The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00324

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
lewish family sues 'terrorists' for $6 million
u
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
lewish Advocacy Center, an
Irganization founded last year to
lake legal action in support of
lictims of anti-Semitism, has
pled a $6 million suit in a federal
ourt in Brooklyn against three
tings Point, N.Y., men who have
terrorized" a Jewish family in
that Long Island community for
three years.
Irvin Shapell, president of the
I Washington Jewish Advocacy
ICenter, said he filed the suit for
compensation and punitive
[damages for Yaacov and Hanna
Assault rampage' on Long Island
Elkon and then-
aged 6 and 11.
two children,
The suit charges that Brad Barry,
Robert Lesser and Brian Kolen went on a
three-year "rampage of assault, terror
and vandalism" against the Elkons "for
the simple reason that the Elkons are
Jewish."
Shapell noted that although similar
suits have been filed in the past for Black
families, it has never been done before
for Jewish victims of racism.
"This lawsuit marks the beginning of
a new and aggressive program to initiate
civil law suits for monetary damages in
addition to relying on criminal
prosecution to deter the current high
number of anti-Semitic incidents in the
U.S.," Shapell said.
He said this program by the center
will "send a clear and emphatic message
that the Jewish community will not
tolerate anti-Jewish violence, but will
respond forcefully and responsibly
with the full weight of the law."
He said it is hoped that "this lawsuit
will help reduce the number of anti-Jew-
ish acts by making them too costly and
risky to consider.
The complaint charges that the
Elkons' home was defaced with swasti-
kas and anti-Jewish slogans; fires were
set on their property; windows were shot
out and broken; fireworks were thrown
into the house, and anti-Semitic state-
ments against Mrs. Elkon were spray-
painted along a public street.
The suit alleges that the defendants
also placed a voodoo doll in the front
yard of the Elkons' home with a Star of
David on the doll's chest and a hypoder-
mic syringe piercing the doll's eye.
"As a result of these acts, the Elkons
were compelled to live in fear for their
safety for three years," Shapell said. He
said the children particularly were af-
fected by the incidents.
Barry, 20, who lives across the street
from the Elkons, has been convincted in
local courts of the voodoo doll incident
and other acts of vandalism against
Jews in the area, according to Shapell.
He said the two younger men also live
near the Elkons.
eJewi&h Floridlao
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 13 Number 11
Hollywood, Florida Friday, May 27,1983
f f0 ShOChtt
Price 35 Cents
U.S. backs Israel in selling F16s
75 jet fighters to bring
strength to 150planes
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan adminis-
tration officially has announced its plans to sell 75 F-16 jet
fighter planes to Israel, with delivery starting in
December 1986.
This comes 11 months later than originally
scheduled because of President Reagan's decision to hold
up the sale of the planes after Israel went into Lebanon
last June.
Jesse and Cynde Martin are packing for Israel.
To Eretz Israel... finally
By STEVE KATON
Associate Editor
Jesse and Cynde Martin signed up
last week to travel to Israel with the
Jewish Federation of South Broward
as Community Mission members.
This, in and of itself, is not unusual.
The South Broward Federation has
the largest missions program in the
United States.
What is unusual is that Jesse and
Cynde Martin active in the local
Federation 36 years will be making
their first trip to Israel. Since 1947, the
Martins have been thinking about the
trip.
"Actually," Martin says, "we were booked
to go on two missions over the years, h
Continued on Page 4
The decision, hinted at by
Reagan all last week, was in the
form of official notification of the
sale to Congress by the Depart-
ment of Defense. Congress has 30
days in which it may block the
sale an unlikely event since
many in Congress have been
pressuring for months for the
embargo to be lifted.
When all the planes are de-
livered, now scheduled for Sep-
tember 1988, Israel will have 150
F16s. The $2.7 billion sale in-
cludes support equipment for the
75 F16s and training and main-
tenance equipment costs for all
150 planes.
An hour before the decision
was made public, it was an-
nounced privately by Secretary
of State George Shultz to 110
Jewish leaders representing the
conference of presidents of major
American Jewish organizations
and Jewish Republicans. Shultz
mi'i for an hour last week with
them at the State Department at
his request.
Before the meeting, Shultz had
a short meeting with Julius Ber-
man, chairman of the presidents
conference; Yehuda Hellman, its
executive vice chairman: and two
leading Jewish Republicans, Max
Fisher of Detroit and George
Klein of New York.
The decision was announced at
the State Department by spokes-
man John Hughes. "While the
Continued on Page fr
I Annual meeting
JFSB's 40th session June 8

hn Salter
The Jewish Federation of South Broward will hold
its annual meeting its 40th -Wednelay. June
8, at 7:30 at the Federation, 2719 Hollywood Blvd.
According to President Ben Salter, prime order of
business will be the introduction of the Federations
1984 slate of officers and board of directors. I urge all
members and friends to attend," Salter said.
The JFSB nominees and their positions are:
Dr. Philip A. Levin, president; Dr. Saul Singer, Ted Newman
and Nat Sedley, vice presidents; Otto Steiber, secretary; and Dr.
Howard Barren, treasurer.
The proposed board of directors, to be elected to three-year
terms expiring with the annual meeting of 1986, are:
Dr. Barron, Nelson Dembs, Marc Gilbert, Esther Gordon,
Herbert M. Grossman, Alan Kan, Herbert D. Kate, Michael
Orlove, Elaine Pittell, Morris Ratner, Ronald J. Rothschild, Marge
Continued on Page 2
njitzvai)
'I thought this
beautiful way of
thanking God for
Sam reaching 83
and feeling the way
he does and a way of
me thanking God,
too,' Lillian Mandel
says of her
husband's second
bar mitzvah 70
years after the first.
Actually, the
Hollywood couple
was b'nai mitzvahed
last week at Temple
Solel, which also is
celebrating its 13th
birthday.


IC U ClA/iO
/i i uj, >uwh u/m* utwiur ui \jreuier nouywooa
r'nday, May 27.H
'There are Jews in all my songs
Handicapped? It's all in way you see it
By JOAN SILBERSTEIN
UJA Correspondent
JERUSALEM At 10
o'clock on a Thursday morning,
an ordinary workday, I enter a
factory. Within half an hour, I
feel as if I am in a synagogue. Be-
cause of the singing. Because of
the loud, brave, sad songs of
Jewish men and women who
carry our collective history in
their voices.
Picture this room: a large, bare
open floor. More than 150 phy-
sically, emotionally or mentally
handicapped people are seated at
work tables. Six to a table. Four.
One. All ages. In all conditions.
One thing in common: They need
help.
Like them, another 6,300 Jews
are cared for throughout Israel in
Hameshakem sheltered work-
shops for rehabilitation of the
handicapped. It costs $14.6 mil-
lion annually for bask main-
tenance of these United Jewish
Appeal-Federation programs, in-
cluding $5.5 million in subsidies
from the Jewish Agency.
These funds do not cover the
cost of new construction, pur-
chase of new machinery or train
inn of specially qualified tech-
nical staff.
The people I see before me are
all busy.
By hand, they are making file
folders. Sold to the government
of Israel, to the ministry of de-
fense. Two hundred thousand a
month, month in and month out.
Not a very dazzling occupation,
but useful.
I begin to walk past the work
tables. A woman smiles, inviting
me into her life.
"Sara," she says is her name.
An immigrant from Russia. Her
hair is dark, her eyes spark when
she tells me that for 15 years she
was a singer on Russian televi-
sion. She does not mention the
blue numbers on her arm, from a
concentration camp. The other
details spill out one after the
other. In her 40s. Divorced.
Three children. A daughter in
school. Two sons who took part
in Operation Peace for the Gali-
lee.
And she, Sara. Why is she here
in this sheltered workshop,
Hameshakem? High blood pres-
sure. A heart condition. Battered
nerves. She lacks the physical
stamina to put in an eight-hour
day, five and a half days a week
Women's UJA Regional
set in W. Paint Beach
The United Jewish Appeal
Women's Division announces its
Florida Regional Conference is to
be June 1 and 2 at the Hyatt
Palm Beaches in West Palm
Beach.
According to Delia Rosenberg,
regional conference chairwoman.
South Broward officially will be
represented by Joyce Newman.
NCJW award
The Hollywood Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women has presented its presti-
gious Hannah G Solomon Award
to Muriel Kirschenbaum.
In giving the recognition
during the NCJW s annual
luncheon. President Rose Orszag
noted Mrs. Kirschenbaum is
"dedicated above and beyond the
call of duty, unstintingly giving
and guiding to strengthen and
further the work of the National
Council of Jewish Women."
Evelyn Stieber and "the chair-
woman.
Mrs. Newman will be a pre-
senter for the highly praised
movie "Life Behind the Lifeline."
Guest speakers at the confer-
ence will be Harriet Zimmerman.
UJA National Women's Division
chairwoman: Haim Shaked. pro-
fessor of Middle Eastern studies:
Rela Geffen Monson. associate
professor of sociology: and An-
nette Dulzin. a journalist.
Shaked. on leave from Tel Aviv
University, is founder of theShil-
oach Center for Middle East and
African Studies, the largest such
institution in the world.
He is now director of the Cen-
ter for Advanced International
Studies at the University of
Miami.
Monson. associate professor of
sociology at Gratz College in
Philadelphia, is a Fellow at the
Center for Jewish Community
Studies and serves on the advis-
ory committee of the National
Jewish Family Center of the
American Jewish Committee.
in the competitive, open market.
Here, she works from 7:30 in
the morning till 1 in the after-
noon, with half an hour break for
tea. She receives National In-
surance, a pension, medical in-
surance and a salary of about 80
cents an hour. Subsidized, all of
it-
Why does she not sing on Is-
raeli television?
There is no place for her .. .
not on the one and only channel
Israel has.
Well, then, will she sing for me
and let me record her voice on my
tape recorder?
Yes, Sara will sing. In Russian.
Bucharin. Georgian. Uzbeki.
Turkish.
But where, in a sheltered work-
shop, without disrupting the
work of 150 others?
In Jerusalem, anything is pos-
sible. We walk out behind
Hameshakem. to stand in a stony
little alleyway between two
buildings.
"There are Jews in all my
songs." Sara says. And in her
songs, I hear a parade of them
pass by, from 2.000 years ago.
from today, crossing the snows of
Russia, the severe mountains of
Turkey. Walking to Israel. I hear
Jews, singing. Surviving.
When we return to the work-
shop. Sara asks that I play my
tape back for her. Mr. Pesler. Is-
rael director general of
Hameshakem. and Mr. Veeder.
Jerusalem regional director, join
us and indulge this request.
Sara's song fills the room. Like
a magnet, her music pulls others
to her table. They are from many
countries, some wearing the
flowered summer dresses- or
striped pajama-like trousers and
shirts of Arab lands from which
they came, some in the heavy
wool pants, sweaters and peaked
workmen's caps of Eastern
Europe.
There is a spontaneous out-
pouring of joy. Two dozen men
and women come to sing with
Sara, to dance and sway and snap
their fingers, even to send out the
high undulating wail of the North
African and Far Eastern Jews.
Their smiles are so real, their
months so brilliantly proud with
gold teeth that I forget where I
am, in a room where every person
is hurting.
Unexpectedly, from behind, a
man taps me on the shoulder. A
short man, about 60, wanting
something very badly.
"Please," he says, "I want to
sing the Kol Nidre for you."
In Jerusalem, anything is pos-
sibile. Even this most somber,
this holiest of holy songs can be
sung in the middle of a sheltered
workshop where the work of the
day is making file folders.
Aryeh and I retreat to a
storage room. There are grey
metal shelves ranked along the
walls, boxes stored all along their
length and height.
We stand in an aisle, facing
each other. Aryeh plants his feet
firmly on the bare floor. He
strikes a proud stance that makes
him taller.
"I was a cantor," he tells me.
"In Hungary. Before the war.
Before Auschwitz. I used to u
the land. I was a gardener, J
But then I started having troubj
with my kidneys. It was fm!
lying in the snow, in the rain Mvl
mother, my father, they didn',1
survive. After Auschwitz onlv I
was left. 'f
"When I came to Israel, I J
married. For 26 years we werefcJ
getber. Then my wife becan I
paralyzed and six years later 8hf
died. Since then, away from hi
sometimes I feel I'm left lio*
alone like a fly on the wall."
Without another word, Anrt
begins to sing the Kol Nidrt.
And, through his singing, coo-
nects himself to his past, when
was young and there M
Redemption. Lake Sara, who atsa
for me just now in the aUemr L
he becomes a Jew in all his pro:I ^
and glory. The singing pom
through the empty storage room
and through me
And into the workshop. The
dancing fades away. The tape re-
corder is turned off. Sara comet
to the doorway of the storage
room and stands listening
Behind her, other faces gather.
Still flushed with the joy of I
their dancing. But quiet now, re-
flecting the slower cadence of
sorrow past and pride emergent
Listening. Remembering. Shar-
ing hurt. and healing.
Annual meeting
Continued from Page 1
Saltzman. bedley. Marilyn Segal and Dr. Singer.
Two of the Federation's three leadership awards will tx
presented during the meeting: the Herbert I), and Ellie Kau
Leadership Award and the Hy and Belle Schlafer Young
Leadership Award. -.v. .
According to Salter. the third-prestigious leadership award.
the June M. Gordon Award, was presented to Delia Rosenberg by
the Federation's Women's Division.
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Friday, May 27,1983
The Jewish Floridian.and Shofwof Greater Hollywood
Page 3
JewisI? Federation of South. Broward
Ijoijors
its
leaders
Dr. Singer bestows a silver Pe
Kiddush Cup upon Federation Vice
President and Campaign Co-Chair-
man Ted Newman.
1982-83 President Ben Safcer (left) presents 'We Are One Hand by Hand' sculpture, set on a
Star of David in antiqued bronze, on a black Incite base, to 1982-83 U JA-Federation Campaign
Chairman Saul Singer.
Israeli Vice Consul Oded Ben Hur, keynote
speaker as the Jewish Federation of South Broward
honored and presented awards to its top leaders,
made these salient points:
The Arabs have spent $90 billion since the
Yom Kippur War to arm themselves.
The I sraeli army has been waiting for a very
long time to strike a major blow against Syrian
President Hafez Assad, who is in the class of Idi
Amin and other tyrants.
Jerry "Zvi" Wolf, son of Bob and Shane of
South Broward, was a proud soldier in the Israeli
army who fell for his adopted country ... we should
all be proud.
There are many similarities between
Hollywood and Hallandale Beach and the beaches of
Israel's Mediterranean except that the people in
South Broward face the water when they go to the
beach, and the people of Israel must sit with their
backs to the water (to guard against invasion).
Israeli Vice Consul Oded
Ben Hur addressed the
Jewish Federation of
South Broward s Annual
Awards Cocktail Party.
< MM
Dr. Singer presents a multi-colored lithograph (used on
the title page for the Declaration of Independence for the
State of Israel in 1948) to Federation Vice President and
UJA-Federation Campaign Co-Chairman Nat Sedley.
Sumner G. K.ye, executive director of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward, (left) P-?"* ? *
Herodian Oil Lamp to Robert Berkowit. of MuWVkdon
Production, for hi. effort- along ^{^ZSTSL
J.nie Berman and Beverly Shapiro In producing Life
Behind the Lifeline.'
IIJA-Federation Campaign Cr
man Saul Singer awards a silver
Peace Kiddush Cup to Otto
Stieber, secretary of the Feder*
tion and Beach chairman.


