The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00323

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
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and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
. 13 Number 10
Hollywood, Florida Friday, May 13,1983
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Zvi' Wolf of Hollywood and Nir Banim
folfs establish
emorial fund
noring Jerry
innovative memorial is being established in
>ry of a Hollywood man killed in action one year
iring the "Peace for Galilee" campaign.
"Zvi" Wolf was a 24-year-old tank corn-
ier serving in the Israel Defense Forces in Leb-
| when killed on June 9,1982.
grew up in Hollywood, graduating from
High School and attending Broward Com-
ity College. He had been living on an
[ultural cooperative farm (moshav),Nir Banim,
lore than 2'/ years.
[family on the moshav, the Guys, had adopted
and treated him like a son. Ironically, the
i' other son, Shachar, also was killed in combat
1 fighting in Lebanon.
had "found himself" by making aliyah to
el. Friends and relatives reported that he had a
feeling of pride and accomplishment about his
id future in Israel.
)b and Shayne Wolf of Hollywood, Jerry's
ents, are seeking to perpetuate the memory of
son and the ideals which he represented. This is
reason for the creation of the Jerry Wolf
lorial Philanthropic Fund.
Contributions will be used for the purpose of
>moting and encouraging aliyah among members
the Hollywood-South Broward County com-
^nity.
''or more information, contact the Legacy and
kowment Division at the Jewish Federation of
ith Broward at 921-8810.
Arens: Give Syria
time for peace pact
Withdrawal deal
strengthens U.S.,
Israel partnership

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JiA) Israeli
Defense Minister Moshe Arens believes
that Syria should be given "a few weeks"
to decide whether to agree to withdraw
its forces from Lebanon in the wake of
the agreement announced for the with-
drawal of Israeli forces.
"It would be wise for all of us, for the
United States, for Lebanon and for Isra-
el, to give it a little time, see what hap-
pens, give them (the Syrians) a chance to
make up their minds," Arens said in an
interview from Israel on CBS-TV's is
"Face the Nation."
"But if within a few weeks it becomes clear
they have no intention of moving out, then, of
course, we'll (the U.S. Israel and Lebanon) have to
get together and discuss it," Arens said.
He stressed that Israel's withdrawal is "depen-
dent" on the simultaneous departure of Syrian
forces from Lebanon. He said that Secretary of
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Arena
State George Shultz is "hopeful" that the
problem can be worked out.
"My guess is that they (the Syrians) are think-
ing very hard about it," Arens said. But he added
that he has "no grounds to be overly optimistic at
Continued on Page 11 .
CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL SECURITY Director Joseph Churba is surrounded by
Barbara Studley, WNWS talk show host, (left) and Roz and Sylva Solomon, Community
Relations Committee representative and Beach leader, respectively.
Israelis propping up U.S.
Without doubt! Churba, Studley say
By MARA GIULIANTI
Chairman,
Community Relations Committee,
Jewish Federation of South Broward
"The burden of the security of the
United States is being shouldered
by the Israeli taxpayer," Barbara
Studley, talk-show hostess of
WNWS, believes.
In introducing Dr. Joseph Chur-
ba, director of the Center for
International Security, Ms. Studley
called on more than 100 South
Broward residents at the April
meeting of the Comrr unity Rela-
tions Committee to support the
efforts of the security center.
The Israeli citizen doesn't have a TV in
every room and an opulent lifestyle, Ms.
Studley noted. "They're giving their
husbands' and their children's lives to
defend their country and to ensure the
security of the free world." Ms Studley,
speaking of the threat of Soviet ex-
pansionism, asked:
"What is Russia going to be like when
she has the Persian Gull and its oil?" No
one cares in the U.S. but the Jews!
"You're going to have to save the free
world, if it's going to be saved at all,"
declared Ms. Studley, a Christian from
Tennessee and an ardent supporter of the
State of Israel.
Churba supported the WNWS radio
personality regarding the inordinate burden
Continued on Page 9


^ofarofureater Hollywood
r.ADriiU.1983
3 PW2"
The Jewish fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 13
Terror attacks in Paris and Vienna linked
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Clues linking
the August 9, 1982 terrorist
attack on a Jewish restaurant in
Paris with a terrorist attack a
year earlier on a Vienna syna-
gogue, have brought French
investigators to Vienna.
Judge Jean-Louis Bruguiere,
the Paris magistrate beading the
Palestinians questioned in prison
investigation of the machinegun
attack which killed six persons
and wounded 22 at the Jo Gol-
denberg restaurant on the Rue
des Rosiers in the old Jewish
quarter of Paris, will interrogate
three Palestinian terrorists held
Mission meetings planned*;
Under the auspices of United Jewish Appeal and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, again during 1983 a Community
Mission to Israel is in the works.
"There are many ways to visit Israel," Joan Raticoff,
missions chairman says, "but there is only one right way on a
UJA Mission.
"A most unusual itinerary will enable us to explore our roots.
The highest officials of Israel's government and the Jewish
Agency will address and teach us as we walk in the footsteps of
our fathers and our mothers."
To hear, see and'learn exactly what the Oct. 24-Nov. 3
Community Mission is about, informal meetings will be held
during May and June. Call Beverly Bachrach at the
Federation at 921-8810 for more details and reservations.
May 16:
Naomi and Richard Prever, 3720 N. 54 Ave., Hollywood, at
7:30 p.m.
May 23:
Evelyn and Harry Goldstein, 411 S. Holly brook Drive,
Pembroke Pines, at 7:30 p.m.
May 25:
Merle and Michael Orlove, 5220 N. 37th St., Hollywood, at
7:30 p.m.
June 2:
Gloria Burman, 5321 N. 36 Court, Hollywood, at 7:30 p.m.
June 7:
Selma Vogel, 1500 South Ocean Drive, Hollywood, at 7:30
p.m.
June 9:
Carole and Louis Morningstar. 413 Sunset Drive, Hallandale.
at 7:30 p.m.
June 13:
Irving and Libby .V yers. 681 S. Hollybrook Drive, Pembroke
Pines, at 7:30 p.m.
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TODAY! I CITV STATE z,p-
in a Vienna prison.
He and the two French police
officers accompanying him, will
also examine weapons the Aus-
trian police seized from the ter-
rorists.
The three are serving sentences
killing two people and
unding several others when
ty opened fire on worshippers
leaving a Vienna synagogue on
August 29,1961.
Two of the men, Hassan Mar-
wan and Yunis Bahij. admitted
to membership in the Abu Nidal
group, a Palestinian splinter
organization believed responsible
for most terrorist attacks against
Jews and others in Western
Europe in recent years, and
assassinating officials of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion.
The terror squad which struck
in Vienna used WZ-63 Polish-
made submachineguns similar to
those used in the Rue des Rosiers
attack. Police sources here said
there were other similarities be-
tween the two attacks. The
sources described the linkage as a
possible breakthrough in the
year-long investigation of the
restaurant attack and indicated
that the three terrorists in-
carcerated in Vienna might agree
to cooperate.
Brugiere has also visited Rome
and Brussels where terrorists
have attacked synagogues in
recent years and has conferred
with police officials in those cities
in the course of his investigation.
Meanwhile, it was disclosed
that two men who might have
been connected with an explosion
near a Marseilles synagogue last
March 8 were arrested in Paris
for questioning.
The suspects were reported to
have been in the company of the
alleged perpetrators on the night
Daniel Scotti and Jean Chicin,
were killed when a bomb in their
car detonated as they were
fleeing police who had spotted
them near the synagogue.
Scotti and Chicin were both
known racketeers with long
prison records. The two rn
picked up here, indentified onh
as Monge and Marcel, also hjZ
police records for recketeerbi
and armed burglary.
Marseilles police believe the
bomb incident was related to
gang warfare although it rat,
have been the work of an anti
Semitic group which contracted
with underworld elements to
bomb the synagogue.
France asks PLO
to cancel meeting
PARIS (JTA) France has
asked the Palestine Liberation
Organization to voluntarily can-
cel the international Palestine
conference slated to be held in
August.
Foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson met with a prominent
Palestinian leader Hani el
Hassan and asked him to convey
to PLO chief Yasir Arafat and
the PLO executive committee
France's opposition to have the
United Nations-sponsored con-
ference in Paris.
The UN General Assembly last
summer voted in favor of the
meeting. France at the time lob-
bied against the Arab-sponsored
resolution calling for the con-
ference, but when the voting on
the resolution took place France
aligned itself with other Euro-
pean countries and abstained.
UN officials in Paris told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the meeting will be held in the
UNESCO building, which for-
mally belongs to the UN, and
that France is bound by its inter-
national agreements not to inter-
fere with meetings sponsored by
the UN and held on UN-con-
trolled areas.
The UN spokesman also said
that France cannot legally bu
delegates from attending the
meeting.
Most Jewish organizations in
France have vigorously protestal
against the meeting, which will
practically coincide with the first
anniversary of the terrorist
attack on a Jewish restaurant in
the old Jewish quarter of the city
in which six people were killed
and 22 wounded.
Theo Klein, president of the
Representative Council of Major
French Jewish Organizations,
called on the government to do
whatever it can to prevent the
meeting from taking place. He
said holding the conference so
clsoe to the anniversary of the
attack "would be tantamount to. I
provocation."
The Socialist Administration
of President Francois Mitter-
rand, which enjoys the support of
a large part of Frnace's 700,000
Jews, has been seriously embar-
rassed by the scheduled con-
ference.
It is especially worried by the
prospect that Arafat might per-
sonally head the Palestine dele-
gation. France has refused for the
last 10 years to invite Arafat to^'
1 Paris.
We're 82 years old,
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the horse and buggy
down to the Railroad
Station to pick up our
guests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
spent the other 5(1 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resorts
of the land.
Yet deep down we re-
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping-off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day in
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
we've been sa;; r these
last 82 years:
Come up to the Nevele.
And enjoy yourself.
Nevele Hotel
Ellenville. New York 12428
Hotel (9141647-6000
halves: IK Hole Coif Course 10 Outdoor All Weather
Tennis Courts (Day & Night! Magnificent Outdoor
Mega I1h>I Health Club Indoor Pool Indoor Tennis
Kacquetball Hiding 1'rivate Lake Entertainment
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO


JFriday, May 13,1983 ,
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar.of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
From Hebrew University
Stiebers earn more honors
/

Evelyn Stieber
An honorary doctorate of
philosophy will be conferred next
month on South Broward's Otto
Stieber during convocation cere-
monies at Hebrew University on
Mount Scopus. *
-Stieber, the Jewish Federation
of South Broward's board secre-
tary and the 1983 UJA-Federa-
tion Campaign Beach chairman,
helped organize the Southeast
Region of the American Friends
of Hebrew University.
In addition, the university is to
dedicate the Evelyn and Otto
Stieber Observation Plaza. Mrs.
Stieber served as the Federa-
tion's UJA Campaign vice presi-
dent last year and will repeat for
the' 1983-84 Campaign.
On June 22, "Caravan Deluxe"
will, leave to meet with Friends of
Hebrew University from around
the world "for an in-depth look at
the role the university plays in
the life of the State of Israel as
well as its profound ties with
Jewish communities every-
where."
Since the Sue Day War, He-
brew University has been in-
volved in rebuilding its original
home on Mount Scopus, the
ancient and historic hill over-
looking the old city of Jerusalem.
Much of that work is now
completed and includes the Flori-
da House, dedicated two years
ago and underwritten by Florida
Friends and now a key part of the
new humanities complex.
The university was founded on
Mount Scopus in 1918 and
flourished there until the War of
Independence. In 1948, the Arab
legion surrounded the campus
and cut it off from the young
Jewish state.
Though the campus remained
in Israeli hands, Jordanian
authorities refused to allow free
access to Mount Scopus. For 19
years, the campus stood as a
silent symbol of hope that some
day Jerusalem would be reunited
and the university returned to its
original home.
In 1967, the dream came
reality, the city was reunited and
a massive rebuilding campaign
started.
For further information, call
the office of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
at 868-7600.,
Otto Stieber
U.S. policy mistaken, lousy
West Bank settlements really insure peace?
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -. (JTA) .
Geula Cohen, a leader of Israel's
ultra-nationalist Tehiya party;
declared here that rather than .Is-
raeli settlements on 'the West
Bank being obstacles to peace,
the lack of such settlements
would constitute such' an 'ob-
stacle
"A Palestinian state is an ob-',
! Mac It- to peace," Cohen, bne" of
Tehiya's three Knesset members,
stressed at a meeting, with
several Jewish media reporters at
the Israel Embassy. "A Pales-
tinian state is an obstacle .to.
peace" because it would lead to
increased Soviet penetration in
the Middle East, she said. .
Cohen, who is in the United
States to speak to students and
persons considering aliyah,
presented her views to members
of Congress and to State Depart:
[Inent officials, including Elliott
Abrams, assistant secretary of
state for Human Rights and
Humanitarian Affairs. She said
' that several of the congressmen
appeared to sympathize with her
.views but that Abrams listened
and expressed no opinion.
The "mistaken" and "lousy
policy" of the United States is al-
. lowing the Soviet Union to gain
greater influence in the Middle
'East, Cohen charged. She said
Israel has "given in to stay
friends with the U.S." but by
making concessions to Washing-
ton "we weaken ourselves and are
less of an asset to the U.S."
Cohen said her dream for the
Middle East is "neutralization"
from both superpowers. But since
this is not possible now, she pre-
ferred friendship with the United
States because as a Jew she
"shares" common values with
the U.S. But she noted that if
U.S. policy leads to a Palestinian
Community CalenfcaR
may
14, SatuRoay
16, monoay
22-25
22. Sunday

