The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00344

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
~]Tewlsln Floridlan
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 12 Number 10
Hollywood, Florida Friday. May 14,1982
if)frdSfioc/ii
!Price 35 Cents
Politicking Brings Storm of Protest
Cabinet Grounds All Future El Al Saturday Flights
tnnitOATUU MTA1 ...... ^^. > ...____.;
IJERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet, at the
j-enuous urging of
femier Menachem Begin,
Icided that Israel's
[tional airline, El Al, is to
-ase operations on the
hbbath and religious holi-
lys. It empowered an ad
c ministerial committee
work out a new "time-ta-
and other arrange-
ents" with themanage-
ent of the State-owned
rrier and set a three-
onth deadline for the
kbbath ban to go into ef-
JThe ban on Sabbath flights
i one of the concessions to reli-
the Aguda Israel party ex-
.. d from Begin as the price for
ping his coalition government.
gin, who is himself observant,
tied for the ban on religious
moral grounds and insisted
|t coalition agreements must
honored, Cabinet Secretary
i Meridor told reporters.
EFFECT, Begin rejected
majority report of a govern-
nt-appointed committee which
ml that the suspension of
rice on the Sabbath and holi-
would coat the financially
ky airline about $40 million
iially.
(Jut a major fight loomed be-
en El Al employes and the
Irernment over the Cabinet's
tision. Eli Ben-Menachem, a
Ikesman for. the airline's
Vkers committees, said the em-
ployees would consider what
action to take but indicated
nothing immediate.
However, he branded the
Cabinet decision a violation of
the law which stipulates that
government-owned corporations
must operate strictly in accord-
ance with economic considera-
tions. Ben-Menachem said the,
employees would oppose the de-
cision and that the workers com-
mittees of the country's 13 larg-
est enterprises would support
them, hinting at the possibility of
a general strike that could
paralyze the nation.
The El Al management, which
is appointed by the Cabinet, had
no immediate reaction. A com-
pany spokesman said the manag-
ing board was waiting for further
details from Transport Minister
Maim Corfu.
MERIDOR TOLD reporters
that the ministers acknowledged
that the Sabbath ban would
mean a reduction of El Al activi-
ties but said there was no talk of
lay-offs. He said El Al's figures
as to the possible losses were
treated with skepticism by some
ministers who charged that El Al
workers only wanted to protect
the overtime pay they earn work-
ing on the Sabbath and holidays.
Two Knesset members, Dan
Tichon and Dror Seigerman of
Likud's Liberal wing, said they
would vote against the govern-
ment's decision if the matter
came to the Knesset. But the
government apparently feels it
could push the measure through
with the support of religious
members of the opposition fac-
tions. The Labor Party and
Mapam have called urgent meet-
ings on the matter.
Meanwhile, the Gur Rebbe,
Simcha Bunim Alter, a member
of the Aguda Israel's Council of
Sages, said he would propose a
boycott of El Al by Aguda con-
stituents because the Cabinet
had failed to order an immediate
cessation of Sabbath flights. He
said he would not accept a three-
month delay because the govern-
ment had promised the Sabbath
ban would be in effect by Pass-
over.
But Aguda MK Menachem
Porush expressed satisfaction
with the decision and praised
Begin as "a man who kept his
promises." He called on religious
workers not to support any strike
calls "for monetary gain against
Sabbath observance.''
BEGIN DEVOTED the
greater part of an address to de-
fending the Cabinet's decision
Sundey to halt El Al flights on
the Sabbath and religious holi-
days.
He argued that the Sabbath is
Two Friends of Israel
Elected to Top Post
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Two
Dven friends of Israel were
cted to top leadership posts in
ruling Social Democratic
ty (SPD) at its national con-
ation in Munich. Johannes
|u, Prime Minister of North
line-Westphalia, the most pop-
ius state within the Federal
public, was elected party vice
airman by a large majority of
1400 delegates.
ians Jochen-Vogel, leader of
j opposition in the West Berlin
jrliament, was elected to the
Fd's Central Committee, the
j>st important political body
Ithin the party. Both Rau and
bgel have consistently
^monstrated displeasure with
s Bonn Government's pro-Arab
glides. Last year, Rau demon-
jratively visited Israel at a time
ke press was reporting Chancel-
Ir Helmut Schmidt's refusal to
do so despite an invitation of
seven years' standing.
Vogel, as a former Minister of
Justice, has made important
contributions to a much debated
government initiative to tighten
the laws against neo-Nazi activ-
ity. According to press reports,
Vogel would be the most likely
candidate for Chancellor if and
when Schmidt resigns, and Rau
is expected to succeed Willy
Brandt as chairman of the SPD.
Their ascent to leadership
probably would open new per-
spectives for German-Israel
relations.
But the consensus among po-
litical observers here is that the
SPD has little chance to stay in
power much longer and a change
of government may come about
even before October, 1984 when
its term of office expires.
Plaque Memorializes German Children
BONN (JTA) A plaque in memory of 20 Jewish
chool children who were murdered by the Nazis after
paving been subjected to inhuman medical experiments,
(vas dedicated in Hamburg. Wolfgang Tamowski, the
fcty's senior official for cultural affairs, denounced the
trime as one of the most brutal of the Nazi regime.
One of the murderers is still alive, Arnold Strippel, the
5S official said to have ordered the children put to death.
The children were hanged on April 20,1945, shortly before
jermany surrendered in order to cover up the effects ot
[the experiment.
a noble concept that Jewry gave
the world and the national air
carrier of the Jewish State must
not flout it.
Begin expressed the Orthodox
point of view when he stated that
the issue must not be determined
by purely economic factors. Ha
noted that observant Jews in the
diaspora in years gone by had
"lost a lot of money" by keeping
their shops closed on the Sabbath
when local authorities refused to
allow them to open on Sundays.
According to a report by a
government-appointed commit-
tee, the financially troubled El Al
stands to lose some $40 million a
year because of the Sabbath ban.
Begin was heckled vigorously
on the El Al issue by Laborites
who saw the Sabbath ban as a
surrender to the Orthodox Aguda
Israel in order to preserve his
government's narrow Knesset
margin.
BEGIN SAID his government
would not "take account of any
threats," a reference to warnings
by El Al employees that they
would fight against the Sabbath
ban, possibly by a general strike.
He urged El Al workers "to
maintain industrial peace for the
next several years," claiming
that if they did, "El Al will no
longer need subsidies to stay
alive."
JFSB To Honor
Campaign Workers
The Jewish Federation of South Broward will honor those
people who helped to make the 1982 United Jewish Appeal-Fed-
eration Campaign the huge success it was at a breakfast on
Sunday .April 16 at 9:30 a.m. at the Holiday Inn on S. Ocean Dr.
Campaign Chairman Saul Singer, M.D. said that the skills,
experience and personal commitment of our campaign workers
were essential to this year's campaign achievements.
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Offers Exciting Missions Program
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward is offering three
exciting Missions to Israel, ac-
cording to Saul Singer, M.D.,
campaign chairman.
The Family Mission, set for
July 11-21, is the richest source
for teaching your children the
spirit and challenge of Israel -
and what it means to Jewish
people everywhere.
The Gathering, Oct. 11-15, is
the centerpiece of the 1983
United Jewish Appeal-Federa-
tion Campaign and the first
major Jewish 'happening' of the
80's. Minimum commitment for
"The Gathering" is $10,000. This
Mission will be led by Howard
Barron, M.D.
For five memorable days pre-
ceding "The Gathering" partici-
pants will have the unique oppor-
tunity to join with the Jewish
communities of Spain and
Morocco to study the Sephardic
heritage of our people. The pre-
Gathering will be led by Joseph
and Margarita Terkiel.
ThelCommunity Mission is the
vehicle which will bring you in
touch with the mainstream of
Israeli life and enable you
to reach the very heart of the
Jewish people. It is set for Oct.
21-31.
In-Depth Seminars will be
available following both "The
Gathering" and Community
Missions. They will combine ex-
pert lectures and field study to
include such topics as "Sources
of Our Jewish Heritage," "Eth-
nic Cultures of Israel,"
"Archaeology in the Holyland"
and "Jerusalem in Depth."
All Missions include round trip
air transportation (N.Y. N.Y.),
5 star deluxe hotels, meals, taxes,
guides, buses, porterage and all
special programs.
"The Missions program is
a real experience for all par-
ticipants. It gives you an op-
portunity to see for yourself what
has been accomplished by the
Jewish people when their energy
and resources are used fully and
creatively," Dr. Singer added.
For additional information on
the Missions to Israel, contact
Rae Bein at the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward.
Mission
rjccepfcioijs
Monday, May 17,
at 7:30 p.rq.
Kljoi ya Miller
2030 S. Ocean. Dr.
(flpt. 1214
Wednesday, May 19,
at 7:30 p.rq.
I ieoi) and Idelle Weisbrodj
3301 8. Ocean. Dr.
flpt. U04
Tuesday, May 25,
at 7:30 p.n*.
Herb and Doris Yolpci}
1920 S. Ocean. Dr.
flpt. 7Q>


Pigt2A
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. May 14, 19^
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Metro and Western
Young Leadership
Conclude Exciting Year
The Metropolitan and Western
Young Leadership Committees of
the Jewish Federation of South
Brow and recently concluded the
\-ear with two events.
The Western Young Leader-
ship held a Shabbat Dinner and
the Metropolitan Young Leader-
ship heard guest speaker Joyce
Newman discuss "The Role of
Federation and How to Get
Involved "'
During the year, both groups
had the opportunity to meet
speakers such as Tom Dine,
executive director of AIPAC:
Professor Helen Fagin. of the
University of Miami. Marilyn
Tallman. a Jewish educator from
Chicago: and Michael Medved. a
noted author and lecturer.
The Young Leadership
Committees attempt to educate
the community in order to pre-
pare individuals for positions of
prominence in the Jewish
Federation and its recipient
agencies.
For additional information,
contact Susan Marx at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Joyce Newman 1 third from left* recently spoke to the Metropolitan
Young Leadership Committee on The Rote of Federation and How to
Get Involved." From left are Ernie and Perry Smith. Ted Newman.
Toni and Leon Weiss berg
From left are Sherry and M*e Jacobs. Bar Topper Rebecca and
Jerry >cnaru and Jackie Kan
:::::::::::::::::::::::x::w
Israeli Defense Minister
Sharon To Address
UJA National Leadership
\b\N YORK. General Ami
Sharon. Israel s Minister of De-
itnas. ui address the United
Je-.sh Appeal National Leader-
ship ice. Maj 21-23 198!
a; ;he Sheraton \\ ashingtoc
.. ia V\ ashingtoc. D C UJA
Ckanaw Herscbei
S batf jr^ounced
GcmmI Snaroc will address
- approximate.> 1 5M lenders of
:.- \rr.erx\ir. Jewish community
tc Jewish Federation of
*v_".r S row arc representative.
ar.c Susan Singer Philip
Howard Barren. Joan
Katx-ofr and Sumner Kaye at a
mman] ^an^uet Sat'arda> e\ec-
. M *> J^ ies than one month
i~c: Israei < hjstonc w*hdraw,
S traai ;r:e Sina: under the terras of
-e Camp Da vie Acwrc Bhna-
? rerg saxi
The annual Conference w-.il
munch the l3 UJA-coububjct
to hap hud the afc-
aad hit >rm hn-
progrnms of the Jew-
tsh .Agency s Israei and the
\=*rx-*= jewsh Joint Dvtnbu
^uon Comnunee m 33 Bauoc*
- worktwaie. the UJA Nauoca*
* Chairmas nocec
*o years, turns o\er dt-
rectxxi of the annual campaign tc
Robert E Loup of Denver
Colorado Loup will be instaliec
at a special Shabbat service Sat
urday morning
The conference will open Fri-
day. Ma> 11 with a review of the
human needs of the Jewish
people in Israel and around the
gfobe A presentation of the UN
Campaign is planned
Delegates to the Nat
Leadership Conference will also
participate in a series of intensive
workshops and study sessions on
specific campaign programs and
These sessions are
to strengthen their
campaigners at the
,tvtt-!;-,v MBMmll i-~C
aauonal tevds.
The conference program also
rhmVs announcement of the
KBCkas Sapir Awards to cob>
mmmV :.r Mttmmmmg
ccjevement m the 1962 cam-
paign.
The hnrieririyi meeting, wkach
doses Sunday norang. May 23.
wM be preceded by the --J
meeting of UJ A s Namna' Canv
pajg= Pohcv Board, selected my
leaders from
ho
mm anaoai L'JAh
From left are Brian Berman. co-chairman; Joyce and Ted Newman. Janie Berman. co-chairman; Bud and
Bett\ Homans. co-chairmen.
The Western Young Leadership Committee recently held a Shabbat Dinner at the Rock Creek Bath and
Tennis Crab. From left are Bruce Yoskin. Jan Ziff. co-chairman; Rene* and Mark Kaplan. Ellen Amigo,
Eileen Topper. Skip and Ruth Turchen. ___
w
Children of the Western Young Leadership Committee also participated in the Shabbat Dinner.
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
In the world
Not surpr sing t's R .e-
s :e 3-: z~~'~ are ~a-..
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If you've ever nvorked a th
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toer'j-; -g _-?a sfi education,
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fTa 1 1
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Ca I Grossberg. President
Anarew Fier. Vice President.
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral D rectors of
America.
Charles Salomon. Vice
President. New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden. Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack.V.P..Religious
Advisor.
n Rosenthal
Keith Kronish.F.D.
Harvey Pincus. F.D.
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golla
Jules Fischbein
E 3 ne Gardner
Rothfeld
Sonia Gale
Bernard Eilen
f-lumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Ruben
Arthur Fine
Alvin Tendler
NatGoias-
Steven Kleinberg
Guarr ^s:
"3 Jo dberg, Maneaei
Ste.t1 F schman
Joel Kay
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ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.)
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
NE. 19th Ave.
Dade County
Phone No. 531-1151.
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd.
FT. LAUDERDALE (Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Rd.)
Broward County
Phone No. 523-5801.
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd.
Palm Beach County
Phone No. 683-8676.
Five chapels serving the New
York Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
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Tradition. Its wttat makes as Jews