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. May 27.1963
Jewish Floridian
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Fooaralnn oi SouW Broward. 27t* MoUywood Bivd Hollywood. Fia 33020 PtioneMi aj.o
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Friday. May 27.1983
Volume 13
15 SI VAN 5743
Number 11
Peace... exeept
So weary and concerned are Jews
throughout the world about Israel in
Lebanon that the numbness of it all makes
it difficult to understand that it may now
be well over. Except. .
It may be over because Israel and
Lebanon have finally signed a peace
agreement. Whatever else one may say
about the precarious situation these days in
Lebanon itself, the fact is that the
Lebanese must be applauded for their
determination to resist the pressures
directed against them by other Arab
nations and the Soviet Union not to sign.
The "except" is Syria, which occupies
roughly half of Lebanon, and which must
now be persuaded, along with the remnants
of returning PLO forces, to leave the
country, or Israel will not leave. If the
United States and its minions thought the
Israelis were "intransigent" in then-
negotiations, wait until they have to deal
with the Syrians in a similar exodus effort.
Something tells us that Ronald Reagan
and Co. by now get the message.
But for the first time in almost a year.
Israelis and Jews elsewhere can breathe a
momentary sigh of relief. For a while at least,
the pressure is off of them the agonizing
lies of the media, the high-handed methods
of the U.S. negotiators to pressure Israel
into concession after concession in the
cause of peace with little or no concern for
the reasons that Israel went into Lebanon
in the first place.
For a while at least, the media, the
negotiators of the U .S and other countries,
as well, will be able to regard the "in-
transigence" of Syria and the reluctance of
the Arab "moderates" to enlarge the peace
in the Middle East begun with the signing
of the Camp David accords.
Perhaps they will begin to understand
what the last year since the launching of
the Israeli operation June 6 has been all
about.
THE NEW STRpNQrMN
No
time
for
By ABBA BEN YAMIN
(Hebrew name for Abe Halpern)
Tuesday. April 11,1939
On a plane to Washington
Dear Keppele,
As you remember, at the seder last week,
Grandma asked once again what is happening to
my Yiddish novel. And I told her once again that
the idea for this novel was already in my mind
when I arrived in the United States in 1923. A few
years later I began to make an outline and started
to write the first chapter in Yiddish.
Thinking about it now perhaps it would be a
good idea for me to write it in English. I find
myself thinking in English and not Yiddish the
way I did when I first came to this country.
Hopefully, I will try to have an outline and
several chapters written before the next seder.
What do you think of the title "No Time For
Lonelineaa, That's the Story of My Life." I also
think it should be written in the first person
singular the way I started it in'Yiddish base
it on some of my actual experiences but write it as
fiction.
I just translated the first few paragraphs from
the Yiddish.
Enveloped in complete darkness on a spring
day at dawn, first the church steeples, then the
roofs of the houses began to tight up from the
rays of the rising sun on the horizon. It seemed as
though someone began lifting, albeit slowly, the
large blanket covering the village.
First one rooster, then another, followed by a
chorus of roosters began sounding the coming of
another day. A dog ran through the square
looking for shelter. A cool breeze indicated that it
will be a cool spring day.
When I get home in a couple of days, let's
discuss it. You know that I value your opinion.
But remember, don't pull any punches.
' I must close now because the plane is about U>
land All my love,
Abba
Keppele is the diminutive of the Yiddish word
Kop which means head. It is used as an endearing
term. Abba is Hebrew for father.
Thursday. March 4.1943
On a plane to Meridian.
Dear Keppele.
Grandma has been in my thoughts. It is almost
four years since I promised her to have at least a
good beginning of my novel ready to be read to
her. Now Grandma is no longer with us and I in
still on square one.
I know what you are thinking, and I agree. I
could have been working on the novel had I been
willing to give up a great deal of my many ac-
tivities. But how could I? All the things I have
been so busy with, such as working for
Federation-UJA, Jewish Community Center, the
temple. Israel Bonds. United Way, Myasthenia
Gravis, B'nai B'rith and so many more, are so
important.
Sometimes I felt guilty that perhaps I have not
spent enough time with you. But when I look
back I realize that so many of the things I have
done you have been part of. And then of course
you have been busy with your own interests, such
as Hadassah, Sisterhood, Girl Scouts, Brownies,
dramatics and all the other things that have made
such demands on your time.
But with all the things to occupy us we also did
not neglect our social life. Good friends played a
very big role in our lives. What with the expanded
responsibilities of the business and all the things
we did, we sure did manage to cram a great deal
into every day.
As much as I wanted to I simply bad no time to
devote to the novel. Although I did write such
things as editorials, columns, press release*,
speeches, and the joint writing of our programs.
The next few weeks are going to be very busy
for me. As soon as things slow down a bit I'll have
to get busy and start writing the novel.
I miss you very much and would much rather
be home than where I am going. I find myself
talking to you even though you are not with me.
The sign has gone up to fasten our seat belts.
We will be landing soon.
Take care of yourself. I will call you from the
hotel.
Much love.
Abba.
. ;-. :
-
Thursday, Oct. 9,1947
On a plane to Cleveland
Dear Keppele.
Don't laugh at me. although I won't blame you
if you do. I missed my connection to Cleveland so
I had to take a later plane. The reason is that I
met Maurice Samuel and we talked so much that
I forgot about time and the plane left without me.
You always tell me that I talk too much and I
suppose I do. Missing the plane was worth it
Continued on Page 12
Martins to see homeland
Continued from Page 1
something would always come up, and we
would have to cancel out."
As very active Federation workers, the
Martins "have extremely strong desires" to go
to Israel. "Our love for Israel has never and
will never cease," Martin says, "but somehow
we've never seen the wonders of the homeland
in person."
The Community Mission, Oct. 24-Nov. 3,
according to Joan Raticoff, missions chairman!
includes 5-star deluxe hotels, all meals, round
trip airfare (Fort Lauderdale to Fort lauder-
dalel and the best sightseeing guides available
anywhere in the State of Israel.
The United Jewish Appeal's envoys will
guide South Broward visitors through Israel's
historic political and spiritual capital, Jeru-
salem^ where greater Hollywood area Jews will
meet high-level Israelis and lunch at the Knes-
set.
Other highlights of the Community Mission
include:
Seeing Youth Aliyah villages, visiting and
touring Caesarea and Haifa, climbing Masada
viewmg the Chagall Windows and meeting and
eating with kibbutzniks.
Also. JFSB mission-goers will ass and visit
their sister aty. Hod Hseharon. and check up
on where then- Project Renewal dollars are
being put to work.
"All our Christians friends have been there
(to Israel) already." Martin says. "But
somehow it has eluded us. Were not going to
Israel to find our roots las so many Jewish
people do) because they were planted long
before statehood. Our feelings for Israel are
strong and warm," Martin says.
"Israel reflects on all of world Judaism, and
we must see it, experience it. We've been eager
to go for years."
President of the Federation in 1971-72,
Martin was first elected in 1947 to JFSB's
board of directors. "Ben Salter (current
president) and I go back a long, long way,"
Martin says
During his tenure at a top lay leader, Martin
has held nearly every voluntary position
possible. He's been in charge of Super Sunday.
Cash Collection and, during the years of 1970
and 1971, was campaign chairman
He is retired now after 31 years of service to
Hollywood Inc. The last five years Martin was
sales manager.
His community involvement is evidenced by
his presidencies of the Greater Hollywood
Area Chamber of Commerce, Easter Seal
Clink and the Planning and Zoning Asso-
ciation.
The Martins' work for Federation has spilled
over to their next generation. Their daughter,
Melissa, is employed as Community Relations
Committee director, responsible for informing
South Broward on such areas as the Middle
East, Soviet Jewry, gun control and the entire
gamut of domestic concerns.
"We are very proud of Israel. It's glorious:
it's magnificent," Martin says.
"'We've been selling Israel for years do*
we're going to see what we've been selling


