The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00320

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
]Tewis]h. Floridlaim
____________and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
jme
13 Number 7
1 lolly wood. Florida Friday, April 1,1983
,rael did the world
favor In Lebanon. .'
A
f'tdSnochn
Price 35 Cents
^
.*a*p
IANNEL 4 ANCHORMAN Ralph Renick breaks up the crowd by saying he's just been
sinted to a journalists' committee to monitor dentists. Renick had been introduced by
itist David Sachs (right), who heads a committee that monitors news media. Also at the dias
(from left) Jack Bennan, CRC Mideast chairman; Jeffrey Rodack of .he Fort Lauderdale
vs-Sun Sentinel; and CRC Chairperson Mara Giolianti (partially hidden).
Inest intelligence force'
Renick lauds Israelis
'Sec. Weinberger
waging vendetta
against Israel'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) An official of the
American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) has
charged that Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger is
conducting a "vendetta against Israel" which has
resulted in what he termed "something just short of an
arms embargo." But only hours after the charge was
made, AIPAC dissociated itself from any personal at-
tacks made on Weinberger.
The official, Steven Rosen,
AIPAC director of research and
information, told a press con-
ference here for the Israeli and
Jewish media that while
President Reagan is considered
friendly toward Israel, Wein-
berger's dose relations with the
president has resulted in an
administration policy that has
"tilted" toward the Arabs and
against Israel.
AIPAC disowns
lone official
By STEVE KATON
Let me congratulate the Israelis .
have the finest intelligence force in
world, even better than the KGB
|ssia) they did the world a favor in
won." ~r~ ^fWditiM
|alph Renick, Channel 4 anchorman
has been around South Florida tele-
:>n news since its beginnings in the
spoke the above words last week
Ire Jewish Federation of South Brow-
Is Community Relations Committee
l.
lw> speaking was Jeffrey Rodack, South
curd editor for the Fort Lauderdale News-Sun
linel; Barbara Studley of radio station
|WS had been scheduled to be on the news
I >iit was hospitalized.
fcnick. who admits to being in Israel a total of
I two weeks (during the 1967 and 1973 wars
and last August), said Israel had every right to
cross its northern border "to quell the threat of
invasion."
He said the extent of the PLO and Syrian take-
over in Lebanon "was unbelievable. the guests
had become the masters, and were ruling the
country by aggression."
Introduced by David Sachs DDS, who chairs
the CRC group that monitors the media, Renick
opened his remarks with the quip that he (the
newscaster) heads a journalists' committee to
monitor dentists.
Renick said he was the "first goy" on the board
of directors of the Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens. He said
they called him "Mr. Resnick."
On a serious note, Renick, Channel 4 vice presi-
dent and director of news, chastised the Israelis
and especially the Begin administration for not
telling all the facts when instigating "Operation
Peace for Galilee."
Resnick said he believes the Israelis knew all
Continued on Page 19
Weinberger puts every set
by Israel "in the worst light," not
only in his mind but also in the
president's mind, Rosen charged
at the press conference which was
called to discuss AIPAC's new
pamphlet, "Israel and the U.S.
Air Force."
The pamphlet argues that
Israel, not any of the Arab
countries, is the best site for
American air bases, particularly
to provide refueling and main-
tenance of U.S. planes protecting
the Middle East and the Persian
Continued on Page 17
President: man
off many
talents
By DAVID LANDAU
1 JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Chaim Herzog, elected Is-
rael's sixth president,
comes to that office after a
long and varied career that
includes distinguished ser-
vice as a soldier, statesman,
lawyer, businessman and
philanthropist. As a public
Continued on Page 17
Chaim Herzog
i/s hospital saving lives, and souls
By GINNI WALSH
UJA Special Correspondent
Ezrat Nashim Psychiatric hos
in Israel, inaugurated in the '40s as
first such institution in the Middle
}, does not fit the image of a modern,
inking rehabilitation center. Yet,
Federation gifts at work
despite its unprepossessing size and its
lack of sophisticated equipment, the hos-
pital's | success in renewing the lives of
seemingly hopeless patients is world-
renowned.
\v\v\\v\ v"\ \~n.~\~\~S~'* \ N\>.\\v%\\v\'\,vn\
>i> Passover
By BEN SALTER
President, Jewish Federation
of Sooth Broward
In our celebration of Passover, we relive one of
lie greatest moments in the history of the Jewish
)ple.
As we sit at seder tables throughout South
Jroward, we reflect on the great drama of the
Exodus. We remember that the drama began with
trie individual, Moses, our teacher, in dialogue with
rod.
This reverence for the individual is paramount in
rur Jewish tradition. Our belief in the sacred worth of
ich individual and the sacred responsibility of
^ach individual continues to inspire our efforts as
Continued on Page 4
i That record has been achieved through the tire-
less efforts of a staff selflessly dedicated to a
unique patient clientele, including many long-
term psychiatric victims of the Holocaust.
]" Israel is unfortunately almost a laboratory for
rking on cures for the effects of persecution,"
s Dr. Haim Dasberg, Ezrat Nashim's medical
eclor and himself a Holocaust survivor. "But
don't and matt netapproach them as emo-
nal cripples. They're heroes, living examples of
wish history It's an honor to help them, not a
len."
ICalling on his associates. Avraham Vertar.
chief social worker; and Dr. Yehuda Oppenheim.
research director, he cites two examples. One, a
personal tragedy, softened The other, what may
be a total cure.
Hiya is the patient on the road to full recovery.
iterated from Auschwitz at 20, the sole surviv-
ing member of her entire family, she married a
man with a similar background. They had more to
survive together-internment as "illegal immi-
grants", in a Cyprus camp and the death of their
first baby as a result of the unspeakable condi-
tions there.
In Israel at last, they perservered against the
odds to build a good and prosperous life. They
had two healthy sons, both of whom served in the
1973 Yom Kippur War and returned home safely.
Then, just when her life seemed settled, serene,
past horrors overcome and a solid future ahead,
Hiya suffered a nervous breakdown.
"It's the kind of delayed reaction many people
have after great persecutions,'* observed Dr.
Continued on Page 4
]


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April l. 1933
It's a 'can do' partnership with S. Broward
Hod Hasharon welcomes Its new leaders
By MARILYN GRANT
Hod Haaharon Communicator
Our Project Renewal areas of
Gil Amal and Giora in the town
of Hod Hasharon have taken on a
new look. There is definite prog-
ress in these two very different
and isolated communities.
Reflecting this change is the
new term of people charged with
overall responsibility.
Hod Hasharon has a new
mayor, a new Project Renewal
director and a new assistant
director. Although we hope that
each of you will come to Hod
Hasharon to meet this new team,
wed like, in the interim, to intro-
duce you briefly to the people
who are helping Project Renewal
in Hod Hasharon become a
reality.
The new mayor, Yitzhak
Kedmi. has lived in Hod
Hasharon for 34 years. A practic-
ing attorney for 20 years, he was
born in Jerusalem. In 1943-44 he
was a runner for the Etzel (Irgun
Zvai laWal and helped dis-
tribute the underground news-
paper
But by the time of the War of
Independence in 1948, he had
ApRll
6, Wednesday
7, thupsoay
10, Sunday
12, tuesoay
14, thupsday
Holocaust Commemoration
sponsored by the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews, Broward Chapter, at Bailey
Hall, Broward Community
College, beginning at 8 p.m.;
call 739-6225.
Temple Solel's Independent
Singles and Senior Youth Group
meets at the temple, 5100
Sheridan St., Hollywood, at
7:30 p.m.; call 989-0205.
Membership Open House,
Temple Solel, at 7:30 p.m.
The 40th anniversary of the
Holocaust is to be
commemorated by the Robert K.
Franzblau Post & Auxiliary,
JWV, at Pines Recreation Center,
7600 Hollywood Blvd., at 8 p.m.
Speaker will be
Harry Topolsky Ph.D.
Business & Professional Women,
Jewish Federal ion of South
Broward, will hear Gene
Greenzweig, director of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Federation, 2719 Hollywood
Blvd.; call 921-8810.
Six-week book review program
begins at Temple-in-the-Pines,
9730 Stirling Road, at
7:30 p.m.; call 431-5100.
Your Community Calendar welcomes news of your Jewish
oriented organization. All meetings, times and their locations,
should be directed to Steve Katon, associate editor, at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar
information must be received at last two weeks before publication
date
uololi
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadassah today!
Your Will can continue Hadassah's achievements
m Israel for a better tomorrow
hadassah
MAIL TO HADASSAH MLLS BEOUESTS OEPT
SO *ttv Ml" S"t' He* yon N v iGO'9 .21?) 3SS 7900
*-i*s if* W .ntptmtli MOCAlM '> Sf" ft OtffmiWM m Prm*
Ni
MMM
Marilyn Grant
changed his political affiliation
and had joined the Labor Move-
ment and the Palmach (the elite
arm of the Haganah).
Kedmi is a happy man. mar-
ried, the father of four girls and
one boy. successful in his profes-
sion and a member of the town
council. Why did he accept the
difficult and often unrewarding
job of mayor? "1 want to be able
to give back some of the good
that I've received from my town
and my country," he said.
What are his hopes and plans?
"I want to bring new ideas to
our community without changing
our peaceful, rural atmosphere. I
want to help young people enter
the work force with careers that
will bring them satisfactory
status and good salaries. Courses
such as banking, computer
science and business should be
taught in our high schools.
Young couples should find our
town, and I mean all of our town,
a pleasant place in which to live.
For this we need affordable two
and three-room apartments."
What about Project Renewal?"
"What a blessing! If we had had
this wonderful partnership with
our Diaspora brethren at the be-
ginning of the state, things would
be very different today." Mayor
Kedmi is a pragmatic optimist.
Yes, there is a "gap" There are
real problems in the Gil Amal and
Giora neighborhoods. But good
things are happening and will
continue to do so.
Project Renewal and the part-
nership with South Broward and
Palm Beach County has given
the sense of "can do" to the
neighborhoods and to the town.
There is, indeed, a long way to
go. but we are. Kedmi feels, on
the right track.
Our new Project Renewal
director, Katriel Weil, has a real
American connection. Katri
married and the father of three
spent seven years in the Pitt^
burgh area where he earned his
degree in industiral engineering
and his MA in management
science and operations research.
During this period, he worked for
six years as a Hebrew teacher at
the B'nai Israel Conservative
Congregation.
This long exposure to oar
American communal system
gives him insights and under-
standing which most Israelis do
not possess. It has helped him
bring that understanding to the
people in the Giora and Gil Amal
neighborhoods. What brought
him to Project Renewal? After
returning to Israel; he worked in
systems management at IBM in i
Tel Aviv for three years, and then^!i
six years in the office of the
I DF's chief of planning.
Hadassah Solomon, new assis-
tant manager, is a practicing at-
torney who graduated from He-
brew University in Jerusalem in
1970 and who worked in her pro-
fession until she heard of Project
Renewal and saw the opportunity
to combine her administrative
skills with her strong love ot peo-
ple.
Born in Nahariva, Hadassah is
married and the mother of two
Continued on Page 17
PASSOVER goodies galore are in store for the Jewish folks confined to South Broward nursing
homes, convalescent homes, hospitals and correctional facilities, thanks to the generosity of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, area synagogues, the B'nai B'rith and individual donors.
The funds are administered through the Federation's Chaplaincy Service, which is under the
auspices of Rabbi Harold Richter. Chairman is Dr. Sam Meline. Volunteering their time and
energy, and shown here, are Meyer Pritzher, Joe Gordon, Tena and Ann Solomon, Pauline
Miner, Esther Fuller, Joseph Glassberg, Ida Lassoff, Lou Field, Leah Sugarman, Marvin
Carrel, Jack Green, Joe Roginsky, Molly Feinbcrg and Rabbi Richter.
Q
joyful
possover

SAVINGS A LOAN
WEST PALM BEACH Comer or M*ory Troil 6 Gun Club *d \k XS 03406 660-O4OO
BOCA KATON 9162 Grades fcd Boca Reran 30404 462-6290
SUNMSE 9001 W.OoMond Ph. Blvd.. Sunrise 30321 740-0201
HALLAMOALE 1110 E HoMondol* Beoch 6*vd Hoftondole 30009 436-4511
I
I


free
rage J
Chances for peace good, Kehillah women told
KEHILLAH organizers take a moment for posing. They are (from left) Lynda
Wilentz, reservations chairwomen; Beverly Hollander, hostess, and Chair-
women Jane Berman and Arlene Ray.
MEETING before the start of the Kehillah Champagne Brunch at the Emerald
Hills Country Club are (from left) Terry Greenberg, hostess; Arrangements
Chairwomen Gloria Burman and Fran Haakin, and Barbara Rosenberg,
hostess.