Friday, May 14,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page3-A
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Celebrates
Yorq Haatzrqaut
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CHAPtLS AVAHAfcLi THROUGHOUT SOUTH FLORIDA FROM BOCA RATON TO MIAMI


Page4A
Tho Totiiich Wlnri
The Jewish
Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
n.l I ----:lon
Friday, May 14,1982
Jewish Floridian
and Sholar ol Graalai Hollywood O f"*d Snocnei
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher Eacutie Editor
Published Bi Weakly Second Ciiii Postage paid at Haiiandaie. Fla USPS 864500
HOLLYWOODFORT LAUOERDALE OFFICE. Am Savings 2500 Bldg 2500 E Haiiandaie Beacn
Blvd .. Suite 707G. Haiiandaie. Fla 33009. Pnone 454 0466
Abraham B. Halpern. Advertising Supervisor
MainOllice (Plant t20NE8tnSt Miami Fla 33132 Pnone 1.373-4605
Postmaster Form 357 returns to Jewish Floridian. P.O. So. 01 2973 Miami. Fla 13101
Jewiah Federation ot South Biowatd OHicers President. Robert Pittell M 0 Vice Presidents
Philip A. Levin. MO Nat Sedley. Secretary Jo Ann KaM. Treasurer Theodore Newman
Executive Director. Summer G Kaye Submit material tor publication to Leslie Silas. Public
Relations Director,
Member JTA. Seven Aria. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA.
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kathruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Area $3.50 Annual 12 Year Minimum $7). or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. 271* Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. Fla 31020 Phone B21-M10.
Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, May 14,1982
Volume 12
21 IYAR 5742
Number 10
Newest U.S. Slap
In Israel's Face
There could not have been a more stinging slap
in the face by the U.S. of Israel than its decision in
Amman last week to sell some of our most advanced
and sophisticated weapons to Jordan. The decision
came only days after Israel's humbling withdrawal
from the Sinai desert, a move so nationally agonizing
and traumatic, that it should have underscored for all
people of good-will the enormous proportion of Isra-
el's craving for peace.
Instead, Reagan Administration spokesmen sat
in the Hashemite Kingdom's capital city carving out
yet another dilemma for an increasingly beleaguered
Israel, creating an even stronger enemy on Israel's
eastern border, chipping away all the more relent-
lessly at the qualitative edge Israel still has over its
Arab neighbors, but which seems fast to be dwind-
ling.
All of this, of course, as word emanates from the
White House and the State Department of still newer
and more massive pressures to be applied on Israel
for newer and more massive land-for-peace conces-
sions now that the Sinai has been returned to Egypt.
Most galling about the Reagan Administration
announcement Tuesday was the apparent ease with
which it confessed that the Pentagon had prevailed
over the Administration's alleged determination to
link the arms sale to a promise from Jordan that the
weapons would never be used against Israel.
It staggers the imagination that all the Presi-
dent's men are perfectly willing to declare that Mr.
Reagan does not make foreign policy, as the U.S.
Constitution empowers him to do, but that certain!}
in this case it was the Pentagon that decided on the
arms sale.
Even more staggering was the simpleminded
declaration that the sale would not be sent to Con-
gress for approval until after the November election.
This, of course, is in the same category of "diplo-
macy" as Mr. Reagan's sudden posturing about a
"summit" meeting with the Soviet Union's Leonid
Brezhnev. In October. Meaning on the eve of the No
vember elections.

mmmmmmmmmm
Letter to the Federation
Dear Jewish Federation of South
Broward
Now that I arrived home, safe
and sound, after spending two
weeks in Israel, with Federation,
I've analyzed my thoughts.
Although this has been my 8th
trip to Israel, this trip was entire-
ly different from all my other
trips. My other trips were sights
that were outstanding, however,
we did see unusual sights. This
trip proved to me, that UJA has
done a fabulous job building
cities like "Hod Hasharon"
settling new developments,
taking care of the elderly, like the
senior citizen gathering that en-
tertained us.
I have never been at an air
base, nor at a naval installation
and 1 shall never forget the seder
at the air base. We all were
greeted with flowers to welcome
us and it was exciting to be with
these beautiful boys that are our
defense to our country.
Although, originally UJA said
there would be no solicitation of
funds, you probably felt this was
a fine opportunity to add finances
to UJA.
Therefore, not having given
then, I am enclosing another $100
check for continued success in
your wonderful work.
Sincerely,
FRANCES LEVITT
Gail Rubin Memorial
NEW YORK A nature re-
serve and wildlife sanctuary
named in memory of Gail Rubin,
the distinguished photographer
who was murdered by the PLO,
was recently dedicated at Kir
Afek near Haifa, Israel.
Mrs. Kstelle Rubin was guest
ol honor at the dedication of tin
project which has been funded by
members of the food industry
in New York, with which her hus-
band was associated.
Sam Dumbrov, senior vice-
. 4?re8idtaUM^w44ll'.;9/,?-.Vl4.
the recipient of JNF's Tree ol
Life award, was also present at
the dedication, the highlight of
a special tour of Israel by a large
delegation from the food indus
try.
The sanctuary is being created
by the Jewish National Fund as a
refuge for migratory birds and a
shelter for indigenous animals.
many of whom Gail Rubin photo-
graphed for exhibitions shown all
over the world.
...... '''.".."." .,... v.-.v.
My Passover Mission Experience
By ADELINE HERMAN
Let me share this exciting ex-
perience with you this wonder-
ful, enlightening and informative
trip to Israel which my husband
and I had the privilege and plea-
sure of making. Our friends and
neighbors, Esther and Ben Sch-
wab, were also on this trip and I
am sure will agree it was worth
while and memorable.
It would take volumes to relate
in detail all the happenings.
Therefore, I shall try to give you
the highlights.
Wednesday. March 31, 1982:
We left the Fort Lauderdale air-
port via Delta for Kennedy Air-
port in New York. We had about
a two hour wait and then de-
parted via El Al Airline to Ben
Gurion International Airport.
Thursday, April 1: We arrived
at Ben Gurion Airport after a so-
called night's sleep. We were
driven to Modi'in for tree plant-
ing (a great way to get close to
Israel's earth, though we would
have preferred getting close to a
bed.) We were than transferred to
the Carlton Penta Hotel in Tel
Aviv, enjoyed a much needed
rest, a welcome dinner and a
short briefing.
Friday, April 2: We departed
our hotel for the south via the
Gaza Strip and visited settle-
ments in Pitchat Shalom Region.
We engaged in a short study of
the resettlement from the Yamit
Region. This resettlement was
necessary because Sinai was
being given back to the Arabs.
They established a new commu-
nity known as a moshav. Those
families who wanted to partici-
pate invested $10,000 in this
moshav. If they did not have the
money they managed to borrow
it. They were given land, cultiv-
ated it and sold the products they
grew. We were invited to taste
and take their vine-ripened
tomatoes which were simply deli-
cious.
They built new homes for
themselves. We spoke to several
young men who came from the
United States. One man told us
he came with his wife and four
children, and that it was his fath-
er who encouraged him to make
this drastic move; really
dedicated pioneers. We returned
to Tel Aviv, rested and enjoyed a
Shabbat dinner at the hotel.
Saturday, April 3: Shabbat
in Tel Aviv After breakfast we
had the option of attending serv-
ices or visiting Caesarea and
Haifa. We visited the ruins of
Caesarea. which our guide inter-
estingly explained, and we re-
turned to the hotel. Being the
Shabbat, the stores were closed.
In the evening we took a cab to
visit the stores that were closed
during the day. The place was
"hopping.'' Caesarea has the only
golf course in Israel.
Sunday, April 4: This was a
very eventful day. After break-
fast we had a field study of Pro-
ject Renewal and Hod Hasharon,
Hollywood's neighborhood in Is-
rael. Project Renewal is a social
endeavor designed to assist those
who are in the greatest need. This
is Israel's great investment for
the future, for the sake of their
children and grandchildren.
Every effort is being made to ac-
complish a high quality of life.
Visiting Project Renewal at
Hod Hasharon was a moving ex-
perience. We were directed to
small buildings which contained
rooms where children and senior
citizens are taught to read anc
write. We were invited to partake
of wine, coke and home-baked
cake. The cake was baked by se-
nior citizens of the community
who were present. They seemed
happy seeing us. A young direc
tor was our interpreter. A young
lady entertained us by playing
the guitar and singing while h.r
friend was Bitting \ I In- am.-
room taking care ol herinlant.
Alter lunch at the Sharon Ho
-VV.V.V^.-.-/.........v....,,
tel we visited Beit Hatefutsoth,
the Museum of the Jewish Dias
pora. emphasizing Jewish history
and heritage. We returned to the
hotel and relaxed around the pool
area.
After dinner came the high-
light of the day a guest speak-
er, Yehuda Ben-Meir, Israels
Deputy Minister of Foreign Af-
fairs and a leading member of the
Parliamentary National Reli-
gious Party.
Dr. Ben-Meir was bom in New
York City in 1939. He has a doc-
torate in psychology from
Gplumbia University and a rab-
binical degree from Yeshiva Uni-
versity. Dr. Ben-Meir has lived in
Israel since 1961 and has served
on the Kensset's key Finance
and Foreign Affairs and Security
Committees.
He delivered a provocative
message covering the political
and social problems of Israel. He
stated that Israel traded tangib-
les for intangibles for the hope of
peace. Israel mcde substantial
concessions to Egypt in the in-
terest of peace. Israel invested
billions in Sinai, most of which is
being forfeited as a result of the
withdrawal under the Camp Da-
vid Agreement. This includes the
air bases in Sinai which Israel
had voluntarily given up. Israel
has handed over to Egypt the
Sinai oil fields. Israel is com-
pelled to pay more than world
market prices for its oil as the
markets available to Israel are
limited. Oil expenditures have re-
sulted in Israel's inflation.
Dr. Ben-Meir also covered Pro-
ject Renewal, one of the projects
we visited during the day. The
pioneers who settled on the sand
dunes of Sinai established agri-
cultural settlements, a variety of
commercial activities, and an
attachment to their homes. The
complete abandonment of their
hard earned achievements is one
of the sacrifices Israel made for
the sake of peace evacuating
people is a human sacrifice.
Israel owes huge sums of
money; they owe more per capita
than any other country, yet Isra-
el has never defaulted on repay-
ment of any of its loans.
Monday, April 5: After break-
fast, we departed the hotel and
drove North. We visited Akko
and the Galilee area and had a
box lunch with the settlers. We
visited Safed and continued to
Tiberias. We checked into the
Plaza Hotel in Tiberias and had a
fish dinner at a local restaurant.
The local fish is known as "St.
Peter."
Tuesday, April 6: After break-
fast we had a briefing by an
Army Colonel on Security in the
North. We left hotel and by bus
climbed the Golan Heights. Our
guide explained the strategic im-
portance of the area. We visited
the Army Units, which was a
special privilege accorded us.
Tanks were engaged in target
practice. We lunched in a restau-
rant on the Sea of Galilee,
boarded a boat and returned to
the Plaza Hotel at Tiberias for
dinner.
Wednesday, April 7: Each day
is more exciting than the previ-
ous one and today was no excep-
tion. After breakfast we headed
for Jerusalem. We traversed Jor-
dan, an area which we could not
pass prior to the Six Day War.
We passed mud huts which
were once occupied by the Arabs.
In 1948 when the British relin-
quished their mandate to govern
Palestine and the U.N. approved
the creating of the State of I srael,
most of the Arabs who lived in
Palestine al the time and who
were left in Israel, ran away and
settled in Jordan. The U.N. built
hese mud huts for the Arab re-
.ugees. In 1967 when Israel oc-
:upied this territory the Arabs
igain ran away and left these
nuts which deter;...;, ted and
aecame eyesores Israel wanted
to demolish them b the) served
no useful purpose, but the U N
Relief Organization would not
permit this demolition.
We entered Jerusalem, got off
the bus and in the street our
friend and neighbor, Ben Sch-
wab, led us in chanting Shehec-
neyanu on Mt. of Olives. We
proceeded to the Hadassah
Medical Center. Although this
was not on our itinerary, many
wanted to see the magnificent
Chagal windows. Unfortunately
the place was closed but our
guide and our UJA personnel
were successful in having it
opened, especially for us.
We returned to the hotel for
lunch and a rest. With deep pride
and joy I will relate the highlight
of the trip the Pesach Seder at
a Military Base.
We were driven to the base,
about a one hour ride from the
hotel. We received a warm wel-
come from the Colonel. We were
then directed to the dining hall
where we were left breathless by
the gorgeous sight. The colorful
flowers, the beautiful and mean-
ingful decorations and the glow-
ing lights of the candles were
festive to behold. The young sol-
diers, our table mates, were a de-
light. The room was colorful and
warm, but the real warmth came
from the people.
The Seder ritual led by the
rabbi proceeded the dinner We
were served by the beautiful Mil-
itary "femmes." After dinner
everyone joined in singing
Pesach songs. Festivity and
gaiety permeated the air.
We bid Shalom to our gracious
hosts and returned to the hotel
with laughter in our hearts, tears
in our eyes, an indelible impres-
sion on our minds, and deep
gratitude at being a part of this
meaningful celebration in Jerusa-
lem.
Thursday, April 8: This was a
free day. Some went to services,
some visited Old Jerusalem and
some went to the Western Wall
where services were being con-
ducted. Lunch was served at the
hotel at 1 p.m. The remainder of
the day was quiet and unsched-
uled. We had dinner at the hotel,
visited with our travelling com-
panions and retired.
Friday, April 9: We departed
for Yad Vashem, Memorial to
the Six Million. We visited the
Museum which was preceded by
a short lecture on the implicit
tions of the Holocaust. The Mu
seum contained paintings and
pictures depicting the horror--
and documented the atrocities
We participated in a special Yi/-
kor service conducted by a rabbi
Tall flames were burning in the
center while the Yizkor service
was being conducted. There
wasn't a dry eye!
After Yizkor we visited the
Military Cemetery. Graves were
placed one after the other, re-
gardless of rank. The Israeli
philosophy is, when one gives his
life for his country, one has given
all. There is no place for "narish-
keit" rank is not important.
The graves and grounds are
extremely well taken care of. A
narrow water pipe, inserted along
side of each grave irrigates the
ground.
We had lunch at the Moriah
Hotel and received a wooden
carving, a gift from UJA. This
carving was made from the olive
tree wood. Before lunch, Nat
Sedley, our chairman, made a
short address after which many
gave additional pledges to UJA.
We than visited Old Jerusalem
and proceeded to the Western
Wall, offered prayers and re-
turned to the hotel for a Shabbat
dinner. The Chief Cantor of the
Israeli Army made Kiddish and
led us in song throughout the
meal, assisted by his son who
acted as Master of Ceremoin
After dinner we socialized and
Continued on Page 9-A
i......
mm


