The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00337

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti FloridMam
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
rolume 9 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 24,1979
"'**' | Price 35 Cents
Feeling the Repercussion
From Young's Resignation
Andrew Young
UNITED NATIONS -
The enormity of the rift be-
tween the American Jewish
and Black communities is
becoming increasingly clear
in the wake of the resigna-
tion last week of Andrew
Young as America's Am-
bassador to the United Na-
tions.
Young resigned on Aug.
15 following the discovery
that he had met with Zehdi
Labib Terzi, a represen-
tative of the Palestine Lib-
Continued on Page 10
Newman Appeals
For Support
"The events of the past several
days have been of great concern
wi all of us who care about Israel,
ourselves and our fellow Jews.
The misplaced racial focus of the
Andrew Young incident makes us
ijver more aware of the fragility of
human relations that as
American Jews, we face con-
stantly, according to Joyce
HWewmun, president, Jewish Fed-
ruliun of South Broward.
"It does no good for former
\mbassador Young to blatantly
.muse on widely viewed
television news coverage that
Israel's leadership is 'stubborn
and intransigent.' "
Mrs. Newman feels for us to
react with anger and frustration
instead of positive action is also
non-productive. She suggests
United States citizens who are
cuught in a world of inflation and
pressured by powerful oil-rich
cartels should strike out and
insist upon forceful destructive
measures directed to Jewish
interests. "We must be vigilant.
We must, in these troubled times,
Continued on Page 9
Temple in the Pines
Finds Home on aRanch
This article is one in a series
which will serve to acquaint you
with the religious facilities
available to South Broward
residents. A different
congregation will be featured
each week.
By AMY WILPON
Pembroke Pines is a growing,
Ml.il Jewish community with a
lot of dynamic, young leader-
ship," said Rabbi Bernard P.
Sliotur of Temple in the Pines. "A
:v s> migogue plays a central role in
^Jewish life by providing the
religious, social and educational
needs of a community. This is
what we are trying to do out
here."

Temple in the Pines has a new
facility at 9730 Stirling Road.
The former ranch is located on 5.5
Phil Levin
Nat Sedley
Lester Grossman
Six Leaders Represent Federation
At Prime Minister's Mission Aug. 26
Lester Grossman, Moses
liornstein, Herbert D. Katz,
Philip A. Levin, Nathan Sedley
and Sumner G. Kaye, executive
director, will represent the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward at the Prime Minister's
Mission to Israel, Aug. 26-31.
The Prime Minister's Mission
will bring top Jewish leaders
horn across the country together
lor intensive meetings with
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. Attendants
will spend one day in Egypt.
Participants of this mission
will go behind the scenes to learn
the realities of today's headline
issues from top decision makers.
They will discover both the
human and financial realities of
resettlement as the peace process
is carried out.
They will meet the young men
and women in uniform who
continue to provide so much of
the strength that makes peace
possible. They will witness the
realization of the lifelong dreams
of Soviet Jewish refugees as they
begin the absorption process.
The Mission will culminate
with a private dinner with Prime
Minister Begin at the Knesset,
when those in attendance will
announce their gifts for the 1980
Combined Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
The Petrobillions Conquest
The Seven-Pronged
Arab Invasion of America
Rabbi Shoter
By HOAG LEVINS
Sen. Frank Church has not had
i easy time of it with the
member
League.
nations of the Arab
Continued on Page 11
Newcomers Incited to Shalom Reception
over
Newcomers from
Lbe South Bro-
ward urou will
meet Saturday.
Aug. 25. at the
Jewish Fedora-
Lion of South
llrowarda first 2$
Shalom Reccp *
tion of the 1979 -
I !W() season.
Greenman
"This is a good opportunity for
those new to the community to
meet ami socialize with each
other and with residents of this
urou who have been here from
,m\ where between one to 35
veins." said Hrenda Greenman,
vice president, community
education.
Seventy-five people are ex-
up of information about the
Jewish community and gifts and
coupons from various businesses
throughout Hollywood, will be
given out.
The next Shalom event will be
Oct. (i at the home of Audrey and
Sam Meline. It will center around
pected to attend this function at Sukkoth.
Kienda and Andrew Greenman's
hone Rabbi RUrhter will lead a If you are new U> the area or
sing a long, and wine and cheese know of any newcomers, contact
will be served. Shalom kits, made
Leslie Altman at the Federation.
The first major public con-
frontation came with the
Khashoggi investigation.
Digging in, the Subcommittee
exposed extensive details of a
worldwide web of connections in
which people like Khashoggi
shuttled petrobillions and war
materiel which generated a
copious "commission" flow. The
Church hearings opened the
window on a lot of the new
connections and inroads the
Arabs have made in Washington
and other seats of power. When
the Subcommittee investigated
his dealings with American
defense contractors, Khashoggi
was represented by Clark Clif-
ford, former Secretary of
Defense, known as the dean of
the capital's lawyers.
DEMOCRAT CHURCH,
Chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, is one of
the most powerful men in
Washington. He has consistently
opposed moves to sell highly
sophisticated military hardware
to the Arabs. Last year. Church's
fight against the controversial F-
15 proposal was bitterly criticized
by the White House.
In another arena, Church has
become locked in a low-profile but
high-intensity battle behind the
Continued on Page 8


Page 2
The Jewish t londian and Shofar of Ureater Hollywood
Sy, ai
Mission Parlor Meetings
Recruit 113 Participants
Young Israel Elects Dr. Ira Ginsberg
From
The Young Israel of
Hollywood-Fort Lauderdale has
elected Dr. Ira Ginsberg to serve
as president of the congregation
for 1979-80.
Ginsberg. a native of
Brooklyn, N.Y., is a graduate of
the Yeshiva of Flatbush,
Brooklyn College and New York
University School of Dentistry.
I le moved to Florida in 1974 with
his wife Miriam and their two
children, Barry and Susie.
na
From left are Anna and Lester Grossman, No No, Julia and George
Schneiderman, Beatrice and Abe Mallet.
left are~No No, UJA guide, Mary Don, Sumner G. Kaye, Wnmpn' Diviuinn
executive director, Isadora Don and Philip A. Levin, campaign TT VIUCIl lfaWW
chairman. The Dons were hosts of the Parlor Meeting.
Leaders Meet
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division Leadership Develop-
ment will hold its first session,
Wednesday, Sept. 5, 9:30 a.m. -
2:30 p.m. at the home of Anita
Courtney, according to Florence
Koth, vice president, leadership
development.
Guest speaker Dawn Schuman
will capsulize 4,000 years ot
Jewish history.
The group consists of ap-
proximately 30 women who have
been somewhat involved in
Federation work. They have
shown some interest and have
participated on various com-
mittees, explained Mrs. Roth.
EnergyCrisis
Topk for Stack
The political implications of
the energy crisis on peace in the
Middle Last was the topic of a
Miuucll given by U.S. Rep.
I M w .ml J. Stack at a Community
Relations Committee luncheon
lor the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, according to
Nathan IVitcher, chairman.
Slack served as sheriff of
Broward County. He was elected
in November 19G8 and reelected
ill 1972 and 1976. Since his
election to Congress in 197M. Rep.
Slack has served on committees
such as Education and Labor,
Merchant Marine and Fisheries
and a select committee on Aging.
His awards and honors include
Intel national B'nai B'rith Great
American Traditions Award in
1978 and Civitan's Man of the
Year Award in 1977.
On the first anniversary of Ida
Nudel's trial and sentencing,
Stack spoke to the House of
Representatives about the Soviet
Union's disregard for the
Helsinki Final Act. This Act
stated that all nations signing
were to do everything possible to
reunite families separated by
political boundaries.
Sixty-five ueoplc attended the
luncheon.
R'JS*
Seated from left are Sylvia Epstein and Myra Green. Standing from
left are Abraham Benjamin, Frances Benjamin, Meyer Epstein and
Sid Green. Dina and Nat Sedley were hosts of the Parlor Meet in v.
[Attentic
Attention College Students Shalom Hadassah
During the course of the school year, the Jewish Federation
of South Broward would like to keep you informed about
hometown events.
Please fill in the form below and mail to:
Jew^ Federation of South Broward
Women's Division
2719 rWrywood Boutewrd
Hotywood, Florida 33020
:name_
AGE
;ADDRESS
PHONE.
i SCHOOL NAME
Sets Meeting
On Tuesday, Sept. 4, the
Shalom Group of Hollywood
lladassah will hold its first
meeting of the season at noon at
the Washington Federal
Building. 450 N. Park Rd.
Guest speaker wili be
Josephine Newman, area vice
president and education chair-
man for the region.
H-J4-7?
RELGO.INC.
Rchgiout Gift Article*
Israali Art* Crafts
Habrtw Books Judaica
Papor Backs Rtcords a Taaas
Opan Sunday
15*7 Washington Av MB J32-S12
N-MHI
Dr. Ginsberg has been an
active member of the synagogue,
serving on many committees and
as executive vice president. He
and his wife are very active in the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School, where he is vice
president in charge of religious
affairs and she is secretary of tne
board. They are members of the
executive board and the board of
governors.
A periodontist in Hallandale,
Ginsberg is a member of the
Florida Dental Association,
American Academy of
I'eriodontology, Alpha Omega
Fraternity, and. is on the
executive board of the North
Dadc I)final Society.
He will be installed as
president of Young Israel at a
special ceremony. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer, the synagogue's
spiritual leader, will install the
new officers and executive board
of directors.
Other congregation officers t01
be installed are: executive
president. Dr. Alvin St _
secretary, Robert Aschhein
treasurer, David Kohn;
mediate past president,
David Kornbluth; president^I
the Sisterhood, Mrs. Jessica]
Schultz. The members who will
serve on the board of directors o(
1979-80 are: Dr. Samuel Rand.
Dr. Walter Fingerer, Dr. Neii]
Weinreb. Dr. Alvin Cohen. Issie I
Messer, Leonard Wallace and]
Marvin Hirsch.
The Young Israel 0f 1
Hollywood-Ft. Lauderdale is an
Orthodox congregation which
draws its members from North
Miami Beach, Hollywood and]
Fort Lauderdale. It is located at
3291 Sterling Road, Fort
Lauderdale.
Amateur Talent Needed
Amateur talents. The Jewish Federation of South Broward
Israel Information Desk is looking for singers, actors and
musicians to perform in Israeli Coffee Houses and at other
special events in the South Broward community. All interested
persons should contact Yossi Netz by calling the Federation
office.
YAHRZEIT TABLETS
For Dignified Fund-raising
Over 52 years experience in furnishing all]
kinds of Bronze and Aluminum Tablets,!
Memorials, Donor Rates, Trees of Lite Awards I
Portrait Tablets, Letters, Testimonials,!
Dedicatory Tablets, Original Sculpture, Etc. |
Send for free calalog or call.
UNITED STATES BRONZE
& ALUMINUM CORP.
1065 E. 28th St. Hialeah, Fla. 33013
836-2880 or 836-2906
The assurance
of service. In the
Jewishtradition.
At Riverside, we take full responsibility
for the performance of our service in a manner
consistent with the expectations of the
community and the high standards
demanded by Jewish Law and Custom.
Our staff of Riverside people consists of
the largest number of Jewish professionals
employed by any funeral director in the State.
They are people who understand Jewish
tradition andjbonor it.
Since 1935, these policies have been
our assurance to a family of service that
respects their needs and the dignity of Jewish
funeral ritual.
It's a trust we've,never taken lightly.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft. Lauderdale (Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
^Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Inc. / Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
Ha-M-n


