The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00330

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
WINNIPEG (JTA) A Canadian
Orthodox rabbi told a world conference
on smoking and health here that he
regarded smoking as a destructive and
suicidal act and therefore forbidden by
Jewish religious law.
Rabbi Reuven Bulka of Ottawa made
that statement in a presentation to the
1,500 delegates from 60 countries at-
tending the Fifth World Conference on
smoking and health. Bulka said, "One is
not permitted to destroy life, life being a
gift of God entrusted to us, rather than
being ours."
Smoking defies
Jewish law,
rabbi states
He added that "the biblical exhor-
tation 'But for your own lifeblood I will
require a reckoning' (Genesis 9:5) applies
to any suicidal act. Cigarette smoking
undoubtedly belongs in that category."
He maintained that anything injurious
to health is forbidden.
"Because life is sacred, even in-
tentionally placing oneself in danger is
also explicitly prohibited" by Jewish
law. Bulka cited the inclusion by the
sage Maimonides of many banned ac-
tions, "including drinking from un-
Continued on Pag* 2
T Jewislb Floridlao.
___ and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 13 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 19.1983
f-tdSnochrl
Price 35 Cents


rjA boss
\to keynote
JFSB's
retreat
The United Jewish Ap-
peal's top worker in Ameri-
ca, Irving Bernstein, will be
| keynote speaker Sunday,
' Aug. 28, as the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward
conducts in Board Leader-
ship Retreat.
The 40th annual session
is to run 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
Hollywood Beach's Holi-
day Inn, 4000 S. Ocean
Drive.
In addition to Bernstein, exec-
utive vice president of UJA,
other featured speakers include
Harry B. Smith, former president
<>f the Jewish Federation of
(ireater Miami, who will concern
himself with Legacies & Endow-
ments; and Jane Sherman, of
Detroit, chairman of the United
Israel Appeal's Project Renewal
effort.
The morning session is to be
devoted entirely to local matters,
leading off with Dr. Philip Levin,
Irving Bernstein
I Federation president, who will
take board members through
highlights of the 1982-83 UJA
Federation year and delineate
expectations and plans for 1983-
84.
L Next, EMe Katz, chairman of
I Planning and Budget, is to ex-
plore issues facing the South
Broward community and the
impetus and ability of the Feder-
ation to meet those issues and
Continued on Page 11
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^. JEWISH BOOK MONTH If you read
the above poster carefully, nearly all the
information you'll need to celebrate
Jewish Book Month is there. This Jewish
Welfare Board [JWB] poster plus
another one for children is available
through the New York-based service
organization, which is a recipient agency
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. Jewish Book Month fa Oct. 30
through Nov. 30.
Budget
reaches
impasse
10% cut sought
after devaluing
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet ended its ses-
sion early this week with-
out approving any of the
budget cuts proposed by
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor or those recom-
mended by a ministerial
Cabinet committee.
The Cabinet was sched-
uled to continue its assess-
ment of the proposed cuts
at special meetings later in
the week.
Last week the government
moved to cool an overheated
economy by cutting the value of
the shekel by 7 percent. It is
moving to cut spending 10 per-
cent.
Compared to the U.S. dollar,
57 shekels are needed now, as op-
posed to 53 the day before the de-
valuation. This means Israeli
products are more attractive on
the foreign market and imports
are more dear at home.
The major difficulty in the
talks was the Treasury's demand
that defense be slashed by 20 bil-
lion shekels.
Defense Minister Moshe Areas
is fighting hard against proposed
cute and has told his Cabinet col-
leagues that he would insist on a
Continued on Page 2
Site writes so U.S. Jews can
see Israel's true nature
By USA HOSTEIN
Of the Jewish Exponent
Most American Jews do not want to
acknowledge that the character of Israel is
changing. But Ruth Shamir thinks they should,
and her new novel helps to get the message
across.
All Our Vows is the story of Miri, a woman
who leaves her comfortable American life to
return to Israel and her roots. Although many of
the people and the places she remembers still
exist, much has changed.
Her image of the dream for which Israel's pioneers
struggled during those pre- and poet-independence days is
quickly shattered as she encounters the reality of mixed
ideologies and attitudes that have enveloped the country.
Shamir, a lawyer who shuttles back and forth with her
family between homes in Los Angeles and Tel Aviv, aays
the story line of her book is not autobiographical although
"everyone's work reflects their personality." As one who
grew up in Israel during the struggle for independence and
has seen the changes, Shamir says she shares many of
Miri's thoughts, emotional conflicts and soul-searching.
The inspiration for the book came after the Yom Kippur
War in 15r73, which is a major focus of the novel. That war
Continued on Page 8


