The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00328

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
[A call to action on behalf of Soviet Jews
p \n what appears to be a renew-
|d attempt to crush the Jewish
I .migrat"0" movement, leaders of
I Tg official Soviet "Anti-Zionism
Icommittee" are seeking to
I justify the virtual cutoff of emi-
Igration from the Soviet Union by
Ifkiming that the "vast major-
|ity" of Jews who wanted to leave
Ihave already done so.
I Samuel Zivs, a Jewish law pro-
cessor in Moscow and the com-
I mittee's first deputy chairman, in
Ian attempt to denigrate Israel
and Western groups concerned
Eft the plight of Soviet Jews,
called assertions that thousands
of Jews still seek to emigrate a,
"juggling of figures by Zionist
propaganda." In one particularly
vicious attack, the groups chair
man. Col. Gen. David Dragun-
sky, one of the highest ranking
Jewish officers in the Red Army,
labeled Zionism "chauvinistic
and racist," and a "man-hating
ideology" indistinguishable from
Nazism.
The Absurdity of
the Charges
The incredible charges that all
have left who wanted to emigrate
can be roundly rejected by thou-
sands of American Jews who cor-
respond regularly with refuseniks
and by thousands of Soviet Jews
now in Israel with close relatives
still in the Soviet Union.
More than 300,000 Jews have
asked for invitations from rela-
tiv outside the Soviet Union to
join them, a necessary first step
in the visa application process.
More than 70 parents and grand-
parents of refuseniks sent a letter
from Israel to Soviet Premier
Yuri Andropov and to the All-
Union OVIR of the Interior Min-
istry director, General R. Kuz-
netsov. Copies of the letter were
sent to newspaper editors, and
press offices for public and pri-
vate organizations.
The relatives wrote:
"We, parents, mothers, fath-
ers, grandfathers and grand-
mothers, living separated from
our children and grandchildren
for many years, address to you
our appeal ... we are firmly con-
vinced that there is no law in the
Civil Code of your country which
forces our children to struggle for
dozens of years for the realization
of their most elementary right
to be a source of joy and support
to their parents, to be a comfort
to them in their old age."
The relatives who signed the
letter included the parents of pro
minent refuseniks Etaline God
yak, Yudit Ratner-Bialy, Gedi
Kun, Iosif Kaplan, Tsilya Kats
Khaim and Yudit Solovey, Grig'
ory Vigdarov, Mikhail Kremen
Yakov Fishman, Ilya Essas
Grigory Leiderman, Basia Mul
Continued on Page 9
]Te wislb Floricliaii.
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
(olume 13 Number 15
Local Jewish
leaders meet
with Reagan
HOLLYWOOD President Ronald Reagan ex-
pressed strong support for the State of Israel and the
cause of Soviet Jewry during a recent closed-door
"feting hold with 20 leaders of South Florida Jewish
communities at the Diplomat Hotel.
The session was initiated by the White House and
followed Mr. Reagan's speech to the International
Longshoremen's Association.
Among the leaders at the meeting were Jewish
Federation of South Broward President Dr. Philip A.
Levin. Federation Board of Directors members Herbert
Katz. Dr Stanley Margulies and Rabbi Samuel Jaffe,
and local Jewish community activists Karen Margulies,
Paul Sussman. Joan Gross and State Representative
Fred Lippman.
Joining t he president were Republican Senator Paula
lawkins of Florida, and Congressmen E. Clay Shaw Jr.
ol Florida and Jack Kemp of New York.
Mr Reagan also urged the Jewish leaders to support
his current policies in Central America, at one point
n-iMirti-dly comparing El Salvador to Israel as a
potential bastion of democracy surrounded by non-
democratic countries.
We came away with a very positive feeling about
the meeting," Dr. Levin said after the half-hour session
with Mr Reagan. "The president was very firm in his
comments about continued United States support for
Israel. He also expressed strong commitment to the
issue ol obtaining freedom for Soviet Jews."
Hollywood, Florida Friday, July 22,1983
f K/Sxocnri
Price 35 Cents
SPOTTING EYE DISEASE .Scientists at the Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology in Haifa have developed an instrument to detect
vision problems at an early, treatable stage. The device, which can be
wheeled to the patient's bedside, measures the electrical activity in the
brain associated with vision. As an image on a television screen is
altered, the responsiveness of the patient's visual pathway can be
measured, enabling physicans to detect the slightest degeneration of
nerves, as well as the early onset of multiple sclerosis.
im Orthodox
mull split
from SCA
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Rabbinical Council of America,
the largest of the American Or-
thodox rabbinical organizations,
has announced a commission and
appointment of a consultant on
the problem of whether it should
continue its association with the
Reform movement -
The Rabbinical Council is the
Orthodox rabbinical representa-
tive on the Synagogue Council of
America (SCA). The Synagogue
Council's other rabbinical mem-
bers are the Reform Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis
i (CAR) and the Conservative
Rabbinical Assembly.
The Rabbinical Council has for
years been under pressure from
other Orthodox agencies to with-
draw from the SCA, as part of
such pressure on all Orthodox
rabbis to withdraw from agencies
which have Conservatives and
Reform membership, such as the
New York Board of Rabbis, the
Jewish Welfare Board's Chap-
Continued on Page 12
TedN
ewman
Dr. Saul Singer, MD
unique view
f Israel's needs
CM f W othw Anna-En
W communities on a unique
Si u,^T"h An*** "*> t<>
l% of tlprided ".""p*
lbiu, "* human services and
**?ncompaMed bv ** 1984 uja-
I Nation Campaign.
^al Federation leaders who parti-
cipated in the mission included Theo-
dore Newman, Campaign chairman;
Dr. Saul Singer, Big Gifts chairman;
Dr. Howard Barron, Project Renewal
chairman; Marc Gilbert, Hillcreet
Campaign chairman; Summer Kaye.
executive director; and Beverly
Bachrach, Women's Division director.
"It was a sobering yet exciting
Continued on Page IS
Begin visit accents brevity
JERUSALEM, July II (JTA) Premier Menachem Begin's
visit to Washington next week is on, despite rumors to the con-
trary here and in Washington. Officials close to Begin said that
the Wednesday meeting with President Reagan at the White
House will take place as scheduled.
They said Begin's visit was likely to comprise mainly political
talks, and few if any public appearances before Jewish or other
groups. They said the visit would last four daysthe extent of
the official sojourn in Washington.
Reports from Washington at the end of last week, citing
American sources, said Begin wanted to defer the trip for health
reasons. This was denied by sources close to the premier here.
But some of the sources do not hide Begin's lack of enthusiasm
over the visit at the present time.
They indicate that the premier feels the visit may not contri-
bute positively to the relationship between the two countries if he
is required to enter into a direct argument with Reagan over
Israel's planto which the U.S. objectsfor a partial redeploy-
ment of the Israel Defense Force in Lebanon.
Despite the insistence by sources close to Begin that his physical condition is
not a problem in connection with the imminent trip, observers cannot help not-
ing that unlike on previous occasions. Begin this time apparently plans to fore-
go public appearances before Jewish groups.
If this turns out to be the case, it will dovetail into the pattern of few and
brief public appearances that the premier has established here at home over the
past several months. The conventional wisdom among political and media pun-
dits to explain the behavior is that Begin is still depressed by the death of his
wife, Aliza, last November and depressed, too, by the complicated and unsatis-
factory outcome of the Lebanon war.
At a long-deferred meeting of the Herat Central Committee that finally con-
vened in Tel Aviv last Thursday night Begin made one of the briefest address-
es he has ever made to his party. This inevitably added to the spectulation that
he is not at the peak of his form at this time.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 22]
JFS aids woman's personal crisis
Mrs. I)., an attractive 30-year-
old, came to Jewish Family
Service of Broward County one
year ago, after 9he had been
separated from her husband for
six months. Her husband had
walked out and Mrs. D. felt as
though her world had come to an
end.
She had difficulty functioning
at home and caring for her two
daughters, aged 4 and 6. Most of
her time was spent crying ur
bemoaning her fate. Always
overweight, she had now gained
30 extra pounds.
The first months in counseling
were spent helping Mrs. D. cope
with her situation. She learned to
tap reservoirs of unused
emotional strength and found she
was more capable of dealing with
day-to-day events and problems
than she had realized.
Once she accepted that her
husband was serious about
getting a divorce, she began to let
out some of the anger and frus-
tration engendered by her
marriage of 10 years. Program-
med from an early age by her
parents to be a "good girl" and to
comply with their values and
ideas, Mrs. D. brought this
submissive attitude into her
marriage. She outwardly agreed
with her husband's financial
management, his choice of
friends and his priority of
material showiness.
Underneath, Mrs. D. was very
angry at her husband because her
own needs and values were verv
Dulzin lauds Assembly vote
By RIFKA ROSENWEIN
NFW YORK (JTA) The
decision by the just concluded
Jewish Agency Assembly to
adopt the Jerusalem Program
indicates the "Zioning" of that
organization. Leon Dulzin, chair-
man of the its Executive, said at
a press conference here.
Dulzin, who is also chairman of
the World Zionist Organization
Executive, called the decision "a
critical turning point in the histo-
ry of the Jewish Agency." With
it. he said, the Agency moves
from "the pragmatic to the ideo-
logical."
Dulzin also praised the more
than 500 delegates for the pas-
sage of the Agency's first
balanced budget, of $452 million,
and called the Assembly the
"most important one" since the
reconstitution of the Agency in
1972.
The adoption of the Jerusalem
Program resulted from the Cae
sarea Process, begun two years
ago to determine new priorities
for the Agency. Dulzin said.
