The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00329

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Jewi]fo Floridliao.
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
^13-Number 16
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 6,1983
fi*JS*ocnn
I'nce 35 Cents
rench Anti-Semitism
fficials say it doesn't exist at all
By JOY HAKIM
|sp#c \pyright Baltimore Jiwith Timti
lUprint by Special Arrangement
Chubby, energetic Helen
a retired schoolteacher
Brooklyn, tells me
kit she and her bridge
ends have stopped
ying French perfume,
if she drank French
j she would stop buying
t, too. I am sitting with
en, a woman I just met,
i small waiting room at
linedy Airport. We are
our way to Paris.
en's husband, Sam,
a Yiddish language
urn a freelance writer. I like
ch wine, but I too am
trbed by what I hear about
[situation of the Jews in
3LEN AND I are in for some
rises. We are embarking on a
; that will see us received by
aders of the French govern-
and by top officials of the
ch Jewish establishment.
will tell us things that will
The Paris/Israel connection
Discover the Paris-Israel Connection on a
special October 11-24 mission, sponsored by
the Jewish Federation of South Broward. Be
a part of a once-in-a-lifetime travel op-
portunity, exploring two countries at a very
affordable price.
The mission begins in Paris, the home of
375,000 Jews, which is rich in its history and
points of interest. Visit the Jewish quarter
and numerous stops of significance to Jewish
past, present and future. Enjoy cocktails
with David de Rothschild, president of the
Jewish Federation of Paris, and meet other
important communal leaders. The itinerary
includes ample opportunities to absorb the
ambiance and cultural richness for which
Paris is justly famed.
Then, on to Israel for nine days that will
warm your heart and soul. Meet with top
leaders of the Jewish State, including
President Chaim Herzog, for insightful and
candid briefings about the challenges facing
the people of Israel. Visit Hod Hasharon,
shatter our preconceptions.
Again and again we will hear,
"the American Jew has the
wrong picture of France. Go
home and tell what we are really
tike."
Helen says, "Wait until my
bridge group hears." I am
writing this to tell you.
But see for yourself. Take the
trip vicariously. Read my notes:
TWA Flight 800: Francois C.
sits in the next seat. We have six
hours to talk. He is an interna-
tional headhunter a recruit-
ment executive on his way
home from a meeting in Prince-
ton, N.J. Francois is soft-spoken
and intelligent, he looks at my
itinerary. He is impressed.
"You're seeing all the right
people," he tells me.
"I'M PARTICULARLY in-
terested in finding out about anti-
Semitism in France," I tell him.
"There isn't any," says my
seatmate.
"Oh, come on."
"No," he insists, "the ground
in France may be fertile. If the
seeds are planted it could erupt
again, but right now, anti-Semi-
tism is not a problem."
Of course, I don't believe him.
Nice man, but he's not Jewish,
what does he know?
Monday, 8 p.m.: Michael
Schneider, head of the Paris
office of the American Joint
Continued on Page 2
\hamir and Arens'
IS. visit a
access story'
:KUSALEM (JTA> Foreign Minister Yitzhak
iir told the Cabinet that the visit to Washington by
elf and Defense Minister Moshe Arens was a "suc-
story."
beting the Cabinet at its weekly meeting, Shamir de-
led the talks in Washington with President Reagan,
kary of State Shultz and other top Administration
Congressional leaders as "most positive and friend-
|Hasically, Shamir explained, the Reagan Adminis-
)n now fully supports the Israel redeployment in
i Lebanon.
foreign. Minister made the same point upon his return to Israel,
ktatement to reporters at Ben Gurion Airport and in a series of
hews Shamir said that he and Arens had set the Reagan
nitration's mind at rest concerning Israeli intentions in
on.
Keagan Administration ended three days of talks with Shamir
irens having accepted the Israeli decision to redeploy its troops
t>anon as "inevitable" and agreeing to Israel's contention that it
I be the first phase of its withdrawal from Lebanon.
his nationally televised press conference, Reagan, asked
redeployment, said: "I am very hopeful that if this
> withdrawal takes place that it will be recognised and admitted
by the Israelis as one phase of their agreement to withdraw."
I added that if the Israeli redeployment is part of a "phased with-
al it will certainly give us a better chance for breaking the dead-
M>at has been established by Syria and persuading them to keep
[original promise that when others withdrew, they would with-
loscow Jews arrested
WITH A LOT MORE ROOM TO GROW in its new Hollywood quarters, the Jewish Family
Service is serving more South Broward residents than ever before. JFS is now located at 4517
Hollywood Boulevard. Above, a large group therapy session is shown during a recent non-
group session. For more information about the Jewish Family Service, call 966-0956.
Judge criticized for ruling
Maikovskis 'not deportable'
|W YORK (JTA) Four
T>w Jews were arrested last
V night for holding a private
service, the Student
le for Soviet Jewry re-
Of the approximately one
persons present at the
service, those arrested were Mik-
hail Abramov, Igor Briskman,
and Mikhail Rudman.
The arresting officer, Capt.
Mikhail Stepanov, told them,
"Until you leave the country, you
will live by our rules," the SSSJ
reported.
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) Peggy Tish-
man, the newly-elected president of
the Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York, deplored a
ruling by a federal immigration judge
that alleged Nazi war criminal
Boles lavs Maikovskis was "not
deportable."
Maikovskis, 76. was charged with
failing to disclose, when he entered
the United States in 1961, that he had
been a member of the Latvian police
guard which, the Justice Department
has charged, had exterminated about
20,000 Latvian Jews and other
Latvian citizens. Maikovskis had
declared, on his entry to this country,
that he had been a bookkeeper during
World War II, when Latvia was
occupied by the Germans.
In 1965 he was convicted in absen-
tia for war crimes by a Soviet court in
Riga, and sentenced to death.
The ruling by Judge Francis Lyons
in Manhattan Federal Court, will
allow Miakovskis, a retired carpenter
who now lives in Mineola, Lob
Island, to remain in the U.S. Nc
Sher, acting director of the Justice
Department's Office of Special
Investigations, said in Washington
that hia office was considering an
anneal against Lyons' ruling.
Baeia For Jadge'a Rating
The radge held thati Maikovskis'
past conduct did not rise to toe -level
of depravity" needed to make his
alleged crimes "contrary to human
decency" Lyons held that the arrest
of villagers in the Latvian town of
Audrini "and the burning of the
village under orders of the German
invaders of Latvia was a reprisal
against the killing of one or more Lat-
vian police officers."
The Justice Department had
charged that 15,000 residents, in-
cluding all residents of Audrini,
eventually were killed.
Lyons held also that there had been
no suggestion of racist motivation in
Continued on Page 11


^
"np^ ............................... TTte Jeu>ts* Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
n ,-l

v. Friday, August &,(9ga
Continued from Page 1
Distribution Committee (the non-
political overseas social welfare
agency of the VIA) briefs us with
statistics on France. Next to the
USSR, it has the largest Jewish
community in Europe, third
largest in the diaspora. Seven-
hundred thousand Jews live in
France today: before World War
II there were 270,000; of those.
90,000 died in the Holocaust.
TREMENDOUS problems
have been associated with this
more-than-tripling of the Jewish
population. Terrible strain on all
Jewish institutions. Only 15
percent of French Jewish children
have access to a Jewish
education.
The old pre-war French Jew
was a private Jew, very French,
he tried not to make waves. The
new Jew, often Sephardic, is very
visible and outspoken in his
Jewishness
Tuesday, 9 a.m.: We visit the
"Memorial To the Unknown
Jewish Martyr." Simple, stark
slab of a museum, with docu-
ments from the Second World
War, including orders signed by
Klaus Barbie.
IN THE courtyard, powerful
and silent, a huge stone chimney
engraved with names of the
extermination camps. Ashes
from those camps have been
brought to a crypt below the
courtyard; light enters the crypt
through a glass Star of David in
the center of the chimney. We
place a wreath and say kaddish.
11 a.m.: Meeting with Claude-
Gerard Marcus, Deputy Mayor of
Paris and Member of the French
National Assembly. Marcus is a
devout Jew. We are at the Hotel
de Ville, a building that certainly
must be the world's most opulent
city hall: ornate, embellished,
elegant it screams of majesty
and power, as was intended.
We are served champagne,
caviar, hearts of palm; from long
windows, a view of Notre Dame,
the Seine and the Left Bank; I
almost forget why we are here.
SOMEONE ASKS, "Monsieur
Marcus, what about anti-Semi-
tism in France?"
"Everytime I go to the United
States I am surprised at the
opinon of anti-Semitism in
France. I can assert that if there
is an old tradition of anti-Semi-
tism in France, it is not very
important today
"We are troubled by terror-
ism," he continues, "but that is
not linked to anti-Semitism,
rather to the situation in the
Middle East"
Hmm. Someone aaks about
Klaus Barbie.
"The trial will enable the
young generation to understand
what Nazism was like. It will also
heal the wounds among the
French people, but it will show
that someo! them collaborated."
12:45 p.m.: Visit to ORT
School in Paris. School designed
for 600 students. 2.000 enrolled.
FRENCH JEWS:
Gendarmes must guard every Jewish
building. Terrorist acts against Jews
have been plentiful and spectacular.
problem," Lehmann says.
"France must make its stand
clear. There is no compromise
with terrorism. It is a new way to
make war at a very low cost. The
terrorists are trying to destabilize
democracy."
7 p.m.: We walk through the
old Jewish district. Dinner at Jo
Goldenberg's restaurant. Sign in
the window thanks patrons for
showing solidarity after the
infamous attack here. Paula
Borenstein. JDC staff member,
Holocaust survivor and very
special person, is our guide
through Paris. She says. "People
visiting here used to ask me to
arrange a meeting with one of the
Rothschilds. Now they ask to eat
at Jo Goldenberg's." We meet
Goldenberg who is pleasant. The
meal is so-so.
Twenty-five trades are taught,
subjects like mechanics, electro-
nics, bookkeeping, cabinet-
making. Most of the students
have failed to make the grade in
regular schools, 80 percent are
Jewish. Hebrew culture and reli-
gious studies are required for all
students. Almost no dropout
rate, 100 percent" job placement,
although most graduates go on to
university study.
MOST IMPRESSIVE to me is
a young woman seated with me
at lunch bright, charming
ORT graduate, her English is
marvelous, she learned it at this
school.
"It is a wonderful school," she
says, "everyone cares."
5:30 p.m.: Meeting with Daniel
Buk and Gilbert Lehmann, 36
and 37, two leaders of Renouveou
Juif, Jewish action organization,
founded in 1973. Renouveou Juif
means sort of "born again"
Jew. Buk and Lehmann, elegant-
ly tailored Frenchmen, see them-
selves as representatives of the
"new" active Jew. Lehmann is a
banker, Buk an engineer.
The organization has attempt-
ed to create a Jewish lobby in
France, to give the Jews political
clout, a new concept in that
country. Members have worked
hard politically, often in opposi-
tion to specific candidates. They
supported Mitterrand, but now
have mixed feelings about him.
After the bombing of the Rue
Copernic Synagogue, they
organized a march down the
Champs Elysees. More than
100,000 Frenchmen marched to
show their sympathy with the
Jews.
Two years ago the group cre-
ated Radio Juif. a free network
with 100,000 listeners. Renou-
veau Juif has 10,000 paying
members; the radio station has a
staff of 80, all volunteers.
"WHAT ABOUT anti-Semit-
ism in France?" someone asks.
"Today traditional anti-Semit-
ism doesn't exist here. What we
have is more intellectual, it's
anti-Zionism," says Buk.
This is the only Jewish organi-
zation we will visit that is not
guarded by police. But the offices to donate my blood for an Israeli
are down a small alley, through a "soldier who is protecting my
every school, every syna-
gogue, every community center.
The government will not,
however, take direct action
against the terrorists.
11:45 a.m.: Visit toOhr-Joseph,
a splendid and inspiring institu-
tion with facilities that go from
nursery school to old age apart-
ments, with a high school, stu-
dent housing, and a university
school of computer science in be-
tween. Ohr-Joseph has satellite
facilities and kosher kitchens in
other French cities. It all began
40 years ago with a yeshiva
founded in an internment camp.
After the war, the rebbes had no
place to live so they built their
own housing.
With the knowledge they
gained, they opened a construc-
tion company. Money from that
built a school. Ohr-Joseph now
owns a number of manufacturint
and construction companies, It's I
a unique combination of industry I
and education, with all the bust
ness profits going to Ohr-Josapll
facilities. "Wherever we build |
schools they are full in a
imonths,'' says one of the leads
3:30 p.m.: Meeting at Elysees
Palace (French White House!
with two of Mitterrand's top
aides, Jacques Attali and Jean
Louis Bianco.
I CANT help noticing the
Louis XV furniture, the gilt, the
tapestries. Attali (a well-known I
Jewish political writer) and
Bianco are courteous, they an-1
swer questions, but like good!
politicians, they say little. The*'
tell us how wonderful Mitterrano*
is, that he is a friend of Israel-;
that terrorism has created
sympathy for the Jews.
6 p.m.: Meeting with members
of World Jewish Congress. These
are the people that those at
Renouveau Juif call the "older I
generation." I have to agree.
They are courteous and intelli-j
Continued on Page 4
Wednesday, 9 a.m.: Meeting at
Israeli Embassy with
Ambassador Meir Rosenne.
"There is no doubt in our mind
that terrorism around the world
is organized by the PLO we
have tangible proof. We have
renewed our request with the
French government to close the
PLO office in Paris."
WE ARE SITTING in a long,
narrow, wood-panelled room.
Rosenne, now Ambassador to the
U.S.; is affable and quick-witted.
It is easy to understand why he is
popular with the French.
On the wall, a memorial plaque
and picture of a young,
bespectacled man. It says, "Salle
de conference in memory of
Yacov Varsimantov, 3 Avril
1982. killed in Paris by
terrorists."
"We have many differences on
a political level with the French,
but as far as the sentiments of
the French people toward us,
they are extremely warm and
friendly," Rosenne says. "During
the Lebanese fighting I received
721 letters, mostly from non-
Jews, expressing solidarity with
Israel. They were from generals,
from members of the French
Academy, one from an old
woman who wrote, 'I would like
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc. Funeral Directors
The most respected name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531 -1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P.. Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish, Vice President, F.D.
William F. Saulson, Family Consultant
Carl Grossberg
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged Funeral
Tradition. Hi what makes us Jews.
courtyard, up rickety stairs; past
an unmarked door.
"Terrorism is a European
Barry University
MA IN JEWISH STUDIES
FALL SEMESTER 6:30 9:30 P.M.
Auo.29-Dec.1S.l9B3
Tues., "American Jewish Community"
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
Wad., "History of Judaism" .
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
)..
Admissions Office: 11300 N.E. 2nd Avs.
758-3392 Miami Shores, FL 33161
Name-------
ADDRESS.
City----------
.State.
-Zip-
Phone: Home.
.Bus..
is
Christian brothers.'
"PERSONALLY I have no
problem with Mitterrand, I think
he is a friend of the Jewish peo-
ple. He has been in Israel six
times.
"Sometimes you get the feeling
that the word 'peace' is por-
nographic. -The media suggests
we are too demanding crop
gourmand we just want preen
There is no precedent in history
for a government that won the
wars giving back all the Besots
and then being condemned as
intransigent. The Arab states are
against the peace process; we
must make sure they don't put
pressure on Lebanon to stop the
peace process.
"The UN has 16 times con-
demned the peace treaty between
Israel and Egypt. The UN,
formed and paid for by the world
community to promote peace."
Rosenne is a sunny man, but
the message is heavy.
OUTSIDE, I feel as if 1 am
leaving a besieged fort gen-
darmes everywhere Rosenne has
told us that the French govern
ment pays for soldiers to guard
every Jewish institution in Paris
^^ENTERTAINMENT!
The 2nd Annual "SINAI SERIES"
Begins with
CHAIM POTOK
Sunday Evening. December 18,1983
ALL IOW STAIIT AT tPM ____
January 22.1984
INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL
Cantors David Levine. Yaakov Motzen.
and Opera Tenor J. Alexander Perez.
February 12. 1984
THE FABULOUS
BROTHERS 71M
March II. 1984
THE MIAMI
LYRIC OPERA COMPANY
SERIES TICKETS $45.00 Per Person
(After October 31. 1983 $50.00 Per Person).
Tickets May be Purchased at Temple Sinai Hollywood
Telephone: 920-1577


