit.
Congregation Beth Shalom. Gulfport. 10 o.m. Congregation
Beth Shalom Clearwater, Israel Bond Drive 8 p m. 'Sisterhood.
Congregation Beth Chai. Paid Up luncheon Mens Club.
Congregation B'nai Israel, 'St. Pete, Brunch, 10 a.m.
Brotherhood, Ahovat Shalom, Breakfast Meeting, 9:30 a m.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL Reform
400 S Pasadena Avo St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi David
Susskind Rabbi Robert Kirzner Sabbath Services. Friday evening
at 8 p.m. Tel. 347-6136.
Congregation BETH SHALOM-Consorvative
1844 54 St. S St. Petersburg 33707 Rabbi Sidney Lubtn Sabbath
Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m.; Saturday. 9:00 o.m. Tel. 321-
3380
Jonoregation B'NAI ISRAELConsorvative
101 59 St. N., St. Petersburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob I
c<
301 s si. n., st. Petersburg 33710 Rabbi Jacob Luski Sabbath
Services: Friday evening 8 p.m.; Saturday. 9 am.: Sunday 9 a.m.:
Monday-Friday 8 am.: and evening Minyan Tot. 381-4900. 381-4901.

CONQREQATION BETH CHAl Conservative
8400 125 St. N., Semmole 33642 Rabbi Hsrman Klrsbnor Sabbath
Services: Friday evenings 8 p.m.: Saturday, M0 a.m. Tei 393-5625.
5625.
CONGREGATION BETH SHALOM-Conaorvatluo
1325 8. Belcher Rd.. Clearwater 33516 Rabbi Peter Mehler Sab-
bath Services: Friday evening 8 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.. Sunday morn-
ing Minyan 9 a.m. Tel. 531-1418.
TEMPLE B'NAI ISRAEL Reform
1685 S. Belcher Rd.. Clearwater 33516* Rabbi Arthur
Baseman Sabbath Services: Friday evening at 8 p.m Saturday
10:30 a.m. Tei.531-5829
TEMPLE AHAVAT SH ALOM-Reform
P.O. Box 1098. Dunodln 33528 Rabbi Jan Bresky Sabbath Ser
vices Friday evening 8 p.m. Tel. 734-9428.
sponsored Camp David peace
process even Lhough Palestinian
autonomy discussions are to
begin again soon.
'JWV also wonders about
Saudi friendship when it joined
JWV Commander Zweiman
East Peace: New Oppor-
tunities: reads like a prop-
aganda statement pub-
lished by the government of
Saudi Arabia." Robert
Zweiman. national com-
mander of Jewish War Vet-
erans of the U.S.A.. has
written to W.P. Ta-
voulareaf, president of
Mobil OU.
. The new peace opportunity
cited i> Crown Prince Fahd's
"new eight-point Middle East
plan of Aug. 7. Zweiman noted,
although ihe ad also contains
some of President Sadat's com-
ments during his August U.S.
trip, it mysteriously fails to
mention Sadat's condemnation of
Fahd's plans as "nothing new."
THE AD QUOTES the Saudi
plans as suiting "that all states
in the region should be able to
live in peace." but does not
mention that Saudi Arabia has
never recognized the State of Is-
rael "The new Saud plan implies
peace without Israel; no wonder
Yasir Arafat was delighted with
the plan." said Zweiman. The
PLO is'committed to Israel's
total annihilation; this e the rea-
son why Israel has refused to
negotiate with a terrorist group
that wants to destroy it.
Examples of Saudi Arabia's
peaceful efforts are shown by
their part in helping negotiate the
recent cease fire in Lebanon,
Zweiman claimed, adding: "The
Mobil ad does not mention the
Saudi's financing the PLO to the
tune of S400 million a year. Saudi'
money buys arms which the PLO
uses to attack Israeli civilians.
Lebanese Christians, and import-
ant military targets' like a syna-
gogue in Vienna."
The other example given is the
Saudi effort to moderate OPEC
price increases. Zweiman asked.
"Is it really necessary to tell
Mobil Oil that the Saudis have
seen the dangers of their pre-
cipitous price increases causing a
worldwide reduction in oil con-
sumption and increased efforts to
find alternate energy sources?"
The Saudis have much oil to sell
over the long term: their econo-
mic well being depends on their
ability to maintain worrwide
demand for their major resource.
BASED ON these two arau-
menta. says Zweiman. the Mobil
ad calls for "evenhanded treat-
ment in the sale of military
equipment to our friends in the
Middle East especially Saudi
Arabia." Zweiman asks how the
proposed sale is in American in-
terests.
JWV hoy serious concerns
about this proposed sale, because
of lack of security am
to prevent sooftiatkat
onry from falling into
hands, according to L
"JWV is concornatftrajuai will
cause an escalation often arms
race in an explosive ragjac. Than
are no signs of a Saudi change, in
policy to insure a more balanced
approach to Middle Eastern
problems Sadat called on the
Saudis for such action, but them
has been no change in the Seadi's
denunciation of the American
its five partners in the Gulf
Corporation in calling America's
recent defense of Libyan aggres-
sion in international waters a
provocative trap and medieval
piracy on the high seas.' "
Chatter Box
GLADYS OSHER 866-2007
The song "You've Gotta Have Heart" surely to Israel.
