The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00326

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
THI
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


Volume 13 Number 13
Open gate
Ifor Jews,
[Andropov
is urged
By HELEN SILVER
JTA Reporter
WASHINGTON "I
tell Yuri Andropov to open
[he gates and let the world
bee whether emigration
3m the Soviet Union has
ipped because the Rus-
sian government stopped it
because Soviet Jews no
)nger wish to leave Andro-
s empire," Rep. Tom
pantos, D-Calif., said.
In a brief speech on the
louse floor, Lantos said,
[The Soviet Union has now
loncocted a phony front
Organization with the dual
pal of disgracefully falsi-
.ing the past and deceit-
ally denying the present."
Lantos' call on the Soviet
ader was a response to the new-
established Soviet-government
nnsored "Anti-Zionist Com-
of the Soviet Public,"
lich in Moscow last week
erted that all Soviet Jews who
anted to leave have done so and
Zionist groups are "juggling
ires" to show that large num-
of Jews still wish to emi-
ate.
[Karlier, Lantos, at a joint press
Inference with Reps. John
pi r Ft-111.. and Benjamin Gil-
an. R-N.Y., termed the remarks
the anti-Zionist committee
Bdi r on Soviet Jewish emigra-
r-n "outright lies."
le said the comments made a
fiockery of the hardships and
"ering experienced by thou-
nds upon thousands of Soviet
vs who have made known their
sire to leave."
saw with my own eyes the
Irassment, indignities and eco-
|mic penalties suffered by
ople whose only crime was a
sire to leave the land of their
pressors," said Porter, who
with 40 family members of
|viet refuseniks when he visited
; Soviet Union last September.
pilman, who is a member of
Congressional Rights
jcus, of which Porter and
ii os are cochairmen, termed as
liculous" the allegations of
anti-Zionist committee. As
nember of the Post Office and
Continued on Page 5
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 24,1983
~>l Vnt>
Dr. Levin elected
JFSB president
Dr. Philip A. Levin (above,
seated) has been sworn to office
as president of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Congratulating him (from left)
are Dr. Saul Singer, Nat Sedley
and Ted Newman, vice presidents.
The other two officers for 1983-84
sworn in at the recent JFSB
Annual Meeting are Otto Stieber
(at left),! secretary; and Dr.
Howard Barron (at right), treasurer.
Dr. Howard Barron
Booms, not bombs?
Barbaric raids on Beirut 'really fake'
? Tom Lantos
By HUGH ORGEI.
JTA Reporter
TEL AVIV The deputy commander of
the Israeli Air Force claims the aerial bom-
bardment of Palestine Liberation Organization
strongholds in west Beirut last August never took
place on the massive scale reported by the PLO
news agency and picked up by the world news
media.
According to the officer, interviewed on Israel
Radio, the Air Force employed "misleading
tactics" to prod the PLO to agree to withdraw
from the city.
The PLO news agency reported at the time that 44,000
bombs ware dropped causing 1,000 civilian casualties and
destroying 700 buildings. Those reports prompted President
Reagan to urge Israel to cease the "barbaric raids."
But the raids were largely simulations, the Air Force of-
ficer said- Israeli jets were sent over Beirut from dawn until
late afternoon at high speed to cause sonic booms. "Most of
the operation was to make a big noise around the city,
somewhat like Joshua at the battle of Jericho. I think the
results of our plan speak for themselves. The PLO decided to
leave the city/' he said.
He said the fact was that the Air Force flew only 77 sorties
over Beirut and dropped a few hundred bombs, mainly
outside the built-up areas of the city.
Maj. Gen. Amir Drori of the northern command who led
most of the fighting in Lebanon, said on another radio in-
terview that if the original war aims in Lebanon had been
defined more precisely, the war would have been fought
differently.
Drori said there should have been quicker troop
movements, landings from the sea and larger forces employed
on land which would have avoided contact with the enemy.
Nevertheless, a year after the war began, Israeli troops still
CsatfcwodonPagel


D-~_ t* v%
Page 2
lie Jewish FU>ridu^.an4^f<*rsf PnJiy r June 2i.
South County captures UJA's Sapir Award
NEW YORK The Jewish
communities of Cincinnati, Den-
ver, South i Palm Beachi County
Florida, and Fort Worth have
been named winners of the
United Jewish Appeal s Pinchas
Sapir Awards for outstanding
1982 campaign achievements.
UJA National Chairman
Robert E. Loup presented the
awards to the winning communi-
ties at the recent UJA National
Leadership Conference in Wash-
ington. D.C The Sapir Awards
are presented annually to com-
munities thai have shown bub
stantial achievements in their
campaigns through innovative
fundraising programs and tech-
niques, planning and leadership
development.
"It was a united effort by Jay
leaders, campaign workers and
professionals reflecting a com
mitment and dedication that rec-
ognizes urgent Jewish needs and
takes immediate action," Lsup
said. "It is fitting that an award
which honors outstanding cam-
paign achievement be named for
the man who so superbly articu-
lated our challenge and devoted
so much of his life to the people of
Israel."
A special award was presented
to the UJA-Federation of Greater
New York Campaign for raising
8100 million in 1982
The Jewish Federation of Cin-
cinnati and the Allied Jewish
Federation of Denver received
the award in the Major City cate-
gory for their accomplishments in
the 1982 campaign.
Cincinnati achieved a >7 pec-
cant increase m its 1988 Cam
paign over the previous year. The
community increased -giving in
its Men's Leadership Campaign
by SO percent, doubled the num-
ber of contrrbu tors of $60.000end
over, and developed a Campaign
Strategy Committee to direct nod
monitor the course of the cam-
paign.
The Allied Jewish Federation
of Denver attained an increase of
16.5 percent >ver the previous
year. The community increased
the number of $100,000 contribu
tore more than sixfold in 1982
and a new program, "Leadership
Round Table," was instrumental
in increasing the number of
active campaign leaders. In addi-
tion, a business and professional
women s program was created
and proved to be highly success-
ful.
James Beer, president, and
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, executive
director, accepted the award for
4he South County 4oridal.
Jewish Federation far the Inter
mediate City category. The fed-
eration, which includes Boca
Raton. Delray Beach and High-
land Beach, achieved a 57 percent
campaign increase over the pre-
vious year.
It sponsored an extensive lead-
ership development program, in-
augurated a number of new serv-
ices to meet the needs of its
growing community and tripled
the number of $100,000 and over
gifts it had received the year be-
fore.
The Small City Sapir Award
went to Fort Worth, which
achieved an increase of 27 percent
over the previous year through
leadership development pro-
grams, the creation of campaign
divisions and inauguration of a
$10,000 minimum dinner.
In defining the spirit behind
the awards, named for one of the
founding fathers of Israel, Loup
echoed the words of Pinchas
Sapir: "Together we possess the
means and organization to
strengthen Jewish life.- If -we
work together, there are no im-
passible dreams there ene\o
impossible hopes."
Pinchas Sapir served Isra-
a minister of Commeme jam
Industry (195&-63) and 1st 10
Booms, not bombs?

I ind themselves underettnck. .
Maariv asporU that Israel's awnw ainhassarkrto Britain,
flHomo Abjov. who was ecuawsy wounded in a terrorist
attack in Leadon in Jane 1982,isnuch improved. But he has
not yet been informed that the attempt en his Ufa triggered
Israel's invasion of Lebanon a year i
The paper published an liitiiniee with Argov's wife,
Chaya. who said the envoy has recovered his speech and
lacalto the various languages he ipsalrs
Argov suffered seriouis brain da mags bat, according to his
wife, he was able to follow the war m Lebanon in its later
stsgas last summer by reading newspaper accounts and
listening to radio and television reports.
Argov stOl suffers from physical disabilities But the brain
damage from which doctors doubted he would ever recover,
apparently has been repaired.
t
x

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Community, regional and na-
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States attended the four-day
UJA National Leadership Con-
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paign and to attend workshops
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Eight lay leaders and profes-
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Dr. Saul Singer. 1983 Cam-
paign chairman and incoming
vice president; Ted Newman.
1983 treasurer snd incoming
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coff, overall missions chairman;
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Israel stronger than ever,
envoy to U.S.
11 u h **;
es
WASHINGTON |JTA) -
Meir Rosenne. Israel's new
ambassador to the United States,
declared here that "Israel is
stronger than ever, not only be-
cause we have the military power
but because the people of the
world are with us."
The envoy, addressing a lunch-
eon at the 70th anniversary
convention of the Anti-Defama
tion League of B'nai B'rith.
stressed that "contrary to what
you read in the press, Israel is not
isolated Israel is strong
today because it has given proof
to the entire world that we are
ready for peace, and we are ready
to negotiate peace with any Arab
states with no preconditions.''
Rosenne, who was Israel's
ambassador to France before he
was pasted to Washington, noted
that "Israel has signed an agree-
ment with Lebanon it is not a
full peace treaty but we have said
since the first day of our inter-
vention (in Lebanon) up to this
moment that Israel has no inten-
tion whatsoever to ^ahaage the
borders between Israel eadajeba-
non. We are reedy te withdrew as
soon as all the foreign forces in
'People of world with us'

-
Lebanon today withdraw," he
said.
Rosenne complained that there
was worldwide condemnation of
Israel's invasion of Lebanon bat
oo condemnation of Syra'i
occupation of that country. We
do not hear of any condemnation
in any international forum, wee)
not see any sanctions adopted by
the European Common Market
and we do not see any debate a
the U.N. Security Council over
the fact that one state occupies
illegally 50 percent of the terri-
tory of another state and nobody
reacts.
"The only thing you see,"
Rosenne said, "is a campaign
waged against Israel preparing
public opinion to pressure
against our country." Referring
to dissent in Israel and among
American Jews over goverorneat
pohciesvllosenne said:
"We oorselves should not at
victims of this campaign of
trying to show that there tsdivi-
ston of opinion, that there* as-
sent. When It oomes to tat
proteetaen of Jewish lives tod
existence of the 9eeV of Israt
we amiain re united than ever,'hW
said-

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Friday, June 24,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Sen. Jackson hails Mideast peace pact
Page 3
By HELEN SILVER
JTA Reporter
WASHINGTON Sen.
Henry Jackson, D-Wash., praises
the Israeli-Lebanese agreement
"as a courageous, constructive
hopeful achievement. If it is to be
followed by a wise and tough
diplomacy, it could become
another historic turning point in
reaching stability and peace in
that region."
Jackson, speaking to 800 per-
sons at a dinner of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B nth, said:
"It begins to look as though
the Reagan administration has
finally grasped a basic truth
about the Middle East that a
strong, unwavering United
States-Israeli relationship must
be the core of American policy in
the area.
"I salute the president for his
release of the 75 F-16 fighter
planes to Israel also in the deci-
sion to proceed with the delayed
transfer of the technology needed
for the production of the Lavie
fighter."
Jackson added that "efforts to
implement the Israeli-Lebanese
agreement are turning into quite
a lesson for the administration on
what friends and allies are and
what they are not. The contrast
with Israel is obvious when
compared to Syria, to mention
only one."
New JFSB worker
old hand at the job
As a young girl growing up in
South Broward, Linda Myers as-
pired to work for Federation. She
set up a plan, followed the steps
and, today, is the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward's newest
employee.
Born and bred in Hollywood,
Ms. Myers recently received her
master's degree in Jewish com-
munal service through the Horn-
stein Program at Brandeis Uni-
versity.
Before Brandeis, she was grad-
uated from Emory University in
Atlanta. And all the while she
["paid her dues," volunteering at
I Federation, serving as a youth
adviser and senior citizens' aide
and a counselor at the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC Camp in North
Dade.
While in school, she also took
part in the "Witness to the Holo-
caust" program, interviewing
soldiers who took part in the lib-
eration of Europe.
She also did field placement for
Jewish Family Service in Salem,
Mass., and volunteered as a cam-
paign associate for the Combined
Jewish Philanthropies of Boston.
And all her work and volunteer
efforts, she says, were precon-
ceived toward her goal: Federa-
tion.
Ms. Myers, who will become
Mrs. Simon Reich in the not too
distant future, began her first
paying job last week as a cam-
paign associate, responsible for
Media is topic of NCCJ
meeting in Lauderdale
"The Media: What is its role in
[Fostering Better Intergroup
[Relations in our Community?"
vail be the topic of a NCCJ
Forum sponsored by the Broward
National Conference on Chris-
tians and Jews Tuesday, June 28.
The luncheon-Forum will be
from noon to 1:45 at Stouffer's
Vmuapri Inn, 1901 North
Federal Highway, Fort Lauder-
ale.
Panelists will be Earl Mauker,
managing editor of the Fort
..auderdale News-Sun-Sentinel;
hns Cubbison, Broward editor
of the Miami Herald, and Frank
vnn, Broward bureau manager
W WTVJChannel 4. Dorothy
lubin, publisher of The Broward
Jewish Journal, will act as
noderator.
The panelists will identify
some of the problems of our mul-
ti-religious, racial and ethnic
county; the causes of divisive-
ness and how the media can help
build more positive human rela-
tions in the community. A dis-
cussion will follow the presenta-
tions.
Cost of the luncheon is $8. The
NCCJ office is at 5960 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd., Suite 200, Fort
Lauderdale 33313.
The National Conference of
Christians and Jews is a non-
profit human relations and civic
organization which for 55 years
has been engaged in an educa-
tional program to eliminate
prejudice and discrimination and
to build better relationships be-
tween all groups.
Number of Jews in Canada
unlike U.S.shows rise
I MONTREAL (JTA) In
Inking contrast to the gloomy
Valuations of the trend of the
twish population in the United
ates, data indicates an increase
| Canadian Jews.
(The 1983 American Jewish
ar Book lists 5,690,000 United
ates Jews for 1980. The Cana-
census figure, as quoted by
Canadian Jewish News, cites
overall Jewish population in
anada of 296,000, an eight per-
Int increase over the 1971 cen-
M total. The American Jewish
ir Book lists 308,000 Canadian
bws for 1980.
I The totals for the two countries
[e not strictly comparable. For a
friety of reasons, the U.S.
pnsus Bureau has never in-
ided a question on the norther
Americsta Jews in its pop'ula-
tion survey, conducted every 10
years. All data on the total
number of U.S. Jews are
basically "educated" estimates.
The data on Canadian Jews is
based on specific questions in the
census.
The census showed that half of
Canada's 296,000 Jews live in
Ontario and that 102,000 live in
Quebec
The census found a dramatic
decrease during the past 15 years
in the number of Jews who
reported using Yiddish as a home
language. Yiddish-speaking
Canadian Jews number more
than 10,000 but every province
recorded a substantial decline of
Jews speaking Yiddish at home.
Quebec now shows 7,000 fewer
Yiddish epeakers than the 12,000
listed in t^SJgTJ.censjisr -
I Jackson contrasted the stand-
ard of living and political stabi-
lity in Israel with the poverty,
illiteracy, tyrannical govern-
ments and political instability of
the Arab states which he said
continues to make the area
"fertile ground for Soviet infil-
tration and exploitation by
oligarchic elites and terrorist
leaders in that area."
He said the lesson to be drawn
is that "military approaches
alone are not enough to achieve
stability and security in this
troubled world. Anna alone will
not do the job. The underlying
economic, political and social
causes of instability and violence
must be dealt with, and dealt
with effectively."
The ADL honored J. Willard
Marriott, chairman of the board
of the Marriot Hotel Corp., with
its Americanism Award, present-
ed to "individual whose contri-
bution to democracy has been
outstanding in the private and
public sector of American life."
ADL's International Award,
the Joseph Prize for Human
Rights, was awarded jointly to
violinist Isaac Stern and con-
ductor Zubin Mehta, musical
director of the N.Y. Philharmonic
and musical director for life of the
Israel Philharmonic.
The award recognized the
contributions of the two musi-
cians "to the improvement of
human relations and the growth
of human rights."
Sen. Henry Jackson
Linda Myers
Young Leadership, the Western
Campaign, Colony Point, Three
Islands and Park Place.
Her fiance is from London and
is ja. Ph.D. student in political
science at Brandeis.
Both Ms. Myers and her par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. William
Myers, are 25-year-plus members
of Temple Sinai.