Friday, May 27,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 6
m
mt,
m
HOSPITAL ON WHEELS The Southeast District of the
American Magen David for Israel announces that a 'hospital on
wheels,' supporting Israel's Red Cross, was dedicated last Sun-
day at Hallandale Jewish Center. The mobile intensive care
ambulance was given by Bernard Lieberman of Hallandale,
with his family, Esther Drucker, Rose Propper and Leo and Eve
Lieberman, and honors the memory of their parents, Abraham
"and Celia Lieberman.
Smith Park wins grant
A federal grant of $147,000 has
[been awarded to C. B. Smith
Park, according to Congressman
Larry Smith, D-Hollywood. The
I grant is part of the federal Land-
I Water Conservation Fund and
I will be matched by equal state
I and local funds.
Broward County officials say
Jthe funds will be applied to Phase
12 of C. B. Smith Park's $2 million
[development project for con-
Istruction of picnic pavillions,
|bicycle trails, landscaping and
arking.
"South Broward County has a
tremendous natural resource in
C. B. Smith Park, but it is a re-
source which needs to be care-
fully developed so more local res-
idents can enjoy its beauty. This
matching grant providing
funding from all levels of govern-
ment will help create a recrea-
tion area for all the people of
South Florida," Smith said.
Broward County park officials
say they hope to go to bid on the
Phase 2 project shortly, with
construction to begin Oct. 1.
COME UP TO THE
GOODLIFE AT BROWN'S
In The Comfort Of The Catekjlte!
Sfmc* (ttvowtf* *r M* **
EVERYTHING INCLUDED IN OUR
CARE-FREE VACATION PACKAGE!
C? Baggapf Handing.And tfno Transportation
i ind Gratu*t MtfuM In Wt
,_lwl Service WWt Ixtt Cart**[Spaoai *
I Gourmet Mft* 0* ^VW**32*
lErrtartatarnant C?2ShowWgly
9*on Two 1( iWl Cowas. Tarn*JWar
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Biiwifs
Loch Sheldrake. NY. 1S1W W
4) 434*151 matorcndkemmnonona \
Letter to editor
Thank you
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to thank The Floridian for
the wonderful article about Meals
on Wheels Inc. printed in your
paper last November.
I cannot stress the importance
of "Meals on Wheels" enough.
We have been in existence about
eight years, and feed thousands
of people each year. With the help
of our wonderful board of direc-
tors, we raised $17,000 this Pass-
over season to feed those in need.
I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to thank several Deople-.
Mrs. Ann Richardson, our secre-
tary-treasurer, and also my wife,
has put in countless hours with
me working on our project; Mrs.
Eleanor Bernstein, director of the
Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center; Maurice Diener, Sydney
Holzman, David Khrlich. Abra-
ham Mallet and Billie Weiss, our
vice presidents; and Commis-
sioner Stanley Goldman, our
legal adviser; who have all helped
our project immeasurably.
I would also like to thank The
Floridian for running the article
about Meals on Wheels, Inc. We
have received many volunteers
and donations thanks to that
article.
Once again, our address is:
Meals on Wheels, Inc., 3801
South Ocean Drive, Hollywood,
Fla. 33019.
Many thanks to you all.
Sincerely,
GEORGE RICHARDSON
President
Smith favors keeping truck ban on 1-95
Florida Congressman Larry
Smith applauds the decision of
Department of Transportation
Secretary Paul Pappas to keep
the left lane ban on three-axle
trucks on Interstate 95 in Brow-
ard County.
As Hollywood's representative
in the Florida Legislature, Smith
was familiar with the danger un-
restricted trucks presented. "We
knew that the proportion of truck
involved accidents was far
greater than the proportion of
trucks on the highway," said
Smith.
"As a frequent traveler on 1-95,
I was personally aware of the
danger their unrestricted
presence made on such a busy ex-
pressway. It is very gratifying
that the DOT study has con-
firmed my original findings.
After a year of the ban, truck-
involved accidents are down 33
percent I think that is signifi-
cant."
While serving in the Florida
House, Smith sponsored legisla-
tion which would have banned
trucks from the left lane. The ex-
perimental ban was a result of
Smith's efforts.
The state's truckers argued
such a ban would hurt transpor-
tation of needed goods by in-
creasing truck travel time and
congesting the traffic flow. The
year-long study by the Florida
Department of Transportation
has shown that neither travel
time nor traffic flow has suffered.
Instead of hurting the economy,
the lives saved, the injuries pre-
vented and the unneeded costs
will help keep South Florida pro-
ductive and strong.
"This experiment has proved
so successful in Broward County,
that I hope the DOT and elected
officials will apply it to congested
traffic in other urban areas across
the state of Florida," said Smith.
Jewish Federation of South Broward
40th Annual Meeting
June 8,1983
7:30 p.m.
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood
1983-84 Proposed Slate of
Officers and Board of Directors
Philip A. Levin.
Vice President
Vice President
Nat Sedley___ Vice President
Otto St ieber
Howard Barron ......Treasurer
Board of Directors
Members to be elected to a three-year term expiring
with Annual Meeting of 1986:
Howard Barron, M.D. Michael Orlove
Nelson Dembs Elaine Pittell
Marc Gilbert Morris Ratner
Esther Gordon Ronald J. Rothschild
Herbert M. Grossman Marge Saltzman
Alan Kan Nat Sedley
Herbert D. Kati Saul Singer, M.D. Marilyn Segal
QnafwvciMon. *n
tQO MMCn CCflMP Kit
*M1tN>.1Har-t
whydrink Sorfw.*-
Vfliojj-
a?
Sankq
e9BS3s9
for poople rho
lOWB conga,
but nrt cafeta.
. *$} fHIi^p4pKl rO* MV^iCPlM


TkeJewisk
SMofar ofGreater Hollywood
r^rtoay. May 27,
Just what does Letter of intent mean?
The bosk building block of any Legacy and
Endowment Program is the Letter of latent. Many
myths, fallacies and mtmmkmtmMtm **Te *nata
o%^r the definition of Letter of Intent.
Below is a copy of the Letter of Intent osed by
the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Chech if you can corrector answer the questions
posed under the letter.
QUESTIONS
1] Is the Letter of Intent an irrevocable legal
contract?
2] Can you be sued for failure to perform a
MJ^g specified in a signed Letter of Intent?
3] Is a Letter of Intent necessary for an in-
dividual who has made or wfll make a charitable
_i in his or her will?
41 Is signing a Letter of Intent advisable for an
dividual who feds that he or she is financially
> at present?
5] Is a Letter of Intent a "moral" agreement?
The 8~h* Jrwy Con.
-ku. f tht Cmmm^L
rw-fcw f 8-t* iw
n\ n Ik* to apeak to
nahitegnnanmnS,
-Wk,"-Pl1 I tovint
the Soviet llama n the
LETTER OF INTENT
As an expression of my deep mterest m the future strength and security of our Jewish community. I plan
to participate in the Legacy a Endowment Fund program of the Jewish Federation of South Broward and
thereby help assure the continued support of its agencies, institutions and services.
theR
All
Mania *
Kl-8810.
a who woow
U a rcfaaenik or
of ais or her
** the Peder,
Therefore. I have made pnwiniai ___
to support the Legacy a Endowment Fund
___ by ixxherhng hi my Will a bequest to the Legacy a Endowment Fund
___ by gnrmg m bfe msmrance pohcy to the Federation
___ b* estabhshmg a trust with the Federation as beneficiary
___ by fmng a gift of real estate, securities or other items of value
by serrrj; -_- = r^.^rt^roppc Fund within the Legacy a. Endowment Fund
French
cartoonist
honored
PARIS UTAi French
rartooniat Tim has bees awarded
the prize of the Foundation of
French Judaism for his works.
i Poland in 1919, is
of the editorial com-
:ce of the weekly news magi- 'J
L Eapraaa His cartoons are
; the world
Tim. whose read name is Louis
M ftesberg. joined the Free French
Forces m I ninn during World
War II After the war he settled
m Paris amd started his career
T^_< Letter zl Latent \s zc: s. jes=. : r^a-vx: arc mm\ :? :--rjed at my discretion It is supplemental to
sjiz_i =-z s^fo^l cfbs szc ruecjes i-r**;r. 2*d or ye* :: r= t^sie by myself and others, and not a
jchrtrtut* :";- s-.\r surcc
Ths
Nobel Price
of the jury,
r. Andre Lwoff,
are moat
am na.hli
VK-
the values we
to tolerance.
dafBt>
U.S. backs Israel
taaaaar. at :xs ax.cirar*g s
-atjc .. -_a* Israet. ncveBm.sa.
c* LrfC M afcaaxt x ax ~~i sau: :as aTrr.nvric^rmr a
sk Imat wt.v? ** apprvw; s^cmec t* ue 3risc n..iir-
t^.t- :*.ic i as.- ap.\ rscwc^s :r i a a V_iade Lax acanufs
ara^sers .-.TTT.Tr.t rtrrx. mam- r w** ax it-"? :_ ia aacaa-
n jt-sa cii.arrac; aanmwj saxt xtw S^m k at Sr-_-
^- n :ae raoro. H*jf3 jaac M '.warn.
_\u- afafsuwc csmciens '"mi ~rar atrsaac^^ x a
accut ii Scivc ^mlmapt a lat ncrs mxxr-jat -ua t*m ^aac
-9pi.tr. anehaahah ^* >r-nc Vam -rrwra ^a =-Kaci: :*-
snamo* x :^f 5>Oti Lic^racac aarosnc xj .'-aei. ~ na-
Kr IVrtr^a. sr^ssaK.
aav ^e sov laamaai naaht acaan ^macxacmc me-
F^raaz. b a* r-annsntcs :j avraamaxx *c uaatrKjaan^' m
-nxrwT. mdk mnnra ise scaaaas: ^maoaaaa atrwaaa La.au
*rci;^^ "- i3 Sema> ruiicuc *m -w Ttr^t >-a^.
mil
GCTTHSFKH
INSURANCE BOOKLET.
B&OHB YOU NSD ft
Harry Rubinstein
Sdney Rubinstein
H and S Auto Parts, Inc.
and Service Center
Phone 920-4881
250 South Federal Highway Dania, Florida
mnai wiiihii imtro*c* *: > aii naaaaj .?-
"Www ir ca- p-* ^, e_-*.-
**,"^'W eac-t^ Mrraxav
ana pja tr f mt^xt
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STATE OF
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BOUGHTA\DSOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

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TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
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Ton I
4.


