The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00327

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
___I M L
9^M

fAGO < JTA> A two-year legal battle over a
banning the wearing of skullcaps by players
iter-scholastic play in Illinois has been ended
ral district court order.
its at Ida Crown Academy and Hebrew
Jcal College preparatory school will be
I to play basketball while wearing securely-
I skullcaps, according to Sylvia Neil, Mid-
'\ director for the American Jewish Congress
.Bis High School Association, which regulates inter-
athletic events in the state, flatly banned "wearing of
even though "securely attached" during inter-
sketball play.
onal AJCongrsM, on behalf of the two Orthodox
suit in federal court, charging violation of First
at righto by the association for purportedly refusing
date the religious beliefs of the schools and their
ketball players.
Court
lifts
ban on
skullcaps
David Groaaberg. chairman of the AJCongress Chicago
Commission on Law and Social Action, said, "We have suc-
cessfully insured that these boys will not be forced to stop
playing inter-scholastic basketball because of their religious
The order by Judge Milton Shadur, who heard the case
initially in 1981, had found that the boys secured their skullcaps
during play with bobby-pins or dips. He ruled then that the
association's safety objections to the wearing of skullcaps were
not substantiated.
Judge Shadur also ruled then that "mere speculation" could
not overcome the First Amendment righto of the students. The
federal Court of Appeals for the First Circuit indicated it was
not satisfied with the bobby-pin method of attachment of the
skullcaps and sent the case back to Judge Shadur for further
hearings.
The appeals court declared that the association would be on
"constitutional quicksand'' if it unconditionally barred the
student players from wearing safe, secured fastened headgear.
tewlslla Flox*idiax3t
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Number 14
Hollywood. Florida Friday, July 8,1983
*0S'>o<-n#r
Price 35 Cents
isinger:
fans open
to negotiations
ByHUGHORGEL
rIV (JTA) Former Secretary of State
tsinger said here that negotiations were still
fith Syria for the withdrawal of foreign forces
uion and that King Hussein of Jordan re-
lel's most likely negotiating partner on the
ae West Bank.
K expressed his view8"tHTh"course ofdeBv^""
Yigal Allon Memorial Lecture at Tel Aviv
Allon served as Foreign Minister in the
government headed by former Premier Yit-
He died in 1980.
er said, "I have the impression that the Syr-
[not closed their minds to some kind of negoti-
withdrawal from Lebanon. Meanwhile, the
ty could be taken to discuss with them the
of partial withdrawal, on military, not politi-
cs," he said, adding, "Such partial withdraw-
be by both sides, the basis must be one of
Br said that Syria's actions against the Pales-
ition Organization leadership has forced the
?ncern itself with its own survival and paves
)r Hussein to negotiate on the future of the
Continued on Page 10
'rage!
:i game draws anger
By DAVID KANTOR
JTA Reporter
IN West German authorities and the
immunity have expressed outrage over a dice-
rd game being circulated by right-wing and neo-
Dups, the objective of which is to get pawns
kting Jews into squares marked with the names
ieath camps.
r Nachmann, chairman of the Jewish community of
any, has demanded that those responsible for the game
t to trial. He said the community was awaiting the
i police investigation,
el Schier, chairman of the Jewish community in Bonn,
ame was "simply disgusting."
lice Minister Hans Engelhard said the game, which has
I here and in other cities "exceeds in perversity everything
previously come from neo-Nazis."
said his ministry is working around the clock to ctose
in the present laws forbidding the circulation of Nazi
..Ja.
I game called "Jews, Don't Get Angry," is hand drawn. It
of a large Star of David, each of the six P^nt\0,lwfJCu
i a square with the names Auschwitz, Treblinka, Msidenek
Continued on Pags 4
Faye and Joel Ariel of Hollywood first-time Mission par-
ticipants expect to see a 'different' Israel than they saw in
their five previous trips.
Bridge anyone?
By STEVE KATON
Associate Editor
Joel Ariel would like to see the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Mission Program become the Jewish
Federation of South Bro ward s "Community Bridge"
Program.
The 30-year resident of South
Florida says a Mission describes
a religious trek with mystic over-
tones, and, while this may be true
to an extent, a Community
Bridge means Jews of the area
banding together on s joint ven-
ture to the Promised Land.
Ariel and his wife Faye are to
board a jet Oct. 24 along with
many other South Broward Jews
on the UJA-Federation Com-
munity (Mission) Bridge.
Although the Ariels have made
five trips to Israel, this will be
their first "Bridge."
*'I hope we will cover the West
Bank, see military structures and
get to witness parts of Israel
regular travelers never get to
see," Ariel, supervisor of an in-
telligence unit for the govern-
ment, says.
The Community "Bridge" or
Mission will run Oct. 24-Nov. 3,
and, according to Joan Raticoff,
missions chairman, includes 5-
star deluxe hotels, all meals,
roundtrip airfare (Fort Lauder-
dale-Holly wood International)
Continued on Page 6
Jewish
Agency
Assembly
Project Renewal
plans reviewed
By CINDY KAYE
JTA Reporter
JERUSALEM -
Project Renewal, the part-
nership between Diaspora
Jewry and Israel to rehabi-
litate slum neighborhoods
and other distressed areas,
dominated the Jewish
Agency Assembly here last
week.
Akiva Lewinsky, the Jewish
Agency treasurer, announced
that the agency hoard of gover-
nors has authorized a regular
budget of $390 million for the
next fiscal year and a 1'roject
Renewal budget of $62 million, a
total of $452 million. It was des-
cribed as the Agency's first
balanced budget.
According to reports released
by the Jewish Agency, only $450
million of the original $600 mil-
lion earmarked for Project
Renewal will actually be spent.
Since the start of the program in
1979,67 towns are targeted for
assistance and 13 slum neigh-
borhoods are about to begin
receiving aid.
Agency officials estimate that
the 67 towns already receiving
assistance will require an addi-
tional $287.5 million. Another
Continued on Page 12
Sharon sues Time Inc.
NEW YORK (JTA) Attorneys for former
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon filed a $25
million libel action against Time Inc. in federal
court here last week, charging that "false,
defamatory and libelous" material relating to
Sharon was published in the Feb. 21 edition of
Time magazine.
The complaint refers to an account in Time
alleging that Sharon visited the family of
Lebanese President-elect Bashir Gemayel in
Beirut a day after Gemayel was assassinated last
September to "discuss the grave need to take
revenge against the West Beirut Palestinians and
encouraged the (Christian) Phalangists to per-
petuate bloodshed among them."
Sharon is represented by Milton Gould of Shea
and Gould, a New York law firm.




Pafe2
The Jewish Floridian ami Shofar of Greater Hollywood
w*^'JMyg.MB
UN expert calls for
funding review
NEW YORK (JTA> Juliana
Geran Pilon. an anti-Communist
refugee from Rumania, believes
the US. Congress should hold
hearings to determine how
United Nations money is spent
supporting the Palestine Libers
tion Organization.
She aiso thinks that if UN
attacks against Israel continue.
the United States should con-
sider boycotting General Assem-
bly discussions on the Middle
East.
Pilon's views and her charge
that virtually all of the UN's offi-
cial machinery has been used m
an anti-Israel campaign mounted
by the Arab states and their
Third World and Eastern bloc
allies, are contained in s report by
The Heritage Foundation, a
Washington-based conservative
think tank
Pilon. described as an expert
and veteran UN-watcher, said
Israel dominates the UN agenda
to a remarkable degree. "Of the
Security Council's 88 sessions
last year. 46 were on topics
related to Israel. In the General
Assembly, debates on the Middle
East consumed nearly one-third
of the delegates time and led to
44 resolutions.
The number of times the
General Assembly convened
emergency special sessions on the
Middle East was no leas than five
which is equal to all the
emercencv socciai sessions held
m the UN s first three decades.'
Pilon reported-
According to Pilon. the
"systematic" rampaigw to dis-
credit and isolate Israel in the
UN is growing worse each year. ,
despkrVS. opposition
The United States should
continue to protect Israel from
unfair attacks by UN agencies,
she said, and in cases of serious
violations against Israel, the
United States should drastically
reduce its voluntary contri
butioos to those agencies by as
much as one half of the present
amount.