;.x-:-:v:.:-:v :::-:::-::::-::::-::::*::::::-:::-:-.-.,
WD packs Emerald Hills club

By STEVE KATON
"The chances for peace in the
k Middle East." Yitschak Ben-Gad
told the 180 women at the second
Kehillah Champagne Brunch,
"have never been better than at
this very minute."
"Many Arabs now believe"
lliccuuse so many military de-
feats have taught them), the
speaker said, that "the military
option (with Israel) is no longer
un option.
"We must not convince more
and more Arabs countries (there
are 22 all-tolled) to relinquish the
military option"
W:::W:W::$
Dr. Ben-Gad, deputy mayor of
Netanya, Israel, as a journalist in
1977 covered the first historic
peace conference with the Israeli
delegation in Cairo.
As he addressed the crowded
room of women, pledging a
minimum of $100 each to the
Women's Division, Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward's UJA-
Federation 1983 Campaign, the
speaker found a young, vibrant,
Zionist-oriented community in
South Broward. Many first-time
Federation activists attended
Kehillah.
He said he believes that nine
out of 10 Israelis know that with-
:::::::::::

Women's Division
offers '83-'84 slate!
The following is the proposed 1983-84 slate of officers and
board members for the Jewish Federation of South Broward
Women's Division.
Women's Division
1983-84 Officers:
Nancy Brizel, President
Evelyn Stieber, Campaign Vice President
Audrey Me line, Vice President of Community Education
Hannah Adel, In-Service Vice President
Susen Grossman, Leadership Development Vice President
Susan Sinner. Secretary
Beverly Shapiro, Nominating Committee Chairwoman
Nancy Atkin, Parliamentarian
1983-84 Board Members:
Sis Altman
Janie Berman
Frances Briefer
Helen Cohan
Edna Cohen
Ann (John
Barbara Desky
Meral Ehrenstein
Bertha Goldberg Pass
Mildred Friedman
Sandi Gelfand
Selma Gerslen
Mary Gottlieb
Brenda Greenman
Joan Gross
Fran Haskin
Gloria Hess
Sylvia Kalin
Jo Ann Katz
Khea Krieger
Bea Mogilowitz
Carol Morgenstein
Any petitions for additional nominations to this proposed
slate must be submitted to Nancy Brizel, president, no later
than April 15.
Gerry Morrison
Joyce Newman
Merle Orlove
Naomi Prever
Joan Katicoff
Arlene Kay
Jacki Keichbaum
Delia Rosenberg
Avis Sachs
Lee Schatzberg
Fannie Schif rin
Joanne Scboenbaum
DinaSedley
Doris Tolpen
Lynda Wilentz
LilaZedeck
Associate Board Members:
Mina Finkelstein
Edith Frost
Sally Winograd
Lilian Zeefe
out the support and dollars of the
Diaspora especially the United
States Israel could not exist.
He invited nearly everyone he
spoke to his home in Netanya.
Kehillah, which means commu-
nity in Hebrew, was the feeling
expressed during the day. As Dr.
Ben-Gad spoke, a unity was
evident, and it was evoked by the
question and-answer period
which followed.
The speaker reminded the
women that since 1948, a total of
10,000 Israeli soldiers have died
in war with the Arabs. Another
40,000 have been wounded or
crippled.
"We have only one way to
fight a war," he said, "win or die
on the spot. Our army does not
know the meaning of retreat."
At 35 years of age, the speaker
said, "we (Israel) must stop to
access how we look." Israel is not
alone, he reminded the women
meeting at the Emerald Hills
Country Club.
"We thank our brethren living
outside of Israel. especially in
the United States."
WOMEN'S DIVISION President Nancy Brizel (left) and Vice
President Evelyn Stieber chat with guest speaker Yischak Ben-
Gad last week just before the Kehillah function got under way.
Marion Salter
r
&Ya.ft*i
Post Haste Shopping Center
4S25 Sheridan St.. Hollywood, Fla.
Phone 961 6998 ______
Personal Service Book Store
ZJhey who go feel not
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those vebo stay behind
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April 1,1983
Jewish Floridian
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FB60SMOCMET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
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Putonnad Bi % Second Cum Postage pa.d ai HaHandaic Fia USPS 8*4000
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Btod Suit TO'G Hallandaie. FK 33009 Pnonr 4MV4e
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Mam OMica ft Flam 120 NE Sin St. Mum. FK 33132 Pnonr I 3/J aMS
Pulinlir Fti 1 f JatlaH UK, Q. Sl-awx FU 11B1
Jan Fadaration o South Bnmart Otflcara: PraaWaM. Ban SaNar. Vlca Pntaxtanta. pn.i.p A
Lawi MO. Saul SMoat MO. and Nat Sedley Iraaaocar, Thaodora Nawman. SacnMary. Olio
Stiaoar. Ejiaculrve Otractor. Sunw G. Kaya SuOmit maMnal toe publication io Leahe S>la
Public Ratal bM Otnjclor.
Miwam JTA. W~* Am WHS NEA. AJFA. and EPA
_ < '""'< iiiapnt.iili i Kaahnmial Mirrmin Xiilina.
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Fa^tonMaaaait.,at,..id. t7l>lla|aaaalft..a^ llili !!'. Fla .WMIFtoamn
18NISAN6743
Number 7
Our moderate Saudi allies
Friday. April 1.1963
Volume 13
4 survivor's lament:
To my parents with all my love
Your body like coal
For the furnace was used,
To heat up the touts of pagan*.
The German sadism and lust
Not even ashes or bones were left
Only pieces of soap other bodies to cleanse.
How frightful to think of those horrible years
When paganism returned and laughter became tears.
The ones whose families lost
Paid the highest of a price
But even "men" of apathy
Have given a slice
Because now all those "men"
Who still are alive
Have to live if they can
An with guilt to survive.
Why did no one say
"How long can it last" t
Or did they believe
That there is no past?
Now as we all look
At those years gone by
We shudder at the thought
We even sometimes do cry
Why is humanity
So thoughtless without compassion?
It it really always the other guy
When death takes possession?
Do you really think
With God you have a pact ?
That never to you
Can happen so terrible an act
How many people were there before
That thought the same way
That think of those acts
That you do abhor
Yet so few protested.
Inhumane condition
And no one arrested
But all in submission
To the cruelty of power
Of a state of barbarians
Where all meant so little
Life of the Jews and even the Aryans
Wake up little people
None of you is big
Not even Adolph Hitler.
When he did the "jig"
Thought that his power
Will come to an end
So think of humanity
And do what you can
Time doesn't run out
But life surely will.
When I think of past years
They give me a chill. .
CR-1983
Salter on Passover
Continued from Page 1.
communal leaders.
This year, economic hardship threatens the
dignity of countless Jewish individuals. In Israel the
staggering burden of national defense has meant a
diminution of vital human services to children, to
the aged, to the needy, to immigrants.
Elsewhere across the globe, pressures mount
against the Jewish people. Anatoly Shcharansky
symbol of a modern Jewish exodus continues to
pit his individual human courage against the cruelty
of the Soviet Union.
Anti-Semitism in Europe has shown an alarming
growth, taking with it precious Jewish lives. In
Ethiopia, South America, the Arab lands, Jews look
to us to help maintain their courage.
Our accomplishments in the past year have been
great. But so long as Jewish individuals in any place
in the world suffer degradation, hopelessness or fear,
our task is not fulfilled.
As Jewish leaders in the tradition of Moses, we
must continue strugglingtoroake our people free.
EVERYONE from the sanc-
timonious Caspar Weinberger to
the Bible-thumping bore, Jimmy
Carter, is lecturing the universe
these days about evil Israel.
Weinberger has been trying to
start a war with the Israelis ever
since he blew into a John Wayne
spectacular the confrontation be-
tween a lone Marine Corps officer
and a lone Israeli tank com-
mander somewhere in the jungle
of Beirut.
Carter, for his part, is trying to
give meaning to his life by reliv-
ing the Camp David era of 1978-
79, and he is playing the role of
Jehovah by lecturing the errant
children of Israel for straying
from the Word as he now says he
enunciated it then.
ON THE other hand, what
with all of this revisionism going
on. there are the moderate
Saudis, to whom the Washington
duplicity corps nightly prays
that they will not reduce their oil
production from nine to five mil-
lion barrels daily. We know of
their moderation because the
Saudis offered their own
moderate Middle East peace plan
a couple of years back in the form
of the moderate Fahd pronun-
ciamento, which would have re-
turned Israel to its 1948 profile,
give an inch or two of boundary
line here or there.
Talk about moderation. Still,
that is how the lecturers and the
preachers about the sins of Israel
view the Saudis these days.
But just how moderate are
they in reality? To keep the
Saudis on their loving course of
us. President Reagan last year
engineered our AW ACS sale to
them an arrangement that for
the first time encouraged frank
anti-Semitic rancor on Capitol
Hill and elsewhere across the
nation sparked by an Adminis-
tration campaign demanding a
choice between "Reagan and
Begin."
HAVING WON the AWACS
and created a poisonous anti-
Jewish atmosphere here into the
bargain, the Saudis have since
expressed their gratitude by
systematically thwarting U.S.
policy abroad. For example,
Saudi Arabia took the lead in
isolating Egypt following the
Camp David accord and has kept
it up since then, thus contribut-
ing handily to a weakening of the
Camp David spirit in general.
The Saudis have also:
Encouraged Syria's rejec-
tion ism and Jordanian hesitancy
to enter into peace negotiations;
Effectively blocked the es-
tablishment of peace between Is-
rael and Lebanon and even
managed to make a travesty of
the most basic efforts at nor-
malization between those two
countries even though a de facto
sense of normalization has
existed for sometime now, a sense
preceding the start of the June,
1982 war.
ONE WOULD think that,
from these things alone, there
would have been a reevaluation of
feeling toward the Saudis by
Reagan Administration officials
who are so fond of reevaluating
U.S.-Israeli relations at the drop
of a hat.
But no. that is not in the same
hall park with the Saudis at all.
For their intransigence, we have
punished the Saudis this way:
The U.S. reconfirmed its sale to
Riyadh of a fleet of F15 fighter
jets. And, of course, of the
AWACS. Sales that all of the
Reagan men assured us would
guarantee the Saudis' friendship
and cooperation with the U.S. in
the first place, but that never
have. Nor will they.
In all their bravado. Adminis-
tration spokesmen reject such
conclusions as these out-of hand.
Their main argument is that,
compared to other Arab entities,
say Libya and South Yemen, the
Saudis are in fact moderate by
comparison.
But this hardly erases the
divisive Saudi role in Lebanon,
where the U.S. has been com-
mitted to the withdrawal of all
foreign forces, the security of Is-
rael's northern border, and the
rehabilitation of the Lebanese.
SIMPLY PUT, the Saudis
threaten the liehanoae that if
they come to an accommodation
with Israel, the Saudi penalty
will be a reneging on their offer to
provide financial assistance for
the reconstruction of the Leba-
nese economy. The estimated
coat of that contribution is some
810 billion.
One Lebanese negotiator put it
frankly in a statement published
in the New York Times last Jan.
23: "The Saudis have told us ex-
plicitly that we can give Israel
whatever is necessary on the
security issue, and they will sup
port us. But when it comes to
normalization, 'Wait for the
train,' they say. 'We must all deal
with Israel together. Don't be
another Sadat.' "
Indeed, the Saudis have gone
to the extent of threatening to
cut off all aid to Lebanon if the
Lebanese agree even to normal
commercial relations with the Is-
raelis, according to Lois Got tea-
man, a research analyst in the
Middle East Division of the
American Jewish Committee.
AS FOR the Saudi connection
to Svria's apparent refusal to
withdraw its forces from Leba-
non, there seems to be no pres-
sure from Riyadh on Damascus
in that regard at the same time
that Saudi financial support of
Syria grows in staggering
proportion as a reward for drag-
ging its heels.
So far as the Saudis are con-
cerned, whatever Uncle Sam
would like to achieve in the cause
of peace in the Middle East, to
tmII with him. If these examples
of Saudi intransigence are not
enough, then examine President
Reagan's piece initiative. The
State Department offered it on
Sept. 1. 1982 with the under-
standing that both the Saudis
and Jordan, moderates all, would
Imck the plan a plan they had
been consulted with in the first
place and which it seemed a fore-
gone conclusion they would
accept.
After all. the Reagan plan calls.
for Israel's withdrawal from most
of the territories occupied in the
19f>7 war; there would be a freeze
on settlements on the West Bank
and in Gaza: and. in return, the
Arabs would have to accept the
reality of Israel.
IN ESSENCE, this means that
Continued on Page 12
UJA-Federation dollars at work
Continued from Page 1
Dasberg. "Hiya and her husband were incredibly
strong people who worked long and hard to build
new lives and succeeded. But there was a deep
emotional price. Hiya's collapse was a re-enact
.nent of all the depressions she should have had in
her life but kept repressing."
Ezrat Nashim's staff set out to heal those emo-
tional wounds in its own characteristic way. Aa
chief social worker, Verter says: "We think about
discharge from the day of admittance. For some,
it's a long and rocky road. But to see someone re-
turn to a full life after leaving the hospital's care
that's worth all the time, all the effort, ail the
money."
For Hiya, Verter is certain that day will come
soon. After 10 years of residential and outpatient
treatment, she is only months away from living
completely on her own again thanks to the
supporting, rehabilitative approach of the hos-
pital's staff and to the use of new and beneficial
medications, some of them developed in Ezrat
Nashim's own laboratory.
Simple and no larger than an average apart-
ment, that laboratory has an international re-
putation. Its research focuses on the psycho-
biological causes of mental illness and the de-
velopment of drugs to assist in cures. An ambi-
tious new research program, currently unfunded,
will seek effective treatment for Alzheimer's
Disease, a degenerative brain condition causing
severe and premature senility in people as young
as 45.
Dr. Oppenheim, who will head the program, ex-
plains its importance:
"Nobody knows why brain cells die premature-
ly. With the aging population in Israel and in
America and throughout the world increasing
so rapidly, this research could contribute towards
preventing a major worldwide public health prob-
lem."
It is still, however, in individual ca/e.and jye-,.
MMMuu auui-.vies uiai r./.rai iiasnimexcels. Hiya
will soon come to terms with her haunting past
and live fully "on the outside."
Yacov. however, will never be that fortunate.
The trauma of his concentration camp experience
runs too deep and was left unattended for too
many years after his arrival in Israel from Poland
in 1948. Progress for him is measured at a dif-
ferent tempo.
"When Yacov first came to us." Verter recalls,
"he couldn't do anything or become interested to"'
anything. He didn't respond to anyone. He
couldn't even sit still."
The long, patient, intensive process required
for Yacovs social retraining revealed the strength
of the Ezrat Nashim staff. "We worked with him
step by step," says V,ter, "slowly building his
confidence as we introduced him to other people,
the activities, the social clubs. When it was too
much for him. we iet him pull back but not for
long. Two steps ahead, one back.
"Today he goes to the music club and cooking
classes. He talks to the other patients and hrt
very concerned about keeping track of the
calendar. He loves the holidays and everybody
enjoys observing them with him."
One Holocaust victim's life restored, another's
eased. Hope for a global breakthrough cure. Cur-
rent and projected achievements that sustain Dr.
Dasberg and his Ezrat Nashim associates in their
work of rehabilitation .
As he ushers his visitor out of the hospital,
whose programs are partially supported in 1983
through the United Jewish Appeal's Israel Spe-
cial Fund, he searches for a way of summing up.
"We have all the skill, experience and knowl-
edge we need." he says, "and faith that the fund-
ing will be available so that we can continue to
apply them successfully to our job."
When asked, he characterizes that job in two
words: Life-saving," he replies. "And soul-sav-
\\Wv.\V.VJJU*WA\\^aaiV-V.V.'.'.-'