"Medicare Is
NotEnough"
Edward and Selma Kaplan
You Probably
Weed B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, Too.
It includes private
duty nursing in the
hospital.
It includes doctor's
office and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed."
For members age 65 ami
tivcr. Pre-existing conditions
not covered for the firM 6
months of coverage.
Tor B'nai B'rith members only.
We enroll new members
(mod-as-1 3077) B'nai B'rith's
Tor many medical
charges, it pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays-
Group Insurance aa|ak
Underwritten by <
MONY
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Mutual Life Insurance
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?>
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 24,1983
Jewish Floridian
a* On
*Ha*r
M
% fruasnoctft
FRED SMOCMF' STEVE HA TON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and HuBiiaiW' Aaaociata 6*ior Eioculra* Edno-
PubiiMwdB HOLLYWOOD FORT LAUDEROALE OFFICE Am Savmga 2SO0 Bk>q 2S0O E NNMM Baacfl
Bind.. Sun* 707G Maiianoaia. Fla 33009 Ptiona 4S*0*ee
aSraai Haim. Adi imilin lininlm
Main Oftica* Plant iNE6" St Miami Fla 33132Pnona 1-373-4405
naliilHi FoowMTtialiOTiloJawlannandian PQ aa0iaT3.ltlawl.rTa Midi
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Saui Smgar Tad Nawman and Nal Sadtay Traaaurar Or Howard Ban-on: Sacraiary Otto
Stiaoa- Eiracutrva Dmjctor Sumnar G Kaya Suomtl malarial lor publicatKXi to Stava Katon
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HnM< JTA. Smi Art. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Araa S3 SO Annual <2 Yaar MHaWM ST), or by mamoaramp MM
Fadaraion o' South BroaraW. ZT19 Hoiiwaood BjaaV. Hollywood. Fla. 33030 Pnona S21-OH0. |
Out o* Town upon Raquaat
Wt VI I WWII WWW" 13TAMUZ5743
Number 13
Friday. June 24.1983
Volume 13
*
1ST nasty word* now
Great Britain joins the growing list of
European Economic Community (EEC)
nations bent on repairing their relations
with Israel. The smashing Conservative
victory of Margaret Thatcher in last week's
elections resulted the other day in her firing
of Britain's Foreign Secretary Francis Pym.
Pym had acquired an agonizing record of
finding little that was good in Israeli policy
and much to be admired in the Arab
nations. If he was not quite the central
architect in Britain's pro-Arab leanings,
Pym certainly contributed a substantial
thrust to its development.
Indeed. Thatcher followed up her firing
of Pym with the promotion of two young
Jewish ministers in her Cabinet reshuffle in
the wake of the Conservatives* victory.
Still, however. Israel's new Ambassador
to the United States Meir Rosenne made a
telling point the other day when he
deplored the absence ot negative world
opinion in response to Syria's refusal to
accept the Israel-Lebanon agreement and
to leave that war-torn country
Nowhere do we ourselves see the kind of
angry verbiage heaped upon Syria that was
reserved tor Israel at the height of the
l.eoanon operation. Svna is not bein^
called intransigent." Syria is not being
accused of "genocide" in Lebanon.
Nor is Syria being fingered as
nolocaustic" or as "treacherous" after
being whipped by the Israelis and exiting
toward their own Syrian lines as part of the
ceasefire agreement in that country only
almost immediately thereafter to dig in in
the BeKaa Valley, to wait lor a weapons
transfusion from Moscow and now vow
never to quit.
All of these words, and more, many of
them showing spiteful tones of frank anti-
Semitic feeling, were heaped upon the
Israelis, whose cause was and still remains
just in Lebanon. If the EEC and others
want to prove their "even-handedness,"
now is the time to say so
The pogrom
(massacre)
in Itchnya

ByABBABENYAMIN
(Hebrew name lor Abe Halpern)
Parti
Itchnya is the name of the shtetU (small vil-
lage) in the Ukraine where I was born and grew
up. It is in the Chernigov region, in the pale of
settlement of Russia, the area where the Czarist
regime allowed Jews to live. The village is not far
from Poltava and Kiev.
The village had a population of 5,000 families,
including 150 Jewish families. The main street
was paved with cobblestones and the side streets
were muddy in the summer and packed high with
snow in the winter. There were four churches of
the Eastern Orthodox denomination, each with
its high steeple and belfry.
The village boasted a distillery for vodka which
was distributed throughout the region. The area
was covered by only one doctor and a feldxhwr
who was not quite a doctor but knowledgeable in
medicine. Most of the Russian families were
farmers or artisans.
There was a park on the outskirts of the shtetle
and a square in the center of town where the
peasants and farmers would bring their wares to
market every Thursday -
Our one synagogue was at the end of the main
street. The Jewish families were for the most part
businessmen and craftsmen: tailors, shoemakers,
jewlers and the like. Some were teachers in the
Hebrew schools, others earned their meager
livelihood by writing letters for the illiterate
peasants: and there were those who were rab-
binical students.
FROM MY VERY early childhood, sounds
made a lasting impression.
When I was about 3. even before I understood
their meaning, sounds of Sabbath Z'mirot isacred
hymns or songs) could be heard everv Fnda\
evening and Saturday afternoon from even
Jewish home. As 1 grew older I could hear and
understand the sounds of the chanting or prayers
three limes daily in the synagogue and homes, tin
recitation of the morning prayers trom tn.
Chedonm (Hebrew schools
I could also hear the words of wisdom as th.
1 orah was being cnanted on Mondays Tnursdavs
and Saturdays. There were spirited discussions
during the study of the Talmud, commentaries
and other scriptures
There were other sounds emanating from the
meetings in the synagogue. The reports of what
was happening to life in our village and
throughout Russia were discussed in detail. There
was difference of opinion of how to cope with anti-
Semitism in our village. There was talk about
help for the needy, the sick and how to welcome
the stranger in our midst.
Despite the constant struggle for physical
survival, life was simple, meaningful and lived to
the full according to our understanding of
Judaism. It gave me a better understanding of
my heritage.
At times there were other sounds bringing fear
and horror. Many times the ringing of church
bells was the signal that there was a fire The bells
also rang during the celebrations of Christmas,
Easter and other Christian holidays when it was
dangerous for Jewish children to play in the
streets
During the fall of 1913 when I was 7.the Mendel
Beilis trial shocked the world. Beilia (1874-19341
was the superintendent of a brick kiln in Kiev. He
was arrested and charged with the murder of a 12
year-old Gentile boy for the purpose of using the
boy's blood for baking matxot
FOR MORE THAN two years Beilis was
tortured unmercifully in jail but he maintained
his innocence.
The Czarist regime, despite wenvhelming
evidence that the boy was murdered by someone
else, and protests from scientists and clergymen
throughout the world confirming that the blood
libel was baseless, nevertheless, placed Beilis on
trial for the murder. The trial lasted more than a
month.
Reactionary anti-Semitic organizations led by
the Chornava Sotnva (the Black Hundred) had
instigated the blood libel in order to prepare and
stage pogroms all over Russia on the day Beilis
would be found guiliv-
It is amazing that a jury composed of simpl
Russian peasants, after several nours oi
deliberation, tound Beilis not guilt>
During the course of the trial there was con-
stant tear ot a pogrom throughout Russia. Lven
when the not guiltv verdict reached our village,
all ot us still teared and expected a pogrom.
This fear, this uncertainty, plus the realization
of how dangerous it was to nve as a Jew in j
hostile Christian society, made a traumatic
impression on my mind and conscience
(To be continued)
Reagalogic and
the pesky comma
I AM inaugurating a new
course of study to be entitled
Reagalogic. It will be taught on a
freshman level, since it requires
no prerequisitesnot in previous
course work, nor in academics
generally, nor even in basic intel-
ligence
A perfect example of the kinds
Leo Mindlin
Mr WiTH W
ma?
of problems the course will deal
with concerns the case of Faith
Ryan Whittlesey, the highest-
ranking woman on President
Reagan's White House staff.
PROBLEM: As 1984 and the
next presidential campaign ap-
proaches, all the President's men
have told him that the Adminis-
tration's record on issues dealing
with women's concerns is some-
what less than enviable.
m It is not simply that ERA has
had one of those marvelous res-
surection experiences which is
coming back to plague the typical
male chauvinist anew but that, in
general, the President is a trog-
lodyte in these matters. If he
runs in 1984, and wants to win,
he'd better start mending his
fences with a mind toward at-
tracting the women's vote.
That'8 how the behind-the-scenes
figuring goes in the White House
corridors, and that's why Mr.
Reagan has been warned to get
on the stick.
Well, in Reagalogic, Proposi-
tion 1 reads: "To achieve a clear
objective (or better yet an unclear
one), choose an irrational act to
obscure the principle of logic at
issue. In fact, damn all logical
systems as the Satanic creations
of the northeast liberal Estab-
lishment, most of whom are
Commies anywav
BUT I don't want to get into
any of this, not really. Proposi-
tion 1 is much too complicated.
Continued on Page 12
The Soviet Jewry Coo
mRtee of the Community
Balsa hiws Committee, Jewish
Federation of South aVow
erd, would like to speak to
anyone in the South Broward
area who is planning to via*
the Soviet Union in the sear
future.
Contact Melioaa Martht at
the Federation. 921-8810.
Also, anyone who woakf
like to write to a refueenlk or
a member of his or her
fsadly, contact the Fedora
tioa.