iSuy^ugust 5,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Your pledge Is your promise
to help Jews In need
By ELAINE PITTELL
Caah Chairman
Your pledge to the Jewish
Federation of South Broward is
your promise to help Jews in
need, both at home and abroad.
They payment of that pledge is
the fulfillment of that promise.
In supporting the UJA-
Federation Campaign, we reach
to aid human service pro-
is in Israel and in 32 other
countries worldwide. But of equal
importance are the programs we
provide for individuals in our own
community.
One of the many local benefi-
ciaries of our campaign is the
Hillel Jewish Student Centers, an
agency that brings the beauty
and spirit of Judaism onto the
college campuses. The ongoing
[projects and services of Hillel
kinjpire and involve our youth as
^they make their transition into
julthood. Hillel brings these
Iro'ing people, who will be our
[future Jewish leaders, into a
setting in whkh they can meet
and socialize with other young
Jews. This is particularly im-
portant in this age in whkh we
near and read so much about reli-
gious cults and missionaries who
prey on our teenagers when they
are most vulnerable when they
are alone or isolated.
I recently received a letter from
three young adults who praised
Hillel and the services it has
brought to the Tallahassee
campus of Florida State Univer-
sity. They wrote:
"In the fall of 1980, the Jewish
student community was a non-
cohesive organization. Jewish
students were based in a small
apartment not easily accessible
to the campus. As of 1982, with
the community, students and
university's assistance, Hillel
succeeded in obtaining a house
directly across from the campus.
It was the first major establish-
ment that offered Jewish reli-
gious and cultural activities, and
successfully attracted students.
"Today, with membership
almost tripled, our functions and
motivation have induced inter-
action and stimualtion for the
growing Jewish student body.
The future outlook for Hillel
leaders is to have influence in the
policy making at Florida State.
We greatly appreciate the sup-
port of South Florida's Jewish
Federations.
"Shalom, (signed) Karen,
David and Jody"
Hillel is just one of the many
services you support through the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. If you have not already
paid your pledge to the cam-
paign, I urge you to do so today.
There has never been a greater
need for cash to keep our
programs operating without loss
of services. You have already
made your promise to our college
youth and so many other Jews
locally, nationally and interna-
tionally. Now, keep your promise.
\M! orris B. Abram to head
Soviet Jewry campaign
NEW YORK Morris B.
\bram. a Manhattan lawyer, was
elected chairman of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
iNCSJ) at the last meeting of its
Hoard of Governors. The NCSJ is
: major coordinating agency in
't his country on behalf of the Jew-
I ish minority in the Soviet Union,
with a membership of 41 national
| organizations, and nearly 300
local Jewish community relations
councils and federations.
A former representative to the
United Nations Commission on
Human Rights and former chair-
man oi the United Negro College
Fund, Abram has long been
[active in the human and civil
" igats movements. He also has
Wong Jewish community ties,
1 having served for five years as
president of the American Jewish
Committee, and as president of
Rrandeis University. He is
currently under consideration for
the United States Commission on
Civil Rights.
Abram, a native of Georgia, is
a senior partner in the law firm of
Paul. Weiss. Rifkind, Wharton
and Garrison. He is a former
K nodes scholar who studied at
Oxford University and is the
author of an autobiography. The
Bay is Short, published by
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich in
1982.
In assuming the new position,
Abram asserted that "The Soviet
Union is obliged to place upon its
iron gates the promise to which it
subscribed in the Universal
^Declaration of Human Rights,
which assures that 'Everyone has
I the right to leave any country,'
including one in which he is a
citizen."
Abram stressed that in the
| current campaign for Soviet
Jews, hope is vital. Recalling a
statement made by Winston
Morris B. Abram
Churchill to his war weary
countrymen, he urged that "One
should never for a moment think
that the struggle is n vain. In the
name of all Jews in the Soviet
Union who wish to emigrate to
Israel and practice their heritage,
I pledge to continue our efforts
with renewed energy and vigor."
Mr. Abram succeeds Theodore
R. Mann of Philadelphia in the
three-year post.
Elected with Abram as vice-
chairpersons were Jacqueline
Levine, National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council; Ivan Novick. Zionist
Organization of America; Joseph
Smukler of Philadelphia, and
Rabbi Joseph Sternstein,
American Zionist Federation. Re-
elected were Robert Goldmann,
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith; Rabbi David Hill. Na-
tional Council of Young Israel;
and Rita Salberg, B'nai B'rith
Women.
Daniel Rubin of Bergen
County, New Jersey, was elected
treasurer, while Rabbi David
Goldstein of New Orleans was
elected financial secretary. Re-
elected as secretary was Margery
Kohrman, Women's American
ORT.
This year's newly elected Exe-
cutive Committee members
include: Alan Bernstein, Metro-
politan New Jersey; Marshall
Brachman, Fort Worth, Texas;
Rabbi Ralph Kingsley, Central
Conference of American Rabbis;
Dorothy Lane, Hadassah;
Charlene Loup, Denver,
Colorado; Leo Nevas, American
Jewish Committee; Stanley
Ruskin, Pittsburgh; Constance
Smukler, Philadelphia.
Re-elected were: Lucille Brot-
man, San Diego; Dr. Robert O.
Freedman, Baltimore; Philip
Lax, B'nai B'rith; Elaine Pittell.
Hollywood, Florida; Edward
Robin, Los Angeles; Joel J.
Sprayregen, Chicago; and Marcia
Weinberg, Washington, D.C.
In memorlum
LEONARD SCHIFF (1916-1989)
By Bear
Recently, we lost a man who lived a life worth Irving. He lived
for others, and, therefore, he lived for himself. It's not the
number of years that count, but the quality.
Leonard was a loving, devoted husband. The end of a long and
happy marriage ended when his wife, Edith, passed away.
Leonard's love for the family unit epitomized the expression,
"The family is one of nature's masterpieces." He adored his
daughter, Caroline, her two children, Deborah and David, as
well as his son-in-law, Reuben.
Leonard was a successful businessman. Upon retirement, he
devoted much of his time in giving service. He was a giver. He
gave his money, and he gave of himself.
Leonard's father wished him to study for the rabbinate.
Leonard did not feel that this was his calling. In the 1930s, he
went to Palestine, before Israel became a State. He fought in the
Hagannah. was involved in the dangerous job of smuggling
arms into Palestine, and risked his life at every moment.
His love and devotion to Israel was understandable, under
such circumstances. He knew at first hand, better than most, of
Israel's valiant struggle for survival. His work with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, aside from his own very liberal
gifts, helped Emerald Hills achieve greater goals than ever
attained before.
He was a total pragmatist. His outlook on life reflected this.
He was not casual about it. He simply knew the score. He would
say, "Make the most of your years. They are all too few. Do well
unto others. Smell the roses." And, that's the way he lived.
Leonard was a founder-member of the Emerald Hills Lodge of
B'nai B'rith. He served on the Board at the inception of the
Lodge, and was a Board member at the time of his passing. He
had long been identified with B'nai B'rith before coming to
Florida.
He was a founder-member of Temple Solel in Hollywood. He
gave most generously of his means and of his time. Again, he
will be sorely missed.
To Caroline, Reuben, and their two wonderful children, we
offer a bit of solace from the words of Tennyson:
"A land of promise, a land of memory,
A land of promise flowing with the milk
and honey of delicious memories."
Marvin Gottlieb's
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
We Appreciate Your Business
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
iaron said to be unhappy;
imors he may resign
JERUSALEM (JTA) -Arid Sharon is unhappy
with his limited role in the government since he was forced
(to resign as Defense Minister and is thinking of quitting
[the Cabinet according to "close friends" quoted in a
Wauriv report.
I ACCORDING TO THE REPORT, he is "chaffing at
|>is enforced idleness." He did not attend the weekfy
Cabinet meeting last Sunday and rarely appears at his
""usalem or Tel Aviv offices, Maariv said.
He spends most of his time on his ranch in the Negev.
report triggered speculation over repercussions
ron's departure might have on Premier Menachem
egin's coalition.
Own at the Versailles
for $500 a month!
From $29,990,
the best bargain
on Miami Beach!
The Versailles is having
a renaissance. One of the
most elegant and respected
hotels on Miami Beach is
now offering stately hotel/
condominiums priced from
$29,990! There's 200
feet of tropical ocean beach,
a beachfront pool and
everything is included, too.
Carpeting, drapes, a color TV, a brand-
new refrigerator... everything from the
furnishings to the phones!
Monthly payments include
everything from your base
telephone service to
maintenance, even your water
and electric bills. Plus you get
your choice of fabulous
views of the Atlantic Ocean,
or Indian Creek and the Bay.
The terms are terrific, too.
A 30-year fixed rate mortgage at 10%
interest! 10%!
Vev4iule&
3425 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida 33140 Call 1-800.327-4501 or 531-6092
Sales Office open 10 AM to 6 PM 7 days
.W $24,000 lo.
s $2IO*2 (friadpri mi m
10* taMM <* 110 1/4% ANNUAL KJtCENTAGl KATE)
>.0* ii|......nd 11 i........Wnlil in mtttmettmtmimi
printM.9W.aA *
4 rr S0o 71S.S01. fbrih 1
hmm
$S,MO.MOi
Mrta
t**tm*mm*f*r*bmi>***Hm<**mm- Mi..l.d^
mhwcm