Friday, April 1,1963
The Jewish Ploridian and Shofar of Greater Holl.
lywood
Page 5
4
Technion laboratory pioneering robotics in Israel
By SHEILA EVAN-TOV
HAIFA Your picture of a
robot may be pure Star Wan, but
reality is different. Cosmetically
and functionally, today's robots
contrast the silver-bodied an-
droids that are the darlings of
science fiction.
Resembling an oversized
dentist's drill, the Unimatic robot
arm, for example, stands unpre-
tentiously in a corner of the
Robotics Laboratory at the Tech-
nion-Israel Institute of Technol-
ogy in Haifa.
But despite its humble appear-
ance, Unimatic represents a
breakthrough in the way future
industry will manufacturesprod-
ucts. Able to "handle" fragile
items that are as thin as half the
diameter of a human hair, Tech-
nion's robot gripper is a signifi-
cant milestone in the brave new
world of automatic assembly-line
manufacturing.
Robotics is an ideal industry
for Israel. The country possesses
un abundance of engineers and
scientists to bring Israel the
high-technology enjoyed by other
post-industrial nations.
What Israel lacks, however, is
the necessary unskilled labor
needed to perform the routine
and toilsome tasks in factories
and fields the kind of work
rolmts do so effectively and effi-
ciently. Not only will industrial
robots boost productivity, but
robot technology can be exported
robotics. Graduates go on to
assist private industry and kib-
butz-owned enterprises on
robotic projects.
AU the industrial robots on the
drawing boards for Israeli indus-
try have their genesis at Tech-
nion. These include a device that
assembles 20 components into a
stovetop range, a "robot doctor"
that diagnoses other robots' ills
and instructs a technician how to
cure them and a "sighted" robot
that picks fruit.
Technion's robotic experts
have focused their ingenuity on
the development of robots for
small-scale manufacturing and
production, rather than compete
with the giant robot-makers of
Japan and West Germany which
have had a 10-year jump on Isra-
el.
"Our strength is in the labora-
tory," explains Professor Yoram
Koren, senior lecturer at Tech-
nion's faculty of Mechanical En-
gineering and head of the Robotic
Laboratory.
Research at the Robotic Lab-
oratory emphasizes computer-
like programs which translate
into improved control for robotic
arms, and new designs for
sensors endowing robots with the
ability to see, feel and even hear.
It is innovation in this area of
sensory, or "smart robots," that
enables the Unimatic robot grip-
per to manipulate delicate, easily
crushed parts with greater sensi-
. tivity than ever before possible.
Eventually, says Koren,
oranges and avocadoes grown in
Israel will be picked and
packaged by mechanical hands.
Completely automatic factories
will design and manufacture pro-
ducts by computer.
"All phases of production, as-
sembly and testing will be robot-
operated." predicts Koren, "with
a minimum of human interven-
tion."
ROBOT WITH A LIGHT TOUCH The innovative robot
"gripper" developed at Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology enables industrial robots to handle delicate
objects that human hands would crush.
as a major source of revenue for
Israel.
The Robotics Laboratory at
the Technion here is the source of
Israel's robotic industry. Tech-
nion introduced robots to Israel
four years atco when the Robotics
Laboratory opened its doors with
an $80,000 grant from the coun-
try's Ministry of Commerce and
Industry.
It is still the only institute in
Israel providing course work in
Cantonal Position Available
Adult Conservative Congregation in South
Palm Beach County is seeking a full time Can-
tor.
Please send resume or call
Joseph E. Steinberg
14555 Springside Lane
Delray Beach, Fl. 33445
(305)498-1014
First Jewish High School dinner May 1
The Jewish High School of
South Florida is planning its first
dinner, to be held May 1 at
Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach.
The dinner committee is being
headed by Harry Hap" Levy
and Alfred Golden, according to
Richard Levy, president of the
school, who also announced the
rest of the committee:
Mrs. Miles (Robertal Kuttler,
Mrs. Herbert (Ellie) Katz, who is
SHOWTIME A two-hour
evening of entertainment
featuring Russian songstress
Aida Weiss, who sings in six
languages, and comedian Hy
Kipnis is being planned by
the men's club of Hallandale
Jewish Center and the Jew-
ish Community Centers of
South Broward. The event is
set for Wednesday, April 13,
beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the
Jewish center, 416 NE 8
Ave. Tickets can be obtained
bv calling 921-6511 or 454-
9100.
vice president of the school, and
Mrs. Myron (Charlotte) Brodie.
The Jewish High School of
South Florida was established
through a grant by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation in co-
operation with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward and
the Fort Lauderdale Federation.
It is the only high school in
North America sponsored by
Women's American ORT and
American ORT Federation.
Position Available
Temple Beth Shalom, a large Conservative Congregation
in Century Village. Boca Raton. Florida, seeks a Rabbi
available starting with the High Holidays, Compensation
will include a furnished apartment, within walking
distance of the Temple.
Submit resume to:
President-Temple Beth Shalom
P.O. Box 340015
Boca Raton, Fla. 33434
STATE OF
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Tor many medical
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the actual fee and
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It includes private
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hospital.
It includes doctor's
office and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
a hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
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'Tor members age 65 and
over. Pre-existing condUiorM
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Tor B'nat B'rith members only.
We enroll new members
B'nai B'rith's
Group Insurance .|||fe
Underwritten by JH|252
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BERNHARD G. KALTMAN
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Pe6
The Jewish Ploridian and, Shafar of Greater HoUyxvood
Friday, April 1.1983
Dealing with hidden feelings
helps unite family of four
Mr. and Mrs. R have been
married 15 years and have two
children, John, 8, and Amy, 4.
The R's came to Jewish Family
Service (JFS) six months ago
complaining of John's hostile and
obnoxious behavior. He was bel-
ligerent at home, fought over
everything from doing homework
to getting dressed and always
had to have the last word in an
argument.
The school did not complain
about John, but school work was
a constant topic of bitter battles
in the R. household. Both the R.'s
had high standards for John who
they felt could succeed where Mr.
R., a construction foreman, had
failed.
Mr. II never liked school and
had left in the 10th grade. The
R's had struggled financially for
many years, which left Mrs. R.
bitter and angry at her husband.
Mr. R. also kept his feelings hid-
den and believed that showing
affection to his wife and children
was not "manly."
He fait his wife paid too much
attention to John and that he was
outside of the family, hia only
function being that of a financial
support.
Through counseling, the R's
were encouraged to explore their
feeling about and expectations of
Telephone: 946-9066, Hours -
Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 8600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399. Fort Lsu
derdsle. 33319. Telephone 736-
3394. Hours Monday. Wed-
nesday and Friday 9a.m. tot
p.m. Tuesday and Thursday
9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Sarvke u ,
bsasfldry agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale. the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
knaidlach with G. Washington's"
Seasoning and Broth.
each other. Lines of communica-
tion were opened between them
and they gradually began to vent
and work through anger, frustra-
tion and anxiety which had been
building up between them for
years.
Mrs. R. learned to relax her
rigid, too high standards for her-
self, her husband and John. Mr.
R. learned to examine his feelings
and use them in dealing with his
family. He was able to 1st go of
his ''macho" stance and show af-
fection to his wife and chBdreu.
As the R's hersme more open
with each other, they were able to
take their attention off John.
They learned to act together in
setting house rules and delivering
appropriate punishments. Since
Jewish family unit
making a comeback
PHOENIX, Ariz. (JTA) -
Though less than half of Ameri-
can Jewish families are intact
today as a unit, young Jewish
adults are reverting to traditional
family structures, according to
Jewish sociologist Yehuda Ros-
enman.
Rosenman. national director of
the American Jewish Commit
tee's Jewish Family Center in
New York City, said despite the
alarming breakdown of the Am-
erican Jewish family in the last
15 years, the crisis is turning
around. "At the moment, we
(American Jews) are not doing
very well." he said. "But there is
light ahead of a short tunnel, not
a long one."
Rosenman s team recently in-
terviewed 1.200 American Jewish
college students at 14 campuses
nationwide. "Ninety-two percent
of those interviewed definitely
planned to get married and de-
finitely planned to have chil-
dren." Rosenman said. "Many
were absolutely opposed to
having one child."
Rosenman blamed much of the
breakdown of the Jewish family
on outside influences. "First,
economic, education and emo-
tional independence and maturity
of women.
Second, the continued diminu-
tion of Jewish law and values on
individual Jews. Third, the
impact of the sexual revolution,
of new values placing the em-
phasis on the individual's happi-
ness, pleasure and fulfillment."
Rut the same influence are
causing a return to Judaism.
Rosenman said. After a short
odyssey into the 'me' experience,
lots of kids are finding them-
selves feeling empty, alienated,
lonely and purposeless." he said.
Rosenman said synagogues
and Jewish organizations have to
stop molding their membership
and services for couples. "We
have to start thinking about peo-
ple." he said.
Rosenman s study shows that
unaffiiiated young Jews return to
Judaism through the opportunity
for study and practical experi-
ence with tradition
"In the past." he said, "most
Jewish institutions believed the
only way to attract young people
was through social activities .
parties, dances and outings."
He added: "No more. We have
to start building substantive ed-
ucational programs with original
texts, where people can work
through their tradition.
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the R's were now openly dealing
with their marital problems, John
was no longer used as a scape-
goat.
Mrs. R stopped pushing him
to get straight As in school, and
Mr. R. could now give his son the
time and attention he sorely
needed from his father.
The R's are still in therapy,
solidifying the gains they have
made. But the future looks bright
for the entire family. _,.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service of
Broward County. 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd.. Hollywood. 33021.
L~*~
fog
Mr*
for an extra special seder,
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^ Ot
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Is Hospitality.
Lox n bagels 'n cream cheese a al-
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Jcwtsh household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House* Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House*
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"


