The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00321

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
All's not well in Washington,
Smith reports to Federation
With a great deal of praise for the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee (A1PAC) and the Israeli
Embassy and a great deal of criticism of U.S. Secretary
of Defense Caspar Weinberger and U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz Broward County's own U.S.
Congressman Larry Smith last week briefed residents at
the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
He told the crowd he was trying to be the most ar-
ticulate spokesman (in the U.S. House) for Israel.'
In informally giving an overview of the situation in the
Middle East and the United States, Smith noted that
President Reagan is losing support in the Jewish com-
munity because of the administration's "tenuous" support
for Israel.
The congressman rated new Israeli Defense Minister
Moshe Arens as "tremendously respected" in the United
States. He predicted Arens will be the next prime minister.
U.S. Rep. Smith closed his remarks with:
"I will make sure nothing happens (to harm) this little
country."
U.S. Rep. Larry Smith makes point at Jewish Federation of South Broward.
eJewi&h Floridiao.
and Sbofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 13 Number 8
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 15,1983
fiedShochit
Price 35 Cents
Shamir says
Peace treaty
only days off
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel will know within two
weeks whether an agreement with Lebanon is at hand,
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir reportedly told the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and Security Committee.
He said the pace of the tri-
partite talks between Israel, Leb-
anon and the United States has
been accelerated to four meetings
a week. The negotiating teams
had been meeting on the average
of twice weekly for the past four
months, alternating between
sites in Lebanon and in Israel.
Shamir confirmed to the Knes-
set members that the outstand-
ing unresolved issue is the future
status of Israel's ally in Lebanon,
Maj. Saad Hadadad.
Other Israeli officials seemed
I to share Shamir's view that an
agreement could be imminent.
Avi Pazner, spokesman for the
Israeli delegation, said after the
I latest round of talks in Kiryat
[Shemona, that the Bin qua non
"or Israel's agreement to with-
Jewish
populace
explodes
By IAN BLYNN
Of the Jewish Exponent "
The Central Conference
Df American Rabbis, the
main body of the Reform
pahbinate, has passed a
resolution declaring that all
Children of mixed marriages
Involving a Reform Jew
nay be considered Jewish.
A resolution approved at the
[94th annual conventional of the
IpCAR in Los Angeles said that
[the child of one Jewish parent is
under the presumption of Jewish
descent"-
The move by the 560 rabbis at-
Coatinued on Page 8
draw from Lebanon was a Syrian
commitment to pull out its forces
at the same time.
Pazner said the head of the I
Israeli delegation, David Kimche,
made that point forcefully and
urged the Lebanese to convey it
unequivocally to Syria.
Shamir reportedly gave the
Knesset committee his analysis,
of Andrei Gromyko's references1
to the Lebanese situation at a
press conference in Moscow.
Gromyko, formerly the Soviet
foreign minister, was recently
promoted to first deputy prime
minister of the USSR.
Shamir noted that he had
referred to the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon and
Continued on Page 9
At
restaurant is just
Paris' Pletzel.
7 Rue des Rosiers, Jo Goldenberg's internationally famous
aurant is just one sight Federation travelers will see in
Faffs?
Oui! oui!
It's latest
JFSB Mission
in October
The Jewish Federation
of South Broward is going
to make a "French Con-
nection" Oct. 11 16.
For six days and five
nights, Paris and the heart
of its Jewish community
will open to the Jews of
South Broward Florida.
Under the auspices o: the
Joint Distribution Com-
mittee (JDC), 'ravelers
with the Pari Mission
will:
Visit Le Mar..; amonp the
oldest and most interesting sec-
tions of Paris, v hich i home to.
thousands of Jews born in
France, as well as 'hose from
Eastern Europe and North
Africa.
Tour the sectx,n of Marais
known as the Pletzel. where the
little streets ar. Imed with
Continued on i'age 9
IP

~*^Btv&r^
PAINTING THE LIGHT fantastic is Technion Prof. P. K.
Hoenich, who is demonstrating his sunpainting technique with
handheld reflectors and color gels.
&ui)paii)tii)g. .
By M.S. KAPLAN
The paintings of P. K. Hoenich cannot be
hung from a a&U. Their vivid colors contain
no -pigment. Although Hot..Mi never
touches the canvas, the ether*n't images he
renders dance before the viewer's eye. P.j.
Hoenich paints his pictures using sun-
beams the way other artists squeeze
acrylics from a tube.
Hoenichwho teaches experimental art afthe
Technion-Israel Institute of Technologyfashions
his paintings from-sunlight in a two-step process
using reflectors and color filters. .
Rays from the sun are twisted and curved by re
(lectors of various sizes and textures. Hoenich has
experimented with chromed copper, aluminum foil,
laminated metal, even the crystal of his wristwatch
to draw his fantastic images. Then, he tints his pic-
tures with filters made from cellophane or colored
gels.
As the sun moves across the sky, the entire com-
position comes to life. Filaments of color coalesce
Continued on Page IS



mF^^m
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April 15,
Community CalendaR
17. Sunday

