The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Clearwater (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Petersburg (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Pinellas County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- Clearwater
United States -- Florida -- Pinellas -- St. Petersburg

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 25, 1980)-

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44628627
lccn - sn 00229554
ocm44628627
System ID:
AA00014308:00003

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewisti Filariidlihi in
Off IN ncI las County
i me
;1 Number 2
St. Petersburg, Florida Friday, May 9. 1980
Price io Cents

.V
lusivc Search For
Sc\nnl Equality
EW YORK (JTA) An
Inization calling itself the
American Coalition for
len in Israel has been estab
Id to deal with what it terms
|grim reality of the lives of
en in Israel. The founding
knal conference took place
{last week and for two and a
[days explored the personal,
Issional and religious status
praeli women, according to
Bob, editor of The Journal,
[publication of the North
Jewish community in
Mass., who will emigrate
lelin 1981.
declaration of principles
led by the 200 women at-
ng the conference stated
|we support the struggle for
lit y of Israeli women
;h our activism. We recog-
l.u the preliminary basis of
activism is aliya. thereby
Ig the responsibility of
^ving Israeli society."
DECLARATION called
Knesset and government
Srael "to allow secular
jns for secular people and
fmand full expression and
cognition to all branches
idaism. We call on the
iox rabbinate to increase
sensitivity to women's
i and to direct steps towards
Ising sexual equality."
pey Hazelton. author of
Women: The Reality Be-
Uhe Myth, told the con-
that despite Israel's
ition of Independence's
Jtee of equality irrespective
of religion, race or sex. Israeli
women face many legal and social
obstacles to achieving equal
rights. Bob reported.
Primary among these, Hazel-
ton said, is the absolute power
vested in the Orthodox rabbinate
by the Knesset in all matters of
personal law. If feminism is to be
achieved, she said, "there must
be a separation of synagogue and
state The real issue is the
political establishment of Ortho-
dox Judaism."
SHULAMIT ALONI, Civil
Rights Party Knesset member,
warned that the power of the rab-
binate in areas of marriage and
divorce mitigate against
democracy. "What makes (Ash-
kenazi Chief Rabbi Shlomo)
Goren's interpretations any
better than mine? she asked the
audience. "The only place for
imposed unity in a democracy is
in the army."
Tamar Avidar, Attache for
Women's Affairs of the Iraeli
F.mbassy. said that women's
issues were not among the top
priorities of the government of
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin. The 92-member Com-
mission on the Status of Women
appointed during the government
of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
examined all aspects of Israeli
life. It presented 241 recom-
mendations to the Knesset last
year. Avidar noted. The Begin
government, however, has yet to
Continued on Page 8
New Ground Missile
|EL AVIV (JTA) Israel's military industry
jveloped a ground-to-ground missile at the request
^ember nation of the North Atlantic Treaty Alliance
>) which is presently in use by the armed forces of
^ountry as well as Israel, it was disclosed in the
lilitary industry bulletin. The NATO country was
led.
IEPUTY DEFENSE Minister Mordechai Zipori
connection with the report that Israel's military
shment is cooperating with a number of European
on ground-to-ground missiles of which the one
id to the NATO country is an example.
apitol
naiysis
Legislators Still Swell Liberal Ranks
WASHINGTON (JTAI -
Despite the shift to conservative
positions by many members in
both houses of Congress, the 23
Jewish Representatives and
seven Senators mostly remain in
the ranks of the liberals or in the
center of the political spectrum.
This conclusion is drawn from
the voting record of 1979 of the
435 House members and 100
Senators on 19 issues reported by
the liberal Americans for
Democratic Action which ob-
served "Congress continued to
move to the right" in domestic
policy and "the faltering of
progressive initiatives" in foreigr
affairs.
DOMESTIC ISSUES about
which ADA conducted its annual
survey included busing, assisted
housing, nuclear power, abortion,
food stamps, low-income energy
assistance, windfall profits tax.
Foreign policy matters concerned
relations with the People's
Republic of China, Rhodesian
sanctions, foreign economic aid, a
nuclear aircraft carrier and the
M-X missile.
Of the 12 Senators who sup-
ported ADA positons three out of
four times, two are Jewish
Howard Metzenbaum (D.. Ohio)
and Carl Levin (D. Mich.).
Among the 65 Senators who
approved ADA positions less
than half the time were Richard
Stone ID.. Fla.t. Rudv Boschwitz
(R.. Minn.) and Edward Zorinsky
(D..Neb.).
Metzenbaum ranks third
among the Senate's members in
support, of liberal viewpoints.
With a record of 84 percent,
Metzenbaum trails only Sen.
George McGovern (D, S.D.) who
has a perfect record, and Patrick
Leahy (D.. Vt.) with 89 percent.
Second to Metzenbaum among
the seven Jewish Senators in
Levin with 74 percent, while third
is Jacob Javits |R.. N.Y.) with 63
percent. Other Senatorial records
as reported by ADA: Abraham
Ribicoff ID.. Conn.) 53 percent,
and Stone, Boschwitz and
Congressmen are: Ken Kramer
(R.. Colo.). 5 percent; William
Lehman II).. Fla). 89: Elliott
Levitas (I)., Ga.), 68; Abner
Mikva ID., Ill), who retired in
September. 91; Dan Glickman
(D.. Kans.l. 47; Gladys Spellman
ID.. Md.). 63; Lester Wolff (D.,
N.Y.), 74; Benjamin Rosenthal
ID.. N.Y.I, 68; James Scheuer
ID.. N.Y.), 84; Elizabeth
Holtzman ID..N.Y), 84; Ben-
jamin Gilman (R., N.Y.), 53;
William Green (R., N.Y.), 68;
Willis Gradison (R.. Ohio), 16;
Marc Marks (R.. Pa.). 32: and
Martin Frost (D., Tex.), 37
percent.
Of the 127 House members
about two-sevenths of the
chamber's total who voted
pro-ADA at least two out of three
times, 16 are Jewish a factor
of about two-thirds of their total
membership. No Jewish member
was among the 24 recorded in the
scoring are Democrats Richard
Ottinger and Ted Weiss, both of
New York; Anthony Beilenson
(Calif.) and Howard Wolpe
(Mich.). In second place were
seven Congressmen with 95
percent. Of these, four are Jewish
Democrats Henry Waxman
(Calif). Sidney Yatesflll.) and
Frederick Richmond and Stephen
Solarz, both of New York.
The records of other Jewish
Zorinsky, each with 21 percent.
IN THE HOUSE, four of the
14 Congressmen achieving
perfect records in the ADA
House having a zero record by
ADA's standards. Only five
voted less than half the time for
ADA points of view.
NO JEWISH Senator was
included among the 30 close
to a third of the Senate's mem-
bership whose record was less
than 21 percent by ADA
reckoning. Among the 19
domestic measures surveyed was
Metzenbaum's amendment to
increase budget authority in
fiscal year 1980, 1981 and 1982
for nutritional programs for older
Americans. His amendment was
approved 68-21.
In the House, Kramer in-
troduced the amendment to allow
elected officials to veto VISTA
projects within their jurisdic-
tions. Kramer's amendment,
opposed by ADA. carried 229-
178. The ADA-backed offered by
Weiss to reduce the fiscal year
1980 defense spending by $1
billion in budget authority and
$355 million in outlays and to
transfer those funds to selectd
human needs programs was
rejected 92-321.
The ADA report noted that
Zorinsky supported the bipar-
tisan effort in the Seante to block
restoration of U.S. military
training to Guatemala, while
Wolff held "a major hearing on
the continuing famine" in
Indonesia related to opposition to
military aid to that southeast
Asian country which is warring
against Fast Timor. The ADA
supported both the Zorinsky and
Wolff actions
Edmund Muskie, 66-year-old senator from Maine, was
named by President Carter on Tuesday to succeed Cyrus
Vance as Secretary of State. In announcing the chain .
Carter cited Muskie's long Senate tenure and his "inter-
national reputation." Muskie has been in the Senate for 21
years, for one-third of that time on the Foreign Relations
Committee.
Federation Has
New Everything!
With the coming on board of a
new executive director. Jerry
Rubin, on July 1. the Federation
has nominated the officers and
board of directors for 1980-1981.
The annual meeting, to be held
on June 25 at 7:30 p.m. at
Temple Beth-El in St. Pete, will
inaugurate their election and
term of office.
Officers are President, Reva
Kent; Vice president campaign.
Marvin Feldman; Vice president
- budget and allocations. Charles
Rutenberg; Vice president -
education. Rabbi Morris
Chapman: Vice president cash.
Dr. Joel Shrager; Tressurer.
Steve Hersch; and Secretary,
Ron Diner.
Nominated for three-years
terms were: Barry Alpert. Nory
Pearl. Dr. Joel Marantz, Maureen
Rosewater, Dr. Michael Phillips,
Lorrie Pasekoff, Sophie Glasgow,
Sam Winer and Stanley
Newmark.
School Allocations Increase
Charles Rutenberg, chairman.
.Budget and Allocations Com-
mittee of the Jewish Federation
of I'm. lias County, reported on
the tremendous growth of the
new Pinellas County Jewish Day
School's fall opening enrollment.
The enrollment is increasing,
and the Budget and Allocations
Committee recommended the
increase of an additional $5,000
for the 1980 fiscal year.
The board of directors of the
Federation agreed, and the in-
crease was accepted. The Jewish
Day School is a new constituent
agency of the Federation.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Friday
May 9,19
y
Synagogue Dedication Planned
After five years of meeting in a variety of tem-
porary quarters. Congregation Beth Chai of
Seminole will dedicate the completion of its
permanent synagogue on May 18 at the new
facility. 8400 125th St. North, in Seminole.
The synagogue, designed by architect Ron
Ginn of ARG Corporation, and constructed by
M&R Builders, is the last in a line of con-
gregational meeting places that have included the
Pinellas County Vocational Agricultural School,
Seminole Office Center, and a local firehouse.
Chartered in 1975 by nine families in the
Seminole area. Beth Chai. which translates as
"House of Life," practices Conservative Judaism,
and is a member of United Synagogues of
America. Rabbi Michael I. Charney has been the
spiritual leader of the congregation since 1976.
The property on which the new synagogue is
located was purchased after two previous at-
tempts to acquire property in the Seminole area
were thwarted by an inability to obtain a zoning
variance that would have permitted use of the
parcels for religious purposes. A variance was
obtained for the present location in the fall of
1978. and plans were established to construct a
modest building that could serve as a sanctuary,
social hall and religious school.
"We are pleased that although our finances and
the economy limited the synagogue's size, its
design allows maximum use," explained syna-