23,iTronoay
24,tuesoay
26, thuRsoay
Overview Penthouse Dance, JCC
Young Singles, 9 p.m. at Howard
Johnson Hotel, 2501 N. Ocean
Drive.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood's
last meeting of the season, at
Haber Karp Hall, at 12:30 p.m.
ORT District VI, Biennial
Convention at Hyatt Regency
Hotel, Miami; call 458-1557.
Tony & Company, presented by
Sabra Scopus Chapter of
Hadassah, at Temple Sinai
beginning at 7:30 p.m. For tickets
to the off-Broadway production
call 981-1079 or 962-7999.
American Jewish Congress,
Hollydale Chapter, final meeting
of the season, at Galahad South,
3901 S. Ocean Drive, at noon.
Ed Newman, Miami Dolphins' all-
pro guard, will speak to Temple
Sinai's Chaverim at 6:15 p.m.;
call 920-1577.
Grand People of Temple Solel
Installation and Dinner, at 6 p.m.;
call 989-0205.
Your Community Calendar welcomes newa of your Tewlsrt
oriented organization. All meetings, times and their totftoroj,
should be directed to Steve Katon, associate editor ''"f^6"
Federation of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar
Information mutt be received at last two weeks before publication
Jate.'. '''"'"''' _______
state and an increased Soviet
threat, then perhaps Israel
should seek friendship with the
Soviet Union. She said Israel's
"first value is to be alive" and
then it can think about democ-
racy and other factors.
Cohen suggested that perhaps
the "price" of the bombing of the
U.S. Embassy in Beirut has been
a "lesson" for the State Depart-
ment that while it seeks to win
over the Arabs at Israel's ex-
pense, instead of receiving
"flowers they get bombs. But
I'm not sure they will learn this
lesson," Cohen said.
She added that when King
Hussein of Jordan rejected Presi-
dent Reagan's proposals to enter
the peace negotiations, Reagan
said he "understood" Jordan
reasons, but when Israel rejected
the Reagan peace initiative, it
was castigated throughout the
world. In addition, Cohen
charged, Reagan is now suggest-
ing that what Jordan needs to
enter negotiations is Syria's ap-
proval and to get this the presi-
dent is promising Syria the Golan
Heights.
According to Cohen, Syria is
not concerned about the Golan
Heights or the Jewish settle-
ments on the West Bank. She
said what Syria wants is "the
settlement which is called the
State of Israel."
Cohen stressed that Israel
would not freeze settlements on
the West Bank even if Premier
Menachem Begin wanted to
which he doesn't she said.
She claimed that her three-
member Tehiya Knesset faction
along with Rabbi Haim Druck-
man. the Gush Emunim leader
who broke from the National Re-
ligious Party, "will not let the
government do so." She said that
she and the three other MKs pro-
vide the majority for Begin's 64-
member coalition.
Cohen, who said she favored
annexation of the West Bank,
complained that the government
is going too slow in building set-
tlements there. She was a long-
time disciple of Begin but quit his
Herat party over the Camp
David agreements. She opposed
the return of Sinai to Egypt and
the dismantling of Jewish settle-
ments there both in the Knesset
and at demonstrations at the set-
tlement sites.
She told the Jewish media re-
porters that she still opposes the
autonomy plan because it re-
quires negotiations on
sovereignty over the West Bank
and Gaza after a five-year period.
Cohen said she is "not for dis-
cussing our sovereignty" at any
time.
^Medicare Is
Not Enoughs
Edward and Selma Kaplan
You Probably
NeedB'naiB'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOO-AS-13077)
Tor many medical
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difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
JULES L. SOLOMON
It includes private
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hospital.
It includes doctor's
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visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed.**
'Tor members age 65 and
over. Pre-existing conditions
not covered for the first 6
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We enroll new members
B'nai B'rith's
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HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
925-7766 or 925-7768


Pag* 4
viandShotarotUreater Mouywooa
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
**". May 13, lM
A United Jerusalem in Every Jewish Consciousness 1
Last Wednesday, May 11, was
Jerusalem Day. The occasion marked the
unification of Jerusalem on June 7,1967 in
the Six-Day War.
Since that momentous event, Jews
throughout the world have felt substance
added to their millenial dream the return
to Jerusalem. But while Israel has gone
about the business since then of methodi-
cally uniting the East and West sections of
the city, there has been no applause from
any quarter elsewhere, not even from
alleged friends.
In fact, with few exceptions, no nation
that maintains diplomatic relations with
Israel recognizes Jerusalem as its capital
city, and this includes the United States,
whose Embassy has always been in Tel
Aviv.
To add further salt to the American-
inflicted wound, the U.S. maintains a
special "regional consulate" in East Jeru-
salem to keep contact with the Arab
population there as if Israel were so
large a nation geographically that regional
consular offices are a "must," and the
facility in Tel Aviv couldn't do the job. As
the Israelis have long known, this East
Jerusalem facility serves as a center
symbolizing the division of Jerusalem,
where American officials in one way or
another feed the flames of Arab discontent.
Then what is there to celebrate?
Much to celebrate
No Jew, not Israeli nor diaspora, can
take his cue from others. The sad fact is
that "others" have throughout the history
of the Jews been a divisive force aiming to
destroy the Jewish continuum. In our own
time, what voice was raised against the
haphazard Arab occupation of Jerusalem?
What Christian demanded that it become
an "open city"? What Pope deplored the
fact that Jews were not permitted to visit
their own most sacred sites there?
Who, indeed, cared, not just about
Jerusalem but about all of then-Palestine
until the Jews returned to struggle for the
renewal of their ancient homeland?
And so the issue is not that there is no
cause to celebrate because "others" are
bent on denying us. Rather, the issue is
that there is cause to celebrate because the
millenial dream of the return to the City of
David has been fulfilled.
Today, the Jewish presence in Jerusalem
is dominant both numerically and
politically, and the city is first and
foremost the capital of the State of
Israel .More than three-quarters of the
population are Jews, and while their Arab
neighbors are substantial in number and
long-standing in their residence, under the
circumstances the amount of social tension
in the city is surprisingly limited.
Jerusalem Day occurs at a time when
Israel's American "friends" in the form of
Secretary of State George Shultz are in
Jerusalem applying the screws for further
concessions from Israel in the presumable
cause of peace in Lebanon. But this is only
the first step toward the Reagan
Administration's next move: the divesting
Jewish Floridian
of East Jerusalem from Israeli hegemony
despite the President's previous promises
to the contrary.
The world does not recognize the Jewish
emotional attachment to Jersualem. It does
not understand the Zionist dream a
dream the world itself enflamed with its
historic persecutions and cruelties of Jews
and Judaism. We somehow believe that
Jerusalem as Israel's capital city will
prevail as one and indivisible.
And that is what there was to celebrate
last Wednesday.
Education and the Seven-Year Itch
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.
Friday. May 13.1983
Volume 13
1 SIVAN 5743
Number 10
AS WITH the Seven-Year
Itch, there are men in high places
who, when it is written in their
stars, come to an extra-curricular
love affair with Education (the
capital "E" is an important
symptom of this malaise). Not
their own Education, mind you,
which is a personal matter whose
quality they believe they have
amply demonstrated by climbing
to the power of high places in the
first instance, but Education as a
condition of the nation's young.
Or, more specifically, the Lack of
it.
The love affair is both ethical
and practical. It shows attention
to the details of our country's
spiritual and intellectual situa-
tion, which is always a philo-
sophical Good. And it enhances
the political prognosis of the man
in high places who is still on the
go, which is about as practical as
anybody can possibly be.
Besides, it doesn't cost a thing.
THE TROUBLE is that the
Itch is always chronicled in the
media in the form of a debate,
where the maximum benefit can
be wrung from agonizing in pub-
lic view over these ethical and
practical considerations The
reason this is undesirable is that
the media are too often inclined
to know so Little of what they are
talking about. And the less they
know, the more vociferous they
become in their preachment.
A prime example of the Itch is
the National Commission on Ex-
cellence in Education. How else
to inquire into things without a
commission? And a prime
example of vociferous debate in
public view is the avidity with
which the media have seized upon
the commission to reflect the
high purposes of the men in high
places, not to mention the lovely
light it casts on the agonized
sensibility of the media them-
selves in the cause of the wret-
ched condition in which Educa-
tion wallows in America today.
Everybody wins the politicos
amd the press (Of course. Educa-
tion wins nothing, being a side
issue) In this instance, both are
Mindlin
%fcVrX-^c-Mfl>G*:;si:fi:*
the Nietzschean "braying ass"
par excellence: both talk about
the sadness of the growing
American illiteracy, even the
danger of it. Both talk to one
another, the politicos to the press
and the press to the politicos. and
the public, being fed every word
of the exchange, gets a sense that
something of real significance is
being done about the problem.
TO GIVE the impression that
they know what they are talking
about beyond any question, from
time to time one, or the other, or
both talk to a college or univer-
sity president here or there, or
perhaps a school board superin-
tendent with a keen intelligence
for Public Relations.
Or, for some special color,
maybe even a 10-or- 12-year old
black or hispanic kid is drawn
into the colloquy, who is quoted
as regretting being victimized by
the crummy classroom experi-
ence these days.
As for the National Commis-
sion on Excellence in Education
itself, I can never get past the
name of the commission to the
debate in which it stands so
steadfastly at the epicenter of
this earth-shattering concern.
It's that lovely assonance of sorts
that gets me every time Excel-
lence in Education. Who cares
what the commission really doss
so long as it sounds good?
FOR THOSE with a greater
yen for substance, though, there
ts always President Reagan, who
s customarily quoted in the con-
text of the commission's latest
findings on his own depressed


an.......-
view of just how low the Excel-
lence of Education has fallen.
In Florida, happily, we have a
special treat in this otherwise
dreary situation in the form of
Sen. Jack Gordon ID.. Miami'
Beach), the self-appointed doyen
of the Greatest Good Principle in
Education, who has passed a rule
in Tallahassee that every college
kid in the state, in required
courses in English, must write an
amount of words roughly
equivalent to the number of
words Tolstoy managed in "War
and Peace."
This Greatest Good Principle
is predicated on the time-honored
equation between quantity and
quality first proposed by op-
ticians who concluded that
microscopes have become out
moded henceforward to be sup-
planted by the universal tele-
scope, since bigger is always bet-
ter.
The GGP is based on Sen..
Gordon's many years of academic-
experience in insurance and
banking, where the more bucks
earned the merrier. It ordains
that the more words a student
writes, however illiterately, the
more the student learns about
writing. Once he passes his re-
quired courses, the average
Florida college kid can now look
forward to a publisher's contract
with, any, Knopf or Random
House. ,
SINGULARLY SUPRISINC
in all of this public debate is that
the only people invited to take
part are administrators-the col-
lege presidents, the politicos. the
editors. Mr. Reagan on a natioav
level and Sen.Gordon in Floriox
More recently, the Governor at
the state. Bob Graham, has also
gotten into the act with m
statements about where will our
future scientists come from if *
one can read or write anymore?
But Gov. Oraham is know"*
his habit of working tor J
every now and than t one or