,.-T~


The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. August 19,1983

Page 2 The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HoUywooa -
JCC starts program so dad, kids can be together
More than 80 fathers already
are enrolled with their children
(aged 6-10) in a new Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Brow-
aid program called Macabee and
Macabett.
According to Abe lAvil Levy,
an organizer of the group, the
idea behind the activity is to
enable fathers "to devote exclu-
sive quality time to their children
... it's the "child's night out with
daddy.' "
Levy says groups of 10 fathers
and their children are forming
tribes throughout Greater Holly-
wood. Pembroke Pines and
Cooper City to meet once a
month for a planned function.
One example of such an ac-
tivity would be a visit to a fire
station, where the youngsters go
on the fire tracks, put on ths
large black boots and the hats,
and see how the station operates.
Similar trips to Castle Park, a
courthouse and a police station
are planned. Levy says
Twice a year all the tribes
gather for a II campout.
. Levy, an Israeli born the same
year as the State of Israel, is a
stockbroker at Advest and the
father of two. He and his wife.
Barbara, a nurse at Hollywood
Medical Center, became inter-
ested in the JCC-sponsored
program because of their son,
Harold. 7'..
Their other child. Miriam. 4.
will be eligible for the program in
two years. The Levys are five-
year residents of the Hollywood
area.
A meeting of all interested par-
ents will be Aug. 30 at 7 p.m at
the JCC, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.
For more information, call Levy
at 466-1800 or the JCC at 921-
6511.
JCC executive galas 2 posts
Paris marks anniversary
of Jewish Quarter violence
PARIS (JTA) President
Francois Mitterrand was to
attend a ceremony last weak to
mark the first anniversary of the
terrorist attack in Rue des
Hosiers in the old Jewish quarter
of this city during which six
people were killed and more than
20 were wounded.
Elysee sources said Mitterrand
planned to personally pay tribute
to the victims of the ceremony
which was to be held outside Jo
Goldenberg s restaurant, where
the attack took place
The ceremony was organized
by the Representative Council of
Major French Jewish Organiza-
tions (CRIFl whose president.
Theo Klein, said that such a com-
memoration is necessary to help
prevent a possible renewal of ter-
rorism and racist attacks-
Most French political parties
and major non-Jewish organiza-
tions also planned to be repre-
sented at the ceremony
According to a recent public
opinion poll, an overwhelming
majority of French people believe
that another anti-Semitic attack,
similar to the one in the Rue des
Rosier*, could take place.
Budget
reaches
stalemate
Coatiaued from Page 1
Cabinet decision, implying that
the responsibility for the defense
budget cuts should be borne by
all the ministers, not by just him-
self alone.
Areas was quoted as saying.
The choice is between our stan-
dard of living and liie itself
Some observers interpreted this
to mean that Areas fek the pro-
posed $20 billion cut would
""pair and thereby endanger tne
nations vital defence needi
Treasury and Defense Ministry
representatives were to meet in
informal sessions to try to bralge
the differences between Arens
and the Treasury
Areas has indicated that he
was willing to alow a 66 billion
cut. but no more.
Aridor has also called for cuts
in the budget of other ministries.
including Health and Social Wel-
fare. Education. Transportation
and Communications
The ministerial Economic
Committee approved a package
of economic cuts m thai area
However a fight is kwming
between Education Minister
Zevulur. Hammer and the Treas-
ury hammer is abroad on vaca
uan. but he has let it be known
that be wu. not accept an assaiut
on presecondarv ecucatior whicn
a*- coosntcrs one of thts goverr
BBCaU s ma to" acruevemenic
1 t*t Fmanc*' Ministry proposal
called "-
tiasR boAr
Of those polled. 68 percent said
such an attack can take place at
any time and 56 percent said
France is the likeliest terrorist
target in Western Europe.
The poll found that 27 percent
of those interviewed believe that
the Arab states sometimes en-
courage the terrorists and 9 per-
cent fek that Israeli actions
spark terrorist reprisals. The poll
was carried out to mark the anni-
versary of the Rue des Rosiere
attack.
Meanwhile. Prime Minister
Pierre Mauroy showed up at Gol-
denberg's restaurant together
with a half dozen of his closest
aides for a traditional Jewish
meal complete with gefilte fish,
chopped liver and the special of
the day." goldene yoich." chicken
soup.
Mauroy said his visit to the
restaurant was not just a gas-
tronomic outing but a symbolic
gesture "to show that terrorism
cannot stop traditional Jewish
activities and that life goes on
unimpaired (in the old Jewish
quarter)"
After the meal, the premier
walked along the Rue des Rosiers
fcirig hands with the local in-
habitants and assuring them that
the government is doing all it can
to protect them
Eleanor Bernstein, director of
Senior Adult Center for the Jew-
ish Community Centers of South
Broward. has been elected to the
board of directors of Jewish
Family Service and the Broward
Handicapped Meals on Wheels
be.
Mrs. Bernstein is also regional
delegate to the Florida Associa-
tion of Senior Centers.
The Jewish Community Senior
Center services more than 3,000
seniors annually with a myriad of
services recreation, hot kosher
lunch, health support services,
transportation, day care center
for the frail-elderly
The center is a recipient of
funds from Jewish Federation of
South Broward, Area Agency of
Aging of Broward County and
United Wsy.
Federation forms
Spanish Division
Brandeis women seeking books
The Hollywood chapter of
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee again this
year is collecting books for its
book sales to benefit the univer-
sity
Paperbacks, cook books, dic-
tionaries, children's books, art
books, mysteries and Westerns
are needed for the sales Oct. 18 at
the Hollywood Fashion Mall and
for a five-day sale in March at the
Hollywood Mall.
The tax-deductible contribu-
tions may be arranged by calling
458-8176 or 454-8081.
Smoking
Coatiawed from Page 1
covered water, lest a snake has dropped
venom into the water.'
The rabbi noted that the issue of
whether smoking is forbidden has been
subjected to various halachic
pronouncements. all of them
discouraging smoking but not
unanimous on whether smoking is. in
fact, halachicaliy prohibited.
Bulka. in a comment to The Canadian
Jewish News, said he feit the am-
bivalence in the Orthodox community on
an outright ban stemmed from the fact
that many key Jewish leaders are
themselves smokers.
If you are Jewish and Hispan-
ic, a new division just established
by the Jewish Federation of
South Broward might be both
helpful and informative. -
According to Susen Grossman,
chairman of the Federation's new
division. "The idea is to locate
and draw together Jews in South
Broward who have ties to His-
panic heritage. We don't even
know the size of the Hispanic
population in South Broward"
The Federation is planning to
set up programs especially
designed to help Spanish-des-
cended newcomers to South
Broward become oriented to their
new Jewish community.
Various speakers are being
lined up to address this as-yet-
disorganized group of new and
nearly new Americans.
Co-chairmen of the new divi-
sion are Margarita Terkiel. Hay
dee Jacubowicz and Lily Flemen
baum.
If you would like to become in
volved. or know someone who
would, call the Federation at 921
8810. or write: Jewish Federation
of South Broward. 2719 Holly
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. Fla
33020.
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Friday. August 19. J983
The Jewish Floridign and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Page 3
nside Hod Hasharon
Renewal team
visits typical
neighborhoods
By MARILYN GRANT
"Where do we stand now that the project is into its third
year?" This question centralized the discussions during the'
recent Project Renewal Chairman's Mission in Israel.
Led by Dr. Howard Barren, Project Renewal chairman of
South Broward, the delegation consisted of lay leaders Ted
Newman, Marc Gilbert and Dr. Saul Singer, and professionals
Sumner Kays, Beverly Bachrach and Michael J. Moskowitz.
The intensive four-day sessions ran from early morning until
late in the evening. Kicked off by Gideon Witkon, the new
national director of Project Renewal in Israel, the mission in-
cluded visits on the first day to three different typical neigh-
borhoods, one reaching the phasing out process, a second in
serious trouble and a third just about to be integrated into the
program.
Each area presented its own problems and challenges and the
interchange between executives, lay leaders and professionals
was exhilarating.
The sessions covered the broad spectrum of community in-
volvement, volunteer programs, economic development, and
how to properly present the Project Renewal concept to each
local U.S. community.
One day was given over to individual visits to each Project
Renewal neighborhood. The visit to Hod Hasharon's Giora and
Gil Amal communities (South Broward's sister cities) started
with a far-reaching general discussion at the Senior Citizens'
building in the latter neighborhood.
Visits were made to the day care center in Giora where 46
children from age 6 months to 3 years receive a full day's care in
a building that was designed to accommodate 30 and will be
evacuated as soon as a new building can be funded and built.
On the other side of the coin, our 12 delegates saw the newly
completed Sports Hall-in Gil Amal, which is used for many
activities; they also visited the site of an Enrichment Center,
which is to provide additional learning opportunities and day
care facilities for children in Gil Amal.
The trip continued across town to Giora. (One of the great
difficulties facing these two Project Renewal communities is
their distance from the center of town and their even greater
distance from each other Gil Amal is about two miles to the
east of the center and Giora about three miles to the west.)
There we visited the recently refurbished community hall and
saw the individual classrooms for after-school tutoring and club
Activities. Dinner was in the beautifully decorated (with their
own handwork) Senior Citizens' center, and one of the high spots
of the evening was being entertained by the quartet of young
women from Giora whose singing made such a hit on their last
visit to the Hollywood area.
These four young women are about to enter their last year of
high school arid then the army. Ronit, one of the quartet, said to
us:
This voice training we've received because of the project has
given me a great chance to get into the entertainment unit in the
army. If this happens, maybe I'll be able to make a career of
singing."
The implications are clear, Project Renewal can make a big
difference in many people's lives.
Our involvement is helping make that happen.
LET THERE BE AIR Tel Aviv University Prof. Mocdechsd
Sokolov operates his new automobile air conditioning system
which uses an auto engine's heat to fuel its operation.
Obviously still in the engineering stage (look at Ha size), the
system uses an absorption refrigeration cycle, taking heat from
the engine with no strain on the motor. The invention has been
patented in Israel, the United States and England.
Tourism
rockets
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Tourism from the United States
to Israel is breaking all records,
according to Moshe Shoshani, Is-
rael's new commissioner for
tourism to North America. "We
welcomed 30 percent more Amer-
ican visitors this May and 46 per-
cent more in June than in the
same months of 1962.
"Overall, we expect to end
1983 with some 320,000 Ameri-
can tourists visiting the country,
16 percent more than last year
... we have already surpassed
the previous record set in 1960."
Discussing the tourism figures,
Shoshani said that quite apart
from the surge of travelers
visiting Europe, there is a
growing perception amongs
Americans that Israel is an excit-
ing, interesting and enjoyable
country to visit over and
above the country's "traditional"
religiouis and historic attrac-
tions.
167 free In July
NEW YORK (JTA) In July,
167 Jews were allowed to leave
the Soviet Union with Israeli
visas, the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry reported. The figure
is higher than the monthly
average of approximately 100
people per month during the first
half of 1983.
Israel predicted to become
granary of the Middle East
NEW YORK (JTA) A
vision of Israel in the year 2000
as the granary of the Middle East
thanks to the revolutionary use
of desert conditions and exten-
sive land reclamation for agricul-
ture is projected by Dr. Samuel
Cohen, executive vice president
of the Jewish National Fund of
America.
In a report to more than 100
JNF national and regional execu-
tives attending an annual fund-
raising conference here, Cohen
stated that by 2000 Israel will be
well on its way to becoming an
"economically independent oasis
of peace."
Citing the extensive land-
reclamation achievements of the
JNF, which will be 99 years old in
the year 2000, Cohen based his
prediction on current statistics
and trends.
He predicted that by 2000 over
236 million trees throughout
Israel will have been planted,
adding to the cover of green and
network of forests now dotting
the country.
JNF's aforestation program
has until now been responsible
for the planting of 160 million
trees. Planting continues apace
at the rate of almost five million
trees a year, Cohen said.
He pointed out that the JNF
Continued on Pace 8
Chapel worker
'Outstanding
oung Man'
A new resident of Hollywood
ps t>een chosen to be included in
1983 edition of Outstanding
loung Men of America.
1 Steven R. Fischman of Atlanta
et, a district manager for
Pyerside Memorial Chapels.
flistinguished himself in volun-
py service to the community,
Pth professional leadership,
ademic achievement, business
Pvancement, cultural accom-
lishments and civic and political
^ticipation."
I fischman, in charge of the
[uardian Plan of funeral prear-
>ngement at Riverside, is vice
hsident of the South Florida
[nai B'rith Council and past
Sident of the Sports Lodge.
"e is a member of the Fund-
l>ng Cabinet for B'nai B'rith
fd ls editor of two B'nai B'rith
Fblicationa. In addition, he has
Pn active with the Jaycees on
I'ami Beach.
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3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
We Appreciate Your Business
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
STATE OF
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Oration Toll Free (800)221-48381

- f -


Page 4
^''^aa^BaaBBBBB^^^^^^^^^
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of (heater Hollywood