Piloo said UN attacks on Israel
go beyond propaganda. "It is
reflected in the very composition
of the decision-making bodies."
she said, noting that Israel is
excluded from the Economic
Commission of Western Asia
(ECW Ai in violation of UN rules
ECWA is composed entirely of
Arab states.
The UN Educational. Cultural
and Scientific Organization
(UNESCO) passed a resolution in
1974 excluding only Israel from
full participation in its regional
activities. Pilon recalled.
Other UN agencies that have
undertaken campaigns against
Israel include the World Health
Organization, the International
Labor Organization, the Interna-
tional Telecommunications
Union, the UN Relief and Works
Agency and the Human Rights
Commission. Pilon said.
The UN bloc-voting
mechanism has contributed to
the UN attacks on Israel because
most countries are bound to
support the policies of the blocs
to which they belong. Pilon said,
adding that "In what became a
watershed, the Western bloc is.
1973 increased the" "frequency
with which they abstained on
resolutions attacking .Is.r*ei-
instead of baclringlsTaei '"-"-* "":
MEN & WOMEN Guest speaker Dodie Wemstem addressed the Jewish Federation of Sooth
Browsrd Business and Profcaaioiial Women recently on the topic: 'Businessman
Businesswomen: The Difference is YOUR Business.' With Ms. Weinsteas (center) are Susan
Matter (left) and Sandy Rhodes. Next BAP meeting is Thursday. Sept. 15.
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PARIS (JTA) An Arab
terrorist being held in Lisbon for
the April 10 murder of Palestine
Liberation Organization official
Issam Sartawi is believed by
French police to be the same man
who participated in attacks on
a Jewish restaurant here hut
Aug. 9 and on the main syna-
gogue in Rome last Oct. 9.
. The suspect. Youcef Al Awat.
26. is allegedly a member of the
extremist Abu Nidal gang which
has attacked Jewish targets and
PLO representatives in several
European cities in recent years.
The grenade attack on the Jo
Goldenberg restaurant on the
Rue Des Rosiers in Paris' old
Jewish quarter last August
claimed six lives and wounded 22.
The attack on the Rome syna-
gogue exactly two months later
killed a child and wounded 34
other persons.
A French investigating magis-
trate has flown to Lisbon, accom-
panied by the chief inspector of
the Paris police criminal squad,
to interrogate Awat.
They are seeking confirmation
that the suspect was in Paris last
Aug. 9. According to his forged
Moroccan passport, he was here
at the time of the Rue Des
Rosiers attack and was also in
Rome when the synagogue was
attacked.
Police have already determined
that the grenades used in Paris
and Rome come from the same
mold- If suspicions are confirmed
that Awat was one of the killers.
responsibility for the outrages
would fall on Abu Nidal who lives
under the protection of Iraq and
Syria.
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fTday.July8.1983
i and Shofar of Greater Hollyi
Page 3
JFS heals family's wounds for Mr. and Mrs. T.
When Mrs. T. called Jewish
nily Service of Broward
ounty 1W yeare ago, she was
ying hysterically. Her marriage
[ four years seemed over and she
i distraught.
Mr. and Mrs. T., both in their
rly 20's, had known each other
nee high school. Right before
Ley married, Mrs. T. discovered
\e was pregnant. They had nine
onths of married life together
before their baby daughter was
born, but neither realized what
having a child would be like.
Both the T.'s were immature
and were unsure of their roles as
parents and spouses. Mr. T. had
an explosive temper, yelling at
the slightest provocation. He felt
"real man" should not do
housework or be involved in child
care routines. He wanted his
daughter to be his friend and
Convenience of
Philanthropic Fund
Is Israel Bonds knocking on your door? Is Hadassah and-or
B'nai B'rith soliciting you for another annual contribution?
Does an Israeli university want you to endow a new wing? Is
your Federation annual dinner on the horizon?
If you are like many people, you are confused and bewildered
by the myriad of Jewish charitable organizations that exist in
our area. Every organization has a seemingly worthy purpose.
Every organization is talking to you with its hand out and palm
up.
The average individual becomes resigned, or impatient when
considering which charities to contribute to. The prospect of
physically writing a check for each charity is tiresome. However,
favoring one charity to the exclusion of all others is also not
logical.
If you have been or will be in the above situations, your South
Broward Federation has a time-and money-saving convenience
for you. Its name is the Philanthropic Fund. A Philanthropic
Fund is a written agreement between the Legacy and Endow-
ment Fund of the Jewish Federation of South Broward and a
. contributor.
It can be established in two forms:
1) By a contribution to the Philanthropic Fund of money or
property.
2) By the transfer to the fund of the assets of a terminating
private foundation.
What are the advantages to you in establishing a Philan-
thropic Fund?
* A Philanthropic Fund carries the name which you designate
and thus stands as an endowment memorial.
Fund assets are invested and can grow continually.
The contributor to a Philanthropic Fund can suggest which
[organizations should receive checks from his-her fund. The
Legacy and Endowment Fund will handle the bookkeeping and
issue the checks. No more drudgery!
* Your relatives and friends can likewise be encouraged to
> honor you by making contributions to this fund. This is an
excellent way to avoid those garish ties and perfume you always
receive for presents.
Contributions can be mad* in the form of appreciated
properties, stocks, etc.
Since the fund assets are invested, there will always be
"pool" from which to make your contributions from. You will
not dip into your private checkbook every time another agency
solicits you.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund assumes the responsibility
of all record-keeping for your fund and will report to you
periodically on the utilization of your contributions.
So, there's no need to worry about particular contributions for
your B'nai B'riih-Hadassah "eggs, ORT "eggs," Technion
"eggs," Israel Bond "eggs," etc
Put all these "eggs' into your Philanthropic Fund omelet and
i eat heartily.
IRVING
OF TheLevotor-
fa,Bind.HOLLYWOOD "ggj*


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tried to accomplish this by giving
in to her every whim and buying
her expensive gifts.
Mrs. T. was quiet and re-
served. When her husband
became enraged, she withdrew
more into herself. She resented
his buying binges, which played
havoc with their budget. She
became overly strict with their
daughter to compensate for Mr.
T.'s extreme leniency.
Mrs. T. often felt tense and de-
pressed and sensed that the com-
munication gap between her and
her husband could not be
bridged.
Mr. T. was, at first, very re-
sistant to counseling. He felt the
marriage wasn't working and
that he "didn't care" about it. A
breakthrough came when dis-
cussing each couple's family
background.
Mr. T. asked to see the thera-
pist alone and he admitted he
was guilty about his father's
death which occurred five years
ago. He felt he had been childish,
selfish and had never been a good
son. Mr. T. said he wanted a
better relationship with his wife
and child than he had been shown
in his family.
Mr. T. then began to work on
controlling his temper and calk-
ing to his wife. He started taking
her needs into consideration and
began to make Mrs. T. and their
baby the first priority in his life.
In response, Mrs. T. learned
how to express her needs and tell
her husband how she felt. She
learned: to talk about what
angered her, rather than bottling
it up inside and silently seething
with fury.
The T.'s developed a system of
budgeting their money, in which
Mrs. T. has the primary respon-
sibility for financial management
and bill paying. Mr. T. is in-
volved in planning the budget
and is working in therapy to keep
his spending binges under con-
trol.
Extensive counseling was also
done regarding parenting skills,
and information on normal child-
hood development was discussed.
The T.'s now work together in
rearing their daughter.
Mr. T. realizes he must set
limits on their daughter's
behavior if she is to develop the
self-discipline he lacked earlier in
life. Mrs. T. has now moderated
her punitive, harsh stance. The
T.'s are united in the behavioral
priorities they set for their child,
as well as how to implement
them.
Mr. T. now feels better about
himself and has let go of many of
the. "macho" ideas of his
adolescence. Mrs. T. is sure of her
husband's affection and is not
fearful of being open regarding
, her feelings and emotions.
The T.'s feel their marriage is
on solid ground and have
remained in therapy to further
work on what they have learned
about themselves and about each
other.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please
contact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4617 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-9056. Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone:
736-3394. Hours Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to90.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and the
United Way of Broward County.
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iday,July8,1983
ThtJeuri&FlQridMi+artSMvpfdndter Hollywood Page!
High Court rulings may affect Mideast
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
Special to The FlorldUn
| Two recent developments in
Jinois and a landmark Supreme
purl decision might make an
Lreciable difference in future
Ingressional support for Israel.