"Friday. April 1.1988
Actor Mite hum apologizes for playing bigot
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
Actor Robert Mitchum says he
got himself into trouble as a re-
sult of an interview in last
month's Esquire magazine be-
cause he was play-acting in "a
prankish attempt" to "string
along" his interviewer. Mitchum,
in a lengthy interviews, emerged
as an anti-Semite, racist and sex-
ist bigot.
In a letter to Herbert Luft, a
Jewish Telegrahpic Agency
columnist, Mitchum said he is
"sorry" about the "misunder-
standing" especially "since it is
so foreign to my principle."
Mite hum's statements caused
a stir in the Jewish community
and received rave reviews from
bigots. In an effort to find out if
the actor was quoted correctly,
Luft wrote to Mitchum asking
him to clarify the circumstances
of the interview and to explain
some of the statements attri-
buted to him.
Mitchum said that "under
pressure" from "a young lady
employed as a publicist by my
employers" he "reluctantly
agreed" to the interview. What
followed, as presented in Esquire
by the interviewer, Barry Reh-
feld, amounted to a denial that
the Holocaust had taken place,
and a series slurs and expletives
regarding women, blacks and the
Irish.
When Mitchum was aked
about the slaughter of 6 million
Jews, the actor replied, "So the
Jews say." He added, "I don't
know. People dispute that."
After a series of questions and
answers, Mitchum was quoted as
offering the following statement:
"Ilow do you say trust me in
Jewish? Fyou."
Later in the interview, Mit-
chum spoke about how, growing
up in Philadelphia, "I had to go
over and light the sabbath
candles. I was the only god-
damned gentile I'd go to Mel
niumhcrg's house. He had a
rabbi uncle who'd read from the
Old Testament about angels
pissing on sinners who were
climbing Jacob's ladder."
In his letter to Luft, Mitchum
said that early in his meeting
with Rehfeld he recited a racist
speech delivered by Coach
Delaney In Jason Miller's "That
Championship Season," in which
he appeared, which Rehfeld
"mistakenly believed to be my
own. From that point on, he ap-
proached me as the character in
the script and in playing the
devil's advocate in a prankish at-
CTUDIO
tempt to string him along we
compounded a tragedy of errors.''
Mitchum added that he is
"truly sorry that this misunder-
standing has upset so many peo-
ple, especially since it is so for-
U^
II" '"1111111111"
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CREDIT CARDS
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2340 SW 32 AVE.
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elotad Monday*
atass
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iu*
eign to my principle. The at-'
tendant misfortune is that it has
brought me a spate of mail from
people and organizations who are
encouraged to believe that I
share their bigotry and dis-
crimination.''
Ironically, the interview ap-
peared at the same time he was
starring in the ABC-TV series.
"The Winds of War," in which he
portrayed a U.S. official in
Europe sympathetic to the plight
of the Jewish peoDle in fascist
Italy and Nazi Germany. A
month earlier, in January,
Mitchum was an honored guest
at a dinner of the American
Friends of Technion at which
Kirk Douglas was given an
award.

If Sam Breakstone hadnt been so
me shugga h about bis sour cream
and cottage cheese in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today.
100 years ago, Sam Breakstone had a reputation for being a demanding man.
A very demanding man.
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His sour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natural, and as delicious as they could possibly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, his sour cream and cottage cheese
tastes so delicious now.
Right now, you can demand !0< off both Breakstone's sour cream and cottage
cheese by redeeming these coupons.
KOSHER FDR PASSOVER.
99E222 OOEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the lace value of this
coupon plus It handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S COTTAGE CHEESE
1(K
i
or where taxed, prohibited, or
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Cash value l/20c Customer must
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Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
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provided you redeemed it on your
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SAVE If* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S SOUR CREAM.
CKr*Mn7"i9eT
10C
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20C. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft. Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton, Iowa 52734.
Uama/31/S3
14300 5EEb3b
w-^f*u*j,9kam HaW
MJt*AslMW.
WHB>


Pag.-8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 1.1983
VS. Holocaust Museum wins
home in two D.C. buildings
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Two large vacant buildings have
been allocated by the federal gov-
ernment for a multi-million dollar
national Holocaust museum to be
built with private funds.
Observers said the decision to
place the memorial museum so
prominently, plus its size and the
official status provided by its
congressional mandate, repre-
sented an unusual American
commitment to remember one of
GOLDEN BAY TOWERS last week pud tribute to Jerome
Gevirman at the United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of
South Broward 1983 Campaign breakfast. Presenting the
plaque to the honoree is Dr. Louis Finkelstein (left). Gevirman
and his wife. Rose, have been Golden Bay residents for 14
years, and in that time has devoted many, many hours to UJA
and Federation.
TbQROHl
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go tor Zooroni iwo by two1 Kids think Zoofoni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamm-
ennched pasta simmered in lots ot yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it. too'

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history's darkest periods.
The only other memorial on
this scale, observers pointed out,
is Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, an independent agency
created by Congress in 1960 to
raise private funds to build the
museum, said "our hope is to
create a living museum" to keep
the past alive "for the sake of
future generations." He said
completion is scheduled for mid-
1987.
Wiesel said transfer of the
buildings to the memorial council
will be announced officially at the
Gathering of American Holo-
caust Survivors here, April 11-14.
He said the memorial council will
announce a $75 million national
drive to build the museum and
fund the museum's programs.
The council has an $820,000
federally-funded budget this year
and has asked for $1,953,000 for
next year.
Micah Naftalin, the council's
senior deputy director, said the
budget increase is needed to pay
the expanding number of design,
engineering, computer and other
consultant needed to plan the
museum.
Mark Talisman, memorial
council vice chairman, said that
the museum would have "much
broader" dimensions than being
"a Jewish museum," referring to
the millions of others, in addition
to the six million Jews, murdered
by the Nazis. But he said that
any Holocaust museum must
always have a special meaning
for Jews.
Naftalin said "there will be an
emphasis on the role of the liber-
ators" as well as exhibits noting
groups other than Jews who died
in the Nazi death camps.
The Commission on the Holo-
caust, appointed by then Presi-
dent Carter, recommended a me-
morial building in Washington.
Wiesel was chairman of the com-
mission, as well as of the memori-
al council which Congress and the
Reagan administration later
created to implement the recom-
mendations of the commission.
Officials said the memorial
museum will include exhibits to
evoke the horror of the Holo-
caust, and education program for
young people, and possibly a
computer system to store
documents and names of Holo-
caust victims.
NATIONAL COUNCIL of
Survivors, a subcommittee
of the U.S. Holocaust Me-
morial Council, has ap-
pointed Carl Rosenkopf of
Hallandale as a member.
Rosenkopf, president of the
David Ben-Gurion Culture
Club which is composed of
Holocaust survivors pri-
marily living in South Brow-
ard, is to attend the Ameri-
can Gathering of Holocaust
Survivors April 11-14 hi
Washington. An entourage
of some 75 survivors, from
South Broward is to attend,
Rosenkopf says.
Hotel
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751
Telephone: (914) 794-6900
Direct N.Y.C. Phone: (2121924-6162
GIBBER
Surrounded by our 400 private acres,
in the beautiful Catskills.
3 Meals DailyStrictly KosherAII Diels Catered to
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Music and Entertainment DailyPlanned Activities
All Rooms Air Conditioned'TV's'Caoacity 450 Guesti
Make "Gibbers" Your Summer Vacation Home,
You'll Lpve Us. The Gibber Family
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FREE copy of Holiday Inns" large booklet containing dozens ot
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Dinner Th*ataraSuppsr Cluba*Cruiaaa*Epcot Tourfiuumi
Narrated Tours Wholesale Bus Prtcss
!!!AND MUCH MUCH MORE!!!
Mall this coupon or call person-to-parson collect to the "Package
Plan Manager" at (305) 655-8800.
The Information You Want Will
NO COST
Your: Name_________________
Be Mailed To You
NO OBLIGATION
Address_
Phone.
Club Name.
Call or Mail To: Holiday Inn, 100 Datura Street at
Flagler Dr., W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33401 (305) 655-8800
CALL OR WRITE DO NOT DELAY
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Travel Tours Int'l
ISRAEL RIGHT NOW!
DADE 9440411
Broward 584-9664
Palm Beach 736-2466
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Independence Day In Israel 20 Days Super Deluxe 5 Star Apr. 13/83
15 DAYS Deluxe 5 Star R/T airfare from Miami 2 meals daily, touring May 2/83
15 DAYS Deluxe 5 Star sponsored by Aviva Hadassah & A.R.M.D.I. May 23-June 6/83.
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4485 Stirling Road
Ft. Lauderdale. Fla 33314
Dade 914-0411
Broward 584 9664
Palm Beach 736 2466


Friday. April 1. 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
F'age 9
SINCE 1962
NEED A FUND RAISER?
Raise Thousands Fast and Effortlessly
No Risk No Cost
Entertainment 83
Call 4937900
TIFFANY INTERIORS
5201 Grant Street
Hollywood, Fl
Broward
962-6118
620-9020
Dade
Happy Passover
MEADOWBROOK residents honored Debby and Aaron Smilow (center) at the 1983 United
Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of South Broward Campaign breakfast. With the Smilows
are Federation activists Paul Felbain and Chairman Jack Mintz (left).
Jcc
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HCH.LYWOOO BLVD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Hebrew
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., is offering
a new course, "Sholem Alei-
chem" an easy way for adults
to learn Hebrew to participate in
services.
The course will be on Thursday
mornings, 9:30-11:30, for six
weeks starting April 7.
It will be taught by Esther
Gordon. Call Dene for informa-
tion and registration at 921-6511.
JaMaf
Be a winner! Join the JCC of
South Broward for an afternoon
at Dania Jai-Alai on Friday,
April 8.
The afternoon includes a
luncheon of stuffed boneless
breast of chicken, a reserved
center orchestra seat, matinee
program and all taxes and gra-
tuities. Luncheon will be served
at 11:45 a.m. Cost for the after-
noon will be $10. For reservations
call Dene at 921-6511.
Cancan
The JCC of South Broward is
planning a Cancun holiday in
DO YOU REMEMBER THE
BEAUTIFUL CATSKILL MOUNTAINS
IN THE SUMMER? ESCAPE THE
FLORIDA HEAT AND COME ON UP!
THE WORLD FAMOUS CONCORD RESORT HOTEL
OFFERS YOU A SPECIAL SUMMER
COME ON UP PACKAGE
H083
per person, dbl. occ, standard
room, air (are not included.
D
2Weeks ^
15 Days and 14 Nights
Round trip transport from
La Guardia to Hotel
Concord representative will
meet you and handle your
luggage and transfers
Gratuities for waiter and maids
during your stay
Local and State Taxes
14 Breakfasts
14 Lunches
14 Dinners
Special diets available
2 Cocktail Parties
Welcome drink upon arrival
Superior Room$7,233.
Executive Room$1,323.
Tower Room$1,4 73.
ADDITIONAL WEEK
Standard Room-$520
Superior Room$595.
Executive Room$640.
Tower Room$715.
u Full time Fitness Director
D Speakers, Social Programs
and Daily Fun Activities
D Entertainment every night
a Dancing to 3 orchestras
D Monticello Raceway Nearby
D Free 9 hole golf, tennis (indoor
& out), Health Club, Indoor and
Outdoor Pool
11 Relatives and friends can visit
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
to call us direct Toll Free 800-431-3850, or contact Helen and
Norm Levin in Florida at 305-485-8861 (They will also assist
you in making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Agent
ONLY AT THE
CONCORDE
Kiamesha Lake, NY 12751 \^/
Mexico for Memorial Day week-
end, May 25-29. The trip will in-
clude a five-day, four-night stay
at the deluxe Sheridan Cancun
Hotel, transfers from airport to
hotel, yacht cruise, day tour to
Tulum-Xel-Ha, Mayan Ruins and
Natural Aquarium; taxes and
tips. Cost will be less than $300
per person. If interested, call
Dene at 921-6511
Seder
The Senior Adults Department
of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward's annual
Passover Seder, Sunday, March
27, was conducted by Elaine
Goldstein. Ms. Goldstein was
formerly a recreation coordinator
in the Senior Adults program and
has been involved in Judaic
teaching in the South Broward
community for many years. She
is employed by Area Agency on
Aging in Dade County as a plan-
ner.
We Wish AU Our Friends
A Happy Passover
Dr. Stanley and Karen
Margulies
Robin Margulies
ISRAEL
RIGHT NOW!
Independence Day In Israel 20 Days Super Deluxe 5 Star 4/13/83
15 DAYS Deluxe 5 Star R/T airfare from Miami 2 meals dally. Full
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Oct. 10-24, Nov. 7-21.
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dade 944-0411 brow 584-9664 pbch736-2466
It's time for
happiness, good food
and Sorrento.
Sorrento wishes all
our friends a happy,
healthy passover holi-
day. It's a time for the
joy of family gather-
ings, a time for remem-
bering and sharing.
Sorrento Ricotta s be-
come a tradition at
family celebrations.
We're proud to be a
part of your life.
Have a joyous feast!