Friday. May 27,1983
the Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
I American Jewish history book could use depth
On Equal Term*: Jewa in Ameri-
ca 1881-1981. By Lucy C. Dawid-
owicz. Holt, Rinthart and Win-
ston, 383 Madison Ave., New
York, N.Y. 10017. 192 pages.
I $12.96.
I Reviewed by Jeffrey S. Ourock
When a scholar of Lucy Daw-
idowicz's stature turns her atten-
tion apd applies her considerable
talents toward writing a defini-
tive history of American Jewry,
publishers and Jewish reading
[public alike immediately take no-
ftice.
This present volume by the au-
LUCY
DAWIDOWICZ
Jews in America
is8i im
Peace pact fails
to impress Peres
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
opposition Labor Party, lacks
confidence in the Israeli-Leba-
nese agreement because Lebanon
is in "a state of weakness" and
cannot control the activities of
the Palestine Liberation Or-
I ganization on its soil.
The Labor Party, Peres said in
I a radio interview, should not sup-
port the Likud government on
the agreement because to do so
would create unwarranted
euphoria in Israel that finally all
was well.
He urged, instead, concent ra-
it ion on the security of Galilee and
[solution of the Middle East con-
II i in as a whole.
"We were not a partner either
to the decisions of the war (in
ebanon) or to the decisions on
(the negotiations and we are not
willing or ready to identify our-
selves with the ways, the priori-
ties and the emphases the
government has selected to intro-
puce in these negotiations,"
Peres said.
He added, however, "We are
responsible enough not to en-
danger any chance of bringing
our army back home as soon as
possible..."
Peres insisted that "the prob-
lem with Lebanon was not the
state of war" which the agree-
ment ends, because "Lebanon
never in fact made war with Is-
rael. The problem with Lebanon
was not a state of war but a state
of weakness, and unfortunately I
feel that Lebanon is going to -
remain as weak as it was before
the war."
Peres said he did not think the
Soviets are looking for a direct
confrontation with the United
States in the Middle East but are
trying to keep the region divided
because "it gives them spheres of
interest ... it maintains the
depth of dispute between the
Arabs and ourselves and it will
show that without the Russians
. that nobody can move
seriously in the Middle East in
either direction."
thor of the widely acclaimed The
War Against the Jewa is not,
however, the promised compre-
hensive examination of 325 plus
years of this Diaspora commu-
nity's history.
It is rather, by her own admis-
sion, an "interim report" on the
state of her research and consid-
ers in outline form the saga of
Jewish communal life between
1881 and the present.
On Equal Terms is an ex-
panded version of her earlier
American Jewish Year Book
(1982) article. It offers discussion
of the arrival and progress of
East European Jews in the met-
ropolises, considers that group's
impact on the transformations in
Jewish ethnic leadership, and
talks to the problems and
dynamics of acculturatod Jewish
life in the post-World War II
period.
A book doomed to an extreme-
ly short shelf-life both by its au-
thor's ambitions and by its al-
most total neglect of scholarly
apparatus (footnotes and biblio-
graphy are non-existent except
for an appended suggestion for
future reading), On Equal Terms
will be of present interest to those
Mounties Investigate
TORONTO (JTA) There
are currently 100 investigations
being conducted by the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police into
possible extradition of Nazi war
criminals living in Canada,
Soliciter-General Robert Kaplan
disclosed here.
The Cabinet Minister, address-
ing a R'nai B'rith covenant
breakfast, said the issue of
former Nazis living in Canada is
still a priority for the govern-
ment. But until new avenues are
established to deal with
suspected war criminals, the
federal government will concen-
trate its efforts on extradition, he
said. It is. however, open to new
arguments on how to deal with
the matter, but for the time being
it is not convinced that there are
any. Kaplan added.
looking for a shorthand, high-
light history of this most source-
rich period in our history.
Future historians will have use
for this work primarily for histo-
riographical studies of one of this
generation's most prolific and in-
fluential historians.
Jeffrey S. Ourock is associate
professor of American Jewish
History at the Bernard Revel
Graduate School of Yeshiva Uni-
versity.
Not since David and Goliath has
something so tiny made It so big.
Its Tettey's tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true for
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea, Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier!
TETLEY
ForBlqVn
Satht-Ktk*

K Certrlted Kosher
TETLEY. TEA "it** i* -
I'..

Wald
man hotel
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3 meals Sat. and holidays
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Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 or 534-4751
ON THE OCEAN A T43rd STREET
xxMedicare Is
Not Enough:'
Edward and Selma Kaplan

You Probably
Need B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOO-AS-13077)
Tor many medical
charges, it pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
JULES L. SOLOMON
It includes private
duty nursing in the
hospital.
It includes doctor's
office and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed.**
For members age 65 and
over. Pre-existing conditions
not covered for the first 6
months of coverage-
Tor B'nai B'rith members only
We enroll new members
B'nai B'rith's
Group Insurance |fck
Underwritten by li!aSE
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HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
925-7766 or 925-7768


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 27,1933
No time for...
Continued from Page 4-
because during the course of our conversation
Maurice Samuel told me all about a new novel he
is writing called "The Web of Lucifer." I am
looking forward to reading it as soon as it is
published.
And speaking about novels, the years go by
and my novel is still only in my head.
Perhaps I am now ready to go along with a
suggestion you made some time ago that instead
of a novel I should write an essay or a short story
on the same subject.
I know 1 wasn't in favor of the idea then but the
more I think about it the better I like your
suggestion. Yes. I must admit that eventually I
come around to your way of thinking. But if you
tell anybody I said so, I"11 emphatically deny it!
This flight has been anything but smooth. It
made it difficult to write. Hope you can read my
hen scratches.
I miss our talks. I know I talk a great deal, but
you are no slouch at holding your own. See you
soon.
Much love,
Abba
Wednesday, March 7,1966
On a plane to Detroit
Dear Keppele,
Reflecting upon "No Time For Loneliness" I
realize that it is now more than 30 years since I
first thought of writing it. I just could not take
the time for even an essay or short story on this
topic because of the pressure of other things we
were doing together and individually. There is
just no time now for "No Time For Loneliness."
I just worked out a schedule that will allow me
to come home a day earlier than planned.
Enjoy the concert tonight. I 'm sorry to have to
miss it, but most of all I'll miss you. I will call you
in the morning.
All my love,
Abba
Sunday, Aug. 7,1966
On a train from Philadelphia
Dear Keppele,
I spent the day in Cherry Hill with the family.
We all missed you and everyone sends their love.
I will hate coming home to an empty house and
I am looking forward to your homecoming next
Saturday.
Do you realize it is more than 30 years since the
idea for my great American novel (sic) came to
me? "No Time For Loneliness" is still a good idea
but I realize now more than ever that there is just
no time for anything else in my life except my
"Keppele." I therefore have come to the con-
clusion that I am going to abandon the project for
the time being. Perhaps in a few years when we
retire, but that is for the future.
I '11 call you every day as usual. By the way do
you think of moving to Florida when I retire.
Think about it!
Love,
Abba
Wednesday, May 19,1976
On a plane to Detroit
Dear Keppele,
I am sorry you could not join me for this
conference. However, I know that you could not
break your commitment to your own
organization.
To continue with what we were talking about
on the beach yesterday, I agree that after almost
50 years, including five years of retirement, the
real reason I did not write the novel is because all
the activities in our new community in which we
have become involved became more important.
And, thinking about it now, isn't it true that all
our lives we had No Time for Loneliness, therefore
we had no time to write about it. Do you agree?
Love,
Abba
J colmpifftIIffisaiiciiiMiP
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Now I am going to take time for all the really
important things. The following poem (author
unknown) expresses it perfectly.
TAKE TIME
Take time to work
It is the price of success
Take time to think
It is the source of power
Take time to play
It is the secret of perpetual youth
Take time to read
It is the fountain of wisdom
Take time to worship
It is the highway to reverence
Take time to be friendly
It is the road to happiness
Take time to laugh
It is the music of the soul
Take time to dream
It is hitching your wagon to a star
Take time to live.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Have You Heard?
AUDJOLOGIC CARE CENTER
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by a certilied clinical audiologist.
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1st
MONTH
FREE
SIMM
anna:
weo 11 in
923-3300
You'll Love Our Long Distance Rates
H083
per person, dbl occ. standard
room, air (are not included
Superior Room-$1,233
Executive Room$1,323.
Tower Room$1.4 73.
2 Weeks
. 15 Days and 14 Nights
Round trip transport from
La Guardia to Hotel
. Concord representative will
meet you and handle your
luggage and transfers
Gratuities for waiter and maids
during your stay
Local and State Taxes
14 Breakfasts
14 Lunches
14 Dinners
Special diets available
2 Cocktail Parties
Welcome drink upon arrival
AD
Sta
DITIONALWEEK
tandard Room$520
Superior Room$595
Executive Room$640
Tower Room$7J5
.. Full time Fitness Director
D Speakers. Social Programs
and Daily Fun Activities
? Entertainment every night
Dancing to 3 orchestras
:: Monticeilo Raceway Nearby
: Free 9 hole golf, tennis (indoor
& out), Health Club. Indoor and
Outdoor Pool
. Relatives and friends can visit
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
to call us direct Toll Free 800-431-3850. or contact Lynn Green Asso-
ciates/Norm Levin in Florida at 305-485-8861 (They will also assist
you in making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Agent.
CONCORDS
Kiamesha Lake. NY 12751 \___/
Summer is Special
at Stevensville.
SPECIAL DISCOUNTED RATES FOR
MINIMUM 4-WEEK STAY DURING JULY AND AUGUST!
Join the Dinnerstein and Friehling Families at one
of the Catskill's finest resorts this summer and get
everything we're famous for PLUS special discounts on
our rates. You'll enjoy luxurious accommodations, our
own magnificent 18-hole championship golf course
indoor and outdoor tennis, 3 sumptuous meals daily
and an exciting line-up of big-name performers all
summer long. So, come to Stevensville. Spend the
summeror a monthat very special savings.
Olympic-size Outdoor Pool
Indoor Pool
Men's & Women's Health Clubs
(Saunas, Massage)
^'''"fl. Boating, Fishing on 5-Mile Lake
Roller Skating
Professional Social Staff
CALL TOLL FREE
800-431-3858
ASKFORKATHY
f~m Or CaH Your Travel Agent
Stevensville
Stevensville Country Club. Swen LMe. NY 17713 Hotel Phone <|W) 2,^0,


lay, May 27,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page?
EL AL RELIEVES
THE 10 MOST COMMON
SYMPTOMS OF
TRAVEL DISCOMFORT
ON THE WAY TO
ISRAEL