Friday, August 24.1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
HIAS Leader Praises
U.S. Policy on 'Boat People'
Upon his return to the United
States from the U.N. meeting of
65 countries on Indochinese
refugees in Geneva, Switzerland,
HIAS president Edwin Shapiro
praised U.S. policy in its com-
mitment to increase its
Indochinese refugee quota and in
augmenting its financial support.
Shapiro was part of a special
four-man delegation, chaired by
Vice President Walter Mondale,
which included Lane Kirk wood,
secretary-treasurer of the AFL-
CIO; Brendan T. Byrne,
governor of New Jersey and Hess
Kline, a Minneapolis industrial
leader. Aboard Airforce II,
Shapiro and other delegates were
briefed by the vice president on
the issues which were to be
discussed at the meeting.
Shapiro also attended a special
reception for U.S. Congressional
leaders as well as various am-
bassadors to the U.S. and other
dignitaries. The meeting was
chaired by Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim of the United
Nations.
THE HIGHLIGHT of
Shapiro's trip took place when he
and fellow delegates from 65
countries listened to Vice
President Mondale's speech at
the Palace de Nations. Said
Shapiro: "The strength of our
U.S. policy was eloquently ar-
ticulated by the vice president
and remarkably transformed the
conference from a meeting of
good will to a meeting of action.
His speech was a rallying point
for all of the delegates present
and resulted in a commitment of
reception as well as financial
^ support for the United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees
IUNHCRI."
HIAS has cooperated and
collaborated with the UNHCR
for many years and has received
valuable assistance from that
office in its commitment to aid
refugees.
In the only speech that
received roaring applause. Vice
President Mondale announced
thai the U.S. would ask Congress
lo allocate an additional $105
million for the UNHCR. as well
as another S20 million toward the
creation of transit centers. In
addition, the vice president
proposed the creation of an in-
li'inalional fund of $200 million
and offered a U.S. contribution of
820 million for the initial year. An
earlier commitment to double the
U.S. monthly quota to 14,000
also was made.
Shapiro stated that he was
especially touched by the vice
[5 president's references to the
Evian Conference in 1938 which
dealt with the furthering of
emigration of Germany's per-
secuted Jews. Ironically, the
Evian, France Conference took
place only 14 miles away from the
Geneva parley.
"THAT CONFERENCE did
not succeed in preventing the
death of millions of Jews. Let us
hope that as a result of the
Geneva meeting we will avoid the
same mistakes," said Shapiro.
In a press' conference sub-
sequent to his address the vice
president made a special point in
thanking all the U.S. voluntary
agencies for their assistance in
receiving and resettling the
Indochinese refugees.
HIAS, the worldwide Jewish
migration agency, is among
several U.S. voluntary agencies
that are aiding in the Indochinese
* rescue effort. 'During the past I
four years a more than 6,000
Indochinese refugees have been
assisted to resettle in this
country by HIAS. This year the
agency has announced it is
w prepared to receive and help in
the resettlement of an additional
0,000 Indochinese, many of them
boat people, instead of its
original 1979 commitment of
3,000.
According to Gaynor I.
Jacobson, HIAS' executive vice
president, the organization has
the full backing of the American
Jewish community in this
humanitarian project.
OTHER HIAS representatives
who attended the meeting were
Rabbi Erwin Herman and Rabbi
Steven Jacobs, both of the Union
of American Hebrew
Congregation in North
Hollywood, Calif., and Leonard
Seidenman, director of HIAS
European and North African
Operations in Geneva, Swit-
zerland.
Speaking in behalf of the
International Council of
Voluntary Agencies, shortly
before the conclusion of the
meeting, Seidenman praised U.S.
policy as well as that of Canada,
France, Australia and other
governments. He also lauded the
leadership of the U.S. and urged
all countries to increase their
humanitarian endeavors to
rescue these homeless and
uprooted people.
HIAS is a beneficiary of every
organized Jewish community in
the United States, the United
Jewish Appeal and the UJA-
Federation Joint Campaign of
Greater New York.
MHMNMM
IMMMNH**-^
Media Directors
Attend Conference
NEW YORK A National
Conference of Directors of Jewish
Media Centers was convened by
the Jewish Media Service/JWB
on Aug. 21-22 at Gratz College,
Philadelphia.
Jewish Media Centers serve
the fields of Jewish education and
Jewish communal service as
audio-visual resource centers.
They are attached to local
bureaus of Jewish education,
Jewish Community Centers, and
Jewish institutions of higher
learning.
Says Dr. Eric A. Goldman,
director of the Jewish Media
Service, "Participants in the
conference examined the role and
potential of the media center in
the Jewish community, studied
the application of computer
technology to the work of the
media center, probed legal
questions connected with the use
of videotapes, reviewed the latest
Beth El
Temple News
Registration for Temple Beth
El Religious and Hebrew School
will be held in the Tobin
Auditorium of the temple,
Sunday, Aug. 26, from 9 a.m. to
noon.
The temple will offer a creative
educational program for kinder-
garten through confirmation,
including choir, dramatics, arts
and crafts, history and folk
dancing. A number of new
programs will be inaugurated.
Family services will be held
once a month which will be spon-
sored* by the students of the
religious school classes.
The eighth and ninth grades
will be part of the Judaica High
School in which Temple Beth El
and CAJE (Central Agency for
Jewish Education) combine
forces. There will be a series of
mini courses on the Holocaust,
Cults, and Reform Judaism, as
well as year-long studies of Torah
and Jewish history.
Confirmation class will be
taught by the rabbis and an
experienced CAJE instructor on
Mondays from 7 to 9 p.m. All
religious school classes will be
held Sunday, starting Sept. 9
from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
Membership at Temple Beth
El is a prerequisite to
registration.
Temple Beth El is now ac-
cepting members for the New
Year. Inquiries can be made by
calling Sydney D. Kronish,
executive director.
information on federal and state
funding for media projects, and
exchanged ideas and ex-
periences."
Jewish Media Centers are
located in New York,
Philadelphia, Los Angeles,
Chicago, Miami, St. Louis,
Baltimore, Boston, Cleveland,
Milwaukee, Kansas City,
Montreal, Toronto, Washington,
D.C., San Diego and Providence.
They provide consultation and
information on the use of films,
videotapes and other audio-visual
media. Some media centers
maintain film and videotape
libraries and conduct workshops
on the use of these materials.
Others actually produce
videotapes, filmstrips, and the
like.
The Jewish Media Service,
which serves these media centers
and other Jewish communal
agencies, is a cooperative venture
that involves major national
Jewish organizations. The prime
sponsors are the Council of
Jewish Federation (CJF), the
National United Jewish Appeal
(UJA), and JWB. The Jewish
Media Service is part of the
Program Services of JWB, 15 E.
26th St.. New York. N.Y. 10010.
Local Woman WritesOf
Touching Experience'
Editor's Note: The following is a letter sent to the Morrison
family of Hollywood by their 21-year-old daughter Lisa who is
spending the summer on a Jewish Agency Study Course in
Israel.
Dear Family -
Shalom! I must tell you about my experience today which I
will never forget. Here I've been in Israel for two weeks
learning the ins and outs of Zionism, politics, Aliyah, our
heritage and those who helped to return Eretz Yisrael to the
Jewish people. Our group went to the 75th anniversary of
Herzl's yahrzeit at his graveside an entire area devoted to his
memory. You had to have an invitation to attend, and our group
received invitations.
To make a long story short, I sat one row and five seats down
from Menachem Begin. A little pushing and shoving and there I
was. I took a few pictures he noticed I was doing this, and he
turned and smiled, waiting for me to focus (which I hope I did in
that state of mind).
It was so exciting the head of the Jewish State a man
with a worn, kind, humble Yiddishe face. A few men spoke
words of praise about Herzl a children's choir sang soldiers
saluted and flowers were laid on the tomb. A rabbi said kaddish
and a cantor chanted his voice clear and from the heart.
After the ceremony, Begin stood up from his chair and turned
to shake the hands of those around him of course I was right
there he took my hand, shook it, looked into my eyes (not just
at me but into my eyes!) and said Shalom! It was a touching
experience, not like saying hello to a common celebrity it was
Israel's Prime Minister a legend, a piece of history
Menachem Begin.
I love you all Lisa
Women to Take Bus Tour
Presidents and top leaders of
all local major Jewish women's
organizations will participate in
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division Bus
Tour, Friday, Sept. 7.
Buses will leave the Jewish
Community Center Hollywood
Extension, 2838 Hollywood
Boulevard, promptly at 9:30 a.m.
The participants will tour several
Federation supported agencies
including the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community
Center, Douglas Gardens Jewish
Home for the Aged and Hillel
Day School, according to Brenda
Greenman, vice president,
community education.
Marion Satan
Posj Haste Shopping Center
4525 Shendon St.. Hollywood. Fla.
Phone 961 -o998
Personal Service Book Store
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
CljapelS
THE ONLY JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
REPRESENTING
KIHSCHENBAUM BROS INC
N* Vo#h
PISER MEMORIAL CHAPELS
OMNB
ST ANETSKY* SCMl OSSBE RG SOLOMON
MEMORIAL CHAPELS '
Botlon
Mark Wnnmlini0ii Kaon. Lkiid Faaml ItaMon
Call or write for your Yahrzeit Calendar at:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE PEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate
*