\wv.v. AVA^^^v,^^^^v".>^'yz

Page*

"T!a"T
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

*Md*r. August 6,1983
UNDER
Continued from Page 2
gent, but there is no passion. We
are offered canapes and conver-
sation. One member addresses
us, the message is one I now
accept: "I have just come back
from the States. Everywhere the
same question, 'How can you live
with this terrible anti-Semitism?'
I answer, 'It is not worse here
than anywhere.' Where do you
get this idea? Has the American
Jewish Press misled you?"
Thursday, 8 a.m.: Breakfast at
the Quai D'Orsay. Greeted by
gentlemen in white tie and tails.
Croissants and cafe-au-lait in a
state dining room with the
relaxed and affable Claude
Cheysonne, French Foreign
Minister. M. Cheysonne is per-
ceived by much of the French
Jewish community as a combina-
tion of Machiavelli and the
Wicked Witch of the West.
He says complimentary words
about the Israeli government,
about the right of Israel to live in
peace. He says Israel has at-
tacked the basis of Lebanon's
economic succes. (Afterwards I
kick myself for not asking
'how?") He talks of the dangers
of the Khomeini revolution to the
area.
THERE IS no equivocation
when he says, "We see the PLO
as the representative of the
Palestinians." He also makes it
dear that the views of any top
minister are the views of his
government and president.
11 a.m.. Meeting with Ber-
nard-Henri Levy, 33-year-old
philosopher. His fourth book re-
viewed in the newspaper be
Matin (glowingly) this morning..
He writes occasionally for The
New Republic. Was a war cor
respondent in Bangladesh.
Comes from the liberal left.
Levyslim, with long dark
hair and the intensity of a poet-
speaks. "The anti-Semitism we
knew is dead. We will never again
here Nazis speak of a master race.
We will not hear ourselves called
Christ-killers. European
Catholics are more and more
friendly to the Jews.
"THE NEW anti-Semitism is
anti-Zionism, the link to Israel.
It says: 'The Jewish people is
guilty of a Holocaust upon the
Palestinians. These diabolical
people use the memory of what
happened to them to hide what
they are doing to others.'
"We are no longer the people
with big noses, but the people
who persecute the true' op-
pressed of today, Besides, they
say, maybe the Jewish Holocaust
was not so bad. Maybe they
exaggerated. Maybe they enjoy
the role of eternal victim.
"People need legitimacy for
hatred. The ground needs to be
prepared. For 20 or 30 years
before Dreyfus, the Jews were
portrayed as economic blood-
suckers. It became patriotic to be
anti-Semitic.
"TODAY THE Jews are not
yet hated. I've never been told I
am a Christ-killer, as ray father
was. But the little Frenchman is
French Jews and officials say Amer-
icans have it all wrong
anti-Semitism.
there's no
beginning to accept the idea that
these people are guilty, not of
what our grandparents thought,
but of being persecutors.'
"Work is in progress that will
make it normal to hate me. They
will hate me because they will
convince themselves that I am an
oppressor.
"If there is an orchestration of
this campaign, it comes from
Moscow, a state that is openly
anti-Semitic.
"Anti-Semitism is rooted in a
hatred of the law. It goes back to
pre-Christian times, you find it in
Cicero. We are witnesses for the
law. We are still engaged in a
fight between the Bible and
idolatry.
"I AM NOT anti-Palestinian
at all, but I am violently ant;
PLO. It is an international of
murderers. How do we fight
back? Our only answers are sym-
bolic. We need to help form a
Palestinian national identity. We
need to give them a Balfour
Declaration. It shouldn't be used
against us.
"We need to show solidarity
with Israel. We need to affirm
and celebrate our Jewishness. We
need to rebuild the link between
the'Judaism of Israel and the
Judaism of the diaspora.
"There have always been
ashamed Jews. The new shape
says,' I am not in favor of Israel,'
'I am one with you,'' don't want
anything to do with Begin.' "
12 Noon: Quick trip to a Jew-
ish Community Center in a four-
story inner-city building. Worn,
crowded, obviously much used.
3:45 p.m.: Meeting with Evan
Galbraith, U.S. Ambassador.
Nice guy, Yale graduate, not re-
lated to the other Galbraith. U.S.
Embassy seems austere after all
the French grandeur.
"FRENCH ARMS exports are
next to food imports in national
importance," says Mr. G. "The
French feel the U.S. should lean
hard on Israel and force it to
withdraw from Lebanon."
7:45 p.m..: Dinner at a kosher
restaurant in Montmarte. Falafel
okay, Montmarte a visual feast.
Friday, 9 a.m.: Breakfast at
local Jewish federation building
(FSJU). Meeting with members
of Jewish press. Long-winded ad-
dress on narrow problems. These
editors, like some others I have
known, like to hear themselves
talk. They complain of the
paucity of the French Jewish
press, but we look at their pub-
lications and are surprised by the
variety and quality.
10:30 a.m.: Conference with
Mme. Jacqueline Keller, execu-
tive director of CRIF. an asso-
ciation of 54 Jewish agencies. In
France, the Grand Rabbi heads a
Jewish Floridian
end Sholer of Oreeler Hollywood
* fr*3Shochil
FREDSMOCHET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and PutMiarier Aeeoclate Editor Executive Editor
Published Bi Weekly Sacond Cim Poataga paid at Hallandala. Fla USPS 864500
HOLLVWOOO-FORT LAUOEROALE OFFICE. Am. Savtnga 2600 B4dg.. 2500 E Hallandala Baacn
Blvd.. Suita 7070. Hallandala, Fla. 33009 Pnona 454-04M
Aaiahai B. Helpem. Adierltelrn Supanrlai
Main Ottlca Plant: 120 NEStn St., Miami, Fla 33132Phone 1-37K605
Poetmaaler Form M7*retume to Jawtah Flortdi.n. P.O. 8o 01-M73. Miami, Fla. 33101
Jawlah Federation of South Broward of hcera Preeideni Or Philip A. Levin, vice Preaidente. Di
Saul Singer, Tad Newman and Nat Sediey. Treaeurer Dr. Howard Barron, Secretary: Otto.
Stieoer; Executive Director Sumner 0. Kave Submit mat-rial for publication to Steve Katon.
aieociate editor.
Member JTA. Seven Art., WNI. NEA, AJPA. end FPA.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Area S3.50 Annual (2 Year Minimum ST); or by memberehlp Jewlah
Federation of South Broward. 2719 Hollywood Blvd Hollywood, Fla 33020 Pnona 9214810
Out of Town Upon Requeat
Friday. August 5,1983 26 AB 5743
Volume 13 Number 16
Jo Goldenberg's kosher restaurant attacked by terrorists is a
fixture on the Jewish tourist route. Sign defies terrorism, urges
justice and rule of law.
"We have no trouble gaining
access to Mitterrand," she says,
"but it is impossible to get our
views on TV. Only the pro-PLO
Jews are heard."
Keller is more alarming than
some of the others we have lis-
tened to. "We are now used to
living with guards and gates .
We want inquiries into the ter-
hierarchy of Jewish religious
bodies. The social, political and
educational organizations come
under the CRIF, umbrella.
MME. KELLER, a no-non-
sense woman, repeats what we
have heard before: The French
are no more anti-Semitic than
Americans. But there is an im-
portant problem with the press.
rorista groups. Wo want new
anti-terroriat laws. We have a
terrible feeling of isolation. Many
non-Jews are afraid to live in our
neighborhoods, afraid that the
bullet meant for a Jew will hit
them."
"We are dismayed by the
French government's initiative*-'
during the Lebanese War; they
helped save the PLO. American
money will help finance an
August conference in Paris on the
Palestinian question. We don't
want it here. We expect
Cheysonne to receive Arafat. We
are afraid of the political and ter-
rorist consequences." (Editors
Note: This report was filed before
the French asked the PLO to
move. The conference is now set
for Geneva.)
I AM impressed by Mme.
Keller, as I have been with so '
many of the other French Jews I
have met. Theirs is a vital,
vigorous community. The
Sephardic leaderswho often
seem to have a bad press in the
U.S.have been particularly
strong and attractive.
5:30 p.m.: Services at Rue
Copernic Synagogue. Rabbi
Williams, a redbearded English-
man who speaks impeccable
French, delivers a sermon on the
Tun Commandments. He is
ebulient, the whitewashed sane-.
tuary is bright, the chanting is
joyous. I, a New Englander, who
learned early to stay in control,
find myself weeping. I am stand-
ing next to a plaque memorializ-
ing a 21-year-old killed by terror-
ists. It is more than I can handle.
We leave the services and
notice, in addition to the
ubiquitous gendarme and his
rifle, an armored police vehicle
with a machine gun on its roof.
.)i.-
Reprint by Special Arrangement
EU
ac
ih
COl
in
-
CO
br
\l
Li
mi
Li
st
Mi
wl
Rl
re
kh
Ni
lb
P*
tb
wl
th
ec
R
G
on
up
('<
S
IK
bi
('(
ci
Ai
of
Ri
na
of
bl
CV
1
Lj
U
sr
aj
C
n
i(
M
H
Ift Easy to Feel Like a MiNon
Without Spending a Dime
A! first glance, it's just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe its
a garage filled with tools Or a closet
fiHed with clothes. -
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us it's worth millions. It's worth
medicine and medical supplies tor
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital tor the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible. Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops -when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Itls that easy. And youH feet Kte a
million without spending a dime.
5713 NW 27th Ave
500 N.E 79th St
3149 HaMandate Beach Blvd.
&
Irving Cypan. Chairman of the Board
HaroWBack.PrKJenl
Aaron Kravitz. Chairman. Thrift Shop
Comrmiee
Bed D. HW. Executive Diractor
aa