Friday. August 19,1983
Jewish Floridian
CFmdSttochM
FHCOSMOCMCT STEVEKATON SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and u6Nanar Aaaoclata Editor Eaacvttva Edrto.,
ubaaftad m Waakty Sacond Ctaaa MM paid at Haliandala. Fla. US*S StajOO
HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDAUE OFFiCt Am. Sannga 1800 1Mb, 2900 E. HaMandaW Baacn
Stud.. Suit* 707Q. Haliandala. Fla. MOOS. Wwna 181 OSM
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Mam Offloa a Plant: 120 NE am St.. Miami. Fla. 33132Phona 1-373-atOS
aaairFaiaia7liaami>aJaa*HirtSia.0.aaatT-aWX.Ia^a.W1
Jawian Fadaratlon oi South Broward omcarc Piaaldant: Or. Ptniip A Lavtn. vica Praaldann: Or.
Saul Slnoar. Tad Naaanan and Nat Sadiay. Traaaurar Or Howard Barron. Sacratarjr Otio
Stwoar. Exacuth* Duaclor Sumnar Q. Kaya. Submit malarial tor publication to Stava Katon,
uaociata editor
Maaahar JTA. Saaaa Ana. WNS, NCA. AJPA, and FWL
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Araa S3.90 Annual (2 Yaar Minimum 7). ex oy mamoaraMp Jaanat
Out of Toon Upon Raouaat
The
Lomza
Yeshiva
Friday. August 19.1983
Volume 13
10 ELUL 6743
Number 17
'Bad blood' not needod
Reagan team urged
not to punish Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Harry Hurwitz, who returned to
Jerusalem last week after three
years as Israel's minister of
Information here, is urging the
Reagan administration "not to
punish Israel when there may be
some disagreement" between
Washington and Jerusalem.
"This wrapping over the
knuckles, withholding, releasing,
sending, not sending, is some-
thing that causes bad blood,"
Hurwitz told 50 Christian leaders
who attended a luncheon to bid
him farewell as he leaves to take
up his new post as adviser to
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
on diaspora affairs.
The minister said there was no
need for this kind of behavior by
the United States toward Israel
because the strength of the
Israeli-US. alliance lies in their
"ability to remain together in
times of difficulty. "
Hurwitz said that during his
three years here, Israel has been
villif ied as never before in history
and blamed this on the "manipu-
lation" of the media. But he said
that Israel's image has improved
now and the reasons he said are
that the policies of the govern-
ment of Israel are at last being
understood.
A close friend of Begins since
1947 and author of a biography of
the prime minister, Hurwitz
urged the administration to
understand that Begin "is the
most honorable gentleman in the
world; he does not tell lies and he
does not deceive."
Harry Hurwitz
Hurwitz said he will take back
to Israel the knowledge that
Israel is not alone but is
strengthened by the American
Jewish community and its
friends in the Christian com-
munity.
In his new post as an adviser to
Begin, Hurwitz replaces Yehuda
Avner. who was named ambas-
sador to Britain. Hurwitz and his
wife made aliya to Israel in 1978
from South Africa where he had
been editor of the Jewish Herald
for many years. He came to
South Africa aa a boy from
Latvia.
By ABBA BEN YAMIN
(Hebrew name for Abe Hal pern I
Following the pogrom in Itchnya (the small
village in the Ukraine where I was born and grew
up), the entire Jewish population moved out. Half
went to Konotop, a nearby large city in the
Chernigov region.
My mother chose to go with the rest to Prilulri.
It was closer to Itchnya and. in addition, a cousin
lived there. (Jewish Floridian, June 24July 8,
p.4.)
Our cousin was married to a much older man, a
wealthy widower with seven children. They also
had four children together, making a family of 11
children.
They had a very large home with an orchard
and garden on the outskirts of the city. His
business, a cotton-gin mill, was on the premises
where he employed about a dozen men.
Although our cousin invited us to stay with
her, my mother, a very independent woman,
chose to rent an apartment closer to the center of
the city. It was in a house which opened out onto
a courtyard. We had many neighbors, both
Christian and Jewish.
She immediately established herself with a
small stand in the market, selling shawls, dress
fabrics and necklaces which she received on
consignment.
Priluki was a part of thegubernia (state) of
Poltava. Sholom Aleichem, the Yiddish writer,
was born in the nearby small village of
Pereyaslov.
Sholom Aleichem (1859-1916) immortalized the
cities and villages of the area in his writings. For
instance, Pereyaslov he called Kasrilovkeh and
Kiev he called Yehupetz
Priluki was much larger than Itchnya. The
Jewish population of three thousand to four
thousand lived among a Christian population of
40 thousand to 50 thousand. There were many
churches and four synagogues. The largest, near
the center of town, was considered the main
synagogue.
During the next several years our life was very
difficult. The area was stabilized under a com-
munist dictatorship which began Nov. 7,1917.
For a while the Germans occupied the area.
Soldiers and officers were housed in different
homes. Even in our modest two-room apartment
we had a German officer living with us. The
German occupation was benign. They shared
their cigars with the men and some provisions
with us.
My older brother became apprenticed to a
jeweler and my younger brother was enrolled in a
cheder. I was enrolled as a student in the Lomza
Yeshiva.
The Lomza Yeshiva, housed in one of the
smaller synagogues, was a branch of the world
famous Lomza Yeshiva. The city of Lomza, a
part of Poland, is about 100 miles northeast of ~
Warsaw. During the fighting in '17 and '18, a part
of the yeshiva was moved to Priluki.
Many of the students and rabbis were moved
with the yeshiva However, the yeshiva also
accepted students from the area.
The yeshiva had three classes. In the first class
the students were beginning the study of the
Talmud. Most of them were my age (12 or 13). A
rabbi was guiding and teaching the students who
were studying the text in Hebrew and Aramaic
and translating it into Yiddish.
The middle class was for advanced students. a*
The method was different. A rabbi would assign
several pages of the tractate. The students were '
required to study the entire assigned pages in
advance by themselves and be prepared to in-
terpret and discuss them.
Rashi's and other commentaries were included
in the assignment. In a few days the rabbi would
meet with the class and call upon the students at
random to discuss and interpret any part of the
text and explain it in his own words.
For a number of years I had studied the
Talmud with the rabbi of Itchnya, as his only
student. Following an examination I was ac-
cepted into the middle class.
The students in the upper class were engaged in
the study of the Talmud for many years and were
being prepared for their ordination.
In addition to the study of the Talmud, all
students participated three times dairy in ser-
vices. Saturday afternoons were devoted to a
seminar led by students of the upper class.
Between Passover and Rosh Hashanah every
Saturday afternoon we also recited and discussed
one chapter of the Pirke A vot (The Sayings of the
Fathers).
Most of the students came from the Lomza
region. They were given lodging in different
Jewish homes. Meals were provided by a custom
prevalent in every yeshiva throughout Europe a'
that time, known in Yiddish n&essen teg (eating
days). 11 was an ingenious idea of providing food
for every student in seven different homes for
every day of the week.
Rabbi Itzhak had the responsibility of
providing these homes. It was a monumental
task. However, the Jewish families of the area
cooperated. Some of the area students slept at
home and some also ate at home.
Even though I lived at home with my mother
and brothers I was provided with seven homes for
my three meals a day. Once in a while Rabbi
Itzhak had to change days for various reasons.
However, all students ate well, albeit not every
Continued on Page 8
Aid to Israel not gift but investment
By MORRIS J. AM IT AY
There has been much discussion in Washington
of a lengthy General Accounting Office (G AO) re-
port on U.S. aid to Israel.
The GAO, which serves as a congressional
"watchdog" on government spending went into
great detail analyzing the U.S. foreign assistance
to Israel and its relationship to Israel's economy,
defense production and future debt burden
among other issues. In doing so, it sometimes bat
sight of some basic truths regarding American
assistance to Israel's armed forces.
This aid is not a gift it is a vital contribution
to the national interests of the United States in
maintaining peace in the Middle East and in
checking both Soviet and radical expansion in the
entire region.
The current $2' i billion level of aid can easily
be defended if one realizes the enormous benefits
which accrue to the United States from this rela-
tively modest assistance 1 percent of our own
defense budget.
Israel has strengths and capacities unique to
the Middle East, and among them are a commit-
ment to democracy, proven military capabilities
and reliability as an ally. From this there flows
the premise that a strategic partnership with Is
rael would enhance U.S. influence in the region
and promote America's global goals.
The Memorandum of Understanding signed by
Israel and the United States in November 1981
although very general, acknowledged this for
mallv for the first time Thi agreement, however.
was unilaterally suspended by the United States
without ever being implemented after Israel's an-
nexation of the Golan Heights.
This was done as if to "punish" Israel as if
the agreement was only for Israel's benefit. It
also demonstrated the administration's taking
Israel for granted. Actually, given the identity of
interests between the two countries, the United
States can rely on Israel, as it has in the past. But
unless concrete arrangements for military cooper-
ation are worked out in advance, when a crisis
erupts in the region, valuable time and Ameri-
can lives could be lost.
The uniformed U.S. military are great fans of
Israel. They have seen Israeli forces take on the
latest Soviet equipment and even on rare occa-
sions, Soviet personnel and come out on top.
The former commander of the U.S. Rapid
Deployment Force, and current commandant of
the Marine Corps, Paul X. Kettsy. acknowledged
to this writer that it would be years before the
United States could project any credible force in
the Middle East and that until then "we would
have to rely on our Israeli friends."
In fact, a Defense Department report in the
mid-1970 s asserted that the Israeli Air Force
could destroy the Soviet fleet in the
Mediterranean if general hostilities mipted.
Given Israel's capabilities, why isn't a strategic
partnership being created?
The answer is not a simple one. It is partially
because our foreign policy establishment believes
American alignment with Israel means the loss of
American influence in the Arab world, particular-
ly with the so-called "moderates." It is also due in
some measure to the animosity towards Israel of
our current secretary of Defense, and the lack of
uny countervailing view in the White House.
For whatever reasons, the United States is
spending unnecessary billions on building up our
Rapid Deployment Force and supporting
unreliable allies, while the practical and strategic
benefits of a closer association with Israel are
being ignored.
State Democrat and Republican Party leaden "-{
in California have been battling over the
redrawing of congressional district lines. Last
week, the Republican governor called for a Dec.
13 special election to vote on a Republican
redistricting initiative.
If the plan passes, two freshman, Jewish
members of the House Foreign Affairs Commit
tee, Mel Levine and Howard Barman, could face
serious problems. To make matters worse, Levine
and Berman could be thrown into the same con-
gressional district as two other Jewish members
of Congress, the veterans Henry Waxman and
Anthony Beilenson all Democrats.
Additionally, Northern California and fresh
man Jewish Congresswoman Barbara Boxer
would be redistricted into a more GOP-leaning
district.
Needless to say. if the plan passes, and some
feel it well could, congressional support for Israel,
particularly in the House Foreign Affairs Com
rrritree.rould be adversely affected:
..