I ridav. June 24, 1983
,
The Jewish Ftondian and Shofar of Greater HoU$u>ood
Page 5
Mondale outscores Glenn on Jewish checklist
Bv MORRIS J. AMITAY
Special to The Floridian
The national political scene as
it relates to Jewish concerns is
heating up with new statements
and endorsements in
Washington.
Sen. John Glenn of Ohio
received the public endorsement
for his presidential candidacy
from Paul Tsongas of
Massachusetts, a fellow colleague
on the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. Among those who
know how the committee lines up
on Israel-related issues, Tsongas
and Glenn were described by a
former staff member of the
committee as "two peas in a
pod." Both have been lukewarm
supporters of Israel at beat.
Tsongas, in particular, has
been extremely critical privately
and in closed committee sessions
I' .if the Israeli government and its
policies in the so-called West
Bank and in Lebanon. His en-
dorsement of Glenn can be
contrasted with Sen. Paul
Sarbanes' endorsement of Walter
Mondale. Sarbanes has been a
tenacious and consistent sup-
porter of Israel over the years,
and perhaps its most unswerving
friend on the Democratic side of
the committee. Before an-
nouncing his own support for
.Mondale, Sarbanes sought to
make certain that Mondale's
views and record on the Middle
I East matched his own.
Glenn, who has publicly
[ acknowledged his difficulties
| with the American Jewish
[community over Israel, once
(again sought to allay fears by a
I recent statement to the Near
[East Report the pro-Israel
|\Vashington-based weekly.
His statement, however,
lalmost pointedly ignored those
[specific issues which rekindled
It he very same fears after his
February speech in Cleveland to
. national Jewish audience,
ifically: sophisticated arms
pales to hostile Arab countries, a
unilateral Israeli freeze on West
liunk settlements and his curious
contention that the now-defunct
p' ;u:an plan was based on the
f'ump David process.
The latest statement we have
im Glenn is a fine general
( uiment of support for Israel
i a proper criticism of the
Reagan administration for
iglecting Israel as an ally. But
[here are still a large number of
key unanswered questions, and a
potty record in the past which
eaves doubts.
Mondale is due to release his
bwn statement to the same
publication, and undoubtedly
both will be compared. However,
Mondale's total record over the
pears, along with his close ties to
idropov
irgedto
pen gates
Continued from Page 1
pivil Service Committee. Gilman
oke of his investigations of
oviet interference with U.S.
>il addressed to Soviet citizens.
"We have now received a great
umber of documents attesting
the fact that there has been a
oncerted affort to interrupt the
'nil," he said.
Gilman added that the U.S.
st master general has taken up
i issue with Soviet interference
h the mail with Soviet officials
a recent visit to the Soviet
fnion.
"We hone that we are going to
^ve this issue straightened out
that minority groups will no
nger be isolated from outside
rnmunication, from the only
[te-line that they have written
rTnmunication and the oppor-
nity to start with an emigra-
f>r., Gilman asserted.
Opinion
the American Jewish community
and Israel's leadership, may
speak more loudly then his
words.
It is interesting to note that
with the recent attention being
given to the importance of black
and hispanic voters in the up-
coming presidential election,
Jewish voters, who vote
disproportionately higher than
any other group, still are a key
element in any electoral college
strategy.
In such states as New York,
California, Illinois, Maryland,
New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania
and Florida, a marked shift in the
percentage of Jewish votes has a
significant impact on the total
votes of these crucial states.
For instance, a shift of Jewish
votes in New Jersey from 60
percent to 40 percent Democrat
over Republican, to 50-50 would
shift the state's entire vote
almost 2'/i percent a
significant number. In this
regard, it is interesting to cite the
aprpox imate spUt of the Jewish
vote in presidential elections
since 1956.
Percent
1956 Stevenson (D) Eisenhower (R) 60 40
1960 Kennedy (D) Nixon (R) 82 18
1964 Johnson (D) Goldwater (R) 90 10
1968 Humphrey (D) Nixon (R) Wallace (AIP) 81 17 2
1972 McGovern(D) Nixon (R) 66 36
1976 Carter (D) Ford (R) 75 25
1980 Reagan (R) Carter (D) Anderson (I) 46 46 10
The administration still has a
long way to go to improve the
tensions of the vital U.S.-Israel
relationship. For whatever
reason, we hope this positive
trend continues.
We also hope that these im-
provements are in recognition of
the best interests of the United
States; namely, that a strong and
secure Israel is our most reliable
ally in volatile Middle East,
rather than as an op-
portunistic consideration of
domestic political gain.
These figures make it clear
why a 1984 Reagan candidacy
cannot afford to alienate Jewish
voters as Carter did in 1980. This
realization might help explain the
improvement in U.S.-Israel
relations in recent weeks. But
these improvements approval
of licenses for the Israeli Lavi
fighter and an end on the ban of
F16 deliveries look reasonable,
only because administration
policy has been so one-sided
against Israel for so long.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
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children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
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Enjoy special savings on Fleischmann's
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Pag*6
Tk+Jo*stoFh*dUn ttnd&h6f(**f OtHdt^UdUywixxi
Jrfcky. June 24
.1983
<
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t
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Jewish household

How to Run Traditional Jewish
Household. By Blu Greenberg.
Simon A Schuster, 1230 Avenue
of the Americas, New York, N. Y.
10020. 495pp. $19.95
Reviewed by Paul Cowan
In 1973, when my wife Rachel
and I began to make our house-
hold more Jewish, we bought a
plethora of "how-to" books. They
supplied facts, but there were no
feelings behind them. Later on,
The Jewish Catalogs began to fill
that gap.
Now. How to Ron a Tradi-
tional Jewish Household pro-
vides a new. indispensible guide
to the practical details and emo-
tional satisfactions of ob-
servance.
Blu Ureenberg has written an
all-purpose "how-to" book. She
explains religious observances
And yet another
novel about Israel
This Year in Jerusalem. By Joel
Gross. New York: G. P.
Putnam's Sons. 1983. 304 Pp.
$14.95
By MORTON 1. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
'How-to' book a good one
Jewish Books
b in Review
i$ a service of the IWB lewish Book Council.
15 Esst 26th St., New York, N.V. 10010
like Shabbat, kashrut. prayers
and blessings. She discusses
stages of life marriage, birth,
bar-bat mitzvahs, divorce, death
and mourning.
She shows the cycle of the
Jewish year, focusing on each
holy day and describing its sig-
nificance. In all the sections of
her book, she blends information,
theology and autobiography in a
Joel Gross has given us an en-
grossing novel about the birth of
Israel The story takes place dur-
ing 1947 and 1948 in the United
States and Israel.
The heroine. Diana Mann, or-
phaned at the age of three, was
the adopted daughter of a
wealthy California couple. Her
adoptive father was the brother
of her real mother and her real
father was Louis Bernstein, a
notorious gangster. His un-
derworld empire was taken over
by his brother. Marty Bernstein,
"the most famous unconvicted
criminal in the United States."
A RADCLIFFE graduate.
Diana went to Palestine as a
journalist in 1947. There, she met
and fell in love with David Stern,
a leader in the Haganah. She was
caught up in the Jewish struggle
and was alarmed by the lack of
weapons for the inevitable Arab
attack. She returned to the Unit-
ed States to secure guns for the
Haganah. and she asked her
uncle. Marty Bernstein, for help.
He arranged a series of meet-
ings for her with other gangster
leaders who contributed gener-
Joel Grass
ously to Louis Bernstein's
daughter. In her travels across
the United States, she was ac-
companied by Joel Marino, a
young gangster assigned as her
bodyguard by her uncle.
Joey fell in love with Diana and
stayed with her when she return-
Continued on Page 19
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York, NY. 10017
(212)759-1310
tion Toll Free (800) 221 -48381
way that claims the reader's
fascinated attention.
The strength of the book comes
from its author's ability to infuse
each ritual with thought and pas-
sion. Her first chapters, which
describe preparations for the
knowledgeable guide like Blu
Greenberg to help them on their
way.
Paul Cowan is the author of An
Orphan in History: Retrieving A
Jewish Legacy I Doubleday).
Want to go
to the Point?
Congressman Larry Smith is
accepting applications from high
school students who wish to be
considered for nomination to the
national service academies.
Students eligible must be in
their junior year and live in the
16th Congressional District. Ap-
plications are being accepted for
West Point, the Naval Academy,
the Air Force Academy and the
Merchant Marines. Qualities
sought by the service academies
include high SAT scores, extra-
curricular activities and demon-
strated leadership ability.
Interested students may con-
tact the 16th Congressional Dis-
trict Office in Hollywood for an
application.
L&E: Just what is it?
You can be a leader
In South Breward, the Legacy and Endowment Fund concept
is a relatively new idea. As a result, many people in the com-
munity are not familiar with its purpose and function.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund was established as an
integral part of the Jewish Federation of South Broward. It has
the authority to receive and accept contributions of cash, stocks,
bonds, gifts-in-kind, etc.
The fund is managed and administered by a board of trustees
consisting of community business and financial leaders. For
example, members of the Legal and Tax Committee, composed
of leading attorneys, accountants and insurance underwriters,
are available to assist your legal and tax advisers with respect to
your gift or bequest.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund is not another annual
fundraising campaign. It is a long-range continuing effort to
build a fund for use in times of economic stress, and to institute
innovative programs required by changing priorities.
Endowment funds enable the Federation to keep pace with
growing community needs, and to meet crises when they arise.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund is a separate fund segregated
from annual campaign funds, whose uses are for the special
purposes described.
Federations throughout the country are strengthening their
endowment funds to assure sufficient support for future needs.
The strength of any Jewish charitable organization resides in
its lay leadership. This is equally true for the Legacy and
Endowment Fund. We urgently need leaders that are willing to
work with our Development Committee and our Legal-Tax
Committee.
We need individuals who are willing to contribute to the
Legacy and Endowment Fund. We need individuals who are
willing to speak on the fund's behalf at various civic groups in
our area.
The time for action is now.
Call the Federation for further details.
Harry Rubinstein
Sidney Rubinstein
H and S Auto Parts, Inc.
and Service Center
Phone 920-4881
250 South Federal Highway Dania, Florida
Fiddler on the Qlyde.
By the banks of the river Clyde in the bonny town of Glasgow,
there thrives a small but active Jewish community center. And here a
simple stage boasts shows put on by its proud members. You might be
sorted by bagpipes wailing to the strains of Hava Nagila. Or even seethe
hora danced by men in kilts.
While productions like these do the heart good, the Scots have
an encore that does the palate good, as well: A wee sip of fine scotch
whisky. Americans have also taken kindly to this tradition and made
J&.B Rare Scotch the one preferred above all others, for so delicate and
so refined is its taste thatJcxB is the scotch that whispers. And that is
why we recommend it as the perfect libation sunrise, sunset or when-
ever the curtain calls.
Ciaanaf
3&B. It whispers.


Friday, Juns 24, 1983
TKeJcwM-Floridicft andShofarof Greater HNtyObd**
Pi*7
'My daughter's on drugs, and I can't cope'
"Help, I can't cops with this {'
chaos in my house anymore.''
There were the words Mrs. Z.
cned during her first session.
Mrs. Z. called Jewish Family
Service with the presenting prob-
lem of "my daughter's on drugs
and I can't cope anymore."
Mrs. Z. is 47, divorced
Jewish. Her daughter is 23.
and
Becky is living with her and is
actively using drugs.
Mrs. Z. said Becky was a high
school dropout and had roamed
the streets for years. Only recent-
ly did she move back home be-
cause she had been beatened up.
Mrs. Z. stated that Becky
would not come in for therapy
with her; Mrs. Z. wanted to know
what to do. The counselor told
Mrs. Z. that from what she was
saying about Becky's drug his-
tory and behavior, Becky needed
to be in a residential drug pro-
gram.
As talk continued, it became
apparent that Mrs. Z. felt
Becky's drug use was because
Mrs. Z. must have been a "bad
mother." The counselor told her
that this issue could be worked
on. but first Becky must enter a
drug program.
Mrs. Z. believed Becky would
not go into a program, arid "How
can 1 kick my daughter out of the
house?" What if something bad
was to happen to Becky?
The counselor explained that
Becky is of age and only Becky
can be responsible for what hap-
pens to her. If she chooses to use
drugs and not go into a program,
she should not be permitted to
use drugs in Mrs. Z's house.
After talking at length, Mrs. Z.
was able to see she was doing her
daughter a disservice by condon-
ing her drug life.
What she thought was helping
her daughter was only perpetuat-
ing (his behavior Mrs. Z. felt she
now had t he strength to go home
and tell Becky. 'It's your life and
if >ou want to to use drugs you
must leave my house. If you want
my support and help you have no
alternative but to enter a drug
program."
With much anger and resis-
tance. Becky went into the drug
program.
STUDI0
-gcitiw
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FRIDJOSSI
wcicomw
vooMcktc
M IH
STUOK)
WSTAIMUNT
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Win* c*iin. siuoto Plae*
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Also vioMn playing
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OPENS AT 5 P.M.
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ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
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MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 AVE.
445-5371
cioitd Monaeyt
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OP BROW ARD COUNTY
4617 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla. 33021 (305) 966-0966
As therapy progressed Mrs. Z.
was able to come to terms with
herself as an "OK" mother and
not feel guilty over the fact that
Becky used drugs. Mrs. Z. also
learned how to say no without
feeling guilty.
It's two years later now and
Becky is working in Oade County
as a secretary. She is leading a
clean, healthy and productive
life. Mrs. Z. and Becky now have
a relationship based on honesty
as two adults rather than one
based on manipulation and test-
ing.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please
contact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4617 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-9066. Hours -
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone:
736-3394. Hours Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday
9 am. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 1800 W. Hills-
bo ro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfiald
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8608. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to90.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and the
United Way of Broward County.
% %u/ts4
3k <3k cPictufte
Be a part of the next
Jewish Federation of South Broward Mission
PARIS/ISRAEL LEADERSHIP MISSION
October 11-24,1983
COMMUNITY MISSION
' October 24-November 3,1983
For additional information, contact Rae Bcin or Beverly Bachrach at the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, 921-8810
2719 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Fla. 33020
I
l
I am interested in:
I Paris/Israel Mission
{ G Community Mission
X
Name.
Addresa.
Phon_
..____...-_ __..____ __.._._.-_..__.-._.._..-.u