T8. mon&av
19. tuestav
21, thupsday
21-24
24, Sunday
Crime Watch Program at Temple
Soiei's Brotherhood Meeting,
9:30 a.m. Features Ron Pagano,
Hollywood P.O.; Pat Jenkins,
Southern Bell; and Bea Silverman.
coordinator.
Open House, Temple in the
Pines, 9730 Stirling Road, from
10 a.m. to noon; call 431-5100.
Association of Parents of
American Israelis meets at the
JCC. 6501 W Sunrise Blvd., Plant-
ation, at 1:30 p.m.; call 584-0598
Yom Hashoah, Holocaust
Memorial Day Commemoration,
Community Relations
Committee, Jewish Federation of
South Broward, at Haliandale
Jewish Center, at 8 p.m.;
call 921-8810.
Hillcrest Salutes Israel's 35th
Independence Day at the
Playdium,8p.m.
South Broward Technion Women
meet at Galahad North, noon;
call 920-0761.
Donor Luncheon, Sisterhood
of Temple Beth El. at Emerald
Hills Country Club.
Brandeis Life Membership
Luncheon, Greater Hollywood
Chapter, at home of Abby Klein,
noon; call 454-6472 or 458-0686.
Eleventh Annual Installation
Dinner-Dance, Hemisheres
Lodg- 2861 of B'nai B nth at
Haliandale Jewish Center,
6:30 p.m.
Brandeis Bargain Boutique,
across from Hollywood Dog
Track, clothing, bric-a-brac,
household items, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Yom Haatzmaut, Israel
Independence Day Celebration,
Young Circle, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
Memorial Service,
David Ben Gurion Culture Club,
Survivors of the Holocaust, at
Haliandale Jewish Center, 3 p.m.
Rummage Sale, Sisterhood of
Temple in the Pines.
Your Community Calendar welcomes news ot your Jewish
oriented organization. All meetings, times and their locations,
should be directed to Steve Katon, associate editor, at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar
information must be received at last two weeks before publication
date.
x
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Palestinian state backed
by Greek prime minister
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
TORONTO IJTA) Prime
Minister Andreas Papandreau of
Greece called for the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state
alongside Israel with secure fron-
tiers.
At a press conference here last
week, the 64-year-old Greek
leader said his 18- month -old
government intends to "develop
and enrich" its growing ties with
the Arab world.
Papandreau. who was in
Canada to promote Canadian
investment in his country,
compared Greece's struggle for
national independence with that
of the Palestinians' quest for self-
determination. Greece, he em-
phasized, has a "soft spot" in its
heart for "any people" seeking
self-determination and a home-
land.
Papandreau. who heads the
Panhellenic Socialist Movement,
has moved Greece closer to the
Arabs since he took over as prime
minister in the autumn of 1981.
Under Papandreau. Greece has
become the only member of the
European Economic Community
to extend diplomatic recognition
of the PLO.
Yasir Arafat, chairman of the
PLO. was the first foreign digni-
tary to visit Athens after Pa pan
dreau's election victory. It was
then that Greece permitted the
PLO to open a mission in Athens.
Israel also has a mission in the
Greek capital.
During the war in Lebanon, he
likened Israel's invasion to Nazi
genocide against Jews. In 1982,
welcoming Arafat to Greece after
his flight from Beirut, Papan-
dreau described him as "this
great fighter for freedom." Not
long after Israel invaded Leba-
non, Papandreau expressed
opposition to Israel's "aggressive
and expansionist policy." At
European Economic Community
meetings, Greece took the lead in
condemning Israel.
Papandreau. who was a York
University professor of
economics from 1969 to 1974. told
reporters at his press conference
at the Hilton Harbour Castle
Hotel, that he understood the
Palestinians' desire for sov-
ereignty because Greece itself has
had a "long and difficult"
history.
Greece has always fought to
maintain its independence and
territorial integrity. Therefore, he
explained, it is sympathetic to
the Palestinians.
Papandreau. the son of a
former prime minister, said "we
have a soft spot in our heart for
any people struggling for self-de-
termination and a home-
land."
In a reference to the 1948 Arab
Iraeli war, Papandreau said the
Palestinians had been "kicked
out" of their homeland. This, he
noted, was a "major injustice"
which could be remedied if they
were granted a homeland.
a
He said that Israel was entitled
to "secure frontiers" and that the
Palestinians deserved a home-
land. (Earlier in the week, he told
a joint session of the Senate and
House of Commons that the
Palestinians are "fully justified"
in their demand for a homeland.)
Greece, he went on to say,
intended to develop and enrich its
links with the Arabs. Greece
imports much of its oil from Arab
countries, and Greek con
truction firms have landed hefty
contracts in places hke Iran
Libya, Saudi Arabia and uj
anon.
In 1981 Greek exports to the
Arab world totaled more than $1
the Greek Embassy in OUwt
points out that investors will find
many attractive and unique tea
tures in Greece" among then
proximity to the Middle East and
"excellent political and economic
ties with countries throughout
the Arab world." ""^m
Quiz yourself
Out-ofstate will
valid in Florida?
The Legacy and Endowment Fund works on a daily basis with
individuals and their tax-legal advisers. Many questions arise
that concern the general subject of estate planning will drafting.
The following are some of the most commonly asked
questions.
Can you answer them?
For more information, call the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. 921-8810. and read the next issue of the Jewish
Floridian for the answers.
li Does an out-ofstate will have to be redrafted when an
individual-couple moves to Florida?
2| What i^ required to establish resident y in Florida?
31 Does Florida have an estate lax?
ti Can you write your own will?
~>\ How many witnesses are required tor a will?
6| Must a will be notarized?
"I Can an out-ofstate relative be named as your personal
representative?
8( Can an individual refrain from making a bequest to his-her
children?
91 Must your husband-wife be given a portion of your estate
upon your death?
10) How are changes made to an existing will?
11) 1 s there a tax advantage to making charitable gifts in vour
will?
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jar of ureater tioilywoi
Heroic Jewish Resistance
Page 3
starvation of Ghetto was Nazi's first aim
By DR. DAVID GEFFEN
IN THE early years of
Ihe Second World War, the
4azi occupying force in Po-
ind believed that it could
jfestroy the 500,000 Jews in
|he Warsaw Ghetto
through starvation. In 1941
Ind 1942, some 80,000 died
this fashion. However, it
loon became clear that this
[ort of death was too slow
knd too incomplete. On
July 22,1942, therefore, de-
portation to the concentra-
tion camps began the so
balled "resettlement" of the
lews.
A number of Jews in the War-
saw Ghetto now began to organ-
i resistance and a small amount
weapons was smuggled in to
them. Their first armed action
Occurred in December 1942. With
only 143 revolvers, one machine
gun, and seven rounds of ammu-
nition per weapon, they overcame
the guards at a prison in one of
the Ghetto streets and freed 100
Jews bound for Treblinka.
AS THE new year began, SS
'hii'f Himmler had his own ideas.
ome 100,000 Jews had been ex-
terminated by the summer of
)942 in the Ghetto proper. Him-
iler wanted to be rid of the
[0,000 Jews still left there. On
January 18, 1943, the German
ildiers surrounded the Ghetto
ordered the deportation of a
lumber of workers. The Ghetto
tghters were caught by surprise,
lut nevertheless fought back,
}rging all who could to join
em in this struggle: "Do not
esign yourselves to death.
Mend yourselves, grab an axe,
iron bar, a knife. Let them
Bke you this way if they can."
For two days the battle raged.
/ith their tiny quantities of
rimitive arms, the Jews in the
etto killed 20 Germans and
minded 50, but they themselves
Ustained heavy losses, with over
LOOO dead. Some 6,500 were
bunded up and sent to the death
snips. "But the action electrified
be Ghetto," Holocaust historian
lora Levin writes, "The myth of
lazi invincibility crumbled .
Ihese first shots of revolt showed
pws that they could kill Ger-
ans."
I The Jewish Fighters' Organi-
ntion. the JFO, was mainly
bmposed of Zionist groups
foale Zion, Hashomer Hatzair,
'ror, Betar and Gordonia
long with Bundist and Comu-
ist elements. It constructed an
ktricate infrastructure of under-
round cellars and tunnels,
iking the various commands
id defense posts. (The Nazi
zander of the enemy action,
Major-General Stroop said
r that there were 631
inkers.) There were also outlets
i the Aryan side of Warsaw out-
de of the Ghetto, though it was
ferilous to try and use them.
I AS THEY prepared for the
al battle, whenever it might
pme, the fighters made one
Jajor outside patrol on March 6
nen the SS storehouses were set
re. Try as they would to get
Be -assistance from the Polish
Isistance forces little, if any, was
Irthcoming. So a gloom hung
Ver the fighters as they waited
|r the Germans to move. Even
|r the miserable number of
Istols they had acquired, each
>d no more than ten bullets.
Passover was now approach-
|g. and p: Derations had to be
i'dc for this festival of freedom
spite of the captivity sur-
^unding them. Matzah was
iked some wine was hoarded;
bunkers were given a spring
inlng. On April 19, Passover
*, at 2 a.m., the German forces
Circled the outer Ghetto walls.
lordecai Anielewicz, the 24-year-
Nazi soldiers in the burning streets of the Warsaw Ghetto during the Revolt of April 1943.
old commander of the revolt, was
in the headquarters bunker at
Mi la 18, and he had carefully or-
ganized his fighters for the at-
tack.
At four that morning, an es-
timated force of 5,000 Germans
began to move in, and at the Mila
Zamenhof intersection a hail of
bullets, grenades and bombs
rained down on them. The Ger-
man troops scattered in confu-
sion. Tanks were brought in, but
using gasoline bottles and
Molotov cocktails, the Jewish
fighters knocked out one tank
and turned back several others.
IN THOSE areas of the Ghetto
where the fighters were concen-
trated, they put up stiff
resistance against the heavily
armed German soldiers. When
the Germans realized that they
could not take the Ghetto as
easily as they had thought and
planned, they withdrew, attack-
ing the Ghetto hospital in
retaliation and murdering the
patients.
On the second day a crack Ger-
man force was sent into the
Ghetto. Howitzers and field
artillery were trained on building
after building and blasted away.
A major stronghold, the brush-
makers' section, would not yield.
General Stroop was amazed by
the resistance of the Ghetto
fighters. A second day had
passed and still the Ghetto had
not fallen.
Mordecai Anielewicz described
the feeling of the defenders when
he wrote to Yitzhak Zucker-
man, his second in command:
"What we have lived through
after the two days of defense,
defies description in words. We
must realize that what has hap-
pened has exceeded our most
audacious dreams. The Germans
twice fled the Ghetto I have
the feeling that what we have
dared is of great significance."
("Antek" Zuckerman was one of
'those Ghetto fighters to reach
Israel. He died in 1981 in his kib-
butz, Lohamei HaGettaot
Ghetto Fighters).
STROOP NOW sent in more
men, more tanks, armored cars,
and flamethrowers. The Germans
set fire to entire blocks of
buildings, turning the whole
Ghetto area into an inferno.
"What the Germans could not.
do," Marek Edelman, one of the
fighters wrote, "the omnipotent
flames now accomplished. Thou-
sands perished in the conflagra-
tion; the stench of burning bodies
was everywhere. Charred corpses
lay on the balconies. Hundreds
committed suicide by leaping
from fourth and fifth story
windows."
Three days had originally been
planned for the Ghetto's annihi-
lation, but it was clear that this
schedule was impossible. Stroop
reported that it was very difficult
to capture the Jews. "New battle
groups of twenty to thirty Jewish
fellows, lR-to-25 years of age, ac-
companied by a corresponding
number of women kept kindling
new resistance."
He specifically elaborated on
the women, noting that they fired
pistols with both hands and used
hand grenades concealed in their
bloomers. (Eichmann called the
Ghetto fighters "important bio-
logical material. ").
FACED WITH this deter-
mined resistance, Himmler gave
the order on April 23 "to com-
plete the combing out of the
Warsaw Ghetto with the greatest
severity and relentless tenacity."
To implement this order, Stroop
decided that the only way to
finish off the Jews was to set fire
to every block in the area.
Using boring machines, poison
gas, and flame-throwers to finish
the job, he was sure he could
flush the fighters out. But still
they resisted day after day. Deep
in the bunkers they even cele-
brated May Day, but on that
May 1st, 1,000 Jews fell in battle
"not a single one gave up vol-
untarily," according to the Ger-
mans.
During the first week in May,
the numbers of Jewish fighters
Continued on Page 16
We talked about it.
But we thought we had
more time.
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Page 4
ri^iajm&n^Fioriaian ana anorc
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
riday, April 1, 1983
Friday, April is |t
There was no other choice, says Mom
New kidney to mean new life for Elizabeth
Klein
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Less than 46 hours ago,
Elizabeth Klein had no kid-
neys. Although she had
been plagued with kidney
disease from birth, her
childhood was normal and
happy; her condition rarely
interfered.
Until last December, that
is.
Suddenly, the 20-year-oJd life
resident of Miami Beach began to'
fed fatigued, nauseous, dis-
oriented, and started forgetting
things. Around the time of the
holidays, she went into renal fail-
ure: her kidneys just stopped.
BY FEBRUARY. Elizabeth s
spleen and two kidneys had been
removed. Her parents, Howard
and Ruth Klein, he. the executive
director of State of Israel Bonds
Organization in Dade County and
Puerto Rico, and she. an assis-
tant branch manager of a Miami
bank, watched Elizabeth's
normal life and independence
Abruptly undermined
l|fc Elizabeth had completed three
^years as an early childhood
education major at University of
South Florida in Tampa. She left
school and saw her desire to be a
teacher become distant.
In fact, everything felt distant
that first day she found herself
hooked up through needles in her
arm to a dialysis machine. She
was terrified and got sick. It
began a round of Mondays.
Wednesdays, and Fridays, at
three and a half hours a shot, in
Jackson Memorial Hospital's
Pedi-DialysisUnit.
THE FAMILY sat down and
confronted their options. Eliza-
beth who as a youngster skip-
ped a grade at Lehrman Day
School, had been named for three
years to the National Honor So-
ciety, served as editor of Lear
High School's newspaper and
yearbook, and had been active in
Chosen Children Group and USY
was not going to be hooked to
a machine for long, that was cer-
tain.
Two avenues were available. "I
could have been put on a 'cadaver
list.' waited for a newly-dead per-
son's kidney and stayed on dialy-
sis." Elizabeth explains, "or try
for a transplant from a living re-
lated donor, which is the best
possible chance for a healthy
transplant."
"We talked about it a lot," she
continues. "We looked at the
various choices immediately, be-
cause I plan to go back to school
and later to teach."
F.liza>eth s doctor. Joshua
Miller, director of Transplant
Unit at Jackson Memorial, affil-
iated with University of Miami,
iind Jose Strauss, director of
i^cdiatric Nephrology Unit, who
had been following her condition
for years, through a series of
"tissue-typing" tests, found Mrs.
Klein and her daughter's blood
compatible.
MORE INTENSIVE and pro-
longed examinations followed.
Mrs. Klein went into Jackson
Memorial and underwent four
days of tests on blood and kid-
neys that would leave no reason-
able doubt in Dr. Miller's mind,
who would perform the trans-
plant, that Elizabeth's mother
was indeed her best shot.
Further discussion was unnec-
essary. "It was understood from
that point that my mother would
do it." Elizabeth declares. "When
the doctors found her a com-
patible donor, the decision was
made. It was taken for granted.
"And it wasn't a tough de-
cision for her," she continues.
" I'm her daughter, her only child.
It was something she knew she
had to do. wanted to do for me."
"She's scared of course."
Elizabeth adds, "but there was
never any doubt."
"I DON'T think I'm doing a
wonderful' thing, as so many
people say." Mrs. Klein puts in.
"It's a thing any mother would
do in any circumstances.
"Seeing my 20-year-old girl on
a machine, a girl with her whole
life ahead of her. what else would
anyone do?"
As for her own feelings; Eliza-
beth admits anxiety and that
feeling of unreality when one isn't
quite sure it's all really happen-
ing. "But then." she smiles, "you
go on and you have to say, 'I
have to go on with my life."
The Kleins' complete con-
fidence in Dr. Miller and the
Jackson Memorial Transplant
Unit is evident in their optimism
and buoyed spirits
"Dr. Miller's criteria to be met
before allowing a transplant are
very high." Mr. Klein declares.
"He'll be taking tests right up
until the last moment.
"He tells us that you can live
perfectly well with one kidney."
he adds.
"I tell my friends." Mrs. Klein
puts in. "God gave you two kid-
neys, one to giveaway."
"We chose Jackson Memorial
because of Dr. Miller," says
Elizabeth. "The hospital's got a
great reputation in the South a
fantastic record, and Dr. Miller is
the greatest."
ELIZABETH'S confidence
stems partially from her exper-
ience on dialysis. She can't say
enough kind and grateful words
about the Pedi-Dialysis Unit
staff, who turned an awful exper-
ience into something bearable
*nd even "not so bad."
"The dialysis unit really scared
me," she declares, "but the
nurses there are the best. They're
all there with words of comfort all
the time. If it weren't for them, it
would have been a terrible exper-
ience for roe."
"It's really not that bad,"
Elizabeth adds. "You go through
three hours of pain, but then
you're able to walk around like a
normal person.
"I've gotten the greatest care
m
LH