Denial Haaa. who has relatives on the Suncoast. made alivah
two years ago. and is in the Israeli army. Daniels family was
having a reunion here, and his sister wrote to Prime Minister
Begin requesting a special leave for her brother, the only son in a
family of five. Leave was granted, and Daniel returned to the
United States for the happy event. Only a Jewish army would be
so compassionate, as they really recognize that every soldier is
someones child Soon people will be lining up to get a table at
Richard Levy and Jeff Levinea restaurant in Clearwater. Ben-
tleys. opening m November. Both young men held management
positions al the Wine Celler Restaurant, before branching out on
their own ... At Meryl and Gary Bulmers swim party, the
splashers included Horty and Morty Lasher. Shari and Don
Craig. Hugh Leeb, Len Friedman, and Derek Craig. Instead of
the usual fare, frash fruit and yogurt was served to the health
food lovers .
There was an overflow at Tierra Verde for the performance
of Rache Alpert and Sheene. who appeared with top recording
star Kenny Rankin. Applauding his sister was Stephen Alpert
in the front row. and many of his friends from the JCC. including
Lee Gingold. Pearl Mergaman, Tom Fortunate and the Sy
Glausers. Stephen will be wearing two hats for the JCC Dinner
Theater. He will be the leading actor in the production of
"Butterflies Are Free." as well as its director. The shows at the
JCC have a reputation for their excellence Natasha and Max
Lazeroff had a rewarding experience on a recent trip to Marietta.
Ga. Many years ago Natasha, a nurse, took care of a critically ill
baby boy. She devoted many hours of caring and loving to nurse
this child. Now. eleven years later, this same chUd is well and
happy. The Lazeroffs visisted the boy and his family, and they
shared a touching moment together.
Hondo sWost
Coast's Only True)
JEWISH CEMETERY
For People of f ha Jawish Faith
Many families who own cemetery property
up north" compared the high costs of double
funerals, inconvenience, inclement weathar,
shipping and travel. Thair decision was to
select in "Monorah Gordons".
For Information and Pricas
Call Sue Maraman 531-0475
Adjoining area available tor mixed marriages and
those who prefer cremation."
i by Gorhom tAatt+r Cmftuntti
Interested
In A
JCareer?
f
Superior Surgical Mfg. Co., Inc. the nation's
second largest manufacturer of uniforms.
career apparel and accessories for the health
care, leisure and industrial markets, is always
in need of motivated people to support our
rapidly growing operations. We offer careers
in the following categories:
Accounts Receivable
Computer Programmer Analysts (370-138. minis)
Personnel
Customer Service
Secretarial
Word Processing
" Accounting
We would be pleased to consider your resume sent to
the attention of our Personnel Department or. stop
in for an interview Superior Surgical is an Equal
Opportunity Employer, publicly traded on the
American Stock Exchange. Our Annual Report is
available on request
Superior Surgical
Mfc.Co,lnc.
Semmole Boulevard at 100th Twiji
Semmole. Florid* 33642
Phone (813) 307 get 1


October 9. 1961
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 7
Congregations, Organizations Events
NCJW
BUSINESS MEETING
it October business m*ting
MClW St Petersburg, will be
Wednesday. Oct. 28 at the
' *ge7 Elbow U..N..t 12
"Political Awareness is
J^opic of the program.
i This is the annual Membership
please bring a brown bag
Dessert and beverage will
served Bring donations of
| goods or a specialty that is
c made for the annual bake
This will benefit Cornells
jfy-s and Means.
TEMPLE
B'NAI ISRAEL
Chai Club
For those who enjoy a good
j and adventure, join us for
"annual mystery nite? Satur-
v.Oct.24. at 8 p.m. meeting at
Temple back parkin*; lot.
vations are a must! If you
further information (no too
though) just call: Ruth
er 577-5663 or Bobbi Haus-
1796-4482.
The Chai Club is Temple B'nai
Israels' auxiliary of "young peo-
I under 401. It is one of the
i popular social groups. Join
. judge for yourself.
Clearwater
Temple B'nai Israel. Clearwa-
r presents The Best Littlf Hoe-
wn in Clearwater, Saturday.
17 Limited reservations,
call now 531-5829 Time
|:30 p.m. Donation $10 per
arson Includes refresh-
enis. Door Prizes Plus Profes-
onai calling by: Hank Sthene-
as well as dancing to your
rorite tunes. Dress Wtern
This is our first fund raiser of
year and we would like to
ire you join us.
Simchat
1 until Service
Temple B'nai Israel. Clearwa-
will hold its annual Simchat
rah Service on Tuesday Oct.
.at 7:30 p.m. in the sanctuary,
rhe community is invited to
e in the joy of completing
nd beginning again the reading
bf the sacred Torah scroll.
There will be NO Hebrew
sses that evening so students
y participate in the service
'here flags and apples will be
rt of the Torah processions.
Religious School
Consecration Service for all
Statement of Ownership. Man
gement and Circulation ire
quired by 39 USC. 36S8 i 1 Title
of publication- The Jewish Flo-
ndian of Pinellas County Pub-
UcaUon No MH-470 2-Date of
filing September 30. 1981 3
Frnqumcy of Issue Bi-weekly.
A No of issues published an-
nually 28 B
Annual subscription price
! 75 4 Location of known
office of publication 302 Jupl-
|" Av So Clearwater. Fla.
"515 5 location ol headquar
ters of publishers: 120 N E th
Street. Miami. Fla 3S1S3 6-
Publlsher. editor, managing
editor Fred K Shochet. 120
NE 6 Street, Miami. Fla 33132
'Owner. Fred K. Shochet. 120
\E 6 Street. Miami. Fla. 33132.
