The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00319

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
ampaign
Running a whopping 30 percent ahead of the 1982
iCampaign, the United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federa-
Ition of South Broward 1983 Campaign is now at a
Irecord $5.45 million the highest amount ever raised.
General Campaign Chairman Saul Singer M.D. re-
ported earlier this week that "reaching the 1983 Cam-
Ipaign goal of $6 million is definitely attainable."
Last year's final total was $4.78 million.
iVrPentagewise. according to the Council of Jewish Federations
USIew YorB, South Broward's 30 percent increase is eighth highest
Hi the nation.
It is the highest in Groups 1 and 2," Bea Chenkin, CJF's
bupervisor, statistics unit, reports. This means the South Broward
I ampaign is outstripping those in Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Los
Rngeles, New York, Pittsburgh, San Francisco. Atlanta and
Miami.
Cincinnati, for example," Mrs. Chenkin says, "raised $4.2 mil-
sets record
$5.45 million pledged
means 30% increase
lion in 1982, and so far for 1983 shows a 17 percent gain compared
with South Broward's 30 percent.
"The only other community in Florida to come close to South
Broward is South (Palm Beach) County, which is highest." Mrs.
Chenkin said that that community shows a 55 percent gain, but its
figures are askew because of that Federation's newness. South
County broke away from West Palm Beach Federation in Novem-
ber of 1979.
Dr. Singer emphasized that "we must meet the challenges and
overcome the obstacles of Jews everywhere. In Israel. 300.000 Jews
Dr. Saul Singer
Continued on Page 17 A
Jewlla Flor idiaint
____^__ and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
(plume 13 Number 6
Hollywood. Florida Friday, March 18.1983
f.eOShochtl
Price 35 Cents
uperSuijday a super success
(JRAND TOTAL OF $225,000 was raised last Sunday, Super Sunday, Federation of South Broward at 2719 Hollywood Blvd. The callers in-
ks 10,000 telephone calls went out in a single day. Better than 400 creased last year's Super Sunday record collection of $175,000 by
I "In nteers manned the special phones set up for the day at the Jewish $50,000. For more photos of the day's events, see Page 2-A.
.S. faulted
Israeli: Reagan thwarting peace effort
By STEVE KATON
"The United States is seeking a foot-
old in the Arab world (Lebanon) at
k expense of Israel," Major Eiran
fazit of the Israeli Defense Force told
Jth Broward audiences last week.
American and Israeli interests are at
dels, perhaps for the first time in his-
ky, the combat-field intelligence officer
[aintained, adding that Israel and
jebanon would have had a peace treaty
Igned, sealed and delivered, if not for
|-S. intervention.
k'he 28-year-old major said the Reagan ad-
I'Hstration is attempting to mix the Jordan and
V'.inon situations into "a Mideast solution"
hich is complicating matters far beyond what is
ded.
This is tantamount to France coming in to
liate between the U.S. and Mexico in a dia-
hii'. the army of fleer said.
I Why is it the United States keeps making the
l"w mistake over and over, Gazit asked,
etorically. How may unstable, unpopular and
un-Democratic governments will the U.S. back
before it learns? Why the examples (Korea, Cuba,
Vietnam and Nicaragua) even are basically anti-
Western, the major contended.
Israel has no choice but to be pro-America, but
the Arabs can swing over the Communists (and
have) at any time, Gazit said.
The United States' attitudes in Lebanon puzzle
the Israeli officer. "We know the Americans (U.S.
Marines) don't even arrest civilians carrying wea-
pons," Gazit said. "They just call the Lebanese
police. That's important because the Italians, for
example, check for a permit to carry that weapon.
If you don't have a permit, you are arrested."
The major explained that France, Britain. Italy
and the United States are sharing peacekeeping
duties in Lebanon. "The European nations are
doing a splendid job in solving problems, but not
the U.S.," Gazit said.
Since the U.S. Marines are not allowed to prob-
lem-solve (Pentagon policy is not to communicate
with the Israelis, so as not to make it appear that
America is tied to Israel), he dreads the catas-
trophic results should a U.S. Marine get shot.
The major told the Jewish Federation of South
Continued oa Page 4-A
Israeli Major Eiran Gazit


Page 2-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 18, l%3
Super Sunday