Friday, August 19.1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
PageS
i
JEWISH COMMIMTY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
28J8 HOLLYWOOD BLVD HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
921-6611
in
7 JCC Singles
make lemonade...
Complaining is the easy way out of any bad situation.
The JCC Singles of South Broward, led by coordinator Mark
Brotman, was not looking for the easy way out. even though
the group's first meeting eight months ago attracted only 19
singles.
These few were determined to build the group into one in
which singles could meet comfortably, without the pressures
and problems of a bar, Brotman says.
Members elected attorney Bart Strock chairman, and got to
work. Membership has been soaring ever since, with two singles
meetings monthly, as well as dances, trips, beach parties and
anything else that strikes the group's fancy.
Brotman reports that quite a number of couples have formed,
with talk of at least one marriage. "But we're not just here to
meet dates," says Fran Slobeck, one of the group's founders.
"Girls have met other girls, and men have met other men .
it's a good place to make friends, and people sometimes forget
that."
A hospitality committee attempts to make everyone feel
welcome, she adds.
jr
Claws
The Adult Department of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd., will be offering and ex-
m citing season of fall classes.
Classes include aerobics, basic
computer, Yiddish for all ages,
PET (parent effectiveness train-
ing), bridge, Ulpan (modern con-
versational Hebrew), Sholom
Me it hem (reading prayers) and
Israeli and international folk
dancing.
PET
The JCC's parent effectiveness
*_training course (PET) starting
Tuesday, Oct. 4, from 7-9; 30 p.m.
lasts six weeks and offers proven
methods to help bring parents
and children together and to
teach parents how to help their
children grow into loving, mature
and productive adults.
PET teaches communication
skills that are effective in differ-
ent situations at home, work
recreation. The course will be
taught by Maria Gale, and coat is
$30 for JCC members and 136 for
non-members.
Computers
The JCC is again offering basic
computer I at Radio Shack Com-
puter Center, 429 State Road 7 in
Hollywood.
Two classes will be offered
Monday evening 6:30-8:30
starting Oct. 3 and Thursday af-
ternoon 1-3:30 p.m. starting Oct.
6. Cost is $50.
Garden trip
The JCC will tour the Grove
Isle Sculpture Gardens in Coco-
nut Grove on Wednesday, Oct.
26, from 9a.m. to3:30p.m.
The tour of the 50 pieces of
contemporary sculpture dotting
the beautiful landscape on Grove
Isle will be conducted by Martin
Margulies.
Free time for lunch and shop-
ping in the Grove will follow.
Tickets are $8 for JCC mem-
bers, $10 for non-members and
includes the tour and round-trip
transportation.
Brunch Bunch
The JCC announces its fall
season of the "Brunch Bunch"
enrichment workshops for
women.
Coffee and danish and stimu-
lating discussions led by profes-
sional facilitators are on the
menu.
The group will meet monthly
the second Wednesday 9:30-11
a.m., Sept. 14, Oct. 12, Nov. 9
and Dec. 14.
The first session, "Quality
Time for Me," on Sept. 14 will be
led by Augusta Zimmerman.
The fee for each session is $2
for JCC members, $2.50 for non-
members or $7 and $9 for the
entire series. Registration is re-
quired.
Dinner Theater
The JCC is offering three din-
ner-theater trips for the coming
season. :
They are Wednesday evening,
Nov. 16, "Pal Joey" at Royal
Palm Dinner Theatre. Cham-
pagne Brunch Dec. 18. Bve Bye

lit
Tho delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-hapod animals Mas tovsl
Moms and kids go tor Zooront two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
ennched pasta simmered in lots ot yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too1
Birdie" at Burt Reynolds Dinner-
rheatre; and Tuesday evening,
Jan. 17, 1964, "Annie'' at Royal
- Palm Dinner-Theatre.
All tripe include round-trip
transportation from the center.
Foliage tour
The JCC is offering a Fall
Foliage Tour through the colorful
Smokies on a six-day fully es-
corted bus tour from Sunday,
Oct. 16, to Friday, Oct. 21.
Package includes all admis-
sions, first-quality lodgings, lug-
gage handling, taxes, tips for
services and meals on tour.
Meals included are five dinners
with one dinner theater show,
and one breakfast.
Tour cost is $439 per person,
double occupancy. Deposit of $60
is necessary.
Bowlers
The JCC is forming a mixed
bowling league at Miramar
Lanes, 890 Miramar Parkway,
starting Oct. 5. The league will
meet every Wednesday at 9 p.m.
excluding holidays. Four people
will make up each team.
Dancing
The JCC is to present Israeli
and International Folk Dancing
on Sunday evenings at the cen-
ter.
Classes will be led by Saason
Joury, who was bom in Israel
and graduated from Beersheva
University with a degree in phy-
sical education, specializing in
Israeli folk dancing.
The first session will be on Oct.
2. Beginners meet from 7-8:15
p.m. and intermediate-advanced
8:30-10 p.m. Cost is $20 for mem-
bers and $25 for non-members.
Reading
Do you go to temple on Friday
night but still cannot read the
prayers in Hebrew? The JCC
presents Sholom Aleichem Part
II. This "Easy Method of Read
ing Hebrew" is taught by Esther
Gordon.
The first part of this class was
so successful Mrs. Gordon will
continue and this session will in-
clude a review of the Sabbath
prayers and blessings aa well as
learning Sholom Aleichem, Kid-
dish, Sh'ma and more. The class
will be on Thursday mornings
starting Oct. 6 from 9:30-11 for
six weeks.
Senior classes
The Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Center will be offering new
classes beginning Sept. 1 with
ballroom dancing; Sept. 7, drama
class: Sept. 6, sketching; and
basic sewing, Yiddish, Bible
study, yoga, exercise.
Spaijist}?
Jewish?
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward is forming a
new division especially for
those with an Hispanic back-
ground.
Sound interesting?
Call Beverly Bachrach at
the Federation for details.
921-8810

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Your Hosts Ssm and Morr! Waldmn, Gary Sher, David Diamond
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HASHA\ A YOM KIPPUR
12Days-11 Nights *oi*f\
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SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
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_______ON THE OCEAN AT43rd STREET
44 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's* Mn star d
Glaze
Vi cupkoney
* cup Gulden's
Span Irown Mustard
I teaspoon borseraduh
QnaaJ Cornea' Beef "- CHARLIE GULDEN
S pound corned beel
brisk**
4 carrots, cut into I usch
sices
I onion, quartered
I baykal
I garlic clove, cnished
Place (MM in aift sauce pot; conct wMa coM utter. Add
carrots, oak* bey leal mt avkc; keel to task** Reduce
beat; ami tad saaawt 3 boars or until tender. MnairMli,
I* sou* saucepan, coaatat keney. i
horseradish. Sauaer em low heel, stout i uumtes. stirruM
occasionally. Place meal on rack in open roastuuj pan. Spoon
t over meat, ami bake in iSTf own
lor 21 awNrtes, kesMnj occasionally,
It's kit recipe
that makes
these recipes
SO delicious!
fatal* Safari
7 potatoes, peeled.
baeMaadcutup
V> cup cropped on*.
V> cap chopped celery
V> chopped tomato
fc cup imitation bacon tats
ft cup mayonnaise
2 labetspooas larraaon vinegar
! tat*
Combine potatoes, onion, celery,
tomato and imitation bacon bits Blend
mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar aad sapr.
About a kaM hour before serving, toss
potato salad witk dressing Serves*