I Tom Corcoran, three-term
..publican representative, an-
fmnced he will challenge incum-
nt Sen. Charles Percy in the
publican primary next March.
_rcy, who is chairman of the
Dreign Relations Committee,
been unhelpful to say the
st on Israel-related issues in
at years.
| Corcoran, who spearheaded
pposition to the sale of sophis-
ated arms to Jordan, is ex-
cted to run strongly among
ksaffected Republicans, thus
resenting Percy with a credible
ml articulate primary opponent.
I On the Democratic side, signs
^dicate that the highly respected
ep. Paul Simon will seek his
ty's nomination to run
gainst Percy. Political analysts
el he would be the stronirest
esearcher
teeksdata
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I am doing research for a
baster's thesis on the history of
everal Jewish agricultural com-
aunitiee that existed in Western
iansas in the early 1880s. I hope
> complete the thesis as soon as
ossible.
The communities were in Ford,
finney, Clark, Comanche,
lodgeman, Barber, and possibly
fratt counties, and were called
ersheba, Montefiore, Lasker,
filead, Hebron, Touro, Leeser
nd New Jerusalem.
Many of the families in these
ommunities were assisted by
wish families in New York
ity, Rochester, St. Louis, Phila-
plphia, Cincinnati, St. Louis,
ansas City and other cities.
Ind when they left the com-
munities in the late 1880s many
loved to these cities and to other
lajor cities throughout the
puntry.
I *m trying to locate the des-
Mants of these families. I'll
ppreciate corresponding with
nyonc who might have
icmories, photographs, informa-
Dn or records of any of the com-
munities or of the persons who
p*ided in them.
My telephone is 316-688-0065,
id my mailing address is P.O.
ox 8509, Whichita KS 67208.
[ Thank you very much.
Sincerely,
L. DAVID HARRIS
tare shekel
Iraws $160,000
i GENEVA (JTA) A
[ealthy Palestinian Arab paid
5.000 for a rare silver shekel
Ming from 66-70 CE, auctioned
I Sotheby's gallery in Zurich.
The coin, minted at the time of
l>e first Jewish revolt against
"me, came from the collection of
f irgil Brand. Its book value was
ily $35,000 and the unexpected
' high bid drew a standing
Nation from the audience.
The purchaser, identified only
is a Mr. Barakat who has homes
Jerusalem and Beverly Hills,
pal if., said the shekel is for his
fovate collection and will not be
T>r sale. It weighs 14.07 grams.
According to Sotheby, there
fe only 13 such coins in exist-
nee and only four are in private
lands; two in Israel, one in the
iunt collection in the US and the
ourth now owned by Barakat.
challenger. In effect then, Percy
will be facing his most serious
challenge since his election in
1966.
In its decision to strike down
legislative vetoes of executive ac-
tions, the Supreme Court has
taken away the congressional
veto on arms sales to foreign
countries. This means that the
Saudi F-15 and Awacs battles,
for instance, could not be waged
by Congress in the future.
Initial reaction is to pass new
and constitutional legisla-
tion requiring positive congres-
sional action under defined cir-
cumstances. In the interim, the
Resolution of Disapproval route
is no longer available to modify
or stop the sale of sophisticated
arms sales to Israel's foes.
There is great merit to the
argument that the current energy
"glut" is a temporary
phenomenon which should be
taken advantage of to ensure
greater U.S. energy independence
in the future. Such a window of
opportunity exists this summer
as Congress takes up a number of
proposals regarding the
deregulation of natural gas. This
is an extremely complex subject
involving a patchwork of govern-
ment regulations, gas producers,
pipeline owners, public utilities
and consumers.
The bottom line here is that
unless Congress takes final and
definitive action in the next few
months, it might be forced to
take precipitous action later
when serious shortages occur.
In pushing administration pro-
posals for renegotiation of con-
tracts between producers and
distributors, there will be winners
and losers but ultimately it
looks as though the consumers
will actually be better off.
This is supported by a recent
General Accounting Office study
which also pointed out that no
less than 76 percent of all natural
gas use is commercial not
residential. Under the present
situation, cheap gas is kept
underground and instead more
expensive deep gas sold to pipe-
lines and consumers. In fact, we
even import liquified natural gas
from Algeria certainly an un-
reliable source.
It was, therefore, gratifying to
see the American Jewish Com-
mittee has endorsed the adminis-
tration's position. In its state-
ment it pointed out, "Both
national energy security and con-
sumer interests are served by re-
forming the regulation of the gas
industry along the lines recom-
mended by the administration."
The connection between U.S.
foreign policy in the Middle East
and greater energy independence
will remain. It behooves the
organized American Jewish
community to recognize this in-
extricable link and supports
measures to protect us against
blackmail in the future.
f RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL V-----------------
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
Vi cup chopped or whole small
onions
W cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
V4 package (10 oz.) frozen whole
green Deans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
Vi cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.
.'^AiiSX :S"- -a-%;';'?' .'*-'.;.:.:
Try the
french fries.
DfilMOtmC*iup. It's gotjuet the
taaekkbkm; w^ti^frie,bnr|teT -
and hot dogs. lr* the one canup that's
made with the tame caitt and high
quality standards youW come to
expect from Del Monte.
So treat your family Next to
thick, rich DEL MONTE Cateup,
everything nwtf better.


Pw
The Jewish
IEW1SH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2818 HOU.YWOGO M.VD MOU.WVOOO rXCA 3MZ0
921-6511
Yankee Game
Aug. 16 is "Back to School
Nite" with the Fort Lauderdale
Yankees. The JCC of South
Breward is planning to be a co-
sponsor for this special game
with the Lakeland Tigers.
Bring your family out to
Yankee Stadium at 7:30 p.m. for
an evening of fun. Special rate:
$1 per ticket.
Wine and Cheese
Ruth Feit will address the JCC
Singles 20-35 at a Wine & Cheese
Social on Thursday. July 28. at
7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Brow-
ard. The topic will be "How to
Use Personal Ads to Meet that
Special Someone (by one who
did)." Cost is S3.
'30s Dance
The JCC Singles Group 20 to
35 is sponsoring a '50s Dance at
Howard Johnson's Penthouse.
2501 N. Ocean Drive (A-1A),
Hollywood, on Saturday. July 16,
at 9 p.m.
Cost is $5 and includes snacks,
cash bar and a Live Oldies D.J.
50's dress optional.
Bible Study
The Southeast Focal Point
Senior Center of Hollywood is
offering a Hebrew Bible study
class on Mondays at 10 a.m. The
instructor is Betty Goldenholz.
who was born in Poland and re-
ceived her teachers degree in
Israel. She attended the College
of Jewish Study in Cleveland and
has taught Cleveland, at Temple
in the Pines, Hollywood, and was
the leader of Bible study at a
local Hadassah.
For further information, call
Rosalie or Rachel at 921-6518.
wui make* you Itw* Ihe Cubans an) here'
T* Star
OFFICE/RETAIL PARK
SAMPLE and POWERLINE
ALL FIVE SEPARATE BUILDINGS HAVE:
1.) A MaiMtaiiaimn took wrttt cut coral atone, cedar, and Spanish
tile roots
2.) Surrounded by fountains and lush pardon landscaping
3.) Paraing at your door.
Space from S10 per sq. ft.
Bong thw ad and see what a drHerenoe it makes in prices!
Phone 979-67 30 Expirea7/30/83 Open 7 Days
Kutsher's Playaway Plan
Gives You The Stars!
ROBERT KLEIN SUSAN ANTON
My 16 Wy23
BILLY CRYSTAL DAVID BRENNER
My30 At* 6
CONNIE FRANCIS
Ai*l3
Impressed? That's just July-wait t* you see our
August galaxy! Al m addition to our private lake, 18-hote
golf course, tennis, racquetbal. indoor ice skating, ex-
ceptional Day Camp and Teen programs It's al here to
make you feel ike the most important star of al!
25TH ANNUAL MAUtTOSTOttS BASJCHBALL GAM
Foafunng NBA stars'
PLUS "OLD TIMERS" GAME wsri as-time "greats"'
Kutsherfe
Mont*c. New tor* 12701 (t14) 7*4 SOOO
CALL TOLL FREE: (SOO) 431-1273
Major C/eo* C*tdi nonome
IN FULL SWING The JCCa Camp Kadima at Broward County's newest park, C.B. Smith,
is well under way, but there are openings for the second and third sessions. The JCC, a recipient
agency of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, can be reached at 921-6611.
