The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00325

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
siness forum emerges
By STEVE KATON
Associate Editor
fling yet enthusiastic group of 70 businessper-
Kntly got to know each other, initially, as the
oward Business Executive Forum was born,
bred by the Jewish Federation of South
"to provide Jewish identity, information-
ind career development for business leaders,"
sup met at Emerald Hills Country Club.
| purpose of the executives is to:
business experiences and ideas in order to broaden
n the business world, and, hopefully, broaden
lusinesses' bottom lines.
ample, one businessman shares his practice of
.back coupons in newspapers, every businessper-
,as thought of using such a technique can benefit
a report.
a referral service, both for bosses and em-
in
ex
ployees. Through social contacts gained through the new
Business and Executive Forum, businesspersons can use the
forum to meet other businesspersons.
As envisioned by the eight organizers of the Business Ex-
ecutive Forum, the group actually can serve as an employ-
ment service, becoming a clearinghouse for job openings.
Counseling new businessmen and women, either new to
South Broward or new to a particular line of merchandise.
Guest speaker at the first session was Sam B. Topf, who
asked his audience in South Broward to think BIG (Buying
Israeli Goods). Speaking for the America-Israel Chamber of
Commerce, Topf said Israel's gross national product of til
billion proves out to be more than a 10,000 percent increase in
30 years.
"As friends of Israel," he said, "we must help the country
meet its challenges, both militarily and economically. Sur-
vival is the object."
Federations are dedicated to the economic survival of
Israel, at least unofficially, Topf said.
And the America-Israel Chamber of Commerce is becoming
Continued on Page6-A
BUSINESS EXECUTIVE FORUM leaders
Ginny Hyde and Joseph Terkiel meet, gnat
South Broward movers and shakers.
cJewislh Floridiaim
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
13-Number 12
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 10,1983
f.ec .p'rft#r
Price ;*5 Cents
Syria still
won't budge
on withdrawal
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) Special U.S. envoy
Philip Habib indicated here last week that the simul-
taneous withdrawal of all foreign forces from Lebanon has
reached what he hoped was a momentary impasse on the
part of Syria which has refused to accept the Israeli-Leba-
non agreement.
Addressing the opening session of the three-day annual
national governing council of the American Jewish Con-
gress, Habib said:
[Jewish Community Centers of South Broard's Southeast Focal Point Day Care Center
the Frail and Elderly was the site last week for a 'gig' by the South Broward High
ol Band Ensemble. The youngsters lugged their instruments to the center, located
id Temple Sinai on Johnson Street, to entertain and instruct the day care clients.
|ng a few pointers on the cymbal to Aaron Barmach is student Jim Boccuzzi. The center
recipient agency of the Jewish Federation of South Broward and the United Way.
ose who fell...
130 American, Canadian o/Im
gave their ultimate for Israel
"What it means is that it is
going to take a little more talk-
ing. A little more negotiating. A
little use of the influence of
others."
Habib, who returned from the
Middle East last week, said he
will not continue to participate
personally in this stage of the
negotiating process to get the
Syrians to withdraw from Leba-
non simultaneously with Israeli
troops because the Syrians have
made it clear that he was not wel-
come in Damascus, where he has
been declared persona non grata
for alleged pro-Israel bias.
Habib, however, remained op-
timistic that there is the possi-
bility for the withdrawal of forces
Continued on Page 11-A
Philip Habib
encana and Canadians have not only
buted funds to build Israel, they have also
Jtheir blood. This was highlighted at the
trial Park of the Association of Americans
Vanadians in Israel at Sha'ar Hagai with the
K"g of a plaque with the names of 190
an and Canadian olim (immigrants) and
sons who fell in the defense of Israel.
following is a report of the event, including
tceprt of the address delivered there by
view contributing reporter Eliezer Whar-
. whose son Moshe was among the fallen.
By ELIEZER WHARTMAN
Newaview magazine
Mrty of the 130 names are of men who
I fallen during the last five years in-
g 14 wh0 were killed in Operation
ce for Galilee.
[ut volunteers from North America came
to fight for Jewish independence as far back
as World War One.
"Perhaps not all of you know that the First
Aliyah in mass after the Balfour Declaration
came not from Russia or Poland or Galicia, or
from anywhere in Europe, but from America,"
wrote David Ben Gurion.
"I was in America during part of the First
World War ... I came back to Palestine with
some 2,000 American Jews in uniform to fight for
it, to help to free and rebuild it. .
"The first hatuU (pioneering) organization to
train young people for work on the land was
established in America, and they in turn formed
the Jewish Legion. They were the first of the
pioneers in Palestine."
According to Ze'ev Jabot in sky, who along with
Ben Gurion trained the Jewish Legion, the ap-
proximate composition of its 5,000 men was:
1,720 (34 percent) from the United States; 30
Continued on Page 8-A
Nicaragua becomes
'country without
Jews' after exile
NEW YORK (JTA) The Sandinist
government of Nicaragua has forced the
country's entire Jewish community into
exile, confiscating Jewish-owned property
and taking over the synagogue in Managua,
according to the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
Rabbi Morton Rosenthal, director of the ADL's
Latin America Affairs Department, made the
disclosure in an article in the ADL Bulletin, the
agency's national publication.
Rosenthal, who last visited Nicaragua shortly
before the Sandinists came to power in 1979, said
the government of Nicaracua has been
unresponsive to ADL appeals to end "these
human rights violations" and permit the return of
the Jews to their country.
The forced exodus of the Nicaraguan Jewish
community numbering about 50 took place
Continued on Page 11-A