-. ..
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HEADACHE: Only El Al has daily (except
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CRAMPS: El Al flies only wide body 747s,
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HANGOVER: Only El Al has a non-stop night
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FOOT TAPPING-ITIS: El Al has one of the
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FRUSTRATION: El Al has one of the lowest
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ANXIETY: El Ah concern for safety and
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PAIN-IN THE POCKET: El Al has the
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C
The Airline of Israel
,V:- -V^W


ir. SJ ii/i-'ni
Page 10
7Vt? Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
____Friday, May 27,1983
Ask the rabbi
Let's mourn Jews
on Memorial Day
By DR. MORTON MALAVSKY
Rabbi, Temple Beth Shalom
Over this weekend, our nation will pay tribute and offer re-
spect to the men and women who served in our armed forces. .
to those who sacrificed tremendously ... up to and including
the supreme sacrifice their lives.
Perhaps at a time such as this, it would be most noteworthy to
point out a fact that is little known, or, too often, shoved aside.
The Jew, after arriving on these shores, took his place in the
mainstream of American life.
Despite many and varied undercurrents of anti-Semitism and
anti-Jewishness, he desired to be a full-fledged American. With
heart and soul, he gave of himself; not only for the furtherance
of the progress and the building of this G-d blessed land of
America, but in the defense of this country and took a back seat
to no one.
We know that in the early days, Peter Stuyveaant refused
Jews to serve in the military guards. It took an Asher Levy, who
took a vehement stand against this action, to get the prejudice
totally reversed.
In the War of 1776, 25 percent of the total Jewish population
fought, serving in all fields. Later, in the War of 1812, similarly,
Jews served with distinction, holding high ranks as well.
In the Civil War, the estimate is between 15,000 and 20,000
who served in the Union armies. Again, with high-ranking of-
ficers.
This pattern repeated itself throughout American history.
Later, during the First World War, and then the Second World
War, there were some astonishing figures. During World War
II, upward of one-half million Jews served in uniform in defense
of our country.
Ten percent of the Jewish refugees who had come here from
the European conflagration were voluntary enlistees in the
American armed forces.
It was with pride, distinction and great honor that the Jewish
people took their place side by side with every other race, color
and creed ethnic and non-ethnic individuals ... in defense of
our land.
We hope and we pray that the youth of America is never
called upon in defense of our country via the avenue of war. If,
G-d forbid, it should ever be necessary, the Jewish population
will never shirk.
It is with that in mind that we must together offer a silent
prayer offer a public prayer salute the flag of stars and
stripes and say thank you, Dear G-d above, for a haven of
refuge for a land which Thou hast blessed ... for the freedom
and liberty we have received, and for the glorious opportunity of
serving giving and sharing whatever we have with
America.
Temple Sold celebrates its bar mitzvah
I. Minkoff, Jewish leader,
dies in New York at 82
NEW YORK Isaiah M.
Minkoff, who for more than half a
century was among the handful
of American Jewish leaders who
gave shape and direction to the
American Jewish community,
has died of cancer.
Jacqueline K. Levine, chair-
man of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council, which Minkoff served
for 31 years as its founding
executive vice chairman, des-
cribed him as "one of the true
giants of the Jewish community
relations field. He had," she said,
"a profound effect on the nature
and substance of the field and the
impact of his thought and work
can be clearly seen in the struc-
ture of the American Jewish
community, particularly at the
local level."
Minkoff, 82, served for 31
years as executive vice chairman
of the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC), from its
creation in 1944 until his retire-
ment in 1975. NJCRAC is the
national planning and coordinat-
ing body for the field of Jewish
We Hope
' You Never Need Us
But IfYou Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument. Inc.
759 1669
community relations.
Under Minoffs directorship,
NJCRAC grew from an umbrella
group of four national Jewish
agencies and 14 central com-
munity bodies, mainly devoted to
combating Nazism and anti-
Semitism, to its present dimen-
sions as a planning apparatus
that seeks consensus within the
American Jewish community on
a variety of issues. Today,
NJCRAC comprises 111 local and
11 national Jewish agencies.
Minkoff, through NJCRAC,
brought the silent suffering of the
captive Soviet Jewish population
to the world's attention and was
instrumental in the founding of
the American Jewish Conference
on Soviet Jewry which was
housed and staffed by the
NJCRAC for nearly a decade.
The American Jewish Conference
was the precursor to the National
Conference for Soviet Jewry.
After his retirement, from
NJCRAC in 1975, Minkbff re-
mained an active lay leader in
many Jewish organizations, in-
cluding the Jewish Labor Com-
mittee, the Forward Association,
YIVO (the Jewish Scientific and
Cultural Institute), and the
Workmen's Circle. He also served
on the boards of the Atran
Foundation, the Memorial
Foundation for Jewish Culture
adn the Conference on Jewish
Material Claims against Ger-
many.
He is survived by his wife,
Dussia, whom he married in
1926; a daughter, Nina M. Cohen
of Washington; a son, Paul of
New York, who is a member of
the staff of NJCRAC, and seven
grandchildren.
Temple Solel celebrated its
13th anniversary with a weekend
of special events.
The Bar Mitzvah Anniversary
Weekend began with an anni-
versary Shabbat worship service.
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin con-
ducted the worship service.
Cantor Michael Kyrr chanted the
liturgical portion.
The worship service partici-
pants were members of the sis-
terhood, brotherhood, Grand
People, religious school students,
nursery school students, youth
group, singles, adult choir and
Solel Singers.
Havdalah service were fol-
lowed by the family show "The
Wizard of
Oiys." Festivities
Temple Beth Shalom
is enrolling for school
The religious school of Temple
Beth Shalom is taking enrollment
applications for the 1983-1984
Open House June 1
Temple Sinai's annual Open
House will be Wednesday, June
1. from 7:30-9 p.m.
All members and their friends
may attend. School and USY
registration will take place.
Meet the rabbi; education and
youth director; executive
director; president and the repre-
sentatives of Sisterhood, Men's
Club, Chaverim and the Minyan
Club. Refreshments will be
served.
Bonds
launches
collection
effort
State of Israel Bonds Organ-
ization is undertaking a special
cash collection campaign as part
of a nationwide effort to support
Israel, according to Gary R.
Gerson, general campaign chair-
man.
"This intensive effort to
convert all unpaid Israel Bond
commitments into cash for Israel
is being conducted to assure that
urgently needed Bond dollars will
help offset the effect on Israel's
economy of the Lebanon
operation," he said, pointing out
Israelis have assumed additional
financial burdens in the form of
increased taxes and reduced
subsidies.
"We are hopeful that our com-
munity effort will contribute
significantly to the attainment of
our goal as an indication of our
concern for Israel and her central
needs at this time," Gerson
continued.
"The whole-hearted co-
operation of friends of Israel in
this cash collection effort," he
added, "can have a double benefit
for Israel. It will help the Israel
Bond Organization reach a goal
and speed us on our way to
providing Israel with the addi-
tional $100 million we promised
for 1983."
Knesset Interview
On Thursday, June 2, at 10
p.m., on Channel 2, Israel Diary
presents an interview with
Shulamit Aloni, a liberal member
of the Knesset. She talks with
host-producer Stanley Rosen-
blatt about the status of women
in Israel, her views about the
Palestinians and her opinion on
democracy in Israel.
rCERTIFIED MOHEI>-j
Your Baby Deserves,
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
|W ill Travel j305) 673-5062^
school year.
New features of the program
include a center in which stu-
dents are to be provided with
computer assisted instruction in
many of their subjects.
Specialties in library and arts
and crafts will supplement the
music program established
during the current year.
In addition, the school plans to
sponsor several parent and
family education programs,
weekend interclass activities and
major celebrations of Jewish
events throughout the calendar.
The religious school sponsors
programs for students in grades
kindergarten through 10.
For applications and details,
call the school office at 966-2200.
included a birthday party
Sunday evening. May 22 .
dmnw-dance celebration was held
at Turnberry Isle Country Club
Temple Solel was founded in
May 1970. It has grown from 35
families to more than 650 fami-
lies, and has become a viable part
of the community offering a
variety of projects, programs and
cultural events.
Solel's nursery school has,'
daily enrollment of more than 100
pre-schoolers. The Abe & Grace
Durbin School of Living Judaism
has 600 students registered in
Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday
classes.
Projects and programs
designed for Temple Solel'g Se-
nior Youth Group, the Junr
Youth Group and Solel's Youni I
Singles. ^l
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin, |GL
founding rabbi, has provided the
spiritual guidance and leadership
in the continuing growth of the
congregation.
Cruise, anyone?
Temple Sinai's Sisterhood and
Men's Club are preparing a
seven-day winter cruise on the
new ship Song of America, on
Jan. 15, 1984. For additional in-
formation and group rates, con-
tact the temple at 920-1577.
Religious directoi
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.: Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning,9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood: 431
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, -ludaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Mkamar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbathk
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
FJefomrj
Temple Beth El 1351 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood; 920-8226.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10.
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
"^ Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
babbath services. .8:15 p.m. Religious school: Pre-kinder
garten10.
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989^)205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:16 p.m.; Sabbath mor
mng, 10:30oclock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
F)ecoi)structloi)lst
!Sl5u2trJ32 W' Br9Wd vd.. Plantation: 472
3600. Rabbi Elliot SkidelL Sabbath services, 8:1* p.m. Religious
school: Pre-kindergarten 8.