Friday, August 5, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and
iteri
>y
ur
ie
it
ie
it-'
y
in
in
ie
1't
ct
Ie
w
rs
rt
to
et
ie
bi
h-
le
it-
is
iCv
is
10
>1,
d-
z-
r-
!.
d
ie
is
le..
'Semitic acts deplored
Reagan critical of sad fate of Nicaragua's Jews
ByJTA Services
WASHINGTON President
Reagan has deplored anti-Semitic
acts in Nicaragua, citing the fact
that "virtually the entire Jewish
community has been frightened
into exile by the Sandinista
-gime.
The President made the
comment at a White House
briefing addressed by Rabbi
Morton Kosenthal. director of the
Latin American Affairs Depart-
ment of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, and Isaac
Siiivisky, a member of the
Nicaraguan Jewish community
who was forced into exile.
According to Rosenthal,
Keagan told the briefing organ-
ised by the White House Out-
reach Group on Central America
in,it the repressions against the
Nicaraguan Jewish community is
the consequence of a "self-
proclaimed blood unity between
the Sandinistas and the PLO"
whose "results are evident for all
the world to see and are an evil
echo of history."
Reform Woman Rabbi
Qata 'Solo' Pulpit
NEW YORK A Reform-
ordained woman rabbi, whose
application to become the first
Conservative woman rabbi was
rejected last April at a conven-
tion of Conservative rabbis, has
been appointed rabbi of a
Conservative synagogue in
Clifton Park, N.Y.
A source at the Rabbinical
Assembly (RA). the association
of Conservative rabbis, said
Rabbi Beveraly Magidson was
named solo rabbi of Beth Shalom
of Clifton Park, effective Aug. 1,
her first pulpit. She is leaving her
current post as associate director
) the Hillel Foundation at
Washington University in St.
Louis to take the Clifton pulpit.
The term "solo rabbi" is used
to refer to a congregation too
small to need or to be able to
afford more than one rabbi. The
Clifton Park congregation is
made up of slightly more than
100 families, the RA sources said.
McFarlane Replaces
Hablb in Mideast
WASHINGTON President
Keagan has named Robert
TUDI0
Continental
Cuisine
FREOJOMI
walcomaa
you back to
Ml ranownad
ram
RESTAURANT
'of umqua
dining axparianca
Mated your table to your
mood m on* ot 5 individual
'oomt ThaTant
WlnaCallar. Studio placa
Pigalla. Swiaa Chaiat
Fine Entertainment
at trie Piano
Alto violin playing
for your plaatura
OPENS AT 5 P.M. |
innvata lunchaona arranged)
ENJOV COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO" 1
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340SW32AVE.
445-5371
clOMd Monday*
McFarlane. a deputy assistant
for national security affairs, to
replace Philip Habib as his
personal representative in the
Middle East. McFarlane, who, as
Habib did, will carry the personal
rank of ambassador, is expected
to leave for the Middle East
within a week.
The surprise announcement
was made by Reagan last Friday
as he concluded a 90- minute
White House meeting with
Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel. Reagan said that
Habib "must return to his
business and academic duties."
But Administration officials
later conceded that one of the
reasons is to bring in a "new
face" in the United States diplo-
matic process in the hope that
this will aid the U.S. effort to
convince Syria to remove its
forces from Lebanon. Habib has
not been welcome in Damascus
and it is hoped that the Syrians
will now receive his replacement.
Canadians Big
Gift to Gurion Univ.
MONTREAL The Canadian
government has donated $60,000
to the Canadian Associates of the
Ben Gurion University of the
Negev toward its sponsorship of
the first "Right to Food" confer-
ence to be held in Montreal May
25-27, 1984.
The check was presented by
Agriculture Minister Eugene
Whelan who declared in the
House of Commons, "The Cana-
dian Associates of the Ben
Gurion University are to be
congratulated for taking this
initiative." He noted that the
conference "is intended to inform
the public that hunger can be
beaten within the next generation
if countries use the means at their
disposal."
Soviets Export
Propaganda Film
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) reported that a new film
made by the Soviet government
for export abroad, particularly to
the United States, links Zionism
with Nazism and racism.
According to the NCSJ, the
film, "Babi Yar: the Lessons of
History," is disturbing because it
represents an attempt to expand
the ongoing Soviet propaganda
campaign personified bv the
three-and-a-half month old "Anti-
Zionist Committee."
Narrated in near flawless
English and of high technical
quality, it was apparently sent
out to a wide variety of media
outlets, including CBS News, the
Simon Wiesenthal Center and
private individuals involved in
tracking down Nazi war
criminals.
15 Ultra-Orthodox
Qo on Trial
JERUSALEM Fifteen
ultra-Orthodox Jews went on
trial Monday for disturbing the
peace but only 14 showed up in
court after being released on bail
last Friday. A warrant was
issued for the arrest of the
missing man, identified
Yeshayahu Cohen.
as
All were arrested following
riots in the Mea Shearim
quarter two weeks ago against
archaeological diggings near the
Old City wall. Two of the
defendants were charged .ith
assaulting a policeman.
Presiding Judge Miriam Maor
who granted bail after Aguda
Israel Knesset members in-
tervened, instructed the accused
to stay out of Jerusalem except
when the court was in session.
They were required to sign a
pledge not to participate in any
demonstrations for the duration
of the trial and to surrender their
passports and identity papers.
CALIFORNIA FIG JUICE.
ADEUaOUSLYDlFFERENT
TASTETKEAT
From Sunsweet
INew Sunsweet* California
Fig Juice is sweet and tangy,
a deliriously different fruit
juice. 100% natural, it con-
tains no artificial sweeteners
or preservatives.
Try new Sunsweet Cali-
fornia Fig Juice, and save 15*.
15 CALIFORNIA FIG JUICE
RETAILER This coupon is redeemable for face value _.........-
and 7 handling charge* provided a* follows it m received
m a retail sale of the product specified harem You mall it
_^DiamortdGrower* otCalifornia. PO Ben 1404. Clinton.
Iowa 32734 On request, you mux supply invoice* provma: suffv
cwrtt stock pure ha*** centring coupon* submitted lot redemption
Other use transferred Customer must pay any sales lax Void where pro-
ilbiled. taaed. license required or restricted by law Cash value 1/20*
Good only in U.S. A Offer limited to on* coupon per purchase COUPON
EXPIRES fun* 30.19M
41143 105765
C Sun Diamond Ciowm of California. 1983


Pmg.8
TA JewisA Floridian and Shofarof Greater Holly wood
Friday, August 5,1983
Recipients of the Technion's 1983 Harvey Prize: Professor
Robert J. Aumann of Hebrew University (left) and Professor
Philip Leder of Harvard University (right).
Techion's '83 Harvey
prize presented to
Aumann and Leder
HAIFA Professor Robert J.
Aumann. a leading figure in
mathematical economics and
game theory and Professor Philip
Leder, a pioneer in the field of
molecular biology, have been
awarded the 1983 Harvey Prize of
the Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology at ceremonies on the
Institute's Haifa campus.
Prof. Aumann, who has served
in the Mathematics Department
of the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem since 1956, was
bestowed the prize in the field of
Science and Technology for his
contributions in analyzing the
complexities of an economic
market involving many traders.
By postulating a "continuum" of
participants, Prof. Aumann was
able to utilize the tools of con-
tinuous mathematics in des-
cribing interactive decision
making in an economic arena.
Prof. Leder, head of the
Department of Genetics at Har-
vard Medical School in Cam-
bridge, Mass. since 1981,
received the Harvey Prize in
Human Health "in recognition of
his outstanding contribution to
the field of molecular genetics
through the development of novol
methods of analysi* of gene
structure and function." Dr.
Leder's work has focused on the
genes which encode for the
structure of antibodies the
body's main defender against
infection.
The Harvery Prize Fund was
established by the late Leo M.
Harvey of Los Angeles, Calif, to
recognize major contributions
toward human progress in one or
more of four fields: Science and
Technology, Human Health,
Literature of Profound Insight
into the Life and People's of the
Middle East, and the Advance-
ment, of Peace in the Middle East.
Each prize bears a cash award of
S35.000. Past recipients of the
Harvey Prize include Professor
Freeman John Dyson for his
work in theoretical physics, and
Gershon Scholem for his studies
of Jewish mysticism.
The Technion is Israel's most
comprehensive academic resource
for the research and development
of innovative technologies. Over
70 percent of the engineers and
scientists working in Israel are
Technion graduates.
Smith demands stronger
anti-skyjacking measures
sky
and
air-
The skyjacking of two Florida
flights in as many days has
prompted Congressman Larry
Smith (D-, Hollywood) to
demand greater security mea-
sures for airline passengers. Rec-
ognizing the region's vulnerabil-
ity to this type of terrorism,
Smith took the Floor of the
House to call for more
marshalls, ground security
personnel at South Florida
ports.
"This government has a duty
to protect the public in the air. If
we let this trend continue, people
will be afraid to fly." Smith told
Members of the House. "Even
worse and more seriously, injur-
ies or deaths may occur, even ac
cidentally"
Although additional marshalls
have been put on some flights.
Smith says much more need to be
done. "Criminal penalties for
skyjacking are severe, but they
do not deter these criminals.
Once a flight is airborne, any at-
tempt to capture or disarm a sky-
jacker jeopardizes the lives of the
innocent passengers and crew,"
said Smith "The best way to stop
skyjackers is to catch them be-
fore they leave the ground."
Congressman Smith has asked
the F.A.A. to increase the
number of surveillance people at
the gates and security stations at
Miami and Fort Lauderdale-Hol-
lywood airports. Smith also
wants the FAA to make better
use of personality profiles to
prevent would-be skyjackers
from boarding flights to and from
South Florida.
"I am asking the F.A.A. to put
an end to this frightening in-
crease in airline skyjackings and
to restore safety to the skies."
Prices and Coupons Effsctive^^P
Thursday, August 4th thru
Wednesday, August 10, 1983.
Quantity Rights Reserved.rWhp*-
___ Pickup
Pubiix your picnic
from the Deli
at Pubiix
and make the lazy days of k
summer delicious! >