' a -


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April,nes
3m_WBUJE BONNET ^^Bw .^iflfHw
BREAKSTONE LOWFAT
SMOOTH & CREAMY OR CALIFORNIA STYLE
PANTRY PRIDE CHILLED
Orange Juice
FLBSCHMANN-S SALTED OR SWEET QUARTERS
Margarine ......
BOROEN S COLOREO OR WHITE .
American Sin)
SARGENTO DOMESTIC CHUNK
Edam*
PANTRY PROE
Cream
PANTRY PROE SWISS STYLE ASST FLAVORS
I LB
HALF GAL
LB1
CRISP AND CRUNCHY (U PICK LOOSE DISPLAY) SJ ^T^f
Green Peppers DM
SALAD SIZE FIRM. RIPE SIX IN PKG M ^ 4^S4
Tomatoes Oil
NUTRITIOUS AND DELICIOUS (U PICK LOOSE DISPLAY) >4j W9 i
Southern Yams 1 /
.............-._;.. i20i
LB
*
80Z
DEAN'S ASST FLAVORS
Ok* ....................
PANTRY PROE HOMESTYLE OR BUTTERMILK
Biscuits
SARGENTO GRATED
eoz-i
80Z
TASTE THE DIFFERENCE QUALITY MAKES HAWAHAN
REO BUSS
Crean
CALIFORNIA SUNKIST EASY TO PEEL SWEET EATING
Novel Oranges
FLOROA TOPS IN VITAMIN A GARDEN FRESH
(LG6SIZE)EaI%RJ
.3 LB BAG."
4IS9
-39
4/.S8
eoi
eoz
*m
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
CORNED BEEF ROUNO OR
n P
Round
1.19
LB
ts HtSSUfl I 4L8 SMOKED
Tur1y
NOBVWGIAN jahisaehg
1^VB4MM
KITCHEN FRESH
FWEST QUALITY I 2 LB ^_ ^_ ^^
V" 1.19 HOT FOODS
AMERCAN WMiTe o
1.49
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
RoB ow kRP
OVEN FRESH #**>
ApptoPto ,.189
........(2 LB BAG) EA
INDIAN RIVEflWHITE SEEOLESS (UC LOOSE DISPLAY)
UrSPSfrUn EXTRA LG 27 SIZE
ROROA SWEET AND JUICY (U-PIC LOOSE DISPLAY) -k- AA
oranges Lg o size flhn9f
NORTHWEST SWEET EATING (lAPC LOOSE DISPLAY) Ajfc
AnjouPears LB.60
NORTHWEST EXTRA FANCY m -^fc
Red Descious Apples hoinvexarbagiIbIRI
FLAVORFUL AND REFRESHING _j,
Sunktst Lemons inpkgiea .79
PERFECT FOR THE HOUDAY
Fresh Frurt Bowls 5.99
We have a fiill variety of potted flowers,
corsages, floral bouquets, floral
arrangements for your holiday needs.
BAKERY _
A1C ITAUAM OR (SAVE Ml)
I IVULllBrMMaoz LOAf a#V
^T% VI ~i M~fc *> I velvet cwemesox of u
ROUS ^99 OtedDcnub 1.29
.79
PANTRY PROE TWIN. CLOVERLEAF
PARTY FLAKE (SAVE 39cl
Brown 6 Serve
AUNT HANNAH (SAVE cl
MEYEFTS PKG OF M
(SAVE Mil
*G Of < I
A fB S ASST (SAVE Mil
DbWIWROSS PKGOf>.'l
HANTTW POE JO OZ LOAF (SAVE 10c!
HbulljumpfiorJoy
our Hobday
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS ^J
I V


Friday. April 1,1983
T*J. IUmJ
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
; *3:
IES ^
MILLER HIGH UFE &^|<)
tfftf
Late the bonny aaysTHop right over to our PantryT
ft** loaded with holiday apache*
Our produce is the freshest, and packed loooe so
you pick only what you wantl
Our meats are always the freshest, tannest and only CL8.D.A. Choice,
of course. Our Entertainment Centers feature Del and Appetbw
departments. Just the place to start a party or plan an Informal family
gathering.
Uke the bunny says,HHappy Holidays from our Pantry to yours!"
Open Sunday, April 3 9am7pm
6PKV120Z.BTLS
ASST FLAVORS
1/2 GAL
BREYERS
Ice Cream
TAB, SPRITE, OR DIET COKE
(NOT AVAILABLE W FT PIERCE)
PANTRY PRIDE AJXC. REGULAR OR E.P
PANTRY PRIDE
Ftait Cocktail
PANTRY PRIOE CREAM STYLE OR **f 4 f\\
Whole Kernel Comeoz can all-UU
PANTRY PRIOE REGULAR OR UNSALTEO
...............WOiBOX
4 oz can iOy
PANTRY PRIOE 10. OZ CANS f^B^M aWaSsh
Ch&ckBnNoorJeSoup 3/1.00
pjnso ^ AQ
440ZB0X laasVaa*
FOAMY UQUO ^ AQ
Dish Detergent volbt^ JU9
WVNTRy PRIDE ___ $115
6R0LLaaas
MUSSULMAN'S &W3&
sooz-JAR asaas


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April 1. 1983
On the bookshelf
Smith sponsors equity act
Passover books right for kids
A Picture Book of Passover. By
David Adler; illustrated by
Linda Heller. Holiday House, 18
E 53 St., New York, NY. 10022.
32pp. $9.95.
Only Nine Chairs: A Tall Tale
For Passover. By Deborah Uchill
Miller; illustrated by Karen Os-
trove. Kar-Ben Copies Inc.. 11216
Empire Lane. Rockville, Md.
20852. unpaged, hardcover $8.95,
paperback $3.95.
Reviewed by Bea Stadtler
Two new books for Passover
written for small children are
available this year. A Picture
Book of Pasaover tells the Pass-
over story, beginning with Jacob
and Joseph and ending with the
crossing of the Red Sea. The au-
thor then continues with a short
section on "The Holiday of Pass-
over," from which the holiday
derives its name, and then the
Seder ritual, very simply told.
The illustrations are lovely, the
language is simple and the story
appealingly told. However. Pass-
over is probably the one holiday
that has a multitude of books
written about it for all age levels,
and there is nothing really special
about the book which could not
be found in other books about
Passover for children.
Only Nine Chairs is a Passover
story told in rhyme, and the
WASHINGTON When the
1983 Economic Kquity Act was
introduced on the House floor
last week. South Broward Con-
gressman Larry Smith was an
original cosponsor. As a member
of the Congressional Caucus for
Women's Issues, the freshman
Democrat considers this impor-
tant measure to be crucial in
providing equal opportunity to
women from all walks of life.
"This legislation will reform
many of our laws which stand
more than 60 years after women
were given the legal right to vote
as barriers to the equality and
freedom this nation's founders
assured all its citizens," said
Smith.
"This package will offer
women significant reform in pub-
lic and private pension laws, child
care, insurance availability and
coverage, and enforcement of
alimony and child support agree-
ments. More than our obligation
to assure equality to women, this
legislation will help to insure the
economic well-being of the Amer-
ican family families which
bylXnyulAAUer
illustrate! byLxtda JMltr
Leo Mindlin
Continued from Page 4
neither Israel nor the Arabs
would get their maximum de-
mand, thus humiliating neither
side no Israeli sovereignty
over the West Bank and no new
Palestinian state.
And so what did America's
Saudi buddies do in response?
The proposed Reagan emascula-
tion of Israel was not enough
for them. At the Arab conference
in Fez, Morocco of Sept. 9, 1982,
just eight days after the an-
nouncement of the Reagan initia-
tive, the conference, inspired by
the Saudis, did the following:
It concluded with a declaration
calling for Israeli withdrawal
from "all Arab territories occu-
pied in 1967, including Arab al-
Quds (Jerusalem)," the dis-
mantling of Israeli settlements
and the "establishment of an in-
dependent Palestinian state."
Jerusalem would be its capital.
Furthermore, the declaration
reaffirmed the PLO as the sole
representative of the Palestin-
ians. This virtually assured Jor-
danian rejection of the Saudi-
hacked alternative to the Reagan
initiative, which Jordan also
rejects if for other reasons.
THE RESULT of this Saudi
maneuvering, at a time when the
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
was still preoccupying the Rea-
gan Administration, was a dan-
gerous vacuum of inaction into
which Moscow has since been
pulled as a M iddle East presence
to be reckoned with after all of
these years of having lost even so
much as a toehold there.
One would think that the
Saudis would oppose this if only
on the basis that its ancient,
decrepit monarchy is absolutely
anathema to Soviet thought
processes. But Saudi animosity
to Israel was apparently deemed
more important in Riyadh than
Russian Communist expansion-
ism.
These are Mr. Reagan's
"moderate" allies in the Middle
East those Saudis who, in
January. 1981. led by then Crown
Prince Fahd, called for "jihad
with funds, self-sacrifice, in-
formation, economy and weapons
if necessary" for the "liberation
of Jerusalem and the occupied
territorial
FORGET Jimmy Carter, a
weary von in the wilderness,
alone and bitter. But the State
Department still pursues these
U.S. friends. So do the Presi-
dent and, of course, the
Secretaries of State and Defense,
old time Saudi lovers if ever there
were some.
But if moderation is to take
on some meaning at all, you
would think it is these advocates
of the Saudi cause who could be-
come more moderate in their lov-
ing of our retrograde Arab
friends. And in their attacks on
the Israelis who see through this
tissue of deception better than
anybody else these days.
In short, there's more sinning
going on in the Middle East to-
day than merely in Israel's capi-
tal. One gets tired of U.S. policy
that sees only one part of it.
problem is obvious when there
are only nine chairs for 19 guests.
So where do they all sit? A
number of solutions are offered,
and all's well that ends well, for
Elijah comes bringing his own
chair, thank goodness.
The print is large and the
pictures black and white. The
format, language and short
rhymes are aimed at the very
young child, to be read to, but the
humor and illustrations, which
are a bit too cluttered for the
voung child, would amuse an
older "read-it-myself' youngster.
The hardcover edition includes
a centerfold poster to color, which
is a nice addition to this unusual
little book which certainly tells a
different Passover tale.
Bea Stadtler is an author of Jew-
ish children's books and registrar
of the Cleveland College of
Jewish Studies.
Bottling Company of Miami, Inc.
to lAe (otilite ffettUbA TD&nvmu*u4u.
Our Passover Products
Coca-Cola
Diet Coke \
Sprite
Tab
Fresca
Mr. Pibb
Schweppes Club Soda
Schweppes Ginger Ale
are all prepared with strictly Kosher forl
Passover ingredients without corn sweeteners
Personal supervision of Rabbi Tibor H. Stern.
need two full paychecks to sir
vive, single paycheck households
in which a woman must carry the
load alone, and women who
choose to stay at home and raise
a family."
The Economic Equity Act ad-
dresses the needs of older women
who make up almost 60 percent
of the population over age 65.
"When passed, this legislation
will end the inequities of pension
plans which discount the contri-
bution, whether at home or in the
marketplace, of a spouse who has
been a significant part of--*
working couple," said Congress-
man Smith.
Broward woman
gets NCJW post
Barbara Miller of Hollywood
has been elected to the board of
directors of the National Council
of Jewish Women (NCJW) at its
35th national convention in
Washington. -*--
Established in 1893, NCJW is
the oldest Jewish women's vol-
unteer organization in America.
wooooooooooo I
ADOPTION
Happily married couple will give love, warmth
and security to white infant.
Expenses paid. Confidential.
Please Call
(212) 339-2286 COLLECT after 6 P.M.
or anytime on weekends.
WANTED
PART TIME
SWITCH BOARD OPERATOR
Good Typist
Clear Speaking Voice
Monday Through Thursday
4:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Call 921-6551
Mountain Lake
250 boys & girls, ages 5-16
Mature. e Sabbath Services Friday nights
' Tutoring; American & Ini'l Staff
i MDs and RNs in residence
4 or 8 week sessions
ON PRIVATE
M ACRE
OSCEOLA LAKE.
HENOERSONVILLE.
NORTH CAROLINA 7M
Scheduled activity program
includes: water ski. canoe, sail,
swim (2 healed pools), tennis,
racquet ball, all landspons.
crafts, photography,
gymnastics, overnights, hiking,
nature, skits, field trips,
horseback riding.
PLUS options, etc
LIMITED OPENINGSCALL NOW305-866-3045
or write: P.O. Box 41-4450, MB, Fla. 33141
Owners Erectors
Alvin & Nanette Savage (Certified Camp Director)
Caren Savage Cdeman
- .:


L.April 1. 1983
'raids I IHls-Crmjdvicw
MM
The Jewish Floridian and Shqfar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Arens names chief of staff
r--'^f ;________________________
1983 goal of $500,000, leaders of the Emerald Hills-Grandview United Jewish Appeal-
Federation of South Broward Campaign eagerly awaited the annual dinner. Object, of
was to meet or exceed goal. And, while, a half-million dollars is still in sight, the dinner
i'd one-tenth of the goal: $50,000. Above, Nelson Dembs, Emerald Hills UJA-Federation
lan (left), and Paul Sigel, Grandview chairman; flank guest speaker Ehud Olmert, a
er of the Knesset. Pictured below at the Emerald Hills Country Club, from left, are Nate
i dinner chairman: Olmert, Jack Malamud and Ben Salter, president of the Federation.
Summer is Special
at Stevensville.
SPECIAL DISCOUNTED RATES FOR
MINIMUM 4-WEEK STAY DURING JULY AND AUGUST!
Join the Dinnerstein and Friehling Families at one
of the Catskiil's finest resorts this summer and get
everything we're famous for PLUS special discounts on
our rates. You'll enjoy luxurious accommodations, our
own magnificent 18-hole championship golf course,
indoor and outdoor tennis, 3 sumptuous meals daily
and an exciting line-up of big-name performers all
summer long. So, come to Stevensville. Spend the
summeror a monthat very special savings.
Olympic-size Outdoor Pool
Indoor Pool
Men's & Women's Health Clubs
(Saunas, Massage)
Sailing, Boating, Fishing on 5-Mile Lake
Roller Skating
Professional Social Staff
CALL TOLL FREE
800-431-3858
ASK FOR GLORIA
^^ Or Call Your Travel Agent ^
Stevensville
SkNMcvttla Caantry Club, Sana Lain. N.Y. 17713 Haiti!
Your Hasts. Tha Dtanantaia a FrieMlaa Fa
i(t14)2tt-
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Cabinet meeting in special ses-
sion has accepted the proposal of
Defense Minister Moshe Arens to
appoint the Deputy Chief of Staff
Maj Gen. Moshe Levi as chief of
staff.
He will take over his new post
as Israel's 12th chief of staff from
(Jen Rafael Eitan when he retires
on April 19.
Levi s appointment had been
widely anticipated, as Arens had
clearly preferred him over his
rivals, Major Generals Avigdor
Ben-Gal and Dan Shomron.
Among Levi's first tasks will
be to meet with Arens on a
number of new appointments of
senior officers to head area com-
mands and functional corps such
as the Intelligence Corps.
Levi, who was born in Iraq,
was former commander of the
army's Central Command but
has never headed a large forma-
tion in wartime.
But as commander of the
Central Command he was for
many years in charge of the army
on the West Bank. He is regarded
as a very thorough, quiet, but
"extremely basic" commander,
according to officers who have
worked with him.
Golf tournament set May 12-13
A total of 600 men and women
aged 55 and older are expected
for this year's Menorah Seniors
B'nai B'rith Golf Tournament on
two Falm-Aire Country Club
courses, the Oaks and the Cy-
press.
Oscar Goldstein, tournament
director, said individual flights
will compete May 12 and 13, with
overall net and gross winners de-
termined by the Galloway scoring
system.
The tournament raised $4,800
last year, all of which was
donated to the youth services of
B'nai B'rith, which include the
Career and Counseling Services,
Hillel and the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization Pre-regiatration for the tour-
nament is advised; the field will
be limited to 500.
Golfers may obtain further in-
formation trom tournament
supervisor Goldstein at 742-6000.
RETAILER This coupon
is redeemable for face
value and 7< handling
charges provided as fol-
lows it is received on a
retail tale of the product
specified herein You mail it
to Surv-Diamond Growers
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Clinton Iowa S27M On te
quest, you must
supply invoices
proving suffi-
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purchases cov-
ering coupons
submitted
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for redemption Other
use constitutes fraud
Coupon may lot be
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Customer must pay ^
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mere prohibited
taiied license required
or restricted by law 5
Cash value I- 20* Good S
only in U S A
Oder limned to
one coupon per
purchase COU-
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December jl
1963
RETAILER Thii coupon i!
redeemable (rx bee value
and 7* handling charges
provided as (of lows it is re
cetved on a retail sale of
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in You mad it to Sun-
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limited to one
coupon per pur
chase COU-
PON EXPIRES
I December 31
1983
WTAILER Thn
coupon is redeem-
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on a retail tale of erther
product spec Aed hereto
rou mail it to Sun-Diamond Growers of Cii
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SUN-DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
O Sun-Diamond Growers of California. 1982


'aRo 12
14
'ihe'j!ii^d-+Wrtl**iatid Mojar of Onvf Houywooa
***y, April 1,1983
*
Fund aims to involve offspring in Judaism
This A another in a series of articles about community leaders
who have established philanthropic funds at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward. For more information, please call
921-8810. -~,,~-
By MICHAEL J M06KOWITZ
MmMh Staff
Some given are selfish when they create a philanthropic fund.
A tax deduction is their prime motive. Others are interested in
their pet charities.
For Philip and Rae Olender, however, more noble, traditional
reasons are involved. As Olender himself explains it:
"We want to encourage our children and grandchildren to
actively take an interest in Jewish affairs. Tax deductions are
useful, but are secondary."
Since the Olenders have three children (two boys and a girl),
nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild, there will be great
interest in their family philanthropic fund for decades to come.
The Olender Philanthropic Fund is a written agreement
between the Olenders and the Jewish Federation of South
Broward which has the following advantages:
1) After establishing the fund, the Olenders may make ad-
ditional contributions at their discretion in varying amounts
from year to year.
21 The Olenders all generations have the ability to make
written suggestions as to specific disbursements from their
fund.
3) Contributions may be made in the form of appreciated
properties and securities.
4) Each fund carries a name designated by the Olenders and
therefore stands as a living endowment and memorial.
5) The Jewish Federation of South Broward's Legacy and
Endowment Fund assumes the responsibility of all record-
keeping and will report to the Olenders periodically on the
utilization of their contributions.
6) Philanthropic fund contributions may come from more than
one source. Members of the Olender family, their associates and
their friends may contribute to the same fund.
The family history of the Olenders is a good example of the
progress that American Jewry has made in this century. Both
Phil and Rae came to this country from eastern Europe more
than 50 years ago. Their families settled in the Detroit, Mich.
area.
On both sides of the family, there was a tradition of Uedahah
and involvement in Jewish activities. As a young man, Olender
was active with the YMHA, and especially enjoyed debating.
The Olenders established a food distribution and processing
business, which now has a fourth generation family member
working in it.
In addition to their families and work, the Olenders have been
active in the following organizations:
Federation of Detroit (1934-1966, helped start food division,
campaign chairman), OUT, B'nai B'rith, Youth Education
League, Hadassah, Congregation Shaare Tzedek, Jewish
National Fund, March of Dimes, Sinai Hospital, American Red
Magen David. United Council for Soviet Jewry and a host of
other organizations.
In 1966, the Olenders retired and began spending a sub-
stantial portion of the year in Hollywood. However, they did not
retire from their participation in Jewish affairs.
Olender is chairman of the Low-Rise Division for the 1982-63
annual campaign of JFSB.
His comments on his role in this year's campaign
"It was much harder work than I expected. We need more
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Philip and Rae Olender
It's Olender brand of giving
cooperation from building residents, more contributors and,
most importantly, more workers in the building.
"The key is to know someone in the areas in which you are
working and get that person to help spread the meaning of
Federation through the buildings."
Rae Olender says it is "fantastic" to see the relative number
of young people actively involved in Jewish affairs in this area.
She is especially proud of the role that women are playing in this
work.
Olender concluded by saying that Federation is important
because it is the most efficient way of working with all facets of
the community.
"The Federation investigates its constituent agencies and
because of this, much waste and unnecessary expenditures are
eliminated. It is the best means of strengthening our people,
both in Israel and in the United States."
Sf)c.il A panel of Jewish communal
workers from across the country*
is available for speaking assign-
menu as part of Riverside
Speakers Bureau, Alfred Golden
of Riverside Memorial Chapels
has announced.
According to the head of the
bureau, Eli Topel, organizations
using the service over its first
year of existence have included
B'nai B'rith. ORT, Hadassah and
the National Council of Jewish
Women.
Topel is a past president ofv
B'nai B'rith, District 1 ani
serves on the group's intern*
tional board of governors
Golden, associated with B'nai
B'rith and Jewish Federations for
17 years in South Florida, is a na-
tional commissioner of Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and sits on the board of
directors of the Greater Miami,
South Broward (Hollywood) and
Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Federations.
The bureau offers speakers _
a wide range of Jewish subjects
from the ADL of B'nai B'rith to
Zionism.
Sorrento
Cheese
Takes pleasure in wishing
all a Very Happy
Passover. We regret the
error the newspaper made
in printing an incorrect
advertisement in the last
issue.
it
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We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
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Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family