riday. March 18, 1963
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Holly wood
Page 3-A
Continental man next ambassador to U.S.?
Meir now Israel's Paris envoy
By AL ERLICK
Jewish Exponent
PARIS An Israeli with close ties to his nation's diplomatic
[immunity observed, "If the decision is to replace Moshe Arens as
.nbassador to the United States with a professional, Meir Rosenne
i the most logical choice.
Admittedly, such decisions involve at least as much politics as
Irofessionalism, but there is no denying that urbane Rosenne, cur-
^ntly Israel's ambassador to France, is way out in front in the
nor derby.
nould he be selected by his government to follow Arens as chief
It the sensitive and important Washington embassy, it would rep-
Ijsent a change of substance as well as style. Arens came to Wash-
kgton with the reputation of an Israeli hawk in military and diplo-
matic matters and as a well-publicized opponent of the Camp David
ccords.
Arens' straightforward attitude and familiarity with American
Ittitudes and customs earned him high marks in his ambassadorial
inure, but comments attributed to him since he became Israeli de
fense minister show no softening on important issues. He has re-
ortedly been less than complimentary in discussing the U.S. State
department and Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger.
I^tosenne, as ambassador, would be bound to enunciate and sup-
Tort the policies of his government, but he would arrive in Wash-
hgton with a track record as one of the Israeli architects of the
[amp David accords.
The Romanian-born Rosenne, 51, has lived in Israel since 1948.
trench-educated and the recipient of a doctor of law degree, he is no
Jtranger to diplomatic service in the United States, having pre-
viously held the post of Israeli consul in New York.
More important, though, have been his contributions as one of
he Jewish state's most able and experienced negotiators. In addi-
lun to the difficult Camp David talks that resulted in the Israel-
Egypt peace treaty, he represented his country in negotiations with
fyria, Egypt and the United States following the Yom Kippur
v ar. He also was a key figure in the talks with Egypt immediately
allowing Anwar Sadat's historic journey to Jerusalem.
Kosenne met recently in Israel's embassy in Paris with editors of
he American Jewish press who were visiting France on a study
(i,"..si(in sponsored by the United Jewish Appeal and the American
lewish Press Association. He waved off the rumors that he would
in be trading the banks of the Seine for the banks of the Potomac
(s premature and not suitable for discussion.
On other matters, however, he was more forthcoming. Relations
etween Israel and France, he admitted, reflected many differences
opinion on the political level. Nevertheless, he described French
president Francois Mitterrand as "a friend of Israel.''
Economic ties between France and the Jewish state are also im-
iressive. Rosenne. nqted that trade between the two countries
(mounts to about $300 million per year in both directions. In short,
he ambassador sees French-Israeli relations as improving, "but all
tpblems are not yet solved."
lone ol the areas of contention is France's seeming acceptance of
'alestine Liberation Organization, which maintains a Paris
Community Calen&aR
mARch
20-21.
Suno&y-montay
20, Sunoay
21,mon6ay
I, thunstay
26,SauiRtey
White Elephant Sale, Sisterhood
of Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood, 9 a.m. 5 p.m.
First Aliyah Conference, Temple
Israel, Miami; call 1-573-2556.
David Ben-Gurion Culture Club
meets at 7 p.m. at Hallandale
Jewish Center.
Technion, South Broward
Women's Division, meets at noon
at Galahad North, Hollywood.
"Jews in Distress" is Alfred
Goldens topic as Temple Sinai's
Lecture Series continues at 8 p.m.
Singles (20 35) Wine and Cheese
Party, sponsored by the Jewish
Community Centers, 2838
Hollywood Blvd.; call 921-5511.
Singles (20 -35) Dance at Orange-
brook Country Club, (across from
Hollywood Mall) at 9 p.m.,
sponsored by JCC; call 921-5511.
28, monftay "First Passover Seder.
Your Community Calendar welcomes news of your Jewish
riented organization. All meetings, times and their locations,
Ihoulo be directed to Steve Katon, associate editor, at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar
Information must be received at last two weeks before publication
date.
Ambassador Meir Rosenne
office. "A great deal of international terror is orchestrated by the
PLO," Rosenne said. "We have renewed our request that the
French government close the PLO office here in Paris."
Problems in the Mideast and on the issue of the Palestinians also
have set Ambassador Rosenne at odds with the administration of
Paris' politically powerful Mayor Jacques Chirac. "His attitude on
the Mideast is a cause of disagreement," Rosenne said. "For all
other countries of the world, the Palestinian problem and the possi-
bility of a Palestinian state is a matter of foreign policy. For Israel,
it is a question of to be or not to be."
Accused Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie, charged with sending
thousands of Jews to the gas chambers of the Holocaust, was re-
turned to France shortly before Rosenne met with the editors and
was in prison awaiting trial. "Israeli authorities are ready to co-
operate with the French in his prosecution," the ambassador said.
"We will provide whatever documents we have and will make wit-
nesses available."
Relations with the French people, Rosenne noted with satisfac-
tion, are far rosier than with their government. Since the beginning
of the Lebanese war, he said, he has received 720 letters from
French nationals, most of them non-Jews, expressing solidarity
with Israel. "I hope to have them published," Rosenne said, ob
Continued on Page 8-A
Photos capture Holocaust
Norman Morrison checks photo display at Jewish Federation of South Broward.
P
....'.'.
As members of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Mission to Poland in October 1981 ex-
perienced scenes of the horrors of Auschwitz and
the tragedies of Warsaw, Norman Morrison and
Or. Robert I 'it it'll photographed what they saw.
It is quite a graphic account of and testimony
to the Holocaust. The photographic experience
will be on display through March at the
Federation, 2719 Hollywood Blvd.
As photographer Morrison puts it, "We at-
tempted to document the main camp (Auschwitz)
and Birkenau." The Federation's mission spent
three hours touring the main concentration camp,
a half-mile from Birkenau. Each camp in the area
was dedicated to a separate function: torture,
children, labor. Morrison says.
At Auschwitz, where 2 million Jews alone were
murdered, the main killing facility consisted of
four systems. Each was capable of gassing to
death 2,000 Jews an hour; 15 ovens were
operating in each facility to burn the bodies.
As the trains rolled in from all over Europe, as
many as 8,000 Jews every hour were murdered.
Twenty to 30 percent died on the way to the
concentration camp, Morrison says.
In Crakow; mission-goers witnessed evidence of
what was once a thriving Jewish community of
60,000. Today, there are three synagogues, and a
fourth in ruins.
In all of Poland, he said, there are only 5,000-
6,000 Jews left.
CljapelS
Simple, Dignified
&>Aceoiding to
Jewishlkhdition
Pre-Need and Cemetery
Counseling & Arrangements
Worldwide Shipping Available
Chapels in: Fort Lauderdale, Margate,
Deerf ield Beach, W. Palm Beach and N. Miami Beach
Broward 742-6000 Dade 945-3939
Palm Beach 627 2277
South Palm Beach 427-4700


Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18,1983
Jewish Floridian 7/f e race to rearm Egypt today
and Sholar of G...I.I Hollywood C f'rtb1" aJaaa r A I
no Sholar ot Graatar Hollywood C F'Mb'
FHEDSMOCHET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and Publisher Associate Editoi F.Kacuhve Editor
Published Bi Weakly Second Clas* Postage paid at Hatiandaie Fia USPSU64S00
HOLLYWOODFORT LAUOEROALE OFFICE. Am Savings 2500 Bidci 24001 Haitandale Beach
Blvd Suite 70JG. Haitandale. Fla 33009 Phone 454 (Ufirj
Abraham B. Halpwn. Ad.artising Supanlaor
Main Otlica & Plant 120 NE 6th SI. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone t 3'J 4605
Poetmaster Form 3579 rsiurnt to Jewish Floridian P.O. Boi 01 2*73. Miami. Fla 33101
Jewish Federation of South Broward Oiticers President. Ben Sailer. Vice Presidents. Philip A
Levin M.O.. Saul Singer M O and Nat Sediey. Treasurer. Theodore Newman. Secretary. Otto
Stieber. Executive Director. Summer G Kaye Submit material lor publication to Leslie Silas.
Public Relations Director
Member JTA. Sevan Arts, WNS NEA. AJ PA. and FPA
Jewish Floridian doei not guarantee Kaahruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Area (3.50 Annual (2 Year Minimum */). or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. 2711 Hollywood Slvd.. Hollywood Fla 11020 Phone 921 M10
Out ol Town Upon Request.
Friday, March 18, 1983
Volume 13
4NISAN5743
Number 6
Presidents Who've Struck Out
We live in a unique time. Three ex-
Presidents walk among us. This may be a
tribute to medical science, which regularly
makes such progress in the field of aging
that all our life expectancies seem on the
increase. But not all of us are ex-Presi-
dents. When they live longer, they can con-
tinue to bring their collective wisdom to the
nation, gleaned by their broad experience,
even after they have left office.
Or they can sit .there like exhausted
ducks, some of them symbolic of disgrace
or just plain repudiation, contaminating
the atmosphere of America's political reali-
ties.
Unfortunately for us, these days there
seems to be more of the latter than the
former from ex-Presidents Nixon, Ford and
Carter. Whether it be the greed and
rapaciousness for power that characterized
at least two of them, or the unrelenting
foot-in-mouth disease that continues to af-
flict the last of them, what we experience in
our surviving ex-Presidents is not so much
wisdom as wooliness.
For President Carter, the wooliness is
accompanied by a now wearying sense of
evangelism in his soul that he can best jus-
tify his four years in office by bringing
peace to the Middle East. There was con-
sumate arrogance in his belief that he could
do that in the first place when he sat in the
Oval Office.
Still, Camp David came closest to a
"success'' he could point to in his one term
a "success" that never quite disguised
his other abysmal failure: the humiliating
hostage-taking scenario staged in Iran, and
dilemma out of which Carter tried to crack
the nation with an even more humiliating
hush-hush military rescue operation that
died on the sands of the Iranian desert well
before it could get to Teheran.
Since the past galls Mr. Carter, he
spends so much of the present trying to
correct it. His book, "Keeping the Faith," a
mystifying fantasy devoted to his four
years in office, is one example of this. It is
history in a way that bears little relation-
ship to reality. Unfortunately, it devotes so
many pages to Camp David, but that is the
lopsided nature of the Carter years there
was too little to show for them. And so his
weakness, contrasted by nothing, appears
all too glaring. Nor does the Carter ob-
sessjon^ndjjojy^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
BEFORE, President Mubarak
embraced the Palestinian cause.
At the height of the Israeli
bombing of Beirut, he used the
embarrassment of the situation
to say nasty things, even about
Israel's alleged violations of the
Camp David accord. He then
violated the accord himself by
withdrawing Egypt's am-
bassador from Tel Aviv.
What Mubarak had in mind
was to ingratiate himself in
Araby and, ultimately, to bring
Egypt back to its former position
as spokesman in the West for the
Arab cause against Israel, of
course, but never stated that
way, since to state it that way
would be to make nonsense of
Egypt's role as a signatory to the
"peace" with Israel, which his
violation of it had already
achieved.
Anyway, all that was before.
NOW, Mubarak is suddenly
tilting with the Palestinians. He
has especially in mind the PLO
people in his own midst who, like
all good revolutionaries, love
particularly to bite the hand that
feeds them.
By Mubarak's own count,
there are some 40,000
Palestinians living in Egypt
today, and only last week, he
accused them of inciting the
Egyptian people against the
government, meaning himself,
and the army, also pretty much
meaning the same thing. "I am
not prepared to have a state
within the state or above the
state," Mubarak declared.
One can only wonder whether
he had Lebanon in mind when he
said this, and what the PLO in
Lebanon did to the safety and
comfort of Israel that finally
moved the frustrated Israelis to
march into that benighted
country. Or would that have
rnade Mubarak's angry criticism
of Israel during the war in the
cause of his campaign to reeled
Egypt as mouthpiece of Araby
mere posturing?
IN ANY CASE, if Egypt
weren't facing such profound
problems at home economic,
religious and out-and-out
revolutionary whatever the
40,000 Palestinians were doing or
saying there could hardly count
for very much important enough
to get Mubarak so riled up in the
first place.
Mubarak's angry warning to
the Palestinians the other day
that he would begin mass
deportation of their numbers
unless they quieted down and
behaved themselves like cour-
teous guests rather than as
revolutionaries certainly em-
phasizes his awareness of their
true intentions.
But warnings are not action
not in the cause of Egypt in-
ternally; not in the cause of
Egypt's pan-Arabism; nor even
in Mubarak's ambition to forge
his image in Egypt as an
equivalent of his predecessors,
Sadat and Nasser. After all, in
the end, he must at least be able
to present himself as their equals
if he is to achieve either of the
first two causes, let alone both.
AND THAT is the trouble
with Mubarak, his essential do-
nothingism. Robert Fisk, writing
in the London Times, hit it
squarely on the head when he
observed that "President
Mubarak espouses nothing .
and that is why in the vacuum
that exists in Egypt now
people are turning with in-
creasing vigor to Islam." And.
apparently, to the PLO in their
midst.
The West, meanwhile, rushes
wildly to fill the vacuum in Egypt
the best way it knows how
with weapons. America, par-
ticularly, seems intent upon
spoiling for a fight in North
Africa by which it can ac-
complish in Egypt what
Mubarak warned the PLO there
he would not let them do to
become "a state within the
state."
That is what our own
posturing in the Mediterranean
the other week was all about and
our sending of AWAC's to Egypt
and warnings to Libya's
strongman Khadafy not to
engage in any military ad-
venturism to Egypt's south. To
put it bluntly: we have Israel in
our hip-pocket Now. how about
Egypt, too?
THE REAGAN Administra-
tion will say it is all being done in
the name of a peaceful attempt to
help Egypt unravel the tangle of
its domestic economic crisis. But
the fact is that, following a June,
1981 agreement, Egypt pur-
chased two nuclear reactors from
the U.S. of "relatively low" pow-
er in the 1,000 megawatt range
each, and for low-grade uranium
fuel.
But the agreement include? |
technical and training assistance,
as well as the supply of services
for uranium enrichment, which is
a euphemism for converting
nuclear reactors from pur-
portedly electrical energy
(peaceful) purposes to military
status.
To clarify the point: Just one
year later, on July 3, 1982, the
U.S. shipped Egypt a 1.5,
megawatt nuclear laboratory, for j
industrial electronic radiation,
more specifically, for handtfbg
electrical cables and sterilizing1
medical products. Or so we said.
BUT THE real objective of
this latest shipment of equipment
lies buried in the U.S.-Egyptian
agreement of March, 1982 in
which the "electronic radiation"
terminology is far more ac-
curately spelled out as an I
agreement for scientific
cooperation and protection
against nuclear radiation. And I
when, pray, is one concerned I
about nuclear radiation short of
an accident, which would be I
minimal and limited to the area of I
the reactor itself? Answer: in I
time of nuclear war, of course.
If the U.S. contribution tol
Egypt's rearming process seems
alarmingly nuclear in nature,!
other European nations, and I
Canada, seem no less bashful in I
selling their own nuclear facilities!
to Egypt, including West Ger-I
many, where a national election!
only last Sunday somewhat paral
doxically hinged on that coun-f
try's apparent unwillingness tol
stock American missiles on itij
territory aimed at the
Union.
Presumably, it's okay to plantl
your nuclear devastation!
capabilities elsewhere, Egypt for!
example, but not at home. Still, it I
should be understood that in this I
hypocrisy the West Germans are|
not alone.
JUST AS the United States!
does not have a monopoly on thel
nuclear arming of Egypt, neither!
do we have a monopoly on thel
sale of conventional arms tHgrVj
either. From Europe to the U.S.,]
from Canada to China, which is
rapidly becoming Egypt's third!
largest arms supplier after thel
U.S. and France, the flow of I
weapons to Mubarak has become!
an awe-inspiring display to|
behold.
For more on that, another timel
Jewish student conductei
anti-Semitic campaign
"No! You cannot bring him to services even if he is eating
matzoth."
U.S. faulted
Continued from Page 1-A
Broward audiences that America has a great deal
to be thankful for for its investment in Israel.
"It's like the domino theory in reverse," Gazit be-
lieves.
The domino theory is best exemplified by what
happened in Southeast Asia. The Communists'
influence kept growing, knocking over the next
country and eliminating any hope for
Western influence.
In the Mideast today, Major Gazit said, just
the opposite is happening. Because of Israel's
dominance in military and moral concerns, the
Arab nations' respect for the Jewish State over-
flows onto its greatest ally: The United States.
The Israeli said he expects Jordan's King Hus-
sein to join the peace talks "any day now."
Asked the possibility of Syria going to war
with Israel, Gazit pointed to the news of new
strategic surface-to-air missiles """n*d by
Soviet personnel on Syria soil. They are
trained on the U.S. Sixth Fleet in the Mediter-
ranean, on Turkey, on Greece and on Iran.
GENEVA A 23-year-old
Jewish medical student arrested
in Basel was described by police
as the perpetrator of a campaign
of virulent anti-Semitic graffiti,
harassment and death threats in
that city last month.
The disclosure by the police
last Friday that Philip Gotchel,
son of a prominent Jewish family,
was solely responsible for the
acts called unprecedented ml
Switzerland, stunned Jews and]
non-Jews alike. The Jewish com-l
munity expressed deep sympathy I
for the "shame and scandal to hill
family." Gotchel has been placed,)
under psychiatric care. -**
The young man, nephew of il
leading physician, was said to bel
an excellent student at the Basel|
medical school.
This is the first time the Soviets actually have
sent in troops to maintain missiles in the Middle |
East, Gazit said.
The Israeli spokesman said his country will not j
pull out of Lebanon until four conditions are met.
"We don't want to be in Lebanon ... we want j
to go home Israel is an idea, a dream, a homel
an insurance policy for both Jews and gentiles. I
Our home is a reality, a hope, and it gives us |
sense of being."
Israel wants 11 prisoners held by the Syrianij
returned. In return, Israel will release most of thel
hundreds of prisoners it has captured. Gazit ej
plained that anyone who is accused of a terrP"^|
act within the borders of Israel cannot be freed|
until he or she is tried on the accusation.
The other Israeli demands call for all terror
forces to leave Lebanon; a parallel agreemefl-.
with Syria that states if Israel moves 20 miles ou|
of Lebanon, the Syrians will do likewise; and.1
finally, that Israel demands a multinational
tmreimoiog force to fill the void left by the IM
raelis and Syrians.