Pae 4
The Jewish Fhridiem and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 24,1979
Dr. Mengele's End ?
It is hard to forget the indifferent way in which
the Allied powers let Josef Mengele out of its grasp
at the end of World II. Even the defeated Germany,
which one would have thought anxious to
rehabilitate itself in the eyes of the civilized world
after the Nazi era. did nothing to retrieve him.
And it was all so easy to catch up with the in-
famous concentration camp doctor, too. Mengele had
simply gone home toGinsburg, where his father and
the family of Alfred Mengele virtually own the whole
town and environs.
What is even more unbelievable is the equally
indifferent way in which all concerned let Mengele
escape to Latin America, where he found ultimate
refuge in Paraguay's large German colony and the
odious Nazi revivalist movement there.
But if no one else has learned from the past,
certainly West Germany has. Now. Paraguay has
acted to remove citizenship status from Dr. Mengele.
and it is hoped that extradition to West Germany
will not be far behind.
The difficulty is that Mengele is as slippery as
an eel. He has proven this time and again in the past.
when reports of his whereabouts made Mengele move
from one Latin hideout to another.
We hope that this time the butcher will be
caught.
Poor Vanessa
Poor Vanessa Redgrave.
After several years of courting the PLO. she now
finds that her political activities may not permit her
to be the star of a movie on the Holocaust. It seems
she was to be cast in the role of a survivor of Ausch-
witz. Members of the Jewish community in England
and now United States organizations are objecting to
her playing this role.
It is past time for some public figures to realize
that they can not publicly embrace terrorists and
murderers who call for the extinction of a country
and the annihilation of its people and then expect to
be treated as fine upstanding citizens.
We are judged by the company we keep, Miss
Redgrave. Maybe your companions should be
changed. For the good of the world and maybe even
your own career.
More Sensitivity Needed
The Carter Administration appears tired of try-
ing to convince the Arab countries of joining the
Israeli-Egyptian peace efforts and is on the verge of
agreeing to the Palestine Liberation Organization
that United Nations Security Council Resolution 242
be amended po include something about Palestinian
self-determination.
This lack of sensitivity was especially demon-
strated by Carter's statement comparing the Pales-
tinian issue with the civil rights movement in the
U.S. This statement not only angered Jews, but also
Blacks, who took umbrage that a peaceful drive for
legitimate rights could be equated with a movement
that is based on terrorism.
Unless the Administration stands fast on 242
and stops its practice of making off-the-cuff state-
ments that can only serve to add to Israel's concern,
it will destroy all the good work it has done in the
Mideast.
Jewish Floridian
an* SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .MS Federal Hwy Suite 20S Duua FU 13004
Telephone MG-Mla
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT 1NE 6th St Miami. Fla S31J2Phor.r IT) 4*06
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
The Jtwith Floridian Does Not Guarantee The Kathruth
0< The Merchandise Advertised in Its Columns
Publlahed Bl Weekly
Second Claae Postage Paid at Dania. Fla 664600
- fna snocner
Federation officers President. Joyce Newman; Vice Presidents Allen Gordon
Moses Hornsteln, Secretary. Joel Schneider. MD.; Treasurer Jo Ann KaU;
Executive Director, Sumner G Kaye Submit material for publication to Marcy
Schackne Public Relations Director, or Leslie Horn. Assistant Public Relations
Director
The Jewish Floridian has absorbs41 me Jewish Unity and ihe Jewish We-toy
Member of the Jewish Teletraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, warn,
wide News Service. National Editorial Association. American Association 01
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area 1 One Year-W SO Out of Town Upon Request
Carter's Evangelism is Showing
NEW YORK The debate is'
Tierce here about the Carter
presidency, far more fierce than
anywhere else I've been in the
past month or so. including
Europe, where it was certainly
fierce enough. One reason for this
overriding passion may be that
New York is a concentrated
center of the political power upon
which the President had to draw
in order to be elected Blacks.
Hispanics. Jews, labor.
.Jews, particularly, are con-
gregated here in high con-
centration. Furthermore, in
addition to sharing with the rest
of the city and the country the
domestic disappointments Mr.
Carter has engendered in them.
the> are angry about his foreign
policy toward Israel They find
thi*- "policy a betrayal of their
tru-t in him. which he asked for
pacifically spiritual, indeed
terms when he was
running for office.
Mindlin
MORE "mundane" betrayals,
however important they may be
because they deal with the very
political, economical and social
fabric of the nation, do not in the
end possess the spiritual and
religious' qualities that the
President invested in his appeal
10 .Jewish voters and the Jewish
voters' Bem identification with
Israel
r
...Send -rhese.-fhe homeless,
*empesfr--fc>sr io me..,
eMMA LAZARJJS
That is why his betrayal of thjj
sector of the electorate elicits*"
such passionate debate.
It strikes me that Mr. Carter
understands, for the first time,
what has occurred here, and he is
trying to turn a liability into an
asset. The President, particularly
during his address to the nation
in which he launched his energy
program, and in other of his
statements since then, has at-
tempted to inject an aura of
spiritual and religious thought
and feeling into his domestic
policies, as well.
IT IS hard to see how an
economic problem such as in-
flation and or energy can be
defined in religious terms. Or how
the President can hope to rally
the nation around his faltering
performance, domestic or foreign,
this way
Furthermore, ecumenical
religious appeals, which be is DO*
firing at all of us broadside in his
effort to crystallize the national
malaise, are not the fabric of the
religious and spiritual feelings
thai Jews have for Israel and
which he evoked so successfully
111 them during his candidacy: if
l hey were, these feelings would
nut be so passionate, nor the
Jewish belief that they have been
betrayed. debated so
passionately.
Ik-sides, ecumenical religion is
not Mr Carter's way either And
howev er bland it may be. it is not
1 lie nation's way. which is
traditionally accustomed to
heartfelt but secular straight-talk
- indeed, which is suspicious of
-exinons 111 high places because it
us so fiercely concerned about
separation of church and state as
a principle if not entirely as a
jii jelke.
THAT IS why the character of
\li. Carter's appeal to the Jewish
vote in his campaign for the
pu Mdency was so strange in the
In si place and so dangerous to
boot. Now that he is in such
desperate trouble, the President
iii expanding his religious and
spiritual appeals beyond the
1 < uinenical. "Your God is my
lied," he once told an affluent
Continued on Page 9
Litanies of Alienation
Mixed Marriage Kids: A Mixed Bag
Friday, August 24.1979
Volume 9
1 ELUL5739
Number 17
NEW YORK The children
of religiously-mixed marriages,
are the subject of a series of case
studies in the just-published
summer issue of Present Tense,
quarterly magazine published by
the American Jewish Committee.
In an article titled "Half-Jews:
Sooner or Later the Children
Grow Up," Paula Span, a free-
writer, presents five
vignettes ?' people whose
parental backgrounds were half
Jewish and half Christian. Span
makes a point of acknowledging
that "five interviews are no
substitute for a real research
effort."
HOWEVER, she maintains
that "these stories, these per-
sonal litanies of alienation or
attachment. commitment or
indifference, contentment or
bewilderment or regret, are one
raj to present the world of the
half-Jews."
Her subjects include two men,
two women, and a 14-year-old
girl. The adults range in age from
the early 20s to middle 30s. They
come from widely different
geographical areas in the United
States two from New York
City, and one each from
Baltimore, Salt Lake City, and
Santa Monica, Cal.
Despite their differences in life
styles, and despite the fact that
only one of the five subjects
the 14 year-old girl is actively
involved in Jewish religious
observance, all of them indicated
a desire to retain an identification
with Judaism, on an ethnic level
if not on a religious one.
EVEN THE least Jewishly
identified of the group a 24-
year-old New York woman, a
highly successful producer of
television commercials, the child
of a Catholic mother and a Jewish
father who claimed that
Judaism "doesn't make a dif-
ference in terms of anything I
do," added: "I still consider
myself Jewish."
The one other subject whose
mother was not Jewish is a writer
and story editor for a film
company in Salt Lake City.
Acknowledging that Jewish
law maintains that religious
identification stems from the
matriarchal line, and that it
would therefore reject his claim
to Jewishness, he stated: "It
makes me feel that when I say it,
I'm telling a lie. It keeps me
somewhat detached, too. I*m not
one or the other of anything."
Nevertheless he added: '"I
always felt part of Judaism. I
think it had to do with Jews
turning out so many brilliant
scholars and artists. They were
such a preeminent force in this
society and in others I saw. I was
proud to say I was Jewish."
A JOURNALIST in Santa
Monica, the daughter of a Jewish
mother and a Protestant father,
is described by Span as "com-
fortable with, even a little proud
of, the continuing contradiction
of her lineage." f
"I've always wanted to break
away from stereotypes," the
journalist said, "and 1 think I've
come to like it this way. I can't be
the Jewish princess and I can't be *.
the WASP commilleewoman I
can be me."
\ chemist in Baltimore
declared that in his early youth
he had been a sort of "bi-religious
person." celebrating the religious
holidays of both his Jewish
mother and his Southern Baptist
father, although he attended He-
brew school three days a week
and was bar mitzvah "to appease
grandfather His break with all
religion came, he stated, when he
began to study science at a tech-
nical high school.
"I COULDNT bring the two
things together," he declared.
Discussing his life today, and
his relationships with his very
intermarried family, he said: '
"I get into these arguments
with my relatives about being
Jewish. My argument is that you
have to specify being ethnically
Jewish or religiously Jewish. Mv
uncle says that being a Jew*^
means being religious. And I
always say, 'What about Ein-
stein?' "


*i 11 Friday, August 24,1979______________________________Tfte ./euttaft Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood___________________________________________
f Israeli Shlichim to Arrive in U.S. This Month
Page 5
"They have an interesting and
ried background,*' says Bessie
jine, JWB's senior personnel
consultant, of the new crop of
psraeli shlichim who will be
arriving in the U.S. in time to
pegin their stint at Jewish Com-
munity Centers and YM and
VVVIIAs this fall.
The JWB is supported in part
|>y the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
"They include a kibbutznik,
teachers, a pilot, health and
physical educators, and persons
who have had some experience in
the Community Center move-
nent in Israel."
EARLIER THIS year, Mrs.
I Pine went to Jerusalem where she
participated in the interviews of
60 Center shlichim candidates
out of 500 who had been pre-
|screened by Ray Levin, head of
be North American Desk of the
ITorld Zionist Organization.
She also interviewed an ad-
ditional 140 shlichim for summer
I camp positions, nearly 120 of
I whom served this year at camps
sponsored by Jewish Community
[Centers, Jewish Federations and
other Jewish communal in-
I stitutions.
"The camp shlichim are in
their early 20s and fresh out of
the Israeli Army," Mrs. Pine
says, "whereas the Center
shlichim have finished college
and range in age from 27 to 37."
In the 15 years that the
program has been in operation
under the joint auspices of JWB,
the American Zionist Youth
Foundation, and the Youth and
Hechalutz Department and
Aliyah Department of WZO in
Israel, 130 Israeli shlichim have
worked in 65 different JCCs in
"he U.S. and Canada. Mrs. Pine
has been JWB's coordinator of
this program for the past 10
years.
CANDIDATES for Center
shlichim positions with a fa-
mitment of a minimum two and a
maximum of three years in a JCC
must have passed an English test
and Jewish information test and
have undergone psychological
screening before they reach their
final interview. Of the 60 can-
didates interviewed, 25 were
accepted, and of these, 10 will
come to the U.S. to begin their
center assignments after they
have completed an intensive
training program in Israel.
"The process of selection and
placement often seems endless,"
Mrs. Pine says, "principally
because seeing that the best
possible people are chosen is
tremendously serious business."
To insure an ideal match be-
tween shaliach and assignment,
-center lay leaders and executives
"are encouraged to vist Jerusalem
in person to screen candidates
themselves.
This year, Doris Morris, new
m Wilmington, Del., JCC president,
interviewed candidates and
selected Amir Berenson. Sterling
Neuman, past president, San
Antonio, Tex., JCC, selected
Eytan Shuminer. Robert Weiner,
executive director, JCC of
Greater Washington, D.C.,
selected Avi Rechter. And
Harold Gittler, executive
director, Mid-Island YM and
YWHA, Plainview, L.I., N.Y.,
placed a trans-Atlantic phone call
to Yehuda Snapiri to get answers
to questions he wanted clarified
before reaching the final decision.
THE Wilimington JCC and the
Mid-Island Y, as well as the JCC
of Atlantic County, N.J. (Simcha
Shelhav) and the Syracuse, N.Y.,
JCC (Dan Matus) are new to the
center shlichim program, Mrs.
Pine points out.
This year's contingent of
center-based shlichim reflects a
broad range of professional
experience, says Mrs. Pine. "Two
of them, who will have health and
physical education respon-
sibilities, are Yehuda Snapiri,
assigned to the Mid-Island Y,
and Yehoshua Katz, who'll be
working at the Seattle, Wash.,
JCC. Yehuda, a teacher, is a
graduate of Wingate, has had
experience in health and physical
education, and spent one summer
at Camp Tamarack as a camp
shaliach. He also has had some
TV experience. Yehoshua, from
Czechoslovakia, is also a Wingate
graduate and is a teacher at the
Nautical School at Michmoret.
"Avi Rechter, who will be
going to Washington, D.C., is a
pilot, an attorney, and former
captain in Israel's Defense Force.
The one kibbutznik is Simcha
Shelhav, who will be working at
the center in Atlantic County,
N.J.
"Of the 10 new sh lie hem, two
are women. Debbie Aronstein,
assigned to the Cincinnati, Ohio,
JCC, was born on a kibbutz. She
is a Hebrew teacher and is assis-
CTUDI0
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lant in the Hebrew Language Di-
vision, The Jewish Agency. Sho-
shana Zfatt, who will be joining
four other shlichim at the Jewish
Community Centers of Chicago,
is a graduate of Hebrew Univer-
sity and served one summer as a
counsel or at Surprise Lake
Camp. She will be on leave from
her position as assistant director
of the Machon training program
for shlichim.
"EYTAN SHUMINER, as
signed to the San Antonio JCC,
worked as a director of an agency
affiliated with the Israel Cor-
poration of Community Centers
and served as a shaliach at the
North Shore JCC, Marblehead,
Mass., from 1970 to 1973." Other
new shlichim and their assign-
ments are: Amos Van Raalte
(Louisville, Ky., JCC); Amir
for the 1979-80 year. Israeli
shlichim are assigned to centers
for a two-year "tour of duty,"
with an option for a third year.
"In each community preparing
to welcome its new Israeli
shaliach or shlica, the center is
encouraged to establish a com-
mittee to help acclimate the new
worker and his family to the com-
munity and to the center," Mrs.
Pine says. "Staff personnel and
members are being alerted to the
arrival of these Israeli workers
who will maintain the close living
bond between America and Israel
and will provide a special dimen-
sion of Israeli programming in
their centers in addition to any
particular responsibilities they
may have.
"The very special ingredient of
each shaliach is his or her on-
JWB is the Association of
JCCs, Ys, and Camps throughout
North America, the U.S. Govern-
ment accredited agency for serv-
ing Jewish military families and
VA hospital patients, and a
leading North American agency
in strengthening informal Jewish
education and culture. It con-
ducts a wide variety of Israel-
related programs and is the
North American affiliate of the
World Confederation of Jewish
Community Centers.
Berenson (Wilmington JCC), and going contact with Israel while
Dan Matus (Syracuse, N.Y.,
JCC).
In addition to these, 20
shlichim will continue their work
at JCCs in the U.S. and Canada
serving in America. The over-
riding factor is the shaliach's
commitment to return to Israel
when he or she has completed
their shlkhut here."
B'NAI B'RITH YOUTH
ORGANIZATION SEEKS FIELD
SUPERVISOR TO WORK WITH
EXISTING YOUTH CHAPTERS,
PRIMARILY EVENINGS. MUST BE
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All Sunshine cookies and crackers are baked with 100% vegetable shortening