'
Pge8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. June 24.19Q3
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Jcc
JEWISH COMMLWITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
28 J8 HOLLYWOCO BLVO MOlXrwOOD. nOSlOA J J020
921-6511
JCC seats Dr. Meline
as 1983-84 president
Dr. Samuel M. Meline has
taken the reins as president of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward for 1983-84.
His election took place at the
3rd Annual Meeting of the JCC
at a dinner-dance at the Orange
Brook Country Club Handing
over the gavel was Ronald J.
Rothschild, past president
Other officers elected at that
meeting are:
Brenda Greenman. first vice
president: Dr. Alvin Shapiro,
second vice president: Joan
Youdelman. third vice president:
Michael Orlove. secretary: and
Edward Hoffman, treasurer.
JCC "President's
was given to Mrs.
The first
Award"
Youdelman '"for her outstanding
service as a member of the JCC
board of directors.
Also receiving an award were
George and Ann Richardson on
behalf of the JCC Meals on
Wheels program which serves
thousands of regular and holiday
meals to South Broward s needy
elderly
Rothschild dedicated a
Friends of the Center" plaque
which will be a perpetual award
in honor of each year's "Friends"
who donate a minimum of $250
President Meline said his goals
Member dues to rise
The JCC of South Broward has changed rU membership due.
structure effective July 1. PaadHna joining before that date will
till be eligfole for the $75 family foe. which wfll raw to $100
The following are the new categoric* and rates far JCC mem
berahip: Friend, of the Center $250 (min.l. Family f 100, SineU
Parent Family S75. Senior Citiien Family $60. Individu.
Single Parent $50. University Student (Single) $25, Senior
Ckiten lover 60) $25 ^*
Health
Dr. Samuel Meline
for the new year include the JCC
buying land for a full JCC
facility, beginning construction
of that building, the continued
growth program of the center and
expanding membership
JCC hires Brandeis grad
reach Program. Professionals will
lecture at various condominiums,
in addition to setting up classes
on a myriad of subjects.
Two such classes are in session
at Hillcrest. Brotman says. One
is a discussion group and the
other teaches Jewish history.
"If anyone reading this article
is interested in the JCC estab-
lishing classes at their condo." he
says, "all they need do is contact
me "
The JCC is a recipient agency
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
The JCC of South Broward an-
nounces a Super SummerShape-
up Special at the Hollywood Spa
& Health Club. 6712 Stirling
Road |M mile west of 441), for
July and August.
Cost is $25 per month, which
includes full use of the facility on
Monday. Wednesday and Friday.
9 a.m.-9 p.m.
Visits feature aerobic classes
three times daily, special yoga
class at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
sauna, steam room, whirlpool and
full exercise program with Uni-
versal equipment. Join for one or
two months. Registration is re-
quired.
Picnic
The JCC Singles 20-40 is spon-
soring a picnic and co-ed softball
game Monday. July 4lh. at 10
a.m at TY Park, Pavillion No.
Ifi
The park is at Sheridan Street
and N Park Road. Hollywood
Admission of $4 include* bear,
soda and hoi coals. Hnng your
own food to barhcque Softball
glovee art- m-ided for the game.
Single*
Saturday. June 25: Dance at
Miramar Golf and Country Club
3700 Douglas Road 9 p.m.: D.J.'
Weekend
The JCC and the Business and
Professional Singles of Florida
invites all singles 30+ to spend
the Fourth of July at the Kon-
over Hotel.
The four-day. three-night
weekend package runs from
Friday. July 1. through Monday,
July 4. and costs $179 per person
for double occupancy. $235 for a
single room.
Bowlers
The JCC is forming a mixed
bowling league at Miramar
Lanes. 890 Miramar Parkway,
starting Oct. 5.
The league will meet even
Wednesday night at y. excluding
holidays. Four people are needed
for each team. People are needed
to work on a committee u> help
form this league
Mark Brotman
A hometown boy has come
home a man. toting a master's
degree in Jewish communal serv-
ice and ready to put that degree
to work at the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Brow-
ard
Mark Brotman, 25, is new sin-
gles and senior adult coordinator
at the JCC. 2838 Hollywood
Blvd. He has his master's from
the Hornstein program at Bran
deis University, after graduating
with a BS in religion from Florida
State University.
The newest JCC employee also
will marry Janet Babchick in a
week. The couple will live in
Pembroke Pines
Brotman brings to his new
position years of counseloring at
various summer camps, in addi-
tion to the experience of studying
at Haifa University during his
junior year.
His primary focus is twofold,
he says, running the JCC's rela-
tively new singles programs and
the JCC's well-established
senior's program.
Concerning the former, Brot-
man says the group he wants to
motivate most is the 35-55
singles who for some reason don't
turn out for the wine and cheese
and dance parties.
There are two other singles
groups. 20-35 and 55 and older,
which are growing by leaps and
bounds. For the last young
singles dance at Hollywood
Beach. 160 singles showed up.
Brotman says.
A native Hollywoodian. Brot-
man was very active at Temple
Sinai while growing up. He was
particularly interested in the
United Synagogue Youth
As senior adult coordinator, he
is planning to reach more senior
cnVitaaa through the JCC's Out
pour on 1r Sorap* Brand
DiKoRairwfodCorW
Jov~~, ^ WW teaspoon State* (natont or
r^za-DrtedDecoffeaiotedCoffaakialo*1
Ok**- S*r in 1 cup cold water. Acidic* and term
wi* awn and moor, if you want.
*/! how a dafaahrfj summer cooler. Rich,
raol coffee haf 97%cciffain free. And Kosher,
too. Sc>feforuinnwbsudiarnechaiah-
** rest of your jummer thoold only be jo
K Cortrfiod Kosher


Friday. June 24. 1963
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Distaff
A Women'* Enrichment
I,ecture is set for June 29 at 7:30
p.m. at the center.
Terri Goldberg. MSW, will be
facilitating a discussion on "The
Modem Wosaas* P*Jmg Jewish
Value.Into Your F-ajryL*."
Ma. Goldberg received bat
raaa*ass in social week farm
Yesbiwa Usrf.iswiij awa>haa ja.1 -
jefysara invmimM m-Jonah
eommunai work, rkwervamons
are a must. &**
Donation- is S2.5T for actv
members; SBfor numbers. Gsttse
will be- served.
3X2=
Page9
The JCC of South Broward s
Camp Kadima. for grades l-G is
registering campers for a summer
of fun at CB. Snath Park.
Teen travel eaaap is avaikthJe
for 7-9th grades*. ApaCaaiions
am now being taken for jtinior
and senior cooneafats.
Call Mark or Swan at 921-6611
for further informatmn.
Moms
The JCC again is offering an
eight-week summer Moms and
Tots Program for toddlers aged
18-30 months-.
The oroirran will be held Fri-
day mornings-, starting June 24,
at 9 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. at Pines
Middle School.
Pre-registration is required.
Call Susan at 921-6611 for further
information.
Playgroup
The JCC is registering for a fall
Playgroup. Classes are grouped
by age: -' years meet Monday.
Wednesday and Friday: 9 to
noon: age 3 years meet Monday,
Wednesday and Friday: 9 to
noon. Children 4 years meet
Monday through Friday 9 to
noon.
Pre-registration required. Call
Susan at 921-6511 for further in-
formation.
Letters
of note
Ont/ie/CC
The following are txcewpta
/to/ft. the State of thi Center
address given by Ronald' J.
Rothschild. immediate peat
president of the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Brow-
ard. at the organisation's instal-
lation June-5:
The state of our center We
are in the liftoff phase of our mis-
sion. The rapid growth and
accomplishments made thia past
year illustrate the center's accep-
tance by the Jewish community
of South Broward.
Highlights of our past year in-
clude: Employment of Edward R.
Finkelstein, our executive direc-
tor .. serving over 250 senior
citizens on a daily basis through
Southeast Focal Senior Center
the JCC Art Show at the
Hollywood Art and Cultural
Center but October ... a 100
percent increase in family mem-
bership! ... a monthly news-
tetter, Chai-Lights stream-
lining internal administrative
procedures special events
family picnic, Beth Shalom
Player's Benefit and Yom Haatz
maut the ongoing process of
selecting the site for a new build-
ing .. and, the icing to our pro-
gram year the blossoming of
Camp Kadima.
WHAT A YEAR!
Best of luck to the incoming
board and officers for their new
term
Shalom.
RONALD J ROTHSCHILD
JCC. Paat President
Jews not exiled?
f rSEV^i2^L" Enmto C***"*. Nicaragua* minister
n fa& d"lTth*} Wicarajrua'aantita Jewk* community of
2. wSi.*" fcrc*d "* y ti*a***to govwtninsBt;
^"^"^Pimmntryxnilsdto
JS-ST?g fcMfctsd that the regjraerrefiscated Jewish
SgJ2jJ^ *j^"* eosasounery, hadbeavjailad after
' The Managua daily. Nuevo Diario. in July 1962 published a
series of anti-Semitic articles which included a reference to the
" synagogue of Satan."
The minister, who was a priest before the revolution, denied
the reports, claiming there were few Jews- in Nicaragua, that
they bad intermarried and did net keep Jewish langJona
customs. He remarked. "I. myself. ea*of Jewish oricin He also
asserted there ware no Jewish mstHutJoas in Nicaragua,
rehmoua or eivihan. and^that there were no anti-Jewiah feelings
.*.*.:
'
If Sam Breakstone hadn't been so
meshuggah about his sour cream
and cottage cheese in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today.
KX) years ago* Sam Breakstone had a reputation Ux beast demanding man.
A very demanding man.
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His tour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natfural, and as deooous as they casid possibly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, mt sour cream and catta#f cheese
. taste* dekious now. : ^
Right now, yov can demand 10* off both Bwsdutooe's sour cream
Th0122 DOEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
burse you for the lace value of this
coupon plus It handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you seme to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10s ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONES COTTAGE CHEESE.
KK
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20*. Customer must
pay applicable sates tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton, Iowa 52734.
143D0 22b041
S21922 OOEhl
Mr Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus li handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retan sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof ot purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover al redemp
(ions Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S SOUR CREAM
C KrTh, m7"lv*7
KK
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law. and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value l/20e Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption mai' to Kraft. Inc.
Dairy Group. PC Box 1799, Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734
143QC cfSekc*!


Page 10
T^JemtkPhridianaAdShofarofOr^aUrHMywood
****.****
.19
AH you have to do to
get your FREE watch i
to save $250 in
green register tapes!
Then come in to your Rartry Pride store and
select the watch of your choice.
What ccxid be easier?
(SUBJECT TO SALES TAX ON RETAIL VALUE)
FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
SELECT YOUR OWN QUARTZ DKjTTAJL WATCHES BY SHARP
Dependable-Accurate to 2 minutes
year
Easy to read-high contrast numbers
Five functions-Hour, minutes,
seconds, month, date, lamp
OneYei
Long Life Battery
Adjustable Link I
Fashion Models, coior matched dhh
PRODUCE
RRST OF THE SEASON
EXTRA LARGE 15 COUNT CAUFORMA
Cantaloupes
GARDEN FRESM CRBP U PICK
Cucumbers.....
* mucous tropical fruit u pick
._ TOP QUALITY SWEET
.3 fc* .49 CALIFORNIA
EACH
US NO 1 ALL PURPOSE
Red Bliss Po
top Ouauty flOROa uCk
ft*m heads
Ore en
U S NO 1 ALL PURPOSE U PCX
Yellow Onions ....
GARDEN FRESH GREEN U PCK
Zucchini Squash
CRISP WO CRUNCH- 6 Qf CE.iO BAG
RedR
SUNSWEET
Pitted Prui
PANTRY PROE '*. -\#RE < GLASS JAR
.2 FOR .89
. 51< .99
10 1.00
,... ui .23
.... lb .23
, lb .33
. Z'or .39
N
~*r;
. ".8.1.29
Orange Juice.