fmma



Pe6
The Jewish Fkridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Augu-t 19,1983
Pilde
You won't
beef
te^
o
Chicken!
There's no chicken like chicken fresh from our
Pantiv We buv only the best to give our customers
onJv the best .AND YCXTLL LOVE OUR BEEF.
LUCKY
LEAF
64-OZ BTL REG OR NATURAL
Apple
Juice
PANTRY PR BLUE
$J29
.nsi.it
mmmj hmolor watem
. CAN
""1.19
ALPO CHUNK BE fF
Dog Pood
PANTRY I
SSS .79
'-GAL 7Q
JUG !
WHIIIMP
PANTRY PRBE UOUD
." .89
RAOU HOMESTYLEPLAW MEAT Of MUSHROOM
JAR
YANKEE 0OOCUE-ALL VARKTSS
PKOS
KOBE'S MM
""1.59
6^1.00
9 0J
CAN
OPEN PIT REGULAR OB HCKORv
<6 02 Q
, JAR l
BEVERAGE SALE"
PWKCHABUS CHA8LLS BLANC RHINE HEAR'Y
BURGUNDY VIN ROSE AND RE Of
$3
79
Gallo
Wines
3UT BTL BURGUNDY CHABLlS PINK CHABLIS
OR VIN ROSE ,^^_ -^
No. Moun. $C39
Wines toP
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVEI
PRODUCE
TOP QUALITY FCH 4 FLAVORFUL ^B Ifl A'
LARGE I 5 SIZE ST I IV
Cantaloupes***?
California Friar
Plums ^AC
JUMBO
3.4 SIZE LB
49
ftpe
Watermelon
Peaches^jQv
NEW JERSE"
GARDEN ERFSH SWEET
Yellow Com ...
GARDEN FRESm TENOCfi
CRiSP AND CRUNCH* u PC"
Green Peppers
US NO I All PURPOSE u PiC*
Yellow Onions
GAHO* N FRfc SM *frN0RU PlC*
Yellow Squash.............
ANATTRAC'i/i rfAfc Jfc b INCH HANG**-* B-i
Spider Plant..................,- 3.49
too ct AQ
I SUNSHINE SAVERS
(REG OR DIET)
2 UT. BTL. TAB, SPRITE.
SCHWEPPES GINGERALE OR
Coke
WTM COUPON BELOW a S T ORDfcF.
REGULAR OR UNSALTED
Saltines
3PK GIANT MR BIG
Paper Towels
2Q^ reo. UzJ
*1
49
?AN^f DA2* ^HEESE BALLS 6VOZ CHEESE CURLS
7V0Z CORN CHIPS OR 7-OZ PRETZEL TWISTS
8 ROLL PKG ASSTD
COLORS OR PASTEL
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$179
da.&M*\fcl**!iJ
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iZ C0RN CHIPS OR 7-OZ PRETZEL TWISTS n n f,
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200CT CORONET _n_r
Facial Tissue 59*
I GAL JUG GLACIER SPRINGS -
Water 59*
50-OZ JAR LUCKY LEAF AgMflft
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Angle Toothbrush 1.49
IQOCT ML EXTRA STRENGTH
......3.77
FROZEN
: ii
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ASSORTED
SAusauRTi _
VEAL PARMOAMA OR SHIPPED GREEN PEPPERS
$199 Milk 131 *i#Gr
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$19!
PWJCASaEWBAON*
PANTRY PRIOe 100S WHOLE
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APPLE LEMON OR PWE APPLE
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PANTRY PRO lP OR CHOPPED
ANGELOS STEAK CUT
rrencn r nes
SENECA 100*. NATURAL
cm
PANTRY PMOE REGULAR OR PMK
loo*
IS-6T kA """ UH"ONORPAPPLE
~"" Ooldon Top Pies
^3i< a am J"*nw*OR
-3.99 RaWn Muffins .1
m*01 + *k~ AUNT HANNAH -02 *
^"1-00 AngeJFoodBar
59
1.29
220Z
, PKO
eci AA
pkos iW
"at. .S9 PANTRY PRCE PICNIC PAK
M, "** HAMBURGEROR
MX
PKG
OF 12
AOLERS I6 '<:t PRO ASSORTED
.99 Hot Dog Rolls 65C j^Donuts
.79
1.29


Friday, August 19,1983
Th* Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pag* 7
FRESH
Fiyers
UMIT 2 CHICKENS,
PLEASE,
WITH $7.00 ORDER
C
1
9
9
9
5
10
I
S
t
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE!
PRICES AND COUPONS EFFECTIVE AUG. 18-AUG. 24, 1983.
------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
BONELESS
Choice Meat
SALE!
WE SELL OMLY THE BEST. WHY
PAY MORE WHEN PAYING MORE
DOESNT MAKE IT BETTER.
Underblade
Pot Roast-| 79
Hi
Pot
$-179
Top Round
Roast $189
K\'
Roast
USDA CHOICE
BEEF CHUCK
BONELESS
USDA CHOICE
BEEF ROUND
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Underblade Steak
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
CUT EXTRA THICK FOR BROILING
Shoulder Steak
USDA CHOICE 2_ LBS AVG
Beef for Stew
WLLSHWEBEEF
Smoked San-age.......... 2.39
SWIft INTERNATIONAL ENTREES FRESH FROZEN CHICKEN
Cordon Bleu or Kiev....... 2.89
USOA CHOICE
BEEF BLADE
USOA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Top Round Steak............ 2.79
USD* CHOICE BEEF ROUND I ST CU'
Top Round Steak............LB 2.99
FAMILY PACK MEATS
FLA ORSHlPPEDPRf M FRESH 3 LBS & OVER
Fryer Combo.............._1.19
USOACMOCf BtEFCMUCK 3 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS ROAST
BttF STfcW ANOGROUNOBEEF
Beef Chuck Combo ........ 1.69
USD* CHUfF BEEF CHUCK 3 MF *LS IN ONI CONTAINS ROAST
RFTFS1EW AND GROUND BEEF
$179
Shldr. Combo V-l
going to love our Eggs
LB
PANTRY PRIDE GRADE 'A1
f
9 :
WITH COUPON AND $7 ORDER
cPtIde
Count onus!
for the best in I
iHL
SEALTEST LARGE OR SMALL CURD
Cottage
24-OZ
*1
39
S-OJ conn.Nairn MO, WyM M flavor! __-
Brayar'i.Yogurts........fib 3/1.19
FJnlry Pratt cralM haf gaton ~~
Orange juice...............1.19
ftralffinerican ChMN........1.69
SargamoS-oi pna
Colby Longhom Cheese.......1.29
BJui'Boonit Margarine ..55 FRIENDSHIP MIDGETREG OR NO SALT^^^^
Farmer |w
Cheese ,oz OS#
ewrnttsr..............73
BuAarmlfii Biscuits*"..........4/.B9
Lorral'ne^wlss Chaaaa........1.09
Juice
Gaoe"c Cc*oed \ 2-jtf
American Sli.
BALL PARK
ALL MEAT OR _^. __ ^m ^^_
Beef $169
Franks JL
1-LB PKG
HV GRADE GRILLMASTER Oe*W"
Chicken Bologna lb HV
E3|
GENERIC JUMBO
'GENERIC8'
SERVICE DELH
----- NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
MM VALUABLE COUPON |
COUPON VALUE 56c
I PLune
_ PANTRv PRIDE DOZEN GRADE A ._,
LargeEggs 39* I
I UMIT ONE DOZ WITH ORDER Of $7 OR MORE EX- I
1CLULHNG TOBACCO PRODUCTS COUPON QOOO
AUGUST 18-AUGUST 24. 1983
PUB VALUABLE COUPON
COUPON VALUE 60
PLUSM
_ 2LTR BTL TAft SPRITE. DIET COKE.
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'm\
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$ COUPON VALUE 69*
^a /la, I _____
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------ Saltines z k. 2y
IN STORE BAKERYtt" \SSS^mSSS^!iSS^*l3S^S%& I
------ NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES -_ AUGUST IB-AUGUST 24. 1063
miCDv A Aiiirr H
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JSf"^ COUPON VALUE 90*
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42-OZ BOX HEAVY