JFSB community bridge program
Continued from Page 1
and the best guides available
anywhere in the State of Israel.
The United Jewish Appeal's
guides will shepherd the Ariels
and the rest of the South Brow-
ard crew through Israel's historic
political capital. Jerusalem, lunch
at the Knesset and meet high-
level Israelis.
Other highlights of the Com-
munity "Bridge" include seeing
Youth Aliyah villages, visiting
and touring Caesarea and Haifa,
climbing Malaria, viewing the
Chagall Windows, and meeting
and eating with kibbutzniks.
.Also, JFSB mission-goers will
visit with their sister city, Hod
Hasharon. to see where their
Project Renewal dollars are being
put to work.
"It's one of the best-kept
secrets I know of," Ariel said.
"Why uren't the missions
general knowledge in the South
Hrov. aril community?" he asked.
Mrs. Ariel is president of a
consulting firm that deals in
epidemic control. She is past
president and a member of the
Association of Practitioners of
Infectious Control, and has been
published in her specialty.
Ariel, although new to the
Federation and its many social,
educational and public welfare
agencies, has been long active in
QTUBIO
Americans for a Safe Israel, the
United Zionists Revisionists and
Herat USA.
He has been in the law enforce-
ment field for 21 years.
If you would like to cross over
South Browards's "Bridge" to
Israel, contact Beverly Bachrach,
mission coordinator, at the
Federation (921-8810) to attend
briefing Aug. 8 at JFSB, 2719
Hollywood Blvd.
Continental
Cuisine
"IHP"
frcdjossi
rou back io
(ms renowned
STUDIO
MSTMMANT
lor ( unique
drning experience
Matoi your tatxe to your~
moor] in one ol 5 individual
room* The Tent
Wine Cellar Siud.o Place
Pigeiie Sanaa Chalet
Fins Entertainment
al (he Piano
Also violin playing
tor your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
iP"*ai* Luncheons vrangaxji
ENJOT COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CAROS
NONOHtO
2340 SW 32 AVE.
445-5371
cioted Mondays
***aaaaaaakaaMsaaaaaSaa*
COME UP TO THE
GOODLIFE AT BROWNS
In The Comfort Of The Catskills!
ALL INCLUSIVE
TWO-WEEK VACATION
$923
Of Dfs dbi occ
(Covers everything except airfare)
3 WEEKS
$1,354
DELUXE
jwry Lewis, noiiywooa o
Orig Section-Main Bidg
CaMorma & Celebrity
Beverly rfrtts
Imperial & Regency
Princess
2-WEEKS 3-WEEKS
$ 923
$1,017
$1,034
$1,055
$1,099
$1,354
$1,496
$1,521
$1,553
$1,620
WEEKLY RATES from *286 to M26
Terrace Princess & Paace accommodaiions skghtty Higher
Spc*ey oscounrt *or toogty stays
EVERYTHING INCLUDED IN OUR
CARE-FREE VACATION PACKAGE!
^Bappage Haodang And Ltmo Tranaportlnn
To and From Hotel
I A Tarn and Gratuities Included In Ran
~*rsonateed Service With Extra Cart For Spec* Darts
i Gourmat Meats Oary OCockLH Parots
1 Errtarrjirrfnent O 2 Shows Mghtty
j to 3 Orchestras
Free Gotf on Two 16-Hole Go* Course*. Term. Roaer
StaSng. Heat* dub. inAm Outdoor Pools. Ortstandng
SOCW rVoframs 6 Speakers- And Mucn Mont
RITA MORENO
EDDEFtSKER I ESUEUOXaAMfi
BOBBYVMION UBERACE
yrEVEU^WREICEftEYr^QORME
OsnMIYLAMrt
MrWRntw
800-431-3866
Biskra's
Uch Shckhste. N.Y. 11719 W
__________Or See Your Travel Agent


1963
Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update!
KHARKOV YURI
tarN0POLSKY. the 40.year-
ill chemist and Jewh enugra-
tL activist whose daughter
recently wrote to Soviet leader
Yuri V Andropov, was to go on
.rial for circulating fabrications
known to be false which defame
to Soviet state and social
uyrtem." H convicted, he faces
up to three years in a tabor camp,
or five years internal exile.
In her letter, hia daughter
urired that he be released, and
that her family be allowed to
emigrate to Israel. Held since his
arrest on March 16, Tarnopolsky
has been waiting four years for
permission to emigrate to Israel
with his family.
KIEV An appeal made by
LEV ELBERT to overturn his
conviction for "draft evasion"
has been rejected. Sentenced to
one year in prison, the 36-year-old
engineer has been designated a
Prisoner of Conscience.
SUKHUMI, GEORGIAN
SSR It has just been learned
that 19-year-old ALEKSANDR
PANAREV of Sukhumi, a Black
Sea port in the Republic of Geor-
gia, was named a Prisoner of
Conscience. Convicted of "draft
evasion" in April, he is serving a
one-year term. Panarev and his
mother have been waiting more
-than 10 years for permission to
emigrate to Israel. An open letter
on his behalf was written by his
aunt, Ida Shteinberg, who lives
there. His mother's address in
Sukhumi is: Klavdia Panareva.
Tbilisskoye Shosse 45-2,
Sukhumi, Georgian SSR, USSR.
PRISONER UPDATE:
KERCH LEAH SHNIR-
MAN, wife of 25-year-old
SIMON SHNIRMAN, writes
that she received two letters from
her husband in which he notified
her- of his address, but indicated
that he is not allowed to receive
correspondence from abroad. She
adds, however, that he is touched
by greetings from supporters in
the West which she relays to him.
PERMSKAYA OBLAST -
FELIKS KOCHUBIEVSKY, 52,
was hospitalized in the
Solikamsk Prison hospital for
arthritis and high blood pressure.
His wife's visit, which was due in
June, was canceled. Her last
meeting with him was in Fe-
bruary, before he was transferred
to Solikamsk.
REFUSENIK UPDATE:
GORKY The apartment of
LEONID VOLVOVSKY, a 40-
year-old computer scientist, was
searched. All his books on Jewish
religion and culture, as well as
cassettes of Jewish and Israeli
songs, were confiscated. He was
told that the search was made to
obtain information on the former
leader of the Moscow chapter of
Marvin Gottlieb's
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
We Appreciate Your Business
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
OFFICE/RETAIL PARK
SAMPLE and POWERLINE
ALL FIVE SEPARATE BUILDINGS HAVE:
1.) A Mediterranean look with cut coral stone, cedar, and Spaniah
Hereof*.
2.) Surrounded by fountains and tush garden landscaping.
3.) Perking at your door.
Space from $10 per sq. ft.
Bring this ad and aee what a difference it makes in pricasl
Phone 979-6730 Expires 7/30/83 Open 7 Days
OUR NEW
^(ICM, RESTAURANT
HOME OF THE WOllD FAMOUS JbL \ STEAK COWED WITH A
60LKN M6INTAJN OF FftiNCN FRIES.
SOCIALS ONLY 8000 M HALLAN0ALE BLVD. RESTAURANT
2500 E. HALLANDALE BEACH BLVD. PH. 458-4892/
LOCATED IN THE AMERICAN SAVINGS BUILDING
518 CORAL WAV
553-S061
11309 BIRD ROAD
CONCORD SHOPPING
PLAZA
4SB0W.12AVE.
HIALEAH. 822-3388
Amnesty International.
ODESSA VALERY PEVZ-
NER, 36, and his wife, were sum-
moned to the local KGB office for
an investigation, under the
pretext of having signed a
dissident proclamation. Pevzner
denied any connection with such
a document, as well as the
signature he was alleged to have
made. He was threatened with
the extension of his security
classification, a move that could
make the possibility of being
allowed to emigrate to Israel even
more remote. Pevzner and his
family have been waiting five
years for permission to leave.