gogue president, Arthur Ax. "In fact, its design
gives an impression of size greater than the actual
dimensions."
Written invitations to the dedication ceremony
have been extended to the Seminole and Largo
Jewish community and to all the friends of Beth
Engagement
Siskind-Kessler
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard M. Siskind of Bay City
Mich., and Palm Harbor, announce the
engagement of their daughter Deborah Jo to
Lawrence Dean Kessler, son of Mr. and Mrs.
vv alter Kessler and grandson of Israel Z. Kessler
SLT. ad Mrs Feiinand Rosenau of
Philadelphia, Pa.
Ms. Siskind attended the University of South
Florida and currently owns and operates Pride
Piper of Clearwater. Her fiance graduated from
Loyola University of the South in New Orleans,
La., and is an officer at Palm State Bank in Palm
Harbor. A June wedding is planned in Michigan.
Laurence Kessler ami Deborah Siskind
ackground
Sweetness, Light End Talks
MMMM
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Carter
and Prime Minister Mena-
chem Begin of Israel ended
their two days of talks on
autonomy for the West
Bank and Gaza with re-
marks which indicated that
progress has been made
toward an agreement be-
tween Israel and Egypt.
With Begin at his side, Carter
told reporters in the White House
Rose Garden that the talks were
"constructive and very pro-
ductive between myself and
Prime Minister Begin. I wish to
particularly emphasize the issues
are being resolved."
CARTER announced that
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
has agreed to Begin's proposal
that during the next 40 days the
autonomy talks be divided
equally in sessions in Tel Aviv
and Alexandria between Israel
and Egypt with the U.S. as a full
partner in a "concerted effort" to
reach the "goal" of an agreement
by the May 26 target date. "We
made good progress toward that
goal," Carter said.
Begin said, "I am absolutely
truthful" in saying that "we had
very good talks thanks to the
atmosphere created by President
Carter in the Cabinet room and in
our private talks. I think we
made real good progress. '*
The Prime Minister also stated
that the autonomy negotiations
will be conducted "daily, almost
hourly. There is a hope indeed we
may reach the goal" of May 26.
BEGIN expressed "our deep
friendship to the people of the
United States for their role in
world affairs He said he
hoped' the American hostages
in Teheran would be released
soon. He urged "all men for
liberty to stand up for it" and
said American-Israeli relations
are important from this point of
view."
Before entering the White
House for their final session,
Begin remarked to Israeli
reporters. "There has been no
pressure and no confrontation.
Your predictions have proven
wrong."
According to reliable sources,
the issue of Jewish settlements
on the West Bank was not raised,
at least up to the time of their
final meeting. On the issue of
Jerusalem. Carter took the same
position he has taken publicly in
the past that Jerusalem
should remain an undivided city.
But he did not specify under
whose sovereignty. Sadat said
here after his meetings with
Carter last week that East
Jerusalem should be under Arab
sovereignty. Begin insists that
the undivided city is the "eternal
capital" of Israel.
AT A White House dinner
attended by 180 persons many
of them Jewish Democrats favor-
able to Carter's reelection
B.ogin praised the President in a
25-minute discourse. He also
indicated that it was not im-
portant if Egypt and Israel con-
tinued their negotiations over
autonomy beyond the May 26
target date.
SS-f-M
"The sky is not on our heads."
Begin said "We relate to life-
lines, not deadlines We shall
Continue the negotiations until
we reach agreement."
At the dinner. Rep. Clement
Zablocki ID., Wise.), chairman of
the House Foreign Aflais Com-
mittee, was asked by a reporter if
Begin's 'uncompromising
position" was harmful to U.S.-
Israel relations. Zablocki. who is
dose to the Stale Department's
views on the Arab-Israeli con-
flict, replied. "There is no
question" that "the American
public is becoming very con-
cerned about what they perceive
as Prime Minister Begin's in-
transigence. "
U.S- Vetoes
Resolution on
Arab State
UNITED NATIONS. NY. -
UTA) The United States
vetoed a United Nations Security
Council resolution calling for the
establishment of an independent
Palestinian Arab state on April
30.
The resolution affirmed the
Palestinians' right to have their
own nation and to return to their
homes or demand compensation
for their abandoned properties.
The vote was 10-1. with the
four Western European dele-
gations Britain. France
Norway and Portugal ab-
staining.
SS-t-M
Women's Division Has $100,000 Goal
paign above $100,000 by June
Lorrie Paseoff. Women's
Division campaign chairman,
reported S96.300 raised to date.
With a goal of $100,000 for 1980.
She envisions that the cleanup of
outstanding cards, a last
phonothon and community
mailing will increase the cam-
Planningfor 1981 is earmarked
for the near future. StoaS*
Campaign Cabinet additions aS
financial goals will be in ,k
works. Those interested In J
ditional information srinilu
contact Mrs. Freida Sohon H
'Chai Corporation9Formed
Chai who have provided support and encourage-
ment in the past four years. Sid Werner,
dedication ceremony coordination chairman,
predicts an overflow crowd for the ceremony.
"Although written invitations were only ex-
tended to the immediate geographic area, we
welcome anyone interested in sharing the joyous
occasion with us," he commented.
Preceding the actual ceremony, Werner ex-
plained, there will be a processional at 12:15 p.m.
from the Seminole Fire Station at the corner of
131st Street and 88th Avenue North, to the
synagogue, carrying the synagogue's torahs from
their previous location to their new home.
The ceremony itself is scheduled for 1 p.m. and
will be followed by an open house. Rabbi Charney
will conduct the service, and the invocation will
be given by Rabbi Jacob Luski. president of the
Pinellas County Board of Rabbis. Keynote
speaker will be Rabbi Morris B. Chapman, rabbi
emeritus of Congregation B'nai Israel in St.
Petersburg and an active member of the Jewish
community for over 30 years.
Further information can be obtained by calling
the synagogue office.
Len Seligman. chairman of the
Federation Aging Committee,
announced the formation of
"Chai" Corporation for Hebrew
Aged, Inc.
Seligman, a devotee of meeting
the needs of the elderly for years,
has worked unswervingly for the
last two years in researching with
his committee the correct ways o
meet housing nursing and other
needs of the elderly.
.JEm.J&B '"corporation f
Chai. Seligman sees the second
stage of potential resources
becoming kinetic resources.
Historical Journal
'Debunks' Holocaust
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) An
historical journal has been
launched in California aimed at
denying that the Holocaust took
place, according to the Simon
Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust
Studies at Yeshiva University of
Los Angeles.
Kfraim Zuroff. the director of
the Wiesenthal Center, said that
the .Journal of Historical Review
is being published by the
Institute for Historical Review in
Torrance. Calif. The Institute's
"self-proclaimed goal is to bring
history into accord with the
facts,' but whose objective in
reality is to deny the Holocaust
and vilify the Jewish people,"
Zuroff said.
"THE INSTITUTE, for
example, published the infamous
book, The Hoax of the Tuentieth
Century, by Arthur Butz. which
seeks to prove that there were no
mass murders in the gas
chambers, only' a million Jews
died during the war and that no
plan existed for the Final
Solution ."
Zuroff sent a letter to Stephen
Horn, president of California
State University. Long Beach,
asking that Dr. Reinhard
Buchner be dismissed or "cen-
sured by the academic
authorities" for being listed on
the editorial advisory board of
the first issue of the Journal.
Zuroffs letter, copies of which
were sent to Gov. Edmund
Brown and the California Board
of Regent, declared. "The
thought that a man who would
support such ideas is allowed
access to hundreds of students
yearly and that he has invoked
his academic credentials to lend
credence to this hateful ideology
is extremely distressing."
THE JOURNAL lists for sale
by the Insitute many books
denying the Holocaust as well as
the accepted analyses of World
War II. In addition to Butz's
book, some others offered for sale
are:
Debunking the Genocidt
Myth, by Paul Rassinier. which
is described as A French
Socialist who was interned at
Buchenwald tells of his fruitless
search for concrete evidence of
the Holocaust' "; The Myth of
the Six Million, by Anonymous,
described as "the first-ever
English language book to dispute
the Holocaust' "; and Hitler's
War, by David Irving, the book
which claims that there was no
evidence that Hitler ordered the
extermination of the Jew s.
OTHER MEMBERS of the
editorial advisory committee are
Dr. Austin App. who is retired
from La Salle College,
Philadelphia: But/, who i- a
professor at Northwestern
University. Evanston, 111 :
James Egolf, Duquesne
University. Pittsburgh, and Dr.
James Martin, of the Insitute.
Miz Lillian AUows That
Billy 'Drinks too Much'
Mrs.
By GIL SEDAN
ERUSALEM (JTA) -
Lillian Carter. President
Latter 8 mother, left Israel for
Egypt, ending a five-day visit
her second to this country since
she attended Golda Meirs
funeral in 1978. After an escorted
our of the Yad Vashem
Holocaust Memorial. Mrs. Carter
remarked that it would be good if
every American could visit the
site because people have so little
information on the Holocaust.
She also visited the Western
Wall where, according to custom,
she wrote a wish on a small piece
of paper and place it between the
anaentstoneSL She would not tell
what her wish was but said "it
was a good one."
REPORTERS accompanying '
Mrs. Carter asked if she would
want to meet Palestinians. She
replied. T wouldn't he able to tell
between a Palestinian and an I
Israeli, they are all so friendly
Asked
Carter's
remarks,
friendly,
much."
Mrs.
exchanged gifts. Begin presented
his guest with a feather-bound
Hebrew-English Bible, and Mrs.
Begin gave her an Israel-made
silver brooch.
\1 rs. Carter gave Begin a giant
blow-up photograph of himself.
Carter and President Anwar
Sadat at the Israeli-Egyptian
peace treaty signing ceremony.
The picture was signed by the
President. "With thanks and
admiration to my friend
Menachem Begin."
about her son, Billy
frequent anti-Israel
she replied, "Billy i8
but he drinks too
Carter
attended
- "nenaea a
reception given in her honor bv
Prime Minister Menachem Beri
and his "* *>---
wife, Aliza, and
_ n
they
A Guided Tour to Israel
sponsored by
Congregation Beth Shalom
of Clearwater
14 days of travel in
October 1980 ... with
Deluxe accommodation
INFORMAL GET TOGETHER
MONDAY. MAY 12,7:30 p.m.
at Beth Shalom
1325 So. Belcher Road
Clearwater
REPRESENTATIVE OF
-UNITED SYNAGOGUE TOUR
WILL BE HERE TO ANSWER
QUESTIONS
Open to the Public
Free Coffee & Cake
SS-t-M