Friday. May 14,1982
-
'.......
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Holocaust Memorial Observance
Page 5-A
"We must pledge to work hand
in hand to never forget. We must
give our money, our voice and our
soul to the State of Israel."
These words came from David
Schoenbrun, one of America's
most distinguished journalists,
when he spoke to a group of more
than 1.000 at the Holocaust
Memorial Observance, sponsored
by the Community Relations
Committee of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward. The
event, chaired by Carl Rosen-
kopf. was held recently at the
Hallandale Jewish Center.
The program included a
procession of survivors and chil-
dren of survivors, a Holocaust
reading by Mindelle Wajsman
and ghetto songs by Sender
Wajsman.
Four concentration camp
liberators were also presented
with certificates. They included
Seymour Rateman, Hal Jackson,
Hyman Lippman and Lester
Rabin.
IFrom left are David Schoenbrun, guest speaker; Robert S. Pitted,
Ml) and Carl Rosenkopf, chairman of the event.
Hollywood Mayor David Keating (right) presented Federation Presi-
dent Robert S. Pit tell, M.D. with a proclamation at a gathering at Cit\
Hall.
From left are Hal Jackson, Hallandale Jewish Center Rabbi Carl
Klein, David Schoenbrun and Rabbi Harold Richter, co-director of the
Community Relations Committee.
Roeitta Kenigsberg, chairman of
From left are Lester Rubin, Seymour Bateman, Hyman Littman and Children of Holocaust Survivors.
Irving Miller.
ISRAEL
TOUR OF LEISURE-4 WEEKS
With Late Departures, Little Walking, Slower Pace,
Relaxation & Enjoyment
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1 Week Jerusalem 'u" p|us alr
Tour Includes:*Accommodation in First Class Hotel*Twin Bedded Rooms* 2 Kosher
Meals Every Day*8 Days of Sightseeing-Transfers & Porterage-Travelers Insurance:
Medical, Financial Sfe/ftoj,tjATES: ^ ^ ^ ^_____________
ALSO WE HAVE 2 WEEKS DELUXE PACKAGE
OTHER JOURS $1746 Including Air & Breaklast
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL MIRIAM AT:
TRIANGLE TOURS callcollect
18407 W.Dixie Highway* North Miami Beach* 931 -3031
Fla. State Rep. Larry Smith (right) presented Dr. Pittell with a
proclamation from the House of Representatives.
From left are Temple In The Pines Rabbi Bernard Shoter, Hallandale
Jewish Center Cantor Jacob Danziger, Temple Beth El Rabbi Ben
Romer, David Schoenbrun and Hallandale Jewish Center President
M/nrPrtUkar.
AN INVITATION TO
A VERY DEMANDING HIGH SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
If you want the teenagers in your tamily to receive the highest quality
education from excellent laculty,
If you want your children to grow
up proud of our people, fascinated
by our long history, and enthralled
by our unique faith,
THEN
SELECT
THEIR
HIGH SCHOOL
WITH CARE
Because the high school years are the most important of their schooling, v
you are invited to consider the JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA, x
LOCATED AT THE Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center in North Miami
Beach, a school committed to academic excellence. Motivated and
ambitious students, entering 9th or 10th grades are eligible to enroll
for the Fall of 1982
THIS COULD BE THE MOST IMPORTANT DECISION IN YOUR CHILD'S LIFE
For information call Rabbi Louis Herring, Principal: 305/935-5620


Page6-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 14,1982
General Uri Talmor Featured Speaker Pioneer Women Na'amat
At Technion Society Sunday, May 16 Annual Donor Luncheon -1
General Uri Talmor. Deputy to
the Commander of the Israel Air
Force, will be the featured spea-
ker at a brunch being given by
the Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Technion Society Sun-
day morning, May 16, at the
Konover Hotel.
In making the announcement.
Gerald EngeL President of the
Chapter said that there will be a
charge of $12.50 per person and
that reservations are required.
No solicitation of funds is to be
made.
General Talmor joined the
Historical First for Latin
America: Costa Rica
Has a Jewish First Lady
With the inauguration of Dr.
Luis Alberto Monge to the presi-
dency of Costa Rica on May 8. a
Latin American republic has a
Jewish first lady for the first time
in history, according to a report
by the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Mexico and Central
America office.
Doris Yankelewitz Berger de
Mange was born in San Jose.
Costa Rica's capital city. Her
family is part of the small Costa
Rican Jewish community, which,
with almost 2.500 members, has
tx>en as integral part of this de-
mocratic country since the first
arrival of Jews in the 1920s.
Dr. Monge. a lawyer, was the
lirsi Ambassador of Costa Rica
Ki Israel in 1962. He has repre-
sent .-il Costa Rica at the Interna-
tional Labor Organization, the
Regional Interamerican Organi-
zation of Workers, and the Center
of Democratic Studies of Latin
America. He was a member of
Costa Rica's Congreso (Parlia-
ment) for ihree separate terms,
and acted as the president of the
Congreso during his last term,
from 1973-4.
President-elect Monge won the
Costa Rican presidential elec-
tions of February 7. on the
Partido Liberacion Nacional (Na-
tional Liberation Party-Pl.N) tic-
ket. Both he and Mrs. Monge are
active in the party: she plays an
active role in the women's section
of the PLN. They have a daugh-
ter 1 -ena. now in high school.
7th Annual BB Women
So. Coastal Region Confab
The "th Annual B'nai B'rith
Women South Coastal Regional
Conference will be held from May
14 through May 16, at the
Sheraton Hotel in Boca Raton.
Florida. 1-95 at Glades Road.
2000 N.W. 19th Street.
The Regional Conference it
open to members of B'nai B'rith
Women and all are welcome with
prior registration.
This conference promises to be
the best yet. Dorothy Binstock.
the newly elected International
President will be the key speaker.
All attending will be both edu-
cated and entertained.
Not sine* th* birth of Israel has
something so tiny mad* it so big.
4,
It s Tetley's tiny little tea leaves, "heyVe been making it big in
Jewish homes tor years Tetley -.nows that |ust as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the mos- flavorful, the same is true for
lea leaves. Thats why for rich refreshing tea. Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leo /es Because tiny is tastier1
l BAGS
K Certified Kosher
TONY RANDAL _
TETIa K \'- TEA TinM 1% tantirr-
Israel Air Force in 1953, has
served in various command and
staff positions and flew opera-
tionally in three wars. He is a
graduate of the Technion and re-
cently completed a PH.D. pro-
gram in management at U.C.L.A.
General Talmor will discuss the
current state of affairs in the
Middle East, giving special
emphasis to the role the Israel
Institute of Technology (Tech-
nion) plays in helping Israel
secure its future as a nation.
The Technion is Israel's only
university devoted exclusively to
technological education, research
and development and is responsi-
ble for having trained more than
70 per cent of the countries scien-
tists and engineers. Graduates of
the Technion have distinguished
themselves in a wide variety of
scientific disciplines which have
contributed significantly to
Israel's industrial and economic
growth.
Mr. F.ngel. who is Regional
Managing Partner, Southeastern
United States, of Alexander
Grant & Co., expressed his view
that "today, more than ever, Is-
rael's strength and security de-
pend on scientific and technologi-
cal talent. For nearly 60 years
such talent has been nourished
and disciplined by the Technion.''
Those interested in attending
the May 16 brunch should make
reservations by calling the
American Technion Society
office. 868-5666.
Gratified with the results of the recent Annual Donor Luncheon of the
South Florida Council Of Pioneer Women Na'amat are from left,
Phvliss Sutker of Chicago, national president of the organization and
featured speaker at the affair; Harriet Green. South Florida president
and national vice president; ,Bebee Pullman of Ft. Lauderdale,
national board member and Gert Aaron of Hallandale, national board
member. There are 25 clubs and chapters in Dade and South Broward
counties. One thousand persons attended the affair.
J~<
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Friday, May 14.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7-A
* 4.
.
L>
SPRINGTIME IS FOR RENEWAL
A crucial problem facing Israel today is the serious socio-economic gap that threatens
to erode Israel's cohesiveness. ,
PROJECT RENEWAL one of Israel's most revolutionary social programs-ad-
dresseV this imrxrunt problem. It is a comprehensive reh.bihtat.oii.program aimed at
radically upgrading the quality of life in 160 neighborhoods throughout Israel.
PROJECT RENEWALis a partnership among Diaspora Jewry.the Israeli Govern
and the people of Israels distressed neighborhoods. It is a Jewish partnership
utilizing Jewish labor and Jewish giving, helping those in need to help themselves.
We in the South Broward community are "twinned with the community of Hod
Hasharon a small town outside of Tel Aviv. Working together, we are tackling the
problems of housing, schools, daycare centers, parks and much more.
PROJECT RENEWAL wortfs. It forges a link between us and Jewish destiny, bet-
ween us and the future of a Jewish State where all citizens enjoy the benefits of a decent
life.
Springtime is the season for renewal. With your support, we can make the difference.
Make your pledge today.

JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD
271 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood. Florida 33020 Broward: (305) 921-8810 Dade 4W64


Page8-A
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. May 14, 1982
The Fringes Off Jewish Identity
Acts of Faith. By Dan Ross
Foreword by Dr. Raphael Patai.
St. Martins Press, 175 Fifth
Avenue, New York, NY 10010.
256 Pages. $15.95.
Reviewed by Philip E. Miller
Along with the miracle of Jew-
ish survival is the mysterious
existence of groups whose Jewish
identity is vestigal, truncated, or
at least problematic. Some, like
the Samaritans and Karaites, are
the product of schism or doctrinal
dispute; others, like the Falashas
and Chinese Jews, represent
forms of Jewish life which
evolved cut off from the main-
stream and to a degree fossilized.
still others, like the Bene Israel of
India or the Jewish Indians of
Mexico are the subject of contro-
versy, both scholarly and legal.
And then there are the Portu-
guese Marranos, the Chuetas of
Majorca, the Iranian Marranos of
Mashhad, and the Dommeh of
Turkey whose overt religious life
is not Jewish, but who retain a