Another activist, 35-year-old
ALEKSANDR KUSHNIR, was
called to the KGB and rebuked
for '"bad behavior." He was told
that the authorities did not look
favorably on his contact with
fellow Odessa refusenik
YAAKOV MESH. Viewed in the
context of heightened attempts
to isolate Soviet Jews from sup-
porters in the West, the KGB
action appears designed to
atomize the refusenik community
in an effort to isolate Jewish acti-
vists from each other.
MARRIED Seventeen-year-old Lilya Gershenberg of
Hallandale and Andy Sirak, 21, became man and wife last week
during ceremonies at Hallandale Jewish Center. The Siraks
both Russian immigrants were married by Rabbi Carl Klein
(left) with Cantor Jacob Danziger bearing witness. Serak first
emigrated to New York, moving to Israel and serving in the
IDF before coming to South Florida.
Maxwell House9 Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be- a close friend. The good talk. The
come one of America's favorite pas- good feelings. The warmth are some
times. It's always fun to find new of the things that go along with
things, see the new fashions and Maxwell House* Perhaps that's why
perhaps pick up something new for many Jewish housewives don't shop'
the house or family. for Maxwell House* They simply
Another favorite pastime is to come { Its the "smart buy" as any
home from shopping, kick off the a******* knows!
shoes and relax with a good cup of So, no matter what your prefer-
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The ence instant or ground when
full-pleasant aroma and great- you pour Maxwell House* you pour
tasting, satisfying flavor is relaxation. At its best.. consis-
the perfect ending_________ e^> tently cup after cup after cup.
toabusyshop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K Certified Koeher
Sf
GrmIFmj,
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


i ne sewisn riondian ana Shofar of Urtattr Hollywood
FrkUy.JolyS^gg,
Picky! Picky! Pi
CI-Pick the fruit you want during our
summer fruit safe because most of it is
loose. You buy only what you need.
Our buyers are picky, too. They buy the
best so you get the best..for less.
BING
Cherries
TOP
QUALITY
NORTHWEST
garden fresh rni heads
a*ROf' fresh tender uh> garden fresh
Green Beans u, .39
GARDEN FRESH CASP 6 Red mkmhm 2 for .29
SWEET AS AN APPLE
VJdalia Onions lb .25
TOP QUALITY FLOROA U-PCK
Seedless Limes 10 o. 1.00
SWEET RED RIPE WHOLE
Watermelons
SERVICE DELI
(NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES)
LB .59
LB .19
NORTHWEST EXTRA FANCY (10 IN VEXAfl BAG
Red Delicious Apples 1.79
FESHL> CUT ASSORTED COLORS
Pon i Put i is
EXTRA LARGE 5x6 SIZE
Slicing
Tomatoes
bunch 1.79 B-^-w m^^^kM^
JbL each f^^F afca^^ LB
LARQEl
80
sa
DAIRY
TOP QUALITY
California
Nectarines,
59*
deli!
HALF LB CORNED ROUND OR
Pastrami
Round 9
2
09
MRS RESSLERS
White
Turkey
WILSONS
Hard Salami or
t.1.89
~lb1.99
HOUSE OF RAEFOftO
Turkey Bologna
PAULY BRAND CHEESE
.LB .
HALF
NUTTY FLAVOR CHEESE
Austria.
TOUFAVIAHS
LB 1.99
."- .79
IN-STORE BAKERY
Cfwp (NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORESI
Italian lQb
OLD WORLD FLAVOR IS-O* LOAF
.95
PlAP. POPPY OR ONON
FOR
LATTICE TOP
not
1.99
LANDO LAKES l-LB PKG
Margarine 2/QQC
Quarters a7Z7
SEAL TEST LARGE OR SMALL CURC
Cottage Cheese
NATURAL STYLE ASSORTE0 FLAVORS
.'cSp1.39
3c8u2I1.19 |V
PANTRY PPJOE
PANTRY PPJOE HEAVY
Whipping Cream
APPLE AND EVE
ONE
PUT
HALF
. PPIT
.89
.65
PANTRY PROE CWLLE0
Orange Juice ...
MAGGtO LOW FAT OR WHOLE HU
ALOUETTE FRESH SRC OR
Camemoert ....
KRAFT COLOREO SMILES
1.59
1.39
,cso2.1^9
1p
'*pko2.39
FROZEN FOOD
......^1.59
MRS Smith s REGULAR O"
Dutch Apple
FREEZER QUEEN ASSORTED
Faml
<2 .1.69
PANTRY PPJOE PEAS CORN OR
MkedV<
SALUTOOEUJE
2*^1.00
RESEALABLE FAMILY PACK
OSCAR MAYER
BEEF
Bologna
$179
LB
1
PANTRY PPJOE ALL
1.59
AMERICAN KOSHER KNOCKWURST OR
Frank!
POWER PACK
Lykesl
NEW NACHO STYLE OR
.'pSg1.99
"-02 7
, PKG >7V
pkg 1.99
YIASC OEU OBJ.
DeU Style Pickles
"31.39
MEYER S PKQ OF
PACKAGED BAKERY
3/SJ00
PANTRY PPJOE I0O-. WHOLE WHEAT
6 .59
.......Ac1.29
AgUWSPUMPejNO^eREAOORIWO OF AMORTEO
.........79
PNMM
la.2 of 12 .1
VELVET CREME
PANTRY PPJOE IW,
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
2.79
1
JJOI MO
PANTRY PPJOE * Mil
OfveOf ...."St
miMtUI ABBUAUII FLAVORS
'cc aa
BTL .W
PANTRY PPJOE MOJ JAR
VLC 0BW PS-Ot JAR
PANTRY PROE JODCT PKO
ON TON fill CORMCMPS I JO*
CURLS OR HOT BAG mm*!*
0OI
,M A*
PANTRY PROE ASSORTED f FAVORS
BTL
LEOUREWAV WHITE 100-CT PKO
ORANGE OR LEMON UME
MS
BTL
HAWA.AN-ASSQRTE0 FLAVORS f OZ CAN
.89 Punch..........77
PANTRY PPJOE HEAVY DUTY-25 FT ROLL
.99 PERSONALCARE
MB 0LAW0L SHAMPOO FORMULA
.99 OokalnyiCH........3.97 wmetormot
g^^CO^RSMtWAL SYSTSM HMMn
1.29 Wa1rCoajr1n9.......3*67 mS^Sn^^!9)lLJUom 5g?^muy ,
tpBiHR,aajuM .. pkg 1,19 ^award...... jar *
WHTTE MOUSE RQ OWNAT 2&Z JAf
169 Apple gAC
1.37
HEAVY DUTY
antiperspreo unsccnteoor
ars
2-CT PKO
SOLO-I807
JY>CT
, PKO
1.67
MI
CaaATCMtTTANTllJJZ CAN-REG MENTHOL UME
TL
MUELLER S ELBOW
I-**
-kg .99
RMUNO OH CABERNET
A vie Wines
1.99
-99 ShavaCraam 1.19 -WiSh*."% w 1.00 iUaa^-teir^^MI
CXiANTiTYRWMTSHESEWRiOROTRESfONS3LEFORT^^ "*B "MOt-WaVl .. BTL D.O


[^y.JulyMflM.
The Jewinh Floridian and Shofar of Gnater Hollywood

Page 9
,*.v.\ /.*.
^TT
:'>. -'
ILow Prices on
i *."*
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rnaay.juf
Tel Aviv U. opens office
A regional office for the Ameri-
can Friends of Tel Aviv Univer-
sity is now open in Boca Raton.
The announcement was made
by Rabbi Herbert Friedman, na-
tional president of the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University,
who also announced the appoint-
ment of the office's executive di-
rector, Lauren Scharf Azoulai.
The organization works to de-
velop ties between higher educa-
tion in Israel and the Jewish
communities in Palm Beach and
Broward counties through sup-
port of Tel Aviv University.
Ms. Azoulai. a long-time Hol-
lywood resident and formerly ex-
ecutive director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Wom-
en's Division, is a graduate of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
and Nova University.
Lanren Azoulai
After completing social work
studies in Israel, she worked for
Israel's Ministry of Labor and
Social Welfare.
The Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee of the Community
Relation. Committee, Jewish
Federation of Sooth Brow-
ard, would tike to apeak to
anyone la the South Broward
area who is planning to visit
the Soviet Union in the near
future.
Contact Melissa Martin at
the Federation, 821-8810.