Friday. May 9, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Page 3
Pinellas Jewry Celebrates
Israeli Independence Day
The .local Jewish community celebrated Israeli
Independence Day with a day full of ac-
I under the auspices of the Jewish Com-
Enunitj Centers! the Elbow Lane facility.
The festivitiea started with a Youth Torch Run
ated at a point about a mile away, and all
pie and synagogue youths ran a relay cul-
g at the Center at noon with a torch
lighting ceremony.
Mrs Susan Burnette, director of the Religious
[school of Temple Beth El, coordinated the Torch
|Run. rhe opening ceremonies at noon, staged on
the grounds outside the JCC building, were
Ichaired by Bernard I'anush. chairman of the
I event.
I UK JEWISH War Veterans of Clearwater
Hied the Hags; Bernia Lyon, commander,
blew laps; Ida Leichter led in the singing of the
Spangled Banner" and "Hatikvah'; Rabbi
Jacob I.usky offered a prayer for Israel; Riva
Kent extended the greetings on behalf of the Fed-
rial inn; Takis Kapous. president of SPIFF's,
greeted for the St. Pete International Fair
Society; and Congressman Bill Young made the
official remarks, pledging American aid for main-
taining and safeguarding Israeli independence.
\ crowd of 500 sat on the grounds in the sunny
afternoon, participating in the opening
monies.
Continued outside entertainment was offered
bv Ma/./an Moshe Neirovich and Barbi Allison.
directing the school choir of Congregation Beth
Clearwater, USY Dancers and tin-Morris
rs TV Channel 10 and many radio stations
ed the entertainment and other activit
auditorium was decorated with Israeli
I posl a -nve mannei >m-
Anne I'anush. i on,
Bei nd Ben
Lilli I
tel.
HI FOLLOWING
cgaiion Beth Shalom,
g [hop Hi-
. yed magazines, library-pocket ficti >n, USY-
coins, Religious School display
.legation Beth Shalom Gulf port Sister-
hood Gift Shop Cert Lipshitz,displayed Israeli
candy; Congregation B'nai Israel St. Peters-
burg, Sisterhood Gift Shop. Harriet Cohen; Jerry
Mensh stained glass and music: Temple B'nai
Israel Clearwater Yolen Zussman displayed
Holocaust books, religious school display by Zena
Sulkes; Temple Beth Kl. St. Petersburg -
Brotherhood Irv Finklestein. Judaism display.
Religious School display Susan Burnett.
Also. Hadassah. Miriam Barshefsky JNF
and Zionist literature; ORT St. Petersburg -
literature; The Mueller Corner Sabbath table
arrangements and live orchids and carnations;
The Source Israeli imports and Judaica.
While all this was going on, a Maccabia sports
event was in progress at the sports field with over
B. Panush Reelected at Beth Sholom
At the annual meeting of Con-
gregation Beth Shalom, Bernard
Panush was reelected president
for a second term. Elected with
Panush were the following:
Executive Committee: Vice
Presidents, David Baker, Melvin
Silverman and Ethel Honigman;
Treasurer, Kenneth Bornstein;
Financial Secretary, Douglas
Zelman; Recording Secretary,
Ann Lane and Immediate Past
President, Alan Bornstein.
Board of Directors, Three-Year
Term: Dr. Frank Moss, Nathan
Belkin, Leo Hanft and Maurice
Hirsty.
Two-Year Term: Marvin Peltz,
Jules White, Irv Kety and
Marian Paikowsky.
One-Year Term: Dorothy
Feigenbaum, Edward Krouk,
Andrew Sendy and Elaine Stern.
On Tuesday, May 6, Hazzan
Moshe Meirovich of Congre-
gation Beth Shalom appeared on
"Living for Today" on TV
Channel 10.
He responded to questions
concerning the annual Cantonal
Concert to be presented on May
14 at 8 p.m. at Congregation
Beth Shalom.
Community Leaders
Chosen as
CJF Delegates
100 l yo ing it ing
unc Michael Charney and
ites ol part icipation,
A SPECIAL att
Vviv, featuring Israeli food: falafi pita,
chumos, shashlik, kosher hoi hea
The cafe was run by the Sisterhood ol Con-
gregation B'nai Israel with Anne Nessan in
charge
A nasherai corner manned by the JWV of St.
Pete with Joe Charles was also open for those who
wanted just a nosh.
In addition, an Art Gallery featuring many
Israeli pictures was opened in the board room, all
pictures framed for this occasion by Center
members and friends.
In view of the upcoming 40 days of peace nego-
tiation between Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and President Anwar Sadat, the rejoicing of the
Pinellas Jews during Israeli's 32nd Independence
assumed a special significance as was stated by
Bernard Panush. chairman of the celebration, and
by Fred Margolis, executive director of the
Jewish Community Center.
NEW YORK, NY. Mrs.
Reva Kent. Charles Rutenberg
and Marvin Feldman will
represent the Jewish Federation
of Pinellas County as 1980 Year
Round Delegates to the Council
of Jewish Federations.
North American Jewish
communities are currently in the
process of selecting top local
leaders to serve in the CJF Year
Round Delegate structure, a
representative body of ap-
proximately 700 lay leaders
acting as the functional link
between Council and the com-
munities it serves.
The Year Round Delegate
system was developed to reflect
the recommendations of the CJF
Review, which determined that
direct involvement by a broad
segment of top and emerging
community leaders would
dramatically augment Council's
effectiveness as the central
consultative resource for local
Federations in all major service
areas.
YEAR ROUND Delegates will
be CJF representatives in their
communities. communicating
and interpreting Council policy
and programs, anil will also sen B
to bring the concerns of
Federation leadership directly
into Council decision making and
rat ion.
(Governance will be another
vital role of the Year-Round
Delegate body- Voting at the
annual CJF" General Assembly.
Year Round Delegates, along
with community-designated
alternates, will determine CJF's
major programs, policies and
finances CJF Board. Committee
and Task Force members will be
drawn primarily from this body.
The CJF is the association of
more than 190 Federations.
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
90 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective
community services; through
establishing guidelines for fund
raising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action on common purpo
deal 0 regional.
nat ional and international needs.
Endowment for Pinellas
Mas County's .1
Federation joins Orlando and
rampa in i he joint formation
an Endowment Fund.
At the Federation board of
director's meeting in April, the
motion passed in March to join
Tampa and Orlando in an
Kndowment Fund was moved by
Ron Diner, spokesman for the
Pinellas Federation's
Kndowment Committee to
allocate the money necessary in
1981 and 1982 and have Pinellas
in equal member in I
well as pri
The motion b) Dmer. seconded
by (harks Rutenberg. brings
Pinellas into a position of tuture
financial resources to further the
growth of Jewish needs in
Pinellas County.
For further information on the
Endowment Committee. call
Bruce Bokor, Endowment
Committee chairman.
Four Teens Awarded Scholarships
Besides presenting a number of
musical selections, he also dis-
cussed with the moderator the
origins of liturgical and popular
Jewish music, as well as Jewish
music in America today.
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
tion Beth Shalom of Clearwater
sponsored a donor luncheon and
fashion show on Tuesday, May 6.
This event took place at
Countryside Country Club.
Buni Zubaly of Ivey's Depart-
ment Store coordinated and pre-
sented the fashion show. Both
men's and women's apparel were
featured.
Rabbi Morris Chapman,
chairman of the Federation
Education Committee, an-
nounced that four Jewish
teenagers have been awarded
scholarships for this summer's
Israel program.
Awards will be made at the
Federation annual meeting on
June 25 at Temple Beth-El in St.
Petersburg.
The Sohon Israel Memorial
Fund, an added scholarship
annually made in conjunction
with the Federation scholarships,
will be awarded for the last time
on June 25 at the Federation
annual meeting.
The funds, now depleted, have
helped numerous Pinellas teens
as they have enlarged their
perspective and insight into
Israel.
'Up from Zero'
Charlies Rutenberg, "Up From
Zero" chairman of the 1980
UJ A / Federation Campaign,
reports the two phonothon
sessions of April 20 and 27 were
so successful bringing in over
$7,500 of new money that a final
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
3C331UU mi, uc ueld on Monday,
May 12, at Superior Surgical in
Seminole.
Those individuals wanting to
donate their services on the
phones that evening should
contact Pam Tench.
|T St. Petersburg NCJW to Install Officers
The St. Petersburg Section of
the National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its final meeting
of the club year on May 28 with
an installation luncheon at the
Pasadena Golf Club, 64th St.
South, at noon.
be presented to qualified high
school students. This will be the
12th year of presenting these
scholarships on the basis of
grades, community service,
character and financial need.
officer is Fred
Installing
Annual scholarship awards will
Hebrew Classes at Beth Sholom
same time, discuss the nature
and make-up of the Siddur
-^
The Adult Jewish Study Com-
mittee of Congregation Beth
Sholom of Gulf port, headed by
Doris Kushner, announces that
the Hebrew classes which began
early this year will continue every
Thursday morning from 10:30
a.m. to noon until May 15.
Rabbi Sidney Lubin will, at the
(prayerbook).
The Yiddish speaking group
will have its next social at 10:30
a.m., Sunday, May 25. This will
probably be the last meeting of
the season. All groups meet in
the social hall of the sanctuary.
Margolies, executive director of
the Jewish Community Center,
St. Petersburg.
The following are incoming
officers: Mrs. S. Pollinger and
Mrs. S. Sonneborn presidium;
Mrs. J. Lemchak, vice president,
department administration; Mrs.
M. Lippman, vice president,
department ways and means;
Mrs. M. Ehrlich, recording sec-
retary; Mrs. M. Golden, corres-
ponding secretary; Mrs. J.
Colbert, financial secretary; Mrs.
N. Woolf, treasurer; and Mrs. A.
Pfeiffer, Mrs. I. Salkin, Mrs. M.
Urdang, directors.
|
>:
>
.V
8
I
of PINELLAS COUNTY
AND
NIKIBLACKER
present
" LUCK BE A LADY "
A Dance Performance
SUNDAY, JUNE 8
at
THE BINNINGER THEATER of ECKERD COLLEGE
/ CURTAIN: -4p.m.
I Tickets & Information: JCC or Niki
:-:-:*:*:*:-:*:*:*:-ra^^