The program calls for: "the re-
affirmation of the unity of the
Jewish people and the
centrality of Israel in Jewish life;
the ingathering of Jews in their
historic homeland, through aliya;
(and! the preservation of the
identity of the Jewish people
through Jewish and Hebrew edu-
cation, according to a statement
Anti-Zionist Committee
sponsored by Soviets
to open new branches
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The recently established Anti-
Zionist Committee of the Soviet Public will open branches
in major cities throughout the USSR in addition to
Moscow where it is headquartered, the Soviet Communist
Party newspaper Pravda reported.
Pravda said the committee, chaired by Gen. David
Dragunsky, the highest ranking Jewish officer in the Red
Army, will operate "regional and provincial offices" and
organize activities "in certain cities to fight the spread of
Zionist propaganda."
PRAVDA SHARPLY attacked Israel and "world
Zionism," charging that they "used methods similar to
those of the Nazis." The Communist Party organ accused
Israel of "operating concentration camps in which Arabs,
Palestinians and Lebanese are held as the Nazis used to
do."
Jewish circles here fear that the Anti-Zionist
Committee might try to spread its activities to other
Soviet bloc countries. Such a move, they said, would
endanger existing contacts and cooperation between the
Jewish communities in countries such as Hungary and
Czechoslovakia with Jewish organizations abroad.
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released by the Assembly.
Dulzin explained that the
program was the first proposed
at the 1951 World Zionist Con-
gress, the first held after the es-
tablishment of the State of Israel.
It was amended in 1968, to affirm
that aliya was incumbent upon
all Jewish communities, not only
those in 'distressed countries,"
Dulzin said.
A Shift In Focus
Now that the Jewish Agency,
which historically consisted of
"half Zionists, half non-Zion-
ists." has endorsed the Program,
the Agency will shift its focus
towards "Jewish and Zionist ed-
ucation and aliya," according to
Dulzin.
The Agency will be "stepping
in in this new era of assimilation"
and other threats to the Jewish
people, and try to expand pro
grams such as the ones currently
bringing foreign Jewish students
different. Mrs. D. feared that
confronting her husband would
lead to his abandoning her, so she
kept her real feelings inside.
In counseling. Mrs. D. learned
that she had a right to her own
needs. She discovered that anger
is an acceptable human emotion
and that anger can be expressed
constructively in a relationship.
Mrs. D. developed ways of
asserting herself so she could feel
more in control of what happened
in her life.
As Mrs. D. began to feel better
about herself, she stopped using
food as a source of comfort and as
a means of releasing anger. She
lost the 30 extra pounds and is
now working on losing more
weight.
Mrs. D. now feels secure as a
person in her own right and she
knows she can function as such in
a male-female relationship. She
has a boyfriend who can meet her
needs and they are thinking of
marriage. She works full timeandl
plans to continue her career In t^l
future. J
Mrs. D. and the counselor havj
planned to taper off her visits and I
termination of theraphy in the|
next two to three months
expected.
Mrs. D. feels she now is U|
independent adult and th
therapy has given her a new I
on life.
If you have any questions orl
feel that we can help, pleasJ
contact Jewish Family Service oil
Broward County, 4517 Holly I
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 330211
Telephone: 966-9056. Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Wedne
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone
735-3394. Hours Moncty
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
- 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday -1
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to90.m.
Jewish Family Service is
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fq
Lauderdale, the Jewish Fede
tun of South Broward and the|
United Way of Broward Countv.
to universities
said.
in Israel, Dulzin
But the overall implementation
of the Jerusalem Program will
depend on the cooperation of the
world Jewish community, he
added. "We would like to see
aliya as a responsibility of each
community, not just of Jerusa-
lem," he said.
He noted this year's increase in
aliya from the free world and "the
thousands of yordim (Israelis
who have left their homeland) re-
turning" to Israel.
Dulzin deplored the recent
freeze of emigration from the
Soviet Union, but added that he
had "personally warned" world
Jewish leaders that the Soviet
Union would react this way if
they continued to permit "drop-
outs" Jews who leave the So-
viet Union but do not emigrate to
Israel.
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel.rnc. Funerii Directors '
The most respected name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack. V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish, Vice President, F.D.
William F. Saulson, Family Consultant
Carl Grossberg
m
Sponsoring lhe Guardian Plan Pre-Arranged Funeral
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ENTERTAINMENT!
Temple Sinai's 2nd Annual "SINAI SERIES" Will Begin This Year
On Sunday Evening, December 18, 1983
with
CH AIM POTOK
Discussing Themes in his books thai bear upon contemporary issues,
respond to questions and autograph his books.
January 22,1964
Srrli Concern:
INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL Cantor David Levine, |
Yaakov Motzen, and Opera Tenor J. Alexander Perez
February 12,1984 THE FABULOUS BROTHERS ZIM
March 11,1964 THE MIAMI LYRIC OPERA COMPANY
SERIES TICKETS $50.00 Per Peraon
(10% Diicount if Purchased Prior to October 31, 1983).
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I ekphonc: "20-157, or Send Your Check, a


Friday, July2!U983_
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
The past Is our legacy,
the future Is our promise
Why make a gift to the Legacy and Endowment Fund for the
benefit of your community's endowment fund? With so many
causes, charities, fund drives and other appeals for your
charitable dollar, what makes a gift to the Legacy and
Endowment Fund something special, something you should
seriously consider?
As a Jew and as a member of a Jewish community, the answer
should be apparent. We are here today because somebody else
cared yesterday. Our forefathers gave much more than money or
stock or real estate to establish our heritage. Many of them gave
their lives, willingly or unwillingly.
This is not mean to be melodramatic. These are facts. This is a
part of our legacy. No one is asking you to make the supreme
sacrifice that many of our relatives and our ancestors made. But
because of that sacrifice or as a result of it, we are here today,
and it is our job and the job of our children and those who will
come after them to insure that this Jewish community and
Jewish communities throughout the world become stronger,
more vibrant, more meaningful, and more responsive to the
needs of Jews who live in those communities.
A gift to the Legacy and Endowment Fund of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward, in addition to your annual campaign
pledge and other Jewish communal giving, is your way to
become a part of the scheme of things that helps to enhance the
quality of life in your Jewish community. Your gift to the
Legacy and Endowment Fund of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward today, and any additions you mahy make in the future,
can establish a "fund" in your name, or in the name of someone
you wish to honor that can help to spark new programs and
projects that are of interest to you and will benefit others in the
community. Your gift to the Legacy and Endowment fund in
your will, as beneficiary of a life insurance policy, or through a
trust arrangement can perpetuate the charitable interests you
fostered during your lifetime.
For further information, please contact the Federation at 921-
8810.
UJA essay contest
winners announced
NEW YORK, N.Y. The
eight winners of the United Jew-
ish Appeal University Essay
Contest, funded by the Morris J.
Kaplun Foundation, were an-
1 nounced on June 23 by Robert E.
Loup, UJ A National Chairman.
The prize-winning authors of
essays on the theme "Jewish Ex-
perience as a Source of Survival
Strategies" are Barry Paul
Mann, of Harvard University,
age 23: Samuel C. Fleischacker.
of Yale University, age 22; Diane
Faith Steinberg of the University
of Southern California, age 24;
Bonnie Morris of American
University, age 22; Harman M.
Grossman, age 24, from Harvard
Law School and Ellen Resnick,
age 19, also from Harvard Uni-
versity; Michael Seth Berger, age
21, of Princeton University; and
Steven Schnipper of the Medical
College of Pennsylvania, age 23.
"This contest," Loup said,
'provides an opportunity for stu-
dents to join the mainstream of
Jewish life, and at the same time
generates truly creative thinking
on the future of Jewish life and
the challenge it presents to each
of us. Judging from the serious-
ness and depth of Jewish com-
mitment that the entrants
demonstrated, our future is in
capable hands."
According to Professor Henry
,.'- Feingold, president of the
American Jewish Historical Soci-
ety and Chairman of the Univer-
sity Essay Contest, "the quality
of writing of the entrants and
their ability to conceptualize and
project into diversified realms of
inquiry such as sources of
coherence and support for Juda-
ism, Israel as a focus of modern
Jewish identity, primacy of phil-
anthropy in the Jewish tradition,
Jewish mysticism and other
forms of transcendence was re-
markable by any academic
standards."
"The essays submit ed by
talented and imaginative stu-
dents from 66 universities, were a
source of profound inspiration to
me and to my colleagues," Mr.
Zvi Levavy, president of the M.
J. Kaplun Foundation said. "We
believe that this program will
help those on the periphery of
Jewish life to join the main-
stream and help the already com-
mitted to strengthen their dedi-
cation to Jewish precepts of life
and thoughts."
Each winner will receive a
guided visit to Israel this
summer, from Aug. 11 to Aug.
20, with an additional $600 com-
mendation stipened provided
through grants from the Morris
J. Kaplun Foundation. Isaachar
Miron, national director of
UJA'a Creative and Educational
Programs, conceived and coordi-
nated the contest.
Helping
People
is our business
Our reputation is providing
first-class legal services
for fees you can afford.
Call For Free Consultation.
FEINBERG & MAIDENBAUM
ATTORNEYS AT LAW AK111AA
2500 F Hallandale Beach Blvd. 4b /- / f 44
Program aids Broward seniors
GUARDIANSHIP
WATCHES OVER ELDERS
Broward's Guardianship-
Counseling Program is being
funded by Older Americans Act
Dollars through the Area Agency
on Aging as of July 1, 1963.
Project Supervisor Cathy Kim-
brel directs the program, which is
administered by the County's
Social Services Division through
its Gerontology Program.