Elizabeth and her parents, Howard and Rath Klein. Mr. Klein beams as he embraces his
family. The gift of a kidney from mother to daughter will be the gift of life to her, as Elizabeth
puts it, 'a second time.'
imaginable."
ELIZABETH and her mother
went into the hospital March 27.
Two simultaneous operations
took place March 31 in adjacent
rooms in the transplant unit.
where Dr. Miller put one of Mrs.
Klein's kidneys into her daugh-
ter.
A three-to-four-month recuper-
ation period is expected, and
Elizabeth hopes to continue her
education at Florida Inter)
national University jn the fall.
You can't help rememberin,
her final comment: My
gave me life once she'll ce
tainly do it again."
Jewish Floridian
mt emm i orwr mai .'''
FREDSMOCMET STEVE KAfON SUZANNE .MO .ME r
I iifx and Publisher Associate Editor f..- (oMm
Published Bi HVeenly Second Cuts Postage immj el hjiumj* fu UbMSHWiOi'
MOLLVWOOOFOFtT LAUOEFTOALE OFFICE Am Saving:. W*J (!''. 2W f Mjlljivlilo BrKl
B'vd Suite T070 Haiiandaie Fu 31009 Pnonr- S4 "*<.
Akvenem a Harper". MBWaMMJ Sup*ren>e
MainOflice 4 Plant !20NE6inSi Mum. Fia 3313? Pnone 3. 1 W.
Postmaster Fane. lOTitlaM to Jewisn Flor..en. P 0 aaa01-atrS.M4aaM.Fia J1101
Jewish Federation of South Browerd Office** President. Ben Setter Vice President! Philip A
Levin M 0 Saul Singer M 0 and Nai Sediey Treasurer Theodore Newman Secretary. Otto
Siieber Executive Director. Summer O Kaye Submit material for publication to Leslie Silas
P.jnii' MHationsOtrexlor
Miaiaai JTA. Sevan Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA and FPA
Jewish Ftondmn does no) guarantee Kaehruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION NATES Local Area 3 50 Annual 12 Year Minimum S71 or By membership Jewish
F..deration ot South Brewed 2711 Hollywood Bird Hollywood Fla 33020 Phone 42' VQ
Out of Town Upon Request > ^.' wj-. .' Jfl
--------
A familiar sight
at Kutsher's.
I bty. April 15. 19KJ
, ulUIIM' 13
8->rr
rt v ^Aaf.*743
NumherH
> "LORIDA <
ZlT^9T
BROWARD m
So many Fkxidiem com* to Kunher't because we know
just what you want in a vacationand offer It with the
warmth and personal caring that you valua. And everything
to keep you busy and happy is right on the premises! Only
a few steps to the gotf course, tennis, boating and ftehing,
any sport you (ike including srujffktooard on four new
beautttuNy designed courts! Of course there are also
to**** seminars, theme parties, barbecues, countless
dettghta that make the days seem far too sr>ort. All explain-
ing why Ftoridtens favor Kutsher'snot rust for a change
of scenery, but a change of pace!
ON THE PREMSE8: IfrHoJe. 7,157 Yard Or* Counw a 12 Outdoor
-SalA
JOAN RIVERS* ROBERT GOULET* BEN VEREEN
COHmEHUMX'LOLAFALAHA'VKDAmONE
JACK JONES-DAVID BRENNER
Hue teeny Other Start To Be Announced
Kutsher's
Montfcofo, New fork 12701 a (914) 794-S000
CAIX TOLL FREE: (M0) ai-1t7tM'" ~
UxCm*CenhHo*om0 -.0.*610 "*.Q


Friday, April 15,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Cans country strategic asset
Weinberger denies slurs against Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger strongly denies he
considers Israel a "strategic
liability," maintaining that he
considers the Jewish State as
well as most Arab countries
.."strategic assets."
Weinberger's denial came
when he was asked on NBC-TV's
"Meet the Press" about the belief
that he feels Israel is a liability.
"The only people who think that
are people who don't bother to
talk with me," he replied.
"I consider Israel a strategic
asset," he stressed. "I consider
many other countries in the Mid-
east strategic assets. I think we
need many friends in the Mid-
east, including Israel, but in-
cluding also Saudi Arabia and
Jordan and Oman and Kuwait
and the Gulf states and many
others.
"It is essential that we
ON FINANCE Margaret Starner, a professional financial
planner, (left) meets with Dodie Weinstein (center), a Business
and Professional Women's Network committee member, and
..Susan Matter, the network's chairwoman. Ms. Starner advised
the group on the wisdom of IRA accounts, taking financial
risks in making investments and seeking tax breaks. B&P is
administered through the Jewish Federation of South Brow-
ard's Women's Division. Next meeting is May 12, at which
Career Change Strategy' will be discussed by Mary Ellen
Hrutka, director of career placement and planning at Barry
College. Contact Lisa Bernstein at JFSB (921-8810) for more
I details.
American Savings appoints manager
Morris N. Broad, president of
American Savings and Loan
\ssociation of Florida, and
Kdward P. Mahoney, executive
vice president, have jointly an-
nounced the appointment of
Jonathan Levine to branch
manager of the association's new
Hollywood Boulevard office.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WERE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
**
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE
Leumi
tank iiUm> w-iirMi B M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York. N.Y. 10017
Securities (2125759-1310
Corporation Ton Free (800)22148381
maintain good and cordial and
strong and close relationships
with all of these nations. I do not
consider Israel or any other of
these countries with one or two
notable exceptions such as Iran,
a strategic liability."
Weinberger denied that he
recommended an arms embargo
on Israel after the Israeli army
went into Lebanon last June. But
he said the United States has
held up approving the sale of 75
F-16 jets to Israel because
"serious questions were raised"
about whether Israel has been
using U.S. arms, including
planes, "only in self-defense," as
required by U.S. law and in the
arms sales agreements with
Israel.
He said the planes will not be
sent to Israel "pending the
outcome of this investigation."
Weinberger also rejected Is-
rael's charges that incidents be-
tween the Israeli army and the
U.S. Marines in Lebanon would
not have happened if there had
been better liaison between the
two forces."We do have liaison at
all levels where it is required," he
said.
"We do have basically the
same kind of liaison that is
possessed by the other members
of the multinational force" the
British, French and Italian.
He said the marine commander
in the field can contact the
Israelis at any time and did so
only last week. He added that in
a recent talk with Israeli Defense
Minister Moshe Arens, he was
assured there would be no more
incidents from the Israeli side.
Weinberger said he was "very
hopeful" that the incidents have
ceased.
But when pressed to discuss
the incidents outlined in the
tetter to him by Gen. Robert
Barrow, the commandant of the
Marine Corps, Weinberger said
"his letter speaks for itself." He
Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger
said the letter which charged the
Israelis with harassment of the
Marines, was sent to the State
Department which discussed the
issue with Israel. He noted that
since then the situation has
"much improved."
But Weinberger added that
"the solution to all of this" is for
an agreement to be reached in
which "all of the foreign forces,
the Israelis, Syrians, PLO and
ultimately the multinational
force, all get out of Lebanon."
"Medicare Is
Not Enough?
Edward and Selma Kaplan
You Probably
INeed B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOO-AS-13077)
for many medical
charges, it pays the
difference between
the actual Tee and
what Medicare pays.
It includes private
duty nursing in the
hospital.
It includes doctor's
office and he spital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
hospital deductiblcs
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed."
' for members age OS and
over. Pre-existiny conditions
not covered lor the lirst G
months ol coverage.
for B'nai b'rllh members only
We enroll new members
B'nai B'rith's
Group Insurance
Underwritten by '
MQNY .
fm nw fnkw.
Mutual Life Insurance
Company ol flew York
JULES L. SOLOMON
BERNHARD G. KALTMAN
SOLOMON & KALTMAN
HEALTH & LIFE INSURANCE CONSULTANTS
2632 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
925-7766 or 925-7768


r ay
Page 6
i ne.iewLsn tionaian ana onoraroj ureateraouvwooa
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
fulay. April 1, 1983
**? il >hqj ^
_______F"dy. April 15, u
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
YURI TARNOPOLSKY. a
leading refusenik and activist in
the Kharkov community, is the
latest victim in a rash of KGB ar-
rests.
He faces charges of Article 70,
"anti-Soviet agitation and propa-
ganda," which carries a
maximum sentence of seven
years in prison and five years in
exile. I-ong an outspoken critic of
the harsh Soviet policies on emi
gration restrictions. Tarnopolsky
has been under surveillance since
his colleague. ALEXANDER
PARITSKY. of Kharkov was ar
rested in September 1981. Yuri.
40. is married to OLGA. and they
have one daughter.
Tarnopolsky was fired from his
job as a research chemist after he
and his family applied to emi-
grate in 1979. After their most
recent refusal in September, an
OVIR official told them that in
the view of the state, they had
"no reason for leaving the
USSR."
To protest the continued refus-
al. Tarnopolakyembarked on a 40-
day hunger strike in October
1982, which failed to win him per-
mission to emigrate.
Tarnopolsky himself most
poignantly expresses his desire
and determination to emigrate to
his homeland, Israel, in his
appeal to the world, "Save Our
Souls."
.....The authorities tell us
repeatedly: "Renounce your
desire to emigrate and we Mil re-
turn your job, you will live as you
did before." Why, then, don't the
refuseniks give up? Why do they
stubbornly bring their reapplica-
tions to the exit visa office, to-
gether with a heart drug in the
pocket ?
Because whatever reasons for
emigration they had three years
ago, now all the reasons are over-
shadowed by a new reason: one
should not stay in a country
where the "Otkaz" (Soviet policy
of prohibiting free emigration by
Jews) is possible.
How is one to describe the
gnawing despair, the stagnant
anxiety, the tantalizing uncer-
tainty, the unbearable frustration
of our ordeal?.... Every wound
of the heart heals, every wound
but that of the "Otkaz."
.... There are other aspects of
the problem. If they have
deprived us of three years, they
will deprive us of four. If four,
then five is still easier to take
away.
r
Position Available
Temple Beth Shalom, a large Conservative Congregation
in Century Village, Boca Raton, Florida, seeks a Rabbi
available starting with the High Holidays. Compensation
will include a furnished apartment, within walking
distance of the Temple.
Submit resume to:
President-Temple Beth Shalom
P.O. Box 340015
Boca Raton, Fla. 33434
ISRAEL
RIGHT NOW!
15 Days Deluxe 5 Star Packages includes:
R/T Air Fare From Miami or New York
2 Meals Daily, Comprehensive Sightseeing
Departes on Following Dates
May 2. May 23. May 25. Jum 6. June 15. July 11*18
Aug 8.Au<)15. 0C15. Octl0.Octl7. No* 7. Nov. 21. Dae 5* 19
Special High Holidays Departures Sept. 5 & 19
For Information Call Now or See Your Travel Agent
TRAVEL TOURS 440*S Stirling Rd Fl lauoardala Fl 33314
dade 944-0411 brow 584-9664 pbch736-2466
f*
o*
FREE copy of Holiday Inns* large booklet containing dozens ot
exciting ideas for your condo group, club or organization.
Dinner Theaterm Supper Cluos Cruises* Epeot Tours-
Narrated Torn Wholesale Bus Pitcm
!!! AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!!
Mall this coupon or can person-te-person collect to tl
Plan Manager" at (305) 655-8800.
The Information You Want Will Be Mailed To You
NO COST NO OBLIGATION
Your: Name_________________________________
Address.
Phone.
Club Name.
Call or Mail To: Holiday Inn, 100 Datura Street at
Fiagler Dr.. W. Palm Beach. Fia. 33401 (305) 655-8800.
CALL OR WRITE DO NOT DELAY
-SUPPLYS LIMITED
If today we have no job, tomor-
x>w we will have no foreign mail
and telephone calls. If tomorrow
we have no mail, the day after to-
morrow there will be no higher
education for our children and no
free access to other places in the
.country. They will start putting
us into prison for the slightest
protest.
The noose around our neck will
tighten step by step, and the
world will be adapted to that
process.
We address the Jewish people
and all people concerned with our
plight. We are Jews. We are
deadly sick with the "Otkaz."
Save Our Souls!
Ominously enough, Tarnopol-
sky foretold his own eventual
fate. Protest this injustice. Write
letters to:
Anatoly Dobrynin
Ambassador. Soviet Embassv
1125 16th Street, NW
Washington. DC. 20036
President Reagan
1600 Pennsylvania Ave, NW
Washington. DC 20500
General Secretary
Yuri Andropov
The Kremlin
Moscow RSFSR
USSR
New POC SIMON SHNIR
MAN is in Simprofol prison,
waiting to be transferred to labor
camp to serve three years for
"draft evasion." He received a
Only 101 Soviet Jews leave
NEW YORK (JTA) One hundred and one Jews *. i
allowed to leave the Soviet Union last month, it was reports
here by the Soviet Jewry Research Bureau of the Nation
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
This figure represents a 20 percent decline from the number of
Jews permitted to leave the USSR in February and brings the
total for the first quarter of 1983 to 307 people the lowest
quarterly figure since 1968, the Research Bureau said.
sentence of "strict regime" be-
cause it is a recurring "crime."
(Shnirman has already served l"t
years on similar charges.) Strict
discipline entails limited corre-
spondence, visits and the receiv-
ing of packages.
POC FELIKS KOCHUBEV
SKY's appeal against his IV*-
year sentence for allegedly de-
faming the Soviet state was re-
jected by the Moscow Court of
Appeals. His wife, VALEN-
TINA, traveled from Novo-
sibirska in order to be present at
the hearing._____
ABE STOLAR of Moscow re-
ceived another refusal. This was
especially disappointing because
for the first time. OVIR accepted
his American passport and
papers.
ISAK SKOLNIK of Vinnitsa
was refused to even apply L
exit visa this month by the]
OVIR office, on the basis tl
had been less than six mon
since he last applied. He wast
that he has no chance of rcceiv,
an exit visa in the near future.
LILY A ZATUCHNAYA
Kharkov received anoth
refusal. She has been a refus
since 1980.
Leningrad refusenik
KOLKER and his family
denied exit visas for the th
time. Their refusal, as
previous occasions, was on
pretext of "family remaining i
the Soviet Union.'
VICTOR STEIN, a Moscow!
physician, is working as a witchj
man.
Maxwell Home Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of America s favorite pas-
times. It's always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
toa busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K Certified kosher
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House* Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't shop'
for Maxwell House? They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House? you pour
relaxation. At its best, .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
Sf
r.,.v/.
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.
BaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaB


ay, April 16,1963
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of (heater Hollywood
Page 7
rael getting ready for mini-Olympics
YORK (JTA) Israel ia
sparing for one of the largest
orts gatherings ever to be
in the state, the 12th
Games, Isaac Ofek,
of the Hapoel Games
g Committee in Israel,
[More than 3,500 athletes from
> participate in the games from
1 to May 8, Ofek said.
|The games will feature 23
lampionships and invitation
ents along with exhibition
Di-mances in 87 locations in
towns and kibbutzim
oughout Israel.
opening ceremony will be
Jaffa's Bloomfield Stadium,
|th President Yitzhak Navon
siting one of his last public
appearances in office. Premier
Menachem Begin is expected to
attend the closing ceremony in
Haifa.
Participants from abroad,
most of them Jews, but including
many non-Jewish world
champions, will be coming from
Western countries as well as from
Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin
America and Asia. Ofek said the
Asian Sports Federation was
hard at work to bar Asian par-
ticipation, and "I fear they may
succeed," he said.
The visiting sports competi-
tors, their team leaders and
officials, will be housed in six
"Olympic villages" in the Tel
Aviv-Netanya area according to
sports categories rather than bv
nationality, Ofek said. This
features of the Hapoel Games will
Israeli tops top seed
JEW YORK (JTA) Tennis
story was made so far as Israel
concerned on the first day of
fassover at Monte Carlo when
Ihlnmo Glickstein of Israel,
tnked 42nd in world tennis,
efeated top-seeded Ivan Lendl
F Czechoslovakia.
Lendl, generally regarded as
lie top player in world tennis,
beaten 6-2, 3-6, 7-5, in the
ening round of the $300,000
i onte Carlo Open tennis towns-
bent.
Glickstein, who has developed
a consistent performer and
upset top-seeded court
era, destroyed Lendl with his
pping game and his ability to
nash spinning returns to the
i's service.
Glickstein's moves, particular-
on Lendl's first serves, ap-
eared to set off balance Lendl's
ae and forced him out of his
ly deadly serve-and-volley
ne.
tremendous first service
llayer, Lendl succeeded in only
Gordon Leland
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That's so your business
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ir partner becomes
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To find out how to get
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38 percent of his first services. At
the same time, Glickstein limited
his errors to a minimum and
moved with speed and agility at
the net. Lendl is now added to a
rather imposing list of Glick-
stein's victims which include
Jose-Luis Clerk of Argentina,
Brian Gottfried of the United
States, and Mats Wilander of
Sweden.
arrangement, he noted, will
ensure integration among the
competitors on the basis of their
skills and enhance efficiency in
traveling to their venues.
The visiting athletes will
partake in approximately 140,000
meals served in six locations. A
committee of Israeli chefs has
prepared a special diet of 3,500
calories daily to suit the parti-
cipants. ,
For the first time in Israel,
results will be reported by
computer.
As in Olympic competitions, a
committee will check all athletes
to make certain that they are not
taking drugs to enhance their
performances. A total of 1,100
officials will handle the organiza-
tion and judging of the hundreds
of slated events and trials.
Ofek said that there will be a
variety of events each evening in
the different Olympic villages.
Twenty-four official receptions
will be held, by the Israel
Olympic Committee, Israel's
various sports federations, muni-
cipal governments in which
competitions take place, the
Histadrut, and the embassies of
competing delegations.
One of the outstanding
be a six-day bicycling event from
Dan to Beersheba, with 50
competitors from six countries
racing 100 kilometers each day.
IN THfc COOL & SCENIC BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS
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Skilled Religious-School Teachers
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Call Mrs. Seidel
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Try the frest thing next to
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idmwi


^^^TOTZi^^nriamn ana anotar 01 ureatar
__ivwooa
- -
.j-r
I S3! S3" i'.i-

Th* Jewish Ploridm* ami Skofar of Gnatcr Holiyuood
Friday. April i5 19(^
Definition of Jews expanded
tending the convention m a de-
parture from traditional Jewish
law. which holds that the re-
hgious status of a child ia deter
mined only by the rehgioo of the
chad's mother
Rkhard Address, regional direc-
tor of the PesBsyhraaia Federa-
tion of Reform
jaat a laaiaaaja of
what the.
The reaohttjon makes any chiki
of at least one Jewish parent.
whether the parent ts the chad's
mother or father, a Jew if the
child's Jewish status is "estab-
lished through anpnwaiale and
timely puhlk and formal act* of
idewtanratkan with the Jewiah
fakh and people. Such seta
might mcude the study of Torah.
bar or bat
tion.
E.
who voted far the
even though the
ia a rodnVa-
rwkh the other
of Judaism), and that we have a
to perpetuate
Judaism" as a gist hart
within the stream of Jew
nh pliihmha.
"We're just being honest about
what happens m the real world
and in our congregations." Rabbi
Address said
to
of
The
to Rabbi H
oftheCCAJt
iw ruling, said
By offidnDy
Judaism people
(Jewiah lawl specifically
Rabbi Address
Rabbi FJhot Stevens,
tratrve secretary of the CCAR m
New York, pointed out that while
the rasohataon aBows greater flex
milky m anaMiiwJ
the Jewish rebgwo. the
corouary'" of the rating hi I
child of a Jewiah mother and a
non-Jewish father might not be
Jewish.
The new Reform practice.
Rabbi Stevens said, shift* the
focus of religious identity swsy
from the gender of the Jewish
parent.
"Whether it's the mother or
father who is Jewish, the child
may or may not be Jewiah, de-
pending on the practice in the
family." Rabbi Stevens said
Previously. Reform Jewish
practice required a formal con-
version of the children of a Jew-
ish father and non- Jewish mother
when the children reached adult-
hood, but to treat the children as
Jews during childhood, depend-
ing on the wishes of the parents.
The resolution was opposed by
Reform rabbis from Israel
Under Israel's Law of Return,
any Jew who enters Israel is
automatically entitled to Israeli
citizenship. The law defines j
according to Jewish law. but km
accepts as Jews people who bay!
been converted, whether accord
tag to Orthodox. Reform orCi'
servative ritual.
Rabbi Moses Cyras WW i
speaking on behalf of the InJ I
Council of Progressive Rabbk
urged rejection of the resolution'
saying tt would result in a situ*.
tion whereby persons recognized
Jwwsby the Reform movement
in America without conversion
and without a Jewish mother -
would not be recognized as Jm
by the State of Israel
Rabbi Address noted i
resolution is specifically intended
only for "the North American
Reform movement," and that op-!
position from Israeli Reform
rabbis "is motivated out of i
s of where they are."
CAJE hires leader
to oversee S. Broward
For the
* Jewish ed
will be
working full-time in South Brow-
ard.
Meral Ehrenstem. chairman of
the Jewish Education Comnaktee
of the Jewish Federation of Senth
BfOWanfu. MlnTWTwlaswDtal UniaC rJnUafllwi
Ross of South Orange. N J wiD
be the Central Ages
Education s South i
cntaonal;
South Broward We are thriBad
to have soansone of Ma Ross's
calaber to occupy this position,"
Mrs. Ehrenstem said
Ross currently is
the Jewssh
of Meiro-
Sew Jersey. San lam bean
with
Jewish education for 30 years as
s religious school teacher, princi-
pal and educational administra-
tor
She holds bachelor s and mas-
ter's dsgrii i from Keen College
of New Jersey and has done
graduate work at Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reh-
gion in New York.
As South Broward educational
Ms Ross wil be
for aD aspects of the
Federations educational pro-
ahainhg working with
Hebrew schools, adok
and famay-ufe educa-
TheCentral Aaaeacy for Jewish
Toamigkt, jflwt yomr
ml*.)
of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
w caasxafW:
Cook
Uwith
GULDEN'S
oathes sarwr. utmi L wmaa
I KMajuate fa trtnt
m
i avaawtw w naascs
sol
rslBBtystra/nw
jewsr *owas tar
crops and ha/
aaa laewaa Tent* wfty ear
TETLEYTEA
"Finally, a
Catsldll resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
Per wee*, per person (dbLocc i
Every Boom asm Preant Barn.
A*Corirjorw^andCotorTV
When you escape the Honda heat
the. Summer, escape to sornetrany
more than nonstop otereaung
Escape to the Bnckman
*e *no* that you go on vacabon to
do more than a%e from one meal to the
neat That s why re on the Mocafd
American Plan servng two sumptuous
meats da*y Breakfast(unti II30am).
and Droer (from 6 JO to 830 pm).
*d Magrahcent Poc* -
sJe Corfce Shop
There i be no announcement at
I pmcawng you beck to the Drang
Room each you just lea. no need to
rush off the goM course or tenras courts
Lnger a the pool al day i you choose
wfctiaM one outdoor and atooor (corv
tarang heath dub and jet wrwipoot
spa). Play dupacate bndge take art
classes, go tow. dancng jog or work
out on our Uratersat nwagym In short
enjoy a fca day of outdoor act** and
sunsrane. and al the other fabulous
thugs we nave to oner. awJaaaa enter
tanment that s second to none
So come to the Bnckman Where the
meets'are hat not sometrang that
gets n the way of turr"
vlfedonlf"1
Kxr host for tfmse owaaeraobns.
The PosnerFamily