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Friday, May 9, 19$
i
dfewisfti Floridian
OF PINELLASCOUNTY
Business Office, 8167 Elbow Lane North. St. Petersburg. Fla. 38710
Telephone 813 381-2373
We Lost More Than Soldiers
FREDK.SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Second Class Postage Pending at Miami, Fla
Published Bl Weekly
Forward Form S57 to Box 017S. Miami. Fla. 331*1
THIS IS intended as no dis-
respect for the men who died in
the U.S. effort to free our hos-
tages in Teheran. But the truth is
that more was lost than their
lives.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) OntYtar- $4.00
Out of Town Upon Request
Friday, May 9, 1980
Volume 1
23 IYAR 5740
Number 2
Perhaps for the first time since
World War II, we had the Soviets
over an ideological barrel in the
matter of their invasion of
Afghanistan. More than any-
thing else, our Olympic Games
boycott placed great strains upon
>?.v.v.::v::::::*w^ tne Soviets' masters.
:: i#'
For the first time, visible
cracks began to show in the
Kremlin power struggle between
the "moderate" civilian old men
who rule the Muscovite Empire
in the Kremlin and the young
Turk commanders of their
military machine.
ANDREI GROMYKO flew
into Paris last week with his tail
between his legs for a scheduled
tongue-lashing on Afghanistan
by President Giscard d'Estaing
8
1100 Years for ORT
In Russia the year was 1880, and a small group ,
I of Jewish men met with the Czar to petition him to I
| allow them to open a school to teach Jewish boys a j
I skill so they might find jobs. I
Now we are celebrating the 100th anniversary of (|:
this Organization these men founded named ORT. In 1
the United States, over 140,000 women work to I
support 100,000 students in schools all over the 9
world. Working alongside Women's American ORT pi
there is a group of men organized throughout the |
United States, including South Florida, who support
the worldwide ORT vocational and technical
education program.
Because of ORT, the State of Israel gained a top-
level, dynamic, innovative vocational and technical
education system that became the major force in
turning out desperately needed skilled workers for
Israel's burgeoning economy. Because of ORT, the
Jewish world and indeed the world of all mankind
was made a somewhat better and more human
place to live.
The year 1980 marks one century of ORT's &
I service as the vocational and technical education I
g program of the Jewish people. j
Because of ORT, more than two million Jews *
5 were given the modern' skills that helped them 1
g attain livelihood and often life itself. Because of |:|:
| ORT, two million Jews were able to lift themselves
5 up from squalor and hopelessness to productive lives |
S in the societies in which they lived. :j:
a lesson in chastening so im-
probable in the general design of
simplistic French self-interest
these days that one could only
marvel that it would be taking
place at all.
Gromyko came to "explain"
the Soviets' leadership dilemma
the young Turk militants who
are taking over control of his
country even before the old men
have died. Theirs was the
Afghanistan decision, he would
bleat; it was not the decision of
Today, ORT operates in some two dozen
S countries on five continents, with an annual student
g enrollment of 100,000. In Israel alone, 60,000
* students study in 95 ORT schools each year, and
:;!: more than a quarter of a million Israelis one-sixth
of Israel's total work force have received ORT
g training in one country or another. ORT embodies
* the spirit of the ancient Jewish tenets that are quin-
: tessential to Jewish life.
AJCong. Leaders Meet Pope
the old men, who still stand fnr
SALT II and detente. *
All this, of course, was before
the U.S. landing in the deserts of
Iran. By the time Gromyko was
scheduled to meet with
d'Estaing, he was already lee-
turing us before the world on our
reckless adventurism." His
back stiffened, he could not only
push Afghanistan into forgotten
history but give every signal that
a French tongue-lashing would be
an unwelcome political
anachronism.
The U.S. servicemen who died
deserve that we honor them. But
we lost an even more priceless
prize than they .
THE CUBAN community of
South Florida shows a thankless
disregard for the welfare of the
total community in its relentless
drive to transport all of Cuba
precisely here to these shores and
no others.
They are not to be blamed.
Absurd federal laws governing
immigration, education and
welfare have encouraged in them
the strange view that for Cubans
the process of becoming a citizen
is a sacred public trust which the
public must bear in their behalf
and the individual Cuban is
privileged to enjoy with a mini
mum of personal discomfort or
dislocation.
Local community attitudes
have not been any more realistic.
They have created a bilingual
monster, largely destroyed a
public school system that had
none too much quality to begin
with, and bifurcated the area be-
tween opposing Latin and
"Anglo" forces whose festering
rages are finally beginning to
surface.
THE REACTION of the en
trenched Cuban community to
the Castro decision to allow more
emigration shows not a whit of
concern for any of this. Its
flagrant disregard of government
pleas to engage in no illegal alien
activity may be understandable
because, after all, the govem-
Continued on following page
Russians Probing Israel's Ether
Pope John Paul II greets Howard Squadron (center), president
of the American Jewish Congress, and Henry Siegman exeC.
VhTpttT; ^ ^ aUdienCe Ut tke Vatkan Squadron urged
the Pontiff to express strong support for the Camp David
accords and stresses the importance of a unified Jerusalem as
'he capital of Israel, "with free access to all faiths Salem a"
HAIFA It cant be seen for
the windows of my home high up
on Mount Carmel. but
somewhere out there on the
horizon it cruises lazily back and
forth in the Mediterranean, well
outside the territorial waters of
Israel. It is quite safe on the
international high seas, but of
course the little ship has no
aggressive potential. Its ar-
maments, if any, are probably
limited to a few small hand
weapons.
No, this is not a war ship in the
accepted sense of the word. It is
one of the Soviet spy ships which
swarm the oceans of the world
engaged in gathering in-
formation.
There's no secret about it,
either. The Soviet reconnaissance
vessels on assignment to the U.S.
Mediterranean Sixth Fleet are
not at all bashful, and openly
follow the big ships as they sail
back and forth or even during the
midst of naval maneuvers.
AT FIRST glance, one would
think these were simple fishing
boats, except for the fact that
they cruise in waters where there
are no fish. The tell-tale in-
dication is in the antennas which
dominate the decks. These are
not spy ships in the sense that
they "watch" anything. Their
specialty is in their sophisticated
ears. These are "listening" craft
and the intricate electronic
apparatus on board is so finely
tuned that it can pick up
anything and everything that the
Israelis put into the ether.
The space above our little
Cart
AkWH
country is filled with many
electronic signals. They include
ship-to-ship broadcasts, taxi
drivers reporting in to their
dispatch stations, radio hams,
long distance phone calls relayed
by radio, children playing with
their walkie-talkies, and of course
a wide variety of military
communications from tanks,
planes and field stations.
In the ether, this becomes a
chowder of confused sounds and
signals, but the delicate Soviet
equipment which picks it all up
and records it is also capable of
filtering the material and un-
scrambling it so that every
message can be read clearly and
without interference. The in-
formation is all then flashed back
to Moscow where it is carefully
fed into the master computer of
miscellaneous information. It
becomes intelligence on tap, bits
of precious data which may some
day help fill i spaces on a
military jigsaw puzzle.
SOVIET LISTENING ships
off the coast of Israel are not new.
They were on duty here even
before the Six-Day War, when
the Soviet Union was a friendly
nation, enjoying a diplomatic
relations with Israel. Spying has
never been considered a hostile
act. The best of friends do it to
each other. Eavesdropping is
part of the accepted international
game. For some reason, the
Russians stopped "fishing" in
these waters in 1975. Israel's
defense forces weekly.
Bumaham'h, now reveals that
early this year they returned. It
would be safe to connect this fact
with the latest Russian
pansionism into Asia, of which
the invasion of Afghanistan is
but another symptom.
Every scrap of information has
its value at the proper time and
place, and the Russians do not
want to miss anything that
might prove helpful some day.
Language is no problem. As
anyone who has listened to
Moscow's Voice of Kidma
VShalom, Progress and Peace
knows, there is an ample corps of
Hebrew scholars, some of whom
gained their first knowledge of
Hebrew when, as members of the
Russian Embassy in Tel Aviv,
they attended Ulpan here.
A crane operator monitoring
the unloading of special
equipment in the port of Haifa, or
an army officer who phones his
wife from a distant army base
that he won't be home that night
because .... or the banking
communications with Europe
all are rich sources of valuable
information for the little vessel
idly "fishing" off the coast of
Israel.
A COUPLE of friends of
mine, who occasionally speak to
Continued on following page