The Guardianship-Counseling
Grant is orchestrated by the ef-
forts of two social workers, a con-
sulting psychiatrist and the local
probate courts who cooperate to
assess and then determine
whether a referred client is in
need of a guardian to supervise
his activities.
A corps of guardians, primarily
comprised of retired personnel, is
available to accept the tasks of
performing essential deeds such
as paying the client's bills, deter-
mining his living arrangements
and handling his assets. Costs
are determined by the court, and
accounting procedures are ini-
tiated every six months.
Mrs. Kimbrel has been project
supervisor for the Guardianship-
Counseling Program since its in-
ception approximately five years
ago. For further information re-
garding Guardianship-Counsel-
ing for the Elderly in Broward
County, please call 765-8160.
ELDERLY INTEREST
SCHEDULES TOURS
The Resource Development
Committee for the Elderly Inter-
est Fund, Inc., is coordinating
three tours in August. A portion
of the proceeds will be designated
for the nonprofit organization. A
three day tour to the Epoot
Center will initiate Aug. 10. An
eighteen day sojourn to Nova
Scotia and Prince Edward Island
will leave Aug. 14, and a nine-day
visit to Kentucky will leave on
Aug. 27. All travel will be on
deluxe motorcoaches.
For further information re-
garding the Elderly Interest
Fund Tours, please call Sharon
Nembhardt, 486-6370.
NEEDS NOURISH
NUTRITION PLANNING
The Service Agency for Senior
Citizens' Nutrition Program ini-
tiated its eleventh year of opera-
tion in 1983. The project current-
ly provides 2,000 meals daily at
congregate sites and 1,000 din-
ners for homebound recipients.
Careful evaluation of intake
data is helping to assure that el-
ders with the greatest economic
need are receiving meals. Cooper-
ation between the Service Agen-
cy and the Area Agency on
Aging has resulted in more effec-
tive and efficient distribution of
food throughout Broward Coun-
ty. In addition, the Board of Di-
rectors, under the leadership of
President Joseph Kleiman, has
assumed an active role to help the
program develop funding re-
sources on the local level.
For information about contrre
gate or home-delivered meals for
needy elders, please call 663-8991
B'nal B'rith chairman testifies
before Senate panel
There is surely a place for
prayer in children's lives, "and
that place is in the home, in the
church, synagogue, mosque, in
many places but not our public
schools," B'nai B'rith Women
Public Affairs Chairman Rita
Salberg told the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
Speaking on behalf of the
120,000 members of B'nai B'rith
Women, Mrs. Salberg told the
senators that her organization is
"profoundly distressed" over the
proposed bill to amend the
Constitution to allow prayer in
the schools. "We believe it to be
bad government policy, bad reli-
gious practice, and bad
educational programming," she
said.
Salberg, a teacher in the New
York City schools for 15 years,
said that the purpose of the
public school system was best
stated by the late Justice
Douglas, who described a public
school as a place "to train
American citizens in an atmo-
sphere free of parochial, divisive,
or separatist influences of any
sort an atmosphere in which
children may assimilate a
heritage common to all American
groups and religions.
"I would be the last to say our
schools are free of divisiveness or
that they are havens from strife
and conflict," she declared.
"Children from an early age are
aware of racial and religious
differences and conflicts ... But
the role of the public school
system is not to exacerbate those
differences. Rather, schools are
the places to emphasize our com-
monality, our oneness. In our
richly pluralistic country, that
oneness is not to be found in a
religious belief or in a prayer."
Salberg told the legislators
about the "hurtful and des-
tructive" experiences of many
Jewish people when praying in
school was a common practice,
"although the intent of the
practice was quite the opposite."
As members of one of the
largest religious minority groups
in the country, she said, "B'nai
B'rith Women urges you not to
proceed with legislation that will
put prayer back into our
schools."
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to the following questions!!
Yes No Have you the Proposed Insured:
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Page*



The Jewish Ftoridian taut Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 22,1963
Jewish Flor idian
ana Sato*at a> Graafcar Hotiywooa
C rVMSftocftar
FRED SMOCMET STEVE KATOW SUZANNE SHOCHET
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Saul Singar. Tad Nawman and Nat Sadlay; Traaaurar Dr. Howard Barron; Sacratary Otto
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Out of Town Upon Raquaat '
Leo Mindlin
The seduction of a journalist
Friday, July 22,1983
Volume 13
12 AB 5743
Number 15
Negotiation American-style
What is worse, as a principle negotiator
for peace in the Middle East between Israel
and its Arab neighbors, time and again the
Reagan Administration and the U.S. State
Department have managed to create new
sets of facts when they were either in dis-
pute before, or else did not exist at all.
The Reagan Administration's repeated
violation of the stipulations in the Camp
David agreements having to do with the
West Bank and Gaza (Judea and Samaria,
if you will), despite the President's brave
assertions to the contrary during his run
for office in 1980, is a perfect example of
creating a new set of facts involving an
issue previously in dispute.
The State Department's drawing of a
new map of the Middle East is a perfect ex-
ample of creating a new set of facts in-
volving an issue that did not exist before at
all.
In what sense then are the President and
all of his men negotiators in the cause of
peace in the Middle East today? What do
they leave open to negotiate as they go
along arbitrarily changing the rules, the
conditions and the realities of the dispute
among the parties involved?
This is neither negotiation nor arbi-
tration. This is high-handed ordination
instead. Furthermore, it is a terribly
dangerous game which the Administration
is playing. It shows the Arabs increasingly
that the U.S. isn't worth a hill of beans in
honesty or integrity so far as its Israeli ally
is concerned, and Israel is constantly being
assured the U.S. is an ally, is it not?
Under these circumstances, given the
dim-witted attitudes of the Administration,
can there be even among its policy- makers
any doubt that the United States is not
staunching the flames of further fighting in
the Middle East, but fanning them?
A sense of foreboding
As of now, at any rate, the date between
them is still on. Menachem Begin will be
meeting with Ronald Reagan in
Washington on July 27. But there is no
jubilation in Jerusalem about this. And, we
suspect, there is little more at the White
House.
What both parties fear is a Begin ex-
plosion, with Begin s propensity for
Biblical peroration. There is some reason
for this: Begins emotional state of mind
since the death of his beloved wife, Aliza.
And on top of this, the death of bis
longtime friend and political ally the other
week, Deputy Prime Minister Simcha
Ehrlich.
Heightened by the tensions in Hebron
and the growing anti- Lebanon campaign
sentiment in Israel itself, Mr. Begin's
depressed but smouldering state of mind
these days may result in what nobody
wants. Not even the careless, callous
Reagan Administration.
THE INSIDIOUS controllers
of the middle-American mind are
now saying that the Carter paper
caper is a draw and therefore of
no significance. They allege that
both sides knew about it before it
took its toll on President Carter
in his fateful debate with then-
candidate Ronald Reagan, and so
how could it possibly matter
then? Or now?
Charles Crawford, an aide to
Mr. Reagan during the cam-
paign, is supposed to have told
Carol C. Darr, a worker in the
Carter reelection organization,
that Reagan had copies of Presi-
dent Carter's debate briefing
papers.
IN TURN, Darr told her boss,
Timothy G. Smith, the Presi-
dent's campaign counsel. But
Smith thought that the notion
was so unbelievable as to be
untrue, and that it wouldn't even
be worth mentioning Darr's story
to Carter. Now, of course, Smith
says he's sorry.
But the main point of all of this
past tense sleuthing is that we
are now meant to believe that the
Carter paper caper doesn't
amount to a hill of beans. That it
was all a happy intrafamily joke.
That everybody knew about it.
and no one cared. Even Steven.
Nonsense. I do not subscribe to
the theory that, even if the
Democrats surrounding their
man knew nothing about the
stolen papers, as the media now
allege, it wouldn't have mattered.
According to the theory, Jimmy
Carter could never have beaten
Ronald Reagan anyway.
I AM NO Carter fan. Between
him and President Reagan, it is a
toss-up as to who is the greater
national disaster. But the fact is
that the media, principally tele-
vision, are devastating in their
capacity to shape the average
middle-American mind, which
believes that if you read it in
print or see it on TV, why then it
must be true.
"Now, there you go again, Mr.
President." That was Ronald
Reagan's refrain in reaction to
every telling Carter point in the
fateful Oct. 28, 1980 debate be-
tween them. And suddenly, old
dullard Reagan sounded like a
Phi Beta Kappa bent on being
brilliant about everything from
foreign policy to the intricacies of
economics. It was the paper
caper, of course, that prepared
him.
Is it conceivable that this
staged Republican performance
had no impact on a rapt nation
watching it? Or that it can have
no significance now, when
suddenly all the gory tales are
pouring so profusely from the
maw of its erstwhile secrecy?
THE TRAGEDY, for example,
of Watergate is not that stolen
papers from Democratic Party
Headquarters changed the course
of the election. Nothing could
have given George McGovern the
power to defeat Richard Nixon,
even if he had suffered the same
liability that President Carter
suffered in his campaign for re-
election eight years later.
The Watergate theft was
bungled, but suppose it had
succeeded. In either case, the
result was irrelevant to the
outcome. In the end, the tragedy
is that the attempt at theft
should have occurred at all.
Beyond this, I feel like those
Americans who were cheated out
of their proper choice in the 1968
campaign, when Sirhan Sirhan
assassinated Robert Kennedy. In
the same way, I feel cheated by
the assassination of John F. Ken-
nedy in 1963 because he hadn't
even been granted a chance in the
presidency to get off the ground
and show what he could do.