Friday, April 15,1963
'if Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Paris Mission announced
Continued from Page 1
quaint old buildings housing
synagogues, yeshivas, pastry
and butcher shops, delicates-
sens and restaurants and
print shops where presses spin
out bar mitzvah invitations
written in French and Hebrew.
Enjoy Shabbat services in
one of the 50 synagogues in
Paris. France has the fourth
largest Jewish population in the
world. Its 600,000- Jews rank
Israel behind only the United
States and the Soviet Union. In
Paris alone there are 375,000
Jews.
Explore the multitude of
museums (Jewish Art
Museum), bookstores, art
nouses, libraries and Judaic cul-
tural exhibits.
Eat in one or more of the
world-renowned kosher res-
taurants.
Shop to your heart's con-
tent during periods set aside as
free time.
These are but a few of the
highlights being formalized for
the Paris Mission, according to
Joan Raticoff, missions chair-
man.
But that's not all.
"After Paris, it's on to Is-
rael," Mrs. Raticoff announces,
for seven more days exploring
Israel and six more glorious
Arabs protest
'Golda' show
on French TV
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTAI The Arab
League representative in Paris,
Mohammed Yazid, has formal-
ly complained to the French
Foreign Ministry against the
scheduled airing by French tele-
vision of the American TV series,
"Golda," which portrays the life
of Israel's late Premier Golda
Meir.
Yazid, in a written note, said
that broadcasting this program is
tantamount to "glorifying Israel
and its expansionist aims." He
asked Foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson to try to prevent the
state-controlled TV from going
ahead with its program, which
had been scheduled to start hat
week.
Several pro-Arab organizations
Authority," a state-appointed
body responsible for the televi-
sion's political neutrality and
ethics, to have the series, which
stars the late Ingrid Bergman,
banned.
One such organization, the
Franco-Arab Solidarity Associa-
tion, said in its letter to the High
Authority's President Michelle
Cotta: "France, which is favor-
able'to a just solution to the Mid-
dle East conflict, should not use
television to present a biased
view of the problem."
The association's president,
Lucien Bitterlin, also called for a
program on the Palestinian ques-
tion and said it should be fol-
lowed by a debate between the
representatives of all the con-
cerned parties.
Peace?
Continued from Page 1
implicitly criticized extremist
Arab governments that refuse to
recognize Israel's right to exist.
Israeli officials have privately
welcomed Gromyko's remarks.
But they noted that the Soviet
statesman was apparently
making it cleat that the Soviet
Union must be taken into ac-
count in a negotiated withdrawal
of foreign forces from Lebanon.
By echoing the American for-
mulation, Gromyko waa estab-
lishing common ground between
the two super powers on the Leb-
anon negotiations, the Israeli of-
ficial* suggested.
nights of home hospitality, the
best hotels and never-to-be-for-
gotten adventure.
In Eretz Yisrael, mission-
goers get to see the state as few
visitors ever do. The best guides
in Israel, UJA's finest, escort
South Broward travelers
through the land of their fore-
fathers.
According to Mrs. Raticoff,
the mission is to be so fine-
tuned that moat of participants
? even the multi-time goers ?
will be enraptured by the coun-
try.
The progress of Project Re-
newal, Hod Hasharon, the
Youth Aliyah Center, Yad
Vashem and the Western Wall
are but a few of the treats
awaiting.
"Of course, only five-star de-
luxe hotels are used," Mrs.
Raticoff says, and all expenses
(meals, taxes, guides buses,
porterage and round-trip air-
fare) is included.
A minimum commitment of
$5,000 per family to the UJA-
Jewish Federation of South
Borward's 1984 Campaign is re-
quired. Contact Stunner G.
Kaye, executive director, or
Mrs. Raticoff at the Federation
(921-8810) for. more details.
Mrs. Raticoff also announces
the 1983 Community Mission
which is to take place Oct. 23
through Nov. 1.
With a minimum commit-
ment of f 1,500 per family to the
UJA-Federation Campaign,
Community Mission travelers
win explore Tel Aviv, Gil Amal
and Giora in the town of Hod
Hasharon (Project Renewal),
Jerusalem, Yad Vaahem,
Masada, the Western Wall and
more.
After experiencing the hustle
and bustle of the ultra-modern
Tel Aviv, the contrast will be'
stark as South Broward Com-
munity Mission people arrive in
their sister city, Hod Hasharon.
The progress of Hod
Hasharon also will be stark as
UJA-Federation supporters see
where their dollars have and are
being used.
It is sightseeing, shopping
and visiting next as travelers
reach Jerusalem. At Yad
Vashem Israel's memorial to
the 6 million slain at the hands
of the Nazis a ceremony and
tour of the monument is
planned.
Also dedicated to the fallen is
Masada, perched atop a cliff,
where the once luxurious palace
of King Herod stood.
For more information on the
Community Mission, contact
Suzy Briskin at the Federation
(921-8810).
983 HOLOCAUST
MEMORIAL DAY
Sunday.
April 17. 1983
i "
8:00 PM.
the Jewish Community will
commemorate the 40th ANNIVERSARY of the
WARSAW GHETTO
and the
CHILDREN of SURVIVORS
at lh
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
416 NE 8th Av.nn.
with
ABRAHAM J. BAER
DIRECTOR
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION
National JcwUh Community Advisory Council
Holocauat Coaalaaion of tha Counity Relations Caiittaa of tha Jovian rod-
aration of Sooth Broward. for further information call Haliaaa 21-M10.
V
Study medicine in Israel.
A challenge and
an opportunity.
Touro College and Technion- Israel Institute of Technology
announce a new program leading to an M.D. degree
A new door is open to an M.D. degree from
one of the world's great teaching and research
centers. Starting in September 1983, the
Touro-Technion Program will offer qualified
college graduates a unique American-Israel
educational experience.
The program's 18-month American phase
provides advanced science and Hebrew
language studies at Touro College's beautiful
15-acre campus in the New York City suburb
of Huntington. Upon successful completion of
these courses, students will receive a second
baccalaureate degree and may continue their
studies in Israel.
Israel phases of the program comprise 6
months of initial bridging courses, 2 years of
advanced clinical study at Technion's Faculty
of Medicine in Haifa, a thesis and a year of in-
ternship in Israel. An M.D. degree will be award-
ed by Technion to students who successfully
complete its program requirements.
Our goal is the development of skilled and
compassionate physicians who also will be
well-prepared to meet internship, residency
and licensing requirements in the United
States.
For applications and information call or
write:
Center for Biomedical Education
Touro College
30 West 44th Street
New York, N.Y. 10036
(212)575-0190
.K".-*-'.*-**^"'-' "* '


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Wd^Aprt 16,1983
PINT
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4 piece place settings consist
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QUANTITY RK3HTS RESERVED NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS


Page 12
i ""Mif r uiriqw.nai\a.dnoiar i
1 he Jewish t londian and <
y, April 1, 1983
Friday. April 15,1968
Anniversary
"ISRAEL
Harry Rubinstein Sidney Rubinstein
H and S AUTO PARTS, Inc.
AND SERVICE CENTER
Phone 920-4881
250 SOUTH FEDERAL HIGHW/ DANIA, FLORIDA
Best Wishes
JIF INSURANCE AGENCY
AUTO HOME LIFE BUSINESS
921-5381
2501 SHERIDAN ST., HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33020
_ -W mgt RUSS DIEGEL. Owner
rust Nu'Life
****** PAINT and BODY SHOP, Inc/^
-JUa, / Hcm Th, Next Dm*"
COLLISION SPECIALISTS TOWING INSURANCE WORK
WE PICK UP AND DELIVER
2111 S. W. 59th Terrace 1 Block South of Treasury
Hollywood. Fla 33023 'A Block East of 441
Hollywood Lincoln-Mercury
Complete Service Department
BODY SHOP- AUTO LEASING RENTAL
ItoMywdCeM MiemlCel
9204010 949-5486
1700 Sheridan S
Our Best Wishes Always
American Carpet & Interiors, Inc.
CARPET LINOLEUM TILES CERAMICS
REUPHOLSTERING CUSTOM-MADE DRAPES
WINDOW SHADES FURNITURE
To the Trade Commercial A Residential
MAE BELLE IREY
Sales Representative-Interior Decorator
Btoward 563-4450 Dade 944-8899
2811 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood. Fla.
<
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EXAM
All Necessary X Rays and Treatment Will Be
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CHIROPRACTIC PAID BY
Auto Insurance Workers Compensation Company & Individual
Health Insurance Plans Medical When Applicable
In Most Cases We WiU Wait For Your
Insurance Company To Pay Us
Dr. Marvin Green $??'c
4313 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Florida
962-0603


-;
Anti-Semitism
is protested
PARIS (JTAI The Euro-
pean Parliament was asked to in-
tervene to try to stop what one
deputy said was an anti-Semitic
campaign now waged by part of
the Greek press.
Roger-Gerard Schwartzenberg,
a deputy for the French Radical
Party and himself a Jew, asked
the Parliament to intercede with
the Greek government to see
what can be done to stop the hate
incitement campaign.
Schwartzenberg said that
under the guise of anti-Zionism
and criticisms of the Israeli gov-
ernment's policies, several Greek
newspapers are actually spread-
ing anti-Semitism and inciting to
racial hatred.
He also called on the Parlia-
ment to try to obtain the extradi-
tion of Nazi war criminal Walter
Rauff, believed to be hiding in
Chile.
Space satellite
decade away?
TEL AVIV (JTA) Sci-
ence and Development Minister
Yuval Ne'eman, who chaired the
founding meeting of the Israel
Space Agency, said the ground-
work was being laid to launch an
Israeli space satellite "within 10
years or so."
He said the Israeli satellite, for
communications or weather fore-
casting, would have to be
launched in cooperation with
either the American NASA or the
European Space Agency.
In the meantime, Ne'eman
said, the Israel Space Agency
would be laying the groundwork,
for Israeli space work through
contacts with foreign agencies,
joint research and local research
and development work.
Rudi Novak
TREE
SERVICE
RESIDENTIAL
TRIMMING
REMOVING
STUMPS REMOVED
Free Estimates
922-8398
2703 Washington St.
Hollywood, Florida
CITY
NATIONAL
BANK OF
HALLANDALE
at Hit
Diplomat Mall
cvery muuain
iamkmq Service
Site Deposit Boxes
Pheae 454-5000
HeJUdale, Florida
YOM HAATZMAUT
ISRAELS 35th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION..... <
Come join in the Commemoration and Festivities of this
Wonderful Occasion at; YOUNG CIRCLE, HOLLYWOOD, FL.
SUNDAY, APRIL 24th, 1983 II00 A.M.-4 00 PM.
Krnlali Sain Partita Option*
PREFERRED PROPERTY ENTERPRISES, INC.
SEASONAL & YEARLY RENTALS
Broward: 921-4441 Dade: 949-8260
2130 HOLLYWOOD BLVD. HOLLYWOOD. FLA. 33020
Best Wishes Always
ORANGE JULIUS
AT THE HOLLYWOOD FASHION CENTER
PHONE 983-7700 HOLLYWOOD. FL
Best Wishes
BRILLIANT of HOLLYWOOD
AUTO BAKE PAINTING FREE ESTIMATES
2101 S.W. 59th Avenue (One Block Off of 441)
W. Hollywood, Fl.
989-8155
Emerald Gardens Florist
PHONE 966-8262
4461 Sheridan Street Hollywood, FL
PHONE 435-3115
10424 Taft Street Pembroke Pines, FL
Papa D. Carlo's
Italian Restaurant
Every item is prepared to order by the owner.
Specialties in Seafood Veal and Pasta
Telephone (305) 963-4900
3190 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale, FL 33009
3 Blocks West of I 96
V
BANKlo,
Of HOLLYWOOD
TO)982.,nS)d B'Vd"'Hollywood'F,or,da 33021
Member FDIC
Subsidiary of Florida Commercial Banks, Inc.