"Known bondholders. m->r
fgagees and other security
Holders holding or owning 1
Percent or more of total
mount of bonds,.mortgages or
other securities, lf-any:None.
for completion by non-profit
organliatlons: None. 10-Extent
nd nature of circulation, given
in this order: average no copies
*cn issue during preceding 12
months followed by. actual no.
Ples single Issue published
nearest to filing date: A) total
no copies printed (net proas
": 4.277, 1.600; Bl paid ctr
tulation: 1-sales through
dealers and carriers, atreet
vendors and counter sales. 0. 0.
'!!!*" "bscrIptlona: S.9S0
tiil; C)tlml P*W elrculauon
JW0. 4.197; 6) free dlatrlbu-
"on my mall, carrier, or other
means, samples, compllmen
ry and otn,r ^^ copieii 0, o.
11 total distribution. 3.9M, 4.
JJ Ft copies no distributed 1)
onice use, left over, unac-
counted for. spoiled after
P/Jnttng. 47. 40t. 2) returns
ToUl 4.277, 4*0.1 certify that
Elements made by me above
r correct and complete.
* -"red K. Shochet. publisher

kindergarten students of Temple
B'nai Israel Religious School will
be held on Friday. Oct. 16. at 8
p.m. Family Worship Services.
The students, under the direc-
tion of teacher Renee Baseman,
will share a poem and the Shema,
the watchword of their faith
which proclaims the oneness of
God.
The evening's festivities will
begin with a family Shabbat din-
ner in the Temple all purpose
room. The Community is invited
to participate in the service.
Sisterhood
Temple B'nai Israel Sister-
hoods' "In Gathering." Spaghet-
ti dinner and Live Entertainment
on Tuesday. Oct. 27, at 7 p.m.
Admission is by donation of
appliances, furniture, hard goods
(working condition). Value of
merchandise no less than $5 retail
price per person. Children under
12 included with parents admis-
sion.
Sisterhood plans
New Years Eve Gala
B'nai Israel Sisterhood. St. Pete,
will hold a gala New Years Eve
Party at the Temple, and will
provide a delicious kosher meal, a
great band to dance to. noise-
makers and set-ups. BYOB. This
is a bargain at SI9.82 per person.
Send in your reservation to Zelda
Kroll. 546-3616. Anita Helfand.
381-6386. or Barbara Bleier, at
384-4862.
SHALOM, HADASSAH
The St. Petersburg Shalom
Chapter of Hadassah will hold a
paid up membership luncheon on
Oct. 28 at Congregation B'nai
Israel, St. Petersburg. A special
meat luncheon will be served at
12:30 p.m. There is no charge for
paid up members, and guests
may pay $3. If guests join
Hadassah, the admissioi price
will be deducted fro.n the
Hadassah membership foe The
program will highlight entertain-
ment featuring Belle Ma.in. Lil-
lian Corday, Sally Gicherman,
Hannah Marantz, and Molly
A very.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
In honor of their 10th Anniver-
sary the Paul Surenky P>st 409,
Jewish War Veterans have plan-
ned a Gala Dinner Party to be
held on Sunday, Oct. 25,7 p.m. at
the Caribbean Gulf Hotel on
Clearwater Beach. A Complete
four course dinner with musical
accompaniment and true door
prizes. $9 per person. Guests wel-
comed. For further information
or reservations please contact
Gladys Fishman, 443-1825 or
Betty Cohen. 799-2259.
JEWISH SINGLES
The Bay Area Jewish Singles
are planning a theater party for
Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at th? Tampa
Jewish Community Center. The
play is "The Secret Affa r of Mil-
dred Wild." and will be per-
formed by the Tampa Pltyers.
A social, with refreshments,
will follow the show.
Tampa Bay Jewish Singles are
open to any Jewish adilt 21 or
older from Pinellas and Hillsbor-
ough Counties and the furround-
ing areas.
Attendance for past events has
been great. Plan ahead, spread
the word, and join us. For further
information call, in St. Peters-
burg, Steven Tepper at 823-4711
ot Eileen Hirsch at 541-4791.
JEWISH DAY SCHOOL
The Jewish Day School func-
tions as an intensive Jewish edu
cational institution for Ihe entire,
local Jewish community. The
community benefits without
regard to affiliation or
enrollment. Families can benefit
from the Day School even if they
do not have children of school
age. Thus, for instance, the Day
School "marketed project Home
Start a home. Jewish, educa
tional program for pre-schoolers.
Service to the aged, "dthair
^rvice in return, is an ""'
ingredient 0f Day School Me
The Day School tries hard to
react to the needs of the elderly.
People never stop learning, nor
do human beings stop being use-
ful at the a prescribed accumula-
tion of years. AU people have a
strong desire to be loved, enter-
tained and stimulated.
The Day School's participation
in the Gulf Coast Jewish Family
Services Adopt-a-grandchild pro-
gram helps both the volunteer
grandparents and the students.
In exchange for loving help and
smiles, admiration and devotion,
the volunteer grandmas and
grandpas provide Day School
youngsters with help in Reading,
Spelling. Jewish Studies and
Arithmetic. The help that these
grandparents provide is priceless.
Students benefit not only by
learning more, but by developing
a strong sense of commitment to
the values which the grandpar-
ents reflect. Often the students
share close feelings with the
grandparents. For many stu-
dents the grandparents are as
close as blood relatives.