Also, anyone who would
like to write to a refneenik or
member of hie or her
family, contact the Federa-
tion.
Topf feted by Technion
Debate erupts at conference
GENEVA (JTAI War talk
intruded on the International
Labor Conference here when the
Iraqi labor minister proposed to
his Iranian counterpart that Iraq
and Iran end their 33-month-old
conflict and join forces to fight
"the Israeli enemy that has been
flouting international law and
committing crimes in Palestine."
His remarks drew a sharp
response from Ambassador
Ovedia Soffer. the Israeli dele-
gate, who observed:
"The Iraqi government is
known for its persecution of
Kurds and other minorities. Of
course, its ambassador's appeal
from this rostrum that the Iraqi-
Iranian war should stop in order
to start another war against Is-
rael gives him the right to preach
to the rest of the world on the
subject of war."
Soffer also challenged the
Syrian delegate "to inform us
who is responsible for obstruc-
ting the implementation" of the
Syrians open
to negotiations
Continued from Page 1
West Bank. "I think what Syria
is trying to do is to get the Pales-
tinians more under their or at
least a veto over the actions of
the Palestinians, partly to avoid
Palestinian participation in West
Bank negotiations which Syria
cannot veto. But I do not think
they want the Palestinian move-
ment completely split.'' Kissin-
ger said.
"My estimate would be that
they will be more careful in mili-
tary action under Syrian control
but more intransigent in political
action. The question is whether
other Arab states will make it
possible for other Arab negotia-
tors to emerge, be said.
According to Kissinger, a ter-
ritorial solution for the West
Bank can be reached only by
compromise because Hussein
cannot achieve Israel's with-
drawal to its 1967 borders and Is-
rael cannot annex the entire terri-
tory. But until Hussein decides
to negotiate on behalf of the Pal-
estinians and the other Arab
states. Israel and the U.S. should
hammer out an understanding
between them on how to proceed.
Kissinger said.
The American diplomat spoke
warmly of his 20 years of friend-
ship with Allon who once took a
course under him at Harvard. He
also recalled affectionately the
late Premier Golds Meir. She
gave me a hard time, but I under-
stand she sometimes gave her
Cabinet colleagues an even hard-
er time, "he said.
Referring to the negotiations of
1974-75 for an Israeli-Egypsjan
agreement in Sinai, he said the
Israeli negotiators "sometimes
drove me to distraction, but their
attitude was based on faith in
their cause. We would have liked
a more pliant and submissive Is-
rael. Nevertheless, if these people
had behaved differently, we could
not have achieved together the
successes we did accomplish."
Kissinger said.
agreement concluded between
Israel and Lebanon last month
for the withdrawal of all foreign
forces from Lebanon.
"Perhaps he would like to
explain the reasons for his
government's stubborn refusal to
cooperate his government's
refusal to respect the strong
wishes of the government and
people of Lebanon," Soffer said.
Meanwhile, the Iranian labor
minister. Mohamed Mahallati.
said in an interview published in
the daily La Tribune de Geneve,
that "Israel has to disappear as a
Zionist state, and only bearing
this in mind can the Palestine
Liberation Organization work
hand-in-hand with the revol-
utionary forces in the region.'
Mahallati was commenting on
the recent mutiny by PLO hard-
liners against Yasir Arafat. He
suggested that this development
was "the consequence of the fact
that some in the PLO have
forgotten that there can be no
reconciliation with Israel.'"
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HAIFA Sam B. Topf of
Miami Beach has become an hon-
orary fellow of the Technion-Isra-
el Institute of Technology.
Technion's board of governors
bestowed the honor upon Topf
"in recognition of his devoted ac-
tivity in the American Technion
Society and in appreciation of his
unwavering and his long-
standing efforts towards the
achievements of the economy of
the State of Israel.
Topf is a member of the Tech-
nion's international board of gov-
ernors and serves on the board of
directors of the American Tech-
nion Society. In addition, he is
chairman of the board and past
president of the Greater Miami
Chapter of the American Tech-
nion Society.
As founder and president of
Consultants for Israeli Industry,
a national organization dedicated
to increasing the productivity of
Israeli businesses. Topf has
applied his knowledge and ex-
pertise to the strengthening of
the Israeli economy and its posi-
tion in the international market-
place. He also serves as a special
Sam. B. Topf
industrial consultant to the In- i
dustrial Division of the Jewish
Agency and was honored in 1980
by the American-Is reel Chamber
of Commerce as its Industrialist
of the Year.
Technion is Israel's oldest act-
demic institution for the re-
search, development and testing
of innovative technologies. To-
day, more than 70 percent of the
engineers and scientists working
in Israel are Technion graduates.
101 JEWISH HOLISTIC HEALTH
REFERENCES AND REMEDIES
From The Bible, Talmud, etc
Great Reading For Jewish Health, Manhat-
tan, Board of Rabbis; Surprisingly Enter-
taining, and Valid Jewish Literary Digest.
Send $3.00
Check or Money Order to:
JFD Press
316 East 62nd St.
New York, N.Y. 10021
r
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Friday. July 8.1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
ADVANTAGE:
WHILEYOU'RE
ON THE WAY
TO YOUR HOTEL
THEIR CHARTER IS
STILL ON THE
WAY TO ISRAEL.
While you're getting settled comfortably in your
hotel, the people on the charter are still squirming in
their seats at 35,000 feet
No wonder. They had to make a stopover some-
where in Europe. And, in some cases, they even had to
change planes and re-check their baggage.
At El At we don't believe in playing musical planes.
So we provide a daily (except the Sabbath) non-stop
wide body flight from New York to Israel. We're the
only airline that does.
In fact, once you're on one of our roomy 747s,
you won't want to get off. You'll enjoy first-run movies.
Stereo entertainment. And gourmet kosher meals,
including our famous bagels and lox breakfast What's
the food and service like on a charter? Don't ask.
El Al also offers a lot of other advantages a charter
doesn't Like the lowest scheduled fares to Israel. The
only non-stop night flight from Tel-Aviv to New York.
Earw check-in privileges in Tel-Aviv, Jerusalem and
Haifa on the day before your departure. And an
unparalleled concern for safety and security.
Just as important, El Al is the airline of Israel. So we
know Israel best and can help you with all the arrange-
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Ah, the charter finally has landed. Unfortunately,
they still have to shlepp to their hotel as you relax and
enjoy a leisurely dinner.
Now that the advantages of flying El Al are ob-
vious, call your travel agent or us for more information
or reservations at our toll free number 800-223-6700.
The Airline of Israel


Page 12

"^rr
-ryn
The Jewish Floridian and Shqfar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 1983
Books draw attention to Hebrew literature
8 Great Hebrew Short Novels.
Edited by Alan Lelchuk and
Gershon Shaked. New American
Library, 1633 Broadway, New
York, N.Y. 10019. 1983. 414
pages. Paper, $9.95.
The Other Side of the Wall:
Three Novellas. By Nathan
Shaham. Translated from the
Hebrew by Leonard Gold. Jewish
Publication Society of America,
1930 Chestnut St. Philadelphia,
P. 1 9103. 1983. 256pages. $13.95
Reviewed by Jacob Kabakoff
Recent years have seen a
marked growth in the number of
translations from modern
Hebrew literature and particular-
ly from the works of Israeli poets
and prose writers. An encourag-
ing aspect of this growth has
been the readiness of general
publishers to bring the fruits of
Hebrew literature to the atten-
tion of the reading public.
A notable example of Hebrew
literacy productivity in transla-
tion is the anthology 8 Great
Hebrew Short Novels, jointly
edited by an American and an Is-
raeli. Gershon Shaked of the
Hebrew University has guided
the choice of the selections and
provided the background materi-
al which Alan Lelchuk of Bran-
dt'is University has skilfully
woven into his introduction.
To indicate the continuity of
Hebrew letters, the editors have
chosen samples from the works of
such modernist writers in Europe
as Uri N. Gnessin and David
Vogel and have included rep-
resentative pieces by such well-
known Israeli literary figures as
Amos Ox and A. B. Yehoshua.
The editors have sought to
demonstrate the literary merit
and artistic quality of Hebrew
prose writing which is seen as
measuring up to the highest
standards of world literature.