DAIRY-DELI
BAKERY
0> SUNNY DELXiHT FLORID-
P.atnis
Punch
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Light N Lively Oscar Mayer
Yogurt
HALF
GAL
99C 6$J49 $J49
FLEOCHMAN S REO OR UNSALTEO CORN OK.
Margarine Be. .. .89
PANTRY PROE REG OR LOW FAT
Cottage Cheeee cc
PANTRY PROE
PTS
'4<*1.39
..2 foS 1.19
PANTRY PROE NATURAL SLICED S*R OR
3.1.09
REOOl WMP AEROSOL
Cream Topping .. can 1.19
LANO 0 LAKES REG OR UNSALTEO
Whipped Butler.. pg 1.09
PANTRY PROE MONTEREY JACK OR MKO
Cheddar Cheese 2.59
VULSC DEU
Mi,
PANTRY PROE ASSORTEOSUCtO
Lunchs
PANTRY PROE
Hard S
LAND 0 FROST THMSUCEO
pkg LOW
pktH.19
11.39
SARGENTO ITALIAN
. PRO J
OSCAR MAYER
. PKO
OWALTNEY GREAT 00G
Chicken
Franks
BONUS PAK
Meyers
Muffins
2 $
PKGS
OF8
1
. ... LOAF
GRIFF* LEMON PMEAPPLE OR
!201 4
, PC !
MEYERS MM LOAF OR WHEAT AND
16-01
.... PW
.-MAP OVEN BROWNED
Turkey
Breast
$|89
IN-STORE BAKERY
BNOT AVAILABLE AT ALL IIUISIsSl
tTAUAN
WINES
."Visit
KITCHEN FRESH
.79
IN-STORE
BAKERY
NOT AVAILABLE W AU STOMfS
JEWISH STYLE WITH OR WITHOUT I
MAl/LB
JACK 1 MX FRCST QUALITY
LEAN RRST OUT CORNED
MOTHER OOOSE OLD FASMONEO
LOAF .OV
CORN SRANOR
Blueberry Muffins 611.19
GREAT with PANTRY PROE COFPEI
k^ .A Cliaiejiioii Roes .. 47.99
. LSl.lV OVENFRSSH
OT-1Mfc AppMPIe.......-Si.**
.51.39 wwpy
?%*%*.
WHTTI OR YELLOW
rsi
CRBPVLARQ6
KalEiar
Alamaden
Wines
fl"PV 1110 OR CAWTRNTt
Rossi Wines ^S
HEALTH G BEAUTY
OHNkS RNK
0 OFF LABEL USTERME
Mouthweah .
1M0PFLASCL4SOZ TUH
"S2A9
3&'JSSSmKm*ma"*<
1.07
'TtSttAf
MSS SREAK SUPER UNSCENTIO OR SUPER
Lb
1.1?
24-OZ BAG PANTRY I ...
Dinner Fries
14-OZ BOX PET RfTZ ASSTTD
110Z BOX
Eggo Waffles
TOJJMQ-a 10-02 BOX
Party
f r. k*
*
*


r.JM~U,MM j Th*Jewish FloridianandShoforof OnoUr Hollywood____________ __________
! A sharp way to buy meats! 555555E35
FLA. OR SHIPPED Jk \A ^..wV
PREMIUM FRESH Ml 11 Im,
Steak ^,A Lots offlrJL
^BachoTce S*^3*# r>i^ i __* 0J9^B.
BEEF CHUCK ^^ ^T I lIl^M #3kYl 3 BREASTS, 3 LEG QTRS.
BONELESS f lb V*lll\-\dllw/BACKS,3GIBLETPKS.
TaII^IaiImSm P___at FAMILY PACK
I ff. Bfr*M tSOAl f l> SHIPPED PREMIUM FPESH. 3 LBS t OVER
IWIIUaiUlll LJOC1 FrytrBmst.............l.1.20
^ ^ ^PB^fe. m\ V FLA OR SMPPEO PKMUH FRESH. KB t OVER
iw( m45^ M^C If^3h 3^^oNfEFsHuuic"aoNEise^
* ^K^^^^BAb^^J JbBBVWi |4j HjBw^af^l COITAMS BEEF ROAST STEW BEEF AND GROUND BEEF
4a^RaW s^ l*-^ BbW WHOLE IN ^P HImbV BMbF contains beef roast, stew beef and ground beef
Yl# CRYOVAC Chuck
dH LB. JfL LB. Combo LB 1.09
FROZEN ORAOE A" SMOKED SEAFOOD
lUrtlOy ^%- _- J SKINLESS AND BONELESS FROZEN
Drum.**. u ^0 OUIlIiyiailCl WhWng ROM. B1.09
^^_ ^ SKINLESS AND BONELESS FROZEN
FROZEN^ .A 661^ ClflQ CodROM .00
w,n9 -49 oausaoe JL R noundorno*1.3
ySDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK SHOULDER USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN
J89 SHoin $999
Roast M. Steak
11

>*^
p
A MORNING HALF GAL
^
L*"
8PK/18-OZ RETURNABLE BTLS OR PEPPER.HRES ROOT BEER
Spring Water .......59
spa hmav
Foam Plates......1.79
a-w cm Cjr9
Tomato Sauce 5/1.00
IS-OJ M WoMnn* Man
French Dressing .1.29
30O<* PtMryPlM*
Napkins..........1.29
OpnRlKg arackory IS-w M
BBQ Sauce.......79
Juice*l19
_.JT PEPSI. PEPSI UQHT. MOUNTA*
PEPSI FREE OR r Bft
epsiCola*!99
I0T AVAILABLE IN MARATHON OR KEY WEST
w*m38aMt&8:mX
THUS.
46 OZ BTL ORANGE OR LEMON-UMF mf%^^+
Gatorade 99
25 0Z JAR MOTT'S T%Br*4W^
Applesauce otr
32-OZ BTL HEAVY 0UTY LAUNDRY ,- ajfft
Wisk *
32-OZ. JAR PANTRY PROE mT%4%&
MaycMinaiseifir
#_ REG OR DIET
\1U NOT AVMLABLE KEY WEST OR MARATHON
NABISCO 4-OZ CHIPSTERS. 5-OZ. CORN DIGGERS
6-OZ NACHOS OR 7 OZ CHEESE .CRUNCH^
Chipster Snacks
I-LB. BOX MUELLERS
Elbow Macaroni
6%-OZ CAN PANTRY PROE CHUNK
White Tuna
12-OZ CAN SPAM
2LTR BTL ASSORTED FLAVORS
White Rock Sodas
QIANT ROLL PANTRY PfiBE-1 feY WHTTE OR ASSORTE0
Paper TowelscotORS
5 LB HAG MAHATMA
Long Grain Rke
48-OZ JARVLASJC KOSHER
Dill Pickles
14-oz en
89*
2/*i
Del Monte Catsup
0PK/12-OZ CANS
E* BTL. OCTCOKE. SPRITE. SCHWEPPES
^ERALEOR
j*1" 9119
NOT AVAILABLE M FT HERCC JL
FINAL WEEK!
A* USSY NATURAL.
. PLY WHITE OR ASSORTEC
TTssueG*
PANTRY P*K*-1 H.V WHITf qRASBOmlD
PfUCES
EFFECTIVE
JUNE 23-
JUNE29,
1983
WEREDEEM
FEDERAL
FOOD
STAMPS
COMPLETE SITS VOU.MS
AVAILABLE IN OUR MQRS.0PF1CE
cPTide


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. June 24, 1983
Leo Mindlin writes on Reagalogic thinking
I from Page 4
and since I have promawd to
teach Reagalogic on an introduc-
Iieshman level, 1st me
into plain, pragmntie >
how Pi agatfooa %.!
the case of Fakn Bjaar*
Fan* Ryan,
with inseneitivity a
gap that is aJJegedto
in the Reagan White
e.g., she is aloof iai bar
attitude towards man's rights;"
too concerned with "ttjp
" far right, which is kaptin
male chauvinism SMBse
that, through geaeW
;, it has given, rise to s
generation of w*nsw>
male- chauvinists, Phyttja
ScbJaaVy types, for instance;
2) rue Faith Ryan Whittleaey
f roeaher job for these failings;
9t Women are generally luMpvii
to Bjnve their bad days, which
sotfrjekanes are also known to lent
the whole month through. Tbere-
fbsa, to demonstrate Mr
, Reagan's concern with womb's
issue*, appoint a man as- Whit-
tfeeey-'s successor en the basis
that if you ever want anything
done anyway, a man is your only
Reagalogical choice:
4|- Enter Michael Denver.
Wfte- House deputy ebief of
sfMfcsncawe the gender gap::
5) That'll get the women's vote
tor. the President in 1984. ab
sohitely. Reagalogic guarantees
ft.
RSAGALOGIC is a beautnol
Hystenr capable of being applied
to any problem, and that includes
armaments too. Take, for exam-
ple, the arms talks between the
United States and the Soviet
Union.
The Soviets have threatened
that if we go ahead and deploy
i-ruise missiles in the NATO
countries and also other ugly
weapons capable of killing Soviet
citizens. Moscow will do the
same. Before we know it. there
will be similar death-dealing in-
struments aimed at the NATO
countries from installations
based in the Warsaw Pact na-
tions. We are told there aren't
any now.
For his part. President Reagan
has beer attempting to deal
JagjcaPy. with the highly irra
riqaat Kremlin masters. And he
has just come op with his latest
offer, in the Strategic- Arms
Redncations Talks fSTARTr now
going an in Geneva It is the
finest, example yet of Reagalogic
inaction.
The Presidents proposal is
baaed on Proposition 2 of
Reagalogic in which the percep-
tive student will recognize a close
relationship to Proposition 1 by
the laws of logical proximity (2
following 1): "To achieve a clear
objective (or better yet an unclear
one), reduce numerals to their
statas as abstractions of pure-
quantity unrelated to qualitative
meanings or examples of human
consideration, for instance, death
by nuclear holocaust. Damn the
logical principle at issue, and
charge instead that all logical
systems are the creation of the
Muscovite minions of interna-
tional Communism anyway."
WITH THE perceptive
student's experience with
Proposition 1 already under his
or her belt, translating Proposi-
tion 2 should offer little dif-
ficulty. For the slower student,
the following will clarify:
Since the START talks in
Geneva continue to be at some
sort of impasse, President
Reagan has reexamined the last
offer he made to the Soviets in
the matter of arms reduction. In
that last offer, the President sug
gested reduction to 860 in
strategy nuclear missiles each
side would be allowed to have
Now however, Mr. Reagar. is
proposing a reduction by in
creasing upward the number to:
Mr
1.450, and he is being quoted as
hoping "the Soviet Union will re-
spond with corresponding
flexibility.'' Take it or leave it.
OF COURSE, the
' mean practitioners
themselves, which*
LcnistV Logistical
have responded wMt
13 of that labynnthin
a Californian and
governor of that
Reagan should know this
proposition well sad be abk> to
pssceive the danger of it*peasne-
innjnasu. It rivals in its breath-'
Inking scope the resoks of
Reagalogic. Proposition 2, as ap
pHed to the talks in Gejarva-the
Faith Ryan Whittles*? case
being obscured here by the
subtleties of this far axrresoprus-
ticated problem nv logiskl in-
quiry
The Soviets' fmat offer a far?
A reduction upward ta> 1,800
strategic nuclear weanenn each
side would be permittee*** have.
The trouble is the- Reagan Ad-
ministration finds h unarcepta-
Ma that Lenin's Logostkal
Logarithmit-s yields a higher re-
duction upward than Reagalogic
does, and men like the President
himself, no less than his intimate
advisers, are reported to find this
inimical to the American
way of life as defined by the State
Department.
A SEARS ROEBUCK notke
to customers reads: "Due to the
closing of our Northside Store,
some of the merchandise in our
June newspaper supplements
may not be available in our
Northside Store. We apologize
for any inconvenience to our cus-
tomers."
Now that the Northsiae Store
has closed one can only wonder
just what kina of merchandise
they will be specializing in from
now on anyway. After their clos-
ing, the store should apparently
achieve new heights of creative
merchandising. On the other
hand, you may drive up to the
store only to find the parking lot
vacant, the window shutters
down, and a lonely security guard
sitting desultorily at the locked
front door, reading a comic book
in the noonday heat.
"It's closed," he tells you as
you-move to open the door and*
inside.
"But the notice to customers,"
you reply, "says that only som*
of the merchandize may. not be
available. That means not all of
the merchandise. Maybe there's
sale on for the rest of it."
"It's dosed." he repeats.
THIS SCENAJUO can. of
course, continue, hot I am moved
by even the snippstef it because
it has to do wfthV~Aroericen il-
literacy, tna.fact.lhnt the writer
of the ad- dntn't terra how. to
make word* say wpnt he or she
intended tkem*n*an
m this casey tfta WllwHig
word is "ckxeng," which is a
gerund, a greransstical form so
treacherous- as" Ui have cow*
jumping over the moon, or else
over the quick, bisjfii fen if the
moon ia really haft. I've even
heard President Radjan violating
the gerund.
But what about the comma? In
Tallahassee the other day, a
comma set the State Legislature
on its ear as a consequence of a
tax bill pseeed in the final mo-
ments of an extended legislative
session. The billet (sane declares
tax exemptions may be granted
to groups with- an hrfernal
Revenue Code exemption or
"other non-profit organizations
whose sale anerprenary purpose"
is to provide a variety of eon-
stipula tea* social services
NORTH MIAMI'S Demo-
cratic State Sen. Gwen Margolin.
who squired the bier through the
Senate, is incensed as a conse-
quence of the various interpreta-
tions to which-this stipulation is
now being subjected. Margdis
claims that the Florida House of
Representatives committee that
drafted changes in the bill did.
them sloppily. According to Mar-
golis, the committee added a
comma between "organizations"
and "whose," thus In her view
altering the intent of the legisla-
tion.
Enters the Department of
Revenue into the struggle to de-
clare that the comma means that
all tax-exempt groups must in
effect provide an actual service in
order to qualify for an exemption,
not just those with a sales tax
exemption.
What has the little pesky
comma done? It has allegedly
cast doubt or the sales tax
exemption status of organiza-
tions ranging from, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation to
United Way to tint Boy Scouts of
AnMncs- '-**
BUT BE IT SereMar gob* who
is declaiming about the comma,
or Miami Beach's Rep. Barry
Kutui who defends his commit-
tee's rewrite, or the DOR, the fact
is that nobody involved ap-
parently knows a blessed thing
about the rules governing the use
LbibW. W LaW
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of the __
The fart is that "whose sole
and primary purpose" begins a
subordinate clause, and no
comma han*shOwM.exist be-
tween it and tn* antecedent, or-
. aiisrstirrnrr Sane* it has no pur-
pose, no sjMrfaymtT meaning
can be attxnmtectlewlrat all, not
even for those lihiijanilirstaad-
ing el punewmtion generally is so
weal that they"oWwmmaa to
designate a "natural pause."
My own conclusion about this
Tallahassee struggle ia based on
Reagalogic, Proposition 8.1 shall
not burden readers with the prin-
ciple- itseff, onto with its conchv '
sion. Clearly, tb* bill was written
customers about tn* dosing of
the Nerthaide Store awl' what
insupaiidiwi: may now be pur-'
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June 24. 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
i < Page 13
>
JOING PRESIDENT BEN SALTER [ left] is presented with a
token of esteem by Federation Executive Director Sumner G.
The gift is a hand-blown glass decoration surrounding a scroll of
riptures and mounted in black velvet and framed.
PRESENTING THE PRESTIGIOUS Herb and Ellie
Katz award to Ronald J. Rothschild are the couple whose
name the prize bears. The Katzes, long active in Jewish
affairs both on the national and local levels, cited
Rothschild for his dedication as president of the JCC, a
JFSB board member and Super Sunday co-chairman.
isl) Federation
jSoufel) Broward
conducts its
annual rneefeiijg
I
SINGLING OUT MICHAEL ORLOVE as winner of the Hy
and Belle Schlafer Award for 1983 is presenter Dr. Norman
At kin, first recipient of the prize. A relative newcomer to the
Federation, Orlove distinguished himself in leadership
expansion, the steering committee of the Business
Executive Forum and as a member of the Planning and
Allocations Committee.