Or by the assassination of
Martin Luther King, Jr., which
George Will
changed, hardly for the better,
the whole character of the civil
rights movement after that.
THE MANIPULATORS of
public opinion may be strutting
their stuff once again, but there
can be no trivializing of this
latest fraud perpetrated by the
Republican Party's presidential
planners. There can be no
counting on the fact that, by
now, most Americans are tired of
this kind of trickery anyway,
what with the saturation they
feel of Watergate and its after-
math. There can be no im-
munizing of the public conscience
against the horror of such pro-
found immorality in our highest
halls with the vaccine of repeated
immoralities there. Or plays
about these immoralities in the
movies and on TV until we are
meant to shrug them off as na-
tural to the national condition.
For the manipulators and the
planners themselves are finally
being hunted out, as well as their
puppets, the Nixons and now thr
Reagans.
Enter George Will, the disti i-
guished syndicated columnist.
No wonder President Reagan, old
affable Ron, could keep shaking
his head in disbelief during that
Oct. 28 debate and say. "Now,
there you go again, "Mr. Presi-
dent." That, in fact, is what
America must now come to say
to Mr. Reagan.
WHAT DID Will do, a man
who writes conservative columns
of such profound punditry and
winsome wisdom for millions of
the nation's citizens to peruse?
Will knew all about the Carter
paper caper. It was Will, as it
turns out he is Ronald Reagan's
"favorite" columnist, who was
called in to coach Mr. Reagan in
the use of the stolen material so
that Reagan could respond to
President Carter's line of debate
with maximum effectiveness.
Will not only knew about the
theft, but he helped Reagan use
the purloined papers in repeated
rehearsals of the answers Reagan
would be called upon to give.
Here was a newspaperman, a
gifted and respected and trusted
writer and thinker, engaging in a
lie with a flunkie perfectly willing
to participate in the deception,
knowingly or otherwise. And
then what else did Will do?
Following the debate, Will
wrote a widely-syndicated
column in which he expressed
surprise at how well Mr. Reagan
had done. One was meant to
believe that Will had had small
regard for him beforehand, but
that the debate changed his mind
about the Reagan candidacy.
I SAID in this spot last week
that one of our genuine national
tragedies is that we no longer
seem to have high-minded men
among our leaden with the
capacity to act wisely. And what
is more, to speak to us and to
write for history in the noble
English language in such a
cogent way as to arouse our high
moral purpose as a people.
Well, here is Ronald Reagan,
busybody hick telling everybody
how they should live their lives
when it comes to abortion and
prayer and other such precious
moral stuff. But who may well
have stolen into the presidency
by the most insidious means
possible, whether he knew about
the Carter paper caper, or simply
allowed himself to be
manipulated by the golems who
surround him and manipulate
him everyday.
And here is Will. What is there
to be said of him? I can only
repeat what I said here of the
media last week: In the vacuum
of American idealism, "Though
they preach freedom of the press,
in practice they are libertines, i
handmaidens of the greedy and
the power-hungry."
Dutch review
withdrawal
from UNIFIL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Dutch Foreign Minister Hans
Van der Broek said here that his
government might be willing to
reconsider its decision to with-
draw its troops from the United
Nations Interim Force in Leba-
non by Oct. 19 if by then a new
and useful role was available for
the troops and if the Lebanese
situation was improved.
Van der Broek was responding
to Israeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir's suggestion
that UNIFIL contingents might
be able to play a role alongside
multinational force units, in
aiding the Lebanese army to take
over and control areas of the
country that Israeli and Syrian j
forces vacate.
The two Foreign Ministers met
for four hours. Van der Broek met
-later with Premier Menachem
Begin. Israeli officials stressed
the warm and friendly atmos-
phere at the talks despite diffe-
rences that surfaced especially
over the Palestinian issue and Is-
raeli West Bank settlements. The
officials said both ministers had
felt the talks went "excellently."
Burg rescinds
14-day sentences
JERUSALEM (JTA) In-
terior Minister Yosef Burg, over-
riding the recommendations of
the police, rescinded the 14-day*-J
prison sentences imposed on
three rock-throwing religious
zealots.
The police had urged vigorous
punishment for the three who
hurled rocks at passing vehicles
on the Ramot road last Saturday
and attacked police officers who
tried to stop them. Burg, a leader
of the National Religious Party,
ordered the men released so that
they could spend their nights at
home rather than in jail cell*.
They will serve their sentences by
working day* at the local polks
precinct.
According to Burg, the ultra-
Orthodox Jews who have been
harassing non-observant motor-
ists for years on the Ramot road
which passes near an Orthodox
neighborhood, had threatened
worse violence if the arrested men
were kept in jail.
Media can help
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
Nazi-hunter Simon Wieaenth
believes that the mass media
could help bring war criminals to
justice despite the fact that many
of them are now nationals of
countries far from the scene of
their crimes.


[Friday. Jqy 32-1963
The Jewish Fioridian and Shofar of Greater Hollyivood
Page*-
*-
>ro~lsrael Senate candidates on the horizon
By MORRIS J.AMITAY
If present trends continue
there could be a bumper crop of
oro-Israel Senators elected next
vear whose support would aug-
ment a solid core of friends not up
(or reelection in 1984. Some of
these potential additions would
more than offset the declining
support of such former stalwarts
as Senators Pat Leahy (D-VT)
id Tom Eagleton (D-MO).
There are a number of impres-
sive challengers who are curently
touted as having at least an even
chance of defeating incumbents.
Perhaps the safest bet is Rep. Al
Gore. Jr. of Tennessee, who will
be vying for the seat left open by
retiring Majority Leader Howard
Baker. Gore, the son of a former
senator, is an articulate, charis-
matic tour-term Representative
with an impeccable record on
Israel-related issues. If the Re-
publican Governor of the State
decides not to contest the seat,
Gore looks like a sure winner.
Baker's positions have been de-
cidedly less favorable.
In Iowa, another young attrac-
tive Democcratic Representative
Tom Harkin, will be challenging
a Republican incumbent, Roger
Jepeen. Jepsen, whose flip-flop
on the Saudi AW ACS sale was a
great disappointment to the
Jewish community, is reportedly
in trouble back home over his in-
consistency on a number of other
issues. Harkin, who serves on the
House Committee on Science and
Technology, recently visited Is-
rael and returned genuinely im-
pressed by Israel's scientific and
technological achievements and
the need for closer U.S.-Israel re-
lations.
In New Hampshire, incumbent
Republican Gordon Humphrey
will be strongly challenged by
Democratic Representative Norm
Swiss army maintain
conference security
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA (JTA) Units
of the Swiss army will maintain
security during the United Na-
tions-sponsored conference on
Palestine opening here next
month, the government an-
nounced today.
The army was called in because
the local authorities said they
could not be responsible for
security measures, especially at a
time when many of their people
would be on vacation. But the
Geneva police chief said the army
was not an adequate substitute
because soldiers are not trained
for that kind of work. A spokes-
man for the armed forces seemed
to agree. He told a press confer-
ence today that "the army is not
really enthusiastic about having
to perform the task."
Units from the Canton of Tur-
govi will be assigned to guard the
airports, frontiers and foreign
missions as well as the UN
I'alaise des Nations where the
conference will be held. A special
committee was set up of govern-
ment officials, army officers and
the Geneva Canton authorities to
coordinate the measures.
The heavy burden of security
around a conference considered
likely to attract terrorist ele-
ments was the official reason
given by the French and Aus-
trian governments for refusing to
host the conference.
Yeshiva U.
graduates
Two residents of South Brow-
ard were among the 1,500 gradu-
ates recently receiving degrees
and diplomas from Yeshiva Uni-
versity in New York City.
Emma Rebecca Bursztyn of
Blue Heron Drive, Hallandale,
earned a bachelor of arts degree
from the university's Stern Col-
lege for Women.
Gregory Jonathan Rand of
North 37 Street in Hollywood
was awarded a bachelor of arts
degree from Yeshiva College, and
an associate of arts degree from
James Striar School of General
Jewish Studies.
Completing its, 97th year,
Yeshiva University is America's
oldest and largest school under
Jewish auspices.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leufrii
Bank Lw NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
Securities (212)759-1310
itlOfl Toll Free (800) 221-48381
D'Amours. Humphrey's negative I
record is in sharp contrast to
D'Amours consistent support.
John Durkin, a former Democ-
ratic Senator who has also been
seeking the Democratic
nomination, is now contemplat-
ing a House race thereby de-
creasing the prosepct of a bitter,
divisive primary benefitting the
incumbent.
In Minnesota, Republican
Rudy Boschwitz' reelection
prospects look decidedly better
according to recent polls. Bosch-
witz, Chairman of the Near East
Subcommittee of Foreign Rela-
tions, has been a staunch sup-
porter of Israel as being in the
best interests of the United
States. The reelection of the
Jewish, Berlin-born Boschwitz
should be of utmost priority in
the American Jewish community.
A number of his potential De-
mocratic challengers have fine
Israel-related positions and
records. In the Senate, however,
seniority and key chairmanships
are crucial, and Boschwitz's race
deserves major attention.
A race rivaling Minnesota in
importance is shaping up in Illi-
nois where Senator Charles
Percy, Chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, will be
facing a tough primary challenge
from three-term Representative
Tom Corcoran. If Percy sur-
mounts this hurdle, his most
likely and strongest Democratic
opponent, according to recent
polls, will be Representative Paul
Simon. Simon, who will formally
announce his candidacy shortly,
is one of the most experienced
and respected members of the
House. Simon is considered to be
a real threat to unseat Percy, and
his pro-Israel record is in sharp
contrast to Percy's.