MM
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 19,1963
On Israel's
true nature
Continued from Pag* li
"caused a major earthquake in Israel," said Shamir, "and
it is still shaking today."
Shamir emphasized that her book is not meant to be
political. "I'm not trying to give a political viewpoint,"
she said. "I'm trying to look at the inward picture. That is
not dependent on who is in power politically," although
she believes the government should change periodically.
It is the internal conflicts that pose the greatest threat
to Israel today, according to Shamir. "We don't have
enough tolerance and civility to accept the differences
among us," she lamented, citing as an example the
February incident in which a grenade landed in the midst
of demonstrators protesting Menachem Begin's policies,
lolling one and wounding others. "We have to learn to live
with each other."
"Maybe it's right for El Salvador," she said, "but Israel
can't afford it. We're still at war." Although she is not
sure that Israel can be different from other countries
forever, for now at least, "Israel can't afford to be like
everybody else.
"If Israel has no strong moral backbone, if Israel has as
much crime, corruption and cultural confrontation as other
countries," she wondered, "then why should Jews come to
Israel and, even more importantly, why should Jews in
Israel stay?"
Using as an example the "insensitivity" of the doctors'
strike, which came at a time when the nation was still
suffering the trauma of the Lebanon war, she asked, "How
can a young man fight in Lebanon when his own father
can't even get medical attention back home? For what is
he fighting?"
While these moral issues are getting some attention in
the Israeli press, they are rarely discussed in the United
States, said Shamir. In her opinion, the Jewish community
in America is "too defensive" about Israel. By calling
every criticism of Israel anti-Semitic, "we are only hurting
ourselves. We have to learn for the sake of Israel that some
criticism can be very creative."
Shamir's book has evoked very different reactions in
Israel and in the United States. In Israel, people are more
interested in the romance and events in Miri's life. The
history, the background, the internal struggle is nothing
new to them. For the Israelis, "it's more of a story than a
message,'' she said.
But in the United States, the message comes across loud
and clear and many American Jews do not like what
they are hearing. A typical reaction that Shamir gets from
the older generation of Americans is: "I want a perfect
Israel. I don't want to hear about the problems. Even if
they are true, don't tell me about them I have enough
tsoris."
American Jews, Shamir said, retain the idealistic image
of Israel that is portrayed in Leon Uris' Exodus and refuse
to believe that there are very few Ari Ben Canaans left.
American Jews must be made aware not only of what is
going on inside Israel and that "serious soul-searching is
necessary," but they also have the right to speak about
it, said Shamir. She "does not buy the argument" that
because American Jews don't live in Israel, they don't
have the right to criticize.
"American Jews have done and are doing wonderful
things for Israel. They have a right to say something.
We're in this together," she said.
While in the book, Miri decides that Israel shall be her
home despite its problems, Shamir still lives in both
worlds in America and in Israel.
Although she admits it is "a little unconventional," she
says, "I have maneuvered myself into a professional life
where I can do it." She and her husband practice law in
both countries, as well as in the Far East.
There is no doubt in Shamir's mind that she eventually
will return to Israel for good. For now, however, she will
continue to live as "a typical schizophrenic."
Published by Shengold Publishers, Inc., Now York. All
Our Vows is available in hardcover for SI 1.96.
TO BE FETED AJ-
though, ironically, he no
longer represents the city,
U.S. Congressman William
Lehman (D-Fla.) is to be
honored by the dty of
Haflandale on Sunday, Sept.
25, at a noon luncheon at the
Diplomat. The testimonial to
the legislator, "for his good
works in Hallandale," was
conceived and is under the
auspices of the City Com-
mission. For information on
tickets, contact either Irma
Rochlin (456-2879) or Molly
Shapiro Oberfield (454-6039).
Breadbasket
of Mideast?
Continued from Page 3
land reclamation programs,
which prepare desert and rocky
terrain for agricultural and
settlement use, as well as con-
serve woodlands and wilderness
areas, have reclaimed 40,000
acres.
Cohen projected that an addi-
tional 100,000 acres will be
reclaimed in the next 17 years.
Stating that JNF is now in-
volved in Israel in more projects
and programs than at any other
time in its eight-decade history,
Cohen said that in addition to
afforestation and land
reclamation, JNF continues to
clear the way for access roads
linking settlements in Galilee, the
Negev and Arava.
As of 1983, he said, more than
6,000 kilometers of roads have
been paved by JNF engineers.
An additional 2,000 kilometers of
roads will be completed by 2000.
' In recent years, Cohen noted,
JNF has, in cooperation with
other government agencies, been
responsible for developing new
recreation and campaign areas.
In the next decade and a half, 60
new parks and 200 ramping
grounds will be developed by
JNF, many of them adjancent to
existing JNF forests.
HOPEN AND LANE. M.D s. P.A.
JOSEPH M. HOPEN. M.D.. F.A.C.S.
ALAN S. LANE. M.D., F.A.C.S.
TAKE GREAT PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING
THE ASSOCIATION OF
GARY R. HOPEN. M.D.
DIPLOMATE, AMEFKAN BOARD OF OPHTHALMOLOGY
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
4 OPHTHALMOLOGY
ICT. IMPLANTS AND LASER SURGERY
NEURO-OPHTHALMOLOGY
.
TELEPHONE 989-2800
(MIAMI) 624-2684
3419 JOHNSON STREET
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
Lomza Yeshlva
Continued from Page 4
student every day.
The yeshiva had an excellent reputation. It
brought to Priluki a spiritual phis. We studied
from early morning to late at night every day the
entire years. There were no vacations. The ex-
ceptions were Friday afternoons to prepare for the
Sabbath, Saturday mornings for the prayer
service and the Holy Days and festivals.
The more than two years I spent at the Lomza
Yeshiva were very exciting and meaningful. I
learned many tractates of the Babylonian Talmud
with the Commentaries. But more important, I
also learned the meaning of the Scriptures to be
used as a way of life under many trying cir-
cumstances.
It is more than 60 years since I had the
privilege of such a learning experience. I cherish
the memory of those days and years.
Wanted part time membership coordinator for
the Jewish Community Centers of South
Broward. Committee experience essential.
Knowledge of local community a must. Send
resume to Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
Hollywood, Ft, 33020.
Salesman
Wanted
Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
write:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
PHONE 305-373-4605
KARL M. MORQENSTEIN, M.D. &
MYLES K. KRIEGER, M.D., P.A.
Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery
Facial Plastic Surgery
Announce that there will now be
two separate practices:
Otolaryngology Consultants
Karl M. Morgefuteln, M.D.
Martin A. Shuoar, M.D.
1131 M. 36th Avenue
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
961-8153
My let K. Krtager, M.D., P. A
921N. 38th Avenue #201
Hollywood, Fla. 33021
963-3222
Patients will have all medical records available to
the appropriate physician with whom they wish to
continue care.
THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER
-/
25th COLLINS
MIAMI BEACH.
GALA SHOW

ALL Rooms Waterview
Colour TV Air Conditioned
Refrig Strictly Dietary Laws
Open all year music Entertainment
Social Programmes
Pool Free Chaises
Individual Diet Catering
Strict Rabbinical supervision
Complimentary ice cream served daily poolside
HIGH HOLY DAYS
11 Nights and Twelve Days
$340.SEPT.7to18th
Per Person Double Occupancy
6 Nights $199.00 P.P.D.O. (Split Stay)
2 Meals Daily, 3 Meals Shabbas/Hollday*
LABOR DAY WEEKEND, SEPT. 2-6
4daya3nlghts 7ft ,
Call Collect (305) 538-5721


friday, August 19,1983
v

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 9
lr. P. seeks relief from anxiety
I Mr. P. la 24-year-old govern-
Lnt worker. Ha fa a college
raduate, unmarried and lives
lone in the north end of Broward
ounty.
Recently. Mr. P. broke off his
-ngagement to be married to a
loung woman who he has known
lince high school. He was experi-
mcing anxiety, questioning the
visdom of this decision.
In addition, Mr. P. had con-
tracted a skin disease similar to
herpes. While he sought medical
sid to alleviate the symptoms, he
was aware he could use help
Roping with the emotional
aspects of the nature of this
problem. He was starting to
Jli
become socially withdrawn.
During the intake process of
obtaining a brief historical back-
ground, it became evident that
Mr. P. was uneasy about the
3haring of details. This gathering
leals on tap for seniors
The Nutrition Program, ad-
ministered by the Service Agency
lor Senior Citizens, provides
neals for Broward seniors at
ore than 40 sites throughout
(he county.
Homedelivered Meals also are
available for persons over 60 who
are isolated or incapacitated and
lunable to travel to the site loca-
Itions.
Contributions are encouraged
I to help pay for the service. These
monies are utilized to increase the
number of meals. For further in-
formation about Site or Homede-
livered Meals, call 563-8991.
Adult Day Care provides a va-
riety of services for frail seniors
in a closely supervised setting.
Arts and crafts, exercise classes
and educational sessions are
offered along with a hot noontime
meal.
The Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Day Care Program has
openings for participants at 1201
Johnson St. in Hollywood. The
project serves residents of Holly-
wood, Hallandale, Danfa and
Pembroke Park.
Frieda Caldes is coordinator of
I the nondenominational project
which is funded through the Area
Agency on Aging and adminis-
tered by the Jewish Community
I Centers of South Broward.
Contributions help expand the
I service provision. For further in-
formation, call 922-5048.
Trijp
The senior center is planning a
(.rip to Cypress Gardens, Busch
iardens and Ringling Museum.
dinner and show is included in
the tour. The trip is scheduled
24-26. For further informs-
QTUDI0
^c^xu
Continental
Cuisine
FMDJOSSi
mna
you bach to
1iifnownd
ammo
MSTAUHANT
torawrtqu*
dining xparlanca
Milch your tattt* lo your
mood m on* of 5 mdhrMual
room*. Th*T*nt
Win* C*Nar. Studio, Pt*c*
Plg*U*.8 Fine ciitecisNWTtefit
at the Piano
Also violin playing
lor your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M. 1
(prlvat* Luncheon* arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 AVE.
445-5371
'* clo**0 Monday*
dhriBaafcaataaaaBsaaaaaafcaBBi
tion, call Rosalie or Rachel at 921-
6518.
Party
A Rosh Hashana party will be
at the Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Center, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd., Hollywood, on Sunday,
Sept. 11, from 2 to 4 p.m. Enter-
tainment will be provided by va-
rious groups. Refreshment will be
served. Donation: $1.50.
of information fa essential in
order for the supervisor to deter-'
mine which social worker would
be the most appropriate for the
particular problem presented.
When the prospective client
understood the purpose of the
questions and was reassured that
each file remains with the as-
signed caseworker in a locked file, '
he was satisfied that his confi-
dentiality would be respected.
This information aided in fa- j
cilitating the intake process. A
plan was established to have Mr.
P. contacted by his caseworker
for an appointment.
If you have any questions or feel
that we can help, please contact
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood. 33021.
Telephone: 966-0956. Hours -
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service fa a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and the United
Way of Broward County.
/. R. WEINRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
insurance Exchange of the America's
246 Southeast First Street, Suite 319
Miami, Florida 33131 (306) 381-9877
. NJ. (201)696490r>N.Y. (212)66^3070
Telex 642184
Attention Fund Raisers
Make Money For Your
Organization
Bring Your Group
For A 3 Day Trip
HOTEL
Ihealth
RESORT
(305)538-4621
40 Island Ave.
Miami Beach, FL33139
AN OPEN LETTER
To the consumer of kosher foods
from the President of -*"
Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc.
V.FFL.MTOWN. ,A. 1MMM U.S.A.
Dear consumer: _., Kosher Poultry. Inc., Has tried
avallaWeanywherelnthewor ^^^ ^^
t believe our products are ^urp*T\jd ^der one standard of
,Ulon smo. 1968 M rai P -g^wn Mid development
employe our "^^r^rfio^ ~f
of all: yours. ..ware of that
S2S2SS2SESZ-
P6*8^ Shalom,
BMPIRB K08HBR POULTRY, IHC.
Murray L'- Katx
President
OVER FORTY YEARS OF
CO^STEKTOUAUTYANOSERV^