i,'
*_


JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 MOUYWOOO BtVD HOUYWOOO, FIOBIOA 33020
921-6511
!
YANKEE GAME JCC
FAMILY NITE OF FUN
Calling all baseball fans! Come
with the Jewish Community Cen-
40s of South Broward to "Back
to School Nite" with the Fort
Lauderdale Yankees at Fort Lau-
derdale Stadium, August 16th at
7:30 p.m. Adults $1.50 chil-
dren under 14, SI. Transportation
available 50 cents per person
from Center. Bring the whole
family for an evening of excite-
ment. For tickets call Dene
921-6511 or see Mark at Camp
Kadima.
HEALTH CLUB JCC
SUMMER SHAPE UP
The Jewish Community Center
of South Broward, 2838 Holly-
wood Blvd., is happy to offer 30
days at the Hollywood Spa and
Health Club, 6712 Stirling Rd.,
during July and August for S25.
This special includes full use of
facility on Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Visits feature exercise class three
times daily, yoga class on
Wednesday evenings, sauna,
steam room, whirlpool and exer-
cise equipment. Call Dene 921-
6511 for information and regis-
tration.
AUTUMN IN THE SMOKIES
JCC Fall Foliage Tour
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., is offering
a fantastic Fail Foliage Tour.
Travel through the colorful
Smokies on a 6-day fully escorted
bus tour from Sunday Oct. 16 to
Friday Oct. 21. Package includes
all admission, first quality
lodgings, luggage handling,
taxes, tips for services and meals
on tour. Meals included are five
dinners with one dinner theater
show, and one breakfast. Tour
cost: $439 per person double oc-
cupancy. Deposit of $50 due be-
fore Aug. 20. Don't miss this
beautiful trip! Limited space, so
sign up today. For information
call Dene 921-6611.
MIXED BOWLING LEAGUE
Attention: Bowlers!
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., is forming
a mixed Bowling League at Mira-
mar Lanes, 890 Miramar Park-
way, starting Oct. 5. The League
, will meet every Wednesday night
at 9 p.m. excluding holidays.
Four people each team. People
needed to work on committee to
help form this League. Come join
us and bring your friends for a
season of bowling fun! For infor-
mation and registration, call
Dene now to sign up at 921-6511.
SINGLES CRUISE
Sail Aboard the S-S Dolphin to
Nassau with the JCC Singles 20-
36 on Aug. 26-29. Enjoy a fun
filled weekend and some of the
1CONOVER
RAMADA
1SSANCE.
HOTEL
SHARE THE HIGH HOlTdAYS WITH US |
THRU SPECIAL PACKAGES FOR THE HOLIDAYS DELUXE ROOM KOSHER MEALS TEA ROOM DAILY ENTERTAINMENT mjajT CHAISE LOUNGE lQe# TENNIS GOLF Wv Wcbcrmaa Caterers ^ Caatailtanis *Oom net include tnd Hp RELIGIOUS SERVICES GLATT KOSHER SUPERVISION o.R.c. and fir *" IV luataum On the OcMn M M4S CoMlne Avenue HUM SmcH. ri 33148 1305) MS 1500 Rosh Hashanah Yom Kippur '2 DAYS 11 NIGHTS StPT 7th SEPT 18th sc en WWW double o'.cup S/50 unql*
Rosh Hashanah 5 0AYS 4 NIGHTS SEPT Hh SEPT 11th ^^W\0 double occup S 110 vnqle
Yom Kippur ] DAYS 2 NIGHTS SEPT 16th SEPT 18th S 4 Ort '' 1 A.VS \ 1 S5 i.rtqle
J I
II
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
Bank Lawn -'I M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
ration Toll Free (800) 221 -4838|
finest dining and service aa you
i sail to an Island Paradise. Cost
per person is S225 (which in-
cludes port tax and gratuities).
The last day to register for this
cruise is Jury 28. For further in-
formation call Mark Brotman at
121-6511.
ISRAELI and
INTERNATIONAL
FOLK DANCING
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward, 2838 Hol-
lywood Blvd., is happy to present
Israeli and International Folk
Dancing on Sunday evenings at
the Center. Classes will be led by
Mr. Sasson Joury, who was bom '
in Israel and graduated from
Beersheva University with a
degree in Physical Education,
specializing in Israeli folk
dancing. The first session will be
held on October 2nd. Beginners
7-8:15 p.m. and Intermediate-
advanced 8:30-10 p.m. Cost $20
JCC members 925 non mem-
bers. Sign up today limited
classes call Dene 921-6511.
SHOLOM ALEICHEM
PART II
EASY READING HEBREW
Do you go to Temple on Friday
night but still cannot read the
prayers in Hebrew? The Jewish
Community Centers of South
Broward, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
proudly presents Sholom
Aleichem Part II. This "Easy
Method of Reading Hebrew" is
taught by Mrs. Esther Gordon.
The first part of this class was so
successful Mrs. Gordon will con-
tinue and this session will include
a review of the Sabbath prayers
and blessings as well as learning
Sholom Aleichem Kiddish,
Sh'ma and more! New members
to this class are welcome. The
class will be held on Thursday
mornings starting October 6th
9:30-11 a.m., for six weeks. Cost
$15 for JCC members, $20 for non
members. For information and
registration call Dene 921-
6511. *
AUTUMN IN THE SMOKIES
JCC FALL FOLIAGE TOUR
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., is offering
a fantastic Fall Foliage Tour.
Travel through the colorful
Smokies on a six day fully es-
corted bus tour from Sunday,
October 16th to Friday, October
21st. Package includes all admis-
sions, first quality lodgings, lug-
gage handling, taxes, tips for
services and meals on tour. Meals
included are five dinners with one
dinner theater show, and one
breakfast. Tour cost: $439 per
person double occupancy.
Deposit of $50 due before August
20th. Don't miss this beautiful
trip! Limited space, so sign up
today. For information call Dene
921-6511.
Israeli troops
kill 1 Arab
wound others
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
troops fatally shot one Arab and
wounded two others in a battle
with rioting inmates of the Ansar
detention camp in south Leb-
anon. Two Israeli soldiers were
slightly injured by rocks. The
army said the troops opened firs
when the riot seemed to be get-
ting out of hand. It is investigat-
ing the incident.
Meanwhile, two Katyusha
rocket launchers used to fire
sheik into western Galilee were
discovered in Lebanon about 10
kilometers north of the Israeli
border. The rockets caused slight
damage but no casualties. The
launchers were found in the area
of south Lebanon pat ruled by the
Fijian unit of the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNI FIL), the army said.
In Beirut, the death toll rose to
six in the blast that partially
wrecked the Summerland Hotel.
Fifteen persons were injured.
rageil
"'ll.li'
THE AMATEUR thespians of the Jewish Community Centers
of South Broward Day Camp perform before a packed house of
fellow campers.
aoRow
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids lovai
Moms and kids go lor Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zootoni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin
ennched pasta simmered in lots ol yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too1

a*?
Now 2,000 miles closer!
Grossinger's Rye
comes to Florida!
Great Grossinger's hearth baked rye baked fresh in New York- is
now available in the frozen food department of your favorite South
Florida supermarket in a recloseable bag.
Cholesterol free...
No sugar... Artesian well water
No chemical preservatives
It's made from only the highest quality ingredients-just like you
remember it in New York.
Every loaf of Grossinger's Country Club Rye with Jennie
Grossinger's authentic signature is truly a signed masterpiece.
Certttled Koeher-Psrve
25*
25C
STORE COUPON
SAVE 250
on Grossinger's Rye Bread or Pumpernickel
To the dealer [ha coupon M* to redeemed only at tonows For At amount
sptOHad plus 7* handling provided coupon It received from the custom* on
purchase ol Mad merchandise Proot ot purchatt ot sumemrt stow ol metchan-
dist to cover coupons subrruntd must to shown on request (Failure to comply
may void all coupons lor rtdtmptoon) Redemptions are not Honored through
brokers or outside agencies. Coupons are not transferraote and void it use is
prohibited taxed, restricted or a kcenta is required. Customers must pay any
sales tax For redemption, mail to Dtnk Biking rjoraftation P 0. Box 3909. Grand
Central Station New York. N Y 10163 This ohV is via) only m the UraMd States
Limit one coupon per purchase Coupon expires December 31.1963
25*
L.
STORE COUPON
250


cPride
SEE OUR 4-PAGE INSERT IN
YOUR MAIL THIS WEEK FOR
ADDITIONAL SAVINGS!
^.THURSDAY,!
V^ SATURDA^
AUGUST 4 THRU Ai
WITH THESE FOUR COUPONS,
YOU CAN DOUBLE THE FACE VALUE
OF MANUFACTURERS' COUPONS
TOP QUALITY WESTERN (4 SIZE) ^JaW ^^| M\ -4P^k
JUMBO $^ 49
aW
THOMPSON SEEDLESS
IN-STORE BAKERY
ALL STORES)
89*
(NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES)
LARGE CRISPY
Hoagie
Rolls 4
IOAOEO WITH ONIONS LAROf
OREAT FOR LUNCH
LATTACE TOP
.6.0.1.19
.2.39
. .loaf 1.19
.."31.49
Swiss uss all flavors 4407 cups
2& .79
*C1
PANTRY PRBE NEW YORK STATE WMTE OR COLORED
Sharp Cheddar..........,3.09
PACKAGED BAKED GOODS
Me.tRSPKOS Of e
English Muffins.......3 roH 1.00
PANTRY RPW
Spat Top Broad ....
KPJSPY KREME APPLE BLUEBERRY -CMERRv OR LEMON
FruKPIas .........
ADLERS TWIST ROLLS OR
Jswtsh Rys Braad .
OELOOUS
Paean Fudga Brownlas .';
VELVET CREHE
M. #8Q
4 PKQS

.31.29
LOUIS RICH tUCEO TURKEY HAM OR
Turkay Pastrami........!31.49
OSCAR MAYER ... .99
Watch Offer
Ends Saturday
Aug. 6, 1983
^^OU MA\f UNTIL AUO 20
TO REDEEM YOUR TAPES
.'


f ___
, FRIDAY,
Y ONLY
fl^L^BL^OUPOfll 1^ "bLECOUPON-!
I Present this certificate along with any I I Present this certificate along with any I
other one manufacturer's cents-ofi other one manufacturer's cente-on
coupon and get double the value, up to coupon and get double the value, up to ajj
$1.00. Not to include retailer or free I [ $1.00. Not to include retailer or free I
coupons and excludes tobacco coupons coupons and excludes tobacco coupons
and refund certificates. aaaj I and refund certificates.
LIMIT ONE CERTIFICATE PER I I I I LIMIT ONE CERTIFICATE PER
MANUFACTURER COOFON-LIMIT 4 MANUFACTURfRt COURON-IWIT 4
COUPONS PER CUSTOMER I COUPONS PER CUSTOMER
Coupon flooa Aug 4 mru Auq 6 19*3 I I I
ICUSfO
Coupon good Aug 4 Wu Aug 6 1903
I
PONS!
!n DOUBLE COUPON | m DOUBLE COUPON
I Present this certificate along with any I Present this certificate along with any
* other one manufacturer's cents-oft other one manufacturer'a cents-oft
coupon and get double the value, up to l
$1.00. Not to Include retailer or Tree |
coupon and get double the value, up to |
*1.*. Notto include retailer or free |
coupons and excludes tobacco coupons
and refund certificates.
LIMIT ONE CERTIFICATE PER
MAMUFACTUREH'I COUPON-LIMIT 4
"TOMER
rii
COUPON* PER CUSTOMER I aj) ffj COUPONS PER CUSTOMER I BJJ
| Coupon good Aug 4 u Aug 6 1983 I I | I Coupon good Aug 4 mu Aug 8. 1903 I I I
coupons and excludes tobacco coupons .
and refund certificates. slssstoi
LIMIT ONE CERTIFICATE PER .T ,rr-T. I
sa^v&?ssr-L-,,T4 I [
GUST 6, 1983
FROM
PANTRY
PRIDE
TOTAL
SAVINGS
TO YOU!
Bring in one of the coupons with your manufacturer's
coupon. Double value not to exceed Sl.OO. This offer
does not apply to retailer coupons or free coupons and ex-
cludes tobacco products and refund certificates. The
coupon value cannot exceed the value of the item. Expired
coupons will not be honored. Mo rain checks will be issued.
ACH
0
GROUND
=MEAT SALE!
FRESHLY GROUND
3 LBS AND OVER
USDA CHOICE
GENUINE SPRING FRESH SHOULDER
j, WHOLE BOTTOM
v Round $-139
I ly>A C.HCW.F RFFF Rl~M IMiTl ----------
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
W'EYE BONELESS
SOLD WHOLE UNTRIMMED
IN CRYOVAC-SLICED FREE
LB.
Lamb Blade Chops JL lb
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED MM a#^kat*^
PREMIUM FRESH FRYER MM W It
Leg Quarters *KF lb
USDA CHOICE a#
SHOULDER 2
Veal Blade Chops
$1"
PANTRV PW0 FRESH FROZEN 40-OZ PKO
1.99 All Beef
ITS
KNEIP MILD CURE
Corned Beef Brisket
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Tip Steak............ 2.49
USOA CHOICE BEEF FRMMEKOZEN ALL BEEF SAND STEAK-NEW SIZED PKO
Cube Steak..........u.2.79 Steak-umm........?4^4.2Q
USOACHOCE8EEFROUNOBONEUSS3MEALSINONE CONTAINS
ROAST ROUNOOROUNO ROUND STEW
let
X3NT(
u,1.99
SS AND!
USOA CHOICE
GENUINE SPRING WHOLE
Lamb Leg
SHENANOOAH FRESH FROZEN
Ground
Turkey Roll
;iNLSS FREi
[en
ft
Cutlets is
LB
nu*Oi rnjurnj isnusjaev rojyfiusitw
69* Beef Round Combo ... lb 1.9S
$28
USOACHOICEBEEFCHUOKBONElSS3MiALSINONE CONTAINS
ROAST GROUNOBEEF STEW BEEF
Beef Chuck Combo
FRESH FROZEN BONELESS SKINLESS
Cod or
Whiting Fillet lb
FRE SH FROZEN ARROWTOOTH
Flounder Fillet......., 1.39
TURKEY
_ BOTTOM ROUND
DmmsticksflQ<: Roast $179
FRESH FROZEN M ^^Tm ^^^ _
GRADE A J^^m ^^W USDA CHOICE E
BEEF
ROUND BONELESS
WHY PAY MORE SOMEWHERE ELSE WHEN
PAYING MORE DOESNT MAKE IT BETTER?
2 LTR. BTL DIET PEPSI. PEPSI LIGHT.
MOUNTAIN DEW. PEPSI FREE OR
SO
19
If
r
r
Pepsi Cola
BTLS REGULAR OR LIGHT
LIMIT 4. PLEASE
UMIT 2-6PKS.. PLEASE
-*6PK/12-OZ CANS OR PEPPER-BEG OR SUGAR FREE.
HjR|=S ROOT BEER OR REG OR SUGAR FREE
Seven-tip
7%OZ. BOX OOLOEN GRAIN
Mac. & Cheese
Dinner
99*
$|99
SJ59
3/$J00
Coronet Bath Tissue .99
25 Ol JAR WHITE HOUSE REO OR NATURAL **M
Applesauce .69
44 OZ BTL LUCKY IJ=AF
Apple Juke .99
16-OZ MARZETTI
Slaw Dressing 139
16-OZ CAN BUSH S BEST <*
Baked Beans 2/1.00
139
12-OZ CANUBBY
100-CT PKG LEISUREWAY WHITE ^^M^^WtC
P&per Plates 99*