The Day School also strives to
help those senior citizens who are
not able to donate their time.
Last March the Day School held
its first model seder. The seder
was made meaningful to our stu-
dents largely because of the par-
ticipation of the Menorah Center
residents. The Day School is cer-
tain that through the students'
efforts. Passover 5741 was made
more special for Menorah Center.
The elder statesmen of Pinellas
County are a treasure that must
be utilized fully. Anyone capable
of volunteering time or service to
the Day School is encouraged to
contact Adopt-a-Grandchild's di-
rector, Mrs. Robin King, at 446-
1005. The Day School hopes that
it can help the senior years be-
come even more golden.
In other Day School news, the
children of the Day School will be
helping in the decoration of the
Jewish Community Center Suk-
kah on a field trip to be held on
Oct. 6.
The Day School slide presenta-
tion is being revised, and is avail-
able for all synagogues and
Jewish organizations. To arrange
a special showing, organizers
may call the school a 381-8111.
The Jewish Day School is a
beneficiary agency of monies
raised in the annual Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign.
B'NAI B'RITH
YOUTH ORGANIZATION
The B'nai B'rith Youth Orga-
nization (AZA and BBG) has
started a new chapter in the
Clearwater area. The chapter will
be a BBYO Chapter, meaning the
boys and girls will meet together.
The B'ani B'rith sponsored group
is open to all Jewish teens who
are at least 14 years old and in
the 9th through 12th grade. For
information about the group,
please contact either Beth Starr
(7251781) or Mike Brunhild at
the Tampa Jewish Community
Center (1-872-4451).
USY, BETH CHAI
Beth Chai's United Synagogue
Youth is sponsoring a bowling
clinic for all of Pinellas County
Jewish Youth. There is no charge
whatever for this beautiful event.
Information available by calling
the synagogue's office.
BETH SHOLOM
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
tion Beth Sholom of Gulfport will
hold its. regular meeting on
Thursday, Oct. 16, at 1 p.m. New
and prospective members are
cordially invited to help us cele-
brate our 17th birthday.
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
tion Beth Sholom of Gulfport will
hold its annual paid-up member-
ship luncheon on Tuesday, Oct.
27 at noon-time in the Synagogue
Social HaB, 1844-54th Street
South, Gulfport. Our guest
speaker wul be Rabbi Sidney
Lubin. He Will tell us about his
recent visit t*> Israel Friends and
prospective members are cor-
dially invited. Donation 93.
TEMPLE BETHEL
St. Petersburg: A series of four
concerts in the sanctuary of Tem-
ple Beth-El, 400 Pasadena Ave-
nue, South, sponsored by the
Temple's Sisterhood and Broth-
erhood, will be initiated Monday
evening, Oct. 26, by David Syme,
brilliant piano virtuoso. Interna-
tionally acclaimed by audiences
and critics he has made triump-
hant appearances all over Ameri-
ca and Europe.
On Monday evening. Feb. 22,
1982. the St. Petersburg Opera
Company's Workshop, starring
lyric soprano, Sylvia Posno and
other opera stars will make its
fifth annual appearance in the
sanctuary of Temple Beth-El. A
full chorus will feature light
opera, show tunes and operatic
selections.
On Wednesday evening, March
17. 1982. Thomas Palmer,
vibrant premiere baritone will
make his appearance. His suc-
cessful operatic career was culmi-
nated with his debut at the Met-
ropolitan Opera as Silvio in Pag-
liacci. Palmer has distinguished
himself with outstanding opera
companies, in films and televi-
sion.
Sunday evening. April 4. 1982.
Cantor Harold Orbach, a lyric
tenor, will sing a varied reper-
toire. He has scored triumphs all
over America and gave the first
performance of a Jazz Service in a
Synagogue. He is Cantor of Tem-
ple Israel in Detroit.
Subscription prices for the four
concerts are $20 for each person
or tickets may be purchased
singly for S6 per person for each
concert. For tickets call Irving
Finkelstein. 381-5231 or the Tem-
ple office. 347-6136. Sylvia Danto
is Chairman of the Concert
Series.
ORT
Evening Chapter
The St. Petersburg Evening
Chapter of ORT is sponsoring a
pro-holiday Crafts-Fair on Tues-
day. Oct.>B7, at 8 p.m. The JCG
on Elbow Lane will host the fair
which is open to the>public.
Participants of the Crafts-Fair
are:
Play n' Learn who features
toys for children of all ages. A
wide selection for ordering will be
available. This includes baby
toys, space toys, teachers toys,
educational toys, magical toy
games, family games, creative
thinking, and scientific toys.
Play n' Learn eaters to the child
in us all.
Creative Conspiracy has
fine hand-crafted gift ideas. Pot-
tery items, kitchen accessories,
dolls, painted works and dough
art will be among the diversified -
selection.
The Paper Caper is display-
ing personalized items including
stationary, paper goods, chil-
dren's accessories, stickers by the
yard, hand-painted cookie tins,
individualized lunch boxes, cus-
tomized watering cans, a lucite
selection, pens and gifts for men.
Suncoast Creations has a
beautifully crafted and coordi-
nated line of infant ascessories
with eyelet ruffle trim and appli-
que designs. The handmade
quilted items are available in
primary colors, rainbows and
ginghams. The range extends
from baby bags to creative bar-
rett holders to wall organizers
and tooth fairy pillows.
All personalized orders will be
ready before the Hanukah
Holiday begins. A portion of the
profits will be donated back to
ORT.