JUUB
Jewish Books
in Review
i j irv>rt ol tht fW0 tewii/i Book Council.
IS UU .'Wi Si. New ro*fc, N V 10010
Jewish identity, either in their
own eyes or in the eyes of their
Christian and Muslim coreligion-
ists.
Acts of Faith is a well written,
thoroughly researched and docu-
mented study of these groups.
Intended for the general public, it
does not break now ground, but
neither does it shy away from the
scholarly controversies sur-
rounding them, giving succinct
reports of the varying opinions
with useful references for those
interested in pursuing the matter
further. The accounts are excel-
lent m their precision and clarity,
carefullv avoiding such pitfalls as
romantic notions of Jewish
history or identity which could
otherwise limit this books great
value. The 32 pages of illustra-
AJc l < i k-wish klenrity
D4NROSS
Jewisl} (onQnf)ar)i!y;
(gei)ter News
ttf
tions add a fascinating dimension
to the text.
While scholars and specialists
may take issue with certain
statements, Ross has clearly
given an outstanding introduc-
tion to these unusual chapters of
Jewish history and the fringes of
Jewish identity, for as one ex-
plores these byways, one comes
to question whether or how Jew-
ish these exotic communities are
and inevitably one must ask:
"Who is a Jew?"
ir
it
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it
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it
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
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Legal Advice
Free legal advice will be offered
to seniors at the Hollywood Jew-
ish Community Center, 2838
Hollywood Blvd. every second
Tuesday of the month from 10
a.m. to 12 noon. This new service
is provided by the Elderly Law
Unit of Broward County Legal
Aid.
Movies
Delightful movies are offered
to the public every Wednesday at
1 p.m. at the Hollywood Jewish
Community Center.
The Jewish National Fund re-
cently held a reception in honor of
Bert Goldberg. Over 180
people attended the reception at
Temple Beth El. Approximately
$9,000 was pledged for the pur-
chase of trees in Israel. The high-
light of the evening was the
presentation to Mrs. Goldberg of
a plaque by Dr. Samuel Jaffe for
her devotion to Jewish causes
and staunch support of Israel.
Contributions to the JNF can
still be sent to Temple Beth El.
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The Northern Trust Company, Chicago


f, May 14,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9-A
Passqyer Mission Experience'
tinucd from Page 4-A
|t a day
lay, April 10: Thia being
hahbat,
Bv We
we welcomed the
had the choice of
'a walking tour of the Old
I or visiting the Israel
im or Shrine of the Book.
and I decided that we
I visit some friends (Mr. and
K\ Shoen) who own a condo-
i at the Plaza Hotel in Je-
_j where they spend about
jionths out of the year. We
fa delightful afternoon
y, April 11: After break-
the Hilton Hotel we de-
for the Dead Sea. We
a Museum, Shrine of the
Churches, desecrated
which are being restored,
late plants. We reached
da, were taken on a lift to a
and then climbed 79
order to reach the top.
fcde explained the various
[of interest the King's
the swimming pool, the
the kitchen and the re-
hall. The floor of the re-
hall was made of beauti-
Isaic tile. The beautiful
I colors could still be seen.
Lad lunch at the Cassouto
at Sdom. We spent a lei-
kcrnoon at the pool. At the
fere was a deep decline to
ad Sea. Coming out of the
I Sea we found ourselves
1 with a thin coat of oil.
Lir dinner at the hotel we
.pated in Israeli dancing
[the direction of a dancing
Vor. It was fun.
April 12: After
ist we departed for Eilat.
driving we passed much
/. They were using solar
Mineral and salt pro-
| which came from the sea
sing prepared for export.
(headed for Kibbutz Yahel.
ire first accorded the privi-
nd extreme pleasure of
Shlomo Drori talk on Ia-
|uture. He was dynamic.
tie room there were glass
ners which held minerals
In the Dead Sea sodium
le, carnalite, magnesium,
he, sylvinite, potash and
I salt. Drori delivered a
nd interesting talk. I have
of his lecture; it's history
asking.
entered Kibbutz Yahel
[ is approximately 50 miles
Vf the City of Eilat. We had
llunch and were welcomed
by a young American who came
from New York and whose par-
ents live in Fort Lauderdale. His
wife and new-born baby also live
at the kibbutz.
A young lady who came from
Great Neck, N.Y., showed us the
grounds and living quarters.
After this visit we drove to
Eilat and checked into the Caesar
Hotel. That evening we had din-
ner with the Naval Officers.
Tuesday, April 13: This
morning we visited the City of
Eilat. We had the exciting expe-
rience of entering the Underwater
Conservatory. The tremendous
amount of coral, the beautiful
plant life, the unusual fish, were
all very interesting.
Although it was not a part of
our itinerary, we visited the Navy
Base. We were extended this
privilege by a colonel who had
dinner with us the previous eve-
ning. We were taken on a guided
tour. Returned to the hotel for
lunch. The remainder of the af-
ternoon we relaxed. Had dinner
at the hotel.
Wednesday, April 14: This
being our last day in Israel, we
had a free day. At 9 p.m. we left
the hotel for our flight to Ben
Gurion Airport where we were
checked by Customs. At 1 a.m.
our plane departed for Kennedy
via El Al. We arrived in New
York about 5:30 a.m. We cleared
Customs and were bussed to
Eastern. We waited until 8:40
a.m. for our flight to Fort Lau-
derdale and arrived in Fort Lau-
derdale about 12 noon.
Before concluding, we thank
UJ A for a trip well planned, ed-
ucational and rewarding. It was
pleasant being received at all the
hotels by a UJA Hospitality
chairperson. Nat Sedley and his
cooperative staff did a fine job.
Nat and Dina Sedley were very
gracious when they hosted the
cocktail parties in their hotel
room. We were fortunate having
a well-informed and articulate
guide and a capable and careful
bus driver. The two group lead-
ers, Reva Wexler and Susan
Marx, were always on call ready
to help whenever needed.
Though we have left our won-
derful State of Israel, we have
also been left with an indelible
impression of its dedicated peo-
ple, a feeling of fulfillment and
the richness of the experience.
SHALOM!
JLY 4th WEEK-END CELEBRATION
5 days & 4 nights
July I to July 5
4 days & 3 nights
July 1 to July 4
s A 4 nights v 4diysa j
I to July 5 fU July 1 to J
10 f V $85
plus tix A grituitlts
INCLUDING MEALS
pet son
Sou We
occ
Reserve Now For The
UGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
Services Wi'l be Conducted by Prominent Cantor
0CEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
rlviti Beich Olympic Pool Poolsiot Thoriptutlc
Whirlpool TV in All Rohm Rtsldtrd Mashglach
Appropriate Nightly Enttrtalniatnt
Beauti lu I Octantront Sue c ah
GROUP
THE MULTI-MUHM DOLLAR KOSHER
ROTH @
GtATT
I Diraclly on lhe Ocean 40th to 41 St Miami Beach
Fr Retentions Pkonc I "Wl "Off I
four Hol Michael Lethowitz Ale* Smitow JHeVS''**
Silent No More
Soviet Jewry Update
Milgrom Visits Chistopol; Talks '
to Camp Authorities
TARTARSKAYA, ASSR -
Ida Milgrom, mother of POC
Anatoly Shcharansky, visited her
son's prison location April 12,
where she met with several camp
authorities.
At Chistopol prison, where
Shcharansky is entering his fifth
year of a thirteen-year prison
term, Mrs. Milgrom spoke to the
camp manager and to a health
service official. She was told that
her son would be kept in a strict
environment until June 6, for he
has not matched his work quota
and completed only portions of
the work assigned him.
Prisoners are normally per-
mitted to correspond with family
members, but Shcharansky"s let-
ters to his mother were confis-
cated in January and February of
this year, and he is now allowed
to write only one letter every two
months.
On April 15, Mrs. Milgrom
travelled to Kazan and met with
a work camp official who told her
that he would personally check
into the confiscation and censor-
ship of her son's letters letters
that provide a vital link for him.
All of the prisoners at
Chistopol were recently examined
by a special health official. The
Kazan work camp official also
gave his word to Mrs. Milgrom,
that he would release to her,
Shcharansky s health report
when he received the final docu-
ment from the Chistopol
physician.
Mrs. Milgrom is currently
seeking a meeting with the head
of the national organization of
work camps as she continues to
campaign for her son's freedom.
Leonid Shcharansky,
Anatoly's brother, was fired from
his position as an engineer April
16th, and must now seek other
employment to avoid possible
future charges of "parasitism."
Jewish Youth Stages Second
Protest
MOSCOW Arreatod juat
weeks ago in Red Square and
jailed briefly for openly
demanding an emigration visa,
eighteen year-old Leningrad
activist Mikhail Tsivin was again
incarcerated April 16 on similar
charges.
Tsivin chained himself to a
fence and unfolded a metal sign
that read "Let Me Go To Israel."
in both Russian and English.
Soviet police destroyed the sign,
cut Tsivin loose and took him
into custody. *
The young activist, a refusenik
for only a short time, is denied
permission to go to Israel by the
authorities on the grounds that
his parents do not want to emi-
grate.
, Student To Be Reinstated
LENIGRAD Dmitry
Tsimberov, reported to have been
expelled from the Medical Insti-
tute where he is a third year
student, was being purposely
failed by school authorities in an
effort to expedite his military
conscription. An intensive
campaign waged by medical pro-
fessionals in the United states,
who sent cables to Soviet officials
regarding Tsimberov's plight,
helped alleviate pressure on the
student and halt the unfair
examination grading procedures
practiced against him. Tsim-
berov, at the head of his class
academically, will be re-admitted
to the Leningrad Medical
Institute this fall.
D.C. DIGEST: Bush Favors
Soviet Jewry On U.S. Agenda
WASHINGTON. DC. Vice
President George Bush pledged
that the "question of Soviet
Jewry would always be on the
agenda in any meetings with
Soviet leaders," in an April 20
meeting, with over 70 Jewish
leaders at his northwest
Washington residence.
Representing the NCSJ at the
meeting, which was convened by
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations, were Vice-Chairman
Rabbi David Hill, and Washing-
ton Office Director, David Har-
ris.
Hush, whose concern for Soviet
Jews is a matter of historical re
cord, responded favorably to
Rabbi Hill's notion of raising the
plight of Soviet Jewry at up-
coming US-Soviet grain ne-
gotiations in Vienna, stating,
"the Soviets know how we feel.
We will continue to privately and
publicly raise our concerns."
Senate majority leader Howard
Baker (R-Tn). at a meeting with
Jewish leaders the following day,
responded similarly to NCSJ
Executive Committee member
Sol Goldstein's inquiry as to the
expected Senate support for rais-
ing Soviet Jewry at grain talks.
Baker stressed the importance of
the issue of Soviet Jewish emi-
gration, especially as US grain
policy changes, and urged it be
raised at future US-Soviet dis-
cussions.
The Ten I^ost Qlans of Israel?
The Highland Scots, so the story goes, have laid claim to being
descendents of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Whether they really are or
we'll never know. But one thing we do know for sure is that the first
Jews of modern times came to Scotland in the 1600's, found it much
to their liking, and settled there.
Once established, the settlers undoubtedly discovered one of
Scotland's most famous pleasures, J&.B Rare Scotch. Carefully
blended from a selection of the finest scotches, J&B has such a
smoothness and subtlety that it can truly be said to whisper. No
wonder it's become the favorite scotch here in America. Serve
J&B to your tribe, clan or mishpocha. One delightful sip will see
the staff of a tradition that will never be lost.
not.
J&B.ltwhis
B4 ProolBler.o,\- Scold Wnisky C1982 Tie Pailcsngion Cap Ni
pers.


Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 14,1982
Early Childhood Teachers Israel Tour
Mrs. G. came to the Agency to
discuss with a worker her pro-
blem with her aging mother. Mrs.
G. was a very attractive, intelli-
gent, articulate woman in her
middle 50s, who appeared quite
anxious. Mrs. G. and her hus-
band had recently moved to the
South Broward area and, are
living in a large condominium
complex where there are many
recreational opportunities avail-
able. Mrs. G.'s mother lives
nearby and calls her daughter
daily demanding that she take
her shopping, for medical or
dental appointments to the hair-
dresser, etc. ... Mrs. G. feels
guilty because, she is unable to
comply with her mother's de-
mands.
Mrs. G. felt that she had raised
her own family and had looked
forward to her husband's early
retirement in Florida where she
could then enjoy tennis, golf and
swimming regularly. She was
able to articulate her anger at her
mother's constant demands, as
well as her guilt for not being able
to meet all of them.
In the course of counseling,
Mrs. G. was able to work out
some compromises between her-
self and her mother. She was able
to help her mother make other
plans for transportation by en-
listing other support systems;
other relatives, Broward County
Social Service Transportation,
and neighbors. Mrs. G.'s mother
was referred to the Jewish Com-
munity Center where she began
to make some new relationships
and alleviate her loneliness and
thus her dependency on her only
daughter. Freed of these de-
mands, Mrs. G. could than make
herself more available to her
mother on a regular basis without
the guilt and anger that ob-
structed their relationship. They
began to relate to each other in a
mor meaningful way.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County 1909
Harrison Street Suite 109
Hollywood. Florida 33020. Tele-
phone: 927-9288. Hours Mon-
day, Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 North
State Road No. 7 Suite 399,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33319.
Telephone: 735-3394. Hours -
Monday. Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 West
Hillsboro Boulevard Suite 214
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33441.
Telephone: 427-8508. Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and /riday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and The United
Way of Broward County.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward Announces
20th Annual Meeting
Jewish Family Service of Bro-
ward County will hold its 20th
annual meeting on Wednesday.
May 19. at 7:30 p.m. at Soref
Hall on the Campus of the Jewish
Community Center, 6501 West
Sunrise Blvd., Sunrise.
The An..ual Meeting Commit-
tee, under the chairmanship of
Steven Fayne, stated that at this
meeting, an annual report to the
community will be presented by
Board ''resident Brian J. Sherr.
Offici and members of the
>ard I Directors will be elected,
.is the presentation of the :
Esther Lowenthal Community
Service Award. Guest speaker at
the .veting will be Sharon
Solom i, Administrative Assis-
tant to the Sheriff of Broward
Couni 'and Adjunct Professor in
the Nova University Human
Services Graduate Program. She ,
will speak on services, as well as j
lack of services, for children in ,
Broward County.
Jewish Family Service of Bro-
ward County provides counseling
for individuals, groups, families,
single parents, adolescents, and a
variety of offerings for senior cit-
izens. The agency also offers
Family Life Education programs
to community organizations, as
well as a Medicare Information
Service. This is a free program
offering assistance and advocacy
to elderly citizens who have been
denied Medicare coverage.
Offices are maintained at 1909
Harrison Street, Hollywood, 3500
North State Road 7, Ft. Lauder-
dale. and 1800 W. Hillsboro
Blvd.. Deerfield Beach.
The agency is a financial re-
cipient of United Way of Bro-
ward County, Jewish Federation
of Greater Ft. Lauderdale, and
Jewish Federation of South Bro-
ward.
Studying, touring, and first
hand experience of the early
childhood educational programs
of Israel will highlight the Israel
Summer Study Tour of the Early
Childhood Educators of South
Florida sponsored by the Jewish
Council of Early Childhood Edu-
cators and the Central Agency
for Jewish Education.
The three week program, leav-
ing Miami on Wednesday, June
16, and returning on July 7, will
be under the direction of the De-
partment of Education and Cul-
ture of the World Zionist Organi-
zation. Visits have been arranged
to summer day camp programs,
day care centers and experiment-
al nursery and kindergarten
classes in both Tel Aviv and Je-
rusalem.
Seminars for the group will be
led by some of the outstanding
early childhood specialists from
Tel Aviv and Hebrew Uni-
versities, while other programs
will be held at the David Yellin
Teachers College and the Dolores
Kohl Teacher Center in Jeru-
salem.
InterfaHh Council
Elects Officers
The Interfaith Council of Grea-
ter Hollywood has elected the fol-
lowing officers to serve during
1982-83.
President, Sister Marie
Danielle, Madonna Academy; 1st
Vice President, Rabbi Robert
Frazin, Temple Solel; Secretary,
Eleanor Handleman, Temple
Beth El; Treasurer, Rev. Paul
Kirsch, St. John's Lutheran
Church.
At Large members include
Father Joseph Janezewski,
Annunciation Catholic Church;
June Johns, Hollywood Hills
United Methodist Church; Dr.
Stanley Kessel, Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith; Sandi
Khani, Temple Solel, Sal Oliveri,
Nativity Catholic Church; Rev.
Robert Temple, Jr., Hollywood
Hills United Methodist Church;
and Leon Sternberger, Bahai
Church.
The installation will be held at
a Memorial Day picnic on May
31 at 3:30 p.m. at the home of
Fred and Sandi Khani.
In addition, there will be a
number of days devoted to tour-
ing some of the major sites of in-
terest both in Jerusalem and
throughout the country, with a
special visit to the Museum of the
Diaspora in Tel Aviv.
The entire cost of the tour, in-
cluding air fare from New York
Tel Aviv New York, and ac-
commodations in four star hotels,
will be $1,195. Participants who
wish to remain in Israel following
the three week tour, can do so
without increase in the air fare.
Dr. Aviv Ekrony, director of
the Department of Education and
Culture in the United States,
noted that "we are delighted to
subsidize the tour for nursery and
kindergarten teachers, for we are
convinced of the value of a study
tour in Israel. The combination of >.
the unique approaches to earlv
childhood education in Israel
together with the historical 2
cultural experiences in Israel will
make for a fascinating program"
The group from Florida will
join with a similar group 0f
teachers from Los Angeles in
both the touring and study por-
tions of the trip. The tour will be
credited for the South Florida
participants towards the acquisi-
tion and maintenance of the
Early Childhood License.
Teachers in the primary grades^
of the Jewish synagogue and day-
schools and in the kindergartens
of the public schools may also
apply for the tour.
Further inquiries can be di-
rected to CAJE at 576-4030.
,. I uLJi'&
Candlelighting Time
Friday, May 14 7:41
Friday, May 21 7:44
Thursday, May 27 7:47
First Eve of Shavuot. Prayers
for Yom Tov and Shehecheyohnu.
Friday, May 287:48
Second Eve of Shavuot
Shabbat prayer: v'shel Yom Tov.
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Asher kid sluuui H'mil/.vn Uiv. V l/.ee vanu
I.'hud leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Hlessedarl Thou, f) l.nnl our God, King ofthe Universe,
\\ holms suni lifted us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Suhbuth lights.
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__