i"t tuun i tuf uttun umtt
Page2-A
TAe Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday^June 10,19$
JFSB leaders will hear addresses by Herzog, Begin
On Sunday night, June 26.
seven leaders of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward will
hear Israel President Chaim
Herzog in his first address to an
American group since winning
his new office.
Three nights later, the local
leaders will join other Federation
leaders from the United States at
a dinner and caucus with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin at the
Knesset.
The seven leaders from South
Broward will be representing the
community during three special
United Jewish Appeal
in Poland and Israel.
1 Attending the 1984 Leadership
Seminar Mission to Israel and
Poland from June 25 through
Jury 3 will be Ted Newman,
newly named campaign chair-
man; Dr. Saul Singer. Big Gifts
chairman for 1964; Marc Gilbert.
1984 Hillcrest chairman; and
1 Sumner G. Kaye. executive
director.
According to Melvyn Bloom of
UJA. "The mission will help
launch a campaign-long dialogue
between our national chairman
(Robert E. Loupl and the top lay
and professional leadership of
major community 1984 cam-
paigns.
"It will provide participants
with an in-depth orientation to
the key needs and issues under-
lying the campaign, and develop
motivation for our coordinated
campaign efforts.
Mission-goers will spend four
days in Israel before flying to
Poland for a pilgrimage to
Auschwitz and to join the
remnant Polish Jewish com-
munity in its reconstructed syna-
gogue, in this 40th anniversary of
the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.
Touring the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's sister city.
Hod Hasharon, with the UJA
Project Renewal Mission will be
Dr. Howard Barren, 1984 chair.
man.
Dr. Barren will be guafei
through the tour of progress and
progress-to-come by a UjA
Project Renewal expert.
The third mission, the UjA
Women's Division's, is to cov
June25-Julyl. *
Highlights of the women,
itinerary include breakfasting 1
and briefing with prominent Is-
raelis who will prepare traveler*
for the days' events; viaitaa
UJA-funded agencies; traveling
over the "Green Line" to lean
about the West Bank settle-
menta: and entertaining Israeli
women who are in the arta and
sciences, the business world and
in the professions.
Representing South Broward
will be Evelyn Stieber. 1964 cam-
paign chairwoman; and Beverly. I
Bachrach, Women's Divwot
director.
Harry Rubinstein
Sidney Rubinstein
H and S Auto Parts, Inc.
and Service Center
Phone 920-4881
250 South Federal Highway Oania, Florida
SHALOM! Well, they are finally doing it: making aliyah. After years of planning and
hoping. Bud and Bettv Homans. prime movers in the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
B'nai B nth and BBYO. are off to Eretz Israel. Here. Dr. Philip Levin, nominated as 1982-83
Federation president (centerI. presents the Homans with s fire-painted glass plate for their
man v veers of dedication' to JFSB causes. Shalom. Bod and Betty, see yon in Beersheba.
The Pollins establish $100,000
trust fund at Hollywood Memorial
she and her husband have been
patients at the hospital.
Dan a no heoa PoUm of Holly-
wood las: Sunday made sure
their son Gerald, who died 20
years ago at age 2S. will not be
forgotten in South Florida
Th- unveiled a portrait
of Gerald on a wall near Hoiiy
woo*: Memorial Hospital's
eighth-floor oncology ward. Their
son died of leukemia not too long
after becoming a physician.
Wan that portrait and a
plaque, the Pollins established a
S100.000 trust fund that will be
turned over to the hospital upon
their death.
The plaque bears the words of
young Pollin:
If I had my life to live over. I
wouid devote it to relieving
man's inhumanity to his fellow
man."
"I'm doing this as a deed for
people suffering from leukemia."
said the elder Pollin. 78. The
Pollins also have donated a
scholarship fund at Rochester
University to help disadvantaged
students attend medical school.
Pollin. a Washington. DC.
building contractor, retired with
his wife to Hollywood 15 years
ago. Mrs. Pollin is a member of
Memorial's auxiliary and both
Congressman Smith talks in Miami
Congressman Larry Smith (D- the Brickell Point Holiday Inn.
FU> is scheduled to give the key- Smith, from HoDvwood. will
note address Sunday. June 12. as jpe^ on "Overview: U.S. In-
t he Greater M ami Chapter of the vorvement in Latin America."
American Jewish Com mat tee .
holds its 31st Annual Meeting at ,Jg *"*>*- c*Jl 1-
uDloi]
You nave the power to WW the future by
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Friday, June 10,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
',.' i' ,. i i i i -
Security Center to brief S. Florida
Page3-A
A confidential briefing by the
Center for International Security,
a Washington, D.C., baaed
organization dedicated to enrich
Americans' understanding of
world events, is to take place
Monday, June 20, at the Holiday
Inn at Hollywood Beach.
Chaired by Dr. Joseph Churba,
the Center for International
Security brings together
economists and historians,
former diplomats and senior mili-
tary officers, executives and po-
litical scientists deeply concerned
with matters affecting United
States security.
The South Florida function,
on growing Red menace
which begins at 6 p.m., is being
hosted by Nat and Dina Sedley of
Hallandale. Introducing Churba
Maj. Gen. George F. Keegan Jr..'
USAF Spiro, chairman of the center's
advisory board, will be talk show
host Barbara Studley of radio
station WNWS.
Churba recently coordinated
an "Open Letter to the Presi-
dent," which appeared in major
newspapers around the country,
warning of the growing Soviet
threat to the free world, especial-
ly through the Middle East.
The letter was endorsed by 260
U.S. admirals and generals, urg-
ing revitalization of strategic co-
oeration with Israel.
The center is a non-profit, non-
partisan, tax-deductible, educa-
tion institution headquartered in
Washington, D.C. Its director,
Churba. for four years was senior
'What's good for Israel
Is good for the U.S.'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JTA Reporter .
ARLINGTON, Vai------Sen.
Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., said
here that he learned in his cam-
paign last year and during his
nearly five months in the Senate
that there is no conflict between
being a good Jew and supporting
what he believes is in the interest
of the United States.
"What's good for Israel is good
for the United States," Lauten-
berg told the annual meeting of
the trustees of the United Israel
Appeal (UIA) at the Hyatt Re-
gency Hotel.
"I wish we had more allies like
Israel in Central America, South
America, Africa, Europe and
Asia."
Lautenberg urged his fellow
Jews to "stand up for what you
believe, be a good Jew." He told
them not to fear the charge of
dual loyalty since it is not a legi-
timate accusation "in this great
country of ours."
He revealed that before he en-
tered the campaign for the Senate
last year, he was told that a Jew
could never win statewide office
in Jew Jersey.
But he said throughout his
campaign, which resulted in his
upset victory over former Repub-
lican Rep. Millicent Fenwick,
there was "not one reference to
me as a Jew."
Lautenberg, a former national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal who has resigned from
the UIA board of directors, ad-
mitted that he misses not being
able to be closely involved in
Middle East intelligence adviser
to the U.S. Air Force.
He then joined the Reagan
team, becoming senior policy ad-
viser to Dr. Eugene V. Rostow,
director of the U.S. Arms Control
and Disarmament Agency.
He resigned that poet in May
1982, claiming the administra-
tion's strategic thinking "was
bankrupt."
Mrs. Studley, a Christian, has
been an ardent supporter of Is-
rael for many years. She has con-
sistently warned of the growing
Soviet threat throughout the
world.
The WNWS talk show host,
during the Lebanon-Israeli war,
paid for a newspaper ad telling
South Florida she was "appalled
at the distorted reports covering
the war.
"Do not allow public opinion to
be orchestrated against Israel or
to pressure Israel into giving up
IRVING
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Jewish organizations any more.
He noted that he went to Israel
60 times in 10 years but has not
been able to go there in the last
two.
Jerold Hoffberger, outgoing
UIA chairman who had served
for five years, stressed that a
major goal should be to bring
Jews who have separated them-
selves from Jewish organizations
and institutions, back into the
community:
"No one can be left out; our
cadre is too smaD."
Hoffberger said the two major
goals of education and aliyah are
tied together. He said that with-
out greater effort in all aspects of
Jewish education, action for
aliyah will not be successful.
Irwin Field of Los Angeles, a
former national chairman and
president of the UJ A, was elected
new chairman of the UIA.
Barbara Studley
the West Bank. Write to Prime
Minister Menachem Begin," she
asked. "Let him know that the
American press does not speak
for the American people.
"It is also imperative that you
write to President Reagan and
express your support for Israel."
i*"
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It includes private
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It includes doctor's
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visits beyond what
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Hospital deductions
covered.
Acceptance is
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over. Preexisting conditions
not covered for the Irsl 6
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Tor B'nai B'rtth members only
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Page 4-A
The Jewish FkiH&aHm$kofor Friday. June 10. i963
All of a sudden: Reevaluating Israel post-Lebanon
West Germany's Foreign Minister Hans
Dietrich Genscher is reported this week as
saying that his government is considering
rescinding the sanctions it imposed on Israel in
accordance with the sanctions imposed by the
European Economic Community (EEC) in the
wake of Israel's invasion of Lebanon last June.
What this suggests is that Bonn never really
was comfortable with the action as opposed to
most of the other EEC countries that still
apparently are, if only because, dare we
resurrect the phrase, of the "special
relationship" existing between Israel and West
Germany.
But Genscher's report suggests something
else growing doubt about the one-sided,
high-handed attitude the democracies of the
West and Japan have taken toward Israel since
its action in Lebanon based almost entirely on
their oil interests and without even a scintilla of
interest in understanding the issues involved
and what motivated Israel in the first place.
This was easy because the greatest offender
in this parade of selfishness was the United
States. But with U.S. reevaluation of its policy
since the invasion of Lebanon now being
drastically revised anew, particularly in light of
the negative Syrian response to the signing of
the Israeli-Lebanese agreement, revisions
elsewhere should not be far behind. Bonn's,
apparently, is the first among them.
Israel's strength Is ours
It began with Jimmy Carter's presidency.
For some years now, the theory at the State
Department has been that American prestige
and influence in the Middle East were being
undermined by an overly-close relationship
between the United States and what the Arabs
themselves were calling an "intransigent"
Israel. Pretty soon, "intransigent" became the
key word in American circles too, not to
mention in the media.
At the root of all of this "intransigence," or
so went the theorizing, was Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. But the facts appear to be
just the opposite reckoned in terms of the
passing of time. Since then, the truth is that
Israel's so-called "hardline" has in reality
resulted in a growing sense of moderation
among the more reasonable of the Arab
nations.
Prof. Robert Tucker, writing in the May
Commentary Magazine, notes that "Rather
than having had the effects that prevailing
wisdom must lead us to expect, the actions of
the Begin Government to date appear to have
had quite the opposite effects."
Tucker adds: "A hardline Israeli policy if
such it is to be considered has not led to
Arab rejection of the U.S., but to Arab ac-
ceptance, and indeed encouragement, of an
American role in the Middle East that would
not have appeared possible only a few years
ago."
In short, the more reasonable Arab states are
all for the Israeli-Lebanon agreement and are, if
anything, only baffled by how to pressure Syria
into accepting it. Furthermore, according to
Tucker, the allegation of "Israeli in-
transigence" is now perceived in precisely the
opposite terms:
"To a degree that has seldom been ap-
preciated," he notes in Commentary, "let alone
openly acknowledged, the strength of the
American position in the Middle East has been
a function of Israel's power, just as it has been
a function of the intimacy of the Israeli-
American relationship."
The pariah disappearing
The upshot of all of this?
Whereas, before, U.S. policy conceived that
Israel must be brought to heel by working
toward the fall of the Begin Government, and
went out of its way to court such Labor Party
Opposition leaden as Shimon Peres, Itzhak
Rabin and Abba Eban, now that policy with
respect to these men, all of whom spoke out
against the Israel-Lebanon agreement, is just
the opposite.
The consequence is that it takes no
mastermind to see just why Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger is suddenly such a
pussy cat so far as Israel is concerned.
And why Bonn is now considering setting
aside the sanctions it called into play against
Israel last June.
Observes Tucker The period of the Begin
Government has not resulted in the resurgence
of Arab radicalism, but in the modest
strengthening of Arab moderates." One hopes
that it is no longer we and others in our corner
who say these things. Finally, Israel's erstwhile
allies appear to be saying them too.
Jewish Floridian
nd Snertef ol Grui Hilraul t
FREDSMOCHET STEVEKAION SUZANNE SH<> l I
E-litor and Publisher Associate Editor FsdtiHiw) Mrtw
Published BiVVeeKiy Second Class Postage paid at Haitanda:-' Fia usps omvjh
HOUVWOOD-FORTLAUDERDALE OFFICE Am Sa.mgs 2Wu Hi i 2400 E Maiiaruiaie Bcecn
Biw) Sun* niQ Haiiandaie Fia 33009 pio.i.'' *<*
SasaI MeJtepni. Advertising Supervisor
Mam Office t Plant 120NE(HiSI .Miami. Fia 33132 Phone 1 3 Postmaster Fans) UTt reSame la Jswleh FWrtdtan, P.O. Sas oi 2t'3 Miami. FK 13101
Jewish Federation ol South Broward Officers President Ben Sailer Vice Presidents Philip A
LPvin MO. Saul Singer M D and Nat Sexfley. Treasurer. Theodora Newman Secretary Otto
Stieoer. E.eculive Director. Summer Q Kaye Submit material lor publication to
Pubtir Relations Director
Meiwbst JTA. Seven Art! WNS. NEA. AJPA. endfM
Jewish FlorteVen doea not guarantee Kaehruth ol Msrchand.se Adver inao
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local A.sa S3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum |. or by membership Jew.sh
Federation ol South reward. 271* Hollywood Bred Hottywood. Fia. 3J020 Phone 921 M10
Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, June 10,1983 29 SI VAN 5743
Volume 13 Number 12
'I was hoping for an Oscar'
TtiSt*r
Politics
American Jews must remain
Involved In the fray
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
Special to The Floridian
A recent article in The Washington Pott, in
describing the fund-raising scramble of the major
Democratic presidential hopefuls, noted that all
were going after contributions from the Jewish
community. While it has become almost
axiomatic that American Jews are prime source of
funding in federal elections, it is useful to analyze
why so many politicians have come to rely on this
base of support.
To begin with, American Jews have taken their
rights and obligations as citizens seriously. The
vast emigration of Jews to the United States from
despotic regimes in Eastern Europe carried with
it an appreciation of living in a free and demo-
cratic society. The right to vote and to participate
in the political process was taken seriously.
The deeply felt need to continue the Jewish
tradition of contributing to charitable causes was
added to Jewish gratitude for the opportunities
offered by American society. Charity, a pillar of
Judaism, also was reinforced by peer pressure to
contribute to the causes that enhance the life and
needs of the community. Publicly announcing
one's pledge to a philanthropic cause gained one
standing in the community. As it became easier
for Jews to enter the professions and succeed in
business, their philanthropic activities increased
accordingly as did their interest in achieving
social justice.
Because running for public office was ruled out
as a practical matter in many parts of the coun-
try, influence on the political process was sought
by working behind the scenes and through sup-
port for responsive candidates.
After the trauma of the 1973 Yom Kippur War,
which led to the beginning of significant amount
of U.S. aid to Israel, many Jews became more
aware of the need to support those members of
Congress who voted for foreign aid.
At about this time, but more specifically in
November 1972, when Jewish support for George
McGovern fell far below previous levels, a higher
level of support for Republican candidates
became another feature of Jewish political giving.
Also, with the introduction of Federal Election
Campaign Laws in the early '70s and the limits
they imposed on individual contributions, mem-
bers of the Jewish community have become in-
creasingly more active in their political fundrais-
ing.
After all, what group in this country is more
accustomed to the "parlor" meeting where each
guest is called upon to ante up for a good cause? ""
Much in the same way funds are raised for the
United Jewish Appeal, Israel Bonds or a local
synagogue, they are now being raised for a wide
variety of politicians and political causes.
Aside from the actual value of showing tangible
support for a campaign, the interaction between a
concerned, articulate contributor and a candidate
can be even more important. It is not enough to
turn over a check with general good wishes. It
must be clearly understood that the motivation
behind the support is in the U.S. interest. It is not
difficult to explain the value to America of a
strong, secure Israel. In doing so, the contributor'
is acting in the best traditions of our democracy
and is not seeking personal gain, the motivation
behind many contributions.
Even though we may wince when "Jewish
money" is talked about in the media, it is far
better that it is acknowledged as being important
rather than not at all. And as long as this sup-
port is a vehicle for achieving social justice and
the preservation of a fellow democracy, we can
take pride on our activism.
In a perfect world, there would be no need for
expensive campaigns and political contributions
at all. However, as long as this remains a fact of
political afe, American Jews must not only con--
tinue. but expand their efforts to have their views
heard on issues of concern to them through in-
volvement in the political porceas.
Morrii J. Amitay is a Washington lawyer and a
former executive director of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAQ.