ORT operates Vocational
Schools in some 30 countries. The
largest single ORT Program in
the World is in Israel. ORT has
trained over 200.000 people in
I srael. The present enrollment is
over 75,000 students learning in
over 100 major schools. In the
U.S., ORT established the inno-
vative Bramson Technical Insti-
tute. It is an accredited two year
Junior College which offers stu-
dents the option of transferring
credits and continuing their edu-
cation at higher levels. Bramson
II is planned for the Los Angeles
area and the new Jewish High
School in Miami has contracted
ORT to operate the vocational
division.
The Crafts Fair will not only
help holiday shoppers, but also
help ORT to continue its impor-
tant and relevant work.
Afternoon Chapter
Rummage Sale
Friday. Oct. 16 is the opening
date for the St. Petersburg After-
noon Chapter. ORT. annual rum-
mage sale. It will be held at 3290
1st Ave. South. St. Pete and will
continue until Nov. 7. There will
be exceptional bargains in
jewelry, wearing apparel, house-
hold appliances, domestics and
kitchen ware. Many other items
will be available. The public is in-
vited.
Afternoon Chapter
Membership Tea
The opening fall membership
tea for new and prospective
members will be held on Tuesday,
Oct. 20 at 2 p.m. at the Beau
Monde Recreation Room. 4960
Gulf Blvd.. St. Petersburg
Beach. New and prospective
members, with or without accom-
panying sponsors, are cordially
invited. Please call Chairwoman
Hilda Ratner. 393-0579, or Co-
Chairwoman Ann Brien, 3M)-
6305, for reservations. Sophia
Kahn is hostess for the tea, and
Mae Malin is Chapter President.
Afternoon Chapter
New Date for Luncheon
The annual paid up member-
ship luncheon meeting of the St.
Petersburg Afternoon Chapter of
Womens American ORT will be
held on Monday. Oct. 12 at 12:30
p.m. in the auditorium of the
Gulfport Community Center,
5730 Shore Blvd.. S., Gulfport.
Following a light lunch, there will
be a short meeting, after which
the Mary Louise Boutique of St.
Petersburg will present a fashion
show. Chapter members will
serve as models. Mae Malin is
chapter president. Please note
the date, Oct. 12, as this is a new
date.
GOLD A ME IR
FRIENDSHIP CLUB
Thank you. Thank you. Thank
you.
For an outstanding perfor-
mance to an outstanding
audience. On Sept. 14 the Golda
Meir Friendship Club. 302 South
Jupiter Street had their first open
social of the 1981-82 Season. Over
125 persons crowded into the
meeting room to see and hear a
performance given by a group of
residents from "Top of the
World," mc'D by Gerry Rubin,
Executive Director of the Jewish
Federation, who did an outstand-
ing job.
There aren't enough words to
express our appreciation. The
audience loved this four star per-
formance and we hope to invite
them back in the near future.
*
n,-n o i e 7iriu
HAVE SON? WILL TRAVEL!
SURGICAL MOHEL
Approved by all Physicians and Rabbis
Painlessly Dona According to Ihe Highest
Hygienic Medical Standards and Halacha
HOSPITAL OR HOME
(306)052-2712

*W*W>r*VWV-
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The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday. October^
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Reagan Sees Joke in Falling Dow
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THE OTHER day, President
Reagan was asked if the plunging
Dow figures on stocks and bonds
bothered him. The President re-
plied with a burst of laughter.
"No, I don't have any."
We are meant to believe tha*.
of course, the President was
making a joke. But anyone ac-
quainted with Freud's "Wit and
its Relation to the Unconscious' S
would have good reason for deep ^WWWWSwwsw<*4^
concern.
Jokes sav a lot about the peo- u. v-:_on .^m
pie who tell them. In fact, jokes end. make R'ch*^J3n 9<*m
are only a painfully thin disguise l*e poor cousin b> contrast,
behind which the unconscious But there is a far more bitter
drives itself itself into the relief of lesson to be learned here. It is
public expression of what are not that Mr Reagan Pre,er!
often cruel and sociallv unaccep- wealth and power and that he has
table feelings. a punishing attitude toward the
WITH THE excuse that thev P' and the needy ^om he re-
gards as weak and undesiraoie.
Few can doubt this very much
ionger After all. Teddy Roose-
velt l self-reliance principle,
taken entirely out of context by
Mr Reagan from the larger
meaning of the Rooseveltian vi-
gorous life philosophy, is what
motivates him these day to the
point of obsession.
The bitter lesson is that humor
hides hostility given two condi
tions. la) the extent to which the
joke-teller is or is not sociopathic.
that is to say. the extent to which
his super-ego responds to the
greater civilizational need that he
must control his hostility as an
acceptable member of the com-
munity: and (b) the extent to
which the object of the joke-
teller's hostility is or is not nega-
tively stimulating enough to
cause him to lose control.
THE FIRST condition ex-
plains why inveterate joke-tellers
and. of course, professional
humorists and comedians are
often keenly tortured people who
in their private lives are not fun-
ny at all. Many of them are frank
to confess, for example, that their
dream is to play tragic roles, say
Hamlet or Macbeth or Lear,
rather than comic roles.
couldn't possibly mean what they
have just said, that they merely-
meant to be tunny, such people
believp they can get away with
saying the most outrageous
things, sometimes even for our
own good"
David Stockman. Mr
Reagan s crass, opportunistic
budce* hatchKman. made a joke
if his own the very same day
the President played Bob Hope
to the Dow. A handful of Sena-
tors had just gone through a
school lunch authorized by the
Administration in the name of
budget cuts. One GOP legislator
railed the lunch an obscenity."