[Friday, May 9, 1980
The Jewish Floridian ofPinellas County
Page 5
AUUfiNT.MflLL YiMI PtAV fr i GIVE
YOU TH'STEEL AGG/E/TH'GREEN CATS EVE,
AMD A SQUADftON OF F-|6'S ?

Cabinet Discusses
Begin, Carter Talks
By GILSEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet met to discuss Prime
Minister Menachem Begin's
^meetings with President Carter
Washington and the autonomy
ilka with Egypt and the U.S. at
llierzliya. Egypt will be
[represented at the talks by Prime
Minister Mustapha Khalil and
| Foreign Minister Butros Ghali.
The ministers devoted most of
the session to Begin's
Washington visit. It was learned
later than Agriculture Minister
Ariel Sharon accused Begin,
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and Interior Minister Yosef
Burg, head of the Israeli
autonomy negotiating team, of
having overstepped the Cabinet's
mandate while they were in
Washington.
SPECIFICALLY, Sharon
charged that they had no right to
Alpert: Russians
Probing Ether
Continued from preceding page
each other by radio-phone be-
tween Haifa and Eilat,
sometimes punctuate their
casual, friendly conversation
with a few Russian words and
phrases, just to given a kick to
fthe Russians listening in.
To repeat, there's no secret
about it all, but still it gives one a
creepy feeling to know that a
Toiurich on the high seas is
making a cassette of our voices,
to be stored in the archives of the
Kremlin.
"Jumpl
discuss the question of water
rights on the West Bank under
the autonomy scheme or to agree
to the creation of a "continuing
committee" which is to take up
issues that are unresolved after a
general agreement on autonomy
is reached.
Begin replied that he had made
no concessions. He said his talks
in Washington were useful and
expressed hope that President
Anwar Sadat would adopt a
positive position toward some of
the ideas he raised in his talks
with Carter.
The Cabinet did not take up
Defense Minister Ezer Weiz-
man's controversial television
interview in which he said he
favored early elections and took
issue with the Likud government
policies while Begin was in
Washington. Weizman had been
expected to come under bitter
attack by some of his fellow
ministers but Begin apparently
passed the word that he did not
want to force Weizman to resign.
CHIEF OF Staff Gen. Raphael
Eytan briefed the ministers on
Israel's commando raid on a
terrorist training base in south
Lebanon. He said it was "very
successful" and prevented a
massive terrorist assault on
Israel that had been planned for
Independence Day.
Weizman and Shamir briefed
the Cabinet on the situation
arising from the killing of two
Irish soldiers attached to the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL). They were
reportedly slain in a revenge
killing by Shi'ite Moslem
villagers but blame has been
placed on Maj. Saad Haddad's
Christian militia which recently
clashed with Irish troops.
Israel supplies Haddad with
weapons and money. Weizman
said army officers have been
instructed to do their best to
persuade Haddad to restrain his
militiamen and not attack any
UNIFIL contingents. Cabinet
Secretary Arye Naor told
reporters later that Israel did not
control south Lebanon and could
not apply force on Haddad.
THE CABINET had planned
to meet again to discuss the legal
status of Jewish settlements on
the West Bank. That session was
post poned at the request of the
Liberal Party and Democratic
Movement ministers who argued
that it would only dramatize the
settlements issue and arouse a
I negative reaction abroad.
Leo Mimlliii
We Lost More Than Soldiers
Continued from preceding page
ment never discouraged them in
this before.
But it is not understandable
reckoned in terms that the Cuban
community, after all these years,
remains Cuban first an out-
come predicted by many who
have been long documenting its
high-handed cultural swash-
buckling and long been warning
against the recreation of a
Quebec-Canada struggle into a
Cuba-America struggle trans-
planted onto the now mythic
sands of South Florida.
For me personally, there is an
added wrinkle in all this
Cuba's refusal to accept a boat-
load of Jewish refugees fleeing
from Nazi oppression during the
Hitler era. The United States, of
course, refused to accept them
too.
But the Cubans, who these
days are so full of the ideological
platitudes about political op-
pression, must now begin to
reckon with a stiffening
American policy that in the
future will force their countrymen
to seek refuge on other shores, as
well.
Where were their platitudes 40
years ago? .
GENERALLY speaking, I am
an admirer of the Los Angeles
Times columnist, Joseph Sobran.
But the other day, he wrote an
absolutely scurrilous obituary on
the passing of Jean-Paul Sartre
that shows either prejudice or
ignorance of the distinguished
French philosopher's teachings
or both.
Sobran says of Sartre that his
"mordant view of human life
always struck me as unnatural
and even artifical. there is .
such as thing as false
pessimism."
Adds Sobran: "Only the 20th
Century produced so repulsive a
pedant as Sartre." Thereupon, he
attacks Sartre's lifelong affil-
iations with various branches of
Marxism, declaring that "like so
many other intellectuals, he
spent half his time signing
protests against things he had
helped produce."
THAT'S A neat old trick,
calling someone you hate a Com-
munist even if it isn't true and
then giving him the coup de grace
by characterizing him as an intel-
lectual. Of course, everyone
knows what intellectuals are,
including the very intellectual
Joe Sobran they're all "pink-
nik radiclibs," as Alabama's
former Gov. George Wallace used
to declare them to be.
Sartre was an existentialist,
and for those unschooled in
philosophy, existentialism equals
pessimism just as. for the un-
schooled in Freud, libido equals
sex. Why that is, I don't know;
they are common miscon-
ceptions, common forms of
ignorance.
Or maybe I do know, at least
so far as Joe Sobran himself is
concerned. There are two major
institutions of thought that have
misconstrued Sartre's meaning if
only to assure their own survival:
the Catholic Church, whose
attacks upon Sartre remind me of
the nasty cynicism in Sobran's
appellation of Sartre as a
repulsive pedant.
Clearwater BBYO
A new B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization chapter has been
formed in Clearwater for those in
grades 8-12. For more in-
formation, call Vicki Tave or
Jimmy Rosewater.
And then, of course, there are
the. Muscovites themselves, who
: joined the Catholics in a strange
wedding of malevolence to reject
Sartre because his work under-
cuts the authority of monolithic
Marxism in practice.
IN FACT, Sartre was a
supreme optimist. To begin with,
he was an atheist, and it takes
huge quantities of optimism to
survive a lifetime in an absure
universe without a belief in God.
Second, Sartre placed man
himself in the role of God,
teaching that each of us is our
own God in the sense that we are
saddled with the burden of
creating ourselves. This is what
freedom means the right to
make of ourselves what we will in
a process of self-confrontation
during which we analyze our
essence and finally create our-
selves in our own image.
Third, this creative process can
not go on without the primary
awareness in us of a respon-
sibility to others, as well as to
ourselves. We can not create hap-
hazardly, but only in unison with
our duty to what Sartre called
Other a strange "I am my
brother's keeper" attitude for an
atheist to adopt as a primary
principle of action.
Above all, Sartre wanted us to
know that men must never
succumb in their perception of
themselves to the views of others
who have preconceived per-
ceptions of them that they seek
to impose upon mankind
wholesale.
HENCE, and this is probably
where he is at his most contro-
versial from a ritualistic point of
view, it is necessary for the dig-
nity of mankind that God not
exist, since God makes children
of men who readily submit to
doctrines issued from on high;
whereas free men, if they are
truly free, must make their own
doctrines by which to live.
This holds true for any God,
religious or economic, such as the
gods that the Marxists have to
offer.
This is pessimism? On the con-
trary, it is optimism in the
highest sense in the sense of
adoring the free Nietzschean
spirit. There is no wonder then
that the Catholic Church at-
tacked him he would have put
them out of business. Or that the
Marxists reviled him as
dangerous Sartre demanded
that each of us seek out our free
spirit and act upon it, a bourgeois
notion that Marxism can not
tolerate in a regimented pro-
letarian society where such
blatant individualism is punished
as decadent.
WHAT IS it that Joe Sobran
was talking about in his attack
on Sartre? Who knows other
than that his words came from
the mouth of a puppet, and
Sartre above all would be pained
by such slavish doctrinal non-
sense in so far as it demonstrates
the inauthentic personality, the
man encumbered by the dogmas
of others, of those who find
personal human freedom
abhorrent.
Sartre a repulsive pessimistic
pedant? Bilge.
Elusive Search For
Sexual Equality
Continued from Page 1
take action on a single one of
them, she said.
This is but one indication of
the widespread belief that
women's issues are secondary to
"the better of the nation," ac-
cording to Yoella Harshefi,
author of the recently published
Behind the Gunsights. Women
activists are often told that their
criticism is ill-timed and could
only hurt Israel's public image,
she stated.
HARSHEFI, who declines to
call herself a feminist along with
many of the other Israeli par-
ticipants, disagrees. "To say
there is a wrong time to criticize
is a vote of non-confidence in
Israel," she said. "Israel must
not put up with anything that
opposes our rights as human
beings."
According to Bob, other
speakers at the conference noted
that among the obstacles to
equality and the growth of the
Israeli women's movement is
traditionalism of Middle Eastern
society, and the constant fear
among women that their
husbands, brothers and sons
might be killed. The Declaration
of Principles, in this regard,
stated that "peace in the Middle
East will contribute to sexual
equality in Israel. Jewish and
i Arab women working together
can and should have an impact on
solving the conflict."
The Coalition for Women in
Israel was founded to support the
efforts of the Israeli women's
i movement, to develop a support
system for North American olot
(women immigrants to Israel),
and to provide education about
the status of women in Israel,
i Bob reported.
I THESE GOALS will be ef
fected through the establishment
lof liaison in Israel, the develop-
Iment of a resource center, the
Ipublication of a newsletter, and
the creation of local chugei
nashim (women's groups).
The organization will be head-
quartered in New York, and the
organizers of the conference
agreed to act as coordinators
until elections could be held. The
Israel Aliya Center and the North
American Aliya Movement have
been asked for organizational
assistance. Bob stated.
The conference was organized
by an ad hoc group of New York
feminist Zionists headed by
Donna Nevel, co-director of the
University Services Department
of the American Zionist Youth
Foundation. The conference was
held in cooperation with more
than 20 North American Jewish
organizations and institutions.
'Human Time
Bomb'Stopped
ByElAl
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
"human time bomb" was
prevented from boarding an El Al
Boeing 707 jet at Zurich Airport,
thereby foiling a terrorist plan to
blow up the plane in midair,
killing its 47 passengers and crew
members bound for Tel Aviv. The
terrorist outrage was intended to
coincide with Israel's observance
of its 32nd anniversary of in-
dependence.
The plan was detected when a
26-year-old West German showed
signs of nervousness as he ap-
proached the El Al check-in
counter prior to boarding Flight
346 to Tel Aviv. This aroused the
suspicion of airline personnel.
THE MAN was subjected to a
thorough check, including an X-
ray which showed a bomb and
detonator tapaed to his body.
The detonator was attached to an
altimeter which would have
caused the bomb to explode when
the plane reached a certain
altitude.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Friday, May 9,
'980
John J. Loeb (center), the investment banker who endowed the Pylon representing the State
of Rhode Island in the John F. Kennedy Memorial in Israel, is honored at a special ceremony
at the Touro Synagogue in Newport, R.I. Sen. Claiborne Pell (right) and John F. Kennedy.
Jr. (left), son of the late President, were the guest speakers.
Headlines
Reform Jews Rap Chief Rabbinate
I ilion enacted by Israel's Knesset giving
the f Rabbinate sole authority to determine
who .ill register Jewish marriages was assailed
this veek by Reform Jewi dera as "a
aflront to the more than three million
Refi and Conservative Jewe in Israel and'
thn houl the world. "
R ibi Roland B. Gittelsohn of Boston,
pres nl ol the Association of Reform Zionists oi
America, said the new law, passed on March 19,
"undermines recent attempts by Israeli Reform
rabbis to be granted the right to perform mar-
riages by the Ministry of Religious Affairs.'"
In a statement asserting that "this officially-
sanctioned abridgement of religious freedom mars
the democratic character of Israel," Rabbi Gittel-
sohn declared: "Israel, the only Jewish State on
the face of the earth, is the only State in which
Reform and Conservative rabbis are prevented by
law from performing marriages the only nation.
in which Jews are barred from being married by
the rabbi of their choice."
Henry Kissinger rose above ideological con-
siderations to help open the door to Communist
China, convinced the electorate that detente with
the Soviet Union was a realistic and necessary
approach and, in a demonstration of virtuoso dip-
lomacy, laid the groundwork for an Israeli-
Egyptian peace.
At the same time, he prolonged U.S. involve-
ment in the Vietnam War for almost four years,
dismissed as irrelevant the moral question of
human rights, and practiced an elitist foreign
policy that excluded Congress, the State Depart-
ment and the American people.
This contrasting assessment of one of the most
controversial figures in modern American history-
is made in The Crises of Power, a new book that
examines United States foreign policy during the'
Kissinger years.
Written by Brandeis University political
scientist Seyom Brown of Newton, who was a
senior fellow at the Brookings Institution when
Kissinger held public office, Crises of Power
recounts the often erratic course of American
foreign policy during the Nixon and. Ford ad-
ministrations.
Abraham A Ribicoff, chairman of 1 he Govern-
penl Committei. in support ofS. 1647,
introd by Senators Inouye Matsunaga
tra, Cranston, McClun andJChurch
Washington attorney Alfred II Mos.-s has
been lelected by the Carter administration to
succeed Edward Sanders as liaison with the
American Jewish community. He will assume his
dut ies on a part-time basis.
Sara Seanor. of Decatur. (ia.. who has worked
with Sanders during his tenure, will stay on as
Moses' principal assistant.
Moses, 50, a native of Baltimore, is a partner in
the law firm of Covington and Burling and has
been active in Jewish communal affairs for 15
years.
Sol C. Chaikin, president of the International
Ladies Garment Workers' Union, and Sanford I.
Weill, board chairman and chief executive officer
of Shearson Loeb Rhoades, Inc.. New York City,
have been elected to the Brandeis University
Board of Trustees.
Chaikin was instrumental in establishing the
Louis Stulberg Chair in Politics and Social
Welfare in the Brandeis Politics Department, and
Weill created a scholarship fund which provides
deserving students with tuition assistance at
Brandeis.
Chaikin has been a member of the Brandeis
Board of Fellows since 1976, and Weill since 1977.
President of ILGWU since 1975, Chaikin was
named to that post after a career in the labor
organization that began in 1940.
The Anti-Defamation League has urged the
U.S. Senate to adopt a bill to investigate the re-
location and internment of more than 100,000
Americans of Japanese ancestry during World
War II and to recommend "appropriate
remedies" if wrongs were committed.
In a letter dated Mar. 26 to the Senate Com
mittee on Governmental Affairs, ADL national
director Nathan Perlmutter asked why Japanese
Americans were "singled out and deprived of
liberty and property without criminal charges or
trial."
"Was it necessary," he went on, "to insulate
Japanese Americans from the possible effects of a
wartime hysteria? Was it the consequence of
prejudice and discrimination against persons of
Japanese ancestry?"
The letter was addressed to Connecticut Sen.
An international symposium on intensive and
critical care medicine will be held in Haifa under
the auspices of the Technion Faculty of Medicine
on June 4 to 6. The symposium is sponsored by
the World Federation of Societies of Intensive
and Critical Care Medicine, Constitution
Advisory Committee. It will bring together inter-
nationally-known authorities in the field from
Israel, Europe and America in order to provide
the participants with knowledge of recent
developments in the field.