Friday, May 1_4. 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11-A

BETH SHALOM
Annual Spring Conference
Ruth Gillman and Flo Siegel
co-presidents of Temple Beth
Shalom Sisterhood, will lead a
delegation of women to the An-
nual Spring Conference of the
Florida Branch of the National
IV'omens' League for Conserva-
tive Judaism, which will be held
at the Konover Hotel in Miami
Beach, May 16-18.
The theme of the Conference
will be "Dealing in Futures," and
will be highlighted by a script
which will be presented called
Taking Stock in our Com-
Inunity." Various workshops
iave been planned based on the
onference theme.
Annette Blitzer, National
Membership Chairman for
Women's League, will address
the Conference on "The Valued
Volunteer."
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom is one of more than 800
conservative sisterhoods affili-
ated with the National Womens'
League of the United Synagogue
of America.
Temple Sole! Notes
May 30th will mark the last
day of Religious School sessions.
Parents may register their chil-
dren for next year at that time at
the Temple office.
Confirmation services are
scheduled for Sunday, May 30 at
7:30 p.m. at Temple Solel.
Cancer Society Support
Program Begins
A support program for cancer
|patients and friends began May
12 at Hollywood Memorial Hos-
pital.
The first "I Can Cope" pro-
eram sponsored by the South
[Broward American Cancer So-
ciety, begins 10 a.m. Wednesday
[at 3501 Johnson St. in Parlor
|A. (Hollywood Memorial is also
o-sponsoring the program.) The
> minute program runs for eight
Dnsecutive weeks and is limited
20 participants. Each patient
encouraged to attend with a
mily member or a friend.
Dr. Herbert Brizel, director of
Radiology, will speak on
(^Understanding Your Disease"
May 19. Other topics covered
kclude daily health problems,
Imily communications and ex-
ressing your feelings. Handling
Iress and tension is also dis-
kssed.
| Other speakers include a social
prker, and a physical therapist.
In the future "I Can Cope" will
be conducted throughout South
Broward at various locations. Co-
facilitators are Marilyn Turner,
A.R.N.P., and Arlene Feurberg,
M.S.
Hollywood residents will have
the opportunity to be checked for
oral cancer, during the first week
of May, through the American
Cancer Society.
Free oral cancer screening will
be available May 4-6 at the
Hollywood Fashion Center from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Informa-
tional pamphlets will also be dis-
pensed.
The event is offered through
the ACS and the Greater Holly-
wood Dental Association. Saslow
Dental Equipment and Supply
Corporation is also providing the
necessary equipment.
For information contact the
South Broward ACS at 925-2314.
The Grand People of Temple
Solel announced their annual re-
treat Friday, June 4 to Monday,
June 7 at West Palm Beach.
Seminar and leisure activities are
planned. Temple members are
invited to join the group. Reser-
vations are limited so call Mary
Lewis or Janice Schlosser.
YOUNG ISRAEL
End of Year Cocktail Party
The Young Israel is planning
an end of year Cocktail Party for
Saturday night, May 22, at
the Grandview. For a donation of
$50 per couple, food and enter-
tainment will be provided. A
minimum of 35 couples must
place reservations in order that
we be able to have this event.
Please RSVP to Irwin Gott-
lieb, Harriet Schlinsky, or Larry
Rosenzweig by April 30.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Club Meeting
Temple Israel of Miramar will
hold a Men's Club meeting Sun-
day morning, May 16 at 9:30
a.m. The Memorial Hospital
Bloodmobile will be at the Tem-
ple that morning for a blood
drive. Refreshments will be
served.
The Annual Donor Dinner and
Dance, sponsored by the sister-
hood will be held Sunday even-
ing, May 16 at 6 p.m. in the Ro-
sen Family Room. Admission is
by invitation only.
Minyan is held every morning
at 8:30 a.m.
The Temple Israel Hour,
hosted by Rabbi Paul Plotkin, is
carried by local cable systems on
Sunday mornings at 9 a.m. and
Sunday afternoons at 1 p.m.
Please consult your local listings.
Religious Directory
.,
ORTHODOX
fNGREGATION LEVI YITZ-
jHOK Lubavitch. 1504.
Hey St., Hollywood, 923-
?07. Rabbi Rafael Ten-
enhaus. Daily Services 7:56
[m., 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath eve
|30 p.m., Sabbath morning 9
|m.; Sundays 8:30 a.m. Reli-
ous School Grades 1-8.
JNG ISRAEL OF HOLLY-
[OOD, 3291 Stirling Rd.,
ollywood, 966-7877. Rabbi
dward Davis. Daily Services
30 a.m., 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
7:40 p.m., Sabbath
|>rning9a.m.
CONSERVATIVE
.ANDALE JEWISH
>1TER, 416 NE 8th Ave.,
[landale. 454-9100. Rabbi
Klein. Daily Services 8:30
. 5:30 p.m. Sabbath eve
p.m..Sabbath morning
a.m.
|PLE BETH SHALOM.
N 46th Ave., Hollywood,
1-6111. Rabbi Morton Mala-
iy. Daily Services 7:45 a.m.,
pdown; Sabbath eve 8:15
Sabbath morning 9 a.m.,
rious School Kinder-
i-8.
fLE IN THE PINES. 9730
ling Road, Hollywood, 431-
) Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter.
flay 9:30 a.m., Mon. &
9. 8 a.m.; Sabbath eve 8
Sabbath morning 8:45
Religious School Nur-
I- Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRA-
MAR. 6920 SW 35th St., Mira-
mar, 961-1700. Rabbi Paul
Plotkin. Daily Services 8:30
a.m.; Sabbath eve 8 p.m., Sab-
bath morning 8:45 a.m. Religi-
ous School Kindergarten 8.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood, 920-1577.
Daily Services 8:25 a.m., 5
p.m.; Sabbath eve 8 p.m., Sab-
bath morning 8:25 a.m.
Religious School Pre-Kinder-
garten 8.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S.
14th Ave.. Hollywood, 920-
8225. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe.
Sabbath Eve Services 8:15
p.m. Religious School Grades
1-10.
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines
Middle School. 200 N. Douglas
Road. Pembroke Pines, 431
3638. Rabbi' Bennett Green
spon. Sabbath eve 8 p.m
Religious School Kinder
garten 8.
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheri
dan St., Hollywood, 989-0205
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin. Sab
bath Eve Services 8 p.m., Sab
bath morning 10:30 a.m
Religious School Preschool
12.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAM AT SHALOM. 11301 W.
Broward Blvd. Plantation, 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot Skiddell.
Sabbath Eve Services 8:15
p.m. Religious School Pre-
Rindergarten 8.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick of the Young Israel Congregation of Sky Lake in
North Miami Beach hangs the mezuzah in the front door of the new
Menorah Chapels funeral facility on Biscayne Blvd. with assistance
from funeral director Mark Ginzburg (center) and Rabbi Milton
Schlinsky.
Menorah Chapels Opens
Home in N.Miami Beach
Jewish religious leaders from
northern Dade County and Bro-
ward were on hand* recently to
hang mezuzot and participate in
formal proceedings marking the
opening of the new Menorah
Chapels facility in North Miami
Beach.
Taking part in the ceremonies
were Rabbi Marvin Rose of the
North Bay Village Jewish Cen-
ter; Rabbi Philip Labowitz of
Temple Beth Israel, Fort Lauder-
dale; Rabbi Eugene Labovitz of
Temple Ner Tamid, Miami
Beach; Rabbi David Gordon of
Sunrise; and Rabbi Bernard P.
Shoter of Temple in the Pines,
Pembroke Pines.
Others participating were
Rabbi Dr. Max Lipschitz of Beth
Torah Congregation, North
Miami Beach; Rabbi Dr. Morton
Malavsky of Temple Beth Sha-
lom, Hollywood; Rabbi Louis Le-
derman of Temple Beth Moshe,
North Miami; Rabbi Milton
Schlinsky of Sharon Gardens
Memorial Park; Rabbi Paul Plot-
kin of Temple Israel of Miramar;
Rabbi Simcha Freedman of Tem-
ple Adath Yeshurun in North
Miami Beach; Rabbi Chaim
Kovacs of Congregation Etz
Chaim, Miami Beach; and Rabbi
Dov Bidnick, Young Israel of
Sky Lake, North Miami Beach.
Port Everglades Commissioner
Maurice Berkowitz and North
Miami Mayor Howard New also
attended the dedication
ceremonies, as did several can-
tors, congregation president and
administrators of area syna-
gogues.
The sanctuary of the new
memorial chapel was dedicated to
Ted B. Mel in. a leader of the Chi-
cago area Jewish community for
many years prior to his death in
1980.
The new chapel is the first in
Dade County for Menorah. The
firm has facilities in Deerfield
Beach, Margate and Sunrise.
Mala Nursas Aids
looking for Private duty in your
home, Long Term Cases, work
well with cancer & Stroke, will
work 7 days a week ask for Al
474-3932
"Finally, a
Catskili resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
alions.
SSSSB*
For reservations and
information phone
TOLL FREE
800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South Fallsburg. N.Y 12779
Master Card. Visa, Amex
See your travel agent
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
We know that you go on vacation to
do more than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modified
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals daily. Breakfast (until II :30 am),
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Pool
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
I pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
tush off the golf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
taining hearth club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog, or wod<
out on our Universal mini-gym. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
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Page12-A
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Friday, May 14,1982