Friday.Mayia.1883
The J*wishFbridianandS1wfar < i
PageS
Holocaust vignettes
American
By ANDREW POLIN
Special to the Jewish Floridian
Barry Spanjaard, now in his
50s, remains "very resentful" be-
cause of the childhood he never
had.
He spent his early teen-age
years in concentrations camps.
But Spanjaard was different
from the other victims in the
camps. He was born in America.
Barry's parents were Dutch
immigrants living in New York
City when he was born. The
Spanjaard family returned to
Holland in 1932 because his
grandfather was ill.
"We went there in '32 and got
stuck there when the war broke
out," Spanjaard recalled at the
"t American Gathering of Jewish '
Holocaust Survivors in Wash-
ington, D.C.
He was 13 when his family was
arrested, sent to a transit camp
and eventually shipped to
Bergen-Belsen "where people
were not killed. They just died
there."
Spanjaard remembered the
"hunger and the lice and the fear
of not being alive the next day."
It was his U.S. birth certificate
which shielded the Spanjaard
family from immediate death. He
could have gone back to the
Iinit .ni States in the early 1940s,
I but the United States would not
' accept his parents until 1945, he
said.
"By staying I was at least able
to save my mother's life," he
said.
Had it not been for his U.S.
birth certificate, Spanjaard said,
"I would have gone straight to
the gas chambers.
"My grandmother was
arrested and within a week she
was sent to the gas chambers,"
he said. He and his parents were
exchanged for five German of-
ficers in January 1945, four
months before the war ended. His
father, whose health had de-
teriorated drastically, died two
days after their release.
Fifty years ago, a 2-year-old
boy traveled from country to
country. No one wanted to
shelter him or his family from the
Nazi threat.
For that reason, U.S. Sen.
Rudy Boschwitz, R-Minnesota,
said Israel must be secure.
Boschwitz's family left Ger-
many in 1933, only months after
Hitler came to power.
"We went from country to
country to country seeking ad-
mittance into the United States,"
^Boschwitz recently said at the
Capitol steps before the Ameri-
can Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors.
"We had left early enough that
we were able eventually to gain
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admittance into the United
States," Boschwitz said.
But for two years, his family
traveled with no place to go.
"My family was in Uruguay
and South Africa and Kenya and
Shanghai and Cuba. Eventually
my wife was living in Brazil be-
cause when my father-in-law
went to the American Consul in
Switzerland just before the
war he was told in no uncertain
terms that the United States was
not available at that time," he
said.
"If we seem to have a great af-
finity for the State of Israel, it is
rooted in the traveling of that lit-
tle boy from country to country,"
Boschwitz said.
"It is not a mixture of loyal-
ties. It is not a misdirection of
priorities. Not at all. It is just a
feeling of kinship we have for all
Jews, no matter where they are,"
he said.
"And our history indicates
that, indeed, Israel must live," he
said, "because we cannot tell
when the State of Israel will be
called upon again to be a haven,"
he said.
Boschwitz said there were
righteous Gentiles who helped
Jews and even some countries,
including some in Latin America,
who took in Jews.
"But never again can that hap-
pen. Never again can we allow
that to happen," Boschwitz said.
Boschwitz 50 years later still
remembers those days.
"I have that long memory of
that little, boy traveling from
country to country with no place
to go," he said.
Just two years ago Sam
Gejdenson, a Democratic con-
gressman from Connecticut,
traveled a path filled with fear.
Gejdenson, the son of sur-
vivors, was born in a displaced
persons camp in Germany.
"We all knew what happened,
and periodical references of why
we don't have uncles and cousins
or nephews explained very
pointedly what had happened,"
he said.
But his family did not readily
speak about the Holocuast. It
was two years ago when
Gejdeson, then 33, read his first
Continued on Page 7
% QJouftoefij
5n rjne ^Ptctu/te
Be a part of the next
Jewish Federation of South Broward Mission
PARIS/ISRAEL LEADERSHIP MISSION
October 11-24,1983
COMMUNITY MISSION
October 24-No vember 3,1983
For additional information, contact Rae Bein or Beverly Bachrach at the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, 921-8810
2719 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Fla. 33020
-^____________.
Name J
I am interested in: Add** |
1 O Paris/Israel Mission ? Community Mission Phone 1




feflioUywood
Page 4
Page 6
T^JewSk'PSn^miand &2ifar of Great* Hollywood
Frkky.AnriLlfi.J9M
Friday, May 13,1983
JFSB Worqeifs Divisioi) 1}Oi>ops, installs leaders
More than 100 of the
top leaders of the Jew-
ish Federation of South
Broward's Women's
Division were honored
recently during the di-
vision's annual Awards
and Installation Lunch-
eon.
Chaired by Helen
Cohan (pictured at left],
the women convened at
the Seaview Hotel to
celebrate reaching their
campaign goal of $1.65
million.
Top award winners
are shown at right, pre-
senting each other with
black velvet-backed
placques depicting Kin>
Delia Rosenberg accepts Gordon Award from JFSB
Director Sumner Kaye.
Delia Rosenberg
snares coveted
Gordon Award
Perennial Women's Division stalwart Delia Rosenberg is this
year's winner of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's June
M. Gordon Leadership Award.
In presenting the award during the Women's Division's
Awards and Installation Luncheon at the Seaview Hotel,
Sumner G. Kaye. executive director, noted that the
distinguished honor kindles the memory of the late wife of
Robert Gordon.
"June Gordon was a tremendous leadership figure in South
Broward's Women's Division," Kaye said, "a role model for all
who follow."
First winner two years ago was Elaine Pittell; last year the
Gordon award was bestowed upon Evelyn Stieber.
Mrs. Rosenberg "truly has served in the great tradition of
Mrs. Gordon," the executive director said. "She is another fine
recipient of this most coveted prize."
Chavarut chairwoman for 1983, Mrs. Rosenberg's list of
accomplishments includes:
Chairwoman of La Mer; three years as Women's Division vice
president campaign, and numerous assignments for Com-
munity Day, Meirah, Big Gifts and the Women's Board Retreat.
When not active with Federation, Mrs. Rosenberg devotes
even more of her time to Deborah, Hadassah, B'nai B'rith, ORT,
the Florida Regional Campaign Cabinet and the state Women's
Division's League Conference.
She and her husband, Jerome, have two children, Harriet and
Mitchell.
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David holding a lyre,
and an Israeli soldier at
the Wailing Wall.
The winners, Evelyn
Stieber [at left in photo
at right] and Nancy
Brizel (at right], were
honored for their re-
spective work as Wom-
en's Division vice presi-
dent campaign, and
Women's Division pres-
ident.
Both were installed at
the luncheon to serve
second terms.
Mrs. Stieber also re-
ceived a dozen red roses
for achieving the 1983
Campaign goal.
Aliyah 'crisis' delineated
JKKUSALEM (JTA) A
total of 13,178 new immigrants
arrived in Israel during 1982, a 14
percent increase over the
previous year. But most were
from Western countries.
The Soviet Union, the largest
reservoir of potential olim.
remained virtually dry. Knesset
was told as it opened its summer
session with a debate on aliyah.
The immigration figures were
provided by Aharon Uzan, the
minister of Absorption. The
paucity of aliyah from the USSR
was the subject of a separate
report by Rafael Kotlowitz. head
of the Jewish Agency's immi-
gration and absorption depart-
ment.
Knesset members spoke of an
aliyah "crisis" because, despite
the marginal increase from the
West, overall figures were low
relative to the Soviet immi-
gration boom of the middle and
late 1970s.
Kotlowitz reported that of the
114 Jews allowed to leave the
Soviet Union last month, only 11
came to Israel. He said that was
the lowest monthly figure since
the mid-1960s when the Soviets
first opened their gates a crack.
"In effect, a month after the
Jerusalem Conference on Soviet
Jewry, we are now facing the
total end of Soviet emigration,"
Kotlowitz said.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World Zion-
ist Organization Executives,
continued to blame HIAS for the
Aliyah unification
NEW YORK (JTA) The
leadership of the organized Or-
thodox, Conservative and Re-
form synagogue movements have
agreed to work together in a
unified appeal for Americans to
make aliyah, marking the first
time aliyah has been the focus of
such a national effort, according
to Moshe Shechter, director of
the Israel Aliyah Center of North
America.
Israel honored
MEMPHIS. Tenn. (WNS)
The month-long Memphis in
May International Festival,
which in each of its six years has
honored a foreign country, will
honor Israel this year, Tom
Hutton, Jr., president, has an-
nounced. The event is being held
through May 29. The celebration
of culture, art, music and cuisine
which consists of five free
weekend events, as well as art
exhibits, is expected to attract
nearly one million visitors this
year, Hutton said.
high neshira (drop-out) rate.
HIAS aids Soviet Jewish emigres'
who opt to settle in countries
other than Israel even though
they leave Russia with Israeli
visas, ostensibly to reunite with
relatives in Israel.
Dul/.in said he would propose
"tough measures against HIAS"
when the Jewish Agency Assem-
bly convenes here next month.
Uzan said his ministry was
sponsoring a "door-to:door"
aliyah encouragement campaign
in France. He also said one of the
chief deterrents to aliyah the
high cost of housing in Israel -
was being ameliorated.
He said an immigrant could
now l)uy an apartment on the
private market with a mortgage
loan covering- up to 95 percent of
the price.
Hut opposition MKs sharply
criticized thi government's
immigration policies. Dov Zukin
of Mapam warned of possible
wholesale resignations from the
Knesset's immigration unf y
absorption committee to protest
the' ineffectiveness of Uzan's
. ministry.
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Friday, May 13,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Holocaust denier term confirmed
- v .
PARIS (JTA) The
/ French Court of Appeals has con-
' firmed the sentence imposed by a
lower court on Rene Faurisson, a
senior lecturer at Lyon Univer-
sity who has denied, in public
speeches and writings, that the
Holocaust ever took place.
He had been sued originally by
several Jewish organizations.
Faurisson, convicted by a
Paris court in July 1981 of "in-
sulting the memory of Nazi vic-
tims," was ordered by the Court
of Appeals to pay one Franc (15
cents) in damages to organiza-
tions of former deportees and res-
istance fighters plus 14,000
Francs (about $2,000) in legal
costs Ij the plaintiffs.
7
Holocaust vignettes
/
Continued from Page 5-
book about the Holocaust. It was
"Night" by Elie Wiesel.
"It was with fear that I turned
each page. Fear that it would
somehow so disrupt my life that I
would not be able to continue for
in each page of Elie's book I saw
what happened to my family,"
said Gejdenson, speaking on the
Capitol steps last month before
the American Gathering of Jew-
ish Holocaust Survivors.
"As a child of the survivors we
have a special responsibility. We
have a responsibility to see that
not only that it does not happen
to us, but that we, who have so
often have been first, dare not
wait to be second, he said.
Gejdenson, who opened his
speech in Yiddish, closed with a
quote by a German cleric!
"In Germany, first they came
for the communists, and I did not
speak out for I was not a com-
munist.
"And then they came for the
trade unionists, and again I did
not -|'i ak out because I was not a
trade unionist.
' \nd then they came for the
Jews, and again I knew it was
wrong, but I was not a Jew.
"And then they came for the
Catholics, and again I knew it
was wrong, but 1 did not speak up
because I was not a Catholic.
And then they came for me,
dnd by that time it was too late.
For there was no one to speak
up." --------
Nearly 40 years ago, Sam
Golman became a Jew, a dedi-
cated Jew.
That was the day when he
helped liberate Dachau, as well as
two other concentration camps.
"We could smell it 20 miles away.
The people in Dachau said they
couldn't smell a thing," Golman
said while attending the Ameri-
can Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors in Washington,
D.C.
The crematoriums still were
hot when they liberated Dachau,
said Golman, who was a field
director for the Red Cross at-
tached to the 36th Infantry Divi-
sion of the U.S. Army.
Upon entering Dachau,
Golman said they saw "people
sitting not even looking up.
Maybe weighing 75 to 80 pounds.
Not even bothering to look up.
Not bothering to even pay
attention."
"It was hard to get any kind of
reaction out of most of them.
They were glad, but ao weak.
Nothing seemed to move them
until probably the second day
and then they began to realize,
my God, they were going to make
it. They were going to live."
Before that experience,
Golman said he was an indif-
ferent Jew.
"All of a sudden I became a
dedicated Jew," said the 71-year-
old St. Louis resident.
"I think for the first time I
became a Jew. For the first time I
really became a Jew," he said.
One man was liberator. The
other, a victim. Rabbi Hershel
Schecter of New York remembers
April 11, 1945, vividly. That was
the day 38 years ago when he, as
a chaplain in the U.S. Army,
helpedliberate "that hellhole
called Buchenwald."
Schecter, speaking at the
Capital Centre before the Ameri-
can Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors, remembers
when the tanks rolled through
and liberated the camp.
He remembered a young boy
whose eyes he will never forget.
That boy now Rabbi Israel
Lau, an Israeli also will not
forget that day.
Schecter took Lau in his arms,
weeping. When the lad became
frightened, Schecter laughed.
Schecter then asked Lau how old
he was.
"And I answered what dif-
ference does it make. I'm older
than you," Lau said, adding that
Schecter thought he was a little
crazy from what had happened to
him.
"Why do you think my child
that you are older than me?" Lau
recalled Schecter asking him.
"Because you cry and you
laugh as a child. And I stopped
laughing and I can't even cry so I
must be older than you," he said.
Although the fine is a symbolic
token, the verdict was hailed as a
timely reminder to other apolo-
gists for the Nazis.
The Court of Appeals stressed
in its ruling that the defendant
and other persons unnamed were
trying to deny wartime Nazi
atrocities as well as the Holo-
caust and the existence of death
camps.
Gathering set
for Channel 2
On Sunday, May 15, at 11 p.m.
on WPBT-Channel 2, The Ameri-
can Gathering of Holocaust Sur-
vivors is to be presented. It is a
one-hour special highlighting the
recent event in Washington, D.C.
On April 11 through 13, ap-
proximately 20,000 Holocaust
survivors gathered together in
the nation's capital city for a
tribute to those who perished in
the concentration camps.
Many were reacquainted with
old friends and family. President
Reagan dedicated the Holocaust
Museum, ceremonies were held
featuring Henry Kissinger, Vice
President George Bush and
Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill.
HUMAN GUINEA PIG: Dr. Josef Mengele, the "Angel of
Death" in Auschwitz-Birkenau, used living people for bis
experiments, Eva Kor of Terre Haute, Ind., center, was used
by Mengele in one of his experiments on twins.
Study medicine in Israel,
A challenge and
an opportunity.
Touro College and Technion- Israel Institute of Technology
announce a new program leading to an M.D. degree
A new door is open to an M.D. degree from
one of the world's great teaching and research
centers. Starting in September 1983, the
Touro-Technion Program will offer qualified
college graduates a unique American-Israel
educational experience.
The program's 18-month American phase
provides advanced science and Hebrew
language studies at Touro College's beautiful
15-acre campus in the New York City suburb
of Huntington. Upon successful completion of
these courses, students will receive a second
baccalaureate degree and may continue their
studies in Israel.
Israel phases of the program comprise 6
months of initial bridging courses, 2 years of
advanced clinical study at Technion's Faculty
of Medicine in Haifa, a thesis and a year of in-
ternship in Israel. An M.D. degree will be award-
ed by Technion to students who successfully
complete its program requirements.
Our goal is the development of skilled and
compassionate physicians who also will be
well-prepared to meet internship, residency
and licensing requirements in the United
States.
For applications and information call or
write:
Center for Biomedical Education
Touro College
30 West 44th Street
New York, MY. 10036
(212)575-0190