Page 6
ish Floridian and Shofar of Urvater HoUywooa
Jewish-Born Nun Recalled at Mass
NEW YORK UTAI The '
Edith Stein Guild, formed in
memory of the Jewish-born
philosopher-nun who converted
to Catholicism and who was
murdered at Auschwitz in 1942.
sponsored a mass in her memory
at St. Patrick's Cathedral here
last Saturday.
The mass was held on the 37th
anniversary of Edith Stein's
death and in memory of all who
died in the Holocaust. While
M of her Catholic admirers
March for evidence that might
qualify her for sainthood, they
also stress her martyrdom for
and Christians The Edith
Stem Guild is a Roman Catholic
Society dedicated to better
relation! with Jews but
specifically bars evangelization of
The Rev John Kelley of
Rockaway. Queens, said in his
homily Saturday at the mass that
since Dr. Stein's murder "we are
free to realize that a new-
prophetic type has risen among
us. By her martyrdom,
judgement is passed on the
Nazis. By her death, even more
than by her life, she condemns
the demonic in our world."
BORN IN 1891 in Breslau.
then in Germany, now Wroclaw.
Poland. Dr. Stein was the
youngest of seven children in an
Orthodox home. She became an
agnostic at 13 and remained one
until she was 21 when she began
to study the views of Edmund
Husserl. the German
philosopher, in Freiburg. Ger-
many, where she became his
assistant and a leading German
philosopher.
She became a Catholic in 1923
and taught at Catholic schools in
Germany and Austria, but she
always emphasized she con-
sidered herself a Jew. In 1933.
a hen Hitler came to power, she
joined the Carmelite Order and
l>ecame Sister Teresa Benedicta.
In 193* she wa- transferred from
Cologne to The Netherlands for
her own safety, but she and
another nun. Sister Rosa, were
am -ud by the SS in 1942.
In his homily. Father Kelley.
who is active in ecumenical work
between Jews and Christians,
noted that in April. 1973. the
French Bishops Committee for
Relations with Jews issued a
statement emphasizing Jewish
lies to Israel and stressing that
"Jews are called to glorify the
Dhine Name by the holiness of
their lives. Within the Jewish
community this is known as a
vocation to righteousness, or
Tzedekah."
FATHER KELLEY also said
that if the loss of the lives of
Edith Stein and the millions of
Holocaust martyrs says anything
at all. it certainly says that we.
the witnesses of today, must
accept a greater responsibility for
our world and for its social
structures."
Msgr. Nicholas Moore of Our
Lady of Victory Church in
Manhattan, headquarters of the
Edith Stein Guild, said one the
activities of the Guild is to in-
vestigate incidents of anu-
Semitism and anti-Catholicism at
American colleges.
Family Honors Samuel Weiner
Open House at Temple in the Pines
Open house will be held at
Temple in the Pines, on Sunday.
Sept. 2. from 9:30 a.m. until
12:30 p.m. where Hollywood
inquiries can be made regarding
membership all programs and
activities Special membership
fan for young married couples
and senior citizens have been
arrangedOTOOAU members are
entitled to tickets for the High
HoK Days. Tickets are now
available for the membership and
general public through the
temple office.
Registration is still open for all
departments of the Temple
Religious School. The first
-ion of Sunday school for
children five to seven will be held
on Sunday. Sept. 9. The four
grades of the afternoon Hebrew
school open to students 8 to 13
will commence on Tuesdav. Sept.
4.
On Thursday evening at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Bernard Shoter will meet
with parents of post Bar Bat
Mitzvah for the organization of a
Hebrew High School program.
Boj and girls over the age of 13
ure eligible to attend the new
department of the Temple's
Religious School. Some of the
courses that will be offend will be
Jewish Roots in America. Life
of the Jew and Encounter
with the Cult-.
M an being made for an
extended program of the early
childhood program, under the
direction ot Ellin Heilig. There
are several openings for children
2 10 ">.
A new pulpit table cover was presented to the
Chapel of the United States Veterans
Administration Medical Center, Miami, in honor
of the 70th birthday of Samuel Weiner by his
children and grandchildren.
Weiner is a member of the Victor B. Friedman
Jewish War Veterans Post No. 613 of Hollywood,
and is a volunteer worker at the hospital.
assisting in escorting patients to and from the
weekly Jewish services.
A dedication of the cover was recently held
during the services in the chapel. Shown above
are Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Weiner and Rabbi Allan
Mirvis, Jewish chaplain at the VA Medical
Center.
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i ne.1 ewisn rionaian unu anuiur u\ \jikuiv hv*j
Early Childhood Education Registration Silberman Named Chairman
Of UJA Florida Cabinet
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center's,
Early Childhood Education
Program will begin registration
for fall classes the week of Aug.
20 in the Fannie Schectman
Program Building on the center
grounds.
School begins Sept. 4. Early
registration insures a child of
space either in the half day
nursery program (from 9 a.m. to
noon I or the full day nursery
program (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.) In
addition, the Working Parent's
Program, which caters to
children of working parents (from
3 to 6 p.m.) also will have early
registration at this time. Door to
door transportation is available.
Membership at the JCC is a pre-
requisite.
For further information and a
personal interview, which is
required, contact Elaine Herring,
director of the Early Childhood
Development Program at the
JCC.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC
Camp wound up its season with a
tour through Israel" without
jver leaving the campgrounds.
The theme was peace, and
campers were ushered into a
make-believe airplane, where a
film on Israel was shown.
Passports were issued, and on the
grounds were hospitality,
marriage and international food