The fight against discrimination, which made
substantial progress in this country in the 1960s
and 70s, may make further advances in the 1980s
D_iW conditions are ***: The election of a
President with his appointive power to the
bupreme Court, who is in sympathy with this
objective; and continued cooperative efforts by .
Blacks, Hispancis, ethnics, Jews, women, and
others.
This projection for the human rights outlook
n u- next decade wa8 offered by Samuel '
Rabmove^ director of the American Jewish Com-
mittee s Discrimination Division, in an address at '
the recent Tennessee Human Rights Conference.
I he two-day meeting, which was held in Mem-
phis, was sponsored by ten local and national .
religious and communal organizations.
News in Brief
Yadin Movement Opts
To Stick With Likud
TEL AVIV Deputy Prime
Minister Yigael Yadin's
Democratic Movement voted 32-
to reject a proposal by the
party's Secretariate that it quit
the Likud-led coalition govern-
it.
The vote, by the DMS Exec-
utive, was a victory for Yadin
who was supported by Justice
Minister Shmuel Tamir against a
strong secessionist group.
'ladin argued that the time
ripe tor the DM to exert
rage on Prime Minister
achem Begin if the latter
ped to preserve his shaky
me until the 1981 elections.
The DM differs sharply with
Likud over settlement policy and
economic measures. But its views
have had little impact since it
joined the coalition in 1978 as the
Democratic Movement for
Change, then the third largest
faction in the Knesset.
TEL AVIV Israel's
Ambassador to Colombia,
Kliyahu Barak, returned home
after a two-month ordeal in the^
Dominican Embassy in Bogota,
where he and a score of other dip-
lomats and foreign nationals v
held hostage by leftist revo
lutionariee The hostages were
finally released over the weekend.
I n gn Minister Yitzhak
Shamir was at Ben Gurion
to welcome the returning
envoy who looked thin bul
peared in good heall h and |
spirit^ od to be he-
rn- said. "We're glad to have him
back.'' Shamir told reporters
Shamir said a special team had
been working around the clock
for week- to effect Barak's
release. He hinted that certain
measures Israel took which he
would not reveal had helped
gain freedom for Barak and the
others. Asked if Barak would
return to his post in Colombia.
Shamir said that would depend
on his discussions with the
Ambassador which will take
place later on.
NEW YORK The Arab In-
formation Center in the United
States, a branch of the League of
Arab States, has published the
first issue of a new monthly in
English named Arab Perspective.
The editorial of the first issue,
written by Colovis Maksoud, the
permanent observer of the Arab
League to the United Nations,
states that the goal of the sleek
and modem publication is "to
contribute to the understanding"
between Arabs and Americans,
an understanding "that has so
long eluded us."
The April issue oi Arab Per-
spectives contains 70 pages and
includes articles on Zionism
written by Moshe Menuhin, who
is described by Arab Perspective
as "one of the principal American
anti-Zionist Jews." The article is
replete with the standard anti-
Zionist tirades. It also praises
Yasir Arafat, describing him as
"that wise, brilliant Yasir
Arafat," a "worthy leader of the
Arab nation."
TEL AVIV Israeli political
and military leaders spoke with
both sympathy and frank
criticism over the weekend of the
disastrous failure of the
American attempt to rescue the
50 hostages held at the U.S. Em-
bassy in Teheran. Inevitably,
comparisons were made between
that abortive effoit and Israel's
successful rescue of 100 hostages
from Entebbe Airport in Uganda
in July, 1976.
The consensus of opinion here
was that the abortive American
Yigael Yadin
operation humiliated the United
States and did severe political
damage to President Carter.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
sent a cable to Secretary of State
Cyrus Vance Friday expressing
Israel's sympathy for the loss of
American lives and asked Vance
to convey his condolences to the
families of the American service-
men killed or injured.
iime, thi i
Ministry issued a statei
involven
in the American action.
i. rnn
A\\d enior
Us Bret learned oi H frori
NEW YORK Thou
braved intermittent showers
unseasonably cold weather
27 to inarch 10 blocks down Fifth
Avenue and then east to Dag
llammarskjold Plaza, across
from the United Nations, to
demonstrate their support for
Soviet Jewry.
*
The annual "Solidarity Sunday
for Soviet Jewry," sponsored for
the ninth consecutive year by the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, has traditionally
brought large turnouts of Jews
and non-Jews, with men. women
and young people from New Eng-
land to Maryland marching with
their synagogues, organizations
and fraternal groups.
Mervin Riseman, chairman of
the GNYCSJ, estimated the
turnout at 100,000, despite the
inclement weather. Rabbi Haskel
Lookstein, spiritual leader of
Manhattan's Congregation
Kehillath Jeshurun, who was
chairman of "Solidarity Sun-
day," looked at the dwindling
crowd in the plaza as the rain
poured down and declared,
"Because you stand in the rain,
Soviet Jewry will have sun-
shine." But he also promised that
speeches would be short.
TEL AVIV Mayor Jerzy
Majewski of Warsaw has ac-
cepted an invitation to visit
Israel as new relationships ap-
peared to be developing between
Israel and Poland in the spheres
of culture and historical research
with respect to the once great
Polish-Jewish community which
perished in the Holocaust.
The invitation was extended
by Deputy Mayor Yitzhak Artzi
of Tel Aviv who was a member of
the delegation of former Jewish
underground fighters who
battled the Nazis in Poland
during World War II.
No date has been set for the
visit, but it may coincide with the
visit to Tel Aviv next fall of the
Warsaw Jewish Theater.


Friday. May 9, 1980
The Jewish Fluridian of Pinellus County
Page 7
The mod Thing
AJComnu Chapter Slaps Israel
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Officers of the Washington
fhapter of the American Jewish
ammittee who take issue with
he Israeli government's policy of
ettlements on the West Bank
ad Gaza Strip have scheduled a
pecial meeting here of the
hapter's approximately 600
Members to debate their stated
iews.
A letter signed by the chap
&r's president, Nancy Lang, and
krculated to the members, said
Jthe results of our discussion"
till be forwarded to the National
joard of Governors which is
neeting in New York on May 13,
imediately prior to the annual
neeting there on May 15 when
[undoubtedly the plenary body
If the American Jewish Com-
littee will come to grips with
|his issue."
THE LETTER, dated Apr. 11.
autioned that the chapter's
ieeting "is for American Jewish
ommittee members only," and
ie "draft statement" attached
j it is "confidential" for "in-
rnal use only."
However, the contents of the
tter and draft statement are
)W widely known and discussed
Washington and are known in
rael. A copy of the letter and
rait was mailed by a recipient to
ie Jewish Telegraphic Agency's
ashington Bureau.
Hrant Coopersmith, director of
e Washington chapter of the
JCommittee since 1964, con-
firmed the distribution of the
letter. He told the JTA, "It is
unusual for all members to
discuss an issue but not un-
precedented by any means. The
American Jewish Committee is
not a debating society but
engaged in a process to obtain
more wisdom for ourselves."
Coopersmith said that "no one
in New York" A JCommittee
headquarters "told us to
discuss this issue." He noted that
Ms. Lang and Dr. Lawrence
Goldmuntz, chapter vice
president, are members of the
National Board.
Bertram Gold, A JCommittee
executive vice president, told
JTA "If they (the Washington
chapter) are doing it, they are
doing it on their own. They have
no direction from the national
office. At times we solicit chapter
sentiment, and at times we get
chapter sentiment without
solicitation. We haven't done
that in this case. Foreign policy is
made by the national
organization, not local. At best,
the chapter action will be a
recommendation to the national
organization."
ASKED IF other AJCom-
mittee chapters are taking a
critical position on settlements,
Gold replied, "I don't think so."
He said he did not see it as a
"general thing."
Top officials of the AJCom-
mittee. including Gold and
Richard Maass, president of the
organization, remarked in Israel
last February, when an in-
ternational furor arose over the
possibility of Israel establishing
a Jewish presence in the West
Bank Arab town of Hebron, that
they would not be able to defend
such a move in the U.S.
The Washington chapter
officers' action preceded by one
week President Carter's ap-
pointment of Alfred Moses of
Washington, a national vice
president of the AJCommittee, as
his unpaid advisor on matters of
Jewish community concern.
Contacted by the JTA, Moses
said, "I was not consulted and I
did not review it before my
appointment. It is solely the
work of the local office."
The "confidential draft" stated
that "As a general proposition,
American Jewish organizations
should not meddle in what can be
appropriately regarded as the
internal affairs of the State of
Israel. It should not, in par-
ticular, attempt to second guess
Israel on what are purely issues
of defense.
"ON THE other hand,' where
the government (of Israel) takes
steps which can profoundly affect
the future of the Jewish people,
we believe it to be appropriate for
American Jewish organizations
to state their views of these
steps. This is particularly true
where policies by the government
of Israel relate to international
affairs."
The first of the six points of the
draft statement upholds United
Nations Security Council
Resolution 242 as "the foun-
dation of Middle East peace."
The second point states: "We do
not believe that Israel should
incorporate within its borders the
predominently Arab areas of
Judaea, Samaria and the Gaza
districts."
The third point is: "We believe
that Jews have a legal and moral
right to make their homes in
Judaea and Samaria, acting as
individuals or as groups of in-
dividuals. We reject as utterly
disingenuous the protestations of
the international community
which closes its eyes to atrocities
committed across the globe but
violently opposes the action of a
handful of Jews who decide to
make their homes in Judaea and
Samaria. We also consider some
of the statements made by our
State Department on this issue
legally and morally un-
supportable."
POINT FOUR states: Our
observations on the moral and
legal rights of Jews to settle in
Judaea and Samaria not-
withstanding, we deem it highly
unwise and contrary to the best
interests of the State of Israel for
the government of Israel to
encourage and foster such set-
tlements.
"We believe that the set-
tlements policy of the present
government of Israel has
provided propaganda am-
munition to those who wish
Israel ill, has as a result alienated
many persons who would
otherwise tend to be more
friendly to Israel, has resulted in
the squandering of limited
human and financial resources
and, by scattering points to be
defended in case of war, has bee"n
harmful to the security of the
State of Israel."
The last two points of the draft
statement are that the Israel
Defense Force should remain in
the West Bank area until the
"final border arrangement" is
made, that "the indigenous Arab
population should be given the
maximum opportunity for self-
government compatible with
Israel's security" and that
Jerusalem "should remain un-
divided and a part of the State of
Israel."
I



;/
/\

Breyers yogurt is
not just all natural,
its all kosher, too.