Wwtd

Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 13,1983
CRC chairman scores in outstanding rankv .
Mara Giulianti
Five women all South
Broward Jewish activists were
among the 1983 Outstanding
Women of the Year finalists, ac-
cording to Broward County's
Women in Communications.
The five are Mara Giulianti,
Sandra Friedman, Roslyn
"Robbie" Kurland, Suzanne
Gunzburger and Nicki Englander
Grossman.
Mrs. Giulianti, chairman of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Relations
Committee, is immediate past
president of Women in Distress
of Broward County, organizing
and implementing fundrainng
Churba suggests Israel
better off 'unaligned'
NEW YORK (JTA) The
director of the Center for
International Security, Joseph
Churba, believes that because the
United States cannot offset
Soviet adventurism in the Middle
East, Israel should reshift its
policy away from the U.S. and
become an "unaligned" third
power.
Israel, Churba told 100 persons
attending a conference on U.S.
policy in the Mideast here, should
"emerge from its status as an
undervalued strategic asset of
the United States to that of a
third unaligned power" in the
region, "shifting its weight East
or West in accordance with its
security needs."
The conference was sponsored
by the Sephardic House at
Shearith Israel.
Churba, who worked with
President Reagan as an adviser
on foreign and defense policy
during Reagan's presidential
campaign, said such a move by
Israel would create a "triangle"
effect in which Jerusalem would
have to be considered in any
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moves in the Mideast by either
the United States or the Soviet
Union. He noted the Israeli
military is ranked fourth best in
the world.
The first step toward such a
move, Churba continued, would
be for the Israeli government to
cancel the scheduled delivery in
1985 of 75 American-made F-16
jet fighter planes and work to
enhance the development of its
second generation Lavie aircraft.
He said that while the United
States appears willing to
"concede" air superiority in the
Mideast to the Soviets through
the letter's placement of SAM-5
anti-aircraft missile batteries in
Syria, Israel could not afford to
relinquish its air superiority in
the region.
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg,
speaking before Churba, said he
interpreted Reagan's decision to
send Secretary of State George
Shultz to the Middle East as a
"diversionary" move to offset the
failed peace initiative. He said it
is crucial for the administration
to demonstrate activity and
interest in the region but said
that Shultz "is scarcely a very
skilled diplomat."
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MMMNCI MM
Jack Barman
Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD 921-7744
Dade 947-5902
amounting to more than $30,000.
She coordinated the reopening
of a child care center, won
$30,000 in new state funds and
led Women in Distress' 21 mem-
ber board. Mrs. Giulianti also has
been active on the local, state and
national levels in behalf of the
National Council of Jewish
Women.
Her other memberships include
Women's Advocacy; Child Ad-
vocacy of South Broward; NOW;
Women's Political Caucus, and
the League of Women Voters.
Sandra Friedman, executive
director of the Gold Coast Chap-
ter of the Multiple Sclerosis
Society, also serves as a Broward
officer for the National Associa-
tion of Social Workers.
She is active with the Florida
Association for Health and Social
Services; child care administra-
tion at Nova University; Brow-
ard Mental Health Board;
Women's Detention Center;
Women's Political Caucus;
Democratic Executive Commit-
tee, and Broward's Bi-Racial
Education Task Force and Cuba-
Haitian Task Force.
"Robbie" Kurland is chairman
of the Broward County Library
Advisory Board, appointed as a
member nine years ago. She is
legislative leader for the Broward
Library Association.
Her other interests include the
Broward Medical Association
Auxiliary; Temple Solel; Temple
Beth El; the Women's Invest-
ment Program, and Nova
Schools.
Suzanne Gunzburger is vice
mayor of Hollywood. She is co-
chairman of Florida state public
affairs for the National Council of
Jewish Women, and winner of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Shalom Award.
Her other interests include the
Broward Mental Health Board;
White House and Florida Con-
ferences on Families; Broward
Commission on the Status of
Women; Environmental Coali-