[ April 15,1963
roty.ntrTuiS "^
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Pace 13
^***W .#*
\}-*>*JCtiier

X OF HONOR Chairwoman Ruth Schwartz is
by Abe and Jesse Melter, honorees at a recent Clifton
linium-State of Israel Bond Night. The Mdters were
with a prestigious Scroll of Honor for their dedication
South Broward Jewish community.
mg leaders to confer
aism And Israel A
Jnto The Nations?" will be
me of the Sixth Annual
Jewish Appeal Florida
al Young Leadership Con-
3^J co-sponsored by the
of Jewish Federations,
Hrida Association of Jewish
lions and the United
Appeal.
Blreds of young leaders
1 over the state will gather
ekend of May 13-15 at the
efo Resort in Haines City
ear scholar-inresidence
I Siegal, noted poet, writer
pturer, and Mark Talisman,
of the Washington Ac-
ffice of the Council of
Federations.
Martin at the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, 921-8810.
Sunpainting. .
Continued from Page 1
into spectral geometries; arcs and ovals undulate
through prismatic spectra. Woven from light and
hue, sunpaintings are an everchanging tapestry
which dazzle the eye and provoke the imagination.
A sunpainting can be projected onto any surface
depending on the size of the reflectors, says Hoenich.
Although Hoenich's sunpaintings have covered the
interiors of museums in Jerusalem, Brussels and
Paris, he envisions that one day his swirling,
kaleidoscopic pictures will decorate the exteriors of
buildings and monuments.
Rows of giant reflectors could be built to catch the
sun as it moves across the sky making it possible to
drape town squares, avenues, even the tops of
mountains, in colors of shimmering iridescence.
"If the reflectors and filters were permanently
mounted," says Hoenich, "you would get a six-
month programfrom solstice to solsticefor the
projection." Since the artist can calculate the exact
position of the sun for every hour of every day, he
could orchestrate all parts of the image's movements
and changes.
Today's artists are incorporating various tech-
nological mediums into their work, including elec-
tronics, chemistry and mechanics. "Art," says
Hoenich, "should develop in harmony with the
philosophy, science and technology of its time."
Sunpainting uses the sciences of astronomy and
the physics of opticsthe laws of reflection and re-
fractionto create its otherworldly images. To
achieve the brilliant hues possible with sunpainting,
the artist must also be familiar with the subtractive
properties of color.
"Technical universities should include the tech-
nology of art in their research and study," comments
Hoenich, who teaches courses in conjunction with
Technion'8 faculty of architecture and town plan-
ning. "Teamwork between artists, engineers and
I scientists should be encouraged."
The inspiration for sunpainting came more than
20 years ago when Hoenich sat down at his desk to
compose a proposal for a research project. "The form
lay before me, white and untouched," relates
I Hoenich, "and through the open terrace door
streamed a bundle of sunrays. There and then," he
says, came the idea of using sunlight for pictures
with predetermined changes.
He then took his revelation one step farther: to
use sunlight for a series of pictures where neither the
picture nor the changes were predetermined. An ap-
paratus could be equipped with movable reflectors
and color filters that would use sunlight but with the
addition of a second source of energy, such as wind
or the movement of a hand.
"If three or more reflectors move independently of
each other," explains Hoenich, "they will never form
the same combination twice. Their unified projection
will change constantly and never repeat itself."
These machines Hoenich dubbed 'robot painters.'
Visitors to museums and galleries all over the
world have delighted in creating sunpaintings with
Hoenich's robot painters. Participants interacting
with the machines mixed colors and forms with the
joy and ease of fingerpainting. They reported that
the psychological effect of sunpainting was a new
sense of creative play.
"I wanted to give my pictures the fourth dimen-
siontime," says Hoenich, "but I wanted my pic-
tures to move in the fifth dimension, toothat of the
spirit.
"No part of ny research is patented," he adds. "I
do not see myself as an inventor, but as~antrrtist
searching for a form of art that expresses our timj."
A Special Offer
from Fleischmann's* Margarine.
A$3<* Cookbook for!
I bBPBw
f"*>Flei
.' program will be high-
with a special shabbat ex-
b, workshops and a politi-
date. There will also be
[ creative programming for
i to encourage family par-
Dii.
further information and
itions, contact Melissa
TUDIO
itinental
isine
Klo
Venowned
ION)
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-< I
TneTieuiikn r tonaian ana onorar oi greater ttoUvwooa
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 1, 1983
Friday, April 18,1988
On the bookshelf
Sephardim revealed In print
The Sephardic
h the United Statee.
fly Afore D. Angel. The Jewish
Publication Society of America,
1990 Chestnut St., Philadelphia,
Pa. 19103. 1982. 256 pages, with
notes, bibliography and index.
$15.96.
Reviewed by Lionel Koppman
"We live in New York! In en
oven of fire, in the midst of dirt
and filth. We live in dark and
narrow dwellings which inspire
disgust."
That was how Jack Farhi, a
former Hebrew teacher in Tur-
key, described the situation of
Sephardic immigrants on the
Lower East Side in the summer
of 1912.
La America is the story of the
more than 25,000 Sephardic Jews
who migrated to the U.S. be-
:*: Jewish Books
jujb in Review
fi i wrni, oi Mw iwi town/i toot CoukH.
If (Jil MM Si.. Ni lew*. N V. 10010
tween 1899 and 1925 from
Turkey, Syria, Greece, Bulgaria,
Rhodes and other places. It is
also the story of Moise Gadol, the
sometimes controversial news-
paper editor who worked hard to
forge a unified community out of
this diverse population.
The book takes its title from
Gadol's newspaper La America,
published in Judeo-Spanish (the
term is preferred to Latino) from
1910 to 1925. In its pages, Gadol
campaigned continually for the
consolidation of the Levantine
Sephardim into a central
organization.
'Diary of Anne Frank'
previews on April 19
A benefit preview performance
of the play "Diary of Anne
Frank" will be presented Tues-
day, April 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Rtith Foreman Professional The-
-TrnrSoutheastern Florida Hol-
ocaust Memorial Center, in coop-
eration with the Foreman The-
ater, will offer the play, written
by Frances Goodrich and Albert
Hackett, at Florida International
University, Bay Vista Campus,
NE 151 Street and Biacayne
Boulevard, North Miami.
Ms. Foreman has earned an
enviable reputation for direction
and production of plays with her
professional cast.
In addition to being a social
event and an opportunity to see
this play, those attending will be
able to help provide the Holo-
caust Memorial Center with
funds to continue educational
programs, including the recor-
ding of testimony from survivors,
liberators and protectors, so that
the Holocaust may never be for-
gotten and cannot be denied.
Dr. Gregory B. Wolfe, presi-
dent, Florida International Uni-
versity, is president of the Holo-
caust Center. Goldie R. Goldstein
of Miami is executive vice presi-
dent. Arnold M. Picker of Golden
Beach is chairman of the Fund-
Raising Committee, and Elaine
Pittell of Hollywood is chairman
of the Theatre Party Committee.
For further information, call
940-5690.
DO YOU REMEMBER THE
BEAUTIFUL CATSKILL MOUNTAINS
IN THE SUMMER? ESCAPE THE
FLORIDA HEAT AND COME ON UP!
JHE WORLD FAMOUS CONCORD RESORT HOTEL
OFFERS YOU A SPECIAL
COMEOM
UPPACKAGE
$434
WEEKLY
(Minimum 2 weeks stay.)
Per person, dbl occ.,
Standard Room Does not
include air fare, round-trip
transfers, gratuities and
7%Sateslax_
Superior Room$504
Executive Room$546.
Tower Room5676.
ALL INCLUSIVE PACK AGE
$1,083,00. 2 week stay
Dbl. Occ Per Person.
Standard Room, air fare not
included
Includes:
O 15 Days and 14 Nights
? Round trip transport
Airport to Hotel
D Concord representative
will meet you and handle
your luggage and transfers
D Gratuities for waiter and
maids during your stay
D Local and State Taxes
D 3 Full Meals daily
D Special Diets Available
? 2 Cocktail Parties
D Welcome drink upon
arrival
D Entertainment every night
D Free 9 hole golf, tennis
(indoor & out). HealthClub.
Indoor and Outdoor Pool
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
to call us direct Toll Free 800-431-3850, or contact Helen and
Norm Levin in Florida a; 305-485-8861. (They will also assist
you in making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Agent
EARLY BIRD SPECIAL
A $50. REFUND per person
for reservations made by
June 15th for a minimum
two week stay in Superior,
Executive or Tower rooms
ONLY (Also applies to all
inclusive package for
Superior, Executive &
Tower rooms )
CONCORD*
Kiamesha Lake. NY 12751 \__y
There were reasons why the
dream was never realized. First,
there was the language barrier.
While moat of the Sephardic im-
migrants spoke Judeo-Spanish,
others spoke Greek or Arabic,
and all of them were separated
from New York'a Yiddish-speak-
ing Jews.
Second, because the Sephar-
dim came from so many different
places, they often didn't even
share common interests among
themselves. Furthermore, the
newcomers uneducated and
unskilled came into conflict
with the "uptown," westernized
Sephardic Jews in the Spanish
and Portuguese Synagogue
(Shearith Israel), founded by the
first Jews to come to this country
in 1654.
In a fascinating chapter, "Old
and New Sephardim Meet," Marc
D. Angel, the rabbi of Congrega-
tion Shearith Israel, tells how
these two groups, separated by
centuries of history, came to-
gether as estranged relations.
"A Hispano-Levantine Com-
munity" describes customs of
these Oriental Jews which will in-
trigue readers not familiar with
them. Imagine Jews who had
never heard of gefilte fish. Chil-
dren were usually named after
living relatives. Normally, the
first-born son and daughter
would be named after the father's
parents, while the second son and
daughter would be named after
the mother's parents.
The story of these Sephardic
Jews is little known. Their strug-
gles, their experiences and their
many interesting customs should
captivate the reader. Rabbi
Angel sheds a bright light on a
previously hidden part of Jewish
life in the United States.
Lionel Koppman is author
(with the late Bernard Postal) of
the four-volume American Jewish
Landmarks and Gneea Who's
Jewish in American History. He
is an editor and publicist for
JWB.
H'^''iiz3&
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DELANO P.O. Box 130. Monticello. NY. 12701
Telephone: (914) 794-5300
OIMCTIONS
Rout* 17 (Quick way) to Exit 106 th*n go up Broadway to
Monticallo Poll Ottit* th*n turn right into liberty $l.
and go '' oi a mil* to Delano
st. a n ii ii i w s i: ii ii n it v club
Bill: A II A TUN
Two 18 hole championship golf courses, world class tennis courts, and one mile of
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write us at 7227 Clint Moore Road, Boca Raton, Florida 33434 or call 305/487-0700.
*
it