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.....i*ii



112
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood


[Friday. May 27,1983
Pageia
Iron Curtain parted for S. Broward couple
EDITOR'S NOTE: A South
I Broward couple, who wish to re-
main anonymoua lor reaaona that
will become obvioua aa you read
this account of their trip behind
the Iron Curtain, wrote of their
experiencea for The Jewish
I Floridian.
Message of hope, brotherhood
We've just come back from the
USSR. We went to make contact
[ with the leadership of the re-
I fusenik communities in Moscow,
Minsk, Riga and Leningrad. It
was 17 days filled with every kind
[ of emotion one can imagine.
It was an experience which we
will cherish and which has very
significantly changed our lives.
We'd like to share some of these
experiences and thoughts with
you.
First of all, why did we go?
Primarily to bring a faint glim-
mer of hope to these people, all of
whom are firmly committed to
making aliyah; to coming home
to Israel if ever they are given the
opportunity.
These were the unsung, un-
known leaders who are keeping
the tradition alive; who are
searching the Jewish identity so
many of us take for granted; who
have knowingly placed their
futures in great jeopardy and into
an existence that will bring with
it far less in the way of material
comfort.
We met with over 70 people
during our visit and with each of
them we left a little bit our our-
selves.
Of course, our contacts were
deeper and more intense with a
smaller number. These few, in a
matter of one or two meetings,
will always remain part of us.
With almost no exceptions, each
of these Jews has been refused
permission to leave many times;
some even having been told that
they need not apply again, their
refusal is final.
We learned the true meaning of
courage as we watched these
wonderful people conduct their
lives within the law of the
USSR and with quiet dignity and
great personal sacrifice. We went
to give them hope. We came
away with much more; we know
what it is to keep our faith alive
in the face of personal sacrifice
and a hostile environment.
We saw people, primarily with
advanced degrees, professors,
senior engineers, plant managers,
researchers, doctors, those who
had knowingly sacrificed their
careers when they asked permis-
sion to leave.
They were ready to take the
great risk because they felt the
possible reward was worth it.
Today, they are punch card
operators, house painters, male
nurses, boilermen in public bath
houses, telephone repairmen
men and women in the most
menial of jobs, existing on bare
subsistence wages, living in con-
stant fear of harassment and,
even worse, KGB searches and
possible imprisonment; living on
the knife edge of the law waiting
for a fate even worse than what
they now have.
And yet, they live for the
future; they study Hebrew
clandestinely they devour every
book, pamphlet or sheet of paper
that brings them closer to Israel
and the Jewish peoplehood; they
listen to Kol Israel shortwave in
Russian (when it isn't jammed),
in English and in Hebrew; they
meet in seminars and perform
Purirnspiela and Chanukah plays
in quiet, out of the way places,
the location of which is passed
from ear to ear.
They struggle to keep the
. tradition alive, to wht*in their
Jewishneee, to learn who they are
in a society that makes it almost
impossible for them. _.
They know that there vfli
,'^at
the need to identify, to be part of
this rich heritage of ours, to keep
the spark alive transcends the
risk.
We were privileged to meet a
group of people who personify
Zionism in its truest sense.
How did we go about this mis-
sion? We had names and ad-
dresses. We knew who we were to
see. We took subways, buses,
walked, once in a while took
taxis, called for directions only as
a last resort and made contact.
No questions were asked when
we knocked on the door; each
knew that we came as friends. We
communicated in English and in
Hebrew (once both languages
were useless and we had to
dredge up the 10 words of Yid-
dish we know to understand the
important messages two elderly
people were trying to convey to
us.)
One would put us in contact
with others, meetings would be
arranged, we would lecture at
Hebrew classes and then take the
names of those willing to give
them and promise to deliver mes-
sages to loved ones in Israel.
We would attend the first act
of the ballet or opera then leave
the theater for an appointment.
We have incidents of tension, but
meeting these people was more
important.
We helped the people hosting
36 Jews at a Moscow seder to
find the food needed to make this
a true seder. We joined 12 others
in Minsk for a seder conducted by
a young man who had no back-
ground in how to conduct a seder.
When we handed him our
Kippa, gave him a bottle of Is-
raeli wine we had bought in
London and gave his wife the
seder plate we had brought from
Israel, all of us cried. The meal
was sparse, to say the least. The
ceremony was interrupted by a
visit from a uniformed police of-
ficer, but was concluded in dig-
nity and love.
There were repercussions
which they assured us were not
out of the ordinary for them and
which we found for us personally
not as difficult to withstand as
we had thought.
With only one exception, we
made every appointment on
some days seeing three to four
different groups. We worked
hard, under great tension and
difficult circumstances; we did
not see a great deal of Russia.
What did we accomplish? A
great deal, we think. We brought
back important information, but
Continued on Page 14
chance for them to "escape,'
% QJouftse^
&i 'tJlie ^ictu/te
Be a part of the next
Jewish Federation of South Broward Mission
PARIS/ISRAEL LEADERSHIP MISSION
October 11-24,1983
COMMUNITY MISSION
October 24-November 3,1983
For additional information, contact Rae Beta or Beverly Bachrach at the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, 921-8810
2719 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Flu. 33020
l
N
I am interested ia:
ID
1
t-
\
*


Page 14
77-----

Ki-v 4 M~>>?*iW'*tondmt ^S^fvofCff^^.HoUywood
toMy.tUyTt, ism
Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update'
After six months of incarcera-
tion in an isolation call, POC
ALEXANDER PARITSKY
finally has been returned to
regular regime in the prison
camp. Previously suffering from
heart problems, his condition
deteriorated in the- punishment
cell.
In most recent reports, doctors
have found dark spots on his
lungs, indicating either pneumo-
nia or tuberculosis. Despite this
prognosis, camp authorities are
forcing him to perform hard
labor, carrying stacks of logs
weighing 400 pounds.
Camp authorities are deter-
mined to break Alexander Parit-
sky. Protest this inhuman treat-
ment USSR-Buryatskaya
ASSR-67H11-Kabanskii Rayon
Stantsya Pocht. Ya 94-4-
Otryadz-Camp Commandant.
YURI TARNAPOLSKY of
Kharkov is still on hunger strike
in prison, where he is awaiting
triaL His wife OLGA brought
him a package of food, but offi-
cials would not accept it since he
is fasting. Protest Tarnapolsky's
upcoming trial by writing to:
Procurator General Alexander
Rakunkov-15a Pushkinskyaya
St-Mosoow-RSFSR-USSR.
POC FELIKS KOCHUBIEV-
SKY was transferred to Loli-
kamsk work camp on March 22,
according to a letter written to
his wife. VALENTINA. Feliks is
suffering from heart disease
ul. Butlerova 21, Apr. 69-
stam.
BENJAMIN BOGOMOLNY,
whose name appears m the
Guinws Book ofWorid IbcortU
for "longest waiting refusenik,"
is in the hospital for two weeks
for a chronic ulcer condition.
Send get-well wishes to: USSR-
RSFSR-Moscow 106318-
Sherbakovskaya 16-18-Apt. 134-
Bogomolny.
January and removed preserves
and powdered fruit for
LEONID TESMIMTSKY of
Moscow received another refusiL
He was summoned to the citv
prosecutor for unknown reasoni
KATYA UMANSKAYAWi
also sommoned to that office.
LEONID PRAISMAN 0f
Moscow received another refusal.
Leading Kharkov activist
DAVID SOLOVEICHIK was
fired from his job as a cyberne-
ticist. He is now working as a
stocker.
Iron Curtain
Continued from Page 13
that is secondary. We brought
them, each of these dignified peo-
ple, a touch of Israel, a feeling
that they are not alone, a mes-
sage of hope, a reaffirmation of
brotherhood.
We provided them with tan-
gible proof that somewhere
beyond the massive walla of their
prison, there are people who care.
We enriched their knowledge of
Israel and we imparted a little
more of the heritage to people
starving for every morsel of
knowledge.
We provided them with extras
that we consider a natural part of
everyday life. We linked them
with their families overseas. We
learned of their needs: we ab-
sorbed their opinions: we listened
to their suggestions: we brought
out "hard" news of specific cases
which don't reach the media.
In some instances, we re-
kindled the flame because
visitors have been few and far be-
tween since the Andropov regime
has instituted harsher measures.
We left a little of ourselves
with many of them and with all
we provided light and a moment
of hope to very drab and dan-
gerous existences.
What now? That's the difficult
question. We've sat and analyzed
and written out our thoughts and
suggestions as well as conveying
the feelings and opinions of those
we met.
Some of the suggestions are
beyond our abilities to imple-
ment: they will require actions on
the part of a number of leader-
ships. But there are suggestions
that we can act on.
What can "adopt" a family
and write to them, sending
packages, becoming involved.
We can join the action groups
that are verbally and physically
making the Soviets know that
they are holding thousands
prisoner.
We can communicate with our
congressmen and become more
Mountain Top
Experience
With A Taste Of Sugar
i ool Nirth ( droll na
...
hc hiking st
n and i anoeing i<*r
f Dt t*'i k hurt- .itui information
/UGPR HIGH
p O I' 896
rr I ik N.< 28604
V ] 704-898-5141
;
politically active. We can learn
about the Prisoners of Zion and
the refuseniks who want nothing
more than to be allowed to "come
home."
We can help Israel financially
to be better able to absorb these
people, to provide a better social
environment. We can talk with
Russians living in the United
States to encourage them to tell
their families to try Israel first
because the overriding feeling of
those we met was that HIAS was
strangling the Jews of Russia
and that going to Israel first was
the only way the gates could even
be partially opened.
In short, we can seek ways of
becoming involved. If you'd like,
we'd be happy to put you in
touch with people we met, to get
you into this fight for our very
survival as a People. We take so
much for granted.
We are so privileged to live in
freedom. We live at a crucial mo-
ment in our history. Can any of
us not be invovled? Do any of us
have the right to sit on the side-
lines? What can each of us do, in
our own small way, to help our
brothers in exile?
Think about it.
DR NAUM MEIMAN, one of
the most senior scientists to have
applied for an exit visa, was
questioned by the KGB in rela-
tion to the Armenian Human
Rights movement He was not
detained, and is now in the Cri-
mea with his wife. The 72-year-
old mathematician and physicist
has been refused an exit visa
since 1975. Meiman was a
member of the now disbanded
unofficial Moscow Helsinki
Monitoring group.
EVGENY KOFMAN from
Dniepropetrovsk has had all
charges against him dropped.
There was ie. that he might be
accused of drug possession after
police searched his apartment in
Several Israel Independence
Day celebrants ware held in
Leningrad. One group of n
people, which was celebrating in
the forest, was surrounded by 25
KGB agents. All participants
were detained for lour hours and
subjected to unprecedently strict
searches. Every item relating to
either the Hebrew language or
Israel was confiscated, including
an Israeli flag.