tion of Broward; Broward Pur\ |
chase Service Committee, and
Nova Schools Advisory Commit-
tee.
Also, League of Women
Voters; Women's Political
Caucus; Women's Advocacy;
Hollywood Chamber of Com.
merce, and Women in Distress.
Nicki Grossman is vice chair-
man of the Broward County
Commission. A former Holly-
wood city commissioner, she-
serves on the board of the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Broward.
She is also active in the Brow-
ard Metropolitan Planning
Organization; the County Plan-
ning Council; State Association
of County Commissioners; Com-
mission on Cities in the '80s for
the National League of Cities;
Port Everglades Jursidictional
Study Commission; Florida Hos-
pital Cost Containment Board;
National Association of Counties
Home Rule Committee; Early
Childhood Development Associa-
tion; Area Agency on Aging, and
Hollywood Medical Center.
#
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Friday, May 13,1983
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
, y Churba, Studley defend Israeli power
I W Continued from Page 1
nn the Taraali nnnuloiinn fn* Jnf.. ffiinnn *W* i -l______ t *
Mindhn
Continued from Page 1
on the Israeli population for defense.
Western European countries spend 2.5 to 5
percent of their Gross National Product on
defense; the U.S. spends 6 percent, the
Japanese (whom the U.S. helps greatly with
defense, just as the U.S. does Western
Europe) spend less than 1 percent of their
GNP for defense.
Israel spends 35 percent.
"This point," says Churba, "is not
adequately understood in Washington." He
adds, "Israel is shouldering the burden for \
Western defense against the Soviet Union
in the Mideast."
Churba said that of the 12.5 billion in
U.S. military aid, half is forgiven and half is
paid back with interest. About $1.4 billion
is spent in Israel, compared with $80 billion
for NATO and $36 billion in the Far East.
"What is the United States contributing
to Israeli security compared with what
Israel contributes to the security of the
United States?" asks Churba, director of
the security council, which is financed
entirely through voluntary contributions.
The council is part of a nationwide effort
to inform and enrich the public's un-
derstanding of world events, Churba says.
It coordinated an Open Letter to President
Reagan, which appeared in The New York
Times, The Miami Herald, The Fort
Lauderdtde News and The Jewish Floridian.
In this letter, 262 retired U.S. generals
and admirals note the excellent per-
formance of Israeli arms and technology
and urge the president ot revitalize the
strategic cooperation with Israel, thereby
enhancing the safety and well-being of free
peoples of the world.
The National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council (NJCRAC) has
urged the Jewish Federations across the
country to support republication of the
generals' open letter.
Churba told the crowd that the words of
one Gentile general on this issue are worth
what many, many Jews are trying to do.
Churba is a defense policy analyst by
profession. He has been a senior policy
adviser at the Arms Control and Disar-
mament Agency, a foreign and defense
policy adviser to President Reagan, a
special adviser to Air Force Intelligence and
a professor of Middle East Studies.
He told the bulging CRC meeting that
during the Lebanon invasion, Israel
knocked out $3 billion worth of Soviet
equipment 132 aircraft, 50 SAM
missues, 500 Syrian tanks without the
toss of a single Israeli aircraft, and using
only 10 percent of their capabUity. The
Israelis also captured $2.8 bifiion worth of
Soviet equipment.
"Was this due to the ineptitude of the
Syrian soldier?" he asked. The Soviets have
learned that this is not so, that the Syrian
soldiers fought creditably. The victory was
due to the exceptional technological
superiority of Israeli arms and equipment,
Churba concludes.
The Soviets believe that Israel could
transfer this superiority in conventional
(non-nuclear) warfare capability to the
West. Therefore, the Soviet Union has since
poured $2 billion in equipment into Syria.
The Russian SA5 system the most
sophisticated Russian missile program
which heretofore had not been permitted
outside of the Soviet Union has been
installed in Syria.
It is being manned by 6,000 Soviet
technicians, Churba stated. "Now Syrian
high command information will im-
mediately go to Moscow. The Soviets will
be able to directly orchestrate the next
war," declared Churba.
With the new SA5 system, Syria can
dominate the airspace including Israel
and the area where the U.S. 6th Fleet
conducts maneuvers. Churba believes that
with this domination and the ability of the
Soviets to direct the war effort, a Syrian
tank offensive could be successful.
"The main issue is: Are we going to
concede air superiority to the Russians?"
asked Churba. The issues of the West Bank
or Israeli troops in Lebanon are very minor
compared to the Soviet threat of
domination in the area, the analyst con-
tends.
Churba believes that the Caribbean
conflicts (Nicaragua, El Salvador, Hon-
duars) are diversionary moves. The Soviet
Union, he states, would like to isolate the
United States from its allies.
"Prevailing opinion in the Pentagon,
State Department and National Security
Council is that Israel is more a liability than
an asset; there is no dissenting view in the
upper echelons."
This contention is disputed by Churba
and the 262 retired generals and admirals
who signed the "Open Letter to the
President," the advertisements which the
center coordinated and which were made
possible by grassroots support and
donations.
The ads have had quite an impact in
Washington, Churba states. The next
project of the center will be to convene a
symposium in Jerusalem for 150 retired
U.S. generals and admirals, along with 20
from NATO countries and to aid these
retired military experts in speaking
throughout the United States to the media
and to citizen's groups upon their return
home.
It is imperative that the funds for such a
venture be raised entirely from the people of
this country, so that the symposium will
not be viewed as a "propaganda" move by
the Israeli government, Churba savs. The
topic of the symposium will be the "Soviet-
American Military Balance."
William Mazzocco, vice president of the
center, told the crowd that m 1937 he heard
Mussolini speak several times then he
heard Hitler.
"There was no real resolve in the West to
show Hitler that we would not tolerate his
diabolical schemes or to show the Soviet
Union, now," Mazzocco declared.
"Israel is the only deterrent to anti-
American forces in the Mideast today. Only
Israel shows resolve to stand up for its
values and its own defense, no matter the
odds. But she stands alone."
Anyone wishing to make a tax-deductible
membership contribution to the Center for
International Security may do so by
mailing it to 905 16th St., NW,
Washington, D.C. 20006.
For further information, phone (202) 347-
2541 or contact Melissa Martin, CRC
director, or Mara Giulianti, CRC chairman,
at the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Continued from Page 4-.
cu pat ion or another so that he
can become an instant expert in it
and also prove that, as a common
man, he's not afraid to dirty his
hands. Besides, he's an adminis-
trator too, and so all told he fits
admirably into the prescribed
parameters of the debate.
One does, of course, discount
the occasional black or hispanic
youngster drawn into the fray for
color. And so there we are: ad-
ministrators talking to adminis-
trators about Education with the
clear supposition that Education
is the kind of thing anybody with
good intentions can discuss, that
Education like sin or taxes
doesn't require any sort of real
expertise to understandcer-
tainly not why there is so much
illiteracy around these days, not
the least of which is occasionally
suffered among some of those
very administrators searching for
Excellence in it. For example,
Mr. Reagan's use of English
would by contrast make Dwight
Eisenhower and Harry Truman
sound like the immortal Greek
orator, Demosthenes.
ANYWAY, this business of
administrators talking about
Education should not be thought
of as especially strange. Con-
sider, for example, the everyday,
ordinary run-of-the-mill hospital
administrator who feels he's
qualified to practice Medicine
when he's not busy raising funds
or counting the cotton ball inven-
tory.
But what ought to strike
someone is why nobody ever
bothers to talk to teachers if only
to get their insights into the
national illiteracy problem. I can
hear the snorts of laughter al-
ready. Teachers? What do they
know anyway? Would they be
teaching if they knew or could do
anything else? Not likely. Just
ask G. B. Shaw, who was also an
expert in just about everything.
w
If you can say "NO"
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their house of worship that it really isn't a house at all. It's part of a
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Now if such arrangements make the Jews of Ayr unique,
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Pane 4
^^^f^f^nnSnSat^i^nofc^n^eater Hollywood
../"
-~~
Pag* 10
mrr -----------
The Jewish Floridian and ShofarofGreater Hollywood
FrkU. A~ttJ
Friday, May 13.1983
Hillcrest
awards
Joe Raymond, 1982-83
Hillcrest chairman,
[left) receives a gleam-
ing silver Kiddush cup
from Milton Winograd,
premier gifts, during
ceremonies honoring all
of Hillcrest's workers
for the UJA-Jewish
Federation of South
Broward Campaign.
The Hillcrest Awards
Breakfast also was a
platform for the intro-
duction of 1983-84
chairman, Marc Gilbert
[below, at left]. With
the new chairman are
Raymond, Winograd
and Sumner G. Kaye,
executive director of the
Federation.
"Finally, a
Catskill resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
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Air Conditioning and Color TV
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than nonstop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
We know that you go on vacation to
do more than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modified
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals dairy. Breakfast (until 11:30 am),
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Pool-
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
1 pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
rush off the golf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
taining health club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work
out on our Universal mini-gym. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
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So come to the Brickman. Where the
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For reservations and
information phone
TOLLFREE
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaUsburg. N.Y 12779
Master Card. Visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
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don't fit
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family
ORT president will spei
at Hillcrest this Sunday
Alvin L. Gray. American ORT
Federation president, will speak
at a special president's reception
Sunday, May 15, at Hillcrest
Country Club in Hollywood.
Charles Landau, chairman of
Broward County Men's ORT.
said Gray will report on his tour
of ORT Israel schools from Haifa
to Beereheva and his meetings
with students, educators and po-
litical leaders.
For reservations for the recep-
tion, which begins at 3 p.m., con-
tact Steven Perry. American
ORT Federation Southern Re-
gion field representative at 431-
3305.
From advanced micro-
computers to sophisticated naval
technology, ORT schools in Isra-
el are training tens of thousands
of Israel's youngsters in the com-
plex technical skills which have
been responsible for Israel's suc-
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other high technology fields for
both civilian and military pur-
poses.
These are 20.000 members of
Men's ORT in the United States,
supporting operations in ORT's
global network of 800 schools and
training centers serving 100,000
Jews of all ages in 26 countries.
74.000 in Israel alone.
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sy, May 13,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
lyment deficit hits high point in Israel history
tRUSALEM (JTA) Im-
balance of payment deficit
|reached the highest point in
listory of the state, including
iifficult times right after the
Yom Kippur War, according
ares released by the Central
au of Statistics.
sradoxically, the deficit grew
year despite an overall im-
fcrements in Israel's exports. It
tinted to $4.72 billion in 1982,
icrease of $400 million over
the previous year.
According to the Central
Bureau of Statistics, Israel's in-
come from overseas trade de-
creased by $300 million or 11 per-
cent compared to 1981, even
though improved exports in-
jected $530 million into the
economy and security related
imports declined by $640 million.
Without those two elements,
the deficit would have reached
$5.9 billion, the Central Bureau
reported. As matters stand now,
Israel has become more depen-
dent than ever on loans which in-
creased during the past year by
$2 billion, for a total outstanding
of $28 billion.
Israel has paid some $300 mil-
lion on the interest alone. It was
noted that since Yoram Aridor
became finance minister two
years ago, Israel's foreign debt
increased by 25 percent.
;rael s Arens 'faces the nation'
Continued from Page 1
moment."
said the Syrians, who now control 50 per-
of Lebanon, have sought to "intimidate the
nese" and have been "posturing" before
pi and Lebanon reached an agreement.
Je said he believes they will continue to pos-
Lkuntil the agreement is actually signed, Arens
however that he did not know what would
en then.
}t Arens said he "would hope" that the Sovi-
lion does not have the type of "veto" over
Syrians that would prevent their withdrawal
ly decided to do so.
noted that before Israel went into Lebanon
nonths ago, Syria-controlled Lebanon had
led "an umbrella" for the Palestine Libera-
lOrganization to carry out its terrorist activi-
^gainst Israel and worldwide.
bcording to Arens, the Soviets were "not un-
py with that situation since both Syria and
yl.O are Soviet surrogates and if the Syrians
l.i tianon. the Soviets will "lose their influ-
[:;i Lebanon."
pus said that Syria is "getting ready" mili-
lor war with Israel and has demanded and
pved weapons form the Soviet Union to give it
jty" with Ihe Israel Defense Force.
said Syria has received the best weapons
|Soviets have, some of it "very good" and
of it not as good as the parallel Israeli and
rican equipment.
it Arens said Israel does not know if the Syr-
[ want war and if they do, whether they would
i Soviet support.
lie Israeli defense minister would not say
ther the Israeli-Lebanese agreement worked
y Shultz last week included a U.S. promise
to lift the suspension of a process for the sale of 75
F-16 jet fighter bombers to Israel.
He said that was a question that would have to
answered by Shultz or by President Reagan.
Shultz indicated to reporters traveling with him
that Israel would get the planes, but the an-
nouncement would be made officially by Reagan.
Arens stressed that the agreement has put Is-
rael and the United States "back in harmony."
He noted that the differences of opinion over
Lebanon between Israel and the United States
"ruffled feathers" but the basic relationship be-
tween the two countries did not depend on
whether they agreed or disagreed over various
issues.
He said the revival of the memorandum of un-
derstanding on strategic cooperation between Is-
rael and the United States was not discussed
during Shultz's current visit to the Middle East,
and said it was "premature" to deal with that
issue now.
Arens called the agreement with Lebanon a
"great step ahead" in Israeli-Lebanese relations,
declaring that it goes a "long way toward a peace
agreement."
He said Israel and Lebanon now share a "com-
mon interest" in having Syria withdraw its troops
and keeping the PLO terrorists from returning to
Lebanon, and this common ground is the basis for
a "good relationship."
Arens said Israel was "pleased" that Lebanon
is now willing to have Maj. Saad Haddad re-
turned to the Lebanese army as an officer.
He said they would find that Israel's high opin-
ion of his ability to fight terrorists is "not at all
exaggerated."
A familiar sight
at Kutsher's.
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Page 12 The Jewish FhriduutamtSkofarofGrtaUrJiottymrod
Friday. May 13.1963

Have You Heard?
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Sinai on Johnson Street, Hollywood. Checking out another of the animals available through the
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Page 14
urn ana ono/arof Greater Hollywood
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Frutov
Friday, May 13,1983
Ask the rabbi
You, too, may hear
the word of G-cf...
By RABBI HAROLD R1CHTER
Director of Chaplaincy
Jewish Federation of South Broward
On Tuesday evening, May 17, we usher in the Festival of
Shavout, the Season of Giving the Torah and the Festival of the
First Fruits, commemorating the wheat harvest, in which Jews
made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem in temple times and par-
ticipated in the Bikkurim (First Fruits) ceremony.
The First Fruits ceremonials have been revived in Israel today
to celebrate the harvest of this season. In the United States,
modern congregations celebrate confirmation on Shavuot. In
both instances, there is often an emphasis on pageantry.
In a different vein, I can recall when I was a Yeshiva student
Shavout was also a "happening." We students would hold an
all-night vigil known as mishmar." We would remain awake all
night on the first night of Shavout and study Talmud or other
Holy Books.
As the night was ending we would immerse ourselves in a
mikvah a ritual immersion pool as a means of purifying
ourselves before listening to the Torah reading describing the
giving of the Ten Commandments and the Torah at Mt. Sinai.
We had the feeling that since this holiday had been sanctified
as a holy season and* just as our ancestors experienced the
presence and the word g-d, we too might experience something
of the divine.
When one is called to the Torah for an aliyah, one says a
b'rocha which ends with the words notain haTorah who gives
the Torah. This refers to the concept that the Giving of the
Torah is not only an isolated incident in history which occurred
3,495 years ago, out that revelation is continuous.
"What would revelation accomplish today?
What are the questions we would want answered here and
now? How can we reduce tensions and stress? How can we ef-
fectively communicate with our parents and our children? How
can we effectively utilize the Earth's resources?
How can we resolve the problems associated with the threat of
nuclear destruction? How can we avert the slower and more
insidious destruction that the shortsighted industrial-military
complex creates with pollution?
As Jews we ask, "How can Israel achieve greater security and
peace? How can we enhance the intensity of our commitment to
Yiddishkeit?"
According to the Torah, Mount Sinai was the same place
Moses had beheld the burning bush. It was there that g-d said,
"Take off your shoes, for land upon which you stand is holy
earth."
Mount Sinai is a holy place. Shevout is a holy time. But you
can remain oblivious to its spirit and its message if you don't
take off your shoes in today's vernacular I if you don't get
some sensitivity training.
Perhaps this is the calling to today's men and women who do
care about what's happening in our worlds:
Sens it i. >.e yourself to the crying needs of humanity; open your
eyes, your ears, your hearts and perhaps you, too, as our
ancestors. may hear the word of G-d.
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Women outnumber men
at Reconstructionist rabbinate
NEW YORK (JTA) A
slightly larger number of women
than men are studying this aca-
demic year for the Reconstruc-
tionist rabbinate and nearly twice
as many men as women are
studying for the Reform rabbin-
ate, according to a survey by the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
The patterns repeat those of
the 1981-82 academic year when
19 women and 18 men were
studying for the rabbinate at the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College (RRC) and a total of 120
men and 69 women were studying
for the rabbinate at the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion (HUC-JIR).
The RCC, at Wyncote, Pa., has
22 women and 20 men studying
for the rabbinate this academic
year, while the HUC-jir has 126
men and 70 women studying for
the rabbinate.
Twelve women will be ordained
in May and June as Reform rab-
bis. Two women will be ordained
as Reconstructionist rabbis for a
total of 14 new women rabbis.
They will bring to 75 the total
number of American women or-
Did Christians do
right in Lebanon?
theologian asks
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Christians should follow the
example of the Israelis, who
today are searching their consci-
ences and asking themselves if
they "did the right thing" in
Lebanon, a Dutch theologian
stated.
Speaking at a press luncheon
at the American Jewish Commit-
tee's headquarters, Dr. Simon
Schoon, former pastor at Nes
Ammim, the only Christian agri-
cultural cooperative in Israel,
said that Christians should not
forget that it was Christians who
did the killings in the Palestinian
camps.
"Then," Schoon added, "out of
collective responsibility we can
really discuss the matter."
The whole situation is so com-
plex, Schoon asserted, that "we
must go back to history in order
to judge the present religious and
political complexities in the Mid-
dle East."
Both Schoon and Christine
I'ilon. one of the original settlers
of Nes Ammim, and the widow of
the founder, described the settle-
ment as "a unique and moving
attempt to build and demon-
strate Christian solidarity with
Israel." It was born of its found-
ers' desire, they said, "to voice a
meaningful Christian response to
the Holocaust and to centuries of
anti-Semitism."
Appealing to Christians to
visit and spend time in Nes Am-
mim, Mrs. Pilon said:
"We must understand the
depth of the suffering the Jews
experienced at the hands of
Christians. We must repent of
that persecution by identifying
with a living Jewish people in
their homeland."
Schoon told the group that "a
basic pre-condition for solidarity
with the Jewish people today
requires the abandonment of the
mission to the Jews, which is
clearly a moral offense against
the living faith of Judaism and
the Jewish people."
Founded not quite 10 years
ago, Nes Ammim today is home
to 160 Christian men, women and
children mostly Dutch, Ger-
man, Swiss and American. Some
are permanent settlers, others
visitors who "come to experience
the visionary atmosphere of Nes
Ammim and to learn what it can
teach them both about Judaism
and Christianity."
In the Galilee Hills not far
from Haifa and the Lebanese
border, Nes Ammim is generally
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regarded in Israel as a genuine
center of ecumenism. At first,
fear of missionary activity cast a
pall but this has been largely
dispelled, in part because of Nes
Ammim's unmistakable interest
in Jewish customs and traditions.
dained as Reform and Recon-
structionist rabbis since 1972
when Sally Preisand was or-
dained by the HUC-JIR as
America's first woman rabbi.
Ordination of the 1982-83 rab-
binical graduates of the HUC-
JIR will be May 29 at Temple
Emanu-El in New York and on
June 4 at the Plum Street Temple
in Cincinnati Ordination of the
RCC graduates will be June 5 at
the Germantown Jewish Centre
in Germantown, Pa.
Most of the women ordained so
far hold posts as assistant rabbis
and a few have been promoted to
associate rabis, a generalization
that applies to newly ordained
men rabbis as well.
While no woman has been
named as senior rabbi by any
congregation, a growing number
have been named "solo rabbis," a
designation for rabbis of congre-
gations too small to either need
or afford more than one rabbi. A
number of the new women rabbis
have taken part-time pulpits.
Others have taken positions as
Hillel Foundation rabbis, while
still others have chosen staff po-
sitions in schools, administrative
work and organizations.
A: //-$
s
!'X-
\l I / Candlelighting Time
I I Friday, May 13-7:40
Tuesday, Erev Shavuot,]
May 17-7:42
Wednesday, Second night, i
May 18-8:42
Friday, May 20-7:44
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.: Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Miramar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
FJefomj
Temple Beth El 1361 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8225.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10. K ^^^
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
gartan-lO60' 8=15 PJn" Reliiou8 9chool: Pre-kinder-
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30o'clock. Religious school: Pre-school12.
V
\l
Reconstructionist
M*'
SKE^^S^?.."" 11301 W Br9ward Blvd., Plantation: 472-
3b00. Rabbi Elliot SkidelL Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. Reliirious
school: Pre-kindergarten8.