Such outstanding supporters
of stronger U.S.-Israel ties as
Carl Levin of Michigan, Bill
Bradley of New Jersey, Max
Baucus of Montana, and Joe
Biden of Delaware look safe at
this time for reelection. Biden,
in particular, could have an easy
time if Delaware's Republican
Governor, Pete DuPont, takes
himself out of the race.
Looking at the Senate after the
1984 elections, there is a good
chance the Democrats could
regain control, now held by the
majority Republicans 51-46. This
depends a great deal on the deci-
sion of three Democratic gov-
ernors as to whether they will
seek Senate seats. They are Gov-
ernor Joseph Brennan in Maine
who would certainly give Senator
William Cohen a tough fight;
Governor Richard Lamm of
Colorado, who now beats Senator
Bill Armstrong head-to-head in
recent polls and Governor Wil-
liam Winter of Mississippi who
should easily defeat Senator
Thad Cochran, assuming no
major Black candidate is on the
ballot.
Should the Senate change
hands, the next Majority Leader
would be Robert C. Byrd of West
Virginia whose strong pro-Israel
stance the past two years would
be decidedly preferable to the
retiring Howard Baker's inat-
tention. The new Deputy Leader
or the "Whip," Alan Cranston
(assuming he is not the Democ-
ratic Presidential nominee would
be a substantial improvement
over the current number two
man, Ted Stevens of Alaska.
Should the Republicans retain
control, Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas
has the inside track for the Ma-
jority Leadership. Dole, whose
support has flagged a bit recent-
ly, would still appear to be an im-
provement over Baker.
All in all then, the 1964 elec-
tions will hopefully result in
stronger support for Israel in the
United States Senate.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's & 123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's & 123 s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
2*^--^-^^ are tasty
i \hV ^5a P3513 alphabet
WifAJ^ tters and
v^v* numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
Waldman
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Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuisine
Your Hosts Sam and Morris Waklmsn. Qsry She*. David Diamond
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SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
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ON THE OCEAN AT43rd STREET
6,6 The recipe for
Gulden V Mustard
has been in my .
family for years. .
HUH of Sole
CHARLIE GULDEN
I
I
I
I
IVS
cup Gulden's Sptcy
Brown Mustard
en? IM Cretan
tM*>utM)cnMM
iMSpCOXkfM
late spoons burnt w
maintnne. **
|uk* from om lemon
cup ftsa brotn
laniwaoons huvy
pounds sole Mteis
ft cuttertewit*
Mmniumrd ate cream Insepnale
.batebaM
L#o> cm M tfltaMM
en tettore; tattewt*crumbtenure. Saute ha* butter
until atetrv biowned, oteut 5 Miatett each mm. Fact Men
brotn Mo wiM. Maj tote* reMtue
lisn bus. Blend m c
Spoon sauce *r list; serve with
kmm ate pmtmy^nmk. Serves 4.
And these recipes
will be in your
family
for years, too! 99
Aaole Salad
I llhtiipnnni a juice
V cupwMcr
4 aaka IConta*
Macs or Detenus or
mature) MM
toste mi tint
Vj CMcrwooteweJuuts
ft cup suced celery
ft cup Moauae
ft cwCwtnASfiCT
Brown Mustard
I i.
Mete km tea tad water Am icons
ate lei sum I* minutes; drain. Add
walnuts end celery and loss Band
it ayti taunt, mustard ate sugar; loss
with apples Serves 4


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Our Meats
Fresh! Choice! Low Priced to
Save You Money. Check it out Compare!
Friday, July 22,1983 II FT
F^^R SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fiyer
Sg Quarters
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
UNDERBLADE BONELESS
Pot Roast
FRESH GROUND 3 LBS. AND OVER
Ground Chuck
3 LBS 4 OVER FRESHLY GROUNO
Ground Beef Round.. 1.99
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Underbade Steak 1.99
USOA CHOICE ? 3 IBS AVG
Stow Beef.............. 1.99
SHENANOOAH OR RAEFORO SMOKED
Turkey Ham............1.49
FRESH FROZENGRAOf A
Turkey Wings.........u. .49
FRESH FROZEN GRADE A
Turkey Drumsticks .. ^ .49
USOA CHOICE GENUINE SPRMG
Whole Lamb Leg.......2.19
FRESH FROZEN PANTRY PROt
USOA CHOCE BEEF LOW
t_______i____i-;
enoenom
W. LEANER THAN BACON
2.69
,4.39
1.69
FRESH FROZEN WATER 'MIN SUCEL
NEW SIZE PACKAOl
Sandwich Steak

4.29
FRESH FROZEN
Cod
or
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FRESH FROZEN SINGELTON
Fisherman's
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Our
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DIET COKE, TAB, SPRITE
OR SCHWEPPES OJNGERALE
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Ice
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DAIRY-DELI
Breakstone
WHOLE OR HALF
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UF STYLE^aJ
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LOW
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ASSORTED FLAVORED FRUIT ORMKS
39
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PANTRY PRDC ASSORTED FLAVORS SWISS STYLE
...3^1.09.
Yogurt
BREAKSTONE
HALF
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Oscar Mayer
ORIGINAL OR NACHO
Hot Dogs
NEW1 SARGENTO S THW FANCY SHREDDED SWISS OR
IPKG .89
BOROEN COL OREO OR WHITE AMERICAN
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3t .89
PANTRY PROE WHOLE ULK OR PART SKIM lO.'
PANTRY PRDE MLO CHEOOAR OR MONTEREY
,. lb 2.59
KRAFT PARKAY
131.19
SPICED LUNCHEON MEAT SALAMI OR PICKLE AND
PMENTO LOAF-LB PKO
Lykes Power Pack 1.39
HEBREW NATIONAL MDOET SALAMI OR
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2.49
SERVICE-DELI
IN-STORE BAKERY
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BBBBBB^HSaeaBSNOT AVAILABLE AT ALL
BBMAR OVEN BROWN SMOKED suceo OR chunk
Turkey
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IN-STORE
BAKERY
NOT AVAILABLE M ALL STONES
JEWISH STYLE ONWN RYE OR
Com Rye-----
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FASHIONED
16-02
59*
CABERNET OR MBjUNQ
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CMABLB^ICNIN BLANC RHINE. ROSE
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Taylor
f.Ulimil
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HEALTHS
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ORAL*
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NWT TABS OR SO-CT CAPS EXTRA
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Tylenol...........2.57
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
BAKEI
MEYERS PKG OF 8
English
Muffins
2/$l<
APPLE. LEMON OR PINEAPPLE
Golden
Top Pies 22 oz pel
PANTRY PRDE
Rye Bread...
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PANTRY PROE PCWCPAK HAMBURGEBOJ
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GREEN CHANT 10-OZ
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W.CHEESE SAUCE OR
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PANTRY PRDECRMUE CUT P- BM.. rrencn rnej SEALTEBT ASSORTED FLAVORS Hi .SAO PUT am
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MMUTEMAB Lemonade.. .2 "HM CAWM


Friday. July 22,1963
- The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
?
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p"g8-
The Jewish Flortdian-and Shofar of Greater Hollywood *"
FrufaQr>!Jy22,183
Children's guides to Mideast history
The Palestine Question. By
Raymond Carroll. Franklin
Watts Inc., 387 Park Avenue
South, New York, N.Y. 10016.
Impact Series. 1980. 90pp. $8.90.
Gold* Mek. By Mollie Keller.
Franklin Watts Inc. 387 Park
Avenue South, New York, N.Y.
10016. Impact Biography Series.
1983. 119pp. $8.90.
Reviewed by Marcia Posner
An understanding of Middle
East affairs is difficult enough for
adults. Books which can help
young adults gain an under-
standing are especially valuable.
Two new titles in the Impact
Series from Franklin Watts are
both good, in different ways
one a broad historical study, the
other a personal, even intimate
biography.
Jewish Books
B in Review
V
is a service ol the /Wfl lewish Book Councit,
15 fast 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
Carroll begins his discussion of
The Palestine Question with an
excellent, concise history of the
region and the Jewish people up
to 1897.
In it he justifies the Jewish
claim to the land. He shows that
there were always Jews in the
area, Jews who never left during
the dispersions and whose des-
cendants populated the area
along with the Arab population
until modern times.
By giving a thorough history
NEEDED
Volunteers with expertise in video production,
editing, script writing....for exciting, in-
novative intergenerational program.
Contact:
Ed Finkelstein
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF SOUTH BROWARD
921-6511
COME UP TO THE
iOODLIFE AT BROWNS
In The Comfort Of The CatskHls!
.
Orry
Ong. Section-Main Bkkj
Cahfomta & Celebrty
BevfriyHNs
imperial & Regency
rnocess
$ 923
$1,017
$1,034
$1,065
$1,099
WEEKLY RATES from 286 to M26
lentee. Prncess & PMct accommodations sfcgnBy Higher
Spc*l Oocounn lot long "'r'
EVERYTHING INCLUDED IN OUR
CARE-FREE VACATION PACKAGE!
C? Baggagt Han** And Umo Trjnoportaton
To and From Hotel
ITamrt&aMtoiNhidrttoRMi
I Servct\MO>f><^ for Special Diets
I Gourmet Ms* Defy OCocttail Partita
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RITA MORENO
LESLIE UGOAMS
BOB8YVINTON UBERACE
STEVE LAIM^ENCEAEYPIEGORME
800-431-3856
A Ulltene^
rake, NY. 18788 W
Loch Sheldrake
(tt4) 434-5151 mkYCMmemd* honond
Or See Your Tr*s Agent
of the area and the worldwide
factors acting upon the parti-
cipants, Carroll clears up many
puzzles and shows the British
participants as glaringly at fault.