at Inn A X**"'*
Vy, April 16, 1963
itAiOVtr) lowln'
wm
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
irl 's problems prompt sessions with counselor
X called Jewish Family'
for family counseling
[l-year-old daughter, Paula,
ring and flunking out of
X is an attractive 37-year -
the has a B.S. degree and is
byed as a professional. Mr.
140 and quiet. He is a high
f\ graduate and is employed
blue-collar job. Both are
counselor met with the
I members of the X family
egan the session by asking
[they individually wanted to
in the family. Mrs. X
harmony, Mr. X wanted
to get good grades and
wanted someone to listen
en the counselor asked
what she meant by some-
listen to her, she said she
telling her teachers and
Its that she can't learn the
no matter how hard she
j She also expressed that she
punished a lot for her poor
i and that the three of them
fs fight about this.
[addition to exploring this,
the therapist called the school to
request testing. The testing
showed that Paula had a severe
learning disability and this was
the reason for her poor school
performance. Paula was assigned
to a learning disability class with
remedial labs.
As the sessions progressed, the
counselor found out that the only
thing Paula lied about were her
school grades and that was be-
cause of unrealistic punishments
for bad grades. The therapist ex-
plained to Mr. and Mrs. X that
children lie because of fear of con-
sequences, which in this case was
unrealistic.
Jrx
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
9HHBaV0BH
2838 HOUYVVOGO BLVD HOLLYWCXDO. flORIDA 3 J020
JCC of South Broward is
png a Cancun holiday in
for Memorial Day week-
lay 25-29. The trip will in-
|a five-day, four-night stay
deluxe Sheridan Cancun
transfers from airport to
[yacht cruise, day tour to
t-Xel-Ha. Mayan Ruins and
ll Aquarium: taxes and
3st will be less than $300
per person. If interested, call
Dene at 921-6611
Zoo
The Southeast Focal Point Se-
nior Center is planning a trip to
the Metro Zoo Wednesday, May
Cost of $10 per person, in-
cludes transportation and en-
trance fee. For further informa-
tion, call Rosalie or Rachel at 921 -
6518.
TURN YOUR DECORATION HOLIDAY *
INTO A SPECIAL WEEKEND BALL-
COME TO BROWN'S!
W
m
19
LOCH SHELDRAKE, NY 12759^^914-434-6633 ?J
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Terrific Entertainment Starring
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REUNION WEEKEND
Fn., April 22 Sun April 24
starring JULIUS LA ROSA
BiirWiYs
TCH SHELDRAKE, NY 12759^^914-4
Orast > to* Mat CraSt OS. N*iorl
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Telephone: (914) 794-6900
Direct NYC. Phone:(212)924-6162
[Hotel
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Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
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fooms Air ConditionedTVsCapacity 450 GuesU
ke "Gibbers" Your Summer Vacation Home,
I'll Love Us. The Gibber Family
Children need to know what
the consequences will be for un-
desirable behavior. After Paula
was placed in her new classes, a
list of realistic and desirable
behavior was devised, as were
appropriate consequences when
these were not met.
As a family, the counselor
worked on listening skills, how to
express anger and frustration,
expectations of each other, and
how to focus on the positives as
well as the negatives.
When the feelings of frustra-
tion, anger and inadequacy
decreased and communication
increased the X family was
able to become a happy, cohesive
unit.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 4617 Holly-
wood Blvd., Holly wood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-9056. Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort Lau-
derdale, 33319. Telephone: 735-
3394. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
bo ro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort Lau-
derdale. the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and The United
Way of Broward County.
Tvloianta-in Lake
250 boys & pits, ago 5-16
Mature, experienced Mat"! (I per 4)
Sabbath Services Friday nights
i Tutoring; American & lnt"I Staff
i MIX and RNs in residence
> 4 or 8 week sessions
ON PRI\ATI
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Scheduled activity program
includes: water ski. canoe, sail,
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nature, skits, field trips,
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PLUS, options, etc.
LIMITED OPENINGSCALL NOW 305 6 304$
or write: PO. Bra 41-4450, MB, Ra. 33141
Owners ^Directors
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Caren Savage Cdeman
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Our two-week vacations
start at $699.
But don't let the low prices
foolyou.
These arc fine vacations, comparable to those selling for
hundreds of dollars more. They include scheduled flights not charters),
good hotels, breakfast every morning on European and Orient tours, spectacular sightseeing, escorts,
and some of the most exciting destinations m the world. For example:
D California and Las Vegas. Two weeks------from $699.
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Francisco Monterey and the famous California Coasta Tou'
LoiTdon-Paris-Amsterdam. Ten days------from$899
Or Thirteen days....................11001*999.
Ali-time favorite On eiine- vacate" you'll sioWsee " includes visits 10 B'uaes 1 o'Gfie"li Ve'saiiies a"0 r'viiar-'.-
as inree ex!ra "'prt'^ i >
D England-Scotland-Wales. Two weeks ... from *999.
Spend 4 days London tier '0 davs seeing 'n* castle? an I a" fa1 I've mounts
lanes cines and shies tnat are trie very slu'i o' tngfcth Ml
D Canadian Rockies & Pacific Northwest.
Two weeks..........................from$969.
Visit Banff Jasoe- Vancouver SeaPe Victors narnso" Ho- Springs B-oafnia-
scenery First ciass note -
? r^ris-SwHieiland-Vienna. Two weeks.. from *1099.
Start and end you' mo HI me most romantic cities ot Europe in between spend a week on tne &M
Lakes and see trie most spectacular scenery of Lurope
? london-Paris-fiome. Two weeks......from*1099.
The Qrand Tour in the grand manner A relaxed pace with 4 nights in each magnificent capital ana
one mght on the lamed -Palatmo" train from Paris to Home Sightseeing m each city
? Austria and Italy. Two weeks......... from*1199.
Music and An and Alps1 Stay in Vienna. Salzburg the magnificent Austnan and Italian Alps
Venice Florence and Rome Includes sightseeing Si every city
D Scancinavia. 13 days, ind. the Fjords.. frorn*1199.
Or Super Scandinavia: TrK Complete
Luxury lour....................... from*1399.
Choose between the most beautiful low-priced lour on the market and the most beautiful four at any
once Both include the breathtaking fjords of Norway, centrally located hotels in the major cities,
and generous Scandinavian (not continental) breakfasts every day The Deluxe version also
includes visiting and touring Danish Fairytale country a romantic r"^'"'S'SSr
Denmark and Kforway. city sightseeing lours, the best hotels m Copenhagen. Oslo, and Stock-
holmand at toast half your dinners
D Deluxe OrtefTtriylnckisrve.bur/ very
delusive Hotels. Two weeks.........from*1999.
Wartjapan Singapore Bangkok, and Hong Kong I nctudes sight seeing m every city mot dinners,
van some nights on the town with exotic entertainment
dlS*>r~"ia>viioaiprictixi tfn, <* mm im*ft vmnmi mow nona*a hoax
Miiin i.a-itri r r>.p*ow*'bi*)oridoubkiocci4>icy MMxwiiwim
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H you'd Nka more ki*jmatton. R% thto easy: Just indicate which vacation(s) you d like to know
more about by checking the appropriate box(es) in the tour listing above: then till m your name and
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Othual Reservations B'nai B rrth-Bnai Zion Travel Program. 370 Lexington Ave New York NY
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Miami W: (305) 374-130*
Name__________________------------Aaorest---------------,---------------------------------------------
Cy__________________________State--------------------------------------Zf> ------------
*^


Page 16
\t\fnr /if Hrtitmr Hnfnimnnrf
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 15,1983
*'-j h wr
Jewish partisans in the forests of Lithuania fighting the Nazis in the Second World War.
More and more, the message is clear, destroying an earlier myth: Jews did not go to their
deaths without a fight.
Maccabees wil arise
Continued from Page 3
continued to diminish as the Ger-
mans pressed their attack with
heavy artillery and even
aerial bombardments, levelling
and burning building alter
month of the fiercest fighting
imaginable, Stroop could finally
report: "The former Jewish
quarter is no longer in existence;
56,065 have been exterminated,
and 5,000 to 6,000 were killed in
building. On May 8. the com- .explosions or fires."
mand post in the bunker at Mila
18 was attacked. May were killed
by arms and gas grenades: 60
were captured after hours of
fierce fighting, and 21 escaped
while German efforts were con-
centrated on another exit. After
crawling through the sewers to
the Aryan side of Warsaw, most
of these were killed, only a few
managing to be smuggled out to
the forests. Mordecai Anielewicz
himself fell in the command
bunker apparently after a
decision by some of the fighters
to take their own lives rather
than be captured alive by the
Nazis.
SPORADIC resistance con-
tinued until May 16 when after a
It is forty years since that up-
rising in the Warsaw Ghetto
dramatically demonstrated the
fighting capability of the Jew in
the face of overwhelming odds.
Though few of the fighters lived
to see the creation of the State of
Israel including the command-
er of the revolt, Mordecai Aniele-
wicz his last words echo
through contemporary Jewish
history: "The dream of my life
has been fulfilled. I have lived to
see Jewish defense in all its
greatness and glory." Nearly half
a century had passed since I lend
wrote in his "Jewish State" that
"a new generation of Maccabees
will arise." In the Warsaw
TZ
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thing as a Frw Computer?
Camp Judaea
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Buy one dinner and get one
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Uiftairfc


Friday, April IB, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 17
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BLACKWALLS
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SIZE
700x15
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800x16.5
875x16.5
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415
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3 79
98.10
455
111.95
495
116.66
476
205/70-14
87.33
F.E.T. 2.40
IMPORT TRUCKS
MICHELINXCT
185x14
6ply
2.11
1.71
ilFGoodrich
P3/70
IG RADIAL
L BELTS
Pfftt |F.E
1165/70SR13 44.73 1 -2
175/70SR13 50.47
I185/70SR14
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185/70SR13 55.06 1 57
59.07 1 es
1.32
64.23
1.88
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rALL SEASON RACHAI
WE ALSO CARRY
P5, P6, P7 and P8
SIZES TO FTT MOST
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AT MOST STORES
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WHITEWALLS
P155/80B12
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STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEHALL
Plus 1.49 F.E.T.
SIZE
P155/80B13
PI65/80813
P175/80B13
P185/80813
HIGHTECH pi75^5Bi4
RADIALS rmnm*
50,608c 70 SERIES P195/75B14
and the new P205/75B14
COMP T/A p^sii^
P225/75B14
PI55/80815
PI 55/80815
P205/75B15
P215/75815
P225/75B15
PZ35/75B15
PRICE
31.97
33.81
35.75
F.E.T.
1.44
1.50
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
1.13
1.M
1.70
1.71
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2 07
2.20
2 35
1.03
215
THE NEW
GENERATION
RADIAL
RADIAL BLACKWALLS
SIZE
165/70-365
180/65-390
190/65-390
220/55-390
WHITE
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77.08
90.30
99.91
102.39
F.E.T.
1 72
1.94
209
2 26
PERrORMANCE PACKAGE
4 TRX RADIALS
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CALL US TO SEE IF IT FITS ON
VOUfl PARTICULAR CAR
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POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
SIZE
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P165/80R13 48.88
1.09
P175/80R13 48.57
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1.71
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102
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P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
56.92
47.50
1.03
P196/7SR14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
52.32
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Install new disc pad* Resurface
rotors tnet.MI new seels Repack
bearings Check calipers Check
system Inspect master cylinder
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PRICE
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P225/75R15
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41.25
42.62
43.90
45.89
46.28
48.77
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2.31
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FOR FOREIGN A MOST DOMESTIC
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jit ,