Odessa refusenik VLADIMIR
KORNEYEV has been arrested.
Following a recent KGB raid on
his home, where religious papers
and a tape recorder were confis-
cated he was summoned for
arrest. Vladimir was accused of
using forged documents in
order to obtain a work permit.
His wife, VERA, was accused of
forging these documents, but was
not arrested because of their 10-
year-old son. Send letters of
support: USSR-Ukr. SSR-
Odessa-Per. Internatsionalny 16-
Apt. 1-Korneyev.
MISHA ROZENSTEIN. son
of long-term refuseniks
GRIGORY and NATALIA
ROZENSTEIN of Moscow, faces
charges of "draft evasion." He is
refusing to serve in the army for
fear of being refused an exit visa
as a result of having "acquired
state secrets'' during his services.
USSR-RSFSR-Moscow 117 485-
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
The American Jewish Congress, a national public affairs and com-
munity relations agency, seeks an Executive Director for Its Florida
office. The position requires a strong background In oommunlt]
relations, issue analysis and advocacy, membership development
and fundralslng.
Salary open. Please send resume and salary history In confidence to
Lawrence Slegel, Director of Regional Operations.
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
15 last Mth Street
New York, New York 10028
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC'S & 123's
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee -
ABC's & 123 s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
t
.<
ruise The
"Fun Ships"
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabulous "Fun Ships".
Carnivale. Festtvale, Mardi Gras and Tropicale depart
from Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports... Virtually
everything's included for the low price of your cruise:
You can feast on eight meals and snacks a day...
challenge the odds in a full gambling casino...
thrill to spectacular live entertainment nightly...
dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
live dance bands or in an authentic disco-
theque and morel
SNp c* Panomanan and Ubanan (togttry


Friday. May 27,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of. GreaterHollywood............... ..................... Pfs15

Prct Effective to Dado,
Broward, Pahn BMdi. Martin,
St Lucia and Indian Rlvar
Counliai ONLY!
Publix
Add value to your
Memorial Day picnic
with extra savings from Publix
Make your family's Memorial Day
picnic a feast they'll remember for
a long, long time Everything you
need is ready and waiting for
you now at Publix. .-'"^"v;,.""' -..%
Assorted flavors
Hi-C Fruit Drinks^. 65*
Orange or Lemon/Lime
Gatorade..........i
Read's,
Three Bean Salad,
Garden Salad, llomostyto or Gorman
Potato Salad............1? 69*
VanCamp'a
Pork and Beans....... 3l' 73*
Del Monte Catsup.... 59*
Squeeze Bottle
French's Mustard.... botu'. 79*
Ragular or DM, Aatortad Flavors
Publix Sodas............ 69*
Umwaatanad, Aaaortad Flavors
(Makee 2-querts)
Kool-Aid.................. 73*
Breekfaet Oub, White
Sandwich Bread......2T.' 55*
5-oz. Choaz Baas, 6.5-oz. Chaaz
Curls, 7.5-oz. Corn Chips or 7-oz.
Pretzel Tvrlsts
Planters Snacks
Lindsay, Largo Ripe
Pitted Olives......
cnttr
6-oj.
can
99*
99*
' gg<
Cairo Beauties, Whole
Sweet Pickles.........."
7-oz. Natural or 6.5-oz. Barbaquo
Wise Potato Chips... b.a 89*
Regular, 12 oz. Bottles
Miller Beer
$1
99
6-pack
(Limit 2 wWi oQMf (
of $7. or more excludtog
at tobacco products)
HMsNre Farm, "Groat tor Gri*ng"
Cheddarwurst.......... *, $279
I stars Farm, Maat or Boat,
"Cookout Favorite
Sausage or
Kielbasa.....
$2
Dee-Freeh, Macaroni,
Cola Slaw or
Potato Salad....
79*
Deft-Freeh, Wholo
Barbequed
Chickens................. 'l49
PuWU
Cracked
Ice
*69*
Dew-Freeh, Southarn Stylo
Fried
Chicken
tr
.'3s9
Reynold's Wrap, 12-inch Wide^ ^
Aluminum Foil......2 55 $1
2S
Sparky
Charcoal
Briquettes................ a*, $2"
Scott, Famtty Pack 160 Paper Napkins........ pus. 73*
12-oz. Cans, Met Cake, Tab,!
.Yale,
lor
Coca-Cola
59
Prtcas and Coupons Effactlv. Thur.day, May 26th thru Wadnaaday, Juna 1, 1983. Quantity Right. Raaarvad


V-
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 27,1983
cPtide
10 OZ Mf*
BAG !
,6b?l1.20
can iBa
Orange
Crush
I6 0Z RET BTLS PEPSI LIGHT DIET PEPS MOUNTAW OEW
PCPSi FRc OH
Pepsi Cola
NOT AVAILABLE M KEY WEST OR MARATHON
REG OR OKT 2 LITER BOTTLE
A&WRoot
81.50
1.19
PANTRY PROE I -PLY WMtTE OR ASSORTED COLORS
Towels.....1.00
LUCKY LEAF REO OR NATURAL
RED BAG HMOU BEAN
GO*Clock<
4SOZ BEECHNUT STRAINED
nhii IamI
Dwoyrooo
ORANGE OR LEMON LJMJ
m rfa*MW**Vi! [
< I OM Va Kniefcii....... USJaU 17 17
mCORBMBBR untd Bendeoee ^a*s aB^ajav ahaam vahaBBBaajj^aaaaa* oft Puffs........ UTWWABH ..nsu ..^sfaU K7 rr (7
BAlCtNT pHtOuerd ..'?-2n24 ft
You won't
beef
abouto
Chicken!
There's no chicken like chicken fresh from our
Pantry. We buy only the best to give our customers
only me best.M& YOU'LL LOVE OUR BEEF.
Rib Roast
USDA CHOICE BEE!
SEMI-BONELESS
2*
Wings or _
i *:tc
FROZEN GRADE "A"
TURKEY
Beef Rib*
Steak $
LB.
49

USDA CHOICE
SMALL END
Tenderloin1
USDA CHOICE BEEF-" LOIN
(WHOLE IN CRY-OVAC UNTRIMMED)
Family frack-Save Morei. '
FLA OH Shipped PREMIUM FRESM 3 LBS 4 OVER
Fryer Or Hi.............. 1.19
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMBJM FRESH 3 LBS t OVER CONTAINS
BREAST THIGHS ( DRUMSTICKS
Fryer Combo...............* 1.10
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS 1 OVER
Fryer Thighs...............u. .89
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS > OVER
Fryer Wings
.00
Chuck Combo............lbI.OO
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK-3 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS
ROAST STEW BEEF ANO GROUND BEEF
HOLIDAY SAVINGS!
$149
NOT AVAILABLE
IN FT PIERCE
NABISCO 19 OZ PKG m 4T*>^>X >^NIHY PRIDE 20 LB BAG CHARCOAL #*at paj.
Oreo Cookies 1.89 Briquets 3*59
OAL ^^BL^>k
Fluid .99
32-OZ GENERIC CHARCOAL
OPEN PIT REG. OR jjgKORY 16< BTL aBBBJ^ak
BBQ Sauce .79
LEISURE WAY 100 CT PKG WHITE ^ ^m ^*K
PSaper Plates 1.19
rfapie^r. 1.29 WRS&-. 1A9
FROZEN FOOD81
OUR PANTRY IS YOUR PANTRV
PANTRV PROE 8-OZ CAN REO OR
SLaae**!00
GENERICS
ij2d
QENERC
SEALTEST AMOHTEO
69*
5?. 1.00
OREO* GOLDEN CRMUE COT
JELLO
&1.20
0??2 1.00
m
VALUABLE COUPON I
23* OFF
13-OZ. SAO VACUUM
ASSORTED GRINDS
4.
^ i
w
PANTRV
Wi
......4.5S .00
REO 12 OZ CAN
Hawttifen Punch
GORTON CRUNCH*
.70
sss-owsa*-
A via Wines....."."1.00 1V nouso ccoeo
Feunrts Wlnee 'H.r9M I couponoooomay 26-^junei. ie3j
QUANHTY R*HTS RESERVED NOT *SPONS**E EoT^t^ I
.21.20
!
i-ia


Friday, May 27,1963
The Jewish FloridiUn and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
rageiy
Page 17
-
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Lots of
Chicken
3 BREASTS A
3 LEG QTRS
W/ BACKS
3 GIBIET PKGS
cPtide
LIMIT 2 PKGS., PLEASE
Whole
USOA CHOICE "MILK FED"
Fryers CQC
FLA. OR SHIPPED m. MW _
PREMIUM FRESH fft^9T BjS^ LB
Veal
LB
99
IC
,2.89
LB 2.19
PANTRY PRIDE
WITH VEGETABLE
PROTEIN ADDED LB
QuaitersAQ^
prIm
IUM FRESH LB.
BONELESS AND SKINLESS FRESH
Chicken Breast Cutlet
NEW ZEALAND FROZEN WHOLE OR SIRLOIN HALF
Leg O Lamb.............
KNEIP OR KINGS PHIOt
Corned Beef Brisket.......,1:
usoa cHoee boneless
Beef Rib Steak ,4.99
FROZEN SEAFOOD DEPT.I
Arrowtooth M1Q
Flounder Fillet lb*!39
Sea Best
Grouper Fillet.......lb
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
PRODUCE
d-s-
SWEET AND TENDER (fJ-PICK)
Florida
Com
CRISP. CRUNCHY
Garden
Fresh
Cucumbers
GARDEN FRESH
Zucchini''
Squash
SWEEI AND JUICY LQ 80 SUE UCK
Florida
3/4.QC
33
FIRM
<:
Tomatoes
FLAVORFUL AND REFRESHING
IN
PKG
69*
.PKO .79
U S NO 1 ALL PURPOSE UP1CK
Yellow Onions .
CRISP AND CRUNCHY UCK
.9 FOR .1
...LB -25
... LB *W
TOPS IN VITAMN A GARDEN FRESH
Florida Carrots......
NUTRITIOUS AND OEUCOUS U PICK
NORTHWEST EXTRA FANCv 10 M VEXAR BAG
Red DeWctoui Apple*
KRAFT 100". PURE HALF GALLON GLASS JAR
OrangeJuioe.......
FRESHLY CUT ASSORTEO COLORS
. BAG .39
. .33
BAG IlW
. ,1.99
BUNCH 1i79
^ "BAVESAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
PRICES AND COUPONS
GOOD MAY 26-JUNE 1. 1983
WE REDEEM FEDERAL EOOD STAMP!
UtaMlllDMki OWM
BMftMMNRhN
S" '$
Mmtkiait*
**
mtmttmmim
wcmdimim
MMMlMtMAR
NiMai-atnnMM
.Lhl*|llCHMh
Wi.Mail .
"? *'*
!%ttHlwlM
i no sow imic smi
HI _
OMMBMM
CM4 l A.
3fli?
Cmi >
on.......m*m
tmt a
tiMnw
M**MI
I4I0J NM|
0 II.......It
ivm.1m.iima.
IT MIT
R Rn tMBMI Cww
US m IIMBIMR
SERVICE DELH
~ NOT AVAILABLE AT ALLSTORES.'"""
HANSEL 4 ORETEL
Beef $f39
Bologna M -K
Potato
COLE SLAW OR
59
EXTRA LEAN CORNEO I
LOW M SALT CHEESE
31.39
"^2.09
MRS RSSSLERS
Breast... half lb 1*49
IN STORE BAKERYB
bhbbNOT AVALAOLE AT AU STORES
LARGE CAMPY
PICNC nME HOT OOO ROLLS OR
Han ilni ubi HnSi AJ OQ
0ELX2OUS JUMBO
.oca
OVEN FRESH
Cherry Pie.....each 2*99
SOUTHERN STYLE ( PCS INBOX
349
~1.79
100% PURE
TROPIC ANA CHIlLEO
Ora^ $"139
Juice1/2QAL >m
PANTRY PPJOE CULLED
fil I II I fcalfMI HALF 4 JA
mange *waoo.......gal i.iw
DEANS I80Z CONT
rrenor
PANTRY PACE
tour Cream........,6 KRAFT SQUEEZE IB-OX OOMT.
Parkay Margarine.....
LIGHT N UVELV LOW FAT OR
SEALTEST <^^
Cottage^ijQC:
Cheese :?& -f 7
POLLY 0 WHOLE MLK OR PART SKIM
RfcottaCheeee.....'31.79
PANTRY PROE SWBS STYLE ASSORTEO FLAVORS
3 ^1.09
ED OR WHITE
Singles f$l40
tCMOUALLY WRAPPED
BOROEN FROSTED
Chocolate Shake 2^ .89
PANTRY PROE ALL BEEF
Bologna.............^1.59
OWALTNET GREAT OOO
ChickenFranks.....pJS .99
LOUIS PJCH SLICED
Turkey Breast.......^1.39
SUNNYLANQJ
$149
SILVER FLOSS 2 LB BAG
Sauerkraut
CLAUSSENS WHOLE OR HALF OR OU.SUCES
Pickles..............^1.49
HEBREW NATIONAL KNOCKWURST OR
Frankfurters........^ 2.19
MAMA'S WINE OR CREAM STYLE
Marring.............3? 2.49
PANTRY PRCE PIONJC PAK OF 12
Hamburger or *C C
HatDogTMQs D3
MEYERS BUTTERMUt
Biscuits *"
ORWEN LEMON OR
Apple Re...........",%
PANTRY PRDE SPLIT TOP
ItlBlBllI KKH
^JB"..............LOAF
~-----------T 'llll Bill mil WIIU uil
....Si .79
27^1.09
CREMEORULLBRBOR
. .OM
OUANTTTY RIGHTS RESERVED NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS


. .
Pufelfl.
.-..-.--., ^,.,-rvJ#^^A>Jprf^fe>ia^g>>/flFo/Grdo*rHollywood_______
Friday, May 27,1983
Federation well-represented
during Tallahassee sessions
By MELISSA MARTIN
Community Relations Committee
Director
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward is an active mem-
ber in the Florida Association of
Jewish Federation's Government
Affairs Committee. During this
legislative session, most of the
Government Affairs Committee
members of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward went to
Tallahassee for at least one of the
three meetings between March
and May.
Our lobbyist. Elaine Bloom,
who is director of the Florida
Association of Jewish Federa-
tions, has been actively pursuing
the interests of all the Federa-
tions regarding the HRS budget,
which is critical to the needs of
children, youth and families, as
well as the elderly throughout
Florida.
On April 19. Paul Orlan, our
South Broward Federation's
Holocaust Committee chairman,
along with Esther Gordon and
Fred Greene, members of the
Government Affairs Committee,
and Gary Mars, a Jewish High
School students, and I met with
legislators Gwen Margolis, Fred
Lippman and Ron Silver from the
South Broward delegation to
express concern over possible
cutbacks in HRS funding.
Chairman Orlan called the
experience most gratifying and
educational.
Our delegation learned about
specifics of the HRS budget
primarily aging and adult serv-
ices from John Stokes berry,
director of Aging and Adult
Services.
On May 3, Joyce Newman,
past president of JFSB; Esther
Gordon, Federation board mem-
Hotel
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751
Telephone: 19141 794-6900
Direct NYC. Phone: (212) 924-6162
GIBBER
Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
in the beautiful Catskills.
3 Meals DailyStrictly KosherAII Diets Catered to
Rabbi and Masgiach on Premisses* Two Health
ClubsMassage Roomlndoor and Outdoor Pools*
Music and Entertainment DailyPlanned Activities
All Rooms Air ConditionedTV'sCapacity 450 Guests
Make "Gibbers" Your Summer Vacation Home,
You'll Love Us. The Gibber Family
Golf side Getaway
Vacation persons
4 NIGHTS oNLyei8B
2 NIGHTS only fHft
Double occupancy, including ta>ei/gratuiiies April
15 thru December 15.1983
A*^
PACKAGE INCLUDES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room for 2 people 4 nights 2 nights
Continental breakfast for 2 4 mornings 2 mornings
Dinner for 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail for 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Golf Packages and
Discounts also available
*----------------------------------------.ss ^jT
RAMADA* 3*fn
11000 Gulf Shore Drive. North '
VANDERBILT BEACH
Naples, Florida 33040
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment in
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeing,
fishing, shelling. Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents.
Children's meals at menu prices.
Write or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
| MMADA VANDEMILT INN M tin toir Dtal T
| 11080 Ml Vmn BrtM. N *ato. Fli 33140 c
| O Send tree brochures O Golf Package O Gulfside Getaways
| a Reserve room (No of days)_____lor (No of people)______
arrival date------------------------------------------------------------
ADDRESS.
MAIL
COUPON
TODAY!
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO
I CITV STATE ZIP.
ber; Ron Rothschild, president of
the Jewish Community Centers;
Elena Roth, Jewish High School
student, and I had a rewarding
day in Tallahassee.
Our legislative workshop with
Mrs. Bloom included meeting
with Sen. Jack Gordon, Senate
president pro tempore and chair-
man of the Senate Education
Committee, who addressed the
issue of raising educational
standards. He also stressed his
sensitivities to the needs of those
receiving HRS aid.
We also heard from Rep.
Elaine Gordon, chairperson,
Florida Appropriations Subcom-
mittee, House HRS Subcommit-
tee on Health, Economic and
Social Services; and Rep. Fred
Lippman, chairman. House
Regulatory Reform Committee,
which has been responsible for
rewriting regulations on pro-
grams running the gamut of child
care to nursing homes.
One issue which all Federa-
tions and United Ways need to
discuss is the anticipated "Citi-
zens Choice" referendum or
"Proposition One" which is now
certified for the November 1984
ballot.
This "Proposition 13" style
amendment would roll back all
state and local tax bases to 1980-
81 levels and would then limit
property tax and fee increases to
no more than 5 percent per year.
The immediate effect would be
to reduce our revenues by at least .
20 percent. This would have a
devastating effect on all state
services, particularly social serv-
ices.
There are many bills still being
discussed in committees which
directly and indirectly affect
Federations.
Before the legislative session
ends, we will discuss final action
on those bills.
*"
American Carpet & Interiors, Inc.
CARPET LINOLEUM TILES CERAMICS
REUPHOLSTERING CUSTOM-MADE DRAPES
WINDOW SHADES FURNITURE
To th Trad* Commercial A Residential
MAE BELLE IREY
Sales Representative Interior Decorator
Broward: 5*3-4450 Oade: 944-8899
2811 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood. Pto.
&&
hodlavan
Turkey Products
from Israel
NOW AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
ASK FOR IT
AT YOUR SUPERMARKET OR DELICATESSEN
Including Oriole Kosher (Deiray Beach) 7 Tri-Kosher
(Delray Beach) / Harrision's Kosher Meat Market
(Sunrise) / W. Hollywood Kosher Meats (W. Hollywood)
Dist. by Satdman 8 Adolfaon
6151 Mlramar Pkwy., Mlramar, FL 33023 (305) 987-5060
-"Vi
We're 82 years old,
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the horse and buggy
down to the Railroad
Station to pick up our
guests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
spent the other 50 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resorts
of the land.
Yet deep down we re-
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping-off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day-to-
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
we've been saying these
last 82 years:
Come up to the Nevele.
And enjoy yourself.
-..


ly 27,1988
The Jewish Phridiarn
T* *-
of Greater Hollywood
njiiy
*s. IC. learning to deal with kids
a divorced 36-year-
Jewish Family
, counseling
, initially, to help her
effectively with her 13-
tughter Kim who was
belligerent and not
through with her
Mm.
also has a 10-year-old
been divorced three
[was seen at JFS over a
four months during
| child-management is-
[ dealt with as well as
rn unresolved feelings
irorce and subsequent
>ut her self-image.
to be seen alone at
the presenting child
it problems were ex-
it, felt that she could
anting techniques into
but actually involving
essions.
was able to be more
nth limit-setting with
learned to follow
[ith consequences that
ilished and have them
lited which is often
ive.
by beginning to feel
targe, also was better
lmunicate with Kim.
[ pursued fighting with
Derated herself so she
come as irrational as
Iter and thereby fall
iHthe cyclical pattern of
i/J/f. ENJOY TM
ft&L C001
VtiL TS4D6WIM0S
m
SCHECHTERS
VBBEM
KOSHER HOTEL
IGIATT
m M* mo* how
(Advantage of Our
SUMMER RATES
*ft 6000*
I? *21000*
[ "0" pedon flouolt ucc
LUDING MEALS
FREE GOLF_______
IE: 531-0061
imjciTntront Block
[ 38th Sit MIAMI St ACM
CHECHTtS. Otwm Mf* Jf
UDI0
Mini" ^iiiiBi
[tinentalW]
me Wt
cklo
MM
HUAANT
niqu*
|< par isne*
} your t*M* to your
i on* ol 5 Individual
TlwTanl
liar, Siudio Piaca
.SwiatCnalal.
i Enteflalnment
si the Piano
i violin playing
your pleasure
INS AT 5 P.M.
Irate Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
[HE GROTTO" 1
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CAROS
HONORED
10 SW 32 AVE.
445-5371
clotad Monday*
i i i i a i
Mrs. K. had said things she did
not mean: "Go and live with your
Dad, if that's what you want,"
and then because the mother felt
bad about what was, said, she
was not able to follow through
with the rules of the house.
Regarding her 10-year-old son,
Joel, Mrs. K. was also able to
allow him to be a "child." Unlike
Kim, apparently he was very
concerned with "pleasing" Mrs.
K. and at times seemed to as-
sume a surrogate husband role.
Mrs. K. became more aware of
the inappropriateness of what she
expected of the children and
through this recognition, she
began to explore her own needs.
She became less consumed
with the children and saw that to
some extent she was "using"
them and their need for her as
reason for not pursuing her own
interests.
Mrs. K. was able to confront
her own fears of becoming in-
volved in another relationship
and essentially began to mourn
for the relationship with her ex-
husband that had ended.
She has become more assertive
with her employer as well as with
her parents, who at times under-
mined her efforts with the chil-
dren.
Generally, Mrs. K. has become
more self-confident and now
reports that Kim is cooperating
for the most part and that her son
has become less anxious about
her well-being and seems to be
letting himself be a "10-year-
old."
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-9066. Hours -
Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale, 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8608. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and the
United Way of Broward County.
Marvin Gottlieb's
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
Phone 966-7600 624-4777
you never had it
so good!
If you Wnk you know from begets'n
cream cheese, it's time you tried
something even better: Soft
PHILADELPHIA BRAND
Cream Cheese on a
Lender s* Bagel Lender's
makes bagels at their
best. AH of their 11 delicious
frozen varieties have
absolutely no preservatives
and they're certified Kosher.
And nothing coutd be easier
than toasting a pre-sliced
Lender's Bagel into a crusty, soft-centered treat

Now to top such a bagel wouldn't
be sUy not to use PhUly? ITs the
cream cheese thats spreadjn'
ready right from the refrigerator.
And It's certified Kosher, too,
wfth a creamy richness that's
undupScated. So for your next
breakfast, brunch or snack, pamper
yourself with Lender's Bagels and
Soft PHILLY Cream Cheese.
(Then you'll know from bagels 'n
cream cheese!)
KCartMee Kosher
M*M Kraft. Mc



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