Friday, March 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5-A
tmvG****" great friend t0 lsra*h Chavarut speaker believes
m^tattik j'irvjas: ^u^t^ ^^^ ^^0.1^0^. waammmMamm
A few of the salient points
made last week by J. Frederic
Blitstein, former professor of in-
ternational relations, specializing
in the Middle East:
Ronald Reagan is the greatest
friend to Israel since President
Harry S. Truman.
Beware of two of Reagan's
advisers, who the speaker called
"violent anti-Semites": Secre-
tary of Defense Caspar Weinber-
ger and the State Department's
Richard Clark.
"We in the Diaspora have ab-
solutely no right to tell Israel
what to do, when their boys are
dying."
In closing his speech last week
before nearly 600 women at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Chavarut Luncheon at
the Eden Roc, Dr. Blitstein made
the analogy of what was happen-
ing in the Galilee before the inva-
sion.
He likened the deadly situation
to machine guns being set up
atop the Hemispheres in South
Broward, six miles from Emerald
Hills, and ready to be fired upon
anyone who stepped out of their
homes.
This is what Israelis living
nearly the border had faced, he
said.
CHAVARUT Chairwoman Delia Rosenberg I right) shares a
smile with Evelyn Stieber, Women's Division vice president
campaign, and Chavarut speaker J. Frederic Blitstein.
'PEACE NEEDED' Did the Palestine National Council accept or reject President Reagan's
initiative on the Middle East dated Sept. 1? Well, it all depends on to whom you speak. What
the two speakers did agree on last week at the Community Relations Committee's Mideast
Dialogue at Temple Beth El was that peace is needed. Shown at the dias, from left, are Joseph
I-^Jtleiman, speaker's bureau chairman, CRC; Dr. David Sachs, media relations chairman, CRC;
debater Ghassan K. Bishara, a Palestinian who is Washington correspondent for an Arab daily;
debater Gideon Samet, correspondent for the Israeli daily Ha'areti; Jack Berman, chairman,
Middle East Task Force, CRC; and (at podium) Rabbi Samuel Rothberg of Temple Beth El.
The Community Relations Committee (CRC) is a division of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Study, identity, anti-Semitism top list
HappyP
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Mark Davis, F.D.
Doug Lazarus, F.D.
BUI Settles
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial Chapelt.
NEW YORK (JTA) Jewish
education, strengthening Jewish
identity and combating anti-
Semitism emerged from a new
survey of views of Jewish leaders
as the domestic issues they re-
gard as the key concerns of the
North American community.
The survey was made by Paul
Kresh Communications at the re-
quest of a number of Jewish com-
munity agencies, including the
JWB, according to Esther Leah
Ritz of Milwaukee, JWB presi-
dent. Peace in the Middle East
and a strong Israel were listed as
the chief matters affecting the
welfare of Jews on the inter-
national scene.
Mrs. Ritz said the survey form
was mailed to 110 major lay lead-
ers in the Metropolitan New York
area, from October to December
of 1982. She said it included 16
multi-part questions on matters
ranging from organizational
affiliation to children's involve-
ment in Jewish activities.
She said the survey also show-
ed that more than 90 percent of
the respondents believed that
concerns and ties with other Jews
was "extremely important" or
"very important" in defining
what it means to be a Jew.
Next in importance, according
to the survey data, was "a way of
life," followed by "custom and
traditions" and "religious be-
liefs."
THE LEADING EDGE
| OS Merrill Lynch Realty
MCK, Inc.
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Every Saturday and Sunday the fabu-
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a day... a full gambling casino... live enter-
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Medicare Is
Not Enough:
Edward and Selma Kaplan

You Probably
Need B'nai B'rith's
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOD-AS-13077)
Tor many medical
charges, it pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
It includes private
duty nursing in the
hospital.
It includes doctor's
office and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductibles
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed."
* For niembe rs age 65 and '
over. Pre existing conditions
not covered for the first 6
months of coverage.
Tor B'nal B'rith members only
We enroll new members
B'nai B'rith's
...hi.
Group Insurance
Underwritten by <
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JULES L. SOLOMON
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2632 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD
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ii VrtM


- P;
v,..-
PageG-A
ThtJtwishPioridian and Shofar of Ortater Hollywood
'
Friday, March 18,1983 | Z
"3P
OUTSTANDING VALUE Jewish Federation of South
Broward Cash Collection Chairperson JoAnn Katz (1981-82)
accepts a startling, multi-colored award for her work in behalf
of Israel, the Diaspora and the South Broward Jewish com-
munity. Presenting the plaque is Ben Salter, president of the
Federation.
YOM HAATZMAUT
ISRAEL'S 35th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Come join in the Commemoration and Festivities of this
Wonderful Occasion at. YOUNG CIRCLE. HOLLYWOOD. F|_.
SUNDAY. APRIL 24th. 1983
II 00 AM-4 OOP. M.
you wish to have a booth,
contact Mark at the JCC
921 651
for further information
uoDub
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadasaah today!
Your Will can continue Hadassah's achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow
hadassah
* MAI~TO MAO AM AH. WILLS BEOUESTS OEPT
SO Wl Ml SlrW N Vork N V 10019 (2121 355 7900
Fteasc nd m mlo.mlrv Orocfturt -Th* Slut B RamtmOtrta m Ptms* '
i
AOOs*
SEA EDGE workers for the United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of South Broward 1983
Campaign show off the plaque presented to them at a recent breakfast in their honor. Shown
from left are Ann Shapiro. Herman Schulman, Nellie Lerner and Bert Shapiro.
Three sentenced
in Argov shooting
LONDON Three members
of a Baghdad-based Palestinian
terrorist group were sentenced to
30 and 35 year prison terms in
Central Criminal Court here for
the attempted assassination of
the Israeli Ambassador to
Britain. Shk>mo Argov last June
:\.
rUssein Said. 23, a Jordanian
national who fired the shots that
left the 53 year-old Israeli diplo-
mat almost totally paralyzed,
and Marwan Bonna. 20, also of
Jordan, who drove the getaway
car. were given 30 year sentences
by Judge William Mars Jones.
Nauoff Rosan, 36, an Iraqi
citizen, described by the prose-
cution as the leader of the gang,
received a 35 year sentence.
The prosecutor said the three
were members of the Palestine
National Liberation Movement, a
breakaway faction of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization,
headed by Sabri Banna who is
known as Abu Nidal.
Start a tasteful tradition. Make your
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Seasoning and Broth.
#~*^- mm mnMnn For an extra special seder
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G. Washington s Seasoning and
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It s a complete seasoning
The unique blend of herbs and
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more ways than one
Serve knaidlach made with
G Washington s and hear your
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iaHSa
IIAtOMIMO *r* aOTM
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2 eggs lightly beaten
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
' 1 cup malzah meal
1 quart boiling water
S packets G. Washington's
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dash pepper
Mix eggs, oil 1 packet G Washington sand pepper Gradually add matzah meal
stirring until thick Refrigerate 20 minutes in covered bowl Form dough into 8
balls Add remaining 4 packets G Washington s to boiling waler. stir Orop mal-
zah balls into broth; simmer 30 minutes Makes 8 mat:ah balls
K Certified Kosher tor Passover m Specially Marked Packages
t Ifstime to .t
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No cholesterol.
And our light-
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Just try it in
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Certified Kosher by Kosher Overseers of America