The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HbUy wood
Page IB
She ^ounges Through Life
Fran Lebowitz: Laid-Back Writer
By BARBARA PASH
Copyright MtMntaM Timn
Rtpnnt by Special Arrmngrmtnl
AII Publication Kighli Kmrvd
If you believe in luck, then
Fran Lebowitz is the luckiest
person alive. If you believe in
making your own luck, then Fran
Lebowitz is one of the canniest.
For, as she describes it, she
spends her time bunging
through life.
"I get up about now," she told
the audience at a noon lecture
series last week. "I read a lot,
avoid writing and go to parties.
It's a life 12-year olds dream of."
Since Ms. Lebowitz has man-
aged, in the course of doing as lit-
tle work as possible, to author
two best-sellers (Metropolitan
Life and Social Studies), she is
either someone who (a) the gods,
for their own quirky reasons,
have decided to favor, or (b) toils
at her typewriter but realizes it
doesn't have the same amusing
cachet as insouciant ennui.
STILL, however she got there,
Ms. Lebowitz is now famous.
She's been poor and unknown,
famous, she assures you, is
much better.
"It's changed my life com-
pletely," she said of her success.
I got rid of all my old friends. I
bought a car. People usually say
success is terrible, but that's so
others won't want it and try it."
Since becoming famous, Ms.
LeibowitZ, a woman about 5'3"
with blue eyes, wavy shoulder-
length brown hair streaked with
grey, casually clad in button-
down shirt, crew neck sweater,
leans and loafers, has noticed a
difference in how people react to
htr.
They expect me to be eternal-
ly funny, which is not a prob-
lem,'' she observed breezily.
"And they're nervous. I don't
know why. I'm nice; I wish
everyone I knew was as nice as
me," she said, confiding that
"personally / don't care if people
are famous. I care if they're
cute."
THERE IS one misconception
about famous, though, that Ms.
lebowitz wants to clarify. "You
don't make as much money as
you'd think. It's not like being a
doctor," she pointed out, "But
you don't have to go to school
(like doctors) to be famous, and
you do go to better parties. So
it's a tradeoff."
And while she didn't mention
it, there are obviously other perks
as well. For instance, your name
alone can pack a room with, be-
sides the generally older crowd of
senior citizen faithfuls who at-
tend lecture series, a youthful
battalion of student fans.
If you are a famous writer,
they arrive with their copies of
your books, and afterwards they
stand patiently in a long line
waiting for your autograph. They
[* happily burble things like "I've
read every word you've ever
written" and "I love your
writing" and that is something
money can't buy.
What is ironic about her suc-
cess, of course, is that it was so
unexpected, especially, it seems,
by those who knew her when.
"My writing was not historic,"
she said of her first attempts at
the craft. "Everyone's parents
save things. My Mom saved
nothing."
She does remember at the age
of eight penning or, in this inst-
ance, pencilling, her first novel, in
a ooseleaf notebook. Its plot, she
related, "owed a great debt to the
*ancy Drew books, then and now
my favorite books."
FORTUNATELY, her childish
effort somehow survived, bet
mothers draconian houseclean-
mg. This rare and valuable hand-
written manuscript, she informed
collectors of early Lebowitz in the
audience, "is available and for
sale.
Another irony of her success, is
that she had what can be called a
hmited formal education. Said
Ms. Lebowitz, wearing her expla-
nation like a Silver Star worTin
honorable combat with academe
"I was expelled from high school.'
I would never have had the nerve
to drop out of high school, so it
got transformed into being
expelled. My education has been
talking on the phone and read-
ing."
In fact, she confessed, glancing
mock-nervously around the lec-
ture room, "I hate any academic
environment. Even here, I keep
expecting someone to come up,
tap my shoulder and tell me to go
to gym."
Since her success, Ms. Lebo-
witz has been travelling the
speaker's circuit, apparently, like
her presentation at Johns
Hopkins, reading from her books
and answering questions from
the audience "in an entertaining
way, although you don't have to
ask the questions in an en-
tertaining manner." She gets
invited to colleges "I would
never have gotten into" as a high
school expellee.
UNLIKE HER free-flowing
loft where Andy Warhol and his
staff resided.
"It wasn't like storming the
doors of Time-Life," she ex-
plained. "It wasn't hard getting a
job with them, and the reason it
wasn't hard was because they
only paid $10 a film review. It s
not like there were a lot of people
standing before and in back of
me."
The next step was to Made-
moiselle magazine and honestly,
she says, "I was amazed they
asked me to write a column. I
never read Mademoiselle, even
when I was the age 15 to 18
they aim for."
Throughout hor ist.inr. with
them, '(he added, "I never met
anyone who read Mademoiselle,
which has an enormous circula-
tion. The people I met read Inter-
view, which has a tiny circula-
tion. That probably says more
about me than about Mademoi-
selle."
DESPITE BEING a columnist
with Mademoiselle, Ms. Lebowitz
actually had little to do with the
staff. "I never went to the office
because I felt a little out of
place," she explained. "Every is-
sue was like the ski issue, with a
cute girl with three snowflakes
glistening on her nose."
"But they were very nice. Thev
Mere
is a brief sampling of
Fran Lebowitz-isms culled
from her first collection. Met-
ropolitan Life:
On Looks. "All Gods chil-
dren are not beautiful. Most of
God's children are, in fact,
barely presentable.''
On other's alarm clocks:
There are times when I find
myself spending the night in
the home of another. Fre-
quently the other is in a more
reasonable line of work than I
and must arise at a specific
hour. Ofttimes the other, un-
beknowst to me, manipulates
an appliance in such a way
that I am awakened by Stevie
Wonder. On such occasions I
announce that if I wished to be
awakened by Stevie Wonder I
would sleep with Stevie Won-
der, I do not. however, wish to
be awakened by Stevie Won-
der and that is why God in-
vented alarm clocks. Some-
times the other realizes that I
am right. Sometimes the other
does not. And that is why God
invented many things.
On sleep: I love sleep be-
cause it is both pleasant and
safe to use. Pleasant because
one is in the best possible com-
pany and safe because sleep is
the consummate protection
against the unseemliness that
is the invariable consequence
of being awake. What you
don't know won't hurt you.
Sleep is death without the re-
sponsibility.
On democracy: Democracy
is an interesting, even laud-
able, notion and there is no
question but that when com-
pared to Coaamunism, which is
too dull, or Fascism, which is
too exciting, it emerges as the
most palatable form of govern-
ment. This is not to say that it
is without its drawbacks
chief among them being its re-
grettable tendency to encour-
age people in the belief that all
men are created equal. And
although the vast majority
need only take a quick look
around the room to see that
this is hardly the case, a great
many remain utterly con-
vinced.
tangy verbal style, Ms. Lebowitz
has a hard time writing. "There is
no relation between writing and
talking. It may take me an hour
to write a sentence," she said.
Her start came at a small
magazine that "no one ever heard
of and that now is out of business
anyway." She was hired, not aa a
writer, but as an advertising
salesman. "I didn't sell one single
ad," she admitted. "I was embar-
rassed to call people up and ask
them to buy ads because I knew
no one ever read the magazine."
Instead, Ms. Lebowitz began
going to movie previews and
writing reviews. "The movies
would be shown in what are
called distribution centers," she
related. "They were so bad they
never opened in New York the-
aters."
BUT FOR Ms. Lebowitz,
events have a way of fortuitously
leading into each other. At the
suggestion of a friend who wrote
for Andy Warhol's magazine In-
terview, she armed herself with
her published "clips" and
climbed the stairs of the factory-
sent a messenger to pickup my
column" about which, inciden-
tially, "we used to get a lot of
hate mail." Just as suddenly as
her association with Mademoi-
selle began, one day it was over.
Fired, she claims, although even
now she doesn't know why.
However, her first book was a
collection of her Mademoiselle
column, like the first, here second
book is comprised of short, hum-
orous pieces. All of them are
based, loosely and with large
grains of salt, on Ms. Lebowitz'
experiences and perception of life.
"I write mainly about myself,"
she said, "which I find an end-
lessly fascinating topic."
Ms. Lebowitz covers other
topics, of course, from pets to
apartment hunting to the slings
and arrows, not to mention
downright nasty comments that
peaceful law-abiding nice
smokers endure at the hands of
fanatical anti-smokers.
PROBABLY, she cares more
about her writing than she ad-
mits in public. Recently, for
instance, she waa in Los Angeles,
FRAN LEBOWITZ
"the American version of Ver-
sailles, and I went with a movie
producer to his beauty salom ap-
pointment he was getting his
eyebrows dyed, I swear it."
While waiting for him, Ms.
Lebowitz got to talking with the
receptionist who, upon learning
she was a writer, "asked me if I
knew Judy Mazel. Judy Mazel,
for those of you who don't know
it, wrote the Beverly Hills Diet
book, and that's what passes for
a writer in L.A."
Although it would seem that
nothing is sacred to Ms. Lebo-
witz, there are certain subjects
she avoids as being intrinsically
unfunny. "I have an abject terror
of getting a dreaded disease," she
remarked, "and Nazis are not hil-
arious."
Other than those two, "any-
thing that happens to someone
else is instantaneously funny,"
she said. "Anything that hap-
pens to you is funny two weeks
after it happens."
Ctaig Terkowilz
CURRENTLY, Ms. Lebowitz
is working on a novel which she
hopes to finish in, oh, three or so"
years if the amount of time it
took her to write her second book
is any measure.
It will not be excessively
wordy, she promised. "I'm trying
to bring back the slim novel."
Assuredly, it will be in the same
arch writing style as her previous
books.
At the moment, the book pub-
lishing business is "horribly
bad," continued Ms. Lebowitz,
who could offer only dollops of
advice to young writers who
would like to become as famous
as she.
First, she said, "I'd advise
another profession." Since suc-
cess "is not a sure thing, having
rich parents helps," she recom-
mended. "Kich generous parents.
That would be the most impor-
tant thing to ha ve."
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Page2-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 14, 1982
/Ma von Warns Against Racial Char get
Angry Reaction Greets News of
Hatzeira's Suspended Sentences
JERUSALEM-(JTA)
The conviction of
Aharon Abu-Hatzeira on
charges of larceny, fraud
and breach of trust, for
which he received sus-
pended sentences by a Tel
Aviv district court"; has
triggered angry repercuss-
ions here. Interior Minister
STUDIO ,
Continental