The British promised the
Arabs a land of their own if they
helped the British to overthrow
Turkey. They promised the
French to divide up the terri-
tories of the Middle East if they
joined the Allies in World War I.
They wooed Jewish opinion in
Europe and the United States
with promises of a Jewish
homeland, and rewarded the bril-
liant inventor of an explosive,
Chaim Weizmann, with the
promise of a Jewish homeland.
The result was that everyone
had a legitimate claim and reason
to believe that Palestine was
theirs.
With the Holocaust. British
insistence on mollifying the
Arabs (who had sided with the
Axis powers during World War
II, as opposed to the Yishuv
whose soldiers fought alongside
the British) because of their
dependence on Arab oil, was
unforgivable.
Carroll tells how ships full of
Jewish refugees were turned back
to certain death by the British
and how British soldiers clubbed
men and women trying to enter
Palestine illegally.
Carroll also recounts the
massacre of Deir Yasin by the
Irgun under Menachem Begin on
April 9, 1938, a move he says,
calculated to make the Arab
population flee. However, Carroll
says, the Jewish leadership at the
time and the International Red
Cross confirm that the Irgun
"had committed a repugnant
atrocity."
It was these and other acts of
violence against Arab villages
which sent 300,000 Arabs into
flight across the borders to
neighboring Arab states. By the
time the Arab effort to "drive
Israel into the sea," failed, Pales-
tine was partitioned but
between the Israelis and the
Jordanians. The Palestinian
Arabs had nothing.
From that time to the present,
Carroll traces the development of
the PLO, the increasing hosti-
lities of both sides, the Kissinger-
Sadat peace negotiations and the
current debacle in Lebanon.
On the whole this is a fair
assessment of the situation,
although not Zionistic. Zionists
would say that historically Arabs
had evicted Jews from their
homes, and that Jordan, itself,
had advised the Arabs to flee
temporarily to be safe from the
Jordanian armies.
The list "For Further
Reading" does contain books
which do show this information
and from both a distinctly Jewish
point of view as well as from a
pro* Arab viewpoint.
Mollie Keller's biography of
Golds Meir is personal and
Jewish in outlook ana tone.
Beginning with the impression
left upon Golda, the young child,
by a pogrom in her native Russia,
and continuing to her girlhood in
America, where her talent for
organization and speech-making
was discovered, through to the
socialistic influence of her sister
Sheyna and Golda's certain
realization that she must be a
factor in the establishment 6f a
homeland for her people, the book
sparkles.
Although written simply, the
drama of the times through
which Golda lived and to which
v
she reacted were such that one
reads each page with excitement.
A realistic portrait is given about
Golda's doubts and hesitations,
about her worth or lack of it as a
proper wife and mother, and her
warring with her own nature.
This biography conveys better
than any history could the
yearnings of the Jewish people
for Zion. As in the other books in
this series a list "for Further
Reading" is given, and there is an
index.
Dr. Marcia Posner is a library
consultant and librarian, Jewish
Center Library, Roslyn, N. Y.
I R. WE1NRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street, Suite 319
Miami, Florida 33131 (305) 381-9877
N.J. (201)6e&4900N.Y. (212)564-3070
Telex 642184
n
LOUIS D. BENNETT, M.D.
Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology
is pleased to announce
the association of
IRA R. LEFKOF, M.D.
for the practice of
Gastroenterology
Diseases of the Liver
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Internal Medicine
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Holly wood, Fla 33021
Hours by Appointment
966-8200
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, July 22.

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update!
-j
102 JEWS LEAVE USSR
1 IN JUNE
MOSCOW 102 Jews were
allowed to leave the Soviet Union
Israel in June, bringing the
,tal for the first six months of
to 639, less than half that
for the previous year. Since the
peak year in 1979, emigration has
dropped from over 4,000 a month
w an average of 100 a month in
1983.
TARNOPOLSKY SENTENCED
TOTHREE YEARS
KHARKOV Forty-six year-
^ld chemist and Jewish
Lemigration activist YURI
TARNOPOLSKY was convicted
on June 29 of "defaming the
Soviet state" and sentenced to
three years in labor camp. The
only evidence reportedly used
against him at the trial was a
letter from a friend now residing
in the United States.
BEGUN TRIAL SET
VLADIMIR The trial of
I0SIF BEGUN, a fifty-one year-
old Moscow Hebrew teacher and
Jewish emigration activist, is
now scheduled for July 25. Begun
dismissed his lawyer, Leonid M.
Popov, and will defend himself.
The procurator is alleged to have
offered Begun a lighter sentence
if he "expressed remorse." Begun
reportedly refused.
Arrested for an unprecedented
third time last November 6 for
"anti-Soviet agitation and propa-
ganda," Begun faces a possible
seven years in a labor camp and
five years internal exile.
PRISONER UPDATE:
TATARSKAYA ASSR -
IDA MILGRON and LEONID
SHCHARANSKY, mother and
brother of ANATOLY SH-
CHARANSKY. were allowed to
New movement
TEL AVIV (JTA) Herat
is sponsoring a new movement
known as "For Israel" to counter
Peace Now and other movements
opposed to Premier Menachem
Begin's foreign policy and the
settlement drive on the West
Bank.
"For Israel" is billed as non-
partisan. Its founding session
was addressed by former Chief of
Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan who, ac-
cording to press reports is being
wooed to join Herat. Eitan reiter-
ated his support for massive set-
tlement of the West Bank but did
not refer to any personal political
plans he might have.
1 Come fiddle
around.
IT'S COUNTRY/WESTERN CRUISE TIME ON
msCARIDE-I. SEPTEMBER 17, FROM MIAMI.
4
^ *
Join in on oil rhe fun os our
newea Happy Ship.' msCoribe-1.
sets soil on o hond-cloppm. foot
aompm good ole rime
Weve lassoed some of
Country Westerns top tolent
fompoll and the Glaser Brothers
along with Angie Abel os an
oaded arrrocnon They II be
ploying ond singing oil their hits.
You II cruise ro three exonc
Caribbean ports, enjoy oil our
shipboard ocrivines. fine dining,
plush casino ond always cour-
teous service
So come fiddle around.
You'll even ger o real cowboy
hot to wear proudly bock home
Take advantage of our spe-
ciol "Inougural Season" offer.
From only S599 for an inside
cabin, upper and lower beds.
$629 for on inside cabin with
two lower beds, or $679 for an
outside cabin with two lower
beds. No restrictions.
CiariUI
fompoll G Ihe Glaser Brothers
o~*6*tua
"*9;'veedin
AHoppyShip
From +kWM M
PER PERSON
Doubl*occupancy Smteiewro Roiei
ettectiv* rhrough Dec 1719S3
3*
See Your
Travel Agent.
.l<
Starting October 1st. our original "Hoppy Ship: ms Doheme wHI
begin weekly cruises from Miami to the Vfestem Caribbean, visiting
Port-ou-Prince. Port Antonio, Gtond Caymon ond Cozumw.
see him on July 5 at Christopol
prison after an 18 month interval.
They report that he has gained
back 40 pounds after losing 70
during a four month hunger
strike which ended last January,
a sign that his health may be
improving.
KHARKOV POLINA
PARITSKY, wife of forty-five
year-old ALEKSANDR PARIT-
SKY, was refused permission to
visit her husband in June. The
address of the labor camp where
Paritsky is serving a three year
sentence is now known: Stantsi
Vydrino, P. Ya. 94-4, Kabansky
Rayon, Buryatskaya ASSR.
671111, RSFSR, USSR.
FORMER
DATE:
PRISONER UP-
BENDERY IDA NUDEL,
fifty-two, was recently visited by
another former prisoner, MARK
NASHPITZ, of Stranino, and
Moscow activist NATALIA
KHASINA.
BIRTHDAYS
The following refuseniks
celebrate birthdays this month:
July .14: Aledsandr Sudarov,
Grigory Teplitsky; Julv 16:
Action
Continued from Page 1
eris and Aleksandr Kushnir.
A Call to Action
It is imperative that we act
now! Letters should be written on
professional letterhead, if possi-
ble, or on personal stationery
stressing abhorrence to Soviet *
propaganda regarding anti-Zion-
ism and refuting the claims of the
Soviet committee. Clearly, there
are many thousands of Jews
clamoring to leave the Soviet
Union. We all are aware that the
Soviet government sponsors the
-aiiti-Seuiitk! -statements heard
and read in the media of the
USSR. The Anti-Zionist Com-
mittee is being presented by the
Soviets as an authentic voice of
Soviet Jews, which, clearly it is
not.
Send your letters to:
Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin
Embassy of the USSR
1125 16th Street N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
CTUDI0
sJJTk
Semyon Livshits, Elena Gimel-
farb, Miriam Finkelshtein, Laila
Katanov, Arkady Chepovetsky;
July 19: Efim Goldberg, Irina
Shubov; July 20
Grigory Pevzner;
Ginis; July 22:
bilsky.
Anatoly Ioffe,
July 21: Yulia
Anna Cherno-
Marvin Gottlieb's
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
We Appreciate Your Business
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
Gulfslde Getaway
Vacation persons
2NIGHTS oNcyieew
Double occupancy, including taaes/gratuities April
15 thru December 15.1983
PACKAGE INCLUOES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room for 2 people 4 nights 2 nights
Continental breakfast for 2 4 mornings 2 mornings
Dinner for 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Golf Packages and
Discounts also available
^otf
Continental
Cuisine
FREOJOSSI
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rut renowned
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Match your latMe lo your
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ON THE GULF OF MEXICO


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 22,1963
Man needs law
By RABBI
AVROM L. DRAZIN
It is most appropriate that the Sidra in which we read the
Decalogue should always fell on the Shabbat following Tisha
B'Av. We are thereby reminded that the tragedy of Tisha B'Av
was brought about by the Jew's failure to live up to the
obligations imposed upon him by the Decalogue. Man failed in
his relationship with his God and he failed in his relationships
with his fellow humans. Shabbat Nachamu, the eternal Sabbath
of Consolation, the Messianic era, can only come about when we
shall develop honest relationships with our fellows and with our
God.