a
I
Mi
jn-
ide
len
els
Jie
ma
ret
led
nd
ish
oK
nc

re.
wi
for
it
iti-
lai
of
m,
nd
Iday. April 1,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 16
Jewry conferees resolve:
Free world does care: Let our people go
By CINDY KAYE
Jerusalem third World Conference on
/iet Jewry is calling on the
ziet Union to honor its com-
Itment to the Helsinki Final
It and "reopen the gates and
Irmit the departure of Soviet
vs, allow their repatriation to
ael, the national homeland of
| Jewish people..."
The resolution also calls for the
jimediate release of "the
prisoners of Zion," an end to the
persecution of Jews who wish to
notice their faith and an "end
the government-sponsored
ampaign that is fanning the
lames of anti-Semitism and
atred of the Jewish people" in
ne USSR.
Another resolution adopted by
the 3,000 delegates from 31 coun-
tries attending the conference
was addressed to Soviet Jews:
"We take upon ourselves a
personal vow that your struggle
is our struggle, that we are at one
with you in your dreams and
aspirations. In this struggle we
are joined by men and women of
many creeds and races and na-
tionalities who cherish human
dignity..."
The resolutions were adopted
as the conference received further
reports of the alarming deteriora-
tion of the situation of Soviet
Jews. According to information
reaching here, Yuri Tarnopolsky,
a leading refusenik, was arrested
by the KGB in Kharkov.
Tarnopolsky, 48, a 'chemist,
was refused an exit visa in 1979.
He began a hunger strike on Oct.
1, 1982 which he continued until
Nov. 9. He is married and the
father of a daughter.
Conference sources said his ar-
rest was timed deliberately to
dishearten the conference dele-
gates and the hopes of Soviet
Jews who may be looking to the
conference to bring about an
alleviation of their condition.
Other reports to the conference
by Soviet Jewish emigres living
in Israel and delegates who re-
cently visited the Soviet Union
spoke of worsening conditions,
increased surveillance of Jews,
particularly refuaeniks, wider
dissemination of anti-Semitic
propaganda, increased harass-
ment and overt anti-Semitism by
ordinary Russians who shout
"Kill the Jews and Save Pales-
tine."
In a brief speech at the closing
session of the conference, Premier
Menachem Begin said the
awakening of Soviet Jewry is "ir-
repressible." He added: "We here
in Israel will never give up hope
that they will come home to
Zion."
Begin quoted "a reliable
source" as saying that a high
Soviet official had told him,
'Now that the West does not
take an interest (regarding Soviet
lews), we can do what we wish."
The "great importance" of the
Jerusalem conference. Begin
iaid. was to demonstrate that
'the free world does care."
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
YOM HAATZMAUT guest
speaker Sunday, April 24. is
to be Oded Ben Hur, vice
consul of the Israeli Con-
sulate in Miami. Yom
Haatzmaut. independence
Day. celebrates 35 years of
statehood for Israel. The all-
day festivities at Young Cir-
cle begin at 11 a.m. and run
until 4 p.m. In addition to
the vice consul, Ben Salter,
president of the Jewish
Eederation of South Bro-
ward; Nancy Brizel, Wo-
men's Division president;
and Mara Giulianti, chair-
man of the Federation's
Community Relations Com-
mittee, are to speak during
I opening ceremonies. Besides
I the Federation, co-sponsors
of the event are the Jewish
I Community Centers of
_ South Broward and area
^JM jlcmples.
Jt
Recently, strategy for the
Soviet Jewry movement was dis-
cussed by Marshall Goldman,
associate director of the Harvard
Russian Research Center, and
Seweryn Bialer. director of the
Research Institute on Interna-
tional Change at Columbia Uni-
versity. Goldman stressed the
limits of relying solely on
economic leverage as he pointed
to missed opportunities during
the late 1970s to expand trade
and diplomatic relations with the
Soviets in response to their "sig-
nals" of opening the gates to
Soviet Jews.
He contended that those op-
portunities for economic induce-
ments are no longer available.
Bialer also linked the dire con-
ditions for Soviet Jews to the col-
lapse of detente, saying, "In the
last few years, and partly today
. the Soviet Union has little to
fear from the United States and
little to hope for."
But he stressed that what is
needed today "more than ever" is
"to keep the Soviet Jewry situa-
tion in the world view." He called
for a great increase in public
activity, which should be com-
bined with "quiet messages."
Bialer also termed active ad-
vocacy on behalf of Soviet Jews
by Western Europe, as potential-
ly very signf icant in moving the
Soviets.
His appeal was punctuated by
a moving "Call to Conscience" by
former Prisoner of Zion Yosef
Mendelevich, an 11-year veteran
of the Gulag. Mendelevich, a de-
fendant in the infamous 1970
Leningrad trial, pleaded for
worldwide support for his still-
imprisoned brethren, and for all
Soviet Jews who share the dream
of emigration.
Former Moscow refusenik Pro-
fessor Grigori Preiman who
emigrated last December, met
with House Speaker Thomas P.
"Tip" O'Neill (D-Me) last week.
He was accompanied by Reps.
"Sam Gejdenson (D-Conn.) and
Jim Shannon (D-Me) who
traveled with National Con-
ference of Soviet Jewry Execu-
tive Director Jerry Goodman to
the Soviet Union a year ago,
where they met with Freiman.
The former refusenik is the
author of It Se*ms I am a Jetn: A
Samirdat En toy. Ha waa ousted
as Professor of Mathematics at
Kalinin State University in May
1980.
Former Prisoner of Conscience
Laser Liubarsky met with on
gressional activists and govern-
ment officials on behalf of fellow
former prisoner, Joseph Begun.
Still not granted permission to
emigrate, Begun, who has long
been active in the Jewish emigra-
tion and cultural movements,
was arrested on Nov. 6,1982, and
is awaiting trial in Vladimir
prison, north of Moscow.
Liubarsky met with White
House spokesman Michael Gale;
Assistant Secretary of State for
Human Rights and Humani-
tarian Affairs Elliott Abrams;
Reps. Bill Lehman (D-Fla) and
Barbara Kennelly (D-Conn.); and
Human Rights Subcommittee
and CSCE staff. AU pledged to
speak out on behalf of Begun.
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Page 16
The JeWisk Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, April 1,1983
*,
from the Pantry

|^,$'-''"M" HH
J**^"^ Mi
?We
ar
IHOUDA1
FROM OUR
PATfTRY
l-
^O
Open April3
9am7 pm
PRICES GOOD MARCH 31APRIL 6. 1983
Wfefve slashed prices to bring you
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Happy Holidays from Piantry Pride!
[OLIDA1
PEOAU
FROM OUR,
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Open April 3
9am7pm
FAMOUS BRANDS OR
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GENUINE AMERICAN
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BONELESS
CHICKEN BREAST
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
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$2
29
iHWULYmCKi
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Ground Chuck
USD* CHOICt BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
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tMEALS NONE 'CONTAINS ROAS'
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OAIISSIN WMtH i OH HAII
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^11


iday, April 1,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
t
Herzog
Secretary Weinberger blasted
Continued from Page 1
gure he is widely admired
d respected by Israelis of
political affiliations.
Herzog was born in September
18 in Belfast, northern Ireland,
rhere his father, the late Rabbi
Harvei Herzog, served as
ief rabbi, later to become chief
bbi of Israel.
'The Henog family moved to
Jerusalem when Chaim was 16.
[He studied at the Hebron Yeshi-
|va where his older brother,
I Yaacov, was an outstanding pu-
Ipil. Another classmate was
Menachem Elon, the future
I supreme court justice and coali-
tion-backed presidential candi-
Idate whom Henog defeated in
I the Knesset vote last week.
(Yaacov Henog rose to become
director general of the Prime
^Minister's Office and a senior
aide to Premiers David Ben
Gurion and Levi Eshkol. His
death at an early age from cancer
deprived Israel of one of its most
brilliant public servants.)
Chaim Henog was educated at
Cambridge University in En-
gland where he read law. Early in
World War II, he transferred to
idhurst, Britain's national
ilitary academy (the equivalent
f West Point) and was commis-
ioned an officer in British army
telligence.
He served with distinction in
ranee and Germany and was
ith the first Allied forces to
capes the Rhine. Henog partici-
ted personally in the capture of
S chief Heinrich Himmler. A
war wound left him with a per-
manent hearing impairment in
one ear.
Reminiscing recently about his
IWorld War II experiences, Her-
Izog recalled his presence, as the
[personal representative of Field
[Marshal Sir Bernard Mont-
gomery, at the first conference of
[Jewish displaced persons, held at
lie Bergen-Belsen concentration
tip. The qualifications for that
assignment were to be a senior
Intelligence officer in the British
army and to speak Yiddish
fluently.
On his return to Palestine after
the war, Henog joined Hagana,
the pre-State Jewish defense
force for which he undertook
najor assignments. He rose
Mind Your
^Own
Business.
Because if yon don't, who
will?
Owning a business isn't
easy. No matter how large
or small your business is,
there are problems and
responsibilities you have
to face every day. Such as
making certain your
business is properly in-
sured.
That's so your business
won't suffer a severe
financial setbackin case
a key employee leaves or
your partner becomes
disabled or dies.
To find out how to get
the most from your
business insurance plans,
contact us. We're here to
help you mind your own
business.
Jack Barman
Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD. 921-7744
Dade 947-5902
.-!2^r-j^T"sr?>- v,s
rapidly in the ranks of the newly
formed army of the State of Is-
rael and served as its chief of
military intelligence from 1948-
60.
He returned to that post 10
years later for another three-year
tour of duty. It was Henog who
laid down the patterns and prac-
tices of Israeli military intel-
ligence which are operative
today. He also served in senior
command position on the central
and southern fronts during the
1960s.
Herzog retired from the army
with the rank of general to enter
industry. He became the Israeli
representative of Sir Isaac Wolf-
son's "Great Universal Stares," a
financial empire with manifold
commercial and industrial in-
terests in Israel. Beginning in the
early 1970's, Henog served as a
senior partner in a leading Tel
Aviv law firm while maintaining
his business ties. He served on
the boards of directors of several
leading banks and industrial
firms.
From 1976-1978 he was Israel's
ambassador to the United Na-
tions where he earned an interna-
tional reputation as an out-
standing diplomat. His speeches
during the bitter General Assem-
bly debate over equating Zionism
with racism became classic texts
in modern Israeli history and are
studied in Israeli schools and in
Jewish schools abroad.
Herzog is a prolific author. He
has published several books on
Israel's wars which became
worldwide beet-sellers and antho-
logies of his speeches. His face
and voice are familiar around the
world as a radio and television
commentator and interviewee.
Herzog has always found time
to involve himself in public, non-
political affairs. He founded
"Variety in Israel" which raises
money and builds facilities for
disadvantaged children. He is
president of the World ORT
(Organization for Rehabilitation
Through Training) and of ORT
Israel, posts which require con-
siderable time and effort given
the scope of ORT activities in Is-
rael and around the world.
Hod Hasharon
welcomes Its
new leaders
Continued from Page 2
sons and a daughter. She pre-
viously worked as Hod
Hasharon's administrator for the
Jewish agency's (UJA) part of
the project.
Project secretary Malka Lador
was born in Hod Hasharon. She
feels that Project Renewal is
changing the negative self-image
of the two neighborhoods. She
says that with this increasing
self-respect, the rest of the Hod
Hasharon community is becom-
ing increasingly respectful of
these two communities and the
wide gap that once separated
these neighborhoods is being
narrowed.
"You can see the difference,"
she says. "The streets are clean,
there are people involved in the
programs, the kids are getting
higher marks in school and
they're staying in school rather
than dropping out onto the
streets. You can almost feel the
change in people." Malka is mar-
ried. She has a married daughter
and another daughter in the
Army.
Shoshana Tamir, the project's
bookkeeper, has lived in Hod
Hasharon for four years. Born on
Kibbutz Maanit, Shoshana is
married, has three boys and loves
living in Hod Hasharon."
Continued from Page 1
Gulf. The pamphlet is a follow-up
to one iefued by AIPAC last year
called "The Strategic Value of
Israel."
Rosen's press conference
was held eoincidentally at just
about the time the Defense
Department was releasing a
letter from Gen. Robert Barrow,
the commandant of the U.8.
Marine Corps, to Weinberger,
charging that Israeli troops are
deliberately threatening the lives
of American military personnel in
Lebanon for "political purposes"
and urging that "firm and strong
action" be taken by the United
States to end the confrontations.
Rosen asserted that there is
no official in the administration
at a high level with a sympathetic
view toward Israel since the
departures last year of Secretary
of State Alexander Haig and
National Security Adviser
Richard Allen.
The AIPAC official said the
only "good things" that have
emerged recently are such items
as foreign aid which is directed
by Congress. He claimed that
even the administration's op-
position to attempts to expel
Israel from the United Nations
was due to the mandate by
Congress.
Rosen said the only weapons
shipped to Israel in recent
months have been 11 F-16 jets
and 200 Sidewinder missiles. He
said the administration has held
up since last May official
notification to Congress of the
sale of 76 F-16 jets even though
they, like the F-16e, were
promised to Israel in 1978 as a
result of the weapons the U.S.
sold to Saudi Arabia, Egypt and
Jordan.
As for Weinberger's policy
toward the Arabs, it is "come
pick what you want and it's
yours," Rosen said. He said it
was "not clear what the Arabs
wanted that he (Weinberger)
turned down."
Rosen said AIPAC is
speaking out because there has
been an "obsession" over the last
two years over what Israel has
done to strain relations with the
United States but little has been
mentioned about what Wein-
berger has done to strain
relations with Israel. He con-
tended that Weinberger does not
know the importance of Israel to
U.S. security and has thus
harmed American security.
In addition, Rosen warned,
his anti-Israel policies may cause
American Jews who, during the
1970s, supported increased
spending for U .8. defense, to turn
away from this support.
Rosen stressed that there
was an ignorance of Israel's
strategic value in the Defense
Department because the Pen-
tagon has not studied it. He said
that before 1979, the Pentagon
concentrated on Europe and the
Far East. But with the fall of the
shah of Iran and the Soviet in-
vasion of Afghanistan, large
numbers of military men were
sent to the Middle East to study
the situation there.
He said this resulted in a
"search for ways to cooperate
closely with the Arabs" because
there was a seed to obtain
"access arrangements" for bases
in Arab countries. "A strategic
concept evolved very sensitive to
the strategic value of a number of
Arab countries and surprisingly
insensitive to the strategic value
of Israel to the United States,"
Rosen said.
He charged that Defense
Department officials are even
warned against studying the
strategic value of Israel.
Several hours after the
conference, AIPAC issued a
statement through its
spokesperson, Lisa Behren, that
"any personal remarks" about
Weinberger were "solely that of
Rosen's.
She said AIPAC's well-
known differences with the
administration are that it
believes that "Israel is of
strategic importance to the
United States and current U.S.
policy does not take advantage of
that fact.
It will be false to charac-
terize this difference of opinion as
personal criticism of the motives
of the secretary of defense. Our
concern remains what it has
always been policy, not
personality."
ill
When you fry EL AL to Israel between March 6th and
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is good until May 31.1984. But you'd better hurry. Time
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EL7J/4L7ALZ-
The Chosen Airline.