Holiday Cards Available
booths. Campers painted pictures
symbolizing peace and attended a
belly dancing exhibition.
Temple Beth El
Sisterhood Lunch
Temple Beth El Sisterhood of
Hollywood will have its opening
luncheon meeting of the season
on Tuesday, Sept. 11, in the
Tobin Auditorium of the temple.
Ruth and Henry Zimmerman,
affiliated with the New York
School system, specializing in
physicial education and dancing,
will present a program of
American and Israeli dances, as
well as line dancing. The Zim-
mermans have performed in this
area for numerous organizations.
Reservations will be accepted
from members and their
houseguests only. The deadline is
Friday, Sept. 7.
Holiday greeting cards, a project of the Soviet Jewry Committee of
the Jewish Federation of South Broward's Community Relations
Committee, are available through the Federation office. The greeting
cards are $8 for 25, $15 for 50 and $25 for 100. Anyone interested
should call the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
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Beumund. Ehrenreich. Waldmen
NEW YORK Morton
Silberman of Miami has been
appointed chairman of the I
Florida Regional Cabinet of
United Jewish Appeal. The
announcement was made by UJA
National Chairman Irwin S.
Field.
Field described Silberman as a
"dynamic Jewish leader whose
invaluable contributions to
Jewish life make him an out-
standing choice to lead his region
as we enter a decade of decision in
Jewish life. There are few among
us as energetic, committed and
effective as Mort, and the
national leadership of UJA looks
forward to a long and productive
association with him."
"Silberman' involvement in
Jewish communal life goes back
many years, and he has served in
numerous leadership roles on the
local, regional and national
Sign Up Now for Israel Mission
There are still a few spaces left
for the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Community
Mission to Israel, according to
Ed and Mary Gottlieb, chairmen.
Mission participants will visit
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv and
Tiberias.
For complete informations and
reservations and information,
contact the Missions Desk at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
levels. He is currently vice
president of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee, and
recently received the Human
Ilelutions Award of the American
Jewish Committee.
From 1976 to 1978, Silberman
served as president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; prior
to that he was vice president of
the Federation for six years.
Before moving to Miami, he was
founding president of the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach
County.
Secretary treasurer of the East
Coast Supply Company,
Silberman resides in Miami with
his wife Val and two daughters.
Technion Group
Sets Card Party
The South Broward Chapter of
the American Society for
Technion will hold a dessert
(noodle pudding) and card party
for the Technion Scholarship
Fund at Galahad West,
Hollywood, on Wednesday, Sept.
5, at noon.
For reservations, call Reba
Hochman, Ruth Teich or Ruth
Gross.
Having a
Bridge
Party?
Great tasting
Maxwell
House8
Coffee is
the perfect
partner.
A bridge party is never the same with-
out a cup of piping hot Maxwell House
Coffee. Its rich, satisfying taste is
brewed to be remembered cup after cup.
year after year. Smart Jewish hostesses
have been serving it for half a century.
Good
tome
Last Drop"'
/"lo*
K
Certified
Kosher
A living tradition in Jewish homes for more than half a century.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 24,1979
The Seven-Pronged Invasion
f
Continued from Page 1
scenes with Libya, which has'
been lobbying for the Senate;
Foreign Relations Committee to
drop the prohibitions that have
held up the export of military
equipment to that country.
The controversy began some
years ago, when Libya purchased
five C-130 Hercules planes, two
Boeing 727s, large numbers ol
Oshkosh trucks and spare parts
from American manufacturers.
The equipment was to add to the
formidable arsenal Libya has
already assembled with $2 billion
in Russian military equipment,
including 100 MIG jets manned
by crack North Korean fighter
pilots.
The C-130s were the central
part of the American purchase.
Although usually characterized
in press reports as only "cargo"
planes, the Hercules is the most
versatile warplane ever built. It
has been the workhorse of the
American military for 20 years.
THE FOUR-ENGINE turbo-
prop aircraft known to U. S.
troops as "Herks" or "Herky
birds are designed for rough-
field landings and lightning
military strikes; Israeli troops
flew C-130s to make their famous
1976 rescue raid at Entebbe
Airport in Uganda.
THREE PRESIDENTS, the
State Department and the Senate
Foreign, Relations Committee
decided that it was not a good
idea to put such equipment in the
hands of Libyan strongman
Muammar al-Qadaffi. Qadaffi has
openly allowed his country to be
used as a haven and staging base
for PLO commandos, hijackers
and other international terrorists.
Libya was the only country in the
world to aid Ugandan dictator Idi
Amin in the revolution that led to
his overthrow this spring.
Qadaffi has been unable to get
the U. S. export licenses he needs
to move the C-130s and other
equipment from American
warehouses to military bases in
Libya. He has vowed to change
American opinion about Libya,
and has mounted an all-stops-out
campaign to persuade the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee to
approve those export licenses.
BUT COMMITTEE Chairman
Frank Church has refused to
relent or even soften his views
on the Libyan planes.
So, late in 1977, the Arabs
began an economic invasion of
Idaho aimed at "neutralizing"
the Senator.
First, Kuwait bought up the
sprawling Idaho Harding
Livestock and Land Company,
one of the largest land and cattle {
companies in the state.
Then Libya began making
arrangements to buy almost
everything else.
Idaho can best be described by
the short list of things it is
nationally famous for: baking
potatoes, exploding grain silos,
Sun Valley's ski slopes. And
Frank Church. It is the least
populated state in the Union,
with fewer than 800,000 residents
on its 84,000 square miles.
Seventy percent of those people
live on the rural farmlands that
are Idaho's economic backbone;
22,000 of them belong to the
Idaho Farm Bureauthe state's
most powerful political group.
TWO YEARS AGO, the Arabs
started arriving in this unlikely
spot in America's isolated north-
western corner. They began to
buy thingsin units measurable
in tens of millions of dollars.
Officially, Washington has
made no mention of what is
happening in Idaho. Unofficially,
senior State Department officials
have expressed increasing
concern with Arab activities they
describe as "an interesting end
run around the federal govern-
ment to establish a beachhead I
in the mountains of Idaho."
So far, this is what has hap- '
jened in Frank Church's
After Kuwait purchased
Idaho Harding, Libya sent a
seven-member "trade'
delegation" which prowled the
state, meeting with state of-
ficials, farmers, sheep ranchers,
newspaper editors and university
officials. They mentioned two
things very frequently: their
desire to make massive purchases
of local products and their
displeasure that Senator Church
was helping to hold up delivery of
their cargo planes.
Three separate junkets of
Idaho congressmen, state of-
ficials, farmers and university
leaders have toured Libya, where
they were wined, dined, en-
tertainedand introduced to
Arab officials who invited them
to discuss "the possibility of new
trade programs."
Then Arabs began meeting
frequently in both Idaho and
Washington D. C. with Idaho
Congressman Stevens Symms, a
Republican who has announced
that he will run against Frank
Church next year. An arch-1
conservative with seven years in
Congress, Symms is notj
popularly known in Idaho for any I
major legislative ac-
complishments. He is perhaps .
best known for his right-wing |
rhetoric, his backing of the
"liberty Amendment" which
calls for the abolition of all in-
come taxes, and his catchy
campaign slogan, "Take a bite of
government."
Symms' office has told the
local press that the Libyans
aren't so bad, that Qadaffi has
promised that Libya will mend
its ways and "no longer give aid
or support to terrorists," and
"We believe him."
Arabs have negotiated the
purchase of about $40 million in
wheat. They have stated an
interest in making future buys
into Idaho's corn, soybeans and
lamb products.
Arabs have announced they
intend to give a half million dollar
Agricultural Studies grant to the
University of Idaho.
Libya has coyly suggested
that it might want to establish its
U. S. trade mission office in
Boise, Idaho if it would be
"welcome."
The 22,000-member Idaho
Farm Bureau is now aggressively
trying to "convince" the Libyans
to put their trade mission in
Boise. It has begun caustic
criticism of Senator Church for
not actively backing the project.
Sen. Church, who is
preparing to open his campaign
for reelection in Idaho next year,
is keeping a very low profile on
the subject.
"But Church is not the only
one feeling pressure from the
Arabs," the aide continued.
"They are now a major force in
Washington. The progress they
have made is incredible. Four
years ago, the Arab lobby was a
joke. You had maybe two people
here who knew what they were
doing. The rest of them were
tiptoeing around like nuns in a
whorehouse. They didn't know
what they were doing or even
how to find out. They didn't even
understand the theory of the
system, let along how it works
here on the Hill.
"No more. They are well
organized, highly polished
and it goes without
sayingextremely well financed.
They have good staff people and
they know how to keep their
fingers on the pulse and deliver
well-documented position papers
or backgrounders to 'balance' the
issues. They also have some
dynamic law firms and former
Hill people ex-senators,
representatives and
aidespounding the drum for
them.
"THE JEWISH LOBBY is
still far more formidable because
it can bring down the public
wrath of the local communities. '
But the Arabs are closing. They
have tightened their act to the
point where they have real clout:
You only have to look at the F-15
deal to understand that. 1 mean,
that was all-out war. We have
every Jewish organization you
can imagine, and bigwigs from
Israel, coming in. There was arm-
twisting like you can't
believe on both sides.
Everything but the kitchen sink
came floating down the halls on
that one.
"And the Arabs won. Israel
has never lost a vote like that one I
before. It was 55-54 to sell the I
planes to the Arabs. Israel had [
gone all out to defeat it. But they '
lost. I don't think most folks out
there in the real world un-
derstand just how significant
that was.
"From where we sit, it was a
major watershed. The Arabs
demonstrated they now have the
know-how and connections to
affect the passage of legislation.
"Not a lot of people will admit
it publicly, because the topic is
such a touchy one. It's explosive
now with the oil situation. But
Israel lost ground behind the
scenes on that vote. They've lost
ground in general; you could see
that in the concessions they made
for the Egyptian negotiations.
There is a growing undercurrent
hereif we want to keep the oil
I flowing, we've got to take a new
look at our relationships with the
Arabs.
"Egypt and Israel may be
friends now, but that doesn't
lessen the tensions. Egypt is a
bankrupt country armed with
equipment left over from the
Russiansequipment they can't
get parts for. They are not an oil
power and we expect them to
stay under fire from the Arab oil
states for striking a deal. Right
now, you can't move on an issue
involving the Mideast until you
take Arab oil money into ac-
count. When it comes to the
Midwest, man, 'balance' is the
new catchword here."
THE F-15 DEAL was at the
center of a story of controversy in
the winter and spring of 1978. It
involved something more than
the sale of jets to Arab countries.
The legislation set a major
precendent by linking sales of
top of-the-line military equip-
ment to Israel with mandatory
sales of the same equipment to
Arab states.
The F-15 is no mere jet, but a
superplane: the sleek, twin-tailed
fighter is the most advanced
aircraft in the world. It is a
flying, computerized, total
overhead destruction machine,
armed with 20 milimeter machine
guns, Sparrow air-to-air missiles,
Sidewinder rocketsand an
arsenal of other ordinance for
destroying buildings and
bunkers, men and machines, like
no other plane can.
With the fall of the shah in
Iran, the "balance" achieved by
selling the jets to both Israel and
Saudi Arabia in 1978 now ap-
pears to have gone out of kilter.
One of the first public acts of
Khomeini's Islamic regime was
to pledge full support to the
PLO's campaign to destroy
Israel. That pledge carried with it
the weight of the arsenal of
American weapons that the new
Iranian government inherited
from the old. Overnight, a new
fleet of F-15s was added to those
now being purchased by Saudi
Arabia, shifting thr "balance" in
drastic lopsided favor of the Arab
League.
The coffee arrives in delicate
bone china cups rimmed with
gold flake, set on an antique
mahogany serving tray.
Vanishing as quickly as she
materialized, the secretary closes
the thick wooden door, leaving
the two men alone again. Across
the desk, the man in the blue suit
remains standing. For the second
time in as many minutes, he
seeks, verbal assurance that the
interview is off the record.
Strictly off the record. Speaking
in vaguely apologetic tones, he
gestures toward the window and
the Washington streets below as
he explains. "The Arab-Israeli
situation is a very, sensitive
subject at this time."
Mr. Bluesuit has been in and
around Washington's central
power core for more than two
dozen years. A former high of-
ficial in two government agen-
cies, he is now a private con-
sultant to government and in-
dustry on legal and financial
matters involving international
trade.
BLUESUIT UNFURLSa
large map of the world across his
desk. Its corners are held down
by crystal paperweights and
empty gold-rimmed coffee cups.
Its surface is etched with colored
lines that crisscross heavily in
some places, obscurring large
sections of geographical detail.
Red lines. Green lines. Blue
lines. Yellow lines. Each starts at
some major point in the Americas
or Europe or Asia and stretches
seaward, to join with others. The
lines form colored cables that arc
across the oceans, round the
capes, cross the channels and
traverse canals that bring them
to one final massive coagulation
in the vicinity of the Persian
Gulf.
Tanker routes. Traced across
the globe like some enormously
complex elecrical schematic,
wiring the continents together.
Outling the delicate and color-
fully intricate structure through
which the black viscous blood of
industrialized civilization flows.
From the desert kingdoms of the
Middle East to the refineries and
factories and gas pumps of the
rest of the world.
BLUESUIT LEANS across
the map, ignoring the cigarette
ash that begins collecting in the
area of Australia. "This," he
says, tapping to indicate the
entire surface of the world, "is
the new strategy map for the
Mideast War.
"Journalists and the general
electorate of America have failed
to comprehend that there has
been a genuine revolution in the
world since 1973," he continued.
"We have experienced a drastic
change in the definition of the
basic units of monetary value and
a radical alteration in the
previous-recognized concepts of
international 'power.' "
"In effect, the Western in-
dustrialized societies which ruled
the world in 1972 have been
transformed into rever.ue-
producing colonies of the Arab
world in 1979. This reality has
not yet been throughly absorbed
by the general c'tizenry or
political machinery of our
country. It is not a concept that
the traditional American psyche
can readily tolerate.
"WE HAVE also seen the
evolution of a new kind of warfare
that you might term econo-
conflict,' in which one national
group battles another without
ever firing a shot. Sure, economic
measures of one form or another
have always been a part of
modern war. But not quite like
this. The billions of dollars worth
of various Arab transactions in
America you asked me about
earlier are only one portion of a
larger picture. The Arab nations
have spread out to use the entire
planet as a strategy board on
which they plan to settle their
border dispute with Israel. In
short, what they failed to do in
the desert with their tank
charges, they are now attempting
to do in board rooms and
brokerage houses-with their
petrodollars.
"You're too young to
remember, but just prior to
World War II, there was a
controversy over the question of
using airplanes and aircraft
carriers as primary weapons of
war. It had never been done and
Americans did not want to think
about the crazy idea that ships
with airplanes on top of them
could be major weapon of war.
It was, too unusual a thought. So
for years, while the controversy
continued, we did nothing. We
sat there, confident in our own
battleships and watched the
horizon for the enemy battleships
to comebecause that is how
war had always come in the past.
Then, at Pearl Harbor, in the
space of a few hours, a handful of
planes bombed the hell out of us.
We were forced to take notice of
the fact that the art of war had
changed, and battleships did not
matter so much any longer. You
see, it took a catastrophe to bring
home that simple realization.
"THIS IS SIMILAR to what's
happening in Washington right
now. The old heads of the Jewish
movement down here insist on
thinking in old terms. In effect,
they are still watching the
horizon for the next wave of Arab
lanks to come. That is how war
has always happened in the
Mideast. But that is now how the
Arabs are operating any longer.
Now they are attacking with
money.
"The influential American
Jews with whom I deal on a
regular basis seem to dwell on the
old vision: Israel has little to
worry about because it has
proved its invincibility in tank
battles, muzzle-to-muzzle, time
and time again. Their primary,
concern here is to make sure that
Israel receives enough new tanks
and other hardware. Quite
frankly, I've been amazed by
their inability as a group to see
that they are now engaged in a
war of nozzles, rather then
muzzles: the nozzles on every
gasoline pump in America. I'm
not being at all facetious when I
suggest that the ultimate fate of
Israel may well be determined on
the freeways of Los Angeles or
the New Jersey Turnpike.
"If I were Jewish and felt a
deep personal attachment to
Israel as it now exists, I'd be
pretty damned worried about this
country's devil-may care attitude
about energy. The Arabs have
used our own money each one of
us gave it to them when we filled
our cars with gasolineto
acquire the new position of power
and influence from which they are
subtly changing American at-
titudes about Israel."
Rolling up the map, Bluesuit
reached inside a desk drawer and
handed his visitor a manila folder
whose contents he characterized
as "a little more food for
thought."
INSIDE THE FOLDER were
the results of a national Gallup
poll conducted within the last
year. The poll surveyed American
attitudes about Arabs and Israel.
The report snowed that 42
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed were more sympathetic to
the Arabs than they had been a
year before.
During the same year, 34
percent of the Americans sur-
veyed had become less sym-
pathetic toward Israel.
As this series concludes,
events and changes continue with
lightning speed across the Middle
East. Two disturbing
newspaper stories appeared
within a single week:
WASHINGTON D.C.A
Senate report drawing on sub-
poenaed oil company documents
concludes that Saudi Arabis will
limit its oil production in the
1980s to not more than 12 million
barrels a daya level so low it
could possibly touch off 'a fierce
political and economic struggle'
among the consuming countries.
(The present daily production
level stands at an alarming eight
and one-half million barrels.)
The causes of Fahd's declining
influence still are not clear to
U.S. analysts. But the decline
has suddently become a major
preoccupation for the Carter
administration, which fears that
the Fahd problem may be part of
a potential crisis in Saudi
leadership that could vitally
threaten the most fundamental
and basic premises of the U.S.
foreign and energy policy.
Expo Magazine