Friday, June 10,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Or eater Hollywood
PageJMf
JCC-Focal Point announces summer classes for senior citizens
The Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Center, sponsored by the
Jewish Community Centers of
jth Broward, 2338 Hollywood
)rvd., throughout the summer is
[offering these classes for senior
[adults:
On Mondays at 10 a.m., 'Exer-
cise on the Move" and "Handi-
crafts;" at 12:30 p.m., "Self Help
for 60 and Over/' and at 1 p.m.,
"Line and Folk Dancing," and
JCC Choral Group.
On Tuesdays at 9 a.m., "Pot-
tery," at 10 a.m., "Yoga" and
"Basic Sewing," at 1 p.m.,
''Meditation and Relaxation"
land JCC Social Club.
On Wednesdays at 10 a.m.,
"Exercise on the Move" and
"Yiddish;" at 1 p.m., Games.
On Thursdays at 9 a.m.,
"Legal Aid (third Thursdays
only); at 10:30 a.m., Lecture Ser-
ies; and at 12:30 p.m., "Humani-
ties."
And on Fridays, 10 a.m., "Ex-
ercise on the Move;" at 10:30
a.m., "Concerned Volunteers;"
and at 12:30 p.m., "Current
Events."
Singles
The JCC Singles Group, ages
20 to 40, plans these events:
Wednesday, June 22: Wine
and Cheese Lecture and Social at
center, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, June 26: Dance at
Miramar Golf and Country Club,
3700 Douglas Road 9 p.m.; D.J.
? Monday, July 4: Picnic at TY
Park, Pavilion No. 15,10 a.m.
Weekend
The JCC and the Business and
Professional Singles of Florida
invites all singles 304- to spend
the Fourth of July at the Kon-
over Hotel.
The four-day, three-night
weekend package runs from
^ Friday, Jury 1, through Monday,
July 4, and costs $179 per person
for double occupancy, $235 for a
single room.
It includes three breakfasts,
three dinners, entertainment
nightly, cocktail party and music
at poolside, plus July 4th barbe-
que.
Dhtaff
A Women's Enrichment
Lecture is set for June 29 at 7:30
p.m. at the center.
Terri Goldberg, MSW, will be
facilitating a discussion on "The
Modern Woman: Putting Jewish
Values Into Your Family Life."
Ms. Goldberg received her
masters in social work from
Yeshiva University and has had
10 years experience in Jewish
communal work. Reservations
are a must.
Donation is $2.50 for non-
members; $2 for members. Coffee
will be served.
Bowler*
The JCC is forming a mixed
bowling league at Miramar
..--ianes, 890 Miramar Parkway,
starting Oct. 6.
The league will meet every
Wednesday night at 9, excluding
holidays. Four people are needed
for each team. People are needed
to work on a committee to help
form this league.
For information and
registration, call Dene at 921-
6511.
Couplet
fet
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HOLLYWOOD 6LVO HOLLYWOOO. n.C*A 33020
Health
The JCC announces a super
summer shape-up special at
Holiday Health Club, 2736
Hollywood Blvd., for July and
August.
Total cost is $25 per month,
which includes full use of this
facility on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. or
7-10 p.m.
Visits feature aerobic classes
every hour on the half-hour,
sauna, steam room, whirlpool and
a full exercise program with
Universal equipment.
Summer camp
The JCC of South Broward's
Camp Kadima, for grades 1-6, is
registering campers for a summer
of fun at C.B. Smith Park.
Teen travel camp is available
for 7-9th graders. Applications
are now being taken for junior
and senior counselors.
Call Mark or Susan at 921-6611
for further information.
Mom* and Tot*
The JCC again is offering an
eight-week summer Moms and
Tots Program for toddlers aged
18-30 months.
The prom-am will be held Fri-
day mornings, starting June 24,
at 9 a.m. or 10:30 a.m. at Pines
Middle School.
Pre-regi8tration is required.
Call Susan at 921-6511 for further
information.
Playgroup
The JCC is registering for a fall
Playgroup. Classes are grouped
by age: 2'/a years meet Monday,
Wednesday and Friday: 9 to
noon; age 3 years meet Monday,
Wednesday and Friday: 9 to
noon. Children 4 years meet
Monday through Friday 9 to
noon.
Pre-registration required. Call
Susan at 921-6511 for further in-
formation.
HOW SWEET IT IS As a fundraiser, Women's American
ORT, South Broward Region, often sells cookies cooked in
Israel. But.thanks to ORT, the Jewish Centers of South
Broward last week became the recipients of a whole batch of the
goodies. Accepting the sweets from ORT's Marilyn Sdevan for
the JCC is Mark Sherman, program director.
The JCC is forming a Couples
"'fciub. Due to many calls from new
couples in our community
t wanting to make friends, the JCC
responding. To join, call Dene
[at 921-6611.
WCBW
^aVfasaWfe aVaMah SMinMall
_
ttfaMKS-Draaci Decatnmated Coma in a taR
oion. SHr *>1 cud coid water. Ackrlcs and terwj
ten
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_JtowtowlQly^bJweinwse)- And Kosher,
too. So%i*^uriw8rkucHomserBBr~
merest o? your summer should only be to
rawasninQl
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^pi^wl OeTslHi FttMas CsYpeVwaSearl