Unfortunately, in our zeal to do honor in the name of the
Creator we forget that equal weight was granted to each tablet.
We choose to overlook the concept of "Torah Anas," one law
shall apply to everyone, the member of the community and the
stranger equally.
We cause the breakdown of a society and culture when we
create a dual law, one for the "haves" and another for the "have
nots." It is this evil against which Isaiah railed in his first
prophecies when he foretold the destruction of Jerusalem.
Were Isaiah here today, he would repeat his prophecies word
for word. We have created dual standards of law for those who
have, and those who have not. Our religious, educational and
cultural institutions have allowed this insidious attitude to
capture their thinking. The "haves" continue to strengthen their
grasp on the structures of society, while the "have nots" fall
further and further into depression and desperation.
The time has come to recognize that every man is created in
the image of God and is entitled to be treated with dignity and
respect. The organizations and institutions of our community
should be open to every Jewish man, woman, and child,
regardless of ability to pay. No child should be forced to do
without the maximum Jewish education he craves, regardless of
ability to pay, as long as the family as willing to help carry the
burden. The time has come to re-order the priorities of our
Jewish community. There are many of our brethren who
desperately need our help. Will we help them or will we push
them down further? When there is "One Torah" then will the
Almighty come to comfort his people with the eternal blessing of
peace.
Raymond P. Nolan, M.D.
Ronald H. Woody, M.D.
Michael B. Demet, M.D.
Sidney E. Morrison, Jr. M.D.
Announce the Association of
Eric N. Freling, M.D.
for the practice of
Obstetrics, Qynecology
and Infertility
at
371lGarfieldSt.
Hollywood, FL 33021
Tel. 961-8303
1641 N. Hiatus Road
Pembroke Pines, FL 33026
Tel. 431-7000
Hours by Appointment
ROSH
HASHANA
SEPTEMBER 8/9
YOM
KIPPUR
SEPTEMBER 16/17
HIGH HOLY DAYS
SERVICES
1963
MAIN SERVICE^
temple bethohm
sanctuary
(Fcffnsrty bm* ma- Pwa*)
9730 Stirtng Road
Conducted by>
Rabbi Barnard P Shotor
Cantor Abraham Kostor
57M
CONCURRENT SERVICE
cooper city high school
auditorium
9401 Stirling Road
Conducted by:
Dr. Richard Coraarl
TICKETS AND MEMBERSHIP INQUIRES /MMLABLE AT THE
TEMPLE OFFICE. FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CALL.......
0
431-5100
temple beth ahm
A CONSCIMOIW COH0MOMON
OO" MM. timt S""*. Momng O OOim B O-en
Solel sisterhood leads service
Shabbat Summer Worship
Service will begin at 8:15 p.m.,
Friday evening, July 22. This
Worship Service will be con-
ducted by members of Temple
Solel's Sisterhood.
The Oneg Shabbat following
the Worship Service will be
hosted by the Sisterhood of Tem-
ple Solel.
Shabbat Evening Worship
Services are held every Friday
evening during the summer
months at 8:15 p.m.
The Abe and Grace Durbin
School of Living Judaism enroll-
ment is from Kindergarten
through 12th Grade. Various
grades meet on Sunday morn-
ings, Tuesday and or Thursday
afternoons. Religious School
classes will resume on Sunday,
Sept. 11.
Temple Solel membership in-
cludes tickets for the High Holy
Days. Membership inquiries are
invited. Contact the Temple of-
fice 9894)205.
Services will begin Friday
evening July 22 at 8 p.m. in the
main sanctuary. Lay Rabbi
Irving Swade will conduct the
service. Mr. Isaac M. Goldenholz
will chant the liturgy.
Shabbat Morning Services will
begin at 8:35 a.m. on Saturday,
July 23.
Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai is again sponsor-
ing satellite Services for the High
Holy Days. These Services will
be held at the Diplomat Hotel on
S. Ocean Dr., and at the Hillcrest
Playdium. Tickets for the Diplo-
mat Services may be purchased
at Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood, Monday-
Thursday from 10-12 Noon and 1-
4 p.m. Tickets for the Hillcrest
Playdium Services may be pur-
chased directly at the Hillcrest
Playdium. Please call the Temple
office at 920-1577 for additional
information.
Temple Sinai's 2nd annual
"Sinai Series" will begin this
year on Sunday evening, Dec. 18,
with Chaim Potok discussing
themes in his books. Our series
"Concerts" will be held: Jan 22
featuring the International Music
Festival: Feb. 12 featuring the
Fabulous Brothers Zim and on
March 11 the Miami Lyric Opera
Company will peform. Tickets,
may be purchased at the Temple
Sinai office 1201 Johnson St.
Hollywood. Series tickets are $50
per person and a 10 percent
discount is offered if tickets are
purchased prior to Oct. 31.
Sisterhood and Men's Club are
preparing a 7 day cruise on the
brand new cruise ship, Song of
America, Jan. 15, 1984. For
additional information and group
rates, contact Temple Sinai at
920-1577.
Temple Beth Ahm
SABBATH EVENING
SERVICES will be held at Tem-
ple Beth Ahm. 9730 Stirling Rd.
ICERTIFIED MOHEIJf
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital
Will Travel (305)673-5062
of Cooper City, the Conservative
Congregation of Southwest on
Friday evening at 8 p.m. Services
will be conducted by Paul Barko-
witz of the Religious Committee
during Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter's
vacation.
The Oneg Shabbat will be
sponsored by the Sister following
the Services.
During the Sabbath morning
Services, Saturday Jury 30,
Heidi, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Schreidell will become a
Bat Mitzvah. Heidi is an active
member of Temple Beth Ahm,
serving as Kadima Youth Group
President. Heidi attends Pioneer
Middle School and is a member of
the Junior Honor Society. She
will be entering the eighth grade
in the fall.
Sabbath morning Service will
continue at 8:45 a.m. with the
Torah Service at approximately
10 a.m.
Daily Minyanim Services con-
tinue Sunday, Monday and
Thursday at 8 a.m. Congregants,
members and friends in the
Jewish Community, especially
those reciting Kaddish or observ-
ing a Yahrseit are urged to at-
tend.
Dr. Avriel Cohen, president of
Gordon Leland 1
Master Piano Craftsman!
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding I
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
the Congregation announces that
tickets for the High Holy Days
Parallel Service will be held at
Cooper City High School Audito-
rium, are available at the Temple
Office. Hours are Monday to
Thursday 8:30 a.m. to 4:40 p.m.,
Friday 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., and
Sunday 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
(Temple Beth Ahm was previ-
ously Temple in the Pines).
Saxony aid
goes to Jews
By DAVID K ANTOR
BONN (JTA) The federal
state of Lower Saxony will make
available 240,000 Marks annually
for the Jewish community there. .
According to an accord with the
community, the money will be
used to promote religious needs,
as well as the cultural ties with
the surrounding Christian com-
munities.
As of 1960, State funds have
been made available for the Jew-
ish community of Lower Saxony.
The yearly sum was 50,000
Marks until 1972 and 140,000
Marks, thereafter.
F$eligious (directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,.
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
I-O. ,
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily 'services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative,
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, -Judaica High
School. v.
Temple Israel of Maramar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961.1700. Rabbi
Paul Piotkin. Daily services, 8:30 ajn.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolia. Dairy services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:36 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
r}efonir|f
Temple Beth EjI 1361 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood; W04225.
Rabbi Samuel Z Jaffa. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades M0.
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
SSSLb^SC Pi2e": l-8638. Rabbi Bennett Greenapon.
gart^-lO*0""' P4n- ReBiou ** Pre-kinder-
Temple Sold 6100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0206. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath mor
rung, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-scbool-12.
FJeconstructlontet I
5^ uSS.""^?! W Bnmmrd Kvd- Plantation: ^2'
V:i


Friday. July 22J983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pasrell
A unique view of Israel's needs
Die Burger
Menorah golf tourney raises
$4,000for B'nai B'rith
Oscar Goldstein, public rela-
tions director of Menorah
Chapels in Sunrise, Deerfield
Beach. North Miami Beach, Mar-
gate, and West Palm Beach, has
announced a contribution by
Menorah Chapels of more than
$4,000 to B'nai B'rith Youth
Services.
The funds were raised through
a third annual Menorah Chapels
B'nai B'rith Seniors Golf Tour-
nament, held for the second con-
secutive season at Palm-Aire
Country Club. More than 325
golfers, aged 55 and older, were
attracted to the tournament
during two days of play.
Tournament winners were Ted
Garson of Delray Beach, with a
low gross score of 80; Leo Taus of
Lauderdale Lakes, low gross, 74:
Dorothy Schwab of Sunrise, low
gross women, with 101; and Fran
Miller of Deerfield Beach, low net
women, with a 75.