Friday, March 18, 1963
ThtJtwiah Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page7-A
Why me?
Downe's Syndrome strikes,
and your dollars are there
By GINNI WALSH
UJA Special Correspondent
It was the eighth time Gila
waited expectantly in a hospital
bed after giving birth.The results
oft he other deliveries were seven
healthy children. But this time as
Gila waited to hold her infant, the
medical team was discussing how
to break the news.
The doctors and nurses were
struggling with painful ques-
tions: How do you tell a mother
that she has just brought a
genetically defective child into
the world? How do you deal with
the shock, the despair, the cry of
"Why me? Why did this happen
tome?"
Shulamit Shalvit, a social
worker from the Jerusalem De-
velopmental Child and Family
Center, was on hand to cope with
all of the first agonizing re-
actions: "Gila knew immediately
that something was wrong. But
the father wanted to wait a few
days before putting a name on
what the problem was.''
To Gila and her husband, the
name of the problem Downe's
Syndrome did not mean much
at first. Within a few days, they
were denying that this label could
possibly mean their child would
[f*^-raentally and physically re-
tarded, permanently.
"Denying is normal" says
Shalvit. The parents are suffering
terribly at a time like this. It is no
time to make decisions. A deci-
sion made about the child during
those first days is not pure. I
know parents who placed their
children in institutions imme-
diately, and they have lived to re-
gret it."
The center does all it can to en-
cattrage parents to keep their
handicapped children at home. It
offers parental counseling, exten-
sive therapies for the children
and kindergartens designed to
meet the special needs with a
variety of different handicaps.
Most importantly, it offers moral
support and factual information
to guide parents.
Anne Bilowet, one of the cen-
ter's kindergarten teachers, is en-
couraging:
"Advancement that can be
made with these children today is
incredible. We've learned, for
example, what a Downe's Syn-
drome child can achieve when we
work with him or her from birth."
With a loving glance toward
the 2-and 3-year-old toddlers, she
concludes quietly and proudly:
"With these children, we're set-
ting-the foundation. I'm sharing
in the most important time of
their lives."
Mothers like Gila have to be
taught exactly how important
these beginning years are. Gila,
after those first days of pain and
denial, found healing and af-
firmation in that learning
process.
"We taught her that her new-
born would move at a different
I Hani." says Shalvit. "That
there are rules for how the child
should be fed and held, special
techniques for muscle develop-
ment. Above all, that there are
rewards very different from
the satisfaction with a so-called
normal child but very special."
The center, a pioneering
facility launched in 1967 by the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee with funds from
UJ A-Federation campaigns, now
reaches out into the towns
around Jerusalem.
scE2evelopment towns like Beit
Shemesh, where damaged chil-
dren were traditionally just kept
with their families, with no
stimulation and no chance for ad-
vancement, are reached.
For 94 special children in Beit
Shemesh today, since UJA-
Project Renewal funds brought
the Jerusalem center's services
into the town, the picture is
brightly changed. The children
are no longer hidden burdens.
Every advance, every small new
motor skill learned is a source of
joy and triuph.
According to Director Asher
Ornoy, "The centers' approach
Continued on Page 8-A
BROWARD WINNERS of Silver Medallion Awards, National Conference of Christians and
Jews, are the Rev. George E. Weaver, recently retired pastor of the New Mt. Olive Baptist
Church of Ft. Lauderdale (Distinguished Service Award); Charles Lantz, chairman of Atlantic
National Bank of Florida; Audrey Millsaps, president of the Church Women United of Greater
Ft. Lauderdale; and Dr. Abraham Fischler, president of Nova University.
f^.yww
Why Is This Month Of March
Different
From All Other Months?
Because it's the end
of the year.
The Jewish Agency's fiscal year in Israel. When
our cash collection total counts the most.
If that total comes up short, programs for the
next budget year beginning April 1 could
be cut back.
That means people cut off. People who depend
onus.
Pioneers on pre-settlements in Israel's North
waiting for new families to join them in bring-
ing new life to hillsides finally free of terror...
Sinai settlers withdrawn for the sake of peace -
waiting for the housing, the roads, the green-
houses they must have to build new lives in the
Negev...
Disadvantaged teenagers needing guidance and
direction waiting to fill hundreds of empty
places in Youth Aliyah residential schools...
The proud and willing elderly, seeking useful,
dignified employment in their final years watt-
ing for sheltered workshop doors to open to
them...
They could be waiting in vain... unless there
is an outpouring of cash from our campaigns.
Now. And all through this month of March
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Boulevaid, Hollywood, Florida 33020 Phone: 305/921-8810
Pay Your Pledge Today to the 1983 Regular Campaign and Israel Special Fund