Friday, May 13,1963
The Jewish Piorididn andShbfnrof Greater Hollywood
Page 15
Jcc
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
MMHBI
2838 HOtLYWOOO BLVO HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
For singles
The Singles Group of the Jew-
9h Community Centers of South
toward is planning a tri-county
picnic and beach party at Hugh
3irch State Park, Fort Lauder-
tlale (Al-A and Sunrise Boule-
vard, Pavillion No. 1) on Mon-
day, May 30, (Memorial Day) at
10 a.m.
The JCC's of Fort Lauderdale,
I West Palm Beach, North Miami
[Beach and Miami Beach will also
[participate. Bring your own food;
'leer, soda and munchies will be
erved. Donation is 82. Fun and
amesforall.
[For singles aged 20-35,
j A dance will be Saturday,
ay 14, at 9 p.m. at the Howard
jhnson Motel, 2501 N. Ocean
irive. Hollywood Beach. Admis-
|on is $5 and includes music by
r. Music.
or 55 plus:
A dance is planned Tuesday,
lav 24. at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth
1351 S. 14 Ave., Hollywood.
lmi-vn is $2 and includes
fre.-hments and a DJ.
IA dinner-cruise is set for
^day, May 29, at Haulover
Call Esther Greenberg at
|-9113 for more information.
imp
ip Kadima is registering
jmmer.
kiiip Kadima is for 1 through
6 grades, and Chalutzim Travel
Camp is for 7 through 9 grades.
Call Mark or Susan at 921-6511
for further information and
registration.
Cancun
The JCC of South Broward is
Cancun holiday in
planning
Mexico fc
Bxico for Memorial Day week-
end, May 25-29. The trip wfll in-
clude a five-day, four-night stay
at the deluxe Sheridan Cancun
Hotel, transfers from airport to
hotel, yacht cruise, day tour to
Tulum-Xel-Ha, Mayan Ruins and
Natural Aquarium; taxes and
tips. Cost will be less than 8300
per person. If interested, call
Dene at 921-6611
Playgroup
The JCC is registering for Fall
Playgroup: Children 2W-3 years
meet Monday, Wednesday, Fri-
day, 9-12 a.m.; age 4 meet Mon-
day through Friday 9-12 a.m.
Call Susan at 921-6511. Space is
limited and pre-registration re-
quired. |
Mom* & Tot*
i
The JCC is registering for new
Mom and Tots classes: 15-20-
month-olds meet on Mondays at
9:30 a.m., and 20-30-month-olds
meet on Tuesdays or Wednesday
at 9:30 a.m.
Pre-registration is required;
space is limited. Call Susan at
921-6511 for information and
registration.
:ing parents topic of concern
fou and Your Aging Par-
are the concern of two new
being formed by the
least Focal Point Senior
er. Jewish Community Cen-
t>f South Broward.
on going support group for
ren of aging parents will
Monday, May 23, at 2:30
I at the center, 2838 Holly-
Blvd. The group is to meet
Ihiy.
A more structured group is
planned for four classes begin-
ning Tuesday evening. May 31,
at 7:30. Pre-registration is re-
quired. For more information,
contact Dvora Friedman, MSW,
at 921-6518.
The senior center is a recipient
agency of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
ICC NOMINATED OFFICERS AND BOARD, 1983-84
he nominating committee of the Jewish Community Centers
[outh Broward. chaired by Dr. Joel Schneider, has placed in
lination the following officers and board members for the
J-84 fiscal year. These individuals will assume their duties
Iwing election at the JCC annual meeting on Sunday
Vng, June 5th. All JCC members in good standing are
pie to vote at this time. Information regarding the annual
Lng will be sent out within the next two weeks. Additional
ibers of the nominating committee are Brenda Greenman,
jklvin Shapiro, Dr. Sam Meline, Jewel Smith and Ron Roth-
Hex of ficio).
Proposed officers and board members, 1983-84
(1-year term)
ient
1 resident:
ptary:
iirer:
sident;
Dr. Sam Meline
Brenda Greenman
Dr. Alvin Shapiro
Joan Youdelman
Mike Or love
Ed Hoffman
Ron Rothschild
Dembers: (1-year term, expires 1984)
Abraham NelsonKlein
lAmigo M.T5rr2"ker
ne Bunin Dr. Richard Reines
Id Fellows Rabbi Samuel Rothberg
tGaynor Rebecca Schwarte
Gelfand Jerom ?l
jteveGlazer ^'SS
[Jacobs JanZtff
I members: (2-year term, expires 1985)
I Berman
' Eichler
I Fried
iruber
i Hoffman
tier
[Katz
vman
- Pickman
Harold Rosenfeld
Jack Saltzman
Don Samuels
Dr. Joel Schneider
Fran Shapiro
Jewel Smith
Daphna Weinstein
Roberta Weitz
Murray Zedeck
r<> 1- ^kw
^^i i ^s^L^^LW. REMWEOIiElV-'

1

MUuIn Ydiot Achrooot,' on lh v. o U JaruMlam Wortd Coofarana on Sovltt Jtwry.
Brooklyn's Tlden High reunion
Nineteen-eighty-four will mark the 50th anniversary of the
1934 graduating class of Tilden High School of Brooklyn, N.Y.
A reunion is being planned. Tentatively it will be in Florida.
All interested alumni please contact Al Golden at 531-1151
(Dade) 523-5801 (Broward) or Harry Babuah 734-2273 (Boca-
Delray, Palm Beach) or you may write to: Alfred Golden, c-o
Riverside Memorial Chapel; 1920 Alton Road; Miami Beach,
Florida 33139.
Enclose names and location of any other alumni you may
know about.
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r^ww
Tiu JtwUk Floridian andShofar of Urtater Hollywood
tndtv Aimi
, '


Friday. May 13,1983
Holocaust revisited?
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
Heinz: Soviets killing Judaics
PITTSBURGH (JTA) -
Sen. John Heinz (R. Pa.),
charged last week that the Soviet
Union is "engaged in an attempt
to spiritually annihilate all that is
Judaic."
Heinz, addressing the opening
session of the 83rd national con-
vention of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, told the 500 del-
egates assembled:
Just 40 years after the Nazi at
tempt to exterminate the Jewish
IxHjple, as we honor the memory
of those who died in the Holo-
caust, the government of the
USSR is heightening its attempt
to totally destroy Soviet Jewry.
'If it can be said that Nazi ex-
termination camps were an effort
to physically remove the Jewish
people from the face of the Earth,
then the Soviets are engaged in
an attempt to spiritually annihi-
late all that is Judaic.
"Our commitment to Israel,"
he said, "rests on our moral de-
termination that history never be
allowed to repeat itself. People
who have forgotten their history
Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
NADEZHDA FRADKOVA,
the 36-year-old Leningrad mathe-
matical linguist who has
threatened to fast "unto death"
unless she is granted an exit visa
to Israel, has been removed from
her flat by the police and taken to
a hospital where, it is believed,
she is being force-fed.
A report from her friends sug-
gests that nobody has yet been
able to establish which hospital
she was taken to.
The Xssociated Press reports
this week that 47-year-old
Kharkov chemist PROF. YURI
TARNOPOLSKY, currently in
prison, has been on a hunger
strike since April 15.
The news came from his wife,
IRINA, who tried to deliver a
food parcel to the Kharkov prison
authorities. They refused to
accept it and told her that her
husband had declared a hunger
strike, "protesting his unlawful
detention."
Tarnopolsky, who was arrested
on March 15, is being held under
criminal code for allegedly
defaming the Soviet State.
The difficulties facing YOSIF
BEGUN, the Moscow-born
mathematician who is due to be
tried for anti-Soviet agitation,
increased this week when it was
learned that the one lawyer in
Vladimir both able and willing to
conduct his defense was taken ill.
INNA SPERANSKAYA. who
has Begun's power of attorney to
organize his defense, will now
press the Vladimir authorities to
l>e allowed to find a lawyer in
Moscow, instead of one from the
Vladimir circuit.
ALEXANDER PARITSKY.
the Kharkov activist now serving
a three-year prison sentence, may
be getting the "SH-
CHARANSKY treatment."
according to his wife POLINA.
Last October Paritsky was
sent to the prison confine of the
labor camp for six months for
alleged breach of camp discipline,
and has since been denied privi-
leges.
Polina has been pressing the
authorities to tell her whether he
being held in solitary confine-
ment as she fears, and why she is
not being allowed to send him
food parcels. She had not seen
nun since August 1982, and has
een told that her next official
visit will not be for seven months
more, until next November.
The latest information on LEV
ELBERT, the Kiev activist who
at the age of 35 was called up for
military reserve service, is that
the authorities have not yet
decided whether to prosecute
Elbert was willing to accept
the call-up, but insisted that
since he was a refusenik of seven
years he should be given duties
which could not later be labeled
I classified and so delay the possi-
inility of his receiving an exit via*
I'or seven or eight years more.
This the authorities refused to
do.
GENNADY KHASIN, 46-
year-old mathematician from
Moscow who has been a refusenik
since September 1977, recently
also has been served with call-up
papers for reserve duty.
Unlike Elbert, who did military
Continued on Page 18
may not wish Israel ill, but
neither do they commit them-
selves clearly to Israel's right to
exist. And because precisely so
many people today have forgot-
ten the challenge of re-affirming
that right, achieving an enduring
Middle East peace becomes more
and more difficult each day."
ZOA President Ivan Novick
insisted, "It is Arab refusal to
accept and recognize Israel which
is the obstacle to peace." He
urged the U.S. government to
convince the Arabs to be realistic
if they truly intend to have peace.
According to Novick, "Israel is
ready for direct negotiations, the
Arabs are not. Israel is branded
as inflexible, and the Arabs can
sit back and wait for the U.S. to
lean on Israel for more conces-
sions.
'1 believe that it is time that
the administration come to grips
with the reality that this ap-
proach does not address the most
vital elements which are the ob-
stacles to peace," Novick said.
"This is the time for the United
States to reinforce its relation-
ship with Israel. Let the presi-
dent send the Arabs a message
which says:
"We will make Israel militarily
stronger, economically more
powerful and concentrate our
primary efforts in the area of
creating a bridge of friendship
and cooperation between Israel,
Lebanon and Egypt. And hope-
fully, at an early date, the King of
Jordan will also find the courage
to join this union of nations who
may not love each other but
intend to live with each other."
v
One of the most sensible
ways to make holiday
food a little healthier is
to cut down on choles-
terol. So this Shevuoth
make your blintzes
with Fleischmann's
Margarine and
Fleischmann's Egg
Beaters. They have no
cholesterol.
Fleischmann's
Margarine is made from
100% corn oil. has 0%
cholesterol and it's low
in saturated fat. Best of
all. Fleischmann's Sweet
Unsalted Margarine.
parve. and Regular
Margarine have a deli-
cious taste that's perfect
for cooking. Delicious,
too, are new improved-
tasting Egg Beaters.
They're 99% real egg
product, 1% vitamins
and minerals, with
0% cholesterol. Now
they taste like real
eggs and are parve,
too. Fleischmann's
Egg Beaters and
Fleischmann's
Margarine. They're both
certified Kosher. And
with this holiday recipe
they'll show you how
satisfying low choles-
terol cooking can be!
COOKBOOK OFFER
Low Cholesterol
/swish Cookery, a $3.95
value for only $1.95
plus $1.00 postage and
handling with the
front label from any
package of
Fleischmann's
Margarine or Egg
Beaters. Send with your
name and address to:
Fleischmann's Cook-
book, P.O. Box 198,
Teaneck, NI07666.
LOW CHOLESTEROL
APPLE BLINTZES
(Makes Sixteen)
1 container (1 cup)
1 tsupoon sail
K cup ikim milk
1 cup flour
FI.uchm.nnV Margarine
2 medium applet, peeled, cored
and chopped
Vi cup chopped walnuts
1 tablespoon honey
% teaspoon ground cinnamon
Mix Egg Beaten* and salt; alter-
nately mix Id skim milk and flour
until smooth
Lightly grease a 6-inch skillet
with Fleischmann i* Margarine:
heal skillet Pour 2 tablespoons
batter into ski I let; tilt pan to dis-
tribute evenly. Cook until batter
blisters. Turn out onto wax paper
Repeat to make 16. using more
margar! na as needed.
Mix apples, walnuts, honey and
cinnamon. Place one tablespoon
mixture on each bllntz. Fold in
sides to form square*. Melt 3
tablespoons margarine in large
skillet. Brown squares on both
sides. Serve hot with mock sour
cream or your favorite topping
For MOCK SOUR CREAM, puree
K cup low fat cottage cheese,
3 tablespoons skim milk.
2 teaspoons lemon juice
Makes one cup.
CNatmco Brink. Inr 1983
Fleischmann's Gives Every Meal A Holiday Flavor.