Ted Garson poses with a trophy
and camera he received as low
gross winner of Third Annual
Menorah Chapels B'nai B'rith
Seniors Golf Tournament at
PaJm-Alre Country Club
ASSOCIATES IN INTERNAL MEDICINE
ANNOUNCE THE AFFILIATION OF
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Continued from Page 1
trip." Mr. Newman said. "On the one
hand, we learned about the major
funding cutbacks faced by crucial so-
cial service agencies, which have re-
sulted from the financial crunch in
Israel. But we also learned about the
crucial role we play in filling this gap
through our campaign. We saw how
we make the difference in the pro-
grams provided to thousands of
Israelis."
The American leadership dele-
gation met with a number of promi-
nent Israeli dignitaries who provided
insight about the important chal-
lenges facing the people of Israel.
Among the speakers to address the
UJA leaders were Chaim Herzog,
president of Israel; Moshe Arens, de-
fense minister; and Yehuda Avner,
the ambassador to Great Britain. Dis-
cussions also were held with moderate
Palestinian Arab leaders and new
Jewish settlers in Judea and Samaria.
The mission program gave special
emphasis to the goals of Project Re-
newal, the special human service pro-
gram through which South Broward
has been "twinned" with the distress-
ed community of Hod Hasharon. The
Jewish Federation of South Broward
has pledged to support projects in
Hod Hasharon's Giora and Gil Amai
neighborhoods to improve the Israeli
community's general conditions and
outlook for the future. These include a
r.ew pre-kindergarten program, a
gymnasium, a fully equipped com-
munity center and other communal
needs.
"One of the next wonderful things
about visiting our Project Renewal
community is the way they welcome
us," Dr. Barron said. "We have taken
this communitya community that
really needed our helpand brought
it to the middle stages of develop-
ment. We can actually see the pro-
gress we've made. The people of Hod
Hasharon and South Broward have
forged strong bonds of brotherhood.
It is our duty and privilege to con-
tinue this important effort."
BB rabbis, directors demonstrate
WASHINGTON For the
second time in a month, rabbis
and directors of B'nai B'rith Hil-
lel demonstrated before a
gathering of B'nai B'rith leader-
ship in order to press their
request for collective bargaining
recognition.
About a dozen Hiliel profes-
sionals set up an informational
picket outside the Breckenridge
Inn in St. Louis, where B'nai
B'rith District 2 was holding its
annual convention. The directors
have been asking B'nai B'rith In-
ternational to recognize the
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employ-
ees (AFSCME) as its representa-
tive for purposes of collective
bargaining.
Hiliel staff, who had come to-
gether from throughout the Mid-
west, and as lar away as Atlanta
and Boston, were seeking to have
the International Board of (In
ernnors reverse its decision to
deny recognition. At that time, in
late May, some 25 Hiliel profes-
sionals converged on Washing-
ton, in order to protest the action.
The informational picket at the
District gathering was part of the
Hiliel directors' efforts to public-
ize to both B'nai B'rith member-
ship and to the Jewish commu-
nity as a whole its disappoint-
ment with B'nai B'rith's position,
and its determination to continue
to press for collective bargaining
rights. Rabbis Abie Inger and
Jim Diamond, coordinators of the
protest, expressed satisfaction
with the event.
B'nai B'rith President Gerald
Kraft and two officers of the Dis-
trict met with the Hiliel leaders.
Fact* About Falathaa
Hard to Coma By
learning of the plight of the Fala-
shas because the Ethiopian Jews
are intimidated by the govern-
ment, a Jew who escaped from
Ethiopia last November asserted
here.
Simcha Desta, in a Capitol Hill
briefing for Congressional staff
members, said that any meeting
of Ethiopian Jews with foreign
visitors are always infiltrated by
government spies. In addition, he
noted that if foreign visitors
complain to the Ethiopian
government about the treatment
of Falashas, Ethiopian Jews are
arrested after the foreigners
leave.
We Hope
' You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
. >j ; | A vi
Phone 759-1669
Rabbi Inger, vice president of
the Association of Hiliel and
Jewish Campus Professionals
(AHJCP), reiterated his confi
dence on behalf of the Hiliel di-
rectors "that our just request for
recognition will ultimately be
accepted."
TEMPLE SINAI OF HOLLYWOOD
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Prayer Books. Tateisim & Skull Caps Provided
Tickets May Be Purchased At Temple Sinai Office
1201 JOHNSON STREET HOLLYWOOD 920-1577

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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 22,19
fei
IHH Hi IEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
Hkki SOUTH BROWARD
MHHM
28)8 MtXIYWOCO BLVO MOU.YWOOO ftOIOA 3SO20
921-6511
JCC executive
honored
Ed Finkelatein, executive
director of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South
Broward, was honored twice in
June by two Broward County
agencies at which he represents
the JCC.
Ed was elected secretary of the
United Way Council of Agency
Directors and vice president of
the Broward Chapter of the
Florida Association for Health
and Social Services.
Stated Kinkelstein, "It is a
privilege to be recognized as a
leader by both organizations that
work for the betterment of our
community. It is equally im-
portant that our Jewish Com-
munity Center is viewed as an
integral service provider in Bro-
ward Countv for all our citizens."
Mixed bowling
ATTENTION: BOWLERS."
The JCC of South Broward. 2838
Hollywood Blvd.. is forming a
mixed Bowling League at
Miramar Lanes. 890 Miramar
Parkway, starting Oct. 5. The
League will meet every Wednes-
day night at 9 p.m. excluding
holidays. Four people each team
People needed to work on com-
mittee to help form this league
Come join us and bring your
friends for a season of bowling
fun! For information and regis-
tration, call Dene now to sign up
at 921-6511.
Couples club
The JCC of South Broward.
2838 Hollywood Blvd.. will be
forming a Couples Club. Due to
many calls from new couples in
our community wanting to make
friends, we at the JCC would be
happy to form a couples group to
plan interesting social activities
and provide new friendships. To
Correction
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd.. ia happy
to announce a Super Summer
Shape Up Special at the
Hollywood Spa and health Club,
6712 Stirling Road (M mile west
of 441) for July and August.
Total cost is S25 per month,
which includes full use of the
facility on Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Visits feature aerobic classes 3
times daily, special yoga class at
7 p.m. on Wednesday, sauna,
steam room, whirlpool, and full
exercise program with Universal
equipment. Join for one or two
months. Registration required.
Limited number. Call for in-
formation and registration at
921-6611.
Wine and cheese
The Jewish Community Center
of South Broward Singles 20-35
are having a Wine and Cheese
Social with a guest speaker on
Thursdav. July 28. 7.30 p.m. at
the JCC at 2838 Hollywood
Blvd.. Hollywood. Our guest
speaker is Ruth Feit. who will
speak on How to Use Personal
Ads as a Safe. Effective and
Private Wav to Find the Right
Person by One Who Did." The
cost is $3. We hope to see you
there! For further information
call Mark at 921-6511.
Children's
pre-school classes
ATTENTION: PRE
Schoolers! Playgroup for fall
age 212 to 4 years. Separate
groups by age: 3 and 5 day
programs. Limited enrollment.
Pre-registration required. Don't
be left out. Call the JCC of South
Broward at 921-6511 as soon as
possible.
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120
IMS KBQll
Orthodox mull split from SCA
Continued from Page 1
laincy Commission, and local
boards of rabbis.
However, the appointment of a
commission, headed by the Rab-
binical Council's past president.
Rabbi Sol Roth, and the appoint-
ment of Chaim Waxman. a socio-
logist, as consultant to that com-
mission, is believed to be the first
specific response by the Rabbini-
cal Council to such Orthodox
pressures.
In announcing the appoint-
ment of Waxman, an associate
professor of sociology at Rutgers
University. Rabbi Gilbert Klap-
erman. Rabbinical Council presi-
dent, said the rabbinical group
was 'finding it more difficult to
maintain its relationship with the
Reform movement."
Basis For the Actioa
Klaperman explained that the
Rabbinical Council's action was
triggered by adoption by the
CCAR. at its annual convention
last March in Los Angeles, of a
resolution that any child of a
mixed marriage, whether or not
the mother was Jewish, would be
considered a Jew if he or she had
carried out "appropriate and
timely public and formal acts of
identification with the Jewish
people."
Klaperman noted that the
Rabbinical Council had gone on
record as denouncing the CCAR
resolution as "destroying the
oneness of the Jewish people and
publicly inviting and encourag-
ing intermarriages." He added
that the appointments of Wax-
man was "a sign of the vitality of
the commission and the fact that
its pursuing the matter seriously,
objectively and intensively."
Oscar Goldstein of Tamarac,
public relations director of
Meaorah Chapels, has been ap-
pointed to B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional Membership Cabinet,
which governs membership
activity for the organization on a
worldwide basis. Goldstein,
newly-named president-elect of
North Broward Council of B'nai
B'rith, was also named member-
ship chairman for District Five,
which extends from Maryland to
Florida.
Hebron mayor's
ouster confirmed
JERUSALEM The Cabinet
has confirmed the ouster of
Mayor Mustapha Abdul Natshe
of Hebron and his town council in
connection with the murder of a
yeshiva student in Hebron last
Thursday and decided to proceed
with plans to enlarge the Jewish
presence in that West Bank
town.
A Cabinet statement declared.
"The security authorities will
protect the lives of all Jews all
over Eretz Israel and will not
allow anyone to take the law into
their own hands."
But there was no official
condemnation of either the
murder of 19-year-old Aharon
Gross or the arson and des-
truction of the Hebron market
place by Jewish settlers that
followed. Officials explained that
to have condemned both acts
together would equate them
while to condemn one unlawful
act and not the other would be
unseemly.
Nevertheless, government offi-
cials were instructed to inform
the press that the ministers did in
fact condemn both the murder
and the arson and rioting by
Jewish settlers that followed it.
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