ugust24, 1979
Therewith Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Nindlin
\rter's Evangelism is Showing
Hbued from Page 4
by congregation of Jews
end of 1975. "Your
the Book from which 1
|is is timid stuff. Now,
lent is withdrawing into
knows best born-
iristianity. If nothing
em to solve his political
apparently hopes that
"lis can. What is worse,
ring up in the strangest
nericans not only heard
ll snippets of it in his
idress by way of in-
lere is also the bizarre
|ce in Seoul in June, when
Br tried to convert South
president Park Chung
'hrLstianity.
not only an ultimate
year long Christian
that they should per-
plunclcr. pillage and pluck
the bodies and souls of
the name of their belief;
Met of their faith that
kust believe it. too.
latter case, there are
gentler persuasions, such as
"for-your-own-good" conversion,
in which Mr. Carter is apparently
expert even by his current exper-
ience as a Sunday school teacher.
To attempt to assault Park via
the misplaced route of diplomatic
evangelism as the President did
is a special absurdity if for no
other reason than that Park is a
Buddhist, and the serenity of his
religion makes Christianity look
like" Slaughterhouse-Five by
comparison.
Worse than all, it is a blunder
so vast in dimension as to
stagger the imagination. How
dare an American President set
aside the tradition, culture and
principles of his country and to
act instead like a sleazy
proselytizer?
YET THAT is precisely what
Mr. Carter did, according to a
UPI report that quotes him as
saying, "I told him (Park) about
our faith. He was very interested.
I said I was sorry we didn't have
more time to discuss it."
OPEC? Inflation? The dollar
lobaggoning downward on the
international money market?
;ecutive Discrimination
ided by Indifference
YORK Religious
inalion in the executive
particularly in banking,
pi, utilities, shipping, auto
nturing, among others
abetted by the "con-
Is failure ot govern-
agencies to curtail
inatory hiring practices,
:ial of the Anti-Defamation
of B'nai B'rith told the
Banking Committee
[Gissen, ADL's national
linations department
r, also noted that federal
es are indifferent to the
of private clubswhich
le from membership certain
and religious groupson
ti vi' level employment.
TREASURY Depart
"dereliction" is not
to its "history of non-
miient in employment
liance," Gissen said,
ing to that agency's
fisibilities to discriminatory
pointed out that a 1977
Jnal Revenue Service
ration specifically states
Ja club "will lose its tax-
P>1 status if its charter, by-
or other governing in-
lent, or any of its written
statements contain a
Ision which allows for
|i mi nation against any
Jn on the basis of race, color,
iigion."
|l. Gissen said, "there is no
iiiiKful or effective en-
promt of this."
IS NO wonder that the!
its of many corporations!
an attitude of cavalier in-1
times to the continuing
pie in of religious
riniination in employment in
executive suite. The in-
li'iuc o( federal agencies to
problem is pervasive."
In' road to the executive suite
[lined with pitfalls for the
ish aspirant," Gissen con-
led, noting that "vast areas of
I'rican enterprise are con-
|uous by the absence of Jews
among the corporate
era."
jissen called "the evil ol
ligious discrimination in
luting ... a national problem,"
lh most bankscommercial
hks are the worst violatot-
Miaving only "'a token
kesentation of Jewish officers"
banks are the worst violators
having only "a token rep-
resentation of Jewish officers."
Newman
Continued from Page 1
show solidarity and strength,"
Mrs. Newman explained.
What can we do? "We must
make our voices heard by con-
tacting our lawmakers. We must
give support morally, physically
and financially."
As the High Holy Days ap-
proach, Mrs. Newman said we
must be determined in our efforts
to keep Israel strong to keep
the American Jewish community
strong. The United Jewish
Appeal, since the 1940's, has
built the State of Israel and seen
to its viability. Support to UJA
must be doubled, according to
Mrs. Newman.
"If you have already made
your 1979 commitment, consider
an additional contribution. If you
have not yet had the opportunity
to make a 1979 gift, do so now. If
your pledge has been made, but
not yet paid, a cash effort
becomes the key for us all.
"Do what you can. Give your
answer to the Arab nations loud
and clear."
These are mere side issues by
comparison.
No matter what Mr. Carter
quotes President Park as having
replied when he asked Park which
evangelist he might prefer to be
contacted by when Carter got
back to Washington and could
make the arrangement, surely it
would be to Park's credit if he
secretly thought Carter a
madman.
THE UPI report concludes:
' 'I don't know what will hap-
pen,' Carter said. 'Now it's in
God's hands.' "
Writing in the New York
Times, Eugene Kennedy, a pro-
fessor of psychology at Loyola
University, analyzes President
Carters energy address as con-
taining "a wind of uncertain
prophecy" and statements "some
imperial and some evangelical."
Kennedy describes Carter as
"the parson" who speaks
solemnly "of oil and sin" and
win), in an effort to eradicate the
sad image of his slipping
executive powers, "mounts the
pulpit to blame the people for the
miscarried innocence of his own
calling: they are to blame for the
fact that he has never understood
them."
ENERGY APART, the
American people "rightfully mis-
trust the easy analyses that
describe Carter's conflict as be-
tween his pastor's heart and his
engineer's mind ." At the
same lime, "the people will not
tolerate indecisiveness, endless
meditation, or an attempt to lay
on them a style of moralizing as
self-serving and inappropriate as
that in a Somerset Maugham
minister."
Undoubtedly, Prof. Kennedy's
is not the last word on the Carter
crisis in the presidency, whether
or not he will be able to carry on
into a second term in office
whether or not he should be per-
mitted to. The debate here, as
everywhere, rages on, only more
fiercely so.
Gore Vidal's superb bon mot
comes to mind: "I'm a born-
again atheist." Vidal hardly
speaks for the nation, but it
would be the better part of
political discretion for Mr. Carter
to remember that religious zeal
must be his private passion, if
that is what he wants.
PRIVATE IS the key. It can
not be his passion as President,
for it has not been a part of the
nation's tradition to hear ser-
mons from the Oval Room
Mount. And if the President
continues to deliver them as his
"solution" to our problems,
domestic and foreign, he courts
disaster for himself. And for all of
us.
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October 15-22 Israel


Paire 'l
Page 10
I he'.lpii>i)ih hlnruiuin and Shntar n't liraater HoUvwood
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
FrThav..
Friday, August 24,1979

Aftereffects of Young's Resignation Are Felt
Continued from Page 1
eration Organization here,
and that he had subse-
Lowery, president of the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference.
quently lied about the
meeting.
THE RIFT in Jewish Black
relations, which traditionally
has been marked by Jewish
leadership and other forms of
contribution to the civil rights
movement, is clearly indicated by
the statement of Rev. Joseph
"We have been allies in our
struggle because of similar
histories," said Lowery. "But
something has happened along
the way."
This observation is mild com-
pared to previous SCLC charges
that Young's resignation was a
"Jewish conspiracy" stemming