Page8-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 18,1983
Quiz yourself
on L&E fund
By MICHAEL J. MOSKOWITZ
Federation Staff
When many individuals read about the Legacy and
Endowment Fund, they say to themselves, "Well this is only
good for rich people," or "I don't need any tax deductions."
^ Both assumptions are false. The Legacy and Endowment
Fund of the Jewish Federation of South Broward is designed to
help people of every age and socio-economic category.
Head the 10 questions below. If you can answer them, you do
not need the help of the Legacy and Endowment Fund.
However, if you are unaware of the answers, puzzled or want
more information, contact the Legacy and Endowment Fund at
921-8810.
CAN YOU ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS?
1. How to stimulate your children-grandchildren's interest in
Jewish activities?
2. How to set up a trust for your children-grandchildren and
simultaneously receive a tax deduction?
3. How a philanthropic fund can save you money?
4. How to give i:iilul:uli and see exactly where your dollars
go?
5. How to minimize estate taxes, painlessly?
ft. How to make a charitable contribution and receive income
from it at the same time?
7. How to use your appreciated stock to receive a tax deduc-
tion?
8. How to use your principal-vacation residence for a tax
deduction without selling it?
9. How to set up your own private foundation without the
paperwork and expense?
10. How to minimize the tax bite when selling an interest in a
close corporation?
ALIYAH Center of Miami
has a new director by the
name of Allun Milstein, a
former high school English
and physics teacher in Brow-
ard County. The Aliyah Cen-
ter, housed at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation on
Biscayne Boulevard, proces-
ses emigration and absorp-
tion for those who wish to
make a new life for them-
selves in Israel. Short-term
programs are available in
order to experience Israel be-
fore settling there.
first Aliyah conference next Sunday In Miami
A unique overview of life op-
portunities in Israel will be
presented at South Florida "s first
Aliyah Conference Sunday,
March 20. beginning at 11 a.m. at
Temple Israel in Miami.
The conference will offer work-
shops and sessions of interest
and concern to persons who are
considering their future in Israel.
These sessions will answer ques-
tions about college study,
seminars and year programs,
family life, job retraining and
career direction, professions, re-
turning Israelis, business and in-
vestments, retirement and new
lifestyles kibbutz, moshav and
development towns.
Guest speaker will be Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, deputy chief of
Why me-
Continued from Page 7-A
outside of Israel," he states, "are
only diagnostic. The fact that we
diagnose and treat, means that
we're really fulfilling the main
goal of medicine."
Counseling pregnant women
against irrational fear of birth
abnormalities is a key function at
the center. "My main role is to
calm down anxiety and reduce
the number of unnecessary preg-
nancy terminations," says
Ornoy.
The philosophy is clear: life is
precious, should be wanted .
guarded cherished helped
to grow.
Demand for the center's serv-
ices is beginning to outartip its
capacity, but plans for expansion
have been suspended. Funded
from the Ministry of Health,
which has had responsibility for
the Jerusalem facility and 12
similar programs in Israel since
1978, expansion has been cut
back in the wake of Operation
Peace for Galilee. Future growth
now hinges on the success of the
1983 United Jewish Appeal-
Federation Campaign.
For Gila, three years after the
birth of her Downe's Syndrome
baby, the hurt and anxiety are
past: the promised rewards
mount with each sign of slow,
new progress in her special eighth
child. The anxiety has now
shifted to the center's devoted
staff, who wait and wonder if
they will be able to offer that life
gift to all the other mothers and
afflicted children who will need
their unique and loving care.
the Israel Mission in Washing-
ton. Netanyahu is former execu-
tive director of the Jerusalem
Conference on International Ter-
rorism and the brother of
Jonathan Netanyahu, who was
killed while leading the ground
forces in the 1976 rescue mission
in Entebbe, later named Opera-
tion Jonathan.
South Broward residents
working with the organization in-
clude Bud and Betty Homans
and Bob and Shane Wolf.
For more information about
the Aliyah Conference, call the
Israel Aliyah Center at 1-573-
2556.
1SMED
DH&
Thursday, March 24
-10PM
Host: Stanley M.
Rosenblatt
Israeli Diary begins
its second season!
This on-location
WPBT production
features former
Minister of Defense
Ariel Sharon. Future
guests Include
Yitzhak Rabin,
Shimon Peres, and
Yitzhak Navon.
Don't miss the
inside story!
v** mtvtwon
MWWTMHOMM
Rosenne moving to U.S.
Continued from Page 3-A
serving that the outpouring of support came despite the fact that
"large segments of the French press did not treat us (Israel in
Lebanon) fairly to say the least."
The ambassador recently returned from a tour of the French
provinces and described his reception as "very warm and in
many areas, there are very few Jews." One small French village had
signed an agreement of twinning with a community in Israel,
Rosenne said. "I was met on my arrival by 20 members of the
municipal government everyone but the communists. It was
very touching, very moving."
As for France's 700,000-strong Jewish community, "It's
solidarity with Israel is 100 percent," Rosenne said. "It is a com-1
munity that is very much alive and proud of its Jewishness."
Comparing the French Jewish press with its American Jewish
counterpart, Rosenne noted its influence is far less significant, a re-
sult of communal factions and too many political and ethnic
agendas. A recent development is the creation of four radio stations I
devoted to Jewish communal issues. Some broadcasting is done in
Yiddish, Rosenne explained. "It's reaching the three 'Bs' -
Rubbas. Balabustas and Businessmen."
While discussion of his diplomatic future and particularly thel
possibility that he might become ambassador to the United States!
was out of bounds, Rosenne provided observers with a glimpse I
of the steel underneath the skilled negotiator's flexibility and will-|
ingness to compromise.
"We Israelis don't want to be objects of sympathy or be 'nice'l
while we disappear," he said. "We have a special duty as a Jewish)
state to make sure our heritage is transmitted to a new generation!
and to make sure the world never forgets."
Cantor Wanted
Recently formed Templel
seeks Cantor for High
Holidays. Send resume andl
other information to:
P.O. Box 4384
Margate, Florida 33063
Qy3AMAQA\OL.
Music lovers will enjoy the
excitement of Quisisana musical
evenings with future greats from
Julliard and other conservatories.
Thesa young artists are members of
our staff and present concerts,
Broadway musical excerpts and
evenings of opera. We also feature
dancing, folk "sings" and movies.
Quisisana...cuisine par excellence
from brioche to blintzes. Continental
chefs make each meal an "adventure
in Dining."
Happiness is...
a game of tennis on our clay courts...
shuffleboard, badminton or ping
pong... sailing, water skiing,
canoeing. Golfing at Lake Kezar
Country Club.
Informal
luxury on...
LAKE
KEZAR
Center Lovell,
Maine
QUISISANA
Cantar Lovell,
Main* 04016
(207)S2S-3SOO
QUISISANA
P.O. Box 2S0M
Ft. Lauoardal*,
Fl. 33320 Dept.#2
(305) 731-7397
(305)739-3317
Open Juna 21 -Aug. 2fl
r"
Congressman and Mrs. Larry Smith
W.Pol *


Friday, March 18. 1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Oreater Hollywood
Page 9-A
Presidential election only four days away now
JERUSALEM (JTA) With
the Knesset's election for the
next president only days away
March 22 the political parties
are moving into high gear in their
efforts to select candidates.
Both Likud and Labor have set
up small committees of leading
Knesset' members to work on this
issue.
Political pundits say veteran
National Religious party leader
Yosef Burg seems the most
widely supported possible
candidate at this point.
Burg, however, says he will not
run.
Within the Likud coalition,
Herat, La'am. Agudat Israel and
the NRP are known to be pre-
pared to back Burg, though
Tami will oppose him because of
the long-standing feud between
Burg and Tami's leader Aharon
Abu Hatzeira.
So far, Labor has been
reserving its position. Within the
party there are two men who are
seen as possible candidates
themselves:
MK Shlomo Hillel and MK
Chaim Herzog. Hillel has the
advantage of being a Sephardi,
and Herzog has the advantage of
being the son of the late Chief
Rabbi Isaac Herzog (and thus
likely to be an acceptable choice
among the religious parties).
It is unlikely, however, that
either of these Labor men would
win support from the coalition.
Coalition members would
consider it unacceptable for a
Labor opposition figure to be
elected president twice in a row
during Likud's incumbency in
government. President Yitzhak
Navon was a front-beng Labor
MK before becoming president in
1978.
Tami is still pushing the candi-
dacy of Beersheba Mayor Eliahu
Nawi, and Tami's Swiss patron
Nessim Gaon was reported to
have canvassed Premier Mena-
chem Begin on Nawi's behalf this
week and to have drawn a
blank. Gaon would also presuma-
bly support a Herzog candidacy,
since the two men are related by
marriage.
AQUARIUS activists in the 1983 UJA Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward Campaign greet
guest speaker Israeli Ambassador Benjamin Varon (center, above, and below) before he ad-
dressed a recent function. Above, he's with Co-Chair men Max Morrison (left) and Seymour
Goodman. Below, are Aquarius' Bernard Goldberger, Lilian Zeefe and Chairman Lewis E. Cohn
(right).
SOLOMON AWARD The National Council of Jewish
Women has presented its highest honor, the Hannah G.
Solomon Award, to Mara Giukant for her 'efforts in behalf of
the community in providing for the unmet needs from a
grassroots level.' The NCJW called Mrs. Giulianti, who also
serves as the Jewish Federation of Sooth Broward's CRC
chairperson, 'a catalyst for social change.' The honoree is
flanked by Irene Spatter (left) and Sheryl Sherman.
TrWreout
if you don t
have clout!
Oout.Vou oat* whan you
dMl through ma. an
liiitatjaiidant tnauranoa
Agant Hare'* why. Bacauaa
In burin tor myW. I am
your inourano* wRh any
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gtvaa ma clout, tinea I doot
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poaMton to nagotiata in your
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choosing tha car.
homo, bualnaaa, or Ufa
protection that auMa
your naada boat.
For haip wtth your naadi.
can or vi.it ma at
Jack Berman Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD. 921-7744 Dade 947-5902
->------
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"Finally, a
Catskill resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..."
$350and$365
Per week, per person (dbl .occ.)
Every Room wth Private Bath,
Ak Conditioning and Color TV
When you escape the Florida heat
this Summer, escape to something
more than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
We know that you go on vacation to
do niece than live from one meal to the
next. That's why we're on the Modified
American Plan, serving two sumptuous
meals daily. Breakfast (until 1130 am),
and Dinner (from 6:30 to 8:30 pm).
Midday snacks? Magnificent Pool-
side Coffee Shop.
There will be no announcement at
1 pm calling you back to the Dining
Room which you just left, no need to
rush off the golf course or tennis courts.
Linger at the pool all day if you choose.
We have one outdoor and indoor (con-
taining health club and jet whirlpool
spa). Play duplicate bridge, take art
classes, go folk dancing, jog, or work
out on our Universal minkr/m. In short,
enjoy a full day of outdoor activities and
sunshine, and all the other fabulous
things we have to offer, including enter-
tainment that's second to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun.. .not something that
gets in the way of fun!
For reservations and
information phone
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaHsburg. NY 12779
Master Card, Visa, Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
yVedon
Your host for three generations.
The Posner Family
-


Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18,1983
tPride
5 LB BOX
MANISCHEWITZ
ROKEACH WHITE t PIKE OR OLD VIENNA WHITE t PRE
......2c2n2.31
Gefltte Fish
MANISCHEWIT7-REGULAR LOW CAL OR CLEAR
32 02
^ .92
ROKEACH-COCONUT ALMONO CMOC CHIP On CHOCOLATE
10O2
CONT
0O2 1i32
PANTRV PRIDE
2 .79
BTl
MANlSCHEWITZ CONCORD MALAGA BLACKBERRY OR
CHERRY
.."RUt
PASSOVER ITEMS IN OUR
PRODUCE DEPT.
CALIFORNIA SHELLED 16 OZ CAN
Diamond $^79
Walnuts *C
, BOX 1.39
EXTRA LARGE
. ... BOX
?u,2.19
BOX
.99
i;t*L3^
RHINEFLEUR OR GOLD CMABLIS
5.49
LAM8RUSC0 BIANCO OR ROSATO
CeMa Wines........,5b,.?4.99
3 LTR BTL BURGUNOV CMA8LIS PINK CHABllS OR vn ROSE
North Mountain Wine 5.39
l PAISANO BU
VMROSE
Rossi
$199
3
GENERICS
4 HOIL PKG GENERIC
Bath
Tissue
NATIONAL BRAND .............$1.25
GENERIC
Coffee Creamer
77
."1.19
2 ^s 1.00
jfNERlC PK LIOUIO
Dish Detergent
Cranberry Juice
GENERIC EVAPORATED
Filled Milk......
ASSORTED FLAVORS
32 02 PA
BTL 9V
I GAL
. JUG
14 02
JUG
.09
64011.69
' I O/ <%A
CAN >JV
2LTR mm
.BTL II
GENERC
Cat Utter...........1.11.79
GENERIC OWNER-''. 02 BO
Macaroni & Cheese 3 .79
HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS!]
4-PIBCE
PLACE
SETTING
4 piece place settings in your choice of two
patterns consist of: Dinner Plate. Cup. Saucer
and Dessert Dish
SdViCe for 8! 32 pieces for only $3.92. Fill in your Cash SaverC
with Cash Saver Coupons every time you shop. YouTl get one coupon with <
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVEI
PRODCJCE
MCINTOSH
1
FRESH
Mushrooms
CRISP
CRUNCHY
LB BAG
79

FLAVORFUL
NUTRTIOUS
UPICK
LB
99

AM
SWEET EATING NORTHWEST
Anjou
.LB
69
US NO 1 ALL PURPOSE
WHITE
INDIAN RIVER X IX) 27 SIZE U PICK-WHITE
... 4for .89
GAROEN FRESH
CH.39
NORTHWEST X FANCY 10 W VEXAH BAG-HI 0
1.69
FLAVORFUL AND REFRESHING
Sun kist Lemons.*-' .79
Potatoes
97*
19
U S NO 1 ALL PURPOSE
Yellow
Onions..i
NUTRITIOUS AND OEUCIOUS U-PCK
Southern Yams lb .19
ORANGE PMEAPPLE 84-OZ GLASS JAR
Kraft Juice.......1.89
CALIFORNIA SUNKIST NAVEL '"
Oranges .... 6 for .99
FRESHLY CUT ASSORTED COLORS
Floral Bouquet .bunch 1.69
TOPS M VITAMIN A
Florida Carrots iiS .49
CRISP
Green
49
DELICIOUS FLORIDA
_____ Celeiy
Peppers LB**^ Hearts
frSAVE ON NATIONAL BRANDS!
OR LIGHT
12-OZ. BITS.
Stroh's
IJW BTL TAB. SPRITE, DIET COKE OR
I^Q SEALTEST H*Uf GALLON ASSORTED FLAVORS A -% 4%*%
29 Ice Cream *lw
OCEANSPRAY COCKTAIL REG OR
Bathtissue 79* CranberryJuice*!59
2lV9r Canada Dry 2/89*
. MONTE 17-QZ CANS SWEET PEAS CftOnWK.
1OZ CAN CUT OR FRfNCH GREEN BEANS
OUR PANTRY IS YOUR PANTRY FROZEN FOODS*
MCLS^ P^TRYPR,0EiASSORTED32.OZJAR CRISP N TASTV ,0-OZ BOX
c77< t^*!19 iSSs 99c
Mr
Lf
XsVtharvtt*CartrMs* ... 4.97
ftTbefctar............. 1.00
n, aupcn. surer nm. sunder
mMxTa
FROM THE FRENCH ALPS OCEANSPRAY FLOROA-REG OR PINK
Evian Water 'ffLM Grapefruit Juice.." 1.39 Pound Cake
SUNSWEET ^^ FRENCHS ISO* BTl
Prune Juice
BONUS PAC
."^1.29
SARA LEE
RICHS
""pSS 1.39
French's Mustard ">
GIANT ROLl
Delta
lONGGKAIN
ASSORTED FLAVORS 15'. 01 CANS
Coffee Rich 2ccSI .69
GREEN GIANT CORN ON THE COB
EAR
AG
ao> 3L>a>7J
mf. _. --------. ^ U"N WANT COM
79 Friskies Dog Food 3 1.00 Nibbiers
Towels .. .89
'0LBO-O K^tJEJ SOUP >.0C OR WATER
SunbeltRlce 2.59 White Tuna '^1.39 rHet of Ptsh Dtvan 2.49
PANTRY Pf*OE ^^
Waffles 21S& .19
AH Vegetable ON .89 Applesauce ~& .99 PrSSKPrW......881.16