*-
'
Page6-A
jrwjiJkHl* a

Friday, June 10.1868
Business forum given life
Continued from Page 1-A
a greater influence on American and Israeli Jewry to do
business together. How can you help Israel? he asked his
audience.
The main way is to become aware of the myriad of Israeli
goods on the market, "and buy them."
The seven leaders of the new local group Ginny Hyde,
Ginny's Hyde-A-Way; Michael Orlove, Generix Drug Corp.;
Joseph Terkiel, HMF Custom Furniture; Howard Liff,
Merchandise Liquidators; Sherley Morris, Jet Printing
House Inc.; Ted Sorin, Ted Sorin Insurance Agency Inc.;
and Jerry Winnick. Oppenheimer & Co. plan three more
initial meetings: From 6-8 p.m. the first Thursday in October,
in November and in December.
The group plans to bring in speakers to address such topics
as "The Family Business Jewish-style." One suggestion
would have the group meet at the businesses of its members,
for a tour of the plant.
Representatives of the following companies attended:
ABRAMS, ANTON, ROBBINS, RESNICK,
SCHNEIDER AND MAGER, PA, (David Weisman);
ADVEST, INC., (Jfll C. Finder. Ted Newman, Neil J. Not-
kin); FRANK AMIGO, PA, (Frank Amigo); AVANTI
MOTORS. INC., (Gerald R. Ray); JACK BERMAN IN-
SURANCE AGENCY, INC., (Jack Berman); BROAD AND
CASSEL, (Richard H. Breit); MICHAEL P. CAPLAN
INSURANCE AGENCY, (Michael P. Caplan); COOK
REIFF ROOD ASSOCIATES, INC., (Joseph G. Reiff.
P.E.); DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANTS, INC., (Bernard
S. Meyer, Mark J. Moldoff); WALTER DORFMAN, PA,
(Walter Dorfman).
BARRY R. EPSTEIN ASSOCIATES. INC., (Barry R.
Epstein, APR, CCE. CID); THE EQUITABLE ASSUR-
ANCE SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES, (Lois Karlin
Feinberg); DR. ROBERT S. FRANKL, (Dr. Robert S.
Frankl); G & G HYDE, INC., (Ginny and George Hyde);
GUARDIAN DETECTIVE & SECURITY AGENCY, INC.,
(B. Ted Tittmann); GOLDWYN AND WEINBERG, PA,
(Owen L. Goldwyn, CPA); HMF, (Joseph Terkiel);
HOUSNER OFFICE SUPPLY, INC., (Moshe Al-Amary);
JET PRINTING HOUSE. (Marvin I.ibby, Sherley and Syd-
ney Morris); KEYES REALTORS. (Janet Hagendorf, Mari-
lyn Grader); JOSEPH KELRICK. INC., ( Howard Kelrick).
FREDERIC M. KLEIN, PA, (Frederic M. Klein); LAND-
MARK IV REALTY, INC., (Sylvia Saks. Jill M. Hunter,
Jane L. Berman, Judith Tittmann); LAVENTHOL &
HORWATH, (Fern I. Kanter); MALCOM A. LEONARD.
PA, (Malcolm A. Leonard; LIPSON & BLATTMAN,
(Steven M. Gladstone); LOST HORIZONS TRAVEL,
(Norman S. Freedman); M&M ELECTRICAL SUPPLY
CO., INC., (Ron Weintraub); ELIE MALKA, PA, (Elie
Malka); MERCHANDISE LIQUIDATORS, (Jeff Robbins);
THOMAS MOSKOWITZ. MS, (Thomas Moskowiu):
OPPENHEIMER & CO., INC., (Jerome D. Winnick).
PIONEER ROOFING CO., INC.. (Lanny Gelfand); POST
HASTE TRAVEL SERVICE. INC.. (Sylvia Berman);
STEVEN R. PRESS, (Steven R. Press); PRUDENTIAL-
BACHE SECURITIES INC.. (Ira P. Federer); REPUBLIC
ASSURANCE CORPORATION. (Stan Katlin); SAM
BLOOM PLUMBERS INC.. (Ron Bloom); DR. HOWARD
SHULKES. PA, DPM, AACFS, (Dr. Howard Shulkes);
SIDNEY H. BROWN & CO., (David G. Brown); SLEEP-
WORLD. (Rick Stark); SORIN & WEINER INSURANCE,
INC.. (Ted J. Sorin); VOGELSANG & SILVERMAN, PA,
(H. N. "Skip" Turchen); R. B. WOLFSON, (R. B. Wolfson).
The new group thanked last year's new gifts chairman,
Susan Singer, for her efforts in inspiring creation of the
Business Forum.
Federation will distribute copies of the business cards of all
those attending the initial session. For more information,
contact Susan Marx at the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. 921-8810.
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A packed house of 70 leader* attended the first Business Executive Forum.
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dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
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Friday, June 10,1968
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
v'
Page7-A
BROWNIE POINTS Bride and Brownie Troop 644 Leader Diane Press of Hollywood (cen-
ter) wanted her Brownies at her wedding recently at Turnberry Isle. So she invited them all.
^ th?LaI1 ?i55l,S: Thw* to' were bridegroom Richard Bernstein (the big guy on the
W* ?"? Tpl Beth Shalom's Rabbi Morton Malavaky (the other tall person). The Brownies
(clockwise) are Joy Clapper, Mamie Shapiro, Nadine LaUonz, Debbie Gavsie, Paryl Orlinsky,
Darlene Gdasi, Allison Wilner. Para Rosenberg, Melissa Tittman, Alison Karp and Emily
Sobel.
Nazi fighters will convene in Jerusalem
Since Israel has declared 1963
the "Year of Jewish Heroism and
Valor," a World Assembly to
Commemorate Jewish Resistance
and Combat During World War
II will convene in Jerusalem Oct.
2-6, under the patronage of Prime
Minister Menachem Begin.
According to Dov Shilansky,
deputy minister of the Prime
* *"* Minister's office:
"We, a people whose eradica-
tion was sought with a brutality
unprecedented in history, now
gather in the heart of the free
Jewish State; we gather to stand
witness to the past, to transmit
our warning to the present, and
to hand on the ever-burning torch
of Jewish endurance to the fu-
ture."
The assembly is primarily for
soldiers, fighters and survivors:
the men and women who fought
the Nazis and the cohorts in
ghettos and sewers of Europe, in
the marshes and forests, and in-
side the death camps.
Operational headquarters
during the five days will be at the
Hilton Hotel in Jerusalem (Tele-
phone: 02-536151). For accom-
modations and more information,
contact Kenes Tours, P.O. Box
50006, Tel Aviv 61500.
What do doctors in Israel really earn a month?
<
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Finance Ministry published the
pay scale of publicly employed
doctors in advertisements taken
in the daily press.
The figures were immediately
disputed by the Medical Associa-
tion which pointed out that the
i gross income of physicians repre-
sented compensation for more
than 100 hour of work per week
compared to the 40-45-hour week
worked by most other employed
persons in Israel.
The Finance Ministry ran the
ad in connection with the three-
month strike by government and
His tad rut doctors for higher
salaries and better working con-
ditions.
Virtually all doctors in Israel
are employed by iSe government
or the various sick-funds. Few, if
any, have a private practice.
STUDIO
"iiuilliii" ^Baa
Their salaries cannot be com-
pared, therefore, with the income
of doctors abroad, particularly in
the United States. Israeli doctors
earn far less than their American
counterparts.
The basic salary of a newly
graduated doctor starting his in-
ternship last January was
equivalent to $360 a month at the
prevailing rate of exchange.
The base salary of a senior hos-
pital director last January was
the equivalent of S637 a month.
The base salary is the means for
calculating pensions and other
benefits.
But it is usually tripled or
quadrupled by overtime, extra
shifts, weekend duty, travel and
book allowances and various
other allowances, some 16 items
in all. These raise the monthly
earnings of an intern to $1,000
and of a senior hospital director
to just under $3,000 before taxes.
But taxes and various other
deductions consume almost half
of the gross salaries. The heavy
work load and long hours at hos-
pitals leave senior physicians and
specialists little time to accept
the few private patients willing to
pay for medical treatment or un-
willing to endure the long wait for
non-emergency operations or
other treatment.
Continental
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Amsterdam voters elect
their 3rd Jewish mayor
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Amsterdam, capital of The
Netherlands and its second largest city, will have Its third Jew-
ish mayor in succession over a period of six years.
He is Ed Van Thijn, 48, who will succeed Willem Polak when
he retires next month. The mayors of Dutch cities are appointed
by the government.
Van Thijn, like all of his predecessors since the end of World
War II, is a member of the Labor Party. Born in Amsterdam, he
became a municipal councilor in 1962 and a member of Parlia-
ment in 1967. He was elected chairman of the Labor Party's
Parliamentary faction in 1981 and served for seven months as
minister of Interior.
Van Thijn freely acknowledges his Jewish ancestry. But he is
not associated with any Jewish organization and, in recent
years, has been a strong critic of the Israeli government of Pre-
mier Menachem Begin which he considers reactionary.
He stated, in an article written two years ago, that as a Jew he
feels solidarity with all minority groups in Holland and else-
where.
Waldman
HOTEL
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Page8-A
The Jewish Florididn and Shofar of Great$r Hollywood
Friday, Jupa 10, 1988
During Paris Air Show
Israel displays aerial might
By EDWIN EYTAN
JTA Reporter
PARIS More than 20 Israeli
industrial firms specializing in
aircraft construction and defense
equipment ranging from sophis-
ticated missiles to electronic
equipment took part last week in
the Paris International Air Show.
Foreign experts attending the
show said that Israel's aero-
space industries are today
among the world's half dozen
most advanced in the field of
both research and production.
The Israeli delegation to the air
show, held at Le Bourget, was
headed by Defense Minister
Moshe Arens who was invited by
the French Defense Minister
Charles Hernu.
Hundreds of foreign experts
crowded the Israeli pavillion as
the show opened. The use of
highly sophisticated Israeli-made
and designed electronic warfare
equipment during last summer's
battles when 80 Syrian planes
and 400 tanks were destroyed in a
matter of days, helped spur inter-
est.
The pavillion had on display
several types of missiles includ-
ing the world famous Python-3,
the third generation air-to-air
Raphael missile based on the
Shafrir-2 used in Israel's previous
wars and the S AR-2 advanced ar-
tillery location system which can
simultaneously handle up to 60
different fire sources and was
successfully used in Lebanon.
Israeli experts at the air show
revealed that the Lavie prototype
jet fighter will be airborne in
February 1966 but refused to say
when the multi-purpose warplane
will go into production.
The single-engine combat air-
craft, now under development, is
designed for short and medium
range air-to-ground missions and
is expected to become "the work-
horse" of the Israeli Air Force in
the 1990s.
The head of Israel Aircraft In-
dustries research and develop-
ment unit. Dr. Ben Zion Naveh,
told a press conference that "we
have by now all the American ex-
port licenses needed for the pro-
duction of the plane."
Naveh and other IAI experts
stressed that Israel did not need
and had not asked for a techno-
logy transfer but for manufac-
tured parts. "We had no know-
how problem but one of procure-
ment," they said.
Asked about American restric-
tions on the sale of the Lavie
abroad, IAI officials said, "The
plane is not subjected to any spe-
cial restrictions but will have to
comply with normal American
restrictions applying to the sale
of combat planes manufactured
with American parts to third
countries. It will be a case-by-
case derision."'
Though the Lavie will be
equipped with an American-made
Pratt and Whitney jet engine,
most of its sophisticated equip-
ment will be Israeli manufactured
and designed.
Its electronicjjarfare self-pro-
tection syslwIWoeen designed
by an IAI robWiary, Elta Elec-
tronics, and will consist of a fully
automatic and power-managed
computer network which will
permit rapid threat identification
and automatic response using
various deception techniques.
Experts said that experience
gained during the air battles in
Lebanon has been used to ensure
the La vies' future pilots ease of
control, maximum survivability
and 100 percent mission comple-
tion.
i
Those who fell...
Continued from Page 1-A
percent Palestinians; 28 percent from Great
Britain, and 6 percent from Canada."
With the outbreak of the War of Independence
in 1948, an estimated 5,000 Mahal (overseas
volunteers) came from aboard to serve in Israel's
fledgling armed forces. Of these, about 1,000
came from the United States and Canada.
These men constituted the bulk of the flying
crews in the air force, and much of the miniature
navy and armored corps. Individual Americans
and Canadians also served in the infantry,
particularly in besieged Jerusalem.
One battalion the 72nd made up entirely
of Mahal volunteers fought in the Galilee.
About one-fourth of the volunteers elected to
remain in Israel, and many of them continued to
serve in the reserves. They married, settled down
and their sons continued the tradition of military
service.
To this day Mahal has not been disbanded,
enabling volunteers from English-speaking
countries to serve in Israel's armed forces. Many
have paid a heavy price.
Who were the Americans and Canadians who
fell in the Lebanese war?
There was "Zvi" Jerry Wolf, son of Shirley and
Bob Wolf from Hollywood, Fla., who arrived in
Israel as a volunteer four years ago. His decision
to immigrate to Israel was taken after the
terrorist attack upon the coastal road in 1978.
He came as a volunteer to Moshav Nir Banin,
where he was "adopted' by moshavnik Nurit
Gai, whose son Shachar was serving in the armed
forces.
Nurit buried two sons during the course of the
fighting in Lebanon: her own Shachar, and two
days later, Zvi.
At the grave, both mothers, Nurit and Shirley,
stood, clinging to each other for support.. .
There was Yaron Zamir of Kibbutz Ein Dor
who fell in the capture of Beaufort Castle on June
6, a youngster who hated war and killing, the son
of Yehoshua and Rama Zamir, who came from
Rochester and Maywood, 111.
There was Yair Landau, formerly of Baltimore,
a student at the Teachers College for Religious
Studies in Jerusalem, who fell in a tank battle
with the Syrians on June 11. two days after his
23rd birthday.
And Danny Brenner of Chicago, a paratrooper
who had served in the Yom Kippur War, who was
working toward his doctorate in physical
chemistry at the Weizmann Institute when he fell
in Lebanon, leavinga wife, Varda, and parents in
Pardess Hanna.
And Avi Grunwald, who turned down a request
that he serve as an emissary in the United States
because he wanted to serve the population of
Kiryat Shemona as a teacher. He fell in the fierce
fighting near Lake Karun.
The eyes blur as one reads the list Greg
Barry, Davey Thurston, Lotan Yitzchaki, David
Sklar, Daniel Haas, Ya'acov Gal and David
Rosenfeld, the last killed by Arabs at Herodian,
where the Philadelphia native was a custodian.
Shortly before her death, Hannah Senesh, the
immortal paratrooper who sacrificed her life in an
attempt to save Jews trapped in Hitler's Europe,
gave tongue to the meaning of those who fell for
love of Israel.
They are words that still today speak not only
to the Jewish people, but to free men everywhere:
"There are stars whose light reaches the earth
only after they themselves have disintegrated and
are no more. And there are men whose scin-
tillating memory lights up the world after they
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"riday, June 10.1983
The JtmffFhrid&n and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HoUyivood
Friday, June 10, 1983
Ask the rabbi
Being a convert
is no easy task
By RABBI RICHARD J. MARGOLIS
Temple Sinai
After my lecture lest night, an intelligent woman engaged me
in a conversation which happened to touch upon the subject of
conversion to Judaism. She observed, "Isn't it wonderful that
our religion can attract intelligent, dedicated young people."
Ironically, most converts do not experience a warm welcome
into the Jewish community. Their motives, sincerity and
knowledge are often subjected to judgmental scrutiny. Usually
the inhoapitality comes from Jews who are themselves ignorant;
inactive and insecure; but even the most sincere and secure
convert finds these unwarranted attacks upon his integrity
unnerving.
The convert has undoubtedly been taught the Talmudic
dictum that righteous converts are more admirable than native-
born Jews. He may also have learned that a Jew who em-
barrasses a convert by reminding him of his origins is deemed as
culpable as if he had murdered him. Nevertheless, the average
contemporary convert feels patronized.
There are a number of specious and invalid reasons why some
Jews tend to make converts feel uncomfortable. First, most
Jews are simply incredulous; they cannot imagine anyone
feeling strongly about religious principles to join an oppressed
minority like the Jewish People.
With the dread and stigma of intermarriage waning, a
growing number of renegade "rabbis" available to perform
mixed marriages, and the tacit acceptability of "living together
without the benefit of clergy," the skeptic feels justified in
thinking "Why would anyone bother?"
As for the possibility of an intelligent modern human being
making a sincere commitment to live as a Jew without a Jewish
fiance waiting in the wings, well, that's simply beyond the ken
Second, many Jews are more than a little embarrassed that
converts are more interested and involved in Jewish life than
they are. A colleague of mine recently concluded a desperate and
fruitless search for a youth director by appointing a recent
convert.
He was immediately besieged by a furor of controversy and
complaints. You can be certain that no complainer had come
forth to accept the responsibility, but many were incensed that
the rabbi "would allow that shiksa (Yiddishized from the
Hebrew meaning "detestable thing") to lead our children."
As tempers subsided and reason prevailed, the community
was forced to concede that few others were as knowledgeable or
as dedicated to the congregation as the exceptional young
woman who had come forth to serve them.
The last acceptable attack on converts conies from Jewish
racists who in their bigorty insist, "If you were not born a Jew,
you cannot become one." Ever since the time of Ezra the Scribe
in the middle of the 5th century BCE, the Jewish People have
openly accepted converts into the household of Israel.
The Mishnah is replete with stories about the wisdom of Tibi,
the house-porter of Rabban Gamliel, who ultimately decided
that his servant should be freed and was sufficiently learned to
be converted to Judaism. Immediately after the conversion
ceremony, Rabban Gamliel convened a quorum for public
worship and included Tibi in the minyan.
It is a lesser known fact that the first official translation of the
Torah into Aramaic was prepared by a convert named Aquilas
(mispronounced by Babylonian Jews as Onqelos, and so printed
in modern biblical texts) under the authority of Rabbi Akiba.
How reprehensible is the message of the self-hating Jew who
declares, "You may look like a better Jew than me, but I know I
am a better Jew than you because I was born Jewish and you
were not."
I am also deeply troubled over the practical problems that
confront the sincere convert. My converts have taken several
serious courses in Judaism, they are literate of Hebrew and
conversant with the liturgy and they have spent many hours
discussing their personal religious convictions with their rabbi.
Can I introduce them to a community of Jews as well-
informed on the facts of things Jewish and as sure of their own
religious stance? Must I send them forth from the rarined at-
mosphere of the rabbi's study into a Jewish world that looks
upon them with suspicion and fails to match their enthusiasm
for our Jewish heritage?
Is there a way for you to help? Yes, by being as sensitive to
slights against converts as you are to anti-Semitic innuendoes;
by curbing your own tendency to view a convert as a curiosity
instead of as fellow Jew.
It is time we bring into consonance with our professed ad-
miration for converts the actual treatment we afford them.
JOB WELL DONE Elaine Pittel), past president of the Interfaith Council of Greater Holly-
wood, (in striped dress) presents a gavel plaque to Sister Marie Danielle of Madonna Academy
for her 'outstanding work' as president of the ecumenical organisation. Witnessing the presen-
tation are the Rev. James E. Quinn, pastor of Nativity Church (left), and the Rev. D. Wayne
Martin of the First Baptist Church of Hollywood, who is incoming president of the Interf aith
Council.
Home Start package offered
..,* / *.
.,. ...... -..- -.
.-
An innovative program called
Home Start designed for families
with children 3-7 to enhance their
participation and observance of
the Jewish fall holidays is again
being offered through the Central
Agency for Jewish Education of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, in cooperation with
the Baltimore Board of Jewish
Education.
Starting in the early fall, Jew-
ish homes in Dade and Broward
counties can begin receiving
Home Start, an inter-genera-
tional program aimed at promot-
ing greater family participation
in Jewish observances.
Subscribing families will be
mailed three packets one week
apart, including stories and
story-books (or recorded narra-
tions), handicrafts projects,
recipes and cooking ideas, games,
recorded music and historical in-
formation for Rosh Hashanah.
Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Shabbat
and Passover.
Different versions of each set
of holiday materials are tailored
to the age of the children (pre-
school and primary grades).
Cost for Home Start is $22 per
child.
Home Start was developed by
the Baltimore Board of Jewish
Education. It won the William J.
Shroder Award for outstanding
community programming at the
CJF General Assembly in Detroit
Jewish history
course at F All
Rabbi Merle E. Singer of Tern
pie Beth-El, Boca Raton, will
teach a two-semester course,
"The Roots of the Jewish Histor-
ical Experience," beginning this
fall at Florida Atlantic Univer-
sity Boca Raton campus.
The history department is
offering the course under a resi-
dent lectureship established for
the 1963-84 academic year by the
Jewish Chautauqua Society. The
first four-credit segment of the
course will be offered during the
fall semester.
Using a thematic approach,
Rabbi Singer will present a syn-
thesis of the 5,000-year history,
thought, culture and civilization
of the Jewish people.
The Jewish Chautauqua Soci-
ety is the education project of the
National Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods and sponsors
courses at universities through-
out the United States to promote
a better understanding of Juda-
ism.
Contact the university for
more information '
'<*,., '*
in November 1980. Miami, Holly-
wood and Fort Lauderdale were
part of the original pilot program.
For more information, call the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education in Dads (576-4030)
and in Broward (925-6244) and
ask for Betty.
F$eligious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Lev! Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1604 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Dairy 'services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8a.m.
Conservative.
HaUandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 am., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:46 am.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:16 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple la The Ptaes 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday. Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Mkamar 6920 SW 36th St.; 9611700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Dairy services, 8:80 am.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning. 8:46 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Siaai 1201 Johnson St, Hollywood: 920-1677. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:25 am., 6 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School
FlefoiTi)
Temple Beth El 1361 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8226.
Rabbi Samuel Z Jaffa Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10.
Temple Beth Esnet Pines Middle School. 200 N. Douglas
Road Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon
Sabbath services. .8:15 p.m. Religious school: Pro-kinder
garten10.
Temple Sold 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood; 989-0206. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.*.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-school12.
Ffecoqstr&ictioifist.
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot Skideli Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m. Religious
i school: Pre-kindergarten-8.,j
*
m
j
.