feg^Gocfefle
Welcome home to those of you who were lucky enough to
enjoy a summer holiday. For the rest of us, it is always a
vacation to live in Florida.
Every year in late June many of our children leave tearful
but happy parents for summer camp. They travel by bus, train,
car or plane to camps known by such exciting and descriptive
names as Blue Star, White Mountain, Green Briar, Sea Gull,
Ramah. After four or five weeks, parents are invited to travel
1,000 miles or more to attend a five-hour Visiting Day. "Fang"
and I and our oldest son, Michael, flew to Washington, D.C.,
headed for Camp White Mountain in the hills of West Virginia
where Bill was a counselor and Jim, a camper.
In the nation's Capitol we had an escorted tour by Michael
Jobiove, who worked during the summer at the National Science
Foundation. Michael, son of Dr. Louis and Natalie Jobiove, will
soon' have an article published on "Television Coverage of the
Genocide in Cambodia." We met Ted and Joyce Newman, Andy
and Brenda Greenman, Dr. Alan and Ann Lane, Gerald and
Arlene Ray who were also trudging around the Smithsonian.
With the Newmans we visited Morris Amitay, head of AIPAC
(the American-Israel lobby), and we spoke to Sen. Robert Dole
and Sen. Barry Gold water in the Everett Dirk sen Building
corridor. Sen. Richard Stone took time from his busy schedule to
talk to us and discuss the latest political events. Leslie Cornfeld,
daughter of Dr. Bob and Judy Cornfeld, worked as an intern for
Sen. Stone this summer, while Bernard Friedman, son of Dr.
Charles and Sandy Friedman, interned with Congressman Ed
Stack. We lunched with Laura Katz, daughter of Herb and EUie
Katz, who works for Sen. Benson of Texas.
To avoid the gas shortage a bus was chartered to bring over
40 Florida parents from the city into camp. It was a six-hour
roundtrip bus ride and despite the heat, mosquitoes, and remote
rest room facilities, it was worth every minute.
Best wishes to George and Selma Barron on the marriage in
St. Louis of their son, Dr. Bruce Barron to Diane Bluestein. Dr.
Barron, a pediatrician, and his bride now live in Washington,
D.C. while he participates in the Nuclear Medicine Program at
George Washington University.
Congratulations to Dr. Wally and Phyllis Siff on the
graduation of son Steven from the University of Florida. Steven
will enter the University of Miami Law School.
Arnie Seamon, vice president and general manager of the
Doral Hotel and Doral Country Club, and wife Fran moved to
California, where he accepted a new and challenging position as
general manager of the fabulous resort. La Costa. Fran's sister
Ruth and husband Dr. Paul Rodensky are eagerly looking for-
ward to visiting and being pampered at the spas, saunas and
luxuries of La Costa.
Among the well-wishers who bid the Seamons goodbye and
good luck were Dr. Saul and Millie Nitzberg, Estelle Podis,
Harry and Hannah Schorr, just back from Washington, D.C.
and New England, Howard and Eleanor Handleman, Dr. Stoyan
and Tobene Rosenthal, just returned from a Caribbean cruise
aboard their boats. Joyce and Ted Roaman had selected a group
gift of luggage for Fran and Arnie, so that they would be certain
to pay a return visit to Hollywood.
Vacation Notes Many exciting trips were enjoyed by
our friends and neighbors. If you missed some of these folks,
here is where they went. Try to sit patiently through their
stories, slides, and home movies.
Dr. Robert and Elaine Pit tell (she is a travel agent at Lost
Horizons Travel), and daughter Lynn, Holland, Belgium
Allen and Esther Gordon, Belgium, Israel and Spain Mort
and Marria Levin, Dr. Lou and Natalie Jobiove, Dr. Harvey and
Barbara Peretz, Monte Carlo and Southern France Alvin
and Gloria Hess were joined by their son in Tanglewood .
Herb and Ellie Katz cruised the Greek Islands following a trip to
Israel ... Dr. Alfred and Florence Rosenthal, Maine and to a
seminar at Brandeis University.
Dr. Bob and Mimi Sabra, Austria, Switzerland and Paris
where they met Judy Glazer touring the Louvre Mel and
Gloria Friedman cruised the Caribbean and saw former Holly-
wood residents Martha and Lucien Hirschberg in Curacao .
Harry and Edna Swartzman visited California as did Nova
University president, Dr. Abe Fiachler, and attorney wife
Shirley ... Dr. Victor and Femme Hochberg joined the Schorrs
in Washington, D.C. and shared a visit with Harry Schorr's
cousin Eli Wallach while Dr. Bob and Marilee Berger, Herb
and Fran Tobin motored to the nation's capital seeing all the
sights, including Williamsburg, Va. Dr. Joe and Sue Badat
cooled off in the magnificent Canadian Rockies where Jerry and
Delia Rosenberg also chose to spend their vacation. More
vacation news in my next column.
Let's hear what you did this summer or about your simcha.
Write to R.K., c/o Floridian, Jewish Federation of South
Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd.
from the UN Ambassador's
position on the PLO and Pales-
tinian "rights" to the establish-
ment of yet another Palestinian
state on Israeli soil.
WITHIN HOURS after
Young's resignation, Lowery said
at the SCLC annual meeting in
Norfolk, Va., that "We have
always supported the State of
Israel's right to exist, but we
question Israel's relationship
with South Africa."
The confused focus of Rev.
Lowery's charges indicates just
how angry Black leaders are, and
how prone they are to blame
Israel and the American Jewish
community for Young's latest
debacle.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a syn-
dicated columnist and longtime
Black civil rights leader, joined
the charge with statements of his
own about the Carter adminis-
tration's succumbing to
"Zionist" and "Jewish pressure"
which, he said, "surprised" him.
YOUNG, in the wake of his
resignation, did several things
not calculated to soothe the
gathering storm:
He announced that he was
not "a bit sorry" about his
meeting with Terzi, since he
believed he was right;
He resigned only to make
things easier for President
Carter, the implication being that
"Jewish pressure" was so strong
on the President to oust Young
that Young wanted to spare his
boss;
He declared his intentions to
meet Terzi again, or any other
PLO representative, in the future
principally this month
because, resigned or not, as U.S.
Ambassador to the United
Nations, it is Young's turn to
serve as president of the Security
Council, and since President
Carter is delaying the appoint-
ment of a successor. Young will
be completing his term;
He expressed surprise at the
apparent rift in Jewish Black
relations and got on the phone to
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
the Urban League, and Black
mayors across the country.
Young's message to them was
simple and double-edged: "We
trust that this event will not
incite or exacerbate tensions be-
tween the Black and Jewish com-
munities." At the same time.
Young called for a summit con-
ference between leaders of both
communities.
NEWS THAT Young was in
his latest difficulty with the
administration for speaking out
on foreign policy in terms not in
accord with administration policy
was first reported Tuesday. The
meeting between Terzi and
Young on July 26 came to light
because of Israel's complaint to
the State Department on the
basis that America had pledged
to refuse all official contact with
the PLO until the PLO accepted
Israel's right to exist.
What came to light was that
Young had not informed the
State Department or Secretary of
State Cyrus Vance about the
meeting in Terzi's apartment.
This led to speculation about how
Israel knew of the meeting and to
further speculation that Mossad,
the Israeli Secret Service, had
shadowed Young en route to the
meeting.
Complicating the matter
further was Young's confession'
that the meeting did, indeed,
occur, but that nothing "sub-
stantive" had passed between the
two men, a statement which the
State Department promptly
flashed around the world.
WHEN ISRAEL'S UN
Ambassador Yehudah Blum dip-
lomatically suggested that
Young's report of the meeting
was not entirely accurate and
that substantive discussion had,
in fact, taken place, two new
developments followed:
Young admitted that the
Israeli report was correct. At the
same time, he declared that his
meeting with Terzi was arranged
on his own and that he did what
he did "in the best interests of
my country." Young also denied
that he had lied to President
Carter, Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance and the State Department,
declaring, "I didn't lia I didn't
tell the whole truth."
9 Speculation became rampant
about just how Israeli Secret Ser-
vice personnel knew what had in
fact taken place between Terzi
and Young.
IN NEW YORK, Israel's Dep-
uty Prime Minister Yigal Yadin
categorically denied that Israeli
Secret Servicemen were involved,
calling it "rubbish." They are, he
said, given far more credit for
undercover work than, in fact,
they do, to which he added,
"unfortunately."
Young's meeting with the,
Kuwaiti diplomat in his New
York apartment was presumably
to discuss the Kuwait-sponsored
resolution in the United Nations
for a full-dress debate on a Pales-
tinian state scheduled for Aug.
23. The debate was postponed
from July 31 on the request of the
United States, which has already
declared its intention of vetoing
the resolution.
JCC of Hollywood Sets
Fall Program Registration
The Hollywood Jewish
Community Center will hold fall
program registration from
Monday, Sept. 10, through
Wednesday, Sept. 26, according
to Mort Levin, JCC president.
He also announces that many
new programs are listed in the
Fall Brochure now available. The
JCC will preview its new
programs through a "Welcome
Week" (Sept. 10-13 at 7:30 p.m.)
at the JCC and a "Family
Program Sunday" on Sunday,
Sept. 16, at the Hollywood Hills
Elementary School.
"Welcome Week" will start on
Monday evening with
"Children's Nite" and continue
with "Tween Nite" on Tuesday,
"Family Life and Senior Adult
Nite" on Wednesday and "Adult
Program Nite" on Thursday
evening.
On these evenings the JCC will
preview its new programs with
most of the new instructors
available to answer questions.
"Family Program Sunday" will
give families a chance to meet
instructors and see program
demonstrations for all ages on
Sept. 16 from 1 4 p.m.
Some of the new programs
planned are: a tutorial service for
elementary children, arts and
crafts classes, sports clinic and
league in flag football, soccer, T-
ball, tennis and golf.
Programs for teens include a
new Big Brothers-Big Sisters
project with the "Big Brothers"
of Broward County, Term'
Musical Workshop, Teen
Leadership Seminar, S.A.T. Prep
Courses, Spanish Enrichment
Program, Adult Classes in Pen
and Ink, Batik, Diet Workshop,
Dance-A-Cize, Spanish, Bridge,
Disco, Women's Awareness, a
cultural arts series on "The
Jewish Contribution to 20th
Century Culture," an the Family
Life Education Series with mini-
courses by Jewish Family Service
on Parent Effective Training,
Teen Assertiveness Training, the
Single Parent and "his" children
and Dr. and Mrs. Robert Green's
"Couples Communication
Workshop."
Information on the Hollywooa
JCCC's membership can be
obtained by calling the center.
The Hollywood JCC is a
branch of the JCC's of South
Florida.
Day at the Track
Women's American ORT of
Hollybrook will have a day at
("aider Race Track, Monday,
Aug. 27, at 11 a.m. A luncheon is
planned.
Lil Ehrlich is chairman, and co-
chairman is Adele Solomon.
Keep College Students Informed
"College students away at
school often feel cut off from
home town news. The Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
"I South Broward wants to keep
thorn informed by sending The
Jewish Floridian to them, as well
ih planning events for when they
coino home for semester breaks,"
said Ellie Katz, chairman.
If you are interested in taking
part in this program or know of
anyone who would be interested,
contact the Women's Division or
student coordinators, Florie
Brizel or EliseGarris.
AFTER MASTECTOMY
The new Patent KNOCHE NATURAL BREAST PROTHESIS Irom
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UMca\ya><


i nej ewisn r lunuiun 7OTmj7W7BHJ^5WB*BWJCT^B^KF
he News in Brief
^IN Juergen Moellman, a
affairs expert of the Free
ratic Party (FDP), is back
touchy and controversial
the Middle East during
[he had two long meetings
>alestine Liberation Or-
|tion Chief Yasir Arafat in
and Syrian Deputy
Minister Nasser Kad-
> Damascus.
llman. a member of West
ly's Parliament, is a
Wt of Foreign Minister
Jietrich Genscher who is
If a member of the FDP.
)P is the minority coalition
of the ruling Social
bratic Party.
AVIV Defense
Ezer Weizman has
that Palestinian ter-
\me Marketing
ms New Office
tie Marketing of America
ly opened a new full service
rxage office in Fort
rdale. Located at 3461 Gait
Drive, this new facility
li7.es in condominium and
^ront home sales and
ains its own contract
pstration department to
customs in obtaining
pug.
brokerage staff of seven
ales will be
iged by
|e Perkel,
lias worked 1
estate for
years in I
jrt Lauder-
area. She
HMA 114 .
ago after
png nearly
ears selling
rise condo- m / i
is on the
i,e Perkel
lore coming to Fort
brdale, she was a stock-
in New York City. This
she has achieved over
),000 in sales.
M Marketing of America
la, Inc. is a division of
lean Invsco. Inc.____________
rorists are being trained as pilots
in Libya for suicide missions in
which they would crash ex-
plosive-laden planes in Israeli
cities.
Weizman's statement was in
response to a question by
Housing Minister David Levy at
last Sunday's Cabinet meeting as
to whether reports about this new
type of terrorist acts were true.
Weizman confirmed the
reports and added that "we are
preparing ourselves against the
possibility of such attacks."
NORFOLK An order by a
Norfolk traffic court judge to a
Queens rabbi to take of his yar-
mulke stirred widespread
protests against. Judge Vernon
Ililchings from local political and
Jewish officials.
When Rabbi Joshua Sackett
walked into the traffic court last
week to challenge a traffic ticket,
the judge said, "I don't care what
your religion is, no one wears a
hat in my courtroom." The 24-
year-old Queens Village rabbi
complied but said later, "If I had
to do it again, I would have kept
my yarmulke on. I am dis-
appointed by my action. My
people have withstood much
harsher pressure than one
judge."
JERUSALEM Secretary of
Stale Cyrus Vance Monday
telephoned A vital Sharansky to
her Jerusalem apartment to
inquire after her husband,
Anatoly, jailed in a Soviet camp.
Avital told Israel Radio that
Vance had said the U.S. was
expressing its concern to the
Soviets at Anatoly's deter-
iorating medical condition and
doing ils utmost to secure his
release.
TEL AVIV A two-hour
nationwide strike called by the
I lisladrul Monday to protest the
government's cut in subsidies
which Mint basic food prices up
l)> an average of 50 percent,
delayed flights at Ben Gurion
Airport, disrupted banking and
communications and closed down
many large plants.
I lisladrul spokesmen said the
there will be another strike, this
time for an entire day.
JERUSALEM Funeral
services were held Sunday for
David Horowitz, one of Israel's
leading economists, who died in
Jerusalem Friday. He was 80
years old. Horowitz was the first
Governor of the Bank of Israel,
and for years one of the top eco-
nomic advisers to the govern-
ment.
Horowitz was associated with
m a ., n, the economics of the Jewish
11'IT1 pie III the r^neS yishuv in Palestine much before
there was the Bank of Israel or
even the State of Israel. He
arrived in Palestine at the end of
World War I as a halutz. While
emerging as one of Israel's
leading economists, he also
developed a world status as an
economist and humanitarian. He
I strike was fully observed
I throughout the country except
I for the exempted fields, such as
public transportation, El Al and
Arkia Airlines, military instal-
lations and the health services.
Histadrut Secretary General
Yeruham Meshel, who visited
some of the larger factories, told
the workers that the two-hour
strike was a warning to the
government that if it does not
accept the Histadrut's demands
Continued from Page 1
acres of property and is the
temple's fourth home since it was
founded five years ago.
Remodeling should be completed
within the next two years, and
the renovated stables will become
u new sanctuary, kitchen, social
hull and classrooms.
When Rabbi Shoter came to
the synagogue two years ago, the
congregation was made up of 75
families. Since then they have 1
grown in size to almost 200
families and expect to reacn
between 250 and 300 families by
the New Year.
THE RELIGIOUS school
features many programs for
students of all ages. The Early
Childhood Development Program
is for pre-schoolers age 2'/j 5
under the supervision of Ellen
I luilig. Over 30 children attended
the two classes, and September's
enrollment is expected to top 70.
The Sunday School, for children
5 8 years old and the Hebrew
School, for8-13years-old, in-
volves over 100 students.
In conjunction with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward and
the Jewish Community Center,
leisure courses will be taught at
Temple in the Pines starting in
September. These classes are for
both young people and adults
and are offered to anyone in-
terested. The Central Agency for
.Jewish Education (CAJEl, will
also be offering adult education
programs on Monday nights
featuring Hebrew, prayer and
Jewish history.
One of the biggest problems
in this area is the lack of af-
filiation," said Rabbi Shoter.
"People come down here to retire,
bul you can never retire from the
responsibility of Jewish af-
flliutioft-"
won world fame when he
developed the "Horowitz Plan"
for international aid to under-
developed countries.
WASHINGTON The State
>f Israel has awarded the con-
duct for its new Embassy in
Washington to the Blake Con-
struction Co. and work has
Already started on the new
structure at the corner of Reno
Road and Van Ness Street in the
upper northwest section of
Washington. The new bui'.ding,
which will embody suggestions of
both Mediterranean and Middle
Eastern architectural design, is
scheduled for completion in 1980.
Stanley Prill, president of Jhe
I Hake firm, stated
Religious
***
**w*
By Abe Halpera
stion:
11 notice that the Decalogue begins with the
tter Aleph and that the Torah begins with the
tter Bet. Is there a special significance to this
Sincerly yours,
MORLIE GELLIS
Hallandale, Florida
iswer:
The ancient Jewish mystics have always looked
^r hidden meanings in our Scriptures. There are
any legends about what can be deciphered as a
iden meaning which can be found in the
irases, words and even the location of a single
tter of the Hebrew alphabet. .
Following is a brief excerpt from the Legends of
kejews by Louis Ginzberg. (vol. 1, pp. 3-8)
When God was about to create the world by
lis word, the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet
L-scended from the august crown of God where
tiey were engraved with a pen of flaming fire.
fhey stood around God and in reverse order
:>ke and entreated God, "Create the world
rough me." The first to step forward was the
1st letter Tau. It said, "May it be Thy will to
reate Thy world through me, since it is through
ne that Thou will give the Torah to Israel by the
land of Moses."
God refused because the letter Tav will be used
y Him as the sign of death upon the foreheads of
an.
The next letter Shin stepped forward and
entreated God to use the letter Shin to create the
world since God's name Shaddai also begins with
of Shin. Unfortunately however, the Shin is also
the first letter of Shav, lie, and of Sheker,
falsehood, and that incapout that it was the initial
letter of Ra, wicked and Rasha, evil.
Each letter following Resh through Oimel was
also rejected for similar reasons.
After the claims of all these letters had
been disposed of, Bet the second Utter of the
alphabet stepped before the Holy One, Blessed be
He, and pleaded before Him: "O Lord of the
world! May it be Thy will to create Thy world
through me, seeing that all the dwellers of the
world give praise daily unto Thee through me, as
it is said, 'Baruch Blessed be the Lord
forever. Amen and Amen.' "
The Holy One, blessed be He, at once granted
the petition of Bet, and said, "Blessed be he that
comet h in the name of the Lord." And He created
His world through Bet, ad it is said, "Beresheet
Bara Elohim et Hashamaim Vet Haaretz." In the
beginning God created the Heaven and the Earth.
The Aleph, the first letter of the alphabet had
no opportunity to present its plea. However, God
rewarded it later by beginning the Decalogue with
an Aleph. "Anochi Addonai Elohecha." I am the
Lord thy God.
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
c/o Jewish Federations of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BarMtavahs Dlr*tory
JEFFREY GARFIELD
Services will begin at 8 p.m.
Aug. 31 at Temple in the Pines at
9730 Stirling Road. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter will conduct
the service assisted by Jeffrey
Qui field, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Gurfield of Pembroke Pines, who
will chant portions of the liturgy.
Following the services, Mr.
and Mrs. Garfield will sponsor
lite Oneg Shabbat in honor of
their son. Jeffrey, becoming a
Bur Mitzvah.
Sal ilia ih morning services
Sept. 1 will commence at 9 a.m.
with Rabbi Shoter and Cantor
Bernurd Kneel officiating.
During the Torah service, which
will commence at 10 a.m., Jeffrey
will become Bar Mitzvah by
chanting the blessings over the
Torah as well as chanting a
portion of the Haftorah. He will
receive the charge and blessings
from Rabbi Shoter; and
presentations will be made of a
certificate by temple president,
Sidney Schreidell and gifts by
representatives of the Sisterhood
and Men's Club.
Jeffrey is a eigth grade honor
student at Pines Middle School.
His interests include swimming,
reading and animals. His future
umilion is to become a
veterinarian.
The kiddush following the
Sabbulh morning services will be
sponsored by Mr. and Mrs.
Gurfield in honor of their son.
SCOTT KINSBRUNNER
Mincha, Sabbath afternoon
services will be held at 7 p.m. on
Saturday afternoon. During the
Torah service, Scott Allen
Kinsbrunner, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Woody Kinsbrunner, will be
called to the Torah, where he will
become a Bar Mitzvah.
Scott is an eigth grade student
at Pioneer Middle School and a
member of the National Honor
Society. His interests include
baseball and golf.
Mr. and Mrs. Kinsbrunner will
sponsor Seudah Sh'lisheet
following services. The Sabbath
will come to a close with the
Maariv service and the
traditional Havdalah.
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Lebowitz Cantor Maurice
A.Neu. _.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
S7tti St. Conservative. Rabbi I vast
Zimmerman. (44 A)
UBW*
|TEMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plofkln.
Cantor Yahudeh Heilbraun. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
'TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School. 200 NW Douglas Rd Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd.. Hollywood. Conservative Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob HIM Rd. Rabbi
SheON J.Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger.(12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18101 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shu Ikes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Relorm. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistdnt Ben Romer. (45)
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
Conservative. Rabbi Morton
St.
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAi I 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried-
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naftaly A Linkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Fraiin
Cantor Phyllis Cole. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
. Bomzer. ($2)
Levitt
memorial chapel
1S21 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. Fla.
9217200
Sonny Levitt, F.O.
13385SW DixieHwy
North Miami, Fla.
94M315
12k_
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Vemple 3etkl
Wemotial
(jatdeiu
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
for information call: 920-0225 or wrHoi
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 33020
Please send me literature on the
NAME. ___________________
ADDRESS:
PHONE:


EVMau tnmnt 94 1979
Page 12
The Jewish Fbridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 24.1979
7
rets coupon
BUY ONE,
GET ONE
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Prtdr
FIICOUfON
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up $390 = "^" Si
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FREE COUPON
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PRICES COOO THURS
AUC. 23 thru WED. AUG 29
AT All STORES FROM
FT. FIERCE TO KEY WEST
80 ONE
a- MM
GET ONE
FREE E
TO
10 COUNT ENVELOPE FOIY IAC
REDEEM ONE OR All COUPONS
WITH THE SAME S7 ORDER
OR MORE OF OTHER PRODUCTS
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES
AND FREE COUPON ITEMS.
TIDE SS PANTRY PRIDE
LAUNDRY DETERGENT 5 ICED TEA MIX
U.S.D.A. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY
Beef Rib Steak
SMALL END BONELESS
i"-"*! $949
IS.
3
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U.S.D.A. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY
REEF HADE
FLORIDA SHIPPED
Premium Fresh
L0TS4 CHICKEN

>3 ARE AST QTRS
WITH BACKS
3 LEG QTRS
WITH BACKS
3 GIBLET PKGS
n
U.S.D.A. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY BEEF CHUCK
Shoulder Steak-^17?
U.S. CHOKE FRESH VALLEY
BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Shoulder
ESS J10"*
E=3$169
IB.
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY
BEEF BLADE
Chuck Roast
$139
IB.
Kt RBI IBB II _
Fryer Quarters .....u. 69
ham a ioii
Cornish Hens_____u 79
CAM -IOZIM
Turkey Drumsticks .tV
Turkey Burger........_u. *1*
W 1 CMOKI IMSM lllll' [J-J 111.)
Beef Stew________u. $1M
MW IHUNt IIOZIM IOAS1
Lamb Shoulder___u. $109
f Afttf '! FROZE*
Steak-Umm's 2 ft $549
caivoima cats* amo oumcmt eim.
Hearts______2 J.69'
Chuck
Steak
M49
IB
1
FRESH-BRIGHT t LEAN
Ground Chuck
2 TO
3 IIS.
4189
1
IB.
ONf
79*
AM
Jumbo Towels
NOITMllN WMRTI Ot AiSOt'C
Bath Tissue 4 SS 99*
ASSOt'lt PlAVOtS
Hawaiian Punch tS 65*
CHIN ClAMT mOU HIMi
NibletsCorn SS 39*
BBM I
Brown Mustard 22 69*
MOtSTUClIIMC
Caress Soap 2V.ti* 89*
5' S MTU6IMT
Lux Liquid 'if.1 79*
CAIUIU
Panty Shields <% M73
5 .:69<
RICH AND FLAVORFUL
Extra Large 27 Size
CANTALOUPES
MBS III "IOIIM UTTll IAIS
Corn on Cob 8 A 99*

.iCMTT M>CM IIOZIN CMOCOlAn
Cream Pie__
ASSOCtW >IA05
Sealtest Sherbet SSSJ
SAtWTO 'tOZlM
Cheese Pizza
$179
FULL OF JUICE AND FLAVOR
PICK FROM A LOOSE DISHAY
Nectarines
2
$
Stxoiu "Deli "DtpvttmtMl
M' AT STOMS atiIh Ul.<| OU> COUNtll
Aa MATS 1 CHUM U1CI0 IO OlOfl
THORN APPLE VALLEY
Liverwurst
U >. MO I A
Potatoes _5
'* niM SMO-wMn
Cauliflower ma. 79*
>i MASl CHIN
Cabbage-----------u 1 4*
KM M tUNIIALS LAIM 14 UZII
Fla. Avocados ..59*
AKI O* MASM
Yellow turnips-a. 19*
U.l. MO I All lutlOU '*** *OU OWM
Yellow Onions .21*
o uiom* ami rants > iM
jEggplants-------. 29*
I run iMswiiriMO M.nnun
Juice........ ,, $lw
CAl VO II.MO VI1U Al C .
Large Prunes ^.79*
'IS- CUT SSOITID COtMl HOKII
Bouquet *.*! **
tiot
Egg Bread .......2 VS,r95*
RANTiT FIlM
AUNTIANNT
Apple Strudel__SS 89*
"' MUM IKNK A HAM
Hot Dog Rolls
AMUt HICH XNK HAMIMCfl OI
JS 49*
99
SUGAR FREE TAB. FRESCA SPRITE,
MR. PIBB OR REGULAR SPRITE. MR. PIBB OR
COCA-COLA
TROPICANA
GRAPEFRUIT CCv
juice rssDO
ami.. MIM NATUtAl JIICID J
Swiss Cheese US 99*
AMT>* 101
07
SIC
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II
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Turkey Roll__
AUCUSI IIO'MIS
Jewish Rye____Sff 65*
AIMCMO
Chickens_____
1"
HIHIW UIKWU 10
Salami
IIIWT I
MAVU Sl*
----II
Potato Salad.
1
59*
PACK
12-OZ.
CANS
Nof Available in ft pierce
PANTRY PRIDE ALL GRINDS
COFFEE
Cream Cheese
KtAII NfUfCHATft
Cream Cheese___!S8
KMMN C04OMJD CMWAI
Longhorn________IS
69*
75*
Ml
& 75(
SIVE YOUR PINK REGISTER TAPES FOR
iaii loumi .
Margarine____
aniit MM MIAT OI 1 4f
Beef Bologna_____*.
WHCHfOtSMAtS ....
Claussen's Plcklee0yA",r
okai math Mai oa mm ...
Bologna__________ M*
Salami or Bologna&'l"
.Mil.CAM lOWMI AO
Franks_________SS *!**
/
777?
TWIN SHEET
YYITH "JSO IN
PINK TAPES

All SEASON NON AllERGENIC
THERMAL BLANKET
FREE
Sealtest
COTTAGE CHEESE
I WITH 'ISO IN
PINK TAPES
'ALSO AVAIL ABIE
IN DOUBLE OUf EN
AND OK SIZE
SHfETS CHOOSE FROM
THREE COLORS IN
SHEETS AND MATCHING
PILLOWCASES.
ITEM PINK TAPES ITEM
PINK TAPES
OFFER ENDS OCTOBER 17. \m
TWIN SHffT
DOUBLE SHEET
QUEEN SHEET
KING SHEET
JSO
'325
'ISO
'SSO
REG PILLOWCASES hi. ,
KING PILLOWCASES -co.
THERMAL BLANKET
PIUS SALES TAX
MS
27$
'JSO
PLAIN
AND
FLAVORS
12-OZ.
CUP
',TT!C
FOR HKl DETAILS VISIT TOUR NEARBY PANTRY PRIDE TODAY
ITEMS ALSO AVAILABLE WITHOUT TAPES AT SPECIAL PRICES
RICH'S SLICED
Chicken Breast te*l
09
pk*.
Wl BJBflM THE RIGHT TO MS* QUAMTmtS. NONE SOU) TO OCAUBS. NOT BBSPOMEBU FOR TVPOGBAPNKAl


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