Page 18
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday; May 13.1983
Soviet Jews won't be silenced, BB boss says
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The virtual halt to Jeuiah mi-
gration from the Soviet Union
haa not silenced the Soviet Jewry
movement, Gerald Kraft, presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith Internation-
al, told the Annual Laoderahip
Conference of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry.
Instead, he said, the movement
haa "regained momentum,"
pointing to the recent World
Conference on Soviet Jewry and
the B'nai B'rith "Day of Solidar
ity" as a "turning point in the
current history of the Soviet
Jewry Movement."
If the Kremlin thought three
years of heightened repression of
Soviet Jews could snuff us out it
now knows better."
Kraft made his remarks when
he accepted the NCSJ's 1963
Merit Award honoring B'nai
B'rith International for its
programs on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. The award cited B'nai
B'rith in particular for sponsor-
ing worldwide demonstrations
that coincided with, and under-
scored, the March 15-17 World
Conference on Soviet Jewry in
Jerusalem
The events, which took place in
106 communities in 11 countries,
included demonstrations, rallies,
prayer vigils and other activities
designed. Kraft said, to remind
people of the "worsening plight
of the Soviet Union's Prisoners of
Zion." Thousands of Jews and
non-Jews of all ages participated
in the programs, he said.
Kraft told the NCSJ that the
Soviet Jewry movement has de-
veloped strong allies in the form
of Western governments and hu-
manitarians "willing to give of
themselves to further our cause."
And, he said, the media "to the
surprise of many" showed a wil-
lingness to feature the Soviet
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
Continued
service nine years ago. Khasin
has never before served in the
armed forces.
Gennady is married to Natalia.
42, a mathematician, and they
have two daughters, 19-vear-old
LEA and 5-year-old YEHUDIT.
MENACHEM NIDEL from
Riga is the second Soviet Jew to
have graduated from the Rabbi-
from Page 17
nical Seminary in Budapest.
Thirty-year-old Nidel. who is
married with two children, will
serve as rabbi in Riga. He will be
the first officially ordained rabbi
to serve in Latvia for 20 years.
Rabbi Nidel will begin his duties
in June.
AOOLD SHAYEVICH of
Moscow was the first to be or-
dained in 1981.
COME UP TO THE
G00DLIFE AT BROWN'S
In The Comfort Of The Catskitts!
Jany lewis,
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C*tofTM & Celebrity
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sprawanen
2-WEEKS 3-WEEKS
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$1,017 $1,496
$1034 $1521
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i tar *X0*r i
EVERYTHING INCLUDED IN OUR
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TaaHdrtsjuttaW ^
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Jewry issue.
He said the Soviet Jewry
movement must now maintain
and strengthen its alliances, con-
tinue to monitor East-West dip-
lomatic conUcta with the Soviets
and strive to publicixe the Soviet
Jewry issue as much as possible
The United States, he said, by
repeatedly raising the Soviet
Jewry issue in all peat high-level
negotiations with the Kremlin
has "kept the issue alive and
given our movement clout. There
can be no doubt that without
America's support we would have
had little influence on the
USSR"

'RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL ^------------------------->
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ai^dee Cheese Ravioli,
V, cup chopped or whole smal
onions
W cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
W package (10 or.) frozen whole
lean (15 Oi.) Chef Boy-arxJee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
green beans, cooked and drained W cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer tor
15 minutes. Serves 4.
Put a new bright taste into your brisket
arJea Vegetable Mustard Same*
* cop green beans. 1" pieces.
fresh or frozen
H cup dked celery
ft cup chopped omons
ft cup caufcfiower florets, fresh or (rotrn
i tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
2 tablespooas Pineapple |uice
Blanch all the vegetables in haling water for 7
minutes; draw Combine with Gulden's Mustard
and pineapple |uice Store in refrigerator. Serve
with cold or hot meats such as brisket, pas-
trami, corned beef, salami aad bologna
Makes approximately 2 cups
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S'
Fruity MatUrd Saace
V, cup chopped apple
v, cup chopped pear
Vj cup chopped canned
cling peaches
*: cup raisins
t tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
I tablespoon cling peach syrup
Blanch apples and pears in boiling water for 5
minutes: drain Add peaches, raisins. Gulden's
Mustard and peach syrup: stir well. Store in re-
frigerator Serve with cold or hot meats such as
brisket pastrami, corned beef, salami and
bologna Makes 2 cups
The Mustard good enough to cook with
larlsbery.
Its a big
wheel with
all lovers of
tine cheese.
The flavor o Jartsberg' Brand Cheese s as natural as the Norwegians who
make a The'uil nch distinctive nut-hke taste makes it a favorite tor noshing
nabbfcng serving with fruit or wine and using it m your recipes Jartsberg
Every good store carries it
\K. mjm Ski Quern Brand (.jt-tuM ihetv. NnkkrfcrJ
sarnrd cfer%c and man* uthrr rim- chrors from Wav
-


Friday, May 13,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofarof Greater Hollywood
Page 19
Emigration drop 'not U.S. fault'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A State Department official
rejected the argument that the
Reagan administration's anti-
Soviet rhetoric is partially re-
sponsible for the decrease in the
emigration of Soviet Jews.
"You don't help Soviet Jewry
by being quiet or toning down
criticism or refusing to say
exactly what is happening to
them," Elliott Abrams, assistant
secretary of state for Human
Rights and Humanitarian Af-
fairs, declared.
"If they are going to tell lies
about Jews, as they do every day,
let all Jews and let all Americans
respond by very loudly telling the
truth about them."
Abrams spoke at a human
rights session at the annual
three-day leadership conference
of the National Conference on So-
viet Jewry (NCSJ).
He was introduced by Stanley
Lowell of New York, a former
chairman of the NCSJ, who noted
that during the first three
months of this year only 306 So-
viet Jews emigrated.
Lowell said that when a dele-
gation of former NCSJ chairman
met with Soviet Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin two years ago,
he said that emigration would
only improve when relations be-
tween the USSR and the U.S. im-
proved.
Lowell blamed the
deterioration in relations on the
"harsh or undiplomatic words"
used by the Reagan administra-
tion against the Soviet Union
The Soviet Jewry Com-
mittee of the Community
Relations Committee, Jewish
Federation of South Drow-
ard, would like to speak to
anyone in the South Broward
area who is planning to visit
the Soviet Union in the near
future.
Contact Melissa Martin at
the Federation. 921-8810.
Also, anyone who would
like to write to a refusenik or
a member of his or her
family, contact the Federa-
tion.
Urban school
ORT success
in Israel
ORT-Israel recently opened a
new school in one of Tel Aviv's
most deprived areas, the Hatik-
vah quarter, where combined ed-
ucational and social problems are
multifold.
Joan Youdelman, president of
the South Broward Region of
Women's American ORT, said
the school, which is named after
Yehoshua Rabinovitz, a former
mayor of Tel Aviv, will help Hat-
ikvah youngsters who have
dropped out of the regular school
system.
The staff of 10 teachers "ac-
tually goes out into the streets to
talk to the young dropouts and to
offer them a meaningful educa-
tion."
The program aims at making
students feel at ease and gain
confidence in themselves. In such
a relaxed, constructive setting,
they are able to learn Hebrew and
math as well as other basic sub-
IWWa 'gobfito kcqotrt-rv*
Rational i'
which he said feeds the "mutual
paranoia" of the leaders of both
countries.
But Abrams said that de-
creased emigration began in 1979
during the Carter administration
which he said had been reluctant
"to go public" with criticism of
the Soviet Union.
He said the Soviet Union con-
siders the emigration of Jews and
others as "chattel" to be used to
trade for objectives which they
want from the West.
He said emigration began
dropping in 1979 when the Sovi-
ets realized they would not get
the SALT II treaty ratified, they
would not get trade benefits in
the U.S. and the invasion of Af-
ghanistan turned public opinion
against the USSR.
But Abrams said the Soviets
are "conscious of their image"
abroad and "we can use their
concern for public opinion to
pressure them and embarrass
them into more civilized
behavior," improving human
rights and increasing emigration.
Abrams was critical that the
European countries have not
made human rights in the Soviet
Union a major concern. William
Korey, director of International
Policy Research for B'nai B'rith
International, in discussing the
Madrid conference on the Hel-
sinki accords, also said the Euro-
pean countries seem willing to
agree to Soviet pressure for a
conference on disarmament
"without regard to an adequate
quid pro quo. It suggests that
human rights may be less impor-
tant to them (the Europeans)
than security considerations."
At another session, Sen. Ed-
ward Kennedy, (D. Mass.), noted
that the Soviet Jewry movement
is now in a "time of great diffi-
culty." He talked of the courage
of Soviet Jewish refuseniks with
whom he met on visits to the* So-
viet Union in 1974 and 1978 and
who face day to day harassment.
"Can we have any less in our
own effort, in our own determina-
tion to continue this struggle?"
he declared.
Jewish Federation of South Broward
40th Annual Meeting
June 8,1983
7:30 p.m.
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood
1983-84 Proposed Slate of
Officers and Board of Directors
Philip A. Levin..................................President
Saul Singer.................................Vice President
Theodore Newman..........................Vice President
Nat Sedley.................................vice President
Otto Stieber....................................Secretary
Howard Barren.................................Treasurer
Board of Directors
Members to be elected to a three-year term expiring
with Annual Meeting of 1986:
Howard Barren, M.D. Michael Orlove
Nelson Dembs Elaine Pittell
Marc Gilbert Morris Ratner
Esther Gordon Ronald J. Rothschild
Herbert M. Grossman Marge Saltzman
Alan Kan Nat Sedley
Herbert D. Katz Marilyn Segal
Saul Singer, M.D.
- *.- ,
Does your cracker
when it meets cream
gotopeces
cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a bt harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
The Spteadable Cream Cheese
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
14300 52SDbfl
SAVE 10C ON TEMP TEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
IOC
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
phis 7c handling allowance provided
you redeemed it on your retail sales
of the named product! s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod-
uct to cover all redemptions. Coupon

vv%v. vvvv
, O Kraft. Inc. 1*8)
fvv v v ^v -_!_l "-"....... "____ ...#
to void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C. Customer must pay
applicable tax. For redemption, mail
to Kraft. Inc. Dairy Group, P.O. Box
1799. Clinton. Iowa 52734
Expires 11 30 83
14300 255Lufl


Page 20
JtaUvwood
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
FVM* *V3
Friday, May 13.1983
OUR PANTRY
DONT SETTLE FOR LESS
"LOWEST PRICE THIS YEAR"
JUMBO
CANTALOUPES
16 OZ CASS
Libby's
Natural
Vc
m:uri\$u^
Dish Detergent .69
Ant & Roach Spray 1.79
Keg O' Ketchup.......1.45
Paper Plates ...
Paper Plates___
- 1.19
1.69
EACH
\jTR|TiOUS DELICIOUS LARGE 12 SIZE
t^l^HUI'
Cranberry Juice
1.69
Spring Water........ .59
Barbeque Sauce .79
Applesauce ........ 1.19
com onoo^i ooi^oe aoc t -
StBAABtBB. OB So*" COL*
Pantry Pride Sodas .79
.
6 OZ
BO-
.99
.59
Mayonnaise
SaKine Crackers
.88- SC-C'EN
Vienna Sausage..... .39
Corned Beef
1X1.39
Vanilla Wafers
n 01
eo
.99
VS 1.19
Sno-White
Cauliflower
Florida Oranges........ 9
Florida Carrots............... .39
Baking Potatoes............... .99
Anjou Pears................... .59
Sunkist Lemons............... .79
Hawaiian Pineapples...........1.89
ON-CAPE Gfl -
Granny
Apples
lU PICK:
LB
Red Delicious Apples...........1.69
Zucchini Squash............... .29
..............
Cucumbers................2 .49
Italian Dressing
Otter Pops......
Floral Bouquet