_ ... __..... -~. ~... MM MIM//IM U/
ui tmt; nuuywuuu
r nday. August 5,1983
1 .",'.'-----------:
Legacy and Endowment
dictionary explaned
The Legacy and Endowment Fund uses special terms with
special meanings. Look at the definitions listed below. If you
have further questions or desire more information, contact the
Legacy and Endowment Fund at 921-8810.
Philanthropic Fund A named fund established by means of
cash, property or other assets. The donor has the privilege of
making advisory recommendations for the distribution of the
income or principal of the Fund.
Charitable Remainder Trust A trust which pays out to one
or more non-charitable income beneficiaries, which may include
up to five percent of the trust assets for life or for a specified
number of years, and the assets of which are turned over to a
designated charity after the deaths of the income beneficiaries.
Charitable Lead Trust This is an arrangement in which
there is a contribution of an income interest to a charity.
Property is transferred to a trust and an immediate income
interest in the property is donated to a charitable organization
for a period of years or for the life or lives of an individual or
individuals. The remainder interest is either retained by the
donor or given to a non-charitable beneficiary.
Windfall Gifts A windfall gift takes place prior to the sale
or liquidation of a business or the sale of shares of stock or other
property on which a large capital gain will be realized. The
making of such gifts at that time can be achieved at a relatively
small aftertax cost to the donor. There is a double tax savings
resulting from such gifts.
Special Purpose Fund The donor sets up a fund of which
the income from its investments are designated for specific
institutions or areas of interest.
Bequests A gift provided in a Will to the Foundation.
Supporting Foundation This is a separate non-profit
charitable corporation which operates as a foundation affiliated
with the Foundation of the Federation, qualifying as a public
charity under Federal tax laws. Establishment of a supporting
foundation can be made with a contribution or by terminating a
private foundation and converting it into a public charity. It has
its own Board of Trustees. The donor and or member of his
family can serve on the Board, to participate in distributing the
funds, but their number is in the minority.
Pooled Income Fund This is a trust created and ad-
ministered by a public charity. The contributor receives income
during his lifetime. The charity receives the remainder principal
after the lifetime of the income beneficiary.
Letter of Intent The signing of a "Letter of Intent" carries
no legal obligation, but states that the signer intends to con-
tribute to the Columbus Jewish Foundation through a bequest,
a lifetime gift or some other form of contribution.
Life Insurance Policy The Columbus Jewish Foundation
may be named the beneficiary of a new or existing life insurance
policy. One's annual premiums may then be deducted as a
charitable contribution.
Outright Gift A contribution of money or property made
during the donor's lifetime, to which additional funds may be
added as desired by the donor, his family or friends. This may be
made in the form of an Unrestricted Gift," which permits the
Foundation to use its decretion in distributing the gift. An
Outright Gift may also be made for a "Special Purpose" clearly
designated by the donor.
Within each of the methods defined above, there are
variations and modifications available to suit the special cir-
cumstances of the donor or to assist and benefit the charity. The
Columbus Jewish Foundation invites and welcomes par-
ticipation by all members of the Jewish community. Prospective
donors should discuss their participation with an attorney or tax
consultant to determine the most appropriate program based on
personal needs and interests.
Fight for Jerusalem portrayed
Jerusalem, other ore-state areas
an also involved. There is a
particularly poignant description
of a kibbutz that meets a tragic
end. Interweaving historical
events with fictional ones, This
Year in Jerusalem offers sus-
pense, romance and the almost
obligatory sex scenes. Gross is
particularly bitter about the role
the British played as their
mandate drew to a close. They
gave the Arabs freedom to do
whatever they wished, while the
Jewish attempts to defend them-
selves were severely restricted.
The book is well written and
one that can be enjoyed both for
its background material and its
story.
Edith Degani is assistant
librarian at the Jewish Theolo-
gical Seminary of America
New York.
M
Joel Gross
Author of THE B00KS0F RACHEL
This Year in Jerusalem. By Joel
Gross. G.P. Putnam's Sons, 200
Madison Ave., New York, N.Y.
10016. 1983. 304 pages. $14.96.
Reviewed by Edith Degani
This Year in Jerusalem, the
latest book by Joel Gross, author
of the Books of Rachel, is ap-
pearing at a most appropriate
time the 35th anniversary of
the founding of the State of Is-
rael.
The book tells the story of the
struggle for Jerusalem in 1947
and early 1948. Its protagonists
are David Stern, a Holocaust
survivor and an active member of
the Haganah; Diana Mann, a
journalist from a wealthy Ameri-
can Jewish family; and Joey
Marino, a half-Jewish American
gangster.
At the start of the book, Diana,
who is in love with David, is with
him in Jerusalem, but he sends
her to the United States to secure
weapons for the Haganah.
Through family connections she
makes contact with shady under-
ground figures who agree to
supply the desperately needed
guns.
They send Joey to accompany
Diana back to Jerusalem and to
serve as her bodyguard.
Predictably, he falls in love with
her and she finds herself drawn to
him, although still enamored of
David. They form an odd trio,
but work together toward
achieving their common goals.
The book gives a vivid portray-
al of the fight tor Jerusalem.
Although the emphasis is on
Waldman
HOTEL
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuisine
Your Hosts Sam and Morrto Waldman, Qary Sher. David Diamond
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HASHAJVA YOM HPPUR
12 Days 11 Nights Q1A
(Sept. 7-18) 2 meals daily included, v) 1V/
3 meals Sat. and holidays
FROM
OH
Occ
?SPLIT STAY
7 Days 6 Nights
(Sept. 7-11 and Sept. 16-18)
230
FROM
Pt
Mmi
DM
Ocx.
Adolph JacobsonMatre'd
* Slaap at adjoining Atlantic Towers Hotel; mat Is at Waldman
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 or 534-4751
ON THE OCEAN AT 43rd STREET
THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER
[Ah"* 3*0* Dietary Las
IW/l open all year MuSic Entertainment
# *.*. COLLINS social Programmes
25th & pOLLfrwo chaises
MIAMI BEACH. Pool ^ ^ ^^
GALA SHOW suicf RabbiniCai supervision
HIGH HOLY DAYS
11 Nights and Twelve Days
s340.SEPT.7to18th
Per Person Double Occupancy
6 Nights $199.00 P.P.D.O. (Split Stay)
2 Meals Daily, 3 Meals Shabbas/Holldays
LABOR DAY WEEKEND, SEPT. 2-5
4 days 3 nights 7MU-.
Call Collect (305) 538-5721

Local BBYouth
win forensic
competition
Two local B'nai B'rith Youth
members won forensic competi-
tion at the Mason Dixon BBYO
Machon held June 17-21 at the
University of Tennessee at Chat-
tanooga.
Jimmy Gordon of Hollywood,
Fla. won the AZA (Boys) Oratory
Contest and Sandra Marglin
from Coral Springs won the BBC
(girls) Storytelling Contest.
Both Jimmy and Sandra com-
peted against contestants from
the entire Southeastern part of
the country and as winners taey
will be one of four finalists in the
International BBYO Contests in
their category. The International
finals will be held at the AZA and
BBG International Conventions
Aug. 17-23 at Camp B'nai B'rith
Perlman in Starlight, Pa.
ruise The
Fun Ships
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabulous "Fun Ships"
Carnivale, Festivale, Mardi Gras and Troplcale depart
from Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports.. Virtually
everything's included for the low price of your cruise:
You can feast on eight meals and snacks a day...
challenge the odds in a full gambling casino...
thrill to spectacular live entertainment nightly...
dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
live dance bands or in an authentic disco-
theque and more!
9m ol Panomonon and Idaoan Sgtrv
-


f, August 6, 1983
.
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
The Paris/Israel connection
2KHS FAMILY SERVICE OF BROW ARD COUNTY
4617 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla. 33021 (305) 966-0956
Case History
Continued from Page 1
South Broward's sister community in Israel,
and see the great progress our support has
made possible. Experience the majesty of
Jerusalem and walk in the footsteps of the
prophets. Witness the beauty of cities and
sites that have shaped our heritage, and en-
joy home hospitality with Israeli families.
The Federation Paris-Israel Connection
will enrich your life and provide an in-depth
travel experience no other program can
match. Be there.
For more information about this exciting
15-day mission, complete the form below and
return it today to the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
[r. T. was referred to Jewish
lily Service of Broward
inty on the recommendation
Broward County Social Serv-
I He is 70 and recently lost his
i to cancer.
r. T. has three children, aged
[29, and 31. All three are mar
and living in and around the
York area. Mr. T. and his
moved to north Broward
years ago, after his retire-
t from the post office.
kring their time in Broward
Mr. and Mrs. T. enjoyed a
t>f relaxation and fun. They
ged to establish a group of
with whom they shared
time. Florida was all that
[had hoped for.
though their children were
close and the rest of the
was up North, they had
other and their friends.
years ago, Mrs. T. was
jsed as having cancer. She
her chemotherapy treat-
i and struggled for life.
ring this time, both Mr. T.
Br children were emotionally
^rtive, and they did all that
I could. Mrs. T. died six
is ago.
r the last six months, Mr.
been living in the same
dent, his children returned
and they manage to speak
|iy. Mr. T. has been with
ng from life. He has given
contact with his social
does not leave home for
ng except to go to the
I every once in a while.
[neighbor decided to call
rd County Social Services,
in return, called JFS. A
porker then contacted Mr. T.
Bt up an appointment. A
jibor was kind enough to
j him to the JFS office.
ring the first interview, Mr.
able to express some of
rief he was feeling. He told
iseworker he just did not
like living anymore, his sad
| was too great.
rtunately, the caseworker
[able to establish a rapport,
him and another appoint
; was set. Eventually, Mr. T.
[able to come to the office un-
i. He became more verbal
j the sessions. He began to
as his anger about being left
b. He didn't ever expect to be
[without his wife. For some
n he thought that he would
le first to die.
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214. Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to90.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and the
United Way of Broward County.
Yes! I/we would like to receive more information about the October 11-24 Paris/Israel
Connection.
Name .(s)_
Address__
_Phone#_
Return this form to:
Missions Department
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Fl. 33020