r~ r
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 19.1983
Ask the rabbi
Elul: warmup time
for High Holy Days
By DR. CARL KLEIN
Rabbi, Hallandale Jewish Center
This month of the Hebrew calendar Elul is the one before
Rosh Hashana. It is basically warmup i time, warmup for the
High Holy Days in preparation to receiv the Yamin Hanoraim,
the High Holy Days season.
For spiritual activity as sustained and potentially as
exhausting as the High Holy Days there is a month of
preparation for these days, just as there is a warmup time for
some strenuous, physical engagement.
During the entire month of Elul and right through the days up
into Yom Kippur itself, we are called upon to consider how we
might have wronged other people and how we might have sinned
against God. We are expected to ask forgiveness from each
other. We are urged to try to turn from wrongdoing to right-
doing.
Now, in the month of Elul, we do certain things which are
indicative of this preparation. In most of the synagogues, the
Shofar is sounded at the conclusion of every morning service
except on the Sabbath and the day before Rosh Hashana itself.
It is the traditional "call" to repentance. It is the clarion call to
awaken ourselves from our lethargy and to urge us to repent and
to try to better our lives.
The second important part of this warmup period | are the
Selichot prayers. In modern Hebrew, Selichot are to be in-
terpreted as "forgiveness." Sephardic congregations recite
Selichot prayers every day during the month of Elul, and
Ashkenazic congregations recite Selichot only during the last
four to nine days of the month of Elul, just before the High Holy
Days. A special Selichot Service traditionally takes place at
midnight on the Saturday before Rosh Hashana.
This year, Selichot is Saturday night, Sept. 3.
Many of the Selichot prayers are from the High Holy Day
liturgy. These prayers and poems are a distillation of the major
themes of the liturgy of the days of Av. There is the old,
traditional concept that the gates of repentance are open
especially on these days.
The prayers remind us we must intensify our self-scrutiny and
self-judgment. The common theme running through the poems
and prayers of Selichot is an acknowledgment of the conviction
that each human being is indeed called to judgment from which
there is no escape.
The month of Elul has another tradition in Jewish life. This
month we give more charity than usual, not only in a material
sense, but also in a spiritual sense. We try to be friendlier to
other people and judge ourselves in the same fashion as we
would like God to judge us. But charity which means also
justice is understood to be on these days a very effective
method by which we come closer to God.
We give charity to synagogues, to educational institutions, to
social services, to Israel: the agencies which are responsible for
the continuity of the Jewish people. On these days we must be
concerned with this continuity.
And finally, the word Elul is an abbreviated word of the
sentence: Ani Ledodi Vedoli Li "I am for my Friend and my
Friend is for me." These words describe the relationship between
God and Israel. And in the month of Elul we re-establish this
relationship by sounding the Shofar, by the Selichoth Services,
by giving charity more than usual, which are the basic elements
in our preparation for the High Holy Days.
May the month of Elul be a challenge in these endeavors and
thus encourage us to ask for God's forgiveness as well as for
peace to us and to the entire world.
Rabbi Jaffe to teach courses at Barry
HIGH HOLY DAYS
SERVICES
MAN SERVICE
tetnpte bethahm
sanctuanj
(FamwS *****
9730 Slrtng Ftoed
Conducted by.
Rabbi Barnard RShoaw
Cantar Abraham
CONCURRENT SERVICE
city high school
coopercny
auditorium
9401 Strtng Road
Conducted by:
Dr. Richard Coreari
TICKETS AND MEMBERSH* MQUNES AVAILABLE AT THE
TEMPLE OFFICE. FOR ^FORMATION PLEASE CALL.......
O
-431-5100
temple beth ohm
Op*. HM. Ml S-n-, "-Q **- "- B 0*0-
A resident lectureship, an ac-
credited course in Judaica, has
been endowed for the 1983-84
academic year by the Jewish
Chautauqua Society, in honor of
Shepard Broad, at Barry Univer-
sity, Miami Shores.
The lecturer for the under
graduate and graduate courses
will be Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, rabbi
of Temple Beth El, Hollywood.
He will offer a course in basic Ju-
daism and one in Jewish
philosophy. The classes will be on
Tuesday and Thursday mornings
at 9:30, beginning Aug. 30.
Dr. Jaffe is a recipient of an
JDC leaders send
5744 greetings
NEW YORK In Rosh
Hashana greetings to the Jewish
community, the lay and profes-
sional leaders of the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee (JDC) pledged to
"strengthen and advance" the
agency's services to needy Jews
in the Middle East, North Africa,
Eastern and Western Europe and
Latin America int he coming
year.
Extending New Year greetings
to "all Jews everywhere who
have continued to support the
work of the JDC through their
United Jewish Appeal commu-
nity campaigns," Henry Taub,
JDC president, promised that
"while we can take pride in our
accomplishments of the past
year, we hope to do even more
next year."
"JDC aided over 500,000 men,
women and children during the
past year," Taub said. "A third
of the $43 million budget went for
welfare services, almost a quarter
for Jewish education, another 11
percent for care of the aged and
almost 9 percent for health serv-
ices.
"The number of people helped
by our programs over the past 69
years reaches into the millions,"
Taub said. "There has been a
JDC presence at one time or
another in over 70 countries."
Ralph I. Goldman, JDC execu-
tive vice president, noted that "in
the past year JDC was active in
some 30 countries continuing a
tradition of Jewish service begun
in 1914."
In Israel, JDC has continued
to play a major role in advancing
social services in care of the aged,
the chronically ill and the handi-
capped; in advancing the com-
munity center movement, man-
power development and in sup-
porting higher education. It has
also continued its traditional
support of the yeshivot and reli-
gious and cultural programs.
The JDC leaders sent holiday
messages to the Jews of Eastern
Europe. "They will celebrate the
Special classes
set at Solel
Temple Solel's learning disa-
bilities class will begin in Sept-
ember for the eighth consecutive
year.
Students with learning disabi-
lities are able to function in a
classroom of 10-12 students
without the frustration of compe-
tition. Each student performs on
his-her level of ability. This class
is open to third through seventh
graders.
Gordon Lelana
Master Piano Craftsmar >
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Qulld
432-7247
ICERTIFIED MOHELi
Your Baby Deserves
The Beat!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Will Travel (306)67062
New Year secure in the knowl-
edge that the JDC stands beside
them ready to extend the hand of
brotherhood whenever and
wherever needed," Goldman said.
The JDC is a recipient agency
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
MA degree from Teachers Col-
lege, Columbia University, and a
Th.D. from the Burton Seminary.
He also was awarded an honorary
doctor of divinity degree from
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion.
The endowment at Barry Uni-
versity is one of five grants
awarded to the state of Florida
this year and is part of 118 lec-
tureships granted this year na-
tionwide.
The Jewish Chautauqua Soci-
ety is the educational project of
the National Federation of Tem-
ple Brotherhoods and is dedi-
cated to the improvement of in-
terfaith relations. The society
seeks to accomplish this aim, in
part, through the endowment of
courses in Judaica at universities
throughout the United States
and Canada.
Potok to kick off 'Sinai Series'
Temple Sinai's second annual
"Sinai Series" will begin this
year on Sunday evening, Dec. 18,
with Chaim Potok discussing
themes in his books.
The series "Concerts" will be
Jan. 22, featuring the Interna-
tional Music Festival; Feb. 12,
featuring the Fabulous Brothers
Zim. and on March 11 the Miami
Lyric Opera Company will per-
form.
Tickets may be purchased at
the Temple Sinai office, 1201
Johnson St., Hollywood. Series
tickets are $50 per person and a
10 percent discount is being
offered if tickets are purchased
before October 31.
Sinai's Sisterhood and Men's
Club are preparing a 7-day cruise
aboard Song of America, Jan. 15,
1984. For additional information
and rates, contact Temple Sinai
(920-1577).
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 961-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Ma-amar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pan.;
Sabbath morning, 8:46 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:36 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten Judaica High School.
s^efanr)
Temple Beth El 1361 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood; 920-8226.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10. ^^
Temple Beth Emet Pembroke Pines General Hospital
auditorium, 2261 University Drive, Pembroke Pines: 431-3638.
Rabbi Bennett Greenspon. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.
Religious school: Pre-kindergarten-10.
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor
ning, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Preschool- 12.
F}ecoi)structloi)ist
5&!aJ!SLT 11301 W Brw"i Blvd.. Plantation: 472-
36O0. Rabbi Elbot SkidelL Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m. Religious
school: Pre-kindergarten8.