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Yosef Burg responded
sharply to attacks on his
ministry by leaders of
Tami, the three-men
Knesset faction headed by
Abu-Hatzeira.
President Yitzhak Navon
strongly admonished some of
Abu-Hatzeira s supporters who
contended that the conviction
was a slur by the "Ashkenazk
establishment" against Israel's
Sephardic" community.
ABU-HATZEIRA. who
resigned as Minister of Labor.
Welfare and Absorption after his
conxtction, was given suspended
sentences of 30 months, 18
months and three months on the
three counts, and fined 3.500
Shekels (about SI70). He is ap-
pealing his sentence and intends
to hold on to his Knesset seat
pending a ruling by the Supreme
Court.
His former aide and co-
defendant. Moshe Gabal. con-
victed on the same counts, re-
ceived a 12-month suspended
sentence and was fined 500 Shek-
els (about $25) Both men had
faced penalties of up to seven
years imprisonment.
Judge Victoria Ostrovsky-
Cohen justified the suspended
sentences on grounds that both
School Statistics
JOHANNESBURG (JTAI
Statistics released by the
Soutn African Board of Jewish
Education showed that there are
8.568 pupils enrolled in 342
classes in 18 day schools
throughout the country They are
being taught by 160 Hebrew
teachers and 505 teachers for
secular studies.
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defendants has already suffered
from the publicity attending their
case. Abu-Hatzeiras supporters
took this as a victory for the
Moroccan-born minister and
carried him from the courthouse
on their shoulders.
NAVON. who is himself of Se-
phardic origin, condemned the
defamatory slogans scrawled on
the courthouse building and on
walls around Tel Aviv denounc-
ing the judge and the "Ashken-
azk establishment." He said
these manifestations "must
abhor and shock every citizen of
Israel Navon blamed the Tami
leadership directly for the van-
dalism and declared. "Without
regard for political party or
ethnic origin, we must all decry
this phenomenon
The charges on which Abu-
Hatzeira was convicted stemmed
from his administration of a
State-supported charitable fund
when he was Mayor of Ramie
seven years ago. Abu-Hatzeira
has been at odds with Burg's Na-
tional Religious Party since he
defected from the NRP last year
and formed Tami to participate in
the 1981 Knesset elections.
/RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL V-------------------------N
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dcc Cheese Ravioli
14 cup chapped or whole smal
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2 tablespoons butter or margarine
-7 package 110 oz.) frozen yhole
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
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dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon choppcc1 fresh
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M cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
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Friday, May 14,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3-B
On the Book Shelf
Sachar Book Sheds New Light on Mideast History
Egypt and Israel by How-
ard M. Sachar, New
York: Richard Marek
Publishers, 1981, 384
pp. $19.96.
By SEYMOUR B. LIEBMAN
Events in the Middle East are
of major importance to our nation
as well as to the Jews. Newspap-
ers allot columns to the reporting
of the events as well as editoral-
izing. Too often, background
material is missing, and opinons
are expressed without consider-
ation of the causes that brought
on the events. Often the back-
ground material is omitted be-
cause it has aged with time.
We must be grateful to histpr-
ians who resuscitate "aged"
material as well as filling in the
lacunae of the material that was
overlooked or unknown at the
time of the events. Howard M.
Sachar's "Egypt and Israel" has
brought to our attention facts
that produce new or additional
insights and perceptions to the
events of the past, a more thor-
ough understanding of the pre-
sent, and a hope for a better
future.
BEGINNING with the politi-
cal history of Egypt from the
18th to the 20th century and
England's domination of the
nation, he proceeds to King
Farouk, Nasser and Sadat. Inter-
woven in this readable account is
the depiction of the attitudes of
Egyptians during the royal per-
iod and the revolutionary period
to Zionism, Palestine, Arabism,
Pan-Arabism, Egyptian Jews,
and the Jewish State.
Sachar describes the life of
Egyptian Jews who were "in
Egypt" but not "of Egypt."
They constituted a middle class
community owning some of the
largest shops in Cairo, and ser-
ving as lawyers, doctors and ex-
ecutives in the banking system.
Until 1940, their dual cultural
allegiance (to Zionism and
Egypt) "hardly ever involved
emigration to Palestine."
The Zionists were only vaguely
aware of the depths of the grow-
ing Egyptian national feeling
even as the Egyptians failed to ,
gauge the ultimate goals of Zion-
ism. On the eve of World War II,
King Farouk displayed his anti-
Jewish xenophobia and a militant
pan-Arabism. Nasser later outdid
Farouk, but the lesson to the
masses of Egyptians was clear
all their leaders were anti-Jewish.
AFTER EGYPT'S defeats in
1949 and 1956, Egypt gave sanc-
tuary to the fedayeen and aided
them in attacking Israeli settle-
ments. Sachar does not eleborate
on the question whether Egypt-
ians are Arabs. Nasser and Sadat
stressed Pan-Arabism because
they had grandiose goals of being
rule of the Arab world.
Sachar reports that in 1965,
"the Jewish State was equated
with imperialism" by
.Nasser,"andwith the traditional
hatred of Arabs and Islam." One
of the questions is whether
Egyptians can forget the tirade
of hate against Jews to which
they were exposed for almost
fifty years.
The Pinchas La von affair is
revealed in all its ghastly comedy
of committee reports on com-
mittee reports and Ben-Gurion's
fall because of his abuse of the
"Spy Game." The political situ-
ation under the Labor party and
under Begin are discussed but
not at great length.
The return of the Sinai has cost
Israel billions of dollars and the
loss of 24 per cent of its oil sup
plies. Between 1977 and 1979,
Egypt earned $600 million from
the oil fields. The problems of
nurturing a Palestinian entity to
self-government in the West
Bank and Gaza, the revived
Egyptian toleration and benevol-
ence of Jews, and the task of
modernizing the nation and over-
coming domestic and economic
problems are presented.
THE AUTHOR reports on a
touching scene at El Ariah in
1979 when a group of Egyptian
wounded veterans and a like
number of Israeli wounded vets
met in order "to humanize" the
surrender of El Arish and the
parts of the Sinai.
It was to be a display of
"sulkh, a peace far deeper than
the perfunctionary Arab salaam
and denoting a more authentic
reconciliation." The two-page ac-
count is highly emotional; and
the meeting may augur more for
peace than the written agree-
ments, appendices and letters.
'Egypt and Israel" is "must"
eading for all who seek data on
the Middle East.
Trickle of Nazi War Criminals In U.S. to be Deported
NEW YORK The di-
rector of the Justice De-
partment's Office of Special
Investigations, Alan A.
Ryan, has told the World
Jewish Congress that he
expects that "the months
ahead" will bring the first
deportations of Nazi war
criminals hiding in the
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United States, but that
when the process begins "it
will be a trickle, not a tor-
rent."
Ryan made this disclosure at a
recent meeting with the North
American Branch of the WJC
Anti-Semitism Commission in
New York. He placed the failure
to deport Nazi criminals till now
on the "complex and terribly
time-consuming system of ap-
peals and hearings" which "en-
courages and rewards delay."
THE OFFICE of Special In-
vestigatons was established in
1979 by the Attorney General to
take legal action against former
Nazis and collaborators current
ly residing in this country who
had engaged in persecution
during the years 1933-1945. The
Office has investigated over 500
people and having won all cases it
had previously tried, has brought
to court some 18 additional cases
for trial in the months ahead.
Specifically targeted for inves-
tigation, Ryan stated, were,
"perpetrators of the Holocaust
concentration camp staff, auxil-
iary storm troopers, SS murder-
ers and government officials
who were specifically ineligible to
enter the United States under the
law" but succeeded in entering
the country by misrepresenting
their whereabouts and activities
during the War years.
Ryan reported that important
breakthroughs had been made in
engendering the cooperation of
East European government in the
investigative work. He revealed
in this connection that during a
recent visit to Moscow he had
negotiated the first agreement
ever allowing the American gov-
ernment to take testimony from
Soviet citizens.
THIS HAD resulted in receipt
of videotaped depositions of 75
Soviet witnesses which have al-
ready been used in several court
cases. He also noted that the full
cooperation of the government of
Poland continues in force despite
the imposition of martial law.
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Wrf-htOlfWimrtHii^l (.p.-.m*)
nt* b* Miwjirrl im i*"*wl **" **** I*"
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Oh*- bM V7*4 Ofrtnpm
on*coupon
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P*4-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. May 14,1W3
cPtide
017119----
PANTRY PRIDE ASSORTED bLICEt > OZ PKG
Luncheon $~|58
Meats E39 JJIsKSS
SAVE
AMERICAN KOSHER FRANKS OR
Knocks.......i?02 pkg 1.88 55
HEBREW NATIONAL MIDGET
OSCAR MATER MEAT OR SEEF SLICED
Bologna......a pkg 1.08 21
RJCHSAIL WMfJEMEAI e PKG
Tbrfcay Sacas.......1.38 21
LYKES BEEF
Plumper 68
Franks......!& 1 .21
FTNE TASTE MEAT IJCM
Franks.............1.18 10
FYNE TASTE SLICED MEAT LB PKG
Bologna...........1.88 11
GENERIC SUCEO COOKED LB
Salami.............1.38 .10
GENERIC SUCfcO LB
Dutch Loaf.........1.38 10
GENERIC SLICEO SPICED LB
Lunohaon Haat.....1.38 10
DAIRY
24 OZ CUP
SEALTEST LARGE OR SMALL CURD
SESEtptf
S*V(SAVE25)_
TIMPTEE WHIPPED IUCUP SAVE
PANTRT PWOEJM,TUAl SLICED 6 0/ PKG
Swiss Cfcaaas...... 1.18 21
BORDENSCOLOREDWHITE l?OZ PKG
Armrican Singlas 1.88 31
PANTRY PWOE BOZ PKG
CraamChaasa......78 09
PANTRY PRIDE NATUR/tt SLICED 6 Ol PKG
Muanstar Canaj .. .88 07
PANTRY PRIDE COt ORE D I? Oi PKG
Amarfean SfcigUs.. 1.48 05
HBmJMBi........ 2.88 21
pantry pwoe chilled i/? gal
Orange Jute*...... 1.18 11
GENERIC QUARTERS LB
Hargarais.........3/.08 22
GENERIC 8 02 PKG
Grated Chaaaa..... 1.38 eo
GENERC 12 07 PKG
Amarican Singlas 1.18 35
GENERIC 2 LB PKG
Amarican Loaf .. 2.28 31
Irvturo*
IMS
Viva
Paper
Towels
What's
about
WE GUARANTEE
PRODUCE
FIRM TENDER FRESH mbm A^'aTaaS------* -
Broccoli S310*fV Why the produce from
FLAVORFUL AND NUTRITIOUS FRESH hCTC IS better 111311 tilC
Mushrooms QQ/; produce from there!
(U PICK LOOSE DISPLAY)
(SAVE 80c)
US #1 ALL PURPOSE 10LB BAG
\j.\j. w rabbi runrwgt iw L.O D^o
White IG1$149
Potatoes
GARDEN FRESH FLORIDA GROWN LB
Egg Plant...........
GRANNY SMITH CAPE GROWN LB
Something Special! Vidala Onions are
only grown in Georgia and for a very
short season. They're sweet as an apple
and they eat like an onion. Treat your
(save 4) family to something really special. We
save know on- onions Vidafia, that is!
8 -- -- FWST Of THE SEASON SWEET AS AN APPLE" g...
FIRM RIPE SALAD SIZE 6 IN PKG
FRESH. TOPS IN VITAMIN A 2-LB BAG
Carrots................
.49 10
aGJL*CRTSPANDCRUNCHY 2 IN PKG ASSORTED COLORS FRESH CUT BUNCH
Catory Hearts................49 20 RoraJ Bouquet.............. 1.59 20
""iREEN (ZUCCHINI] LB
.....................49 -to
RSEEDlESS (EXTRA LARGE JUMBO ?3 SIZE)
QrapafruH............. 37.89
LotsO'
Chicken
3 BREAST QTRS W. BACKS
3 LEG QTRS W BACKS 3 GlBLET PKGS I (SAVE 21 LB
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
FLA. OR SHIPPED
GRADE A FROZEN TURKEY WINGS OR ^1 -f*fejL PREM. FRESH WHOLE WHOLE ^aj/MS.
D**%48<: Frying Chickens68
^=DAMno nriun___________________ LB.
BONUS BUYS!
SAVE
EVERYDrW LOW PRICES**
'tfaafifaast m fcjivx
US CHOICE BEEF ROUND "~............." "'Cl*
Bottom Boneless ~ I^IQ.'
RouodSteak.........^ T* 41 %LJL0]
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH riCST!
Chicken EOc Ground Chuck .
Wings............. lb 30
0APt B S LOniO* P( MiUM WMQlf
ryt
LB.
'lOIOA p
lags
jjfflt MNKanATIQNAl u MUMCTCS
TOPPS
All Beef
Patties........
.iBao aaa i n
. '7CWPKG 2.96 31
240Z
PKG.
XI MIMCJMANOS
bbq:
21 SKINNED 6 OEVEINED
SHced
Beef Liver....
TYSON GRADE A FROZEN
288 Cornish
41 Game
Hens........
ii
LB.
LB.
SAVE
11
.LB 148 21
98
.31
Sandwich's
^CMOJCl Mil HUUNO BOTTOM (
GOLD KIST U S INSPECTED FRYING
, KM MR 1.48 21
TYSON HEAT & SERVE
a,G 2^8 3t Fried
31
5LB B0X ^SV|(SAVE1S4LB]
Chicken............ \&
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer
Combination
Package ..........
?68
.21
118
LB
.31
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Mb
ion
(Mill


Friday. May 14.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
special
store? i
SAVE YOU MORE!
cPride
ponus
C/160Z BOTTLES
Pepsi,
si Lite,
mtain Dew
lor
PK 0> S 8 Ht*llan Punch .
MO" AtTMPuiP OZ BOTTLE
Piai# Juica.....,
SAVE
1.79 40
1.00 18
26
PUT M 16 Ot CAN
Tot wIom.........2/1.00
la ad Baa na .40 t*
0.' AN
Mm*. ... 1.40 is
* ""SPY REQULAIVUNSAI.TEO
[A.MOCOIAII DUTCH CHOCOLATE 'QOiCAN
Uto.......... 2/1.OO i
SMOKEY/REGULAR
Heinz
BBQ Sauce
16 OZ BTL (SAVE 30C) -
59
BURGUNDY. VIN ROSE. RHINE.
CHABLIS 4 PINK CHABLIS
Cario Rossi a
Wines
3 LITER (SAVE $1 00)
'.00
BOX
17
SACHAMCNTO *10{CAN
PANTRY PHI1H 320* M
Mayonnaisa
pantry prim pcw^hedasst flavors moz can
save Drink KSSS....... 1.10
.00
.00
10
20
mousi dry eoz jau
WO/ CAN
Roach Spray
JUS* | M
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8
20
1.00 14
.00 80
2/.80 209
1.20 36
40
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42
FRESH START
;|NIRAT|0 700/ BOX
NATURAL/REGULAR
Motifs
Apple Juice
i- *
Copies
64 OZ JUG
SUGAR I HI I 7UIERBTI
0/ PKG
L^U*?f~... 1.10 10
JSHGtN S IKXJIO LOTION ASSORTED CtXORS IjyOI
Soap...............00 40
hearts delight chunky nu
16 0ZCAN (SAVEKW
c^2/99
RANTRY PRK* CHUNK LIGHT (04L WATER] .l.?Qjt CAN
Tuna...............70 08
.70 30
1.00 05
1.40 20
.OO 80
2.00 160
1.00 80
WHITE IOOCIiJINCH
Papar Mates....... 1.10 20
ITALIAN. FRENCH. 1000 ISLAND (SAVE 104)
COLE SLAW 8 OZ BTL
PANTPJYMIOE 4LVGAN
Black Pappar.
PANTRY PRIOE 1 GALLON
White Vlnagar
UCIAN SWAYCHANAPJllOH '
JaBy
Htfrt 30CI'30GAUO*
TV-ash Bags
MtMY lAll 30CJ
Kite nan
48 OZ ATI
*( HS GRAPt JAM OR 7 IB JAR
CrtLftter'.r0....... 1.70 30
In^KMter^ 2.10 30
Heinz 44 oz jug
Ketchup
A $166
Am (SAVE 334)
Ftaa* TV* Spray 3.30 20
Charcoal Briquate 1.00 60
PANTRY PRIOt 01S*GN 100CI/7W
Cold Cups......... 140 20
ASSORTED FLAVORS 1/2 GALLON CARTON
Light n Lively
IceMilk fe
$169
{VALUABLE!
f 'QQ 5 CHOCK FULL
^^ ^ OF NUTS (SAVE 66c)
*" "E {Coffee
Bj 1 LB. CAN
m
$149
WITH COUPON
LIMIT ONE WITH A 110 00 PURCHASE
GOOD THRU MAY 18 1962 Jf
IICOUPONI
IIVALUABLEIHBia
YeUow
Oni
(SAVE 40c)
us.*i
3 LB. BAG
SfroVs Regular
Beer
BONUS BUYS
MEYER S BAKE t SERVE (OWON CHEESI
WHIlt CINNAMONl T60Z PKG ^^
Braads..............70 20
PANTRY PRIOt TOBY >OJLOA
Whola Whaat Br-*ad 2/1.00 29
AUNT HANNAH IPS OZ PKG
JaByRofl............70 io
Steak Ito***.'.":......73i2
MEYERS PKG Of S m.
EngNahMumns..... 2/.O0
PfCHIERSSCIOLESS lCV LOAl ^^
RyaBraad...........00 10
with coupon aa asa^
LIMIT ONE WITH A $10 00 PURCHASE
GOOD THRU MAY 18 1962 JF
I ICOUPONI
I IVALUABLEI
PANTRY PRIDE QUARTERS LB.
Margarine ^^
(SAVE 29c) LfCC
with coupon aaaai^aa^
LIMIT ONE WITH A J10 00 PURCHASE
GOOD THRU MAY IB 1982 JF
I ICOUPONI
PREPARED F00D6SK
Francn _
JEWISH STYll W (
W/O SEEDS
C4tert'pU
PrtedCWcfcan
COCONUT EACH
SAVE
3/1.00 35
40 04
2/40 09
140 io
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*^*r[ Pmlry P"oe wtll pay you DpuWe the DiHerence Jusl Buy X -|-(rJ............... 1.78 ?1
d,(torenl .terns worth 20 or mor. .1 P.rrY P>Je Corop*e "^sVeetmunchei /lb
o.K:ew.mesame,iJsmslanyol^Uow'e''^0^ CHaaM........ ..1.38 21
MmBWilM on Itve .ct -me mm 10 PBntry PrnJe Potato Sated
and well pw you DooB* Th. Drflerenc In Cam1
''\ Pantry FYide
> LSodas