All the Senators present con-
cluded that balancing the budget
could not rightly be achieved on
the backs of poor school children.
Whereupon Stockman took to
the airwaves to assure the na-
tion's television evening news
audience that nobody was really
meant to take the reduced school
lunch program seriously espe-
cially to understand ex-post facto
that the ketchup-as-vegetable
scam was nothing more than a
bureaucratic boo-boo in the first
place.
THE IMPULSE is to conclude
that the Reaganites regard back-
bone America as something to
make jokes about. And there is
no doubt that this is
true especially given Mr.
Reagan's predilection for an im-
perial presidency that may. in the
The second condition explains
why there is nothing so
dangerous as the sadistic humor-
ist, the personality that has long
since lost control over the civili-
zational prerequisites for
U.S. Mulling Its Decision To
Attend Egyptian-Israeli Talks
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON The United States has not yet
made a decision on whether it will
be represented at the resumption
of the Egyptian-Israeli autonomy
talks, but is "considering all
options." according to State De-
partment spokesman Dean
Fischer, and "would not rule out
the possibility" that Secretary of
State Alexander Haig will repre-
sent the United States.
Fischer was asked at the State
Department briefing whether it
would not be unusual for the
United States not to be repre-
sented at the first meetings of the
Foreign Ministers scheduled to
take place in Cairo Sept. 23-24.
HAIG WILL be at United
Nations General Assembly
meetings in New York at that
time. Egyptian Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali is also sched-
uled to be at the General
Assembly session at the same
time.
Fischer replied: "We don't
regard it as particularly unusual,
because of the fact that they
(Israel and Egypt) are signator-
ies to the Camp David treaty as
we are ourselves. The two coun-
tries do have full diplomatic
relations, they meet bilaterally at
various levels on a variety of
subjects, just as we meet bilater-
ally with each of them. We regard
these meetings as being as much
a part of our full partnership as
the trilateral negotiating sessions
themselves."
Fischer was asked whether a
replacement for former special
Mideast Ambassador Sol
Linowitz was being considered
and he replied "that decision has
not been made." He was asked
about reports that the autonomy
negotiations would be held in
New York and he said. "We have
no confirmation and no comment
on them
membership in the community
and that finds humor and even
joy in punishing the objects of his
hostility with pain.
Joke-tellers who have em-
barked on that road have a low
anger flashpoint. They lose their
tempers easily. Paradoxically,
they are to be found more among
the seemingly mild-mannered,
often the successful socializes
rather than among the sociopaths
who have long since given up the
pretense that they are "nice
guys."
PRESIDENT REAGAN is the
epitome these days of the "nice
guy." When he made his joke
about the plunging Dow. he was
affable in the extreme. He
showed every aspect of his
pleasing personality that won
him the election last November.
And that, earlier in life, also won
him the Bonzo role After all. he
did not come to play Bonzo en-
tirely by accident: anyone who
was willing to act in that context
limply had to be a "nice guy"
Rut then came Scene Two of
Mr Reagan s script for the very-
same day that began when he
played comedian to the Dow. In
the second scenario, the Presi-
dent was called upon to respond
to the news, the very predictable
news, which he clearly did not
anticipate or see that way. that
the Saudis were not at the mo-
ment prepared to accept the
latest GOP scheme to push the
AW ACS sale through the Senate.
This was the scheme that would
have sold the AWACS but re-
quired of the Saudis that they ac-
cept American crew control over
them
Mr. Reagan's reaction was
clear. His head shook uncontrol-
lably as he dropped the comic
mask for the tragic. His voice
choking with rage at the Senators
lined up against the AWACS sale
under any circumstances, Mr.
Reagan turned Lear, his hostility
bordering on threats of future
punishment for those who were
crossing him. He did not know
"what to do with them." he said.
for failing to support this part of
his military package for the
Saudis. But he would sure come
up with something if they failed
to relent.
THE TWO scenarios are fasci-
nating because they divide along
the lines of the President's emo-
tional imperatives. In the
struggle for budget cuts to which
the Dow has been responding so
negatively, the President could
be his usual, affable self and
make jokes because he was after
all having his way in the war
against welfare America.
But in the arena of military en-
terprise, in the complex world of
the industrial and military fat cat
to which he has elected himself as
heir. Mr. Reagan can see no hu-
mor and will tolerate with only
great control the frustration of
his expansionist soul.
Whether or not the President
goes yet a step further remains to
be seen. He can not readily
punish the Senators of his own
party led by Robert Packwood of
Oregon who have handed him the
AWACS defeat as it now stands.
GMARCHTIMATOVA
BILLMARKHAM
CANDIDATE FOR U.S. SENATE
To All My Friends
May You Be Inscribed and Sealed for
A Year of Health, Happiness and Shalom,
Peace! For Israel and the Entire World.
57421981,1982
| Paid By Bill Markriam For U.S. Senate Campaign Committee
But he can punish l8rtal
whose interests ne presumaj
holds in such high esteem 1
can punish Israel in the same wiJ
that, say, Lear punished his b
loved Cordelia. And whether
not he attempts this depet
upon which of the two conditic,
governing hostility in humor!
timately claims him. The tin
for an end to Administrate
joke-cracking and so-cille
bureaucratic boo-boos may wejl
be at hand.