Project
Renewal
Coe.ti.oed frosa Page 1
$50 million has been targeted for
13 other towns and S120 million
for 68 distressed neighborhoods
to be added to Project Renewal
over the next seven years.
Hagit Hovav, the adminis-
trative head of Project Renewal
at the Housing Ministry,
reported that the decrease in the
proposed budget is due to a
recent decision to exclude mixed
business and residential slums
from the project.
Under Project Renewal, Jewish
communities in the United States
are matched for "twinned" with
distressed towns in Israel. Aid is
rendered not only by funds but
through dialogues and sugges-
tions between the matched com-
munities and occasional visits by
representatives of the Diaspora
communities totheir twin towns
in Israel.
The idea is to foster a sense of
personal involvement on the part
of donors and recipients.
The Jewish community of
South Broward is twinned with
Hod Hasharon, specifically,
Giora and Gil Amal.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward hopes to raise $4
million for Project Renewal.
At an assembly workshop,
delegates resolved "to urge com-
munities who have already taken
on additional neighborhoods to
continue to do so. Those com-
munities unable to assume full
responsibility for twin towns
should be encouraged to conduct
separate campaigns for Project
Renewal." the resolution said.
The delegates also discussed
the possibility of a "phase-out"
program to prepare Israeli com
munities to draw on the resource!
they have accumulated during
the course of Project Renewal.
Those towns are expected to be
able to operate independently
once the flow of funds has ceased.
A
? ?
A_A
JLUB
Jewish Books
in Review
is service of the IWB Jewish Book Council,
15 fast 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
Lelchuk'9 introduction serves to
place the writers within the
mainstream of world letters by
pointing to striking parallels be-
tween Hebrew and general
writers.
The stories have a wide range
of subject matters, touching
upon diverse aspects of both the
human and the Jewish condition,
and the quality of the trans-
lations of Hillel Halkin, who has
translated the selections from
Gnessin and Brenner, and of
Gabriel Levin, who has trans-
lated the Agnon tale.
As with any anthology, the
editors' choices have been
governed by various factors and
particularly the constraints of
space. Apparently, this is what
led them to add a "bibiographic
note," in which they have singled
out various other authors whose
works might have been included.
However, the list is by no
means complete and there are a
number of omissions, the most
glaring of which is the name of
Hayim Haxaz, the author of more
than a dozen volumes, who to-
gether with Agnon achieved a
central position in Hebrew let-
ters.
Still another author who might
have been represented is Nathan
Shaham, three of whose novellas
have now been made available in
the fluent translation of Leonard
Gold. Shahams The Other Side
of the Wall draws upon the
author's experience as a member
of Kibbutz Bet-Alpha and views
kibbutz life in stories set in dif-
ferent historical periods.
The title story depicts the
thoughts and emotions of a new-
comer to kibbutz life during the
1940's, a spinster who is privy to
an illicit love affair which is
enacted on the other side of the
thin partition which separates
her from her neighbor, Raheli.
She records her innermost feel-
ings in her diary. The opening
story "S-S Cairo City," offers a
self-analysis of its main character
in the form of letters to his be-
loved. They are sent from
Geneva, the seat of the 10th
World Zionist Congress that was
convened on the eve of the out-
break of World War II, and they
continue to be dispatched from
Marseilles and from aboard the S-
S Cairo City.
Not only is the atmosphere of
this period of crisis artfully con-
veyed, but there are also por-
trayed the marchings of a youth-
ful kibbitz member who is
troubled about the ideology and
direction of the kibbutz move-
ment.
The final story, "The Salt of
the Earth," comes to grips with
the problem of aging and details
the disappointments of an old
kibbutzmk who is stranded in
New York. Shaham has made use
of the knowledge he gained as a
cultural attache at the Israeli
Consulate in New York to offer
some telling criticisms of Ameri-
can Jewish life and Zionist activi-
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ties as seen through the eyes of
his main character. His kibbutz
novellas illumine the life and
problems of a vital sector of Is-
raeli society.
Dr. Jacob Kabakoff is profes-
sor of Hebrew and Judaic studies
at Lehman College of the City
University of New York and
editor of the Jewish Book
Annual.
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stomptn. good ole time
we've lassoed some of
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Storting October 1st ourongmol Happy Ship? msDoheme will
begin weekly auises from Miami to the western Caribbean, visiting
Port-ou-Prtnce, Port Antonio. Grand Cayman ond Cozurnei


rage i.j
Israeli Consul issues peace challenge
MONTICELLO. N.Y. (JTA)
_ Naphtali ^J'18 te*
consul general in New York,
rhalllenged the Reagan adminis-
tration to undertake initiatives in
concert with Israel to achieve a
binding peace in Lebanon. He
Tjaaid the United States must
act rather than react" to
developments in the Middle East.
Addressing 600 delegates
attending the opening session of
tbe four-day diamond jubilee
convention of Bnai Zion, Lavie
underscored the "cost effective-
ness" of US. foreign aid to Israel
by citing Israel's role as a "deter-
rent force" to Soviet expansion in
the Middle East.
He contrasted this to be un-
willingness of any of the so-called
moderate" Arab states to
provide bases for the deployment
of American forces after they had
received large quantities of
sophisticated American weapon-
ry
Lavie termed the "intran-
sigence" of extreme elements of
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and the radical Arab
states as the "chief obstacle to
peace." He called on the adminis-
tration to spurn Saudi Arabian
attempts at "petro dollar black-
mail" and to focus efforts on
removing Syrian and PLO forces
from Lebanon so that the Israeli-
Lebanon accord, signed May 17,
could be implemented.
Israel's deputy consul general
in New York, Yuri Bar-Ner,
asserted that the Arabs' military
option has been sharply curtailed
because they can no longer shake
the U.S.-Israel military alliance.
But he warned, that the Soviet
Union was seeking to prevent the
imposition of a "pax-Americana"
in Lebanon and cautioned that
the current "honeymoon" in
U.S.-Israel relations could be
eroded by possible American
moves to placate Syria, cater to
the Saudis, teach. -an^jgrejqiAnt.-.;
with tne Soviet Union or rein-
troduce President Reagan's Sept.
1 Middle East peace initiative.
He claimed the differing inter-
pretation of UN Security Council
Resolution 242, which America
interprets as "exchanging terri-
tory for peace," as a "constant
source of contention."
Bar Nel urged Zionist leaders
to focus on advancing Jewish
education and aliyah in order to
avert demographic projections
that within the next century,
America's Jewish population
would fall to under one million
and the Arabs could become the
majority in Israel.
Micha Harish, a Labor Align-
ment Knesset member, under-
scored the differing perspectives
on military and security matters
that led to a vacillation in
relations between Israel and the
United States. However, he said
the basic underlying friendship
l>etween the two countries has
endured because of a "shared
ideological outlook" encompas-
sing values of democracy and
humanity.
The Israeli official noted that
Broward
deputies
sought
Jane Carroll, supervisor of elec-
t'ons in Broward County, has an-
nounced that she is seeking addi-
tional honorary deputies. Her
al is to have at least two
honorary deputy supervisors in
each district.
t iHputies are responsible fof
encouraging voter registration
and participation throughout the
community. Applications can be
obtained at Broward County
Courthouse.
after earlier periods of pressure to
withdraw from Lebanon, Israel
was not being encouraged by the'
United States and its Weat Euro-
pean allies to retain a strong
military presence in Lebanon.
The delegates adopted reso-
lutions affirming Bnai Zion's
solidarity with Israel, condem-
ning Arab efforts to isolate Israel
diplomatically at the United Na-
raise The
tions by equating Zionism with
racism and calling for America's
continued support for Israel's
economic and military needs.
The convention also endorsed
i
the proposal to create a per-
manent committee to explore the
plight of Jews in oppressed lands
and maintain liaison with organ-
izations working in their behalf.
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I MW 14
i ne jewisn r tonaian ana i/io/or of Ureater Hollywood
Friday, July 8,19^
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'/
Ask the rabbi
The quest for
personal tranquility\
RABBI ROBERT P. FRAZIN
My dear friends, the Torah portion Matot-Maeey, from
Numbers. Chapter 30: Verse 2, through Chapter 36, begins by
speaking of making a vow, as Moses speaks to the leaders of the
tribes of Israel saying:
" If a man makes a vow to the Lord or takes an oath, he shall
not break his pledge."