1.69
I SUNSHINE SAVE RSI
IN OIL OR IN WATER imit 4 ^Bj I IfeV
6 OZ CAN CHUNK LIGHT PLEASE IT fl
StaridstTunaOlJ
CASERA 6 OZ CA\
Tomato Sauce
&
'.- \ .-
6 PAK 12-OZ CANS
SCHWEPPES. GJNGERALE
TAB. SPRITE OR
i-ANTR. PRioe I6 0Z JAR GRAPE JELL' OR 0%f^4
Grape Jam o9*
Dish Detergent
PAM'*< PftOCCOT
3'V1.00
TB PAOC mx
HO/
. H'l
PAhlB. PBJOt PHmrcoox PAS'H
1.6!
I40CI
ft, ov
Kidney
Cold Cups
(**IM Wd
Jiffy Mix
.79
.99
1.00
1.49
.79
1.00
Gatorade 99*
delta 4-fcu. m m^m^i^^^
Bath Tissue 79*
LUCK : _> Rj OR NATURAL >! OS BTl & 'Vj
Apple Juke 'l39
Prune Juice ^l29
PANTRv PRiQfc "jw.T BO' ^______
Tea Bags *V*
Cat Litter................ ,- 99
"wCola 1.49
>_ '1". ......... "' I : :l HIIS
Seven-Up ;',';'",''"'.' '" 1 89
IN OUR WINE SECTION
Ri unite Wines
!.',
hi 2.99
I in
4.69
PANTBi PBC(
iiJ.1.49
OUR PANTRY IS YOUR PANTRY
DISH OFFER ENDS\
MAY 28,1983
^49C
FROZEN FOODSi
"GENERICSi
lO'.OZ PKG
iiiiM
ON MAY 21. 1983, WE WILL STOP
ISSUING CASH SAVER COUPONS FOR
DSHES. ALL CASH SAVER CARDS
AND COUPONS MUST BE REDEEMED
BY MAY 28. 1983
Pound Cake
$J39
GENEWC 2OZ BIl
VepetaNe ^05
'SVlNblAMI 4 IWIHt,
Com on the Cob
PANIR I POt
w
CM1!
1.39
UNtw. itui
Tea
l>AM. IANNM, IOII0* n G/ Tropical Blend.....3.97
IJSKlSHAH SMivldSIICI
Bic........ 99
J**ooo 00*0,10*.. fxo oniaoo"
V
, 4eo/r. .89
.39
'*MC//G/ JAB
H O/
C".
^tNt'4 i"XiC BO"
P*NIB< POCK CDMLi CO'
French Fries .... e*
MMIKl BBKJt IC/W PUG 0 'WO
2.49
.59
*.' 1.09
1.19
2 1.00
99
/voc
B0
Crest Toothpaste 1.07
Aqua*
ob p*, Htltf
Bayer A
!^ disposable ooucm{
9c^14)7
40Ct
1.17
Ravioli
-VM.39
OtN"."AV OOIi OB- IAUN0B.
"1.09
* omS?^" w SP*"'' < soi o
OUANTlTr RHTS RESCRVEO NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
1.47
.10 0"
1.47
v
-- ^.
.


-fai^*.


Friday. May 13,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 21
SELLS FRESH!
VIDALJA
ONIONS
Something Special! Vidalia
Onions are grown only in
Georgia and for a very short
season. They're sweet as an
apple and they eat like an
onion. Treat your family to
something really special. We
know our onionsVidalia,
that is!
FIRST
OF THE
SEASON
"SWEET
AS AN
APPLE"
MEAT BONUS SPECIALS!
USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS 4*V ^||i
EXT^AT>|CK FOR BROILING ^^ ^W
Shoulder Steak* i
99
SAVE S1 00)
JSDACHOICE BEEF SHOULDER BONELESS
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
rvOclSt Jl
UndeAlade Roast $189
$J39
P\rn. PBIDI CMUtt
Orange Juice

Kraft Singles
KUAt VArAR(f
Parkay
& Yogurt
,Moi!1.29
:i.89
/AMr,AHlN( IJIJARUHS
1 LB
.53
JDONT aW
SHENANDOAH BUFFET
Turkey Ham
LB (SAVE 30ci
BUY TWO,
GET ONE FREE
SWIFT ENTREES ALL VARIETIES 12 02 PKG
Chicken Cordon Bleu &
Chicken Kiev
~ -
FROZEN LB
New Zealand
Shoulder $-|79
Lamb Chops JL
BONELESS AND SKINLESS LB j^. ^BJ^ f% gf*
Fresh Chicken $^89
Breast Cutlet Ca
USDA CHOICE MILK FED J^ --. r^*f^
Shoulder Blade $^99
Veal Chops G*
Family Pack-Save More!i
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH ..sAVt- 40c .
LB
Fiyer Leg
Quarters
GRADE A FROZEN 'IIRKE* LB (SAVE 20ci
Wings or
Drumsticks
49
20c i
49
USDA CHOICE CHUCK LB
Under
USDA CHOICE BEET CHUCK
AISMONE
FROZEN SEAFOOD DEPT.i
J MEALS!
CONTAINS HOASI STEW BEEF GHOONOBUI
1 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS BOASI STEW BEEF GROUND IK 11
1.99
1.99
AMWW'OOI*
1.39
2.99
3.39
y+
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
ITEMS ANO PRICES
GOOD MAY 12-MAY 16. 1983
|WE REDEEM FEDERAL FOOD STAMP
MH MM MI.KAHH
ktoMismk i>ww *?
Nkkwio act
mISi' *m.i*i4W
a *B9 tllHAv '"v v n.-
ESSUS "8S5SHBT
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1-49


, and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 22
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 13,1983
Family of 'Warners' moves west
Mrs. S. called Jewish Family
Service on Hollywood Boulevard,
stating that her son, Mark, age
.3, was a problem and his teacher
suggested therapy for him.
His school grades were falling
lown, homework was not com-
jelted, chores at home were
neglected, he was hying to his
larents, and neighborhood com-
ilaints were getting out of hand.
Upon the counselor's request,
he S. family, including their 15-
ear-old daughter, came in to-
gether. Within the first session,
ach family member stated his or
ler complaints. Mr. S. blamed
vlark's behavior on Mrs. S.
vhom he felt was too permissive.
.Irs S. blamed Mr. S. for only
Harry Rubinstein
JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY
4517 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood. Fla. 33021 (305) 9660956
communicating with his children
when he was angry at them.
Sarah, their daughter, blamed
Mark's friends whom she viewed
as troublemakers.
Mark, the last to say anything,
Sidney Rubinstein
H and S Auto Parts, Inc.
and Service Center
Phone 920-4881
250 South Federal Highway Dania, Florida
blamed his sister for blaming him
for things he didn't do, blamed
his father for favoring his sister,
blamed his mother for always
nagging him and blamed his
teacher for not liking him.
Before the first session eneded.
Mr. S. blamed his job, his in-
laws, his son, and himself. Mrs.
S. went on to blame her in-laws,
her job, the Florida school sys-
tem, Mark, herself and the
economy.
The next few sessions were de-
signed to teach all family mem-
bers that only when they stopped
blaming each other, could they
effectively function as indivi-
duals and as a family unit. Blam-
ing becomes a habit and a real
time consumer: some even con-
sider it to be an addiction, the
counselor said.
At session No. 4, when all
family members were in agree-
ment with the blaming diagnosis,
and it was time to treat their
"addiction," the S. family de-
cided to drop out of therapy and
move to San Francisco. As Mr.
and Mrs. S. wrote to me from
California, "Florida only brought
us bad luck. But I appreicte your
help and being there when we
needed you."
Unfortunately, addictions are
something that we take from city
to city, state to state and from
one relationship to another.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 4517 Holly
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. 33021.
Telephone: 966-9066. Hours-
Monday, Tuesday, WednesetV
and Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday 9 am. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward Cnuntv. 3600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort Lauder-
dale, 33319. Telephone: 736-3394.
Hours Monday, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward Councy, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and the United
Way of Broward County.
WANTED
Part time worker for innovative experimental
community project. Work with children and senior
citizens. Musical and/or theatrical experience
essential. Call or write to:
MARK SHERMAN
Program Director
Jewish Community Centers of So. Broward
2838 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla 33020
921-6511
Part time Secretary, Effective Reliable, Self-
starter for National Jewish Women's
Organization. Excellent typing, stenoj
desirable, recent references required.
Box CCC c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101
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Is A Wtrm Welcome.
"Breaking bread" as a symbol of
peace, friendship, warmth and hos-
pitality is a traditiornhat is as old as
the Bible itself.
Although far from being as old as
the Bible, Maxwell House Coffee
has been pan of that tradition for
over a half a century. The reason is
simple: the full-pleasant aroma and
great tasting,
satisfying flavor of
Maxwell House
blends right in with the good food
and hospitality that is part of
inviting people into your home.
So, nomatterwhat your preference-
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r 13. 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 23

he bookshelf
tales support folksy, timeless truth
Other Jewiafa
Selected and retold
an introduction by
chwartz; illustrations
teller; calligraphy by
Harper A Row,
\St. New York, N.Y.
272pp. $19.95.
riah Folklore. By
Wayne State Uni-
fas. The Leonard N.
, 5959 Woodward
Mich. 48202. 512
< Allan Mintz.
bs are not the most
i characteristic part of
sture. But like every
Iture, Judaism has
lies, and they are de-
chwartz has selected
14 tales about kings
bs, golden mountains
[birds, sorcerers and
?rests.
simply versions of
fairy tales that were
the oral, story-tell-
tis of Jewry from such
as Persia, Yemen
i fairy tales are found
rary sources, such as
and hasidic collec-
trish element is more
is an adept
id in Elijah's Violin
irish Fairy Tales he
tales the right
Bxotic enhancement
truth. While this
e used as a scholar-
is introduction and
substantive reflec-
! nature of Jewish
accompanied by 11
trations by Linda
ach chapter is begun
linated letter by cal-
lila Schwartz. This
>k can be read with
[adults and read to
[even more pleasure.
reborn
\.0 (JTA) Nazi
ind propaganda.
fgunlina ihret years
irned Lo the news-
liuonoK Aires, ac-
ro|M)rl in () Kstado
ly its liucnos Aires
ll. Hugo Marline/..
paganda emanates
in Nationalist I'arty
onalist Integral). It
togruphs of Hitler
[or the "martyrs of
including war
kltenlirunner. Alfred
II.ins Frank. Julius
lit or of the virulent
r'Der Sturmer," and
I Nazis condemned at
erg trials, Martinez
de publicity is given
I "The History of the
'* authored by Ix>on
recalled that the
ice banned the sale
of Nazi propa-
rgentina three years
>nse to complaints
cratic groups and
inizations. But the
(8, produced in
i reappearing. Only
the publishing house
from Militancia
1 Martinez, "There
cations that certain
1 Federal Police and
[the Nazi cause and
[ internal security.
Argentine Federal
perfected the
inning publication,
so in this case,"
? ?
JLAJB
Jewish Books
in Review
is service ol the IWB lewish Book Council,
15 East 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
birth customs, the Jewish In-
dians of Mexico and many others.
The book has little unity and
proposes no overall view or state-
ment. As an anthropological mis-
cellany, however, the reader will
find fascinating bits of informa-
tion which challenge conven-
tional conceptions of normative
Jewish practice.
Alan Mint* ia director of the
Meyerhoff Center for Jewish
Studies at the University of
Maryland in College Park.
Ob Jewish Folklore is a selec-
tion of scholarly papers repre-
senting half a century of work in
the field of Jewish anthropology
by Raphael Patai, author of
Hebrew Myths and The Hebrew
Goddess.
The topics of the papers range
from methodological reflections
of the field of Jewish folklore, to
studies of specific practices and
customs:
Installation rites in the Bible,
the folk history of the Jews of
Meshed in Iran, exorcism among
the Safed kabbalists, Jewish
Marvin Gottlieb's
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>K*24\
ri.t. vin hi, I, nm*Shofarot urtaterttouywooa
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, May 13,1983
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