I June 10,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11-A
iragua: Country without Jews
Continued from Page 1-A
be Somoza regime was overthrown. Their
raa effected, the article said, by subtle and
ireals or by forcible measures.
ase of Isaac Stavisky, a textile engineer,
out of the country at the time of the
victory, was cited as an example.
ty, the article said, was advised that he
not return to his country "for his own
because he and his brother-in-law were
I enemies of the revolution.''
president of the Nicaraguan Jewish
lity. Abraham Gorn, was jailed after the
victory. "Gorn," Rosenthal wrote,
ras then 70 years old, was falsely accused
ig land and was forced to sweep streets
lie two weeks of his confinement.'
lonths later, he went on, Sandinists
ily ousted him from his factory and took
The Sandinists told factory workers to
t to bomb bis car if he returned.
was quoted as saying that Carlos
, minister of Justice, confiscated his
count and "then kicked me out of my
the departure of the Jewish com-
[ Rosenthal said, anti-Semitism still exists
juntry. In July 1982, he said that a
newspaper, Nuevo Diario, which often
[government policy, published articles
filled with virulent anti-Semitic
statements such as a reference to "synagogue of
oaten.
The Sandinists also have converted the
synagogue in Managua into a children's social
club, covering exterior Store of David with
propaganda posters and adorning the inside walls
with anti-Zionist propaganda.
Nicaraguan Jews, according to the article, cite
the long and close relationship between the
Palestine Liberation Organization and the
bandinists as a source of their problems.
The article states that ADL has sought to
alleviate the plight of Nicaraguan Jews in
ongoing discussions with Nicaraguan diplomats
for two years. In New York in 1981, the ADL
brought the problems to the attention of
Nicaragua's foreign minister, Miguel d'Escoto,
who promised to investigate the complaints.
Subsequently, Nicaraguan officials promised to
review confiscation cases but have not yet
delivered any response, nor have they responded
to ADL requests to state the conditions under
which Jews could return to their country.
Noting that Minister of Justice Arguello said at
a recent meeting of the Human Rights Committee
at the United Nations that the government would
consider a request from Nicaraguan Jews that the
synagogue be returned to them as a place of
worship, Rosenthal said:
"This is a meaningless promise in a country
without Jews."
mfat's powers threatened
nued from Page 1-A
panon within a forseeable
his business you learn
by things are a question
f, and it looks as if the
noment has not yet ar-
Iwhjcy you can say you
Ippedup."
|.S. envoy said Syria,
current objections to
tni Israel-Lebanon ac-
its own incentives for
on with the Lebanon
nt, which include that
J majority of the other
fion.s support Lebanon's
Dnclude its agreement
Jits forces from Lebanon
frians and Palestinian
troops leave as well,
Syria does not wish to
Jible for a continued Is-
iipation of southern
nse to a question,
the current internal
I between PLO Chief
afat, more moderate
rand the more radical
w the PLO is going to
Mound influence on the
[peace and stability in
i East.
radicalize lion" and a
nilitancy and terrorism
LO, which might be ex-
[the more radical wing
will hurt the peace
cording to Habib.
[led that the PLO
I is not going to be the
[ used to be, thus intro-
pegree of uncertainty.
Ding to simplify the
Ding to complicate it,"
to reports from
ivy fighting broke out
\ rival factions with
Bain line Al Fatah
PLO. Fighting was
| PLO, part of the con-
ttle between units in
Bedroom Apart-
atch Plains,
1-8/1 Kosher Klt-
11)654-7691.
\Ne Hope.
Jever N'oed Us
ut If'You Do
Evelyn Sarasohn
Memorial
jnument. Inc.
l-ebanons Bekaa Valley situated
behind Syrian lines who are op-
posed to Arafat's leadership.
Reports said as many as seven
people were killed and 18
wounded in an exchange which
included artillery, rockets and
heavy machine-gun fire.
Habib also noted in his address
that the Syrians are bringing
PLO troops into Lebanon in a
deliberate infiltration contrary to
the previous agreement set up
last summer for the evacuation of
PLO trroops from Beirut which
said they would not return.
Should the Syrians change the
current position against the
^<**!Wava^g^rr*av"# torn
said, then the PLO forces would
also leave. He said in his opening
remarks that attempts have been
made to involve the Soviet Union
in the troop withdrawal negotia-
tions, but that their interests are
for a continued Syrians presence
in Lebanon, and that the Israel-
Lebanon agreement not be imple-
mented.
"The Soviet Union is playing
its usual negative role," Habib
said. He added that the United
States' immediate aim is to con-
vince Syria that coming to the
negotiating table is in its own in-
terests.
"We believe that Syria will .
make its own decision.
"I do not think in the case of
the Lebanese situation the Soviet
Union is calling the shots," he
added. However, the Soviets are
agreeing with the Syrian position
for its own objectives, he noted.
In response to another ques-
tion, Habib said that Saudi
Arabia has been very helpful in
the effort to persuade Syria to
accept the withdrawal agree-
ment.
"It is no secret they are an
actor in the drama of what is
going on," he said. He explained
;that the Saudis, although they
will not admit it publicly, have
the same policy as the Israelis
and the Americans they favor
a sovereign and an independent
Lebanon in which there are no
external forces, Habib said.
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Page 10-A
I'ajp 12-A
The Jpwiah Flnridian and Rhnfar nf Greater Hnll-uun**!
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 10,1883
You've got what it takes.
.
r -
JU