i neJewi'sn rioriaiari ana onojar o] < rreater tioiiywuoa
Friday, April 1, 1983
Ask the rabbi
Pesach reminds
world of liberty
At the request of the Jewish Federation of South Broward,
the South Broward Rabbinical Council is providing this column
of learning and information. It is to appear regularly on this
Synagogue Page. Should you have a question you would like a
rah hi to answer, please address a letter to Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin, c-o, JFSB, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood, Fla.
33020.
By RABBI SAMUEL Z. JAFFE
Temple Beth El
In a world beset by upheaval and violence, with so many
hapless and hopeless people caught in the snare of political op-
pression and persecution, Fesach, our Festival of Freedom,
takes on a new importance and universal relevance. It is a
clarion call to liberty for all who are fettered in spirit or in body.
Fesach proclaims the eternal truth that man was born to be
fret- and live in dignity. At this juncture in history, this moral
principle takes on new dimensions when one considers the pre-
vailing moral climate in our worldThe abject poverty, malnu-
trition and starvation in many parts of the globe; the rein of ter-
ror in many countries of Central and South America; the unre-
lieved oppression of Soviet Jewry; the bloodshed in the little
publicized Iran-Iraq war; the bloodletting in Lebanon; the
random taking of hostages and politically motivated kidnap-
pings; the heinous acts of violence and murder perpetrated by
the FLO, and the rising anti-Semitic incidents of desecration
and destruction.
These onerous events reflect an amoral posture where aggres-
sion and naked power have come to be recognized as modus
vivendi.
Under these trying conditions which characterize many parts
of our world, where no one is secure, and turmoil and violence
threaten daily life, many are struggling to break the shackles of
tyranny.
Fesach is the eternal reminder that we are created to be
servants of God and not of man. Even as the Israelites of old
found courage and strength in God, the Author of liberty, to
seek freedom from Egyptian bondage, so too must all so sorely
afflicted today inwardly and marshal their spiritual resources to
shatter the yoke of their servitude political, social or
economic which dehumanizes them.
The promise of freedom which served as the faith and inspira-
tion for Moses and our forefathers continues to be the banner
and rallying cry for those in our time seeking the blessings of
liberty and human dignity.
For all who are oppressed and persecuted, Pesach resounds
the biblical proclamation:
Let My People Go."
Yom Hashoah speaker
wrote of U.S.-Nazi ties
A former special agent for the
U.S. Justice Department who au-
thored a book called "The
Belarus Secret," detailing the
procurement, use and harboring
of Nazi war criminals by the U.S.
government, will speak Thurs-
day, April 7, at Temple Israel of
Miramar's Yom Hashoah Service
and Program.
The agent of four years, John
Loftus, wrote his work before the
current explosion of events con-
cerning Klaus Altmann Barbie,
Yad Vashem director set
in Hallandale
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Community
Relations Committee is planning
its Yom Hashoah program for
Sunday evening, April 17, at
Hallandale Jewish Center, 416
NESAve.
Paul Orlan, Holocaust Com-
mittee chairman, announces the
appearance of Shalmi Barmore,
director of education at Yad
Vashem in Israel, as the keynote
raker for this year's Holocaust
ervance.
Barmore is responsible for the
seminars on the Holocaust con-
ducted for the youth in Israel and
overseas.
He has dedicated his life to the
investigation of the Holocaust,
its root causes and aftermath.
The Yom Hashoah program
will also feature Mindelie Wajs-
man, a renowned actress in
dramatic readings of the works of
prominent Yiddish and English
writers.
Mrs. Wajsman has appeared in
many Warsaw ghetto com-
memoration programs on stage,
radio and TV.
Torah drive nearly there
The fund drive to restore at
least one Torah to the bemah of
Congregation Levi Yitzchok at
1504 Wiley St. in Hollywood is
better than three-quarters toward
success.
A Torah or two it could call its
own became the Orthodox
synagogue's goal shortly after
Hannukah when its two Torahs
were stolen.
One force behind the campaign
to raise $10,000 to buy a used
Torah comes in the form of a
brother team: Joseph Putterman
of Hollywood and Harry Putter-
Osceola Lake Inn
reopens on May 20
Rubin's Osceola Lake Inn, a
summer resort in North
Curokina's Blue Ridge Moun-
tains, will reopen for its 43rd
season May 20. Located on Lake
Osceola at an altitude of 2,200
feet, the Inn offers outdoor ac-
tivities, nightly entertainment,
and a Jewish-American cuisine.
In uddition to having built new
guest accommodations, Rubin's
Osceiila Lake Inn has a new,
modern swimming pool. Other
outdoor facilities include a nine
hole putting green, golf driving
cage, all-weather tennis court,
ping pong tables, and badminton,
horseshoes, and shuffleboard
courts. Boating and fishing are
also offered, and Crooked Creek
golf course, an 18 hole course, is
located one mile from the Inn.
,CERTIFIED MOHEUf
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
[Will Travel (306) 673-5062|
man of Bal Harbour. The pair so
far has raised SI,100, single-
handedly, according to Rabbi
Raphael Tennenhaus.
Total raised from all sources as
of last week was $7,600; another
$2,400 is needed.
The Puttermans and others
working for the cause vow to
keep on soliciting funds until the
Torahs are replaced.
Have You Heard?
AUDIOLOGIC CARE CENTER
Hearing Aids-Hearing Testing
Dennis C. Dubin, MA, CCC-A
Emerald Hills Medical Square lean tod* tor bettM
4490 Sheridan St. Hwd. 9*1-9900 |_
tomorrow.
Temple Solel
A Liberal Reform
Congregation
5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood
Will Be Having an
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, April 10th, 7:30 P.M.
For Prospective Members
Meet the "Family of Solel"
Refreshments will be Served
For Information Call
989-0205
Shalmi Barmore
who is in custody in France.
The U.S. Justice Department
announced last week that it is re-
versing an earlier decision and
will conduct "a comprehensive
investigation" into allegations
that Barbie was employed by
U.S. government agencies after
World War II and was helped by
them to escape from Europe.
Barbie, called the "Butcher of
Lyons," was thrown out of Boli-
via last month and is awaiting
trial in France, on charges of
"crimes against humanity."
The program at the Miramar
temple. 6920 SW 35 St., is in-
volving many survivors of the
Holocaust and the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising.
Each family in the congrega-
tion there are 350 families
is being given the names of
ghetto children whose nam$
most closely correspond with
theirs. The ghetto children died
in the Holocaust, with no one to
mourn or say kaddish for them.
Congregants and members of
the community are being asked
to attend the services to light a
candle for that particular child.
Six separate candles will be
lighted, one for each million Jews
murdered.
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1"0>
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877
Ka^bi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m. sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning 9
o clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative.
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 961-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7-46 am
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8. /[
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road. Hollywood; 431-"
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Miramax 6920 SW 35th St.; 981-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 ajn.; Sabbath, 8 pjn.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:26 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pw
kindergarten Judaica High School.
FJefomj
ESJUS P*~2* f V14th Ave Hollywood; 920-8226.
ELtp&f? ^^ -8 n- **
Tipple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
sALthTi!^'' ^o*?*. 4313638 ** Bennett GreenapW
Sabbath serves, 8:16 pjn. luUgi^u school: Pre-kuSr-
Temple Sold 5100 Sheridan St.. Hollywood: 9894206. Rabbi
^ mEnHSk ??^bath a****. 8:15 P-m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o clock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
I)ecor)strucUoi)ist
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Broward Blvd Plantation- 472 '
^."SSiS!? SkUleli a*"-*S*!*SSTSSJZ
school: Pre-kindergarten8.. ->


f. April 1. 1983
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19
Renick at JFSB
Continued from Page 1
they were marching to Beirut and not
ig 40 kilometers north of the Israeli border,
had been claimed.
lulted Prime Minister Begin and then De-
linister Ariel Sharon not for carrying
mission but for lying. As for the press
jje of the Lebanon military efforts, which
I Jews worldwide believe was biased against
, Renick said: N
|me of my colleagues were merely painting
i numbers." In other words, the TV re-
s did a gross disservice by not putting the
I its historic perspective and order. The Is-
ne out the villains ... the PLO the poor
(s was not factual," Renick said.
said TV sometimes plays a vital role in
"You can thank TV for the United States
; out of Vietnam," he said.
introducing editor Rodack, Dr. Sachs
that the CRC and the Federation's main
(ring target in Dan Goodgame, the Miami
| reporter based in Israel. The CRC spokes-
tiled Goodgame totally biased against Is-
fhich is contrary to usual Miami Herald
i-iu. he said. '
ick told the overflow crowd of almost 100
alike the Herald, the Fort Lauderdale
(which has an office on Hollywood Boule-
i cover South Broward news) does not have
ter in Israel.
rely on UPI, (United Press International)
AP (Associated Press), the Chicago Tribute News
Service and the N.Y. Times News Service for
our information," the editor said.
He called coverage of the war in Lebanon "a
nightmare" in some instances, but overall, he said
the news the newspapers contained was fair.
"In time of war," Rodack said, "all sides are
prejudiced." He said that as a Jew and as a
journalist, he believed that press coverage was
not biased.
Rodack explained that at the News-Sun Sen-
tinel all versions of a story, from each of the wire
services, are read through by the editors. They
either pick out what they consider the best, most
truthful story, or combine elements of more than
one version.
As an example of how falsehoods sometimes
get into the newspaper, the editor recalled the as-
sassination of Lebanese President Bashir
Gemayel. The front page of the Fort Lauderdale
News-Sun Sentinel proclaimed that the president
"miraculously survived" the bomb blast.
Of course he was dead, Rodack said, but the of-
ficial release described how he survived, and the
wire news services believed it. And the local paper
printed it.
He said the greatest tool of influence the reader
has is "Letters to the Editors."
"We just don't print them," he said, "we listen
to what you have to say."
Renick agreed: "Yes, even one letter is looked
at it does matter."
ORT Institute wins charter
The Bramson ORT Technical
Institute, the only technical
college under Jewish auspices in
the United States, has announced
the granting of its permanent
college charter by the New York
State Board of Regents.
Bramson, which opened in
September 1977, has been
granting associate degrees and
college certificates in accounting,
business management, electronic
engineering technology, ophthal-,
mic technology and secretarial |
studies under its original provi-
sional charter. Bramson holds the
distinction of receiving its per-
manent college charter on its first
request.
In addition to Bramson,
Women's American ORT has tar-'
geted the Los Angeles area as the*
site of its second American!
school, projected to open Sep-
tember 1984.
ORT's American presence also
includes participation in the Jew-
ish High School of South Florida.
For more information on ORT
and its programs throughout the
world, call the region office at
921-5891.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Saraschn
City Memorial
&Monument. Inc
761C NoiiMea1 I fu*
Phone 759-1669
ess
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icher-author
to speak
)RT confab
In Schuman, a national
tant in the field of adult
lion and winner of the Solo-
Schechter Award for the
pding Jewish adult educa-
ogram in the nation, will
Keynote speaker for the
mial Convention of Dis-
rI, Women's American
lay 22-25 at the Hyatt
Hotel, Miami.
chuman, whom author
i-scl has called a "rare and
eacher," is the co-author
Jewish Experience in
a curriculum used in
[high school classes. She
is an assistant to Martin
[King on the board of the
/omen's Bank of Illinois
National Conference of
Mis and Jews.
30 delegates to the con-
will represent 25,000
of Women's American
rom eight southeastern
In addition to Ms. Schu-
rey will be addressed by
Minkoff, national presi-
"Vomen's American ORT
Uso the current president
(Conference of National
/omen's Organizations.
Light of Hollywood,
of District VI, has an-
J a series of six panels on
Jewish Values for the
Ituring many educators,
Lrators, lawyers and
pcluding Joel Arnon,
Bneral of Israel in Miami;
rs Kleinman, dean, De-
of Education, Univer-
liami; Dr. Judith Stein,
of Career Education,
aunty Schools; Janet
Florida state attorney;
kannc O'Laughlin, presi-
fry College; Ruth Shack,
inty commissioner; and
Thompson, executive di-
kmerican Civil Liberties
[Light has appointed
Press of Hollywood as
of the convention, and
nay from Jacksonville.
Ian.
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