jay, August 19,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
STAR program set to fund education
A program to provide scholarships for synagogue students in
afternoon elementary school in Greater Hollywood will be in-
stituted this year by the Central Agency for Jewish Education
through a grant from the Jewish Federation of South Droward.
The program, Student Tuition Assistance Recommendation
(STAR), will provide scholarship money, in the form of vouchers
for partial payment of tuition coats, for families in financial
need.
A family may apply for registration at the synagogue school
of its choice. A voucher would be issued to the family based on
income, cost of education and hours of instruction at the par-
ticular school to which the parents appled. The parents would
then submit the voucher to the school with the Jewish
Federation providing reimbursement.
Avis Sachs, chairperson of the subcommittee on Synagogue
School Funding which formulated the STAR proposal, noted:
"This program is an expression of our community's ac-
ceptance of responsibility for enabling those families unable to
meet the costs of a Jewish education to secure proper Jewish
training for their children. What is special about this program is
that it encourages each family to select that school which best
meets its own particular needs."
Leon Weissberg, a member of the sub-committee and
educational director of Temple Beth Shalom, indicated, "It is
hoped that the scholarship fund will enable students who now
receive no Jewish education to enroll in one of the schools of the
community."
The Jewish Federation, under the leadership of Meral
Ehrenstein, chairperson of the Committee on Education, ap-
proved an allocation of 17,500 for the program, triple the amount
of the previous year.
A family may apply for tuition assistance two ways. One, the
family may go through its synagogue, and after filling out an
application, that would be reviewed anonymously by a com-
mittee from Federation, the synagogue would receive reim-
bursement.
The second way, the family may apply directly to the South
Broward Federation, and after the application is reviewed, the
family would receive a voucher to be submitted at any
synagogue school in the Greater Hollywood area, and the school
would receive the reimbursement.
Sandra Ross, CAJE's educational director for South Broward
Federation, can be contacted at 921-8810 for information con-
cerning the program.
Mysticism magazine off drawing board
Non-Jews
welcome
A 10-week course entitled
"Introduction to Judaism" is
being offered as an outreach pro-
gram to anyone interested in
becoming a Jew by choice.
The course it to start Tuesday
evening, Aug. 23, and is being
taught by Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe of
Temple Beth El and Rabbi
Morton Malavsky of Temple
Beth Shalom.
Classes are to meet Tuesdays 8
to 9:30 p.m., and will deal with
basic Jewish concepts and
practices.
The first five sessions are to be
at Temple Beth El, 1361 S. 14th
Ave., Hollywood, and the last
five sessions will be at Temple
Beth Shalom, 1400 N. 46th Ave.,
Hollywood.
For further information, call
920-8226 or 981-6111.
In response to the re-awaken-
ing of interest in Jewish mystic-
ism, Four World* Journal has
been established.
An independent, bimonthly
periodical, the magazine will ex-
plore the contemporary relevance
of the Kabbalah and the visio-
nary side of Judaism.
Each issue will contain original
articles, interviews, artwork,
book reviews, poetry and other
features.
The editorial board comprises
leading writers, artists and
scholars who are actively in-
volved with Jewish mysticism
and its meaning today.
They include Gerald Epstein,
MD of Mount Sinai Medical
Center in New York City;
Edward Hoffman, Ph.D., clinical
psychologist; Arthur Kurzweil of
Behrman House Publishers;
Rabbi Lawrence Kushner of
Temple Beth El, Sudbury,
Mass.; Paul Palnik, poster artist
and illustrator; Rabbi Zalman M.
Schachter-Shalomi, professor of
religion at Temple University;
and Howard Schwartz, Ph.D.,
professor of English at the Uni-
versity of Missouri, St. Louis.
For information, contact Four
Worlds Journal, 11301 NW 15th
St., Hollywood, Fla. 33026.
JFSB Board Retreat
Continued from Page 1
demands.
Smith will follow Mrs. Katz,
dealing with the concepts of
Legacies and Endowments'
funding of community service
programs.
^TJewly installed Campaign
Chairman Ted Newman is to ad-
dress goals for the new campaign
and report on progress in Opera-
tion Breakthrough and Super
Sunday-Super Week.
Long-time member Elaine Pit-
tell is to bring the board up to
date on her latest assignment:
New Gifts. She is cochairing the
division with Susan Singer.
The Women's Division is up
next as Nancy Brizel, president
of the division, and Evelyn
Stieber, vice president, cam-
paign, are to enlighten the board
on the status of the many func-
tions (fund-raising and educa-
tional) for the coming year.
Hillcrest's Marc Gilbert is
scheduled next to report on the
summer's Leadership Mission
conducted by U JA, followed by a
recapitulation of the highly suc-
cessful Family Mission.
Mara Giulianti, chairman of
the Federation's Community
Relations Committee (CRC), is to
trace last year's highly successful
programs and delve into what the
board can expect for the 1983-84
year.
Missions are one of Joan Rati-
coff's passions, and her love for
Israel is contagious. The
Missions chairman will bring
board members up to date on
facts and figures from last year
and entice the community with
itineraries including Paris,
Argentina and, of course, Eretz
Y israel.
After lunch (breakfast and
lunch are included in the S15 per
person fee), the afternoon will be
devoted to the national and inter-
national agencies supported by
pledges to the Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
: tamrtmft
/
The session will focus on Isra-
el, to which goes approximately
$60 of every $100 given locally.
Joyce Newman, past president
of the Federation, is to remark on
the ties between the Council of
Jewish Federations and the local
arm.
Bernstein is scheduled next.
As UJA leader, he is responsible
for the largest fund-raising orga-
nization in the United States. He
will talk on the international
Jewish World and the methods
UJA dollars are used to keep its
heart pumping.
Project Renewal Chairmen
Howard Barron and Saul Singer
will report on their committee's
recent visit to Hod Hasharon,
showing a new slide presentation
of be fore-and after scenes.
The doctors will be followed by
Ms. Sherman, who is to point out
the intricacies of the American
Jewish community's involvement
in renewal and the special art of
solicitations for our sister city in
Israel.
Board members will then con-
duct a regular meeting, the first
since June when the 1983-84
board was seated.
Teens Invited
OMor
When selecting a professional,
you often have to choose between
quality and price.
At levitt-Weinstein,
you can have both.
Ask about our Guaranteed Security flan*-.
-Cai today for an appointment.
to dance
Memorial Chapeis
Hollywood '
1921 Pembroke Rd.
305/921-7200
West Palm Beach'
S411 Okeechobee Wvd.
355/689-8700
North Miami Beach
1M0 We*t Dirie Highway
30S/949-6315
Pompano Beach
7M0 N. Stale Road Seven
30S/27-fcSO0
Saturday, Aug 27, Temple
Solel's Youth Group will have a
membership dance starting at 8
p.m. Youth group membership is
open to students in grades 9-12.
Teenagers in the community are
invited.
We Hope
' You Never Need Us '
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monumem, Inc.
Notineasi 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
Music Teacher
Part time for Reform Religious School.
Knowledge of Israeli and Jewish music
essential.
EXCELLENT SALARY
Call Rabbi Rothberg
920-8225_____

TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD
A (Conservative) A

5744
HILLCREST
PLAYDIUM
1100 Hillcrost Drive. Hollywood. Florida
High Holy Day Services
1983
cnndw.t*d by
ELLIOT J. WINOGRAD, RABBI
A. PHILIP TOWSNER, CANTOR
MORDECHAI FESTER,
BAAL SHACHRIT
ROSH HASHANAH
September 7th. 8th & 9th
YOM KIPPUR
September 16th & 17th
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Prayer Boohs. Taleiaim A Skull Caps Provided
Tickets May Be Purchased At Ptaydium Office
For Further Information Call 962-1526
$
$
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
And now you can receive a FREE Permanent"
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi
cal information a gift to you from Menorah Chapels.
HwcTlLTjTlr^T^icl^rTY^
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
J ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
I Mail Coupon to: Menorah Chapeis. 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
j Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33313 Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director
I Name_________----------------------------------------------------------------------
Address.
City.
State_____
Telephone.
Zip.
CljapdS

In Dade. 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach. Fort Lauderdale.
Margate. Deerfteld Beach & West Palm Bead
JF


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 19, U
We're Making
American History.

American Ingenuity Works.
During the past two years, significant changes have
occurred in the savings and loan industry. These changes
are the result of economic factors, higher interest rates and
federal deregulation.
April-June, 1983: the second highest quarterly
profit in American Savings history.
Through management planning, operational efficiencies
and acquisitions... American Savings has dramatically
reversed a $13 million loss for fiscall982 into a $9.5 million
profit for the first nine months of fiscal 1983. For the third
quarter (April-June, 1983), net income was $6.1 million.
These results continue the positive earning trend at
American Savings and underscore managements
achievement of balanced growth, improved customer service
and a stronger market position.
Diversification: a significant contribution to
earnings.
As part of our long-range planning, American Savings
acquired a substantial interest in General Homes
Management Corporation of Houston, Texas, the 4th largest
homebuilder in the United States. The Association's equity
in the earnings of General Homes totalled $5.9 million
profit for the first nine months of fiscal 1983.
Positioned to meet future challenges.
For the 12-month period ending June 30,1983... net
worth increased to $132 million from $39 million. Equally
significant, assets increased nearly 25% to$2.9 billion.
This current net worth level places American Savings
among the nations strongest capitalized savings and loans.
VNfe believe that our financial strength, coupled with
management depth, uniquely positions American Savings
to seek out new and exciting opportunities for increased
growth and profitability in the future.
American Savings, the third largest savings and loan
association domiciled in Florida, and the 29th largest in the
United States, is listed on the New Vbrk Stock Exchange.
For a quarterly report on American Savings, or a
discussion of your individual savings or mortgage kn needs,
visit any of our 55 locations. Our staff will provide the same
professional service and personal attention that has been
the hallmark of American Savings for over three decades.
That's how we made American history.
FSLE
MAKE MONEY THE AMERICAN WAY ^_
AMERICAN SAVINGS^


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