^M -.-..;. |
J- m
mm W
itur<'
itl^
fl&f
rii
| 85 >*&
I. ;v:-;i:-V;'.':i
In fact, Breyers yogurt
is so kosher the Union o*
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions puts its seal of approval
on every cup
And just wait until you taste what's in
every fcup. Because Breyers is the creamy smooth,
full of fruit yogurt There's luscious strawberry,
raspberry, black cherry, peach and lots of other
favorite flavors And don't forget, it's made with
active yogurt cultures.
You can pick up all the Breyers
yogurt flavors in the popular 8 oz.
size, and our plain yogurt is now
available in 16 oz. and 32 oz. containers.
Each one is 100% natural with absolutely
nothing artificial and absolutely no gelatin.
So when you're shopping for yogurt, look for
the name with a tradition since 1866 Look for
Breyers In a word, it's Geshmak!
1980 Kratt. Inc


r*agee
TheJeuish Floridian of Pinellas County
Krid.y. May 9.^3
New Olive Peril'
Europe's Old Divide and Rule Game
By SOLLY PRESS
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
In Israel's 32nd year, an irony
has become apparent, that just
when the Jewish State is making
a breakthrough towards regional
cooperation, it is precisely at this
moment that the West appears to
be doing its utmost to undo that
incipient, incremental process Is
this truly a new variation of
Europe's old maxim, divide et
impena to divide and rule?
Is the West afraid that, should
the wamnp. Balkanized Mideast
states mc toward real regional
cooperation such as the Euro-
pean Eo-r.omic Communk\
1EEC1. that the lands of the
silken curtain might comprise a
new power bloc on the world
scene more powerful than the
Organization of Petroleum Ex-
porting Countries (OPECt
grouping with their one-crop
economies''
Do they fear some new olive
peril'' which seems still to haunt
Western chancelleries with
visions of Hannibal's elephants
and Mohammed s horsemen?
ON THE surface at least, the
shadow of irony falling over the1
Mideast bears a striking similar-
ity to the World War I era. wheni
Britain's Sir Mark Sykes and
France's Charles Picot together
with the Russian Czar and the
Italian government agreed in
191516 to divide and rule the
Ottoman Middle East for
Europe's benefit.
Both the pan-Jewish (Zionisti
and pan-Arab (then Hashemitei
leaders objected that the Sykes-
Picot agreement was inconsistent
with Western assurances to their
movements
Even when the Bolsheviks led
by Leon Trotky and Vladimir
Lenin opened the Czar's foreign
office archives in 1917 and made
the Sykes-Picot agreement
public, the Western powers went
ahead anyway to divide and rule
the Middle East from Sinai to
Iraq. Later, suitable noises aside,
the West acquiesced in Benito
Mussolini's conquest of all
Ethiopia, almost a model for their
behavior over Afghanistan.
THE WORDS of Christopher
Sykes. son of Sir Mark Sykes. on
that imperial period speak for
themselves: "So far as the
British government were con-
cerned, they could not welcome a
Feisal-Weizmann agreement
It is hard not to think of
those days of Chaim Weizmann
and the Emir Feisal two
generagions ago. when witness-
ing the current disdain that
Western Europe appears to be
displaying towards the Anwar
Sadat-Menachem Begin accord.
Sykes and Picot: Ernest Bevin
and Adolf Hitler; Yalery Giscard
d'Estaing and Helmut Schmidt
is there somehow a mystical
link between them? Far from
looking for hidden motives or
"conspiracies" against Jewry in
particular and Semites in general
on the part ot the West, and
rather than searching for
morality in international affairs
as practiced by the powers. Israel
and her supporters are simply
facing the reassertion of Euro-
interest.
European self-interest some
would call it opportunism is
simply returning to the world
scene after its postwar lapse. It
is surely not imperialism. It is
not the ancient hatred of Judaea
or sudden love for Falastin that
motivates them now. It is merely
their need for oil that makes
those democracies pander to the
whims of feudal, reactionary
sheikhs
AND II is not a real concern
for the Afghans that underlies
the noises from the West about
the Soviet invasion. It is the
sensing of an opportunity to
embarrass the Russians in the
eyes of the resource-nch Afro-
Asian world If Western
scientists developed an alternate
means of energy tonight, their
politicians would drop OPEC
tomorrow
And if the West had really
been concerned about Soviet
imperialism they'd also have
made noises about the Tadzhiks.
Uzbeks, et ai Nor did the West
go to war over Czechoslovakia
Thanks to her founding
fathers. Israel's resilience is still
rooted in her diversified economy
and in her lively democratic sys-
tem The current diplomatic
pressures may cause many
Israelis to feel again the pangs of
international isolation.
theater of the absurd?"
IN CERTAIN quarters,
proposals of forming a kind of
commonwealth of the world's
pariah states into a fifth world
alliance have been mooted Does
Israel's future lie in that
direction? Yet Israel is by no
means alone on the global scene.
And in her 32nd year she has a
rare opportunity to influence
events in her own region.
Not only is Israel trying hard
to consolidate her accord with
Egypt and. hopefully through
Cairo, putting out feelers to other
African states: she also has an
opportunity to do something
constructive about the Pales-
tinians and. possibly, with Arab
Asia.
Does she become a fortress
what the proud British called
splendid isolation?'' Should she
take comfort in the fact that even
within her own region she is not
the only odd man out?'' Must
she accept as permanent Sen.
Patrick Moynihan's cutting
description of the bulk of the UN
membership as creating "a
To speculate for a moment: If.
as former Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan suggested. Israel
might make a unilateral gesture
in respect of the West Bank and
Gaza, might not such a step be
made conditional on. among
other things. Israels admission
to the Arab League? If a non-
Arab country like Somalia can
become a League member, then
why not Israel. Ethiopia. Malta.
Cyprus. Turkey. Chad and
several others?
BY THUS ending the ex-
clusivist Arab nature of a poten-
tially broader-based regional or-
ganization, all the countries of
the Middle East from the
Sahara to Pakistan would be
taking a major step in building
regional peace in the center of the
Eastern Hemisphere.
Yet there are fears of the
Soviet Union establishing yet
another surrogate in the Middle
East if Yasir Arafat gets his
state, fears fanned also by the oil
states in the region. There are
suspicions that the Palestinians
will serve as proxies for North
Africa, almost as if the old Fati-
mid Empire was again seeking to
penetrate West Asia's fertile
crescent, and as if the Khedive
Mehemet Ali and Gamal Nasser
were again seeking to control
Araby across the Jordan Valley.
There is speculation as to what
Jordan. Syria and Saudi Arabia
might do if Arafat succeeds. And
might his success be taken as a
model for secessionism elsewhere
from Baluchistan to the Basque!
country, from the IRA to the
Bader Meinhoff element, fro,.
Corsica to SicUy. and from Bos.
nia to Pakhtunistan?
WHILE ISRAELS future J
being discussed by Austrian
( hancellor Bruno Kreiskv andl
Arafat. by Giscard and
Morocco's King Hassan, and bv
the U.S. Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance and the new EEC head^
Gaston Thorn, the political'
kaleidoscope does not remain
stationary.
Only recently Davar. Israel's
Labor daily, quoted British Chief
Rabbi Immanuel Jacobovitz as
mentioning^ Soviet suggestion
for improving relations with i
Israel. Given the changing per-'
mutations in international and
regional relations. Israel is far"
from facing her Waterloo as'
prophets of doom would have it.
Indeed, the Jewish State's 32nd
year may mark a watershed in
the ongoing progress of the Mid-
east's gutsiest country.

Introducing
L-31
OomA
NOW
100*
HB9HJ
Lowen Tor KX>
regular and
menthol
Br^elcAroygh! There has never been a
100s cigarette with less tar than todays No\
Now 100s
7 mg m 2 mq ntoime at pet opmi by FTC method
Warn.ng The Surgeo- r era! Has Oeterm.ned
Thai Cigarene SmoK, ief0us toYourjHeaHh


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EZU5O2CJW_JWPKH1 INGEST_TIME 2013-05-11T01:03:16Z PACKAGE AA00014308_00003
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 6
TheJeuish Flondian of Pinellas County
Friday. May 9
19
John J Loeb 'center), the im estment banker u ho endowed the Pylon representing the Statt
of Rhode Island in the.John F. Kennedy Memorial in Israel, is honored at a special ceremony
at the Tour-, Synagogue in .Xeuport. R.I Sen. Claiborne Pell 'right) and John F. Kennedy,
Jr. fit ft), son of the late President, uere the guc-t speakers.
Headlines
Reform Jews Rap Chief Rabbinate
1 -ft giving
-
and
thri
I'.
new law. pa March 19.
"undermn at attempt- bj I-rat-h Rel
.rranted the right to perform mar-
riage by the Ministry of R<
In a statement asserting that this officially-
sanctioned abridgement of religious freedom mars
the democratic character of Israel." Rabbi Gittel-
sohn declared: Israel, the only Jewish State on
the face of the earth, is the only State in which
Reform and Conservative rabbis are prevented by
law from performing marriages the only nation
in which Jews are barred from being married by
the rabbi of their choice.''
Henry Kissinger rose above ideological con-
siderations to help open the door to Communist
China, convinced the electorate that detente with
the Soviet Union was a realistic and necessary
approach and. in a demonstration of virtuoso dip-
lomacy, laid the groundwork for an Israeli-
Egyptian peace.
At the same time, he prolonged U.S. involve-
ment in the Vietnam War for almost four years,
dismissed as irrelevant the moral question of
human rights, and practiced an elitist foreign
policy that excluded Congress, the State Depart-
ment and the American people.
This contrasting assessment of one of the most
controversial figures in modern American history
is made in The Crises of Power, a new book that
examines United States foreign policy during the
Kissinger years.
Written by Brandeis University political
scientist Seyom Brown of Newton, who was a,
senior fellow at the Brookings Institution when
Kissinger held public office, Crises of Power
recounts the often erratic course of American
foreign policy during the Nixon and Ford ad-
ministrations
/era-
Comn
11 M
liter administration to
-ith the
ommunity He will assume his
duties on a part-tim. bfl
Sara Seanor, of Decatur, (.a., who has worked
with Sanders during hi- tenure, will sta\ on Bfl
incipal assistant.
Moses, 50. a native of Baltimore, is a partner in
the law firm of Covington and Burling and has
been active in Jewish communal affairs for 15
years.
t ^ f ,_Chaikin- president of the International
Ladies Garment Workers' Union, and Sanford I.
Weill. board chairman and chief executive officer
of Shearson Loeb Rhoades. Inc.. New York City
have been elected to the Brandeis University
Board of Trustees.
Chaikin was instrumental in establishing the
Louis Stulberg Chair in Politics and Social
Welfare in the Brandeis Politics Department, and
Weill created a scholarship fund which provides
deserving students with tuition assistance at
Brandeis.
Chaikin has been a member of the Brandeis
Board of Fellows since 1976. and Weill since 1977.
President of ILGWU since 1975, Chaikin was
named to that post after a career in the labor
organization that began in 1940.
The Anti- Defamation League has urged the!
U.S. Senate to adopt a bill to investigate the re-
location and internment of more than 100,000
Americans of Japanese ancestry during World
War II and to recommend "appropriate
remedies" if wrongs were committed.
In a letter dated Mar. 26 to the Senate Com-I
rnittee on Governmental Affairs, ADL national
director Nathan Perlmutter asked why Japanese
Americans were "singled out and deprived of
liberty and property without criminal charges or
trial."
"Was it necessary," he went on, "to insulate!
Japanese Americans from the possible effects of al
wartime hysteria? Was it the consequence of]
prejudice and discrimination against persons ofl
Ja pa nese ancestry?''
The letter was addressed to Connecticut Sen.
An international symposium on intensive and
critical care medicine will be held in Haifa under
the auspices of the Technion Faculty of Medicine
?H ,T .1 S 6: The 'ymposium is sponsored by
the World Federation of Societies of Intensive
and Critical Care Medicine. Constitution
Advisory Committee. It will bring together inter-
nationally-known authorities in the field from
Israel, Europe and America in order to provide
the participants with knowledge of recent
developments in the field.
The fight against discrimination, which made
substantial progress in this country in the 1960s
and 70s, may make further advances in the 1980s
if two conditions are met: The election of a
president, with his appointive power to the
{supreme Court, who is in sympathy with this
objective; and continued cooperative efforts by
Blacks, Hispancis. ethnics, Jews, women, and
others.
This projection for the human rights outlook
for the next decade was offered by Samuel
Rabmove director of the American Jewish Com-
mittee s Discrimination Division, in an address at
the recent Tennessee Human Rights Conference.
Ihe two-day meeting, which was held in Mem
afejy T?H2 bv ^l "d national
religious and communal organizations.
News in Brief
Yadin Movement Opts
To Stick With Likud
TEL AVIV Deputy Prime
-ter "i :gael Yadin's
ratk Movement voted 32-
to reject a proposal by the
- .-tariate that it quit
r.ud-led coalition govern-