.78 11
148 n
79<"
Page 5-B


Page 6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 14,1982
Filling in Background
UN Declares Israel Not 'Peace-Loving'
Secretary General Says
Withdrawal 'Significant'
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General As-
sembly has adopted a reso-
lution declaring that Israel
"is not a peace-loving
member state" and de-
manding international
sanctions against it. The
vote was 86-20 with 36 ab-
stentions. Voting in favor
were the ^rab countries,
except Eypt which ab-
stained, the Communist
bloc and Third World na-
tions.
The opposition voters included
the United States, whose repre-
sentative branded the resolution
"an ill-inspired, offensive docu-
ment" that would harm the UN,
and all of the Western bloc na-
tions, except Greece which de-
parted from its fellow European
Economic Community (EEC)
members, and supported the
resolution.
ABSTAINING were most
South American countries, a few
African states and Japan.
Among the South American ab-
stainers were Brazil, Argentina,
Chile, Colombia, Mexico and
Panama.
The vote concluded the debaU
on the "Palestinian question'
which the General Assembly had
been conducting in emergency
session. The harshly-worded
resolution was somewhat softer
than an earlier proposed draft
which called for a review of Is-
rael's status in the General
Assembly when it holds its next
regular session in September.
That call was withdrawn.
But one provision of the reso-
lution adopted declared that Is-
rael "has carried out neither its
obligations under the (UN)
Charter nor its commitment un-
der General Assembly Resolution
273 of II Mav. 1949." Resolution
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273 was the one by which Israel
was admitted to membership in
the UN.
Israeli diplomats said that by
declaring that Israel did not ful-
fill its obligations under Resolu-
tion 273, the Arab states were
preparing the ground for suspen-
sion of Israel from the General
Assembly in the future.
THE RESOLUTION also con-
demned Israel for its "repressive
measures" in the occupied terri-
tories, called for the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state and
called on the entire UN member-
ship "to renounce the policy of
providing Israel with military,
economic and political
assistance."
Israel's Ambassador to the
UN, Yehuda Blum, speaking be-
fore the vote, characterized the
resolution as a "despicable, men-
dacious concoction" and de-
nounced those who would vote
for it as "moral perverts." He
said Israel's enemies had "hi-
jacked" the UN and turned it
into an "anti-peace organiza-
tion."
1'he Egyptian Ambassador,
Esmat Abdel Meguid, said the
draft resolution did not advance
the cause of the Palestinians "a
single inch" as it varried little
from the wording of some 300
resolutions previously adopted
on the question. He said for that
reason, Egypt would abstain.
MEGUID added that the reso-
lution contained certain negative
and critical provisions which dis-
rupted the delicate balance and
ignored, without reason, Security
Council Resolution 242 which is,
he said, "a valid point of de-
parture" toward a settlement in
the Middle East.
The Egyptian envoy further
observed that Israel's withdrawal
from Sinai marked a significant
step forward in the Middle East
peace process and provided a new
incentive toward a just solution
in the area.
William Sherman, the U.S.
representative, who spoke before
the vote, said that with this reso-
lution the UN was pushed one
step closer to a precipice beyond
which looms "a political and
moral abyss." He said the resolu-
tion was intended to intensify the
struggle against Israel and not to
promote peace and was therefore
contrary to the purposes of the
UN Charter.
SHERMAN NOTED that Is-
rael completed its withdrawal
from Sinai only a few days ago
and asked: "But where in the
resolution now before us is note
taken of this hopeful develop-
ment? On the contrary, the state
that withdrew from occupied ter-
ritory for the sake of peace is vili-
fied as not a peace-loving mem-
ber-state, language never used
against any other member-state
of the UN and intended, as we all
know, to question the legitimacy
of Israel's membership in this
body."
The American representative
added: "Can the UN prevent the
further erosion of its reputation if
the General Assembly abuses its
authority and the Charter in pur-
suit of this single-minded and
self-destructive vendetta against
Israel?"
Sherman spoke out strongly
against the clause of the resolu-
tion that condemned the U.S. for
vetoing Security Council resolu-
tions on Palestinian rights. He
said that clause, aimed against
the exercise by the U.S. of its
constitutional prerogative of vot-
ing against resolutions which in
the U.S. view could harm the
cause of peace, was "profoundly
and specifically hostile" to the
U.S.
THE ENTIRE resolution, he
said, "is an ill inspired, offensive
document that will re-enforce an
attitude of cynicism toward the
General Assembly and thus to
the UN itself among people of
goodwill."
Blum, in his remarks before the
vote, declared: "Today the peo-
ple of Israel and the Jewish peo-
ple around the world celebrate
the 34th anniversary of the
restoration of Jewish indepen-
dence in our homeland after 19
centuries of persecution, exile
and desperation. On their behalf,
let me tell the enemies of Israel
and the Jewish people that no
amount of distortion, fabrication,
bigotry and hallucinations in this
building can undo so central a
fact of the political, spiritual, cul-
tural and religious history of the
world, as the inseparable bond
between the Jewish people and
its land."
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar said that "the
final Israeli withdrawal from the
Sinai is a significant and con-
structive development.
In a statement issued here by
his spokesman, the Secretary
General added: "It is now essen-
tial to seek to resolve the other
principal aspects of the Middle
East problem, so that a compre-
hensive, just and lasting settle-
ment is attained."
The Secretary General also
issued a report on the condition
of the United Nations Interim
Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL). He
said in the report that the situa-
tion in the area "has remained
extremely volatile" and that ten-
sions continue in that region.
"While the arrangements for
the ceasefire in southern Lebanon
which came into effect in July,
1981 have generally held, un-
resolved tensions have led to the
very real danger of widespread
hostilities being sparked in the
area. It was for this reason, in
particular, that I learned witfcr
deep concern of the Israeli air
strikes into Lebanon on Apr. 21,"
the Secretary General's report
said.
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Tonight, give your chicken a marvelous marinade
Polynesian Chicken
I {2Vi to 3 lb.) broiler-fryer
chicken, cut up
1 clove garlic, crushed
% cup wale r
V cup salad oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S
2 tablespoons Gulden's*
Spicy Brown Mustard
2 teaspoons salt
''i teaspoon
chili powder
Vi teaspoon sugar
Combine crushed garlic, water, salad oil, lemon
juke, Gulden's* Spicy Brown Mustard, salt, chili
powder and sugar. Pour over chicken pieces in large
bowl and refrigerate for several hours or over
night, turning chicken once or twice. Drain and
reserve marinade. Preheat broiler for 10 minutes.
GULDENS
VlCV RtOW*.
MUSTARD
Place chicken, skin side down in broiler pan. Place
8 to 9 inches from heat. Brush chicken with mari-
nade and broil 20 minutes on one side, basting with
marinade every 5 minutes. Turn; brush with
marinade and broil 15 to 20 minutes on second
side, basting every 5 minutes. Serves four.
The Mustard good enough tocoohwith
UiWr Pan*
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For more information call your travel agent


May 14,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7-B
91/tfs in Brief
itish Jews on Griddle Over Falkland Islands War
By JTA Report
)N Leaders of
ewry have received
letters and telephone
flowing press reports of
irms supplies to Argen-
lich have caused strains
| London and Jerusalem.
the DAIA, the central
Icommunity organization
ntina, which has hailed
entine invasion of the
Islands, the Board of
of British Jews has re-
rom issuing unqualified
for the government of
i the Falkland's crisis.
He Janner, the president
3oard and a member of
Introducing
Bay Resort
rand Country Club
On Blscayac Bay
r tarty)
Ihts
tlate)
0*
per person
ID GO L r AHD TERMS
|TMl Breakfasts- 2 Oounawt
Deluxe Rooms 18 Hole
anshlp Ooir Course 17 Clay
1 us 4 All-weather for day or
> Oversize heated pool with
ntary chaises 2 Marinas
irking Welcome drink
(Special rale to. 2
1 bedroom rioatlng.
Villa*
available
for lamlly
or double
couples.)
[BAY RESORT
ctorxMiavam
>W 62nd Ave.
ria 33158
I) US-7161
tupancy
til md-Week Bonua
jrjdra
c characa and tajaea
IHaylat. tar
Jtlmt____. .
to
m
Parliament, justified this caution
by noting the absence of unanim-
ity in the Jewish community, as
in Britain as a whole, about the
government's handling of the
crisis. At the same time, he I
voiced British Jewry's profound
concern for the safety of British
forces defending the Falkland*.
Children in W.ltarmany
Targets of Anti-Semitism
BONN A Jewish student
spokesman charged that Jewish
children in West Germany are
regular targets of anti-Semitic
verbal attacks by their school-
mates, and many youngsters are
afraid to attend kindergarten be-
cause they are exposed to anti-
Semitic insults.
According to Jacky Bagel,
spokesman for the Association of
Jewish Students in Bavaria
Jews attending West German
universities are also exposed to
anti-Semitism and cannot live
without fear unless they conceal
their identity. Bigel said it was
commonplace that Jewish reli-
gious services could be conducted
only under heavy police guard in
synagogues protected by high
fences.
U.S. Arms Sales Erase
Israel's Qualitative Edge
GROSSINGER, N.Y. Isra-
el's Ambassador to the United
States Moshe Arens warned here
that the sale of sophisticated
American weapons to those Arab
states still in a state of war with
Israel threatens to "erase" Isra-
el's qualitative military superior-
ity and thereby discourage Arab
RELGO.INC
Religious & Gilt Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books-Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Oon SunOav
1507 Washington Avenue. M.B.
'^'"att-atia''^-"^-
participation in the Camp David
peace process.
The Israeli envoy, addressing
350 delegates to the American
Jewish Congress national bien-
nial convention, also claimed that
Israel's biggest concession for
peace was not the just completed
withdrawal from Sinai but its
willingness to negotiate auto-
nomy for the Palestinians on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip, be-
cause the outcome of the auto-
nomy talks are unpredictable.
Soviet Advisers Said
To be in Jordan
TEL AVIV The United
States has passed information to
Israel that "several score" Soviet
advisers are presently operating
in Jordan, according to Israeli
military sources quoted by Israel
Radio Sunday. The sources ex-
pressed hope that the Jordanians
were fully aware of the dangers
arising from the presence of Sovi-
et advisers on their soil.
Their presence is believed to be
connected with the ground-to-air
missile systems King Hussein
ordered from the Soviet Union
two years ago. Western sources
were quoted as saying the Jor-
danians intend to site the mis-
siles along their border with
[THE HISTADRUT WAY"
to keep ahead
of INFLATION!
Introducing
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Synagogues provided with Torah Scrolls and
Religious Articles
Over 500 Youth. Sport, and Cultural Centers
FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 305 531-8702. OR WRITE:
Israel Histadrut Foundation
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach. FL 33139
Attention: Lewis Alpert, Executive Director
am interested in the Histadrut Pooled Life-Income Fund
Plan". Please send me your free Brochure.
W
Zip
" Histadrut Is The Heart Of Israel"
Golda Meir
Syria rather than on the border
with Israel.
Terrorist Details PLO
Ties to Red Brigade
ROME Antonio Savasta, on
trial for the murder of former
Premier Aldo Moro and other
criminal acts, has given Italian
authorities details of Palestine
Liberation Organization colla-
boration with the Red Brigade in
Italy, including extensive
weapons supplies.
According to Savasta, who
confessed that he gave the orders
to kill Moro, the PLO delivers
arms to the Red Brigade for their
own use and to be stored for PLO
terrorist acts on Italian soil.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYtENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
Stanley Margulies
Joins Board of
Directors at So. Fla.
Blood Service
Stanley Margulies, M.D. has
joined the Board of Directors of
the South Florida Blood Service.
Margulies is the director of
radiology at Hollywood
Memorial Hospital. He has been
active in the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
United Way and American Asso-
ciates of the Ben Gurion Univer-
sity of the Negev. He is also a
director of the AvMed Health
Plan and chairman of the board
of Cypress Savings Association
of Plantation.
776-6272
HOWARD
|*RCR A
ACKAGINC

1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT IAUDERDAIE
Maxwell House; Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as. much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
^astronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference-
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
!*!H!
K ( rrliiH-d Kosher
Jp,s3jS 2J fir?
jAXWEli H0U*

ma ivaamiMja
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofor ofeaUtrHolly wood
Friday, May u, 1982
Vantage
Ultra Lights
100s
*zss'<3*.%,
'
ULTRA LIGHTS: 5 mg. "tar". 0.5 mg. nicotine av.per cigarette by FTC method. ULTRA LIGHTS 100s 5 mg. "tar".0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette. FTC Report DEC."81


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