Each one of us, in our daily lives, makes vows to others, but so
often we fail to make vows to ourselves, and therefore, we barm
ourselves.
There are those among us who suffer from fatigue and an all-
pervading sense of sadness that we cannot explain. Some of us
question our self-confidence and have lost our sense of humor.
There are those in our community who have lost touch with their
wives or husbands, or children, or family, or friends. And why?
Because our way of life the way in which we live in this
community is dangerous to our spiritual health. Computers
and credit cards have made us discontented with living a simpler
existence. So we keep on reaching frantically for the good life.
No matter how much we have, we continue to' believe that all
the fun is just above us on the plateau we are about to reach. We
are not there yet; we need just one more expensive car or a newer
home, one more thing than our neighbor has.
And yet our Torah declares: "Achalta VSavato" Eat, and
be satisfied. Instead, we consume and never seem to be satisfied.
And all of this is because so many of us fail to take the time to
pause and look within. We fail to make a vow to ourselves to
seek fulfillment of our authentic needs.
Therefore we must stay in touch with ourselves, with our
inner selves, and make a vow to trust our own judgment and
search within and each day of our lives ask what we are doing
with our lives.
We must rediscover the real pleasures in life: being with
friends and family, or simply being alone; going to a synagogue
on Shal bat evening or Shabbat morning and correcting the
balance if our lives by restoring our spiritual equilibrium and
regaining our sense of priority and perspective and sense of
humor.
And. nost importantly, we must be easier on ourselves. In
turn we will have a greater rachmanut for our loved ones and
upon svi ryone around us.
My d< r friends, the late Israeli Nobel Laureate Shmuel Agnon
once write a delightful story called "Sahlvah" or "Tranquility"
thta suns up the vow we must make at this time of the year. The
tale got that an old man, a neighbor of Moses, turned to the
lawgiver who was about to go to Mt. Sinai to receive the second
Tablets i >f the Ten Commandments
The old man usked the great prophet to do him a favor. He
said: "Now that you are going up to receive the second Tablets.
1 would have you ask one thing of God on my behalf. Nothing
material I only ask far a little shalvah, a little tranquility or
And the story goes on to say that after Moses had received
the Tablets, ha turned to God and said: "Lord of the Universe,
there is a certain neighbor of mine, a worthy/ man, who believes
in You. Please, if you wouM do me a favor, find far this man a
bttle tranquil**"
And God said to Moses: "You are asking far something
impossible." And the great man Moses became very upeet with
this answer, and he protested Whereupon God said: "In six
days I treated everything, but not tranquility. You can only
create that for yourself."
My dear friends, fat that be our vow during these summer
months: to create a little tranquility for ourselves and, in torn,
refresh our souls m we ready ourselves for the New Year to
come.
you often have to
qintty and price.
At UvfH-Wrimtein,
vow can have both.
Cai today far am i
Mcinoiial Cnapcfs
I towy wood North
IPI Hiadisfa? M. tsa* Wew OWe lliawwjy
MS/97V7JW 3Ct*S%-43tS
West Fata* each
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each

i. ^ ^
Rabbis discuss West Bank
SPRING GLEN, N.Y. -
(JTA) Rabbi Walter Wurzbur-
ger, past president of the Rab-
binical Council of America, as-
serted here that despite the
"moral and political dilemmas '
confronting the search for a per
manet solution to the West Bank.
"we must eschew dogmatic abso-
lutes."
"The issues are so complex
that they cannot be resolved by
recourse to simplistic principles
be they the historic and reli-
gious rights of Jews to the land of
Israel, or the claims to self-deter-
mination on the part of the Arab
populations," Wurzburger said in
a debate on the fate of Judaea
and Samaria at the three-day
convention of the National Coun-
cil of Young Israel.
But Rabbi Jay Marcus of
Young Israel of Staten Island
said, on the other hand, that a
more aggressive assertion of
Jewish rights to those lands must
be made. "Israel has already
made its sacrifices for peace
now we must wait for others to
make a similar commitment to
peace."
Marcus said Jews "must be al-
lowed to live anywhere on the
land of Biblical Israel, including
Judaea and Samaria, and we
must realize that further ap-
peasement will not bring about
rapproc he men t.
Wurzburger, who is editor of
the Orthodox rabbinic journal.
Tradition, criticized the divisive
effect of the ongoing debate over
the territories, warning that
"proponets of 'single issues' po-
litics must not be permitted to
overwhelm us to the point that
we impugn the integrity and
loyalty of those who bold diver-
gent views.
"We must resist the encroach-
ment of a creeping fanaticism
which substitutes denunciation
and polemics for rational dis-
course and imperils the unity of
the Jewish people."
Marcus referred to the specific
importance of the land of Israel in
Jewish law, eking Talmudic in-
junctions asainst a Jew selling a
non-Jew tend in Israel, and spe-
cial rHepenMlinns in Jewish law
to encourage the purchase of land
in Israel by Jews.
He noted that Jordanian law
levies the death penalty against
an Arab who sells tend to a Jew
and that, therefore, the position
ol those Jews who assert a strong
claim to Judaea and Samaria is
nut extreme.
ICERTIFIED MOHELr-1
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y.SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital
Will Travel 006)673-6082
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr mam bar
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc
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Phone 759-1669
"For the longest time, Jews
were dependent upon others,
creating a Galus' mentality.
Now, with the State of Israel a
reality, we need to establish
within the Jewish people a sense
of pride and identity, including
our rightful claim to the lands of
Judaea and Samaria," Marcus
said.
Mrs. Burton wins
husband's seat
WASHINGTON -
Sate Gatent Barton, widow of
Rep. Philip Burton, has won the
congressional seat in San Fran-
cisco left vacant by the death of
her husband last April.
Mrs. Burton was born to a
Jewish family in Poland and
came to the United States with
her family in 1939.
The 57-year-old Mrs. Burton
will bring the number of Jews in
the House to 31. She will increase
the number of Jewish women in
the House to three, all from
California.
The others are her fellow San
Francisco Democrat Barbara
Boxer and Bobbi Fiedler, a Repu-
blican from the Los Angeles area.
There are eight Jews in the
Senate.
Mrs. Burton received 55
percent of the vote, nearly twice
that of her nearest opponent
Duncan Howard, a Republican
who received 22.4 percent of the
votes. There were nine other
candidates in the campaign.
Rep. Philip Burton, who served
18 years in Congress, was one of
the leaders of the Democratic
majority there and a close sup-
porter of Israel and of liberal and
environmental causes. Mrs.
Burton worked closely with her
husband and campaigned on her
knowledge of the Washington
political scene.
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Lev! YiUchok Lubavitch. 1604 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tannanhaus. Daily services
7:55 am.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning.9 o'clock; Sundays. 8:30a.ro. Rehgiousschool: Grades
18.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 968-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Dairy 'services. 7:30 a.m., sundown.
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Ssbbatb inorning, 9
o'clock; Sunday. 8 em.
Conservative
1 Jewfah Caster 416 NE 8th Ave.; 464-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Dairy services, 8:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
Sm.: Sabbath morning, *& m ; Rtkbsth afternoon. ft>lnck.
tmple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave. Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Matevsky. Dairy services. 7:46 a.m..
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning. 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple Is The Pines 9730 Stirring Road. Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday. Monday and
Thursday. 8 a.m.; Sabbath. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning. 8:45
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery. Bar Mitxvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Ma-aaaar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Pau! Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pm;
Sabbath morning, 8:46 o'clock. Religious school: Pre
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:26 a.m.. 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pro-
le indergarten-Judaica High School.
FJeforri?
lTPl,~B*fc B l3M i uth Av HoOywood; 8308225.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffa. Sabbath services. 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 110.
Temple Beth Ernst Pines Middle School. 200 N. Douglas
Road Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Graanspon
Sabbeth services. .8:15 pm. Religious school: Pre-kinder
garten 10.
Temple Sole! 5100 Sheridan St. Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning. 10:30o'dock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
F)ecoi)structioi>ist i
52S^,^?5.-J1301 W Broward Blvd.. Plantation: 472
3600. Rabbi Elliot Skideli Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. Religious
school: Pre-kindergarten-8.


P^y.julyMWS
.< * A'v
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page
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The Jewish Floridian and Shnfarof Greater HoUywood
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