vote, by th- DMS Exec-
'..: a victory for Yadin
was supported by Justice
Minister Shmue! Tamir against a
lecessionist group.
Yadin argued that the time
ripe for the DM to exert
on Prime Minister
ichem Begin if the latter
to preserve his shaky
me until the 1981 elections.
DM differs sharply with
Likud over settlement policy and
economic measures. But its views
have had little impact since it
joined the coalition in 1978 as the
Democratic Movement for
Change, then the third iargest
faction in the Knesset.
TEL AVIV Israel's
Ambassador to Colombia.
Kliyahu Barak, returned home
after a two-month ordeal in the-:
Dominican Embassy in Bogota.
where he and a score of other dip-
lomats and foreign nationals
held hostage by leftist n
luti' The hostages win-
finally r> M-r the weekend.
Minister Yitzhak
;it Ben Gurion
to welcome the returning
Iced thin but ap-
in good health and g
. od I
IH e're glad him
Shamir told re]
Shami: ipecial team
n working around the clock
for weeks to effect Bar
release He hinted that certain
measures Israel took which he
would not reveal had helped
gain freedom for Barak and the
others. Asked if Barak would
return to his post in Colombia.
Shamir said that would depend
on his discussions with the
Ambassador which will take
place later on.
NEW YORK The Arab In-
formation Center in the United
States, a branch of the League of
Arab States, has published the
first issue of a new monthly in
English named Arab Perspective.
The editorial of the first issue,
written by Colovis Maksoud, the
permanent observer of the Arab
League to the United Nations,
states that the goal of the sleek
and modern publication is "to
contribute to the understanding"
between Arabs and Americans,
an understanding "that has so
long eluded us."
The April issue of Arab Per-
spectives contains 70 pages and
includes articles on Zionism
written by Moshe Menuhin, who
is described by Arab Perspective
as "one of the principal American
anti-Zionist Jews." The article is
replete with the standard anti-
Zionist tirades. It also praises
Yasir Arafat, describing him as
"that wise, brilliant Yasir
Arafat," a "worthy leader of the
Arab nation."
^ ^
Yigael Yadin
operation humiliated the United
States and did severe political
damage to President Carter.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
sent a cable to Secretary of Statt
Cyrus Vance Friday expressing
Israel's sympathy for the loss of
American lives and asked Vance
to convey his condolences to the
families oi the American sen ice-'
men killed or injured.
v. the sami I
Ministry
denyh
i" it ion. The
and other
learned f it 1

NEW YORK Thousands
braved intermittent shower- and
unseasonably cold weather Apr.
21 to march 10 blocks down Fifth
Avenue and then east to Dag
Hammarskjold Plaza, across
from the United Nations, to
demonstrate their support for
Soviet Jewry.
The annual "Solidarity Sunday
for Soviet Jewry." sponsored for
the ninth consecutive year by the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, has traditionally
brought large turnouts of Jews
and non-Jews, with men. women
and young people from New Eng-
land to Maryland marching with
their synagogues, organizations
and fraternal groups.
Mervin Riseman. chairman of
the GNYCSJ, estimated the
turnout at 100,000, despite the
inclement weather. Rabbi Haskel
Lookstein, spiritual leader of
Manhattan's Congregation
Kehillath Jeshurun, who was
chairman of "Solidarity Sun-
day," looked at the dwindling
crowd in the plaza as the rain
poured down and declared,
"Because you stand in the rain,
Soviet Jewry will have sun-
shine." But he also promised that
speeches would be short.
JEL AVIV Israeli political
and military leaders spoke with
both sympathy and frank
criticism over the weekend of the
disastrous failure of the
American attempt to rescue the
50 hostages held at the U.S. Em-
bassy in Teheran. Inevitably
comparisons were made between
that abortive effort and Israel's
successful rescue of 100 hostages
from Entebbe Airport in Uganda
in July, 1976. 8
The consensus of opinion here
was that the abortive American
TEL AVIV Mayor Jerzy
Majewski of Warsaw has ac-
cepted an invitation to visit
Israel as new relationships ap-
peared to be developing between
Israel and Poland in the spheres
of culture and historical research
with respect to the once great
Polish-Jewish community which
perished in the Holocaust.
The invitation was extended
by Deputy Mayor Yitzhak Artzi
of Tel Aviv who was a member of
the delegation of former Jewish
underground fighters who
battled the Nazis in Poland
during World War II.
No date haa been set for the
visit, but it may coincide with the
visit to Tel Aviv next fall of the
Warsaw Jewish Theater.


Lay. May 9. 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Pinellus County
Page 7
The Mod Thing
AJComm. Chapter Slaps Israel
B> JOSEPH POLAKOFF
IWASHINGTON (JTA) -
Lficers of the Washington
Lpter of the American Jewish
Lmmiuee who take issue with
ie Israeli government's policy of
Ittlements on the West Bank
Id Gaza Strip have scheduled a
cial meeting here of the
lapter's approximately 600
embers to debate their stated
ews.
| A letter signed by the chap-
's president, Nancy Lang, and
culated to the members, said
Ihe results of our discussion"
fill be forwarded to the National
ard of Governors which is
.eting in New York on May 13,
^mediately prior to the annual
.eting there on May 15 when
undoubtedly the plenary body
the American Jewish Com-
mittee will come to grips with
lis issue."
1 THE LETTER, dated Apr. 11.
^utioned that the chapter's
eting is for American Jewish
ommittee members only," and
\e "draft statement" attached
it is "confidential" for "in-
Irnal use only."
j However, the contents of the
Itter and draft statement are
ow widely known and discussed
i Washington and are known in
krael. A copy of the letter and
raft was mailed by a recipient to
lie Jewish Telegraphic Agency's
I'ashington Bureau.
Brant Coopersmith, director of
fv Washington chapter of the
JCommittee since 1964, con-
firmed the distribution of the
letter. He told the JTA, "It is
unusual for all members to
discuss an issue but not un-
precedented by any means. The
American Jewish Committee is
not a debating society but
engaged in a process to obtain
more wisdom for ourselves."
Coopersmith said that "no one
in New York" AJCommittee
headquarters "told us to
discuss this issue." He noted that
Ms. Lang and Dr. Lawrence
Goldmuntz. chapter vice
president, are members of the
National Board.
Bertram Gold, AJCommittee
executive vice president, told
JTA "If they (the Washington
chapter) are doing it, they are
doing it on their own. They have
no direction from the national
office. At times we solicit chapter
sentiment, and at times we get
chapter sentiment without
solicitation. We haven't done
that in this case. Foreign policy is
made by the national
organization, not local. At best,
the chapter action will be a
recommendation to the national
organization."
ASKED IF other AJCom-
mittee chapters are taking a
critical position on settlements.
Gold replied. "I don't think so."
He said he did not see it as a
"general thing."
Top officials of the AJCom-
mittee, including Gold and
Richard Maass, president of the
organization, remarked in Israel
last February, when an in-
ternational furor arose over the
possibility of Israel establishing
a Jewish presence in the West
Bank Arab town of Hebron, that
they would not be able to defend
such a move in the U.S.
The Washington chapter
officers' action preceded by one
week President Carter's ap-
pointment of Alfred Moses of
Washington, a national vice
president of the AJCommittee, as
his unpaid advisor on matters of
Jewish community concern.
Contacted by the JTA, Moses
said, "I was not consulted and I
did not review it before my
appointment. It is solely the
work of the local office."
The "confidential draft" stated
that "As a general proposition,
American Jewish organizations
should not meddle in what can be
appropriately regarded as the
internal affairs of the State of
Israel. It should not, in par-
ticular, attempt to second guess
Israel on what are purely issues
of defense.
"ON THE other hand," where
the government (of Israel) takes
steps which can profoundly affect
the future of the Jewish people,
we believe it to be appropriate for
American Jewish organizations
to state their views of these
steps. This is particularly true
where policies by the government
of Israel relate to international
affairs."
The first of the six points of the
draft statement upholds United
Nations Security Council
Resolution 242 as "the foun-
dation of Middle East peace."
The second point states: "We do
not believe that Israel should
incorporate within its borders the
predominently Arab areas of
Judaea. Samaria and the Gaza
districts."
The third point is: "We believe
that Jews have a legal and moral
right to make their homes in
Judaea and Samaria, acting as
individuals or as groups of in-
dividuals. We reject as utterly
disingenuous the protestations of
the international community
which closes its eyes to atrocities
committed across the globe but
violently opposes the action of a
handful of Jews who decide to
make their homes in Judaea and
Samaria. We also consider some
of the statements made by our
State Department on this issue
legally and morally un-
supportable."
POINT FOUR states: "Our
observations on the moral and
legal rights of Jews to settle in
Judaea and Samaria not-
withstanding, we deem it highly
unwise and contrary to the best
interests of the State of Israel for
the government of Israel to
encourage and foster such set-
tlements.
"We believe that the set-
tlements policy of the present
government of Israel has
provided propaganda am-
munition to those who wish
Israel ill, has as a result alienated
many persons who would
otherwise tend to be more
friendly to Israel, has resulted in
the squandering of limited
human and financial resources
and, by scattering points to be
defended in case of war, has been
harmful to the security of the
State of Israel."
The last two points of the draft
statement are that the Israel
Defense Force should remain in
the West Bank area until the
"final border arrangement" is
made, that "the indigenous Arab
population should be given the
maximum opportunity for self-
government compatible with
Israel's security" and that
Jerusalem "should remain un-
divided and a part of the State of
Israel."

h4:k&.
3j^ry ft/*-*

...*--
r

In (act, Breyers yogurt
is so kosher the Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congrega-
tions puts its seal of approval
on every cup (
And just wait until you taste what's m
every fcup. Because Breyers is the creamy smooth,
mil of fruit yogurt There's luscious strawberry,
raspberry, black cherry, peach and lots of other
favorite flavors And don't forget, it's made with
'active yogurt cultures.
? You can pick up all the Breyers
yogurt flavors in the popular 8 oz.
size, and our plain yogurt is now
available in 16 oz and 32 oz. containers.
Each one is 100% natural with absolutely
nothing artificial and absolutely no gelatin.
So when you're shopping for yogurt, look for
the name with a tradition since 1866 Look for
Breyers In a word, it's Geshmak!
e I960 Kraft. Inc