1
IT OF THE June M. Gordon Award for 1983 is
Bnberg, a leader of the Federation for many years. In
the honor. President Ben Salter noted Mrs.
I 'truly served in the great tradition of June Gordon.' 'LIFE BEHIND THE LIFELINE' creators Beverly Shapiro. Janie Bernian and
Joyce Newman [from left] were honored for their toil and genius in making the film
depicting the story of the Jewish Federation of South Broward.


"-
Page 14
The Jewish Fbridianond Shofar of Greater Hollywood
^r*dyJune24.
'j-
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update!
The current anti-Jewish cam
paign worries the Jews in the So-
viet Union. They see the anti-
Zionist campaign as being anti-
Semitic, and as a campaign
against Jewish culture and the
Jewish emigration movement.
In Kiev recently the few Jews
who visited the OVIR offices to
collect their exit visas were asked
whether they would not reconsid-
er their decision to leave after
watching General Dragunsky on
television.
Six Jewish activists wrote an
open letter to the general, reply-
ing to the establishment of the
Anti-Zionist Committee, as fol-
lows:
You have turned to Soviet
citizens with a call to protect
Soviet Jews from Zionism,
and you have done this at the
command of your reason and
conscience. Our reason and
conscience do not allow us to
remain silent, we Jews whom
you consider to be an insep-
arable part of the Soviet peo-
ple.
Yes, we Jews are an insep-
arable part an inseparable
part of the Jewish people.
Like every people, the Jew-
ish people has its own Home-
land Israel.
This banal truth consti-
tutes the basis of Zionism,
which to you, for some
reason, seems to be the
storm troops for attacks on
socialism and on the forces of
peace and social progress.
What right do you have to
declare in the name of all the
Jews who are Soviet citizens
that thev do not want to
leave the USSR?
How is it that you have
not noticed the 300.000 Jews
who in spite of enormous
difficulties, managed to leave
the USSR during the last 12
years? Among them was. by
the wav. your nephew. Boris
Dragunsky.
How is it you do not see
the tens of thousands of
Jews who in v in are trying
to get permission to emigrate
to Israel.?
Yes. we need to be de-
fended. We have no other de-
fenders besides our brothers
who call themselves Zionists,
brothers from whom you
want so much to isolate So-
viet Jews. How was the Jew-
ish people able to survive
2.000 years of exile and diffi-
cult wandering?
Only thanks to the fact
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that Jews, scattered in dif-
ferent countries, extended a
helping hand to each other
and did not forget about
their brothers.
More than once, by the
will of fate, Jews were a
small part of one multi-na-
tional country or another.
But happiness in these multi-
national settings always
turned out to be temporary.
We will struggle for our
return to Israel. We will be
reunited with our own peo-
ple.
Boris and Elena
ChernobOaky
Victor Elistratov
Natalia and Gennady
Khasin
Evgeny Grechanovsky
Yosif Begun s lawyer Leonid
M. Popov, told Begun s family
that a trial for Begun would ap-
parently take place in Vladimir at
the beginning of July.
The procurator's office an-
nounced it would be an open trial.
Begun and his lawyer are going
through the huge file, which con-
tains about 2.000 pages. Popov
has already seen Begun twice,
and was due to meet him for the
third time.
Popov said also that he does
not see in the material which he
has read so far any reason for
charging Begun under Article 70,
which deals with anti-Soviet
agitation.
Begun s friends in the Soviet
Union still assert that UTput Be-
gun on trial will be to put Jewish
culture on trial.
Yuri Tarnopolsky, the 47-year-
old chemist from Kharkov, is still
awaiting trial. Since his arrest on
March 15. he has been held in-
communicado and his family was
unable to find a lawyer lor him.
His wife Olga. who was in
Moscow last week, told friends
that she was verv worried about
Yuri's health. She fears that his
hunger strike might seriously
damage his eyesight.
A parcel which was brought for
him to the prison authorities in
Kharkov by Olga's mother was
accepted, indicating that he has
stopped his hunger strike; a pre-
vious parcel taken to the prison a
month earlier was refused.
When Yuri undertook his vol-
untary fast of protest against his
refusal, from Oct. 1, 1982, until
the Madrid Conference resumed
on Nov. 9, 1982, he suffered from
serious damage to the sight of
one eye. and a doctor friend told
him then that he should not
repeat such action again.
PoUna Pariuky of Kharkov
has been refused permission to
visit her husband in June. Parit-
sky is serving a three-year sen-
tence in labor camp in Stantsi
Vydrino, Kabansky Rayon, Bur-
iatskaya Assr.
Mikhail Khobniansky, who
was detained for 15 days in
Odessa, has been released, and
has returned home to Moscow
with his wife and son.
Samnil Rombeof Moscow, can-
didate of biological science, was
arresed in Gorky in August 1981.
charged under Articles 88 and
154 of the RSFSR Criminal Code
and sentenced in December 1981
to three years "suspended sen-
tence." which was interpreted by
the court as "working for the na-
tional economy."
He was released at the begin-
ning of this month and has re-
turned to Moscow, it is believed
that he benefited from the latest
amnesty, which was declared on
the occasion of the 60th anniver-
sary of the establishment of the
Soviet Union, and also for his
good work and behavior.
Immediately after his release,
he told his friends that he in-
tended to apply again for permis-
sion to leave.
Natalia Khasina and Liudmilla
Nashpitz recently visited Ida
Nudel in Bendery. They said that
she has lost weight and is com
plaining of heart pains. She is
working in a local park as a lence-
painter
Permission:
Yakov Eingorn: Donetskk
Alexander Gisser: Odessa
Falashas getting
care, press finds
By CINDY KAYE
JTA Report*
JERUSALEM Ethi-
opian Jews, who have men-
aged to immigrate to Israel,
are receiving special treatment to
help overcome the wide cultural
gap and other difficulties in the
way of their integration into
I sraeli society, a recent press tour
of the Jewish Agency's absorp-
tion center for Falashas in Ash-
kelon revealed.
Relatively little is known about
how the Falashas reach Israel.
For practical and political
reasons it is not a widely
publicized subject. But the chief
rabbinate has recognized the Fal-
ashas as Jews despite their long
separation from the mainstream
of Jewish life.
The Falashas face problems
unknown to other immigrants
because of their cultural dissi-
milarities, their color and the
hardships they endured getting
out of Ethiopia and traveling to
Israel.
For these reasons, special
counselors are assigned to them
at the absorption center. They
are permitted to remain at the
center for 10-12 months. Other
immigrants rarely spend more
than five months at absorption
centers.
The Falashas receive free
board and lodging and a stipend
equivalent to S115-S170. depend-
ing on their marital status. They
are given intensive courses in
Hebrew during their stay at the
absorption center.
Leon Dulzin. *"Tnan of tla
Jewish Agency, and World
Zionist Organization executive
told the visiting journalists that
rumors that Falashas auffend
discrimination in Israel wert
unfounded. "You can see for
yourselves that the Falashas who
arrive in Israel receive the same/
treatment as every other olth"
(new immigrant), he said.
Yehuda Dominitz. direao,
general of the Jewish Agency's
immigration and absorption
department, added:
"Any journalist can visit any
absorption center in the country
and meet with any immigrant he
chooses to verify this fact"
Matiyahu Drobless, head of
the WZO settlement department,'
said his department is planning i
communal settlement for about
100 Falasha families near Kirytt
Gat which can provide them with
jobs.
He said it would be modeled on
the settlements which succee-
sfuDy absorbed Jews from Yemen
and from Cochin, India, who
immigrated to Israel years ago.
Although the number of
Falashas reaching Israel is said
to be increasing, about 20,000
still remain in Ethiopia.
Relations between Israel and the
Ethiopian government seem to be
improving. Evidence of that is
seen in the recent visits by,
groups of Knesset members and
Israeli tourists to Jewish com-
munities in Ethiopia.
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Friday
.jmtf2t"t*a
T/ie^fetflT&r*^^
Page 15
III
lOWly
By CINDY KAYE
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ By the end of this week,
L"total of 1,000 volunteers
from the United States will
have come here since last
summer to offer their serv-
ices to the State of Israel.
The volunteers, who pro-
vide one month of service,
part of a project called
"Volunteers for Israel,"
which was born out of the
need for manpower during
the war in Lebanon.
The "Citizen Volunteers," as
they are called, to differentiate
Americans came to help Israel
them from their Israeli co-
workers who are fulfilling reserve
duty, work on army bases, at
agricultural settlements and in
factories. A national council, con-
sisting of Knesset members of all
parties and political views,
which is responsible for the
project, decides where the great-
est need for workers exists and
makes arrangements for the
groups.
THE COUNCIL, headed by
Gen. (Res.) Ahron Davidey, also
finds families for the volunteers
to visit on the Sabbath and or-
ganizes tours during their month-
long service.
Although there have been in-
stances where volunteers were
needed to fill in at private food
companies and at agricultural
settlements, most are sent to
army bases because the army re-
quires the largest numbers of
civilian volunteers.
During their month of service,
which is comparable to the term
normally served by Israeli re-
servists, the Americans are in
uniform, while on the bases and
live on the bases. While they are
not considered to be "in the
army," and are insured as volun-
teers, according to U.S. law, they
work alongside Israelis doing the
same jobs.
'They are not pushed as hard
as the soldiers are," said one re-
serve soldier. "However they are
really productive and serious
about the work."
COL. HEIL SBLAH, an of-
ficer at one of the volunteer posts
commented, "They work as
seriously as those in reserve.
Often one volunteer matches the
output of three soldiers."
The volunteers expressed
satisfaction with the opportunity
to serve Israel. One couple in
their fifties, from New York,
Edith and Sy Gross said, "It's a
privilige to be here. Israel is
doing us a favor by letting us
help out and we are really accom-
plishing something."
Micki Keno of Brookline,
Mass., said that this has been the
best experience in Israel. It is her
third trip and she says, "I've
come to know something genuine
about Israel since the army has
such a major role in Israel."
Volunteer chores range from
assembling and sorting parts of
tanks to cleaning weapons, fold-
ing blankets and rolling sleeping
bags. Rickey Cherner. a mother
and grandmother from Washing-
ton, D.C. said she was happy to
be working. "I wanted to do more
than send money," she said.
THOUGH THE project was
born out of the war effort in
Lebanon, it is being continued
this year. According to Meir
Indor, a reserve major and liaison
to the volunteers, "there are only
three million Jews in Israel.
There is no reason why we can-
not count on the Jews in the
diaspora to widen our pool of
manpower. During emergency
situations as well as during
Continued on Page 17
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Page-16
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 24 19^3
'The Jewish mother': What's in her
By MERRIE EISEN8TADT
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Time
Reprint by Special Arrangement
How many Jewish
mothers does it take to
change a light bulb? None
"Don't bother, I'll sit in
the dark."
Would today's young
Jewish mother prefer to sit
in the dark and practice
martyrdom, or is the
popular light bulb barb ir-
relevant for this generation
of mothers? In other words,
are there any classic "Jew-
ish mothers" left? And is
that stereotype, of a woman
doling out huge portions of
chicken soup, guilt and
love, all bad?
"To me. a Jewish mother' is
the one who cooks all the tradi-
tional foods which I don't know
how to do," comments Abby
Levy, mother of a ten-year-old
step-son, who thinks Jewish
mother-traits run scarce in this
generation. "I see the Jewish
mother as the one who is always
cooking and cleaning and baby-
sitting for the grandchildren. A
Jewish mother is always there
when you need her. The apron
strings are never cut. No matter
what happens, we're always the
children."
LEVY DOES not consider her-
self a stereotypical Jewish
mother: "I'm a working mother,
she explains. "You have less time
to do things. You don't have time
10 cook all the fancy dinners and
everything."
The American Jewish mother
stereotype is a relatively new
creation, dating from the early
1960s when male Jewish writers
and comedians saw their
mothers' excesses as good
material." Such books as Bruce
Jay Friedman's A Mother's
Kisses (1964), Dan Greenburg's
How to Be a Jewish Mother
(1964) and especially, Philip
Roth's Portnoy's Complaint
(1969) branded the Jewish
mother as over-protective,
ubiquitous, interfering, cajoling,
smothering, food pushing, and of
course, a master manipulator
through guilt.
Many of these traits had been
shared by mothers from other
ethnic groups, City College of
New York Prof. William Helm
reich suggested recently during a
lecture, but the Jewish mother
got the label "because so many of
our people have gone into comedy
and writing."
TRADITIONAL Jewish
humor left the Jewish mother
alone. "The vital economic role
played by Jewish mothers in
Eastern Europe is one explana-
tion for the absence of jokes at
their expense," according to the
editors of the Big Book of Jewish
Humor. "One didn't joke about
where one's next meal came from.
Mother earned the bread, in
many cases, while Father was oc-
cupied with prayer and study."
As American Jewish immi-
grant families prospered, the
Jewish mother was freed from the
labor force and devoted her time
almost exclusively to her home
and family.
Perhaps the Jewish mother
had too much time on her hands,
one mother in her thirties
thinks. "Maybe the Jewish
mother Portnoy was talking
about didn't have a lot of outlets
for her talents and so she became
neurotic." she commented. Her
own image of a typical Jewish
mother is a positive .one. "I like
to see the Jewish energy, lots of
ideas and lots of intelligence .
The Jewish mother shouldn't be
maligned." she said.
TODAY'S JEWISH mother is
far more ambivalent about her
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troubled future?
role, this mother of two daugh-
ters added. "Even though many
of our mothers worked, say, in
the family business, our roles
whether to work or not are a
lot less clear. I think a lot of us
are confused having to trv and
balance a tot of things. We have
a strong sense that we must
achieve something outside the
family not to be just a mother. I
think the conflict has been a
strong one. Among my friends,
there are many who have decided
not to have children."
A grandmother in her fifties
also sees this struggle in the
younger generation. "When we
married. I didn't go on and finish
with my degree. And I was very
comfortable being married and
having a family. I loved it. I
really enjoyed homemaking.
Today, the role of the homemaker
is really devalued. I think even
more so among Jews than other
people.''
Beth Davis sees the role
of homemaker and Jewish
mother in a positive light and
says her parenting style partially
resembles her mother's. In the
same way she was. I try to be
very loving and affectionate and
I try to do what I think is best for
my child "'
One difference in mothering
today. Davis notes, is an em-
phasis on self-fulfillment and a
de-emphasis on sacrifice. "I think
more people my age are in-
terested in things that will make
them happy They're not a slave
to anything.''
HER FRIEND. Mandi Siegel.
agrees. "When I think of a "Jew-
ish mother.' I immediately think
of an overly-possessive mother.
Also, a woman who is busy
around her house a slave to her
home. I can't identify with that
image at all," the 24-year-old
mother of two daughters con-
tinued. "I don't spend a lot of
tune devoted to my household I
feel that I am busy in other ways.
For some people the stereotype is
accurate. After all, it had to come
from somewhere."
"I feel this generation of Jew-
Continued on Page 19-
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with
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Discussing Themes in his books that bear upon contemporary issues,
respond to questions and autograph his books.
22,1984 INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL -Cantor David Levine,
Yaakov Motzen, and Opera Tenor J. Alexander Perez
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Telephone 920-1577 or Send Your Check* 10 the Tcmpk Office For Beat Scat Selection
*