try off ref usenik family unfolds
Let my parents go!
Israeli daughter pleads
Jewish florid fan
and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 10,1983 Section B
/hy aren't my parents allow-
i be reunited with me and my
r-old son, the closest per-
i for them in the entire
rid'.'" This is what Diana
Izhansky-Yashchin writes from
tael in an appeal for help.
[Diana's parents, Emanuel and
nlina Yashchin, have been refu-
Iniks for three years. When in
J|79 their daughter sent them an
vitation to Chemogolovka,
[hi re they lived for 16 years,
key did not receive it.
"I had to send five invitations
efore one reached them," she
aid.
[;."Eventually in February 1980
iv parents and brother Grigory
Ipplied for permission to
[migrate. The reply after nearly
|wo years of waiting in December
981 was it is inexpedient to let
ou go at present."
Until 1967. the Yashchins were
typical of many Soviet Jewish
families. F.manuel's father, a
mical '-riKineer. was seconded
i special category *sr work.
i g lather was killed in ae-
on They grew up in the years of
the Stalin terror. ^^v.
Kmanuel was born in Moscow
i 1933. At the age of 18 he was
incepted by the Gorki University
ind qualified in physical and
fnathematical sciences (one of his
|utors was, incidentally, Prof. B.
rain, who later became a promi-
nent refusenik and is now in Is-
|ael). He was awarded his doctor-
He in 1966.
From 1957 to 1967 Dr. Yash-
thin worked at the Radiophysics
Research Institute of Gorki and
was head of the quantum elec-
tronic's laboratory.
By 1967 and married to Galina,
an engineer, and with Diana now
10 years old, the Yashchins went
to Chemogolovka, where
Emanuel was given a research
post at the Solid State Physics
Institute of the Academy of
Science. Two years later in 1969,
their son Grigory was born.
"My parents later told me how
The Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee of the Community
Relations Committee, Jewish
Federation of South Brow-
ard, would like to speak to
anyone in the South Broward
''-area who is planning to visit
the Soviet Union in the near
future.
Contact Melissa Martin at
the Federation, 921-8810.
Also, anyone who would
like to write to a refusenik or
a member of his or her
family, contact the Federa-
tion.
the 'Six Day War' changed tneir
attitude," Diana said. They
always felt Jewish mainly be-
cause of my grandfather, who
spoke Yiddish and as a child went
to chtdtr, but that short period in
Israel's history brought my
father, like many other Soviet
Jews, to a new awareness.
"They nurtured the idea of
going to Israel for a long time.
They are not particularly reli-
gious, but they now feel that Is-
rael is their real home," Diana
said simply.
Although compared with other
refuseniks the Yashchins have
not been waiting long, they have
already suffered some of the
vicissitudes of the refusenik life.
Soon after his first 'refusal' Dr.
Yashchin was demoted from a
senior researcher to a technical-
engineer at half his previous
salary.
"My father was not even in-
vited to the meeting where the
decision was taken," Diana
continued, "and when he wanted
to appeal against the decision he
was told that it was a foregone
conclusion and 'not to create
more problems.'
He was further demoted to do
purely routine work servicing
equipment. He protested to the
director of the Solid State Ins-
titute, Prof. Yury Ossipyan, and
was told "that's all the work
available to you." Two months
later, in May 1982, Dr. Yashcin
Continued on Page 3-B
Letters of note
Visa granted
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Thank you for your positive
response to Medical Mobilization
for Soviet Jewry's newsletter tel-
egram campaign. Your participa-
tion is greatly appreciated.
Along with all the distressing
news we distribute from this of-
fice, we occasionally hear some
good bits of information. Most
recently we learned that Sergei
Batovrin, formerly interned in a
psychiatric hospital for his activ-
ities, has been granted an exit
visa with his wife and child.
JOYCE ZAKIM
Director
Medical Mobilization
for Soviet Jewry
THE HOLOCAUST
. AND POLITICS
Anyone who has read, or seen on the stage or TV,
Elie Vveisel's inspired play .The Madness of God." car
ries with him, possibly forever, the imprint ol the
hero's determination to preserve his heritage in the
(ace of political pressures, political intrigues and bar-
gaining, political encirclement, and political pay-offs.
Throughout post-Biblical history. Jews of Diaspora
have uncompromisingly clung to their traditions,
through the Babylonian Captivity, the Spanish and
Portuguese Inquisitions, the Russian pogroms, and
the Nazi Holocaust
Of these and of all the human tragedy that have
beset this planet, undoubtedly nothing can match the
madness of Adolph Hitlers Holocaust. The Holocaust.
even in the context of Jewish history, was unique.
Unique, because it was. and remains, the only docu-
mentable genocide. Unique, because it was deliber-
ately Jewish. Unique, because it was undertaken as a
national policy, energetically and meticulously car-
riedout. Unique, because it was unprovoked and total
carnage.
N to build a living monument, not only to preserve a
record of the Holocaust, but to declare to all mankind
the commitment of this nation to the banishment from
the earth of anything parallel to the Holocaust. But
nothing, nothing parallels the Holocaust. It is unique.
We support the move to establish a Jewish Holo-
caust Memorial, because it has been in the Turkish
tradition to rise in defense of the Jewish people. Turks
did this by providing a safe haven to the Jews who fled
the Iberian Inquisitions, and after their settlement in
the Ottoman Empire, placed many in high governmen-
tal positions. In the XVIth century, one of the Ottoman
Sultans offered the Jews a homelandin Palestine
which, because of their comfort and freedoms under
Ottoman rule, they did not accept. After the Turkish
Republic was established. Turkey risked her declared
neutrality by providing Turkish ships to smuggle some
40.000 Jews destined for the Holocaust out of Eastern
Europe, lurks were among the first to recognize the
State of Israel, and until the time of Camp David, the
only Moslem people to do so.
But now. for political reasons, the central pur-
pose of the Holocaust Memorial is being diluted. Other
groups are knocking at the door seeking admission in
order to further their own nationalistic goals.
Of these, the most daring are the Armenians.
Daring, because their claim of genocide is a docu-
mented myth made to seem real through the relent-
less propaganda at the end of World War I by the
victorious Western e mpires as justification for carving
up the Ottoman Empire. The truth is, Armenians and
Turks killed each other in a civil war within a global
war. The Armenian attempt to infiltrate the Holocaust
Memorial as innocent victims of a genocide is also
curious, because, during the rise of Hitler, their pub-
lication Hairemk in 1936 carried statements like this:
Sometimes it is difficult to eradicate these poi-
sonous elements (the Jews) when they have
struck deep root like a chronic disease. And
when it becomes necessary for a people (the
Nazis) to eradicate them in an uncommon meth-
od, these attempts are regarded revolutionary.
During a surgical operation the flow of blood is a
natural thing. Under such conditions dicta-
torship seems to have the role of a savior.
Curious also, because during World War II. Armenians
set up a provisional government in Berlin, declared
themselves Aryans, subscribed to Hitlers racial supe-
riority thesis, thereby supporting the Holocaust, and
contributed 20.000 troops to Hitler's army.
Most Jews in this country are unaware that this
intrusion is happening. Most who leam of it are
shocked.
This much is clear: lb dejudaicize the Jewish
Holocaust Memorial is to water down its meaning.
Who gets in and who doesn't now becomes a political
issue, settled too frequently by political intrigue and
pay-offscall it votes.
This must not happen. Keep the Memorial Jewish.
Write. Let the Council know that broadening its scope
will lose them your support. The address Is: U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, 425 13th St. NW,
Suite 832, Washington, DC 20004.
Jewish Members of the
Assembly of Turkish American Associations
For more information write to:
ATAA
P.O. Box 19063
Washington, DC 20036


Page 2-R
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Fr*fry-JuDelQ.n
Wife's wish for child
puts vows asunder
Mr and Mrs C. were recom-
mended to Jewish Family Service
UFSl of Broward County by a
friend They have been having
marital problems for some tune
Mr. C. has been self-employed
for years. He owns a hardware
store. The business has been
doing very well for the last 10
years. They have been able to
buy a lovely two-bedroom home,
vacation in Europe and the
islands, and obtain other
luxuries.
Both Mr. and Mrs. C agreed
that this is the lifestyle they have
been planning for.
The clients stated that children
had not been in their plans 10
years ago when they were mar-
ried. Mr. C was 19 and Mrs. C
18 then.
About a year ago, Mrs. C. de-
cided she did want to have a
child She wanted to quit her job
as a teacher and become a
mother
Mr C was very upset by this
change. He did not want children
and did not understand the
change in his wife. They had tried
talking about this on their own
but to no avail; they ended up
feeling frustrated and angry.
The anger has now interfered
with their relationship. In the
last couple of months both part-
ners have become distant. Mrs.
C. spends a lot of time outside the
home, with her friends. Mr. C
spends a lot of time home alone
Y\ hen tney came to JFS. the
coupk appeared to be at the
breaking point They still loved
each other i>ut communication
channels had broken down: both
partner* wen- disappointed with
each other and were extremely
hur;
Dunne the first lew sessions
both partner.- were able to ex-
press this jrreat disappointment
and hurt. Eventually those env.
twns wen- nol controlling and
they were able to speak to each
other with less stress and strain.
Both partners had very strong
feelings about the issue of chil-
dren
Mr. C. explained that having
children was not something he
wanted and he was not willing to
compromise. Mrs. C was very
disappointed and stated that
when she made the decision not
to have children she was very
young. She has now changed her
mind. She wants children. There
was no compromising
Mr. C. suggested that they
give themselves six months. In
six months if they were unable to
negotiate, then they would have
to separate Mrs. C. agreed. It
was also agreed that they would
continue marital counseling
throughout the six months.
At the end of the contract,
there bad not been a change in
feelings. There had been a greater
understanding of where each
other was coming from, but
neither wanted to compromise. It
was decided that they would,
separate, but continue therapy
individual therapy.
Their future together is still a
question, but now they can work
on themselves and maybe
through individual treatment
become clearer about what they
want as individuals and as a
couple.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 451" Holly-
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. 33021.
Telephone: ybb-9056. Hours -
Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday
and Fnda> y a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday y a.m. to 9 p.m
Jewish Family Service is a
bsnsfiriar) agency of the Jewish
Tederation ol Greater Fort
Lauderdale. the Jewish Federa-
" South Broward ant!
W r llroward Count;
~
Not since Noah's time has
something so tiny mad* rt so big.
Its Teoey snny woe tea leaves They ve been making it be in
Jewish homes tor yean. Teoey knows that |MM as tmy lamb
crwps and bny peas are the most flavorful.te same is true tor
lea leaves Thais why tor rich, refreshing tea. Telley bags
are packed wKh any Mtte tea leaves Because tmy is tastier'
K C#rtif i+d Kosn#f
TEXaLEY. XEA "Tin* l fsuiier"
Jewish
Fanr>ily
Service
Sheldon Polish (right..
installed as president of
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County at JFS'
recent 21st Annual
Meeting, presents the
Esther Lo wen thai
Community Service
Award to Brian J. Sherr,
outgoing presides i
Below. JFS' new officers,
(from left) Norman
Ostrau. second vice
president; President
Polish. Dr. David Sachs,
first vice president; and
Janet Krop, secretary, an
pictured. Treasurer
Steven Fayne la not
shown. During the
meeting, Sherwin H.
Rosentein, executive
director, reported that the
Jewish Federation of
South Broward recipient
agency showed a 44
percent increase in use of
services compared with
last year.
My Son,
TKe Knight!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
RMSfe" can a Jewish vmnt proudIy P^bim: "Meet my son, THE
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the only Jewish
pipe-band in the entire world!
Of course Scotland's most famous product is scotch whisky
And America's favorite scotch is J&.B. Wr carefully select the fin-
est scotches and blend them for smoothness and subtlety The
result is why we say that J&B whispers.
Incidentally, you don't have to wait until your son becomes
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in order to enjoy JckB. Any
'simcha'will do! 1 Y"i ~i" 1 /
JfrliJt whispers.
on Com NY *-
I 86 Proof Bended Scotch Whisky. C I960 TrwPaAtngsonCorp.NV