Jring this time, the case-
ker told Mr. T. about a
.jvers-widow group. The case-
per continued to see him in-
lually. Mr. T. soon began to
.e his house to to to therapy,
kp therapy and has now in-
fed himself in a card game.
_ months later both Mr. T.
[the caseworker decided that
k-idual therapy was no longer
Jed, but that he would con-
be in group. He made some
Jnds in the group and he was
ling much better.
If you have any questions or
I that we can help, please
tact Jewish Family Service of
Dward County, 4517 Holly-
r>d Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
phone: 966-9056. Hours -
frnday, Tuesday, Wednesday
J Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
iirsday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
lewish Family Service of
Dward County, 3500 N. State
d 7 Suite 399, Fort
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a bt harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast Just terrible.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
The Spreadable Crearnheese
.E9922B OOEhT
SAVE KX ON TEMP TEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
10C
Mr. Grocer Kraft. Inc. will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
you i adeemed It on your retail sales
of the named product(s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod-
uct to cover all redemptions Coupon
O Kraft. Inc. 1983
is void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C. Customer must pay
applicable tax. For redemption, mail
(o Kraft, Inc. Dairy Group, P.O. Box
1799. Clinton, Iowa 52734.
1M3DD E52flfl3


i into
ciivun r uinaian ana Snofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, August 6,1983

w.
Smith fasts on day of
Soviet Jewry recognition
committee's co-sponoring
Babi Yar Commemoration
Congressman Larry Smith (D.,
Hollywood) participated in a fast
and prayer vigil to demonstrate
concern for Soviet Jews barred
from emigration.
Smith was one of 70 Congress-
men who took part in the two-
hour prayer vigil held on the
West Front Capitol steps.
Human rights advocates and
members of the clergy from
across the country also parti-
cipated.
"Our prayers and public dis-
play of outrage will remind those
who have sacrificed and suffered
that they are not alone and that
we are doing what we can for
justice," Smith said.
Congressman Smith empha-
sized his commitment to the
cause by fasting from sun-rise to
sun-set in the name of his
adopted refusenik Dr. Yuri Tarn-
opolsky, a Soviet Jew who has
been denied a request to leave the
country.
"Soviet Jewish emigration to
the West has dropped to an all-
time low," said Smith. "This day
set aside for remembrance of the
Soviet Jewish plight will send a
signal to the Soviet Union that
we will continue to figtht this in-
justice."
The events were planned to
coincide with the fifth anniver-
sary of the trial and conviction of
Anatoly Shcharansky, a Soviet
Jew imprisoned in the Soviet
Union.
ORT Grandview installs new officers
Joan Youdelman, President of
the South Broward Region of
Women's American ORT re-
cently installed Annette Sloss as
the first President of the Grand-
view of Emerald Hills Chapter of
Women's American ORT.
Also installed were Jeane
Polsky, Membership Vice Presid-
ent; Esther Hammer, Vice
President; May Ruth Sokal, Vice
President; Blanche Leibowitz,
Treasurer; Dorothy Scheinberg,
Financial Secretary and Bernice
Simon, Recording Secretary.
The Soviet Jewry and Holo-
caust Committee's of the Com-
munity Relations Committee of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward are co-sponsoring a
Babi Yar Commemoration to be
held Sunday evening Oct. 2 at
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.,
Hollywood.
This program will bring into
our community Dr. Franklin Lit-
tell, professor of religion at Tem-
ple University and a correspond-
ing faculty member of the Insti-
tute of Contemporary Jewry,He-
brew University (Jerusalem.)
Dr. Littell currently serves as
honorary chairman of the Na-
tional Institute on the Holocaust
after having been its chairman of
the Board from 1975-1981. Pro-
fessor Littell is a member of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council
and a member of the Internation-
al Council of Yad Vashem.
Paul Orlan, chairman of the
Holocaust Committee is seeking
the assistance of survivors in
planning this Babi Yar Comme-
moration which is a first for our
South Broward community, as
well as those who are interested
in sharing their experiences as
part of the Holocaust education
with the Broward County
schools. If you are interested in
these projects, please contact
Melissa Martin at the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward
- 921-8810.
Attention Fund Raisers
Make Money For Your
Organization
Bring Your Group
For A 3 Day Trip
HOTEL
HEALTH
RESORT
(305)-538-4621
40 Island Ave.
Miami Beach, FL33139
Gulf side Getaway
Vacation a persons
4 NIGHTS only !
2 NIGHTS only 9999a
&4*
Double occupancy, including taxi/gratuities April
15 thru December 15.1983
PACKAGE INCLUDES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room for 2 people 4 nights 2 nights
Continental breakfast lor 2 4 mornings 2 mornings
Dinner for 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Golf Packages and
Discounts also available
--------------------------2**!&
RAMADA' fyt(G
Mine&tMxtfui on ^(u4
11000 Gulf Shore Drive. North^ &
VANDERBILT BEACH
Naples, Florida 339 lO
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment in
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeing,
fishing, shelling Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents.
Children's meals at menu prices
Write or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
i--------"
I RAMADA VANDEPJILT INN mi tni iuu Dipt KTA
| 11NI Ml tkm DrlM ., talks, ft. 33940 c
| D Send Itee txochures Q Golf Package D Gultsrte Getaways
| D Reserve room (No of days)____for (No of people)_____
amvaldate____________________________
NAME.
ADDRESS.
MAIL
COUPON
TODAVI I CITY STATE Z.P.
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO
The chapter meets on the first
Monday of the month. For
further information call 921-6891.
Annette SIom
Joan Youdelman
IRVING
OF
Si*ndsIIOLIYIfOOD
The Levolor
Vertical Blind.
I flJ i I
r7'
><\
8
announces its
LEVOLOR
SALE!
_ _- Special deals hove been
SALE! made with us and now
we're going to give their/ww pawrwwiwn.
ASK ABOUT to you! Free "Shop at
OUR MANY Home" Service.
SPECIALS ^p TO
DRAPERIES EfLtkO/
112 S. State Rd. 7 OU / OFF
Hollywood
625-2194
THE GREATEST
SHOW ON EARTH.
PORT EVERGLADES
TO SOUTHAMPTON
JAN. 23 APR. 10,77 NIGHTS
Take a trip of world
consequence. Through
the Panama Canal to the
Mexican Riviera. The
alluring South Seas.
Bustling Hong Kong and
Singapore. Then onward.
Through the Suez Canal.
To majestic Greece.
And exotic Tangier.
It's all yours when you
sail aboard the graceful
British-registered Sea
Princess. Rated 5 stars
by Fielding's Guide.
EVERYTHING'S INCLUDED,
INCLUDING THE FLIGHT.
When you cruise the
world with P&O, one price
includes airfare to and
from the ship from New
York, Miami or Tampa.
It's considerably less than
the cost of purchasing
cruise and air tickets
separately.
Or if you can't join
us for the entire cruise,
shorter segments from
19-62 nights are also
available. Some are "fly
freer And others offer
air credits up to $1,000.
P&O's World Cruise.
This year, don't let the
world pass you by.
For a free brochure,
write P&O Cruises,
2029 Century Park East,
Los Angeles, C A 90067.
Or ask your travel agent.
TRANSOCEANIC
E U R" 6 P E A N
SOUTH PACIFIC
PftOttGRUISES
150 YEARS AT SEA


'^


I
f. August 5, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
P235/75R15
B F Goodrich
Ti A HIGH TECH
I/A RADIALS
50,60 & 70 Series & Comp. T/A
IIRELLIIIRE
*B2Mi" WIDE
WARRANTY RADIALS
P3
LOW COST. HIGH
MILEAGE, OUT-
STANDING VALUE
BUCK RADIAL
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
39.50
34.85
41.24
44.73
51.12
54.02
d"7"7 revolutionary
# /all season radial
HIGH PERFORMANCE
SPEED RATED
THE ONLY DUAL TREAD
DESIGN, DUAL COM-
POUND TIRE
STEEL BELT M SIDEWALL
FOR ADDED STRENGTH
"195/70HR1186-1
205/70HR14 96.
OTHER SIZES AVAILBLE
WE ALSO CARRY
P5,P6,P7andP8
SIZES TOI
181 SIZESTORTMOST
-------AMERICAN AMPORT CARS
2 11 ATMOSTSTORES
EXPERIENCE
& INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE
YOU MONEY
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co has
offered quality brands competitive
pricing last S efficient service T A
high tech specialist store managers
certified mechanics personal
integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction You pay no eilra for our
service and eipenence
PREMWM4PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
TUBELESS BLACK
195/70-14 205/70-14
81.85 87.33
FE.T 2.27
F.E.T. 2.40
IMPORT TRUCKS
MICHEUN185*146^
XCT 56"fl
iin2Ptyoo*y
<$> YOKOHAMA
Y865 STEEL BELTED RADIAL
FOR FORQCN 4 MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL t INTERMEDIATE CARS
SMALL TRUCK SPEC^U^J^^^^TTri
Y4i
STEEL RABAL
WE HONOR M*^S5r^tl^*,0,
I ^__^_------VISA OMM. mim. Ni-tMi
'ommmoam
MS Mark* OMMt
unm* K2-H00
moos MnHtay M7-MB
W.MOU.TWOOO
*S 9k* IM 7H7-04M
1KUN IMmffyD. 4J4-I3M N* 40.0-.tkr, 7**1S
.tkMAMAC OOTMU>MACH
44lt*Cmw MRI
CxpW imoVflOta ?*" N MmTSZtS^M M.IMI l-ll*0r N IMmKrOi IMcNrtM 771-4700 4*04 S* Si 4M40K
UMaZtXTStTSK MIuTmwW ^fliiSS'SHc- ^'JL*!^Li^^?'0 ""S*?*'
OMfeEoaiWMioMM utOtrTHDAOB
2SMN MS-TOM 001S Ok."-, W7-7575
I740E SantM 443-75M
mjuootom
mn.tmm.i m-rm
*WC*TMLMKAC
Bt0MH-Hl
WMMMMUItUCN
iim LMVrt M4 2M4
4WTONAMACM
M7\MMiAn. Ht-77
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