I Friday, June 24. 1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
)RT speaker
[ells of search
*for nobility'
"Each ORT delegate is writing
Icontemporary Jewish History,"
stated Dawn Schuman, at the
opening banquet of the 5th Bien-
nial District VI Convention,
| Women's American ORT.
"This is what we are searching
for." she continued, "a nobility in
lour lives. ORT is celebrating the
[women of the 80's. ORT is cele
11 a ting us."
Marcia Light of Hollywood,
I District VI president, charged
delegates to escalate their out-
reach efforts into the community
I in order to strengthen the educa-
tional base of this generation so
that our democratic society can
I function effectively with an intel-
ent citizenry.
Women's American ORT has a
1103-year history of supporting
land creating effective educational
Iinstallations around the world.
loRT has 107,000 students in 800
Installations in 24 countries.
At the installation banquet in
liami. National President
everly Minkoff, describing Dis-
trict VI as the pacesetter in the
ountry, installed Mrs. Light as
president for a second term,
ther officers installed include:
Pepi Dunay, executive committee
chairman, Jacksonville; and vice
presidents Bev Aaron, Atlanta;
iloria Chekanow, Miami; Sonia
aschultz. Largo; Carol Sue
Tress, Hollywood: Barbara
Shapiro, Lauderhill; Ann
Speroni, Miami; Shirley Sutter.
ft, Lauderdale; and Bunnu-
| aratoot, Atlanta
Kighteen panelists discussed
|he various concerns of the ORT
I omen of the 80 s in six panels
anting in subjects from U.S.-ls-
adi Relations to Women in a
Technocratic Society Other
npics were Morality and Ethics:
(ocial Justice- Challenging our
Democratic Society: Affecting
[nange Through Social Action:
niality Education: Private or
fmhIic: and.Preserving Pluralism
nd Human Rights
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ORT OFFICERS Mard. light, president; (from left) Jean Zogmun. treasurer; Jesnne
Wormser, finanasl secretary; Joan Youdelman, president, South Broward Region; end Sue
Press, convention chairman, pose during the District VI convention in Miami.
Volunteers for Israel
peacetime, we have to maintain
our connection with Jews all over
the world."
Indor explained the Israeli
philosophy that if everyone in Is-
rael has to fulfill one month of re-
serve duty each year there is no
Continued from Page 15
reason why this obligation
should not touch Jews outside
Israel.
The organization, Volunteers
for Israel, is located in New York
City. It was founded by past
volunteers, and is chaired by
Florence Cohen. The office passes
out leaflets around the city, puts
up posters, recruits volunteers
and sends out press releases
about the project, all on a volun-
tary basis. This July 20 more
people are scheduled to come to
help out in Israel.
ORT rewards
Jewish H.S.
student
Cheri Rothschild represented
the South Broward Region of
Women's American ORT at the
Jewish High School of South
Florida Award's Night to present
a U.S. Savings Bond to a most
outstanding student, Natalie
Sebag.
To quote Rabbi Louis Herring,
principal of the school: "Natalie
is one of the most spectacular
achievers that I have ever had
the opportunity to work with.
"When she came from France
to this country a little over a year
ago she was unable to communi-
cate in English. Since then she
has become the top student in the
school in all subjects, including
Hebrew, which for her wss a new
subject, and Jewish studies."
She is s remarkably talented
young lady, hardworking, helpful
and capable. There is no doubt
that Natalie will have a very sig-
nificant academic record in years
to come."
The presentation of bonds to
an outstanding student, not only
at the Jewish High School but to
a graduating vocational student
in a South Broward high school,
is part of project of the education
department of the South Brow-
ard Region of ORT.
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right to Rosemont.
WATER SLEDGE




Page 18
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, June 24. n
.
Ask the rabbi
Mah To vu: question
which needs asking
By RABBI AVROM L. DRAZIN
Supervisor. Koaher Food Inspection,
Broward County Consumer Affaire
The traditional prayer book, indeed most every service, begins
with the familiar "Mah Tovu How goodly are your tents O
Jacob, your dwelling places, O Israel." I am not alone in finding
it somewhat disturbing that this prayer should be the very first
when we enter the synagogue.
No, there is nothing offensive in the text, which expresses
some beautiful ideals of Judaism. Rather, it is in considering the
source that I find the prayer offensive, for it is excerpted from
the ratings fo Bilaam, the rabid anti-Semite of bis time.
Indeed, we are told that Rabbi Solomon Luria, (the gnat
halachic scholar of the 16th Century who was known as the
"maharshaT') skipped Mah Tovu because of its author.
Generally, I do not agree with Rabbi Luria. In fact, Mah Tovu
is still a great favorite for cantors and composers of liturgical
music. We sing it everywhere we go, and this reflects something
very special about the basic personality of the Jew.
We have developed the innate ability to bring a blessing from
a curse. We recite tha Mah Tovu because of its malicious intent,
not despite its intent.
When Bilaam uttered the words of the prayer, it was not as
praise, but rather as a curse, as a set-up, as it were. Realizing
that the ordinary invectives in his repertoire were inadequate
and insufficient, he attempted to destroy Israel through flattery.
How good you are; how wonderful you are; how strong is your
family life: how close you are to the Almighty. In the end, the
Israelites believed the flattery, and succumbed to the blan-
dishments of Bilaam.
They were good, and could do no wrong. Hadn't the Gentile
prophet said how wonderful they were? When the daughters of
Moab arrived to destroy the morality of the community, they
had little trouble seducing these people who had been "reading
their own clippings."
This then is the message of Mah Tovu, and why it has cap-
tured our fancy and has become so important in our ritual. It is a
constant reminder not to succumb to mindless flattery, to
beware of gratuitous praise which comes from unusual sources.
Even more important is the reminder that it is very Jewish to
find bendiction in the malediction. It does not matter what
Bilaam s intent, we accept the blessing. We find the good in evil
and the opportunity in catastropy. It is Jewish to make the best
of the worst, and to squeeze holiness out of the profane.
Our history has shown that when we have lived up to this
ideal we have outlived our persecutors and have continued to
bring the Light of the Torah to the world.
In behalf of the South Broward Council of Rabbis, we wish all
who are traveling May you go in Peace and may you
return with Peace; and remember G-d does not vacation during
the summer your synagogues and temples are open for prayer
and meditation all summer long.
Judaka courses
setforsumi
FOR BONDS A total of $1.6 million in State of Israel Bonds
were sold at a New Leadership Night in Haifa gala last week at
Port of Miami, where 600 young professional men and women
gathered to demonstrate support of Israel Bonds Organisation
and the Jewish State. Guest speaker. Ambassador Joseph
Tekoah (left), former Israel representative to the United
Nations, is shown with Ronald and Glenda Krongold. Krongold
is national chairman of Israel Bonds New Leadership Division.
A series of weeklong cour*, I
various aspects of Judakalil
education will be condujl
during the summer rnonthTwl
the Central Agency for JeJ
Education for teachers 3^
Jewish schools in Dad,
Broward.
The courses will be held fi* I
days a week, for three houi
day. either nwrnings or ,|J
noons, beginning the week *
June 20-24, and continual
through July and August
Rabbi Norman S. Lip*, m
rector of the Institute of ,W!
Studies, noted, "The courses pro
vide the teacher in the JewLj
schools with the opportunity u ,
enhance his knowledge and akjb
as s teacher, and to maintain bs
on-going professional growth m
Jewish education."
The courses are open to kftj
ested laymen as well as teachers
Further information can Q\
secured by calling CAJE, 1-671.
4030.
Beth Shalom wins know-Israel prize
For the first time in recent
years the religious school of Tem-
ple Beth Shalom in Hollywood
participated in the national
Yediat Israel Knowledge of
Israel Examination.
The religious school received a
commendation from the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
the local coordinator of the World
Zionist Organization sponsored
contest.
Many of the students who par-
ticipated in the examination have
earned awards which will be pre-
sented to them at the school's
opening assembly in August.
The contest is but one of many
Camp Chai openings
There are still a few openings
available at Temple Beth Ahm's
summer day camp, Camp Chai. If
you are interested, can 431-5100.
Beth Ahm is the new name for
Temple in the Pines.
ways in which the school pro-
vides its students with Israel-
centered programs. A series of
Israel-oriented programs is held
throughout the year to bring the
importance of Israel home to
every youngster.
For more information about
"' C
15,000 'olim'from West
expected to settle In Israel
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Raphael Kotlowitz, head of
the immigration and ab-
sorption department of the
Jewish Agency, predicted
here that by the end of 1983
some 15,000 olim from
western countries will settle
in Israel. He disclosed that
in the first four months of
this year 3,393 olim came to
Israel from the West com-
pared with 2,287 during the
same period in 1982.
Speaking with reporters at a
press conference last week. Kotl-
owitz, who returned to Israel
after a visit to several South
American countries, said that he
believes that Israel's new source
of immigrants will be from the
Western countries since "'the
gates of Russia are closed and
aliyah from "countries of dis-
tress" where the Jews are persec-
uted, such as Iran, is also over for
the time being.
HE SAID that in 1981. 7.500
olim came to Israel from the
West. Last year the figure rose to
9.200.
BNAI BRITH to. DADE COUNTY PRESENTS:
ISRAEL
SIMMCI
MISSION
AUOUT IP-AUGUST 34, 19*3
ckaW
15 DAYS DILUXI4 STAI FA
MUaWTlMKIMT FsUSWTHflK
SSTMHUBHTUS ton a* CM. MOW
INCLUDING!
DxrasmiMcs
MX TOO
ALL ttltW CUKtS
VUUY BCOtTaV ON BAl fwOM MIAMI ONLY $ 1 JS5 P/P Dai
NfW YOtK ANO ttONTtiAl OVAMUMIS AVAHAaq
THIS YEAR DO IT FMISIAEL BY DOING IT 1M ISMEl
K* MOffE INKttMATJON 4 BEWIVATtONytAU TOOaT"
Tetex: 52371 TRAVEL TOUR FTL*
TRAVEL TOURS 44*s Stirling Rd.. f\ Lauderdale. Fl 33314
daoe 944-0411 qqow 584-9664 p bch736-2466
economic hardship in many
Western countries and "the real-
ization by Jews that one can Live
well in Israel" can account for the
good prospects for aliyah.
According to Kotlowitz the
largest group will come from the
I 'niteH Staffs. "We expect about
4.000 olim this year from the
United States and Canada, about
2.000 from Great Britain, about
2.000 from France, about 4,000
from Central and South Ameri-
can countries and the rest from
South Africa and various Euro-
pean countries." Kotlowitz said.
Kotlowitz said that his depart
ment is increasing its activities
and services to meet the expected
increase in the number of olim.
|CERTIFIED MOHEL^
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y.SELMAR
Staff Mobel
Mt. Sinai Hospital
Will Travel (306) 673-5062
Gordon Leland
Masler Piano Craflsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild ;
432-7247
I
the school, and how it incorpor-l
ates Israel into its curriculum,
contact the school at 966-2200.
The religious school sponsor! I
programs for students in kinder-1
garten trhough high school. Ap-I
plications for the 5744 (1983-8411
term are now being accepted.
CaadleUghting Time
Friday, June 24-7:57
Friday, July 1-7:58
F$eligious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. L504 Wiley St,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily servicei
7:55 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services. 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning. 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Gradea
J-o.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services. 7:30 a.m.. sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday. 8 a.m.
Conservative,
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning. 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services. 7:45 am,
sundown: Sabbath evening. 8:15 o'clock: Sabbath morning,*
o'clock. Religious school: Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood; 431
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday. Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath. 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning. 8:46
o clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah. ludaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Mframar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700 Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services. 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, f "
Sabbath morning. 8:45 o'clock. Religious school
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rapt
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath.
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
FJeforn,
Tempi. Beth ElI 1361 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8226.
SSS ftEtf ,Z,Jaff* S*00*^ "rviceTs p.m. ReUgioo.
school: Grades 1-10.
Temple BUi Emet Pines Middle School. 200 N. Dougu*
ESLkHbrok" "S8* 31-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
gtr2l-10 K*8'-8'15 Pm" R*Uiou- ** Pre"kin*r
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood: e*02O5. Rabbi
,\i Fnzm Sabbath services. 8:15 p,m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
Becoijstriicfcionist
^rST^TcI.1^,1, X Breward Bfcd.. Plantation: 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot Sk.dell. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. R^ooi
school: Pre-kindergarten8. j^avJ^Tfr
--------------------------------' _. J
a>ii .eaiia'liWi .* .IB Jl
pan.
Pre
R|*i.