The Sunsweet
Self-Imi
iprovenfent
Plan.
sui
>-..
PRUNE
155.'
^j&y
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The Sunsweet Self Improvement plan includes
exercise and u healthy, well-balanced diet
And that includes Sunsweet Prune Juice, with
no preservatives or added sugar sun>wcet is
MM)"., pure natural fruit juice, with Kits of iron
potavsium and vitamin B,. And best ol all. ii
tastes good. So drink a toast to yourself
With Sunsweet
SUNSWEET
lb your health."


Full Text
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FILES



Of Pinellas County
Number 21
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, October 9,1981
C FfdSbochti
' "Price 10 Cents
lm unity Response to 1981 Combined Jewish Appeal Campaign In Final Sto*
leal For Cash Increased As Workers Appreciation Night Mans Take Shape
Is Still Urgently Needed
lections for the com-
sh Appeal of Pinellas
re currently running
jst year, due to inten-
i of the cash collections
of the Jewish federa-
rted F.lli Mills, Trea-
l federation.
Itive reaction from the
is in response to
requests made by Saul
campaign chairman,
tedly throughout the
lrged all members of
community to ac-
^eir payments to the
ibined Jewish Appeal
ind to make every ef-
kmplete payments to
)igns in response to se-
funds previously ear-
life enhancing pro-
| services, both here in
junty and in Israel,
ing example of what
iplish when we work
leet the very real
it people in Pinellas
bout the world."
jnberg, chairman of
ind allocatins corn-
Jewish Federation,
[that equal monthly
the United Jewish
transmission overseas
stain the ongoing aid
by the combined
ML
EM Mills
Mr. Mills cited the fact of "the
diminishing pledge" in which
Israeli inflation, coupled with the
weakened purchasing power of
the dollar, adversely effects the
pledges. For example, he said, "A
$1,000 pledge paid one year late
has a value of $750;two years late
$500; three years late $25Q."
All members of the Jewish
community are reminded "Your
pledge is your promiseredeem
your pledge now."
\Letter To The
Community
libers of the Pinellas
this High Holiday
tould like to share with
lowing message:
Ivens belong to the
earth He gave over
I. Ps 115:16
y. It is Rosh Hashanah
(day of the world. "On
day Clod finished His
He had been doing"
much remains to be
lungry need to be fed,
need to be taught,
fell as the young need
We all need relief
tress and anxiety of
global conflicts that
us.
rfect. Surely He could
a perfect world.
He? He deliberately
rki unfinished because
each generation
woman, and child to
ler in the continuous
>n.
ition tells us that this
I means to be human.
us with unique
eption, compassion,
ss. It is our job to use
iprove the world. We
children that every-
lo makes a difference.
start believing it
slves to act as
actions change the
le. Because they do.
Prayer, ritual and study can
make us sensitive to moments of
change and choice. They give us a
renewed vision of our goal. It is
when we take that vision out into
the world and act on it that we
really become partners in crea-
tion.
What can we do?
Help worthy students stay in
school. Read for the blind. Tutor
in overburdened schools. Share
our talents where they are
needed. All of us can take steps
to guard the water, the air. the
soil that are entrusted to us. We
can respond when people around
us are in pain Visit the sick
and the grieving and really
listen.
In a world of gossip we can
respect privacy. In violent times
we Van deal gently with our chil-
dren and our aged. We can ake
the chance of reaching out to a
stranger. We can refuse to stand
idly by while our neighbors
blood is shed.
Wake up. Accept your role as a
partner in creation Rosh Hasha-
nah is the time and wherever you
are is the place to begin.
My sincerest 'wishes for a
healthy and happy New Year.
Shalom,
RABBI JACOB LUSKI
(Editors Note-Rabbi Lushi^
the President of the Pinellas
County Board of Rabbis. I
Campaign leaders have indi-
cated that the 1981 Combined
Jewish Appeal Effort is in its
final stages, attempting to meet a
community commitment of
$780,000 approved by the budget
and allocations committee on be-
half of all beneficiary agencies.
The campaign to date has sur-
passed $750,000, showing an in-
crease of more than $200,000
based on pledges made by the
same individuals in 1980. Saul
Schechter, combined Jewish Ap-
peal .General Campaign Chair-
man, indicated that both his
campaign leaders and individual
contributors through out Pinellas
County can now take pride in the
fact that we have accelerated the
pace of the campaign by several
months. By doing so, we are able
to give the necessary thought to
planning and coordinating to the
1982 Campaign effort. The 1982
Campaign is already in its plan-
ning stages.
Although the '81' Campaign is
in its final stages, The "HOME
STRECH" OFTEN PROVES
TO BE THE MOST DIFFI-
CULT. Reva Kent, President of
the Community's Federation,
called on all community minded
citizens who have not yet made
their pledges to help meet the
challenge. "We have no intention
of stopping until every man and
woman is successfully and
thoughtfully solicited for their
1981 pledge"
Although the '81' Campaign
is in its final stages, the "home
strech" often proves to be the
most difficult. Reva Kent, Presi-
dent of the Community's Federa-
tion, called on all community
minded citizens who have not yet
made their pledges to help meet
hte challenge. "We have no in-
tention of stopping until every
man and woman is successfully
and thoughtfully solicited for
their 1981 pledge."
Meanwhile plans are now being
unfolded for a workers apprecia-
tion night, which will be held
shortly after the Jewish holidays.