ly, June 10,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Page -3-B
Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
Continued from Paga IB
mas sacked and is still unemploy-
I In February of this year the
family was refused again without
* ny further explanation.
Lev Elbert, one of Kiev's lead-
ing Jewish activists, has been
entenced to one year in a labor
amp for "evasion of an army re-
erve callup notice," according to
the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry and Union of Councils for
Soviet Jews.
Elbert is a 35-year-old engineer
and translator. He, his wife and
Pon have sought exit to Israel for
nine years.
Elbert had stated two grounds
Ifor not submitting to the callup:
]lc had been previously refused
emigration on the grounds he had
acquired "military secrets" while
pigging earth for swimming pools
during his regular army service a
decade ago, and as a former pri-
vate, not an officer, he was
exempt from reserve duty.
Authorities in Odessa have
[stepped up the campaign against
activists, in an attempt to crush
Jthe Jewish community once and
Ifor all.
Relentless attacks against
Jewish leaders have culminated
En a series of searches through re-
Buseniks' apartments in which
"evidence" of activism was con-
fiscated.
Last week YAKOV MESH
was once again the target of KGB
harassment. Six people raided his
apartment: one in KGB uniform
and five others in civilian dress
but aligned with the secret police.
Visiting Mesh at the time of
the search were: ALEXANDER
UISHNIR, VALERY PEV-
fcNKR. LUBA NASHPITZ
(Mark's wife). M1SHAYKOM-
IANSKY. NATASHA KHAS-
KINA and her daughter. The
L'roup was photographed togeth-
er.
In the process of the search,
(Mesh's invitation from Israel was
< iiiitiseated.
The crackdown throughout the
Jkraine, and particularly in
dessa, has ominous implica-
tions for all Jews in the Soviet
|Union.
The Ukraine notoriously has
Ibeen the hotbed of anti-Semitism
I in the USSR. Events set into
I motion in the Ukraine are trend-
I setting" in that new methods of
repression and persecution are
I generally tested and adminis-
tered there.
Contrary to earlier rumors that
[ANDREI SAKHAROV would
"face no obstacles" if he chose to
emigrate, TASS reported last
I week that Sakharov would not be
allowed to emigrate because he
I possessed important military
I secrets.
Sakharov has not had access to
I state secrets since 1968.
Reports on Sakharov s release
first began circulating when So-
viet Minister of Justice Terebilov
said on Swedish television that
there was no reason why Sakha-
rov could not apply to emigrate.
Subsequently the University of
Vienna offered him a one-year fel-
lowship to study physics.
Sakharov a wife, YELENA
BONNER, has appealed to the
West to campaign for Sakharov's
Release. Send letters and tele-
grams to:
Anatoly Dobrinin
Ambassador
Soviet Embassy
1125 16th St., N.W.
Washington. DC 20036
and
General Secretary
Yuri Andropov
The Kremlin
Moscow
RSFSR+USSR
POC IRINA GRIVNINA has
finally received the necessary
forms from the doctor saying she
is pregnant. On April 10, authori-
ties accepted the document, in
which she stressed that she be
released from exile and be
allowed to return to Moscow to
deliver the child. She must have
adequate health facilities, found
only in Moscow, for the delivery.
Also, her husband resides in
Moscow.
My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's Mustard
Glaze
to cap booty
to cup Gulden's
Spicy Brown Mustard
to cup beer
I teaspoon horseradish
Send telegrams to the
following people asking that
Irina receive amnesty and be
allowed to have her child in
Moscow:
Procurator-Procurary of
Kazakhsky SSR-Prospekt Mira
D. lOO-Alma-Ata-480091
Procurator of the Region-
Procuracy of Kokchtavskaya
Oblast-ul. Sovietskaya 230-
Kokchetav-465601.
Glazed Corned Beef
5 pound corned beel
brisket
4 carrots, cut into I inch
like*
I onion, quartered
I bavleaf
I garlic clove, crushed
Place meat in large sauce pot: cover with cold water Add
carrots, onion, bay leal and garlic, heal 10 boding Reduce
heat; cover and simmer 3to hours or until tender Meanwhile,
in small saucepan, combine honey, mustard, beer and
horseradish. Simmer over low heat, about 5 minules. stirring
occasionally. Place meal on rack in open roasting pan. Spoon
Mime glate over meal, and bake in JS0"F oven
lor 21 minutes, basting occasionally
until well gltted. Serves 10 to 12.
CHARLIE GULDEN
It's Ids recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!**
Potato Salad
7 potatoes, peeled
boiled and cut up
to cup chopped onion
to dip chopped celery
to chopped tomato
to cup imitation bacon bus
to cup mayonnaise
"< cup Gulden's Sp*cy
Brown Mustard
2 tablespoons tarragon vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
Combine potatoes, onion, celery,
tomato and imitation bacon bus Blend
mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar and sugar
About a hall hour be lore serving, loss
potato salad with dressing. Serves 6.
Try the best thing next to
trench fries.
DEL MONrTE*Catsup. It's got just the
taste kids love with their fries, hxrgers
and hot dogs. It's the one catsup that's
made with the same care ard high
quality standards you've come to
expect from Dei Monte.
So treat your family. Next to
thick, rich DEL MONTE Catsup,
everything tastes better.


P*4-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater HoUywood
Friday, Jut*
"U*
POKES EFFECTIVE THURS JUNE 9 1983 THRU WED. JUNE 15. 1983 WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
UMTT QUANTITIES WE GLADLY REDEEM YOUR US FOOD STAMPS
TOP QUALITY RICH AND FLAVORFUL
Cantaloupes
LARGE 18 SIZE *
PRODUCE
US NO 1 ALL PURPOSE (5 LB BAG)
Red Bliss
EA
SWtfTAMO JUICY ILG HB
(UPIC LOOM OBLAV>
low m cALOwes man tenocr
OAMMN WH TENOEM WG LOOK O^LAY)
Isstow Iqtassh
-meet as am tmr
89*
91.99
..33
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cmpumix
Qhm
OANOCM (MM (SCALUON.
..49
2A49
SERVICE DELI &
IN STORE BAKERY
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
jgKSS"*9.....jw
OoudiChMM 2.59
OVEN FRESH LB
$J69
Jj-WSIyWComo. Cat*
Onion Rys.........95
lb rare An0lPoodCake 1.69
Cjyi Pulft or CMOMMM Covwrt
a^TpW
27.98
1.99
SELECT YOUR OWN
QUAKE DIGITAL
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Five FunctionsHour,
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FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
r
WHOLE
All you have to do
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1 V^IIjCaSI IiCII^^J. the watch of your choice. What could be ease!)
** (SUBJECT TO SALE TAX ON RETAIL VALUE)
PERFECT FOR SALADS FIRM RIPE
VJ
SWEET EATING
FLORIDA
(6INPKG.)
DAIRY!
-DELI!
BREAKSTONE LOW FAT. SMOOTH AND CREAMY.
ANO CALIFORNIA STYLE (SAVE 30c)
woz.
LAMOOLAKES REOULAMONUNSALTEOISAVE ) 0^^^+
WhippedButter ..99
LUHTNUVEtf ASSORTED FLAVOR. ~\JlL SIQ
^fogurts^,* MtTTr
0.159
0..79
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OMmoEOMdoc,
IWIWIIWlfM ioc.
FROZEN
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mms smtms io*
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1.19
1.79
a .79
5^1.00
32-02 S9A
OSCAR MAYER ORIGINAL CHEESE
OR "NEW" NACHO STVt
lSAVE40e>
Hot Dogs lb -aL
VLASIC- EXTRA CRUNCHr- Hb1QQ
(SAVE 30c) B KJC7
DeU Dills Ml
moiiiM.iMn
OKUIUKIU
tot
eJ9
,109
2*9
r 40Q
M HOI
SELF SERVICE BAKERY
* 100% WHOLE
10-02
LOAF
59
SSjqpsr" SI
WfRI
Muffins 2
frCT
MO
AOLIRSS-Oi FKQ OMON
A*
mo
SI


Friday, June 10,1983
TheJmttih Floridian and Shofar of QroaUr Hollywood
Page 5-B
A sharp way to buy meats!!
WHOLE FRYING
Chicken
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
UMIT2BAGS
)A CHOICEBEEF
Steak $
USDA CHOICE
WHOLE UNTRIMMED
IN CRYOVAC
Brisket
K
n39
USDA CHOCE BEEF
& $289
CHICKEN-BONELESS AND SKINLESS FRESH
Breast $^89
CuUet *&
Beef $129
Oxtails ,1
NEW ZEALAND FROZEN ^ m9f\
Shoulder Lamb Chops 1.79
.1.99
3 LBS t OVER LB
SEAFOOD*
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
MOT 2-3 LB PKQ
ARROWTOOTH
Flounder
Fillet
J39
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Onderblade
Roast
FRESH FROM OUR RMSTRY
A sharp way to
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WHITE ASSORTED OR PRINT 4 ROLL PKG
AURORA
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17 OZ SWEET PEAS, 17 OZ. W.K OR CREAM STYLE CORN,
12 OZ NIBLETS W.K CORN OR 16 OZ CUT GREEN BEANS
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GoebelBeer
PUNCH 42 OZ BOX
Laundry Detergent
PANTRY PRJOE SLICED. CHUNKS OR
CRUSHED IN JUICE
RED CHEEK REGULAR OR CLEAR


p
Page 6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, Jui lo, 1*3 =
30 Jewish cadets4 womenbecome officers
NEW YORK Thirty Jewish
cadets, including four women, are
among this spring's graduates
from four U.S. service academies.
The 30 are being commissioned
as officers, according to Rabbi
Herschel Schacter of New York,
chairman of the Jewish Welfare
Board (JWBI Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy.
JWB, a beneficiary agency of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, wOl present com-
plimentary copies of The Holy
Scriptures to the Jewish officers
at the baccalaureate i
The presentation of Jewish
books to the cadets is part of the
intensified year-round program of
outreach and service provided at
the academies by the JWB
Chaplaincy Commission and local
Jewish communal leaders.
Letter of Intent
questions answered
In the May 27 issue of The Jewish Floridian, a Letter of
Intent was reproduced in its entirety together with five
questions.
We now give the answers.
If you have questions or desire further information concerning
the Letter of Intent, please contact the Legacy and Endowment
Department at Jewish Federation, 921-8810.
1. QUESTION: Is the Letter of Intent an irrevocable legal
contract?
ANSWER: No, the Letter of Intent is merely an indicator
of the signer's long-term interest in the stability of the Jewish
community.
2. QUESTION: Can you be sued for failure to perform a
commitment specified in a signed Letter of Intent?
ANSWER: Absolutely not. The Letter of Intent is not a
bilateral legal contract. Rather it is an indication of an in-
dividual's desire to encourage a strong and vital South Broward
Jewish community.
3. QUESTION: Is a Letter of Intent necessary for an in-
dividual who has made or will make a charitable bequest in his
or her will?
ANSWER: Yes, because executing a Letter of Intent gives
the Federation a reliable guide by which to make planning
projections for the long-range needs of the South Broward
Jewish community.
t. QUESTION: Is signing a Letter of Intent advisable for an
individual who feels that he or she is financially insecure at
present?
ANSWER: Yes. A Letter of Intent is a symbolic gesture. It
simply tells the community that an individual believes that a
public long-term commitment is important.
5. QUESTION: Is a Letter of Intent a "moral" agreement?
ANSWER: Yes. The only strength a Letter of Intent has is
in the moral commitment of the signer to act upon his-her beliefs
of the need to support the Jewish community as specified in the
Letter of Intent.
"The Jewish consciousness of
the cadets has been raised con-
siderably by the work of JWB,
the Jewish chaplains and Jewish
lay leaders," Schacter said.
"By doing this we heighten
their receptivity to the role of
Jewish lay leadership," he added.
"The cadets will not only be in
positions of Jewish leadership
within the armed forces. They an
also potential leaders for posi-
tions in their civilian communi-
ties after they leave the service."
The 30 newly commissioned
Jewish officers include 12 at the
U.S. Air Force Academy in
Colorado Springs, Colo.: eight at
the U.S. Military Academy, West
Point; five at the U.S. Naval
Academy at Annapolis, Md ,
and five at the U.S. Merchant
Marine Academy, Kings Point,
N.Y.
JWB is accredited by the U.S.
government as representative of
the American Jewish community
to serve the religious, Jewish
Babysitting
course Is free
Young people 12-16 may regis-
ter for a free six-hour baby-
sitting course of instruction to be
offered by Community Hospital
of South Broward. 5100 W. Hal-
landale Beach Blvd., on three
Thursdays beginning June 16.
The classes will run from 1-3 p.m.
Topics covered include respon-
sibilities of sitters and parents,
general care of infants and chil-
dren, safety, first-aid. infant
CPR. and child play and
behavior.
The course will be under the di-
rection of Vickie Dinneen RN.
clinical instructor at the hospital.
Participants must attend all
three sessions to earn certifica-
tion.
Registration is limited. Call
Carol Bruno at 966-8100 for res-
ervations.
educational and
Jewish military .
families nad patients in VA Hos-
pitals.
At the same time, JWB is the
network of the central service
agency for Jewish Community
Centers, YM-YWIiAa and camps
in the United States and Canada,
serving one million Jews. It pro-
vides Jewish educational and cul-
tural S1PW !! through tk,
Jwwid.lt*. SarvieaTjWB iT
ton Bureau. JWB Jewish Book
Co-aril, JWB Jewu* jJ2
Council, and Israel-related attjyt
."rKi.fc2!
JWB is
Federations, the UJA-1
Campaign of Greater New YeA
Jewish Community Canters aid
YM 4 YWH A. and JWB aS
Arab arrested
in nuns' slaying
JERUSALEM (JTA) Police have arrested an
Arab employee of the Russian Orthodox convent in Ein
Karem in connection with the murders of two nuns, Israel
Radio announced. The victims, Barbara Vespikov, 68, and
her daughter, Veroniko, 43, died of multiple stab wounds.
Religious Affairs Minister Yosef Burg has cabled con-
dolences to the Russian Orthodox Patriarch in Moscow.
The police said they suspected an "inside job" from the
start because there were no signs of forced entry into the
cottage occupied by the nuns, indicating that they knew
their assailant.
'Haifa Night9
Saturday at
Miami Port
A gala "Night in Haifa" will be
hosted by New Leadership Divi-
sion of State of Israel Bonds
Organization Saturday evening,
June 11, at Port of Miami, Pier 8-
9, M. Ronald Krongold, national
chairman of Israel Bonds New
Leadership group, has an-1
nounced.
Krongold said that the gala
will feature a reception, dinner,
dancing and entertainment by
comedian Jackie Mason. "We
expect a record crowd surpassing
last year's successful event held
at the Metro Zoo, and I know
that we will receive tremendous
support from the young profes-
sional community in South
Florida." he noted.
Bridge, anyone?
Duplicate bridge sponsored by
the Sisterhood of Temple /Beth
El, under the direction of Abe
and Ruth Russo. certified Ameri-
can Contract Bridge League di-
rectors, is held every Monday at
7:30 p.m.. in the Tobin Auditori-
um of Temple Beth El, 1361 S.
14th Avenue. Hollywood. Coffee
and tea is served. Donation is
$2.50 a: the door. 10 tickets are
$20. The public may attend.
Hebrew Religious School
Teachers Wanted Tues.,
Thurs. & Sun. for Synagogue
in So. Broward. Easy Access
to No. Dade. Excellent Salary.
Call 961-1700
Kutsher's Playaway Plan
Gives You The Stars!
BEN VEREEN LOLA FALANA
July 3 July H
ROBERT KLEIN SUSAN ANTON
July 16 July 23
BILLY CRYSTAL
July 30
Impressed? That's just July-wait till you see our
August galaxy! All in addition to everything that
elevates a Kutsher vacation to star quality. Including
our private lake. 18-hole golf course, tennis, racquet
ball, indoor ice skatingsj on the premises. Excep-
tional Day Camp and Teen programs, too. It's all here,
along with the warm Kutsher hospitality that makes you
feel like the most important star of all!
Kutsher's
MowMceHo. New York 12701 (914) 794*000
TOLL Fr*r
MBBfOMM
CALL TOLL FREE: (M0) 431-1273
rCanfcNona
iHonono
raise The
KSfSim-^tsx
"Fun Ships"
B/ery Saturday and Sunday the fabulous 'Tun Ships".
Camivaie. Festfvale. Mardl Gras and Tropicale depart
from Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports... Virtually
everything's included for the low price of your cruise:
You can feast on eight meals and snacks a day...
challenge the odds in a full gambling casino...
thrill to spectacular live entertainment nightly...
dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
live dance bands or in an authentic disco-
theaue and more!
3v of tanaiuiiUx ana l*Mnon OBgJtfiv
iii i i mil