EsatoUttrffc.........
'"**'' '"H! !*?*", Th* Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Peg*
he Jewish mother: her troubled future?
Continued from Page 16-
jh mothers is much more selfish
[han the previous generation."
lays Abby Levy. "Even mothers
vho don't work outside of the
borne enroll their children (in day
re or nursery school) to have
iom, to play tennis or whet-
her."
One young man still sees
pnty of stereotypical Jewish
:>t hers in this younger genera-
lion. 'You raise your children the
ay you were raised," he said.
lowever, one trait he sees less
Lften is austerity. This he attri-
butes to "a matter of economics;
there's plenty to go around now
days:"' there's less need for
other to sacrifice.
Another mother believes the
Dsitive 'Jewish mother' at-
tributes are rare, but finds the
negative images still flourishing.
Vs for the nurturing, devoted,
^lways-present image of the
;>ihVr. she comments, "All the
romen that 1 know my age are
feither working or they have out-
Bide interests beyond the home.
Ill you're talking about the kind
t>f Jewish mother who nags and
nstills guilt and who lives
through her kids, there are a lot
bf them out there."
DOREEN LEVY, 24 years old
ami the mother of a 15-month-oid
daughter, agrees that Jewish
vomen today still tend to push
their children. Perhaps exces-
sively so. "It's like they have the
Is whole life mapped out for
him," she commented.
With all of the advances in pre-
chool programs and the ae-
rated curriculum in the ele-
entary and upper grades,
day's Jewish mother has an
greater arsenal to taw in
jshing her children Although
ewish Family and Children's
ervice Family Life Education
iinatnr Carol Frank ones
ns the validity of Op Jewish
ther stereotype in its applies
on to Jews only, she does find
at Jewish mothers *nwe always
ushed their children to succeed
ademically and professionally
ad ire still doing so teday- "The
lerence teday is that he goal
to produce qualitf datldran,"
ink commented. "There are so
any parents who an so anxious
at their children will net be the
rst They do want perfect
liildren."
Frank said this even
ver into the way some Jewish
sthers dress their children in
ke latest designer fashions. Yet
Bother form of materialism.
"If one nursery school offers
tding six months earlier than
not her. the parents are so afraid
bat their child might be behind
child in their neighbor-
od that they'll switch schools,
is a form of materialism* you
u that child to have the ab-
hite best." Prank said. "This is
that is really going
ANOTHER parent agreed.
) parents' concern now seems
be with how well the child
|hieves and not with the child
nself."
Prank eked other changes in
-enting habits. Per one, fathers
. much more involved with
r children and thus, the pas
re Jewish father-overbearing
wish mother syndrome is
^ing way to a more equal
Wp Hope
You Neve' Need Js
But I* vou Do'
Call Mrs. Evelyn Saiasohn
City Memorial
oMonumenl. Inc.
Phone '
parenting partnership. Another
obvious change, of course, is that
more Jewish children are being
raised by single, divorced
parents, or in stepfamilies.
Today's parents are also more
ambivalent about the appropriate
use of discipline. "They feel less
competent about using age-ap-
propriate power with their chil-
dren," Frank says.
"Parents don't have the same
type of power they used to," she
continued. "You had an
autocratic system at one time:
'You do it because I eatdso.' You
can use that with a child up to a
certain age, but then it doesn't
work anymore. The children are
out in a system in school where
they see things are-dene by con-
sensus, by negotiation In the
past, there was-the threat that
the parent would haul off and hit
the child. Today they know only
abusive parents hit and scream at
a child.
"We don't raise children by
fear any more," Frank added.
AS MORE families contain
two income earners and as
various educational "readiness'
programs proliferate, children re-
ceive more care from institutions
"Children today grow up in age
isolation," Frank said. They at
tend school and enrichment pro
grams with their peers and return
home to almost-deserted neigh-
borhoods.
Even with all these changes
and the abundance of how-to-be-
the-perfect-parent courses, Jew-
ish mothers stffl find themselves
doing some things just the way
mother did .both the best of her
traits and the ones they swore
they'd never duphcate.
In a recent column in Kews-
.weelf^ Fraocine rUagsbrua.
author of "Voices of Wisdom
and other books, argues that
there are still plenty of Jewish
mothers with and without careers
in our midst, only they've gone
undercover "for fear of becoming
the butt of yet one more round of
jokes."
Klagsbrun suggests, in her re-
visionist view (entitled "Hooray
For Jewish Mothers,") that
overprotection builds a firm
base of security in a child Chil-
dren who are carefully protected
know that they are loved and im-
portant, and because they are
important to their parents they
become important to them-
selves."
She admits., that you can
overdo it. of -course, but asserts
that it's better for a oerent to be
guilty of excessive self-sacrifice
than excessive self fulfillment
MAYBE MORE of today's
Jewish mothers prepare chicken
soup from a -can instead of
scratch, but -Klagsbrun thinks
there is at least a pinch of Jewish
mothering in them anyway. After
all. at least one bask trait of the
Jewish mother remains un-
changed: wanting "the best' for
the children who are considered
the most precious gifts in their
lives.
Perhaps the difference between
today's Jewish mother and her
immigrant grandmother is not
the amount of Jove they have for
their children but how they
choose to channel it, to let it all
out or hold some back. In the
past, Jewish mothers had no out-
let for their love and creative
energy other than their children.
Too often stifled in their per-
sonal lives, they had to live
vicariously taseugh their off-
spring. Today's mother has the
option to seek her own fulfill-
ment, to conosntntfee-on her chil-
dren or to attempt to juggle
career and pareaBiag
,1)1 nintii tiasjiffcaii ff......if
This Yea?
in Jerusalem
ed to Jerusalem to see David who
had been imprisoned by the
British. He carried with him
almost a half-million dollars from
Marty Bernstein, to be turned
over to the Jewish Agency. Half-
Jewish and half-Italian, he too
was caught up with the efforts of
the Jews to protect their new-
bom state against the Arab on-
slaught.
JOEY ENGINEERED Da-
vid's escape from prison and
together with Diana, joined the
Haganah. He sacrificed his life in
an effort to break the blockade at
the Jaffa Gate which prevented
supplies from reaching the be-
sieged Jewe in the old city of
Jerusalem. This resolved the love
triangle, and Diana eventually
married David.
A bare outline of the soap-
opera plot does not do justice to
the exciting action which charac-
terizes this swift-Deced novel.
Aside team tits tlswm leading pro-
tagonists. Diana, Joey and Da-
vid, there are. many well-drawn
minor characters who figure in
the story. Most notable among
these is Elliot Crawfield. Brit-
ish constable, who was pressured
and bribed by Joey to help in Da-
vid's prison break. His allegiance
shifted to the Jewish cause and.
he laid down his life, protecting
David and the others ea they fled
from the British.
Gross writes in a span, read-
able style except when he de-
scribee love-making scenes when
he resorts to romantic, purple
prose. By and large, however, the
story flows smoothly end the
reader ie eager to move from one
episode to the next.
This book offers a simple end
relatively painless way of learn-
ing about Britiah-Arab-Jewish
relationships ea the Mandate
ended and the State of Israel was
bom.
ftmammm Wm^m
42. 6 ft, slim, blond, university education, good
bouaawifa. interests: travel, sailing, aiding, walking, ten-
nis, music, theater, painting, li terature, antiquities.
a dynamic gentleman of etnas; character. with sense of
humor, living m excellent financial situation. Object:
matrimony.
Writ*
Marianne Pik
J000 Hamburg 66
Weet Germany
If you have a new addresser
are planning to move, piuaadlet
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folks who are not now receiving
The Jewish Floridian and would
like to, also let us know. Every
issue of the Jewish Federation ot
South Broward's newspaper
contains news you won't want U>
miss. Simply call 921-8814.
^hiropractic
(wenter of Broward County
1 WE ACCEPT ONLY THOSE PATIENTS
WHOM WE SINCERELY SEUEVE WE CAN HELP
iCome In and lets dlacuas
| Your Health Problem
llF YOU ARE SUFFERING
I WITH FAIN?
STOP!
Dr. Green Oats ReeuKs
IN MOST CASES WE WILL
WATT FOR YOUR
INSURANCE COMPANY
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insurance Center
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PINCHED NERVE?
FREE APPOINMENT
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1 NERVE EXAMINATION
! / Practice Since 1966
Dr. Marvin Green
CHIROPRACTIC PHYSICIAN
4811 Hollywood Blvd. Hwd- 962-0603


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The Jewish n<*~ nnd Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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On The
Move
... to new and larger facilities. Thanks to you, our clients,
we have grown and prospered in Hallapdale.
We are now located at
1100 East Hallandale Boulevard
Regency Park
Hallandale, FL 33009
Our telephone numbers will remain the same
949-9740 Dade County
456-1800 Broward County
782-7510 North Broward
Members: New York, American & Other Principal Stock Exchanges
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