The Federation will pay tribute
to the more than 300 men and
women who assisted the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal effort. Geral
Rubin. Director of the Jewish
Federation, added that the best
way to say thank you to its de-
voted volunteers is by achieving
our community goal and in-
creasing the level of funding
which the Jewish Community of
Pinellas County provides.
Mr. Schechter informs us that
"our community has to be re-
minded that to achieve our goals
will not give us an abundance of
funds. It may not even allow us
to keep pace with inflation, but at
least we will be able to maintain
both our commitment to overseas
Jewish in need and our hish
standards and caliber of services
that our Jewish community has
come to expect.
Mr. Schechter informs us that
"our community has to be re-
minded that to achieve our goals
will not give us an abundance of
funds. It may not even allow us
to keep pace with inflation, but at
least we will be able to maintain
both our commitment to overseas
Jewish in need and our high
standards and caliber of services
that our Jewish community has
come to expect. The simple fact is
that we can not provide more
than the community is willing to
give."

The Gnu Control Argument
By BARBARA FINKELSTEIN
A pudgy young boy with a look
of excitement in his eyes balances
a rifle in his hands. Behind him
stands his coach, a young man
not yet out of his twenties.
Nothing unusual here at a firing
range near Texas Canyon, Calif,
except that both individuals are
Jewish.
Lately, various organizations
have appealed to American Jews
to arm themselves. Why do gun
rights campaigns include special
outreach publicity to Jews? Do
the campaigns manipulate Jew-
ish sensitivity valid or ex-
aggerated to anti-Semitic
sentiment in this country? Or do
they play on Jewish embarrass-
ment about "Jewish passivity"
during World War II?
ONE PITCH for Jewish gun
ownership argues that "it can
happ-n here. Another urges
Jewish businessmen to defend
themselves against inner city
crime. The first approach is
specifically Jewish; the second
appeals to Jews as members ot
the white middle class, often
frustrated by the inefficiencies of
a bureaucrat*: legal process.
Occasionally, an organization like
the Seattle-based Second
Amendment Foundation will cite
both reasons as incentives to buy
guns.
The posture of the major
Jewish defense organizations
contrasts sharply with the gun
lobby position. B'nai B nth, the
American Jewish Congress, the
American Jewish Communtiy
Relations Advisory Council all
endorsed their respective gun
control proposals in the early and
Sd-sevSntleV This organ,
zational consensus stems ess
"om any liberal po itical
agenda than trom a cultural
revulsion towards guns which
many Jews have inherited. Jews,
it was said long ago, are not
hunters.
According to a US. Depart-
ment of Justice poll, 11 percent of
American Jews owned a handgun
or pistol in 1980. Twenty percent
owned a long-barrelled gun. By
contrast, 29 percent of
Protestants owned handguns and
40 percent owned rifles; 18
percent of Catholics owned
handguns and 29 percent, rifles.
With Jewish gun ownership so
far below the national average,
why has special attention been
focused on the idea of Jews and
guns?
ONE REASON may be op-
portunistic: anti-gun control
image that the JDL relies on is
the defeated European Jew who
"consented" to his own
destruction. Occasionally the
JDL draws some rather shaky
parallels. For example, JDL
national chairman Irving Rubin
cites the legitimacy of Ku Klux
Klan candidates in recent Cali-
fornia and North Carolina elec-
tions and desecration of syna-
gogues as precursors to another
round of Nuremburg Laws and
groups may view Jews as an
untapped reservoir of supporters.
Another is the increasing
seriousness with which American
Jews have been discussing anti-
Semitism. And judging by the
space devoted to it in the Jewish
press, the subject makes com-
pelling reading. Often in such
articles the Jewish Defense
League is mentioned or quoted.
"The JDL always knew how to
use the press," says one former
member. "It was an organization
that replied on images." The
mass pogroms. If you don't want
to end up like the Jews of Europe,
the JDL states, bay a gun.
"The fact is," says the former
JDL member, "the argument
that the present is an insecure
time for Jews has at least some
validity. For example, it's
become acceptable in the past
decade to think of Jews as Zionist
aggressors worthy of UN con-
demnation."
WHILE JDL influence may be
far less wide-reaching today than
it was ten years ago, JDL-
sponsored target practices still
draw non-JDL members. A
recent appeal is directed at
Russian Jewish immigrants who
are warned: "There are Nazis in
America! It CAN happen; here.
Prepare to defend yourself!"
Many Jewish target shooters,
however, are less concerned with
right-wing extremists than with
self-defense against crime. "This
business about a Nazi resurgence
is bull," Philadelphian Ernest
Brydon told Philadelphia's
Jewish Exponent. "If Jews have
turned to guns it's because they
feel the judicial system has failed
and the streets are full of
recidivist criminals. The public
has lost faith in the law but
this applies to everyone, not just
Jews.
Brydon's opinion raises an
important question: Just who is
supposed to be the enemy? Is it
the various Klan and Nazi parties
with their poorly attended yet
much publicized anti-black and
anti-Jewish demonstrations? Or
is it the urban criminal who
assaults a Jew in his store or on
the street maybe not as a Jew,
but as a vulnerable touch?
"Gun Control Works: Holo-
caust." expounds a bumper
sticker, leapfrogging over cause
and effect. The message is clear,
albeit glib: Buy a gun or be a
, victim. A Jewish victim.


Page 12
The./..."-*. of ...
The Jtwish Floridian ofPintUas County
Fridy. September*
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Happy New Year from Pan Am.