Friday, March 18,1983
The Jewish Ploridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11- A
29-OZ. CAN FYNE TASTE SLICED *fl M^kf*
Peaches .l.U%
You wont beef about our
CHICKENS!
LOTS OF
CHICKEN
FLA. OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
3 BREASTS 3 LEG OTRS W/ BACKS
3 GIBLET PKGS
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM
Fresh
Chicken
3 LBS AND OVER
LB
99
t
UMIT2
PKGS PLEASE
3 LBS AND OVER
BREAST. THIGHS, DRUMSTICKS
FLA OR SHIPPEO PREMIUM FRESH
GRADE -ft
Premium LB $"| 29
Farmer Gray
Turkey Breast
GREAT FOB SOUPS
Beef Oxtails................. 1.39
NEW /i Al AND SPRING IAMB
Shoulder Lamb Chops....... 1.79
US CHOICE KEF BONEIESS
Cubed Steaks............. 2.89
""^iMPA CHOKE KEF CHUCK-? 3 LB AVERAGE
Beef
Fiyer
Combo PUgS
FIORIOA OR SHIPPEO PREMIUM FRESH
Chicken Thighs............... .79
Cottage $1Z^
Cheese ^^oz cm
BREYER SNATURAL
Plain Yogurt
BREAKSTONE
CUP
3?OZ AA
. CONT VV
8 KRAFT PARKAY
CONT
I LB
Chicken Livers..............lb .69
FIORIOA OR SHIPPEO PRFMIUM FRESH SMALL
Roasting Chickens...........lb .69
COOKING GOOD- USDA GRAOE A FRE SH
Roasting Chickens...........lb .89
FLORIDA Ofi SMIPPtO PRfcMWM FRESH
Chicken Wings .............lb .69
SOUTHERN BELLE- BONELESS SMOKED
Turkey Buffet Hams.......... 1.69
USDA CHOICE MILK FED
Fresh
stew 199 veal Breast
PANTRY PWOE-W1VFG PROTEIN ADDED
Great Qround Beef..........lB .99
FAMILY PAK-SAVE MORE
F'AMLY PACK-3 LBS t OVER
Ground Chuck .............. 1.79
FAMILY PACK 2 3 LB AVERAGE
Fresh
LB
*1
19
Low in calories, tastes good...Seafood!
FRESH FROZEN
- L Beef Liver
,LB
79*
King Fish Steak ............ 1.19
SEA BEST TRAV PACK
Red Snapper Filet.......... 2.69
ARROWTOOTM
Rounder Fillet 1.39
margarine uuarvers pkg .sv
SARGENTO-HOLLANO STYLE OOUOA OR
Edam Cheese......<
BOROEN S-COLOREO OR WHITE AMEHCAN
1_ _
PKO
SUNNY DELIGHT -FLORIOA
Citrus Punch.......M^1.09
2.99
20 1.69
2 iSM.29
WEW NATIONAL-MIDGET BOLOGNA ON
PKQi
Salami
AMEMCAN KOSHEfl-KNOCKWURST OR
,2<*>2.49
VSol.
OSCAR MAYER-ALL
.'^1.69
CLAUSSEN-PCKLES WHOLE HALF OR
1.49
I STYLE OR
m
Horlng
12-OZ.
JSELFSERVICI
BAKERY!
ROYAL HONfc*
Bran Bread .
A ( C GARLIC STICKS OR
Garlic Bread
VELVET CREME
Glazed Donuts.....' .31.29
MEYERS ONION CHEESE WHITE CMNAMON
Bake&Serve
AUNT HANNAH
Pineapple Roll
ADLER S- JEWISH RYE OR
Kaiser Rolls........Ml .69
mauam an
White Bread
2 l6oaf71.O0
802 AS
pkg .09
ieoz pa
pkg .69
2ooz at
. LOAF 04
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
WE REDEEM FEDERAL FOOD STAMPS
PRICES AND COUPONS GOOD
MAR 17MAR 23, 1983
ItUMUfA UIMCAYM
So teaniSDMM On*** "euwM ft
* to Stmm Cpm n mm* mum mack
H UMOr I SO I ?'! IMBCMItlWIlM
(to* limto W i? 5i t M
tMtm t W lat a itM Smu SMmCm*
MRMMttoaaM inintolijonsi
SK'MtotS*-.* ^P,*"'*'5'
ciAMkiMitm in***.****.
MNialll KABIMACI-
tea twin, to h ui *
tod CM ft I m a* CM ton. Sww
nutoiioMa CMMtoto'SM
ton GM ft I W* I to f*. St CMM.J* N VWJ
l>ISginto ton* <0B*.
illMlWkl li'OSMItoj
nootoa-iMiaN ;mi-M>
"nMtoCCHM l(r(II
AHA.-A IMM6I M "All SAMI CMf
wM-BMiiMito AT*-
CiwAuitWiMmJi uSWUMAlW
SERVICE DELI
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES'
BILMAR
OVEN BROWN
Turkey
Breast
HALF
LB
HANSEL t ORE TEL
Beef Bologna
:-LOW IN CHOLESTROL
^1.89
DOMESTIC -CREAMY SMOOTH
Provolone
OVEN FRtSH _
B.B.Q. Chicken 1.69
QUANTITY RKJMTS RESCUED NOT RESPONSBU W TVO0RAtAL 6WWRS
Hf1.39
DELICIOUS
Onion Rolls ...
JEWISH STYLE ONION RYE OR
Com Rye.....
DELICIOUS JUMBO
Glazed Donuts
OVEN FRESH
Apple Pie.....


Page 12-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18, 1963

I
I
Mr. H. beats his depression
Nine months ago Mr. H. con-
tacted Jewish Family Service of ji
Broward County, requesting an
appointment. Mr. H, a recently I
widowed 49-year-old salesman,
was depressed over the loss of his
wife 14 months before.
Her illness was one which had
involved gradual but certain de-
terioration of organ functions,
with loss of ability to relate to her |
environment. Mr. H. lived with |
this unfortunate situation for
nearly two years, "holding up"
emotionally, determined to be
there for his wife until her last
living breath.
His only other family was 8 22-
year-old son, who had been insti-
tutionalized for eight years. He
was born with an organic condi-
tion that eventually required
custodial care. Friends never
existed for Mr. H. his sales
positions never afforded him the
opportunity to settle down in one
place; and in more recent years,
his devotion had been toward his
son and wife.
Mr. H who lost his job and
was financially drained, was liv-
CD. Patterson Plumbing
ing in an efficiency apartment in
one of the most undesirable areas
in Broward County.
He worked through his depres-
sion fairly well Mr. H. was
basically a strong individual. His
progress was slow but steady. He
found two part-time sales posi-
tions to meet basic expenses and
then began dating.
Much to Mr. H.'s surprise, he
met a woman whom he loved very
much. While a marriage date was
being worked out, news came
that his son had taken a fall and
soon died from head injuries. Al-
most immediately, Mr. H.'s wife-
.Ice
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
2838 HCXLYWOGO BLVD HOLLYWOOD. fLORIDA 33020
CHAI-LIGHTS The challenge was to name the Jewish
Community Centers of South Broward'* nameless newspaper.
And the winner is Roberta Gershen, shown with her grand-
daughter Keely, who came up with ChaMights. Ron Rothschild,
president of the JCC, presents Mrs. Gershen with a free one-
year JCC membership.
to-be had second thoughts about
the marriage and decided not to
set a date until she was more cer-
tain of her feelings.
Mr. H. was again in the throes
of depression and lost both jobs
that he needed so badly. With the
help of therapy and medication
(taken only for a short period of
time) his depression was con-
trolled.
Together the counselor and pa-
tient formulated what first
seemed to be a bizarre plan but
has now proven to be a workable
opportunity. Mr. H. got student
loans and began college in a large
central Florida university. He
lived in a dormitory and received
grants as well as scholarships.
He was accepted in a work-
study progam and is now very
close to receiving a practical
degree. This should enable him to
get a professional, secure job al-
most anywhere where his age
would not in the least be a limit-
ing factor. Mr. H. has a fantastic
social life and feels good about
himself and his future.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-9056. Hours -
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3600 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale, 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
300 N.W. 2nd Street
Broward 456-4350
Happy Passover
Hallandale
Dade 944-5304
9
MR. AND MRS. NORMAN FREEDMAN
Lost Horizons Travel
2514 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood020-9002
\raweL travmi
2600 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
HaHandale. Florida 33000
LTD.
Brwd.: (305)456-3000 Dade; (305) 944-7119
Richard A. Barnett
2450 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood
921-0200
DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES
We Wish To Extend To All Our Friends
A Happy Passover
Joel Marc Wilentz