Ask the rabbi
'Eye for eye' idea
means cash outlay
By RABBI PAUL PLOTKIN
Temple Israel of Miramar
In this week's Torah reading of Emor, one of the most often
quoted verses, and least understood, appears. The Torah talks
about "an eye for an eye.'' Ironically, the Jews have never taken,
interpreted or practiced that verse literally.
Yet, throughout history, Judaism and the Torah have been
accused by Christian scholars of being "Inhumane." They have
often quoted this verse as a foil to compare with the Christian
concept and approach of love and charity. But as every
knowledgeable Jews knows, "Ayin Tachat Ayin," means an eye
compensated for an eye, with the payment of money.
As is so often the case in Jewish history, the ironies are
overwhelming. The non-Jews historically have accused us of
being barbarians, of being members of a wrathful and vengeful
religion.
And yet. for 2,000 years the Roman law of "Lex Taliones" as
practiced by the Jews, has meant money compensation. In the
non-Jewish world, under Roman law, it was literal, and even into
I'.Hh Century Europe, mutilation and torture of prisoners was a
common practice.
In England, pickpockets were punished for their crime by
hanging; in Moslem countries today, a thief has his hands
amputated us punishment for robbery. Yet. throughout all of
time, Jews have practiced this legal doctrine as monetary
compensation.
There is a question that can and should be asked. Even
though Maimonides explains to us that this interpretation is a
law that was, "given to Moses at Mt. Siani." you really must
wonder, why did the Torah not say "money for an eye" if that's
what it meant.
And our sages teach us that if. indeed, the verse had said
"money as compensation for an eye," we would have received
the impression that man's organs are nothing more than com-
modities, reduced to a strict monetary worth.
It's as if an eye were like an oil filter or a crankshaft or a spare
lire parts that one would find in an auto shop. Therefore, if I
harm you, rather than say, "This is no great deal (especially if
I'm wealthy I. simply send me the bill for the broken arm, for the
lost eye."
Rather than allow us to reduce the human body to merely
being like a fender or a bumper on a car, the Torah wants to
teach us specifically, an eye is equal to an eye. None of us would
like the experience of losing an organ; we must, therefore,
treasure everyone else's body as well.
We see, therefore, that not only has the Torah taught us the
lemon of adjudicating an injury with cash compensation, but at
the same time it has taught us the sanctity, holiness and value
of the human body. The irony is now complete, as we perceive of
the true message of the Torah. compared to the insulting
evaluations we have been subjected to in the past.
To study Torah. to study Yiddishkeit, is very often to studV
the true irony of the Jewish experience.
Composer sets Beth El date
Temple Beth El of Hollywood,
as the third event of its cultural
series, will feature Max Janow-
ski, one of this country's leading
composers of and educators in
Jewish music.
At Shabbat Services on Friday
evening, April 12, he will appear
in a concert with the temple
choir, consisting of Ann Cruz
Lydia King, Patrick Matthews,
Lynda Smith and Robert Smith.
A creative musical service,
featuring Janowski, will be on
Saturday at 10:30 a.m.
Janowski has composed indivi-
dual liturgical pieces, folk songs,
children's songs, music for choirs
and choruses, oratorios based on
the Bible, cantatas and Shabbat
services.
More than 100 of his works
have been published. He has been
commissioned to write musical
scores by numerous congre-
gations in honor of special oc-
casions or distinguished leaders.
Many of his compositions are
in the music departments of
colleges and universities. His
"Avinu Malkeinu" and "Sim
Shalom" (dedicated to Ralph
Bunchr in recognition of his
contribution to the Arab-Israeli
armistice following the Israeli
War of Independence) are
compositions which have become
cherished possessions of many
synagogues and even of non-Jew-
ish religious groups. He has
lectured on Jewish musk at
colleges and universities
throughout the country.
His most recent major works
are two Shabbat evening ser-
vices, including a Torah service.
According to the new Union
Prayer Book, Gates of Prayer,
both services were commissioned
by Temple Shalom of Pittsburgh
and by Temple Emanu-El of
Houston.
He has made several recor-
dings, his last album is "Sh'ma
Koleynu" in which his composi-
tions are sung by a temple con-
cert choir and soloists, and
directed by the composer at the
piano.
In addition to television,
concert performances and illus-
trated lectures, he continues to
compose for youth choirs, adult
Women's equality road still long, winding one
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Women now have a much larger
role in Jewish religious life in the
United States than they did 10
years ago but they have a long
way yet to go to achieve full
equality with men. according to a
report by the American Jewish
Commit tit
lh.it conclusion emerged from
a consultant sponsored by the
committee-. Jewish Communal
Affairs Department A report on
the consultation appears in a
booklet prepared, by Dr. Gladys
Rosen, program specialist in the
depart mint Participants in-
i liuiiti rabbis, cantors, academics
and iominunit> leaders, most but
not all of them women. Dr. Rosen
sukl
A major point brought out at
t hi consultation is that the con
tinned refusal of the Conserva-
tive Jewish movement to ordain
women as rabbis is causing much
"anger and frustration." not only
among women who want to be-
come rabbis but also among other
women and men who feel that
i hi Conservative stand is wrong
and not necessarily mandated by
Jewish law. More than 60 women
have In-en ordained as Reform
ami Heconstructionist rabbis
ERTIFIED MOHELi
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
ML Sinai Hospital.
ill Travel (306) 673-50621
during the past decade.
Another finding was that more
women are also becoming cantors
and congregational presidents
and more congregations are call-
ing women up to the Torah and
counting on them for a minyan,
the quorum for prayers; but ever
where full participation by
women has become "legal." it is
still not considered "normal."
The participants were told that
Continued on Page 19
ADOPTION
Happily married couple will give love, warmth
and security to white infant.
Expenses paid. Confidential.
Plesse Call
(212) 339-2286 COLLECT after 6 P.M.
or anytime on weekends.
>00
I
I

I
I
I
I

I
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I
Have You Heard?"
AUDJOLOGIC CARE CENTER
-Unriiri Aids-Heiri- listing
Dennis C. Doom. MA, CCC-A
tatettionaf mUn and fitting
by certified clinical audiologi.t.
rnrr package* Of batteries
"nCC w/haariog md purchase
whan pcaaanttng this adv.
Emerald Hills Medical Souore \C~ "tSJSLZ""
4490 Sheridan St. Hwd. 9*1-9900 I -
Max Janowski to perform
choruses, orchestral works, Both Temple Beth El event*
cantatas and oratorios. are open to the public.
HONORED WITH TORAH -- Nathan and Phyllis Pritcher
(center) are honored at a recent Temple Beth El-Jewish
National Fund luncheon for their 'dedication to synagogue
Judaism, JNF and Israel.' Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe. spiritual leader
of the temple, also is saluted for 'untiring efforts, valiant lead-
ership and dedicated and outstanding devotion to the cause of
the JNF.' Luncheon chairman is Jules Gordon (right).
11
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8
-i
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood: 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:56 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.: Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.: Sabbath
morning. 9 o'clock: Sundays. 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road: 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m.. sundown:
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown: Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock: Sunday,8a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.: 464-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath. 8
p.m.: Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.: Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave.. Hollywood: 981
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.
sundown: Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock: Sabbath morning. 9
o'clock. Religious school: Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday. Monday and
Thursday. 8 a.m.: Sabbath. 8 p.m.: Sabbath morning. 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, .ludaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Miramar 6920 SW 35th St.; 9611700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services. 8:30 a.m.- Sabbath. 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning. 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 s.m.. 5 p-m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning. 8:36 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
FJeforn)
Temple Beth 1361 S. 14th Ave., Hollywood; 9204225.
Rabbi Samuel Z Jaffe. Sabbath services. 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10.
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Rnad Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Graenspon
habbath services. 8:15 pm Religious school: Pre-kinder
garten 10.
Temple Sold 5100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood: 9894205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services. 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning. 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-scbool-12.
tyeconstriict-Jonist
11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 472
3600. Rabbi Elliot SkidelL Sabbath services. 8:16 p.m. Religious
school: Pre-kindergarten 8.


Iriday, April 15,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 19
Dutch to open memorial
to 100,000 Jews
r.T-'V*:^ ;'-"
I
f

PASSOVER SERVICES are conducted at Golfcrest Nursing Home, thanks to the generosity
tand support of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, the synagogues of South Broward, the
IVnai B'rith and individual donors. Through the Federation's Chaplaincy Service, services for
the holiday along with gifts of kosher-for-Passover foodstuffs to patients were conducted
vilh Jewish folks confined in nursing and convalescent homes, hospitals and correctional
facilities. Here, at Golfcrest, are (from left) Dr. Alexander Golemba, Rabbi Harold Richter,
iirertor of JFSB Chaplaincy; Sadie Cohen and Julia Buyauskas.
[quality road
till long,
inding one
Continued from Page 18
omen rabbis, cantors and com-
liunal leaden have few role
podela which makes their al-
widy difficult positions still
hore difficult.
The biggest obstacles reported
icing women are not those posed
Iv Jewish law but those stem-
ning from entrenched social atti-
lulcs. Women as well as men
Id those altitudes and women
fe sometimes prevented by their
jkvn timidity from moving
Inward.
Jewish law is not as immutable
many insist that il is. It has
I'll changed and reinterpreted
|any times over the centuries, a
mi lusion the Orthodox reject.
To enable Jewish women to
a fuller religious life, the
binmunily must deal with many
Isues that loom large in modern
fculur life: changing family rela-
mships, changing economic
ml parental roles and similar
ituations.
Hoth men and women must en
tge their knowledge of Judaism
^fore the religious community
can be enriched to the full.
I The booklet noted that a per-
Istanl theme of the conclusion
las that of Kaddish, the mourn-
ft', prayer. Many of the partiti-
on s told of undergoing the
millul experience of seeing a 13-
l-ar-old boy being counted in the
linyan for a Kaddish while they,
prect mourners, were told they
not be counted because
y were women.
ires on Channel 2
i Israeli Labor Party Leader
himon Peres is featured guest
WPBT Channel 2's Israeli
try, Thursday, April 21, at 10
Im.
II lost-producer Stanley M.
usenblatt interviews Peres on
ation in Israel in this half-hour
ogram. Peres almost became
time minister of Israel in the
|981 elections, losing by one vote
Menachem Begin. He talks
bout the election process in Is-
el, the Camp David plan, the
Imposed Reagan peace plan and
lie Lebanon invasion.
AMSTERDAM (JTA) A
memorial center for the more
than 100,000 Jews deported by
the Nazis from Holland during
World War II will be opened offi-
cially by Queen Beatrix on April
12.
The center, sponsored by a pri-
vate, non-Jewish group, is at
Westerbork in northeast Hol-
land, the site of a transit camp
used as a staging area for Jews
on their way to death camps in
Eastern Europe.
The center will house a replica
of the Dutch Pavilion at the Au-
schwitz memorial in Poland. The
displays illustrate Jewish life in
Holland before World War II, the
persecution of Jews during the
German occupation and life at
Westerbork when it served as a
way station for Jewish depor-
tees. Only a handful of Jews who
left Westerbork survived.
Westerbork is in a remote cor-
ner of the province of Drenthe.
The camp was built by the Dutch
government in 1939 to house
German Jewish refugees whom
the Dutch did not want to inte-
grate into the country's economic
life. It was taken over by the
Germans in July 1942 and from
then until September 1944, a
tram left each Tuesday with
about 1,000 Jews for death camps
like Auschwitz and Sobibor.
The deportations ended in Sep-
tember 1944 only because no
more trains were available.
Westerbork was liberated by
Canadian troops on April 12,
1945. There were still 900 Jews
incarcerated at the time. The
official opening of the memorial
center will mark the 38th anni-
versary of the liberation.
Dutch Nazi collaborators were
imprisoned at Westerbork in the
early 1950s and for 20 years af-
terwards it housed South Moluc-
can refugees. The barracks have
since been demolished. There is
now an astronomical observatory
near the site of the camp.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
We want to give you three words of
wisdom: Old is Smart. We've seen it
all in our lifetimes marriages and
children, wars and depression. The best of times, and the worst.
When it came to pre-arranging our funerals, we wanted to be sure of ourselves.
Each of us wanted to know exactly where the money was going and what it
was paying for. We wanted to k-now that everything would be covered, and
that there would be no extra "incidental" costs. That meant funeral, grave,
clergy, newspapers everything. And we wanted to be able to get all our
money back if we ever needed it.
So, we looked at Riverside's Guardian. We all shopped around, and we found
that the first such guarantee in Florida every time, no matter what is at
Levitt-Weinstein. Period.
Every day, more and more of us are discovering the Levitt-Weinstein
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1 n
Page 20
I'ha la,,.h k-lnm'Hinn nnei Mhnfnrnf tirtater Hnllvuifinri
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April i5| 1B(,
OOMETO
ISRAEL NOW
AND WELL GIVE
TOTHE
THE J)AND
THEWsX*
FOR ONLY m
It's all yours. A wonderful vacation in ancient, mystical
Jerusalem or the sparkling Mediterranean city of Tel Aviv.
With hotel, car and round trip airfare included. If s El Al's
"Sunsation '83" tour package. And it's unbelievable for
only $829.
tou 11 board an El Al Jumbo Jet at JFK Airport in New
York and fly non-stop to Ben Gurion Airport. You may
choose to stay in the exciting 20th Century city of lei
Aviv in a luxurious hotel overlooking the sea. Or you may
want to go on to Jerusalemwhere first class accommo-
dations will make you feel like King Solomon. An Avis
Rent A Car will be yours for 5 full days so you can
leisurely drive to the places you've only read about in the
Bible. You'll love exploringfrom the Jordan valley to the
breathtaking heights of Masada.
One thing more. As a special bonus. El Al will give
everyone on our special "Sunsation "83" 6 Day/5 Night
tour a 20% discount voucher. You'll be able to use it on
your next roundtrip El Al flight from the USA to Israel -
anytime through May 31st. 1984. '
So call your Travel Agent or ring El Al and ask for the
sun. the moon and the stars. This April and May. you can
get them.
The Airline of Israel.
Prtc H per person based on double occupancy, effective April Kb to May 2Sth FM) One Avis
ui pei double room gas milcaf e and Insurance chaif.es not included Call U Al foe prKct for
deluxe accommodations children s fares and complete lour details ''
G3
$
car omme jorusauMT. hotel Jerusalem hMon
f
TELAVIVrMLTDn
1


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