Friday. June 10. 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Papre 7-B
Four new children's books
all hit the mark
Reviewed by Alta Eisenpress
The Golem. By Isaac Bathtvis
Singer; illustrated by Uri Shule-
via. Farrar, Straus and Oiroux,
19 Union Square West, New
York, N.Y. 10003. 1982. 86 pages.
Ages 10 and up. $10.96.
This is an outstanding story
for young and old alike. Singer's
version of the oft-told legend of
the golem, who was created to
help the persecuted Jews of
Prague and who later had to be
destroyed when he went on an
uncontrollable rampage, reflects
many of the values of Judaism:
honesty, unswerving faith in
(iod, love and loyalty.
Singer's description of events,
characters and places is vivid,
with mystical overtones. His de-
dication of this book to "the per-
secuted and oppressed every-
[ where" is very moving.
Uri Shulevilz, an award-win-
I ning illustrator, enriches the
| story with his black-and-white
(ir.iwinns. The city of Prague and
Ills inhabitants come to lite in
llhese lively drawings which
reveal the changing moods of the
story.
The Jewish Americans: A Histo-
ry in Their Own Words 1660-
1960. Edited by Milton Meltzer.
Thomas Y. Crowell, 10E. 63St.,
New York, N.Y. 10022. 1982. 174
pages. Ages 13and up. $10.60.
This collection of documents
describing the personal experi-
ences of Jewish Americans com-
plements and enriches our knowl-
edge and understanding of many
facets of this period. It is a
worthy contribution to American
Jewish documentary history.
Meltzer has selected the ac-
counts from a variety of sources:
letters, journals, diaries, autobio-
graphies, speeches, petitions and
interviews.
The arrangement is excellent.
Each ducument is introduced
with a description of the speaker
and event which helps to clarify
what follows. At the conclusion
of each document, at the point
where our appetite is whetted,
the editor lists the source so we
can read further on the subject.
Relevant photographs and fac-
similes appear every few pages. A
short bibliography and adequate
index are included.
Joshua in the Promised Land. By
Miriam Chaikin; illustrated by
David Frampton. Clarion Books,
52 Vanderbilt Ave., New York,
N.Y. 10017. 1982. 83pages. Ages
8-13. $11.50.
In this retelling of the biblical
account of Joshua, the author has
created a family and servants for
him. ascribed thoughts and moti-
vations to him and created dia-
logue. The reader will not onlv
become acquainted with the bib-
lical story, but will also learn
much about the everyday life of
the times.
"Conservative Synagogue seeking Bal Koreh who will
also attend Daily Minyan and supervise Kashrut on
premises. Apartment near synagogue provided, plus
I salary. Ideal for retiree...We are also seeking a part-
[time afternoon Hebrew School teacher and Youth
[Director. Send inquiries to: Cong. B'nai Israel of St.
[Petersburg, 301 59th St., North St. Petersburg, FL
13710, ATT: Personal.
Joshua is seen in historical
perspective through an introduc-
tion and afterword that span the
period from the sojourn in Egypt
to Israel s statehood.
The beautiful black-and-white
woodcuts by David Frampton
express moods, events and char-
acterizations very effectively.
Getting Even. By Miriam Chat-
kin; illustrated by Richard Egiel-
ski. Harper and Row, 10 E. 53
St., New York, N.Y. 10002. 1982.
120pages. Ages 8-11. $10.50.
The third book in the series
about Molly, a pre-teenager
growing up in Brooklyn in the
early 1940's, Getting Even in-
vites the reader to share Molly's
life with her Jewish family, with
her friends and at school.
It explores the problems and
challenges a young girl faces. Re-
sentments, jealousy, misunder-
standings, loyalty, friendship
and loneliness make up the fabric
of this warm and sensitive story.
Young people will enjoy it and
relate to it.
The illustrations in black and
white complement the story by
evoking a feeling for the time and
place.
Alta Eisenpress is a librarian at
Temple Israel Center, White
Plains. N.Y.
June birthday?
Free gift awaits
Three Broward County offices
of AmeriFirst are giving away a
tree birthday gift to customers
and visitors during the month of
June during regular office hours.
The offices include: Italian-
dale. 1740 E. Hallandale Reach
Blvd. Monday. 9-6 and Tues-
day through Friday, 9-4: Brow-
ard Mall. Broward Mall Shop
ping Center in Plantation
Monday through Thursday, 9:30-
4, Friday, 9:30-7, and Saturday,
9:30-2; and Lighthouse Point,
3650 N. Federal Highway -
Monday through Thursday. 9-4
and Friday, 9-6.
Anyone celebrating a birthday
in June may stop by to pick up a
free gift. To receive a gift, the
recipient must. be at least 18
years of age and a Florida resi-
dent.
AmeriFirst is celebrating its
50th anniversary this year.
Summer is Special
at Stevensville.
SPECIAL DISCOUNTED RATES FOR
MINIMUM 4-WEEK STAY DURING JULY AND AUGUST!
Join the Dinnerstein and Friehling Families at one
of the Catskill's finest resorts this summer and gel
everything we're famous for PLUS special discounts on
our rates. You'll enjoy luxurious accommodations, our
own magnificent 18-hole championship golf course,
indoor and outdoor tennis. 3 sumptuous meals daily
and an exciting line-up of big-name performers all
summer long. So. come to Stevensville Spend the
summeror a monthat very special savings
Olympic-size Outdoor Pool
Indoor Pool
Men's & Women's Health Clubs
(Saunas. Massage)
Sailing, Boating. Fishing on 5-Mile Lake
Roller Skating
Professional Social Staff
CALL TOLL FREE
800-431-3858
ASK FOR GLORIA
^^ Or Cal Your Travel Agent #^^
Stevensville
Catty CM. Swaa lake,JUT. ^*"*~ <*
Year Hall, Tat MaaicsWa MaHHaa frnMrn
NETWORKING Career Planning and (Job) Placement'
was the topic addressed by Dr. Mary Ellen Hrutka of Barry
University (center) before the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Business and Professional Women's Network. With
the speaker are Vicky Kellert (left) and Susan Malter, chair-
woman. Next Women's Division session is Thursday, June 16,
at 7:30 p.m. Speaker will be Dorothy Weinstein, whose topic is
to center on Businessman-Businesswoman: The Difference is
YOUR business.'
BNAI BRITH so. DADE COUNTY PRESENTS:
ISRAEL
AtfOUST 10-AUOUST 34. 19S3
SIMMER
MISSION
15 DAYS DELUXE 5 STAR PACKAGES INCLUDING!
MEMMST I MO MHT F HA StCNTKEIK EXCITMC EVEMNSS
5 ST MHUE HOTELS LKWtYMCMI.NSSES U1TUES
EMUnVCMMtnU MUtflftMUK All SEMCE CNMGES
FUUY ESCOUTEO ON EtAl FROM MIAMI ONLY $1855 / OBI
NEW YOWK AND MONTHEAl DEPARTURES AVAttABlE
THIS YEAR DO IT FOR ISRAEL BY DOING IT IN ISRAEL
FOR MORE INFORMATION A RESERVATIONS'CAU TODAY
Tn,r, Tatox: 523761 TRAVEL TOUR FTV
TRAVEL TOURS 4485 Stirling Rd.. Ft Lauderdale. Fl 33314
dade9440411 brow 584-9664 pbch736-2466
Gulfside Getaway
Vacation persons
4 NIGHTS only18B
2 NIGHTS ONLY #f095
Double occupancy, including taxes, gratuities April
15 thru December 15,1983
PACKAGE INCLUDES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room lor 2 people 4 nights 2 nights
Continental breaktast for 2 4 mornings 2 mornings
Dinner lor 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Golf Packages and \. j
Discounts also available
RAMADA8 ^ij
Oft
11000 Gulf Shore Drive, North
VANDERBILT BEACH
Naples, Florida 33040
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment in
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeing,
fishing, shelling. Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents
Children's meals at menu prices.
Writ* or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
r-------------------------------------_.
| fUfMM VAMERtlLT INN tin mi rj.pl. IT* '
| I INI M ftm M* ft, Ms*. Ri. SM40
I
| Q Sard tratbrochures D Gorf Package D Gultsir> ., awayt ,
lor (No otpaor


^^
Page 8-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. Jan. 10.19
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
8mg
5 nig
SOn PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL: 2 mg. -*".0.2 mg. mcotmt
av. i cigarette by FTC method
EMMMh t* lew* reflect e*e> the Dec FTC Report or FTC iwhod
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*


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