i/of a u, mmwi unu onujar oj ureater Hollywood
Friday, August 5.1963
The midsummet
doldrums
By RABBI
DR. SAMUEL Z. JAFFE
The midsummer doldrums only heightens the general malaise
in which we are enveloped. We are a troubled society. Our un-
happiness and frustration are evident in our personal conduct
and social behavior. Most graphically they are demonstrated in
the alienation of the generations, in the high incidence of divorce
and the breakdown of the family the bedrock of our society
and certainly of Jewish life as it was constituted throughout our
millennial history. It would seem that we have lost the ability to
cope in both our private and public affairs. This has resulted
in disaffection, tension and hostility in our interpersonal
relationships.
As a Rabbi and family counselor, I find the most prevalent
affliction of our society is the sense of loneliness in as well as
outside, of marriage and family life. There is a loss of com-
munication and of the feeling of belonging and relatedness to
others. It is so easy for our generation to drift into the vortex of
despondency and despair.
All around us, especially among young people there is an
earnest search for meaning and direction. In this climate of
alienation and uprootedness, some have turned to religious
fundamentalism and mysticism in one form or another, as a
panacea to the perplexing problems which beset them. Others
have sought answers in the more occult religious movements
and at times have been drawn inexorably and mindlessly to
charismatic personalities with their grandiose promises of in-
stant salvation and "pie in the sky." What distresses me is that
a number of them are Jews, who in their low self-esteem and
feeling of isolation and alienation would abdicate reason and
intellect and compromise conscience and integrity to accept such
an authoritarian life style. To use Erich Fromm's felicitious
term, "they would escape from freedom." And freedom is our
God-given right, that which makes us human.
Judaism teaches otherwise. There are no easy answers to life's
perplexing problems. Life makes its demands and we must leam
to cope with the realities confronting us. This is not the time for
the abdication of responsibilities. What I am urging is not less
faith but more more faith in ourselves, in our world and in
God. But we must understand the role of faith and its purpose in
our lives. Faith serves to strengthen us, to inspire us and direct
us to make the decisions we must make. But the options are
ours. This is the thrust of the tradition: free will. Man has the
choice of the blessing or the curse. He can look at life from either
end of i he telescope and see it writ large or small. Judaism does
provide us with the courage to extricate ourselves from the
morass of confusion, if we will it. If there is darkness, let us lift
the curtain and let the sun shine in. If we are caught in a maze of
self doubt and frustration, let us use the gifts of reason and logic
to find our way out.
This is the theme of this week's Scriptural reading, "Reh."
Moses the Lawgiver standing on the threshhold of the Promised
Land addresses his people, Israel. "I set before you this day a
blessing and a curse." He informs them that they have freedom
of choice in the decisions they are to make, both as individuals
and as a nation. He clearly defines the alternatives and points
out the consequences of their actions. That choice is still ours.
We can live with hope and optimism or with despair and
defeatism. The answer of the tradition has always been, "Choose
life if you and your offspring would live by loving the Lord
your God and heeding His Mitzvot."
Maikovskis 'notdeportable'
Continued from Pag* 1
that atrocity," the killing of all
Audrini residents. The judge also
declared that he did not believe the
witnesses who had testified against
Maikovskis through depositions
taken in the Soviet Union and he held
that the killings were done under
orders and not racially motivated.
Supports Justice Department's
Intention To Appeal
Ms. Tishman pointed to the federal
government's success two months
ago in obtaining a deportation order
against Karl Linnas, another alleged
Nazi war criminal living in Greenville,
Long Island. She said, "I hope it is
the Linnas decision that will serve as
a precedent for other immigration
judges to follow."
She added that "we must work to
ensure that the Maikovskis' ruling
does not have a 'chilling effect' on
other cases of this nature. To this end
we heartily support the Justice
Department's evident intention to
appeal this ruling as soon as possible
to the Board of Immigration
Appeals."
Calling Lyona' ruling "in itself
dismaying," Ms. Tishman declared
that "the fact that the proceedings
that must be followed are so involved
that seven years have elapsed since
this case was first initiated, is in-
tolerable." She said the ruling "points
up the need for new legislation to con-
dense the entire procedure and devise
some way of assuring that justice is
done before all the victims or then-
persecutors are gone from the scene."
Ms. Tishman also said she believed
the ruling by Lyons that an alleged
war criminal was "not deportable,"
after a hearing "with as much
evidence as was presented in this
case," was apparently the first of its
kind.
Hollywood teen receives award from
National Conference of Synagogue Youth
Julia Barron, a high school
student from Hollywood, Fla.,
was honored at the 29th Annual
National Convention of the
National Conference of Synago-
gue Youth, held June 23-27 at
Smugglers' Notch, Vermont.
Mis Barron, who attends
school at the Yeshiva of the
South in Memphis, Tenn., was
presented with NCSY's Pioneer
Project Award for chairing a new
endeavor of the organization.
Project Mitzvah. For the project,
each chapter in NCSY's 15
regions around the country took
a different ceremonial object
menorah, mezuzah, dreidel,
kiddush cup and others and
made their own creative rendi-
Boeing planes
go to El Al
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Ala-
new Boeing 767 aircraft, the first
of four to be delivered by next
year, arrived here on its first
commercial flight from London.
tions of the item. The winners of
the project will be displayed in
Jewish museums across the
country.
Close to 500 participants from
cities across the United States
and Canada participated in trie
convention which centered
around the theme, "Ani Mamin
I Believe."
NCSY is the youth movement
of the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America,
reaching 20,000 teenagers an-
nually with Jewish educational
and social programming.
Temple Sol el Summer Worship Service
Shabbat Summer Worship
Service will begin at 8:15 p.m.,
Friday, Auk. 5. Rabbi Robert P.
Frazin will conduct the Worship
Service.
The Oneg Shabbat following
ROSH
HASHANA
SEPTEMBER 8/9
HIGH HOLY DAYS
1983
SERVICES
5*4
MAIN SERVICE:
temple bethahm
sanctucnj
'.", h-r^fc #i it Ann)
9730 String Road
Conducted by.
Rat*. Bernard PShoter
Cantor Abraham Koatar
CONCURRENT SERVICE
city high school
cooper city
auditorium
9401 Stirling Road
Conducted by:
Or. Richard Coraart
TICKETS AND MEMBERSMP MOUMES AVAILABLE AT THE
TEMPLE OFFICE. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL.......
o
-431-5100
temple beth ohm
A CONKIMTnt CONQMOAICN
CVOT nu> 1 1 Suno* *m **** OOOao D ONDOn
the Worship Service will be
hosted by Temple Solel's Sister-
hood.
Shabbat Evening Worship
Services are held every Friday
evening during the summer
months.
The Abe and Grace Durbin
School of Living Judaism enroll-
ment is from Kindergarten
through 12th Grade. Various
grades meet on Sunday morn-
ings, Tuesday and-or Thursday
afternoons. Religious School
classes will resume on Sunday,
Sept. 11.
Temple Sole) membership in-
cludes tickets for the High Holy
Days. Membership inquiries are
invited. Contact the Temple of-
fice 989-0205.
ICERTIFIED MOHELi
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y.SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital
Will Travel {3051673 5062
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Rapalta Rebuilding
20 yr. mambar
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi YiUchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.: Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock: Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road: 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily 'services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 464-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon. 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood. 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services. 7:46 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:16 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday. Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.: Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, -ludaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Mh-amar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services. 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:46 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:25 a.m., 6 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
f}etorrq
Temple Beth El 1361 S. 14th Avs.. Hollywood; 920-8226.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffa. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10. ~
Temple Bath Emet Pines Middle School. 200 N. Douglas
Road Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
Sabbath services, .8:16 pjn. Religious school: Pre-kinder-
gsrten10.
Temple Sole! 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
F}econstriicUoi)ist
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Brpward Blvd.. Plantation: 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot SkidelL Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. Religious
school: Prs-kindsrgartan-8., r


1 :fp'hii

ty, August 5,1983
The Jewish Flgridian and Shofgrbf,Greater Holly wood
PtgeJ.5
Dr. and Mrs. Carl Klein meet with Prime Minister Begin in Israel
r. Carl Klein, rabbi of H allan-
Jewish Center, recently re-
from a visit to Israel. He
joined by Mrs. Klein and
two grandchildren, Amara
I Aaron Rosenstock of Hous-
Tex. The visit took the rabbi
I his family from the borders
rpt to Lebanon, the Golan
its to the borders of Syria,
b11 as to all major cities and
it settlements of the
! of Israel.
ie highlight of the visit, how-
was a personal audience
the Prime Minister Mena
Begin which lasted a half
r. Needless to say, this intim-
[discussion covered the poli-
I situation in the Middle East,
[only of the most imminent
^lems between Israel, Leba-
and Syria, but rather the
' aspect of the policies of the
powers surrouding the
lie Eastern problems. Prime
Bter Begin expressed great
|rn about Syria's attitude
i did not give up hope that
lately an agreement will be
Huded between Syria and
non which will remove the
ins from the Lebanese terri-
prime minister was ex-
ny charming to the rabbi's
Hy. It must be noted, how-
that due to the stress and
ety of the political situation,
meeting was marked by
suffering and pain for the
that many families had to
Ire in the war.
having visited Kiryat
DR. CARL KLEIN, RABBI (right) making presentation of
book, written by Rabbi's father and grandfather, to PRIME
MINISTER MEN ACHEM BEGIN (left)
Sh'mone, the rabbi has seen the
wisdom of the Israeli Govern-
ment's decision to invade Leba-
non This was the city that suf-
fered most from the PLO shel-
lings. Almost no building was
without marks on their walls
from the penetration of shells.
Kiryat Sh'mone had to build un-
derground shelters in each
building and the bedrooms for
their children were constructed
with steel walls covered with
masonry. It was especially trau-
matic for the children to move al-
most every night into under-
ground shelters.
Thus the Government's deci-
sion to invade Lebanon had to be
made to keep that border city free
from attack. The Israelis, gener-
ally, in spite of the great losses,
have seen the logic that necessi-
tated this last war to make the
Galil secure.
anada accused of bias
By ARNOLD AGES
VANCOUVER, British
unbia (JTA)
)ld Troper, co-author
Irving Abella of
le Is Too Many," a
which details Can-
restrictive immigra-
policies against Jews
and during World
II, told the Canadian
|ety of Germanists that
ida's attitude towards
lan Jewish intellec-
ts was even more
lent during that period.
oper, who delivered his pa-
It the annual meeting of The
Societies of Canada
more than 50 academic
disciplines meet for scholarly ex-
changes), said that Canadian
government policy was part of
the larger immigration
philosophy endorsed by
Canadians from the early years of
the century.
THOSE POLICIES were an
expression of Canada's belief that
only Northern European types
would make the proper kind of
immigrant needed to develop
Canada's vast rural areas. Jews
and Italians (and other peoples)
were not considered suitable for
this kind of settlement popula-
tion.
When the Nazis took over in
Germany, Troper related, many
German Jewish intellectuals tried
to obtain asylum in Canada and,
unlike the situation in other
countries (the United States, for
When selecting a prtfwioaJ,
you often taw to tim* fcetwew
quality and price.
At levitt-Weirtsteiri,
you can have bora.
A* sb*A ow CoatH*ed Security

North Miami Beach
ISMS We* OWe H%hwv
MS/*4MJtS
w*ratmlMgr *.....fW"g^.**
Left to right: Prime Minister Menachem Begin, Mrs. Helen
Klein, and Dr. Carl Klein, Rabbi


Left to right: Amara Roeenstock, Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, and Aaron Roeenstock
example) they met with a total
blockade.
In surveying the Canadian
university scene Troper produced
grim evidence of the attitude of
Canadian academics towards the
prospects of German Jewish in-
tellectuals arriving in Canada.
The initial response to the Ger-
man Jews was that there were no
academic vacancies. Troper said
ironically that even if there had
been any vacancies no German
Jews would have been invited be-
cause in the 1930s and 1940's the
Canadian universities did not
employ Jewish academics. That
situation did not change until the
1950's.
TROPER, who teaches history
at the Ontario Institute for
Studies in Education in Toronto,
quoted from documents in which
university spokesmen during the
pre-war years warned ominously
about the spectre of Jews inun-
dating the universities if German
Jewish intellectuals were allowed
into Canada.

In the late 1930's at a meeting
of national scope at which Cana-
dian professors debated academic
policies (the predecessor of The
Learned Societies of Canada) and
listened to scholarly papers, a
resolution was introduced on the
issue of German Jewish immigra-
tion into Canada.
The assembled Canadian aca-
demics voted unanimously to
urge the government in Ottawa
not to open its doors to those
prospective immigrants.
We Hope
' You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
Phone 759-1669
Music Teacher
Part time for Reform Religious School.
Knowledge of Israeli and Jewish music
essential.
EXCELLENT SALARY
Call Rabbi Rothberg
920-8225
!
OW38M
HBaUBBHBBB
FOR SALE
LANDS of the PRESIDENT
3 b'drm 2 bath convertible S.E. exposure
Corner apt. on Golf Course In W.P.B.
Near Palm Beach, Shopping, Airport, I-95 and
Close to many cultural activities
(305)689-2115
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Though tfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
And now vou can receive a FREE Pennatieni
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi-
cal information a gift to you front Metiorah Chapels.
I
I WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE MYFREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mail coupon to: Menorah Chapels. 20955 Biscayne Boulevard,
North Miami Beach, FL 33180. Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director.
.Address____________________________________________
City------------------------------------------------------------------------------
State___________________________
-Zip-
Telephone .

4
In Dade, 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale,
Margate, Deerf ieio Beach & West Palm Bear JF


S IT
wammmmmmmmammmmmammmmmmmmm
IBP^HBBH
You ve got what it takes.
i
S*
Fr

.


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E9ZJ2DKYY_X2ZL1Z INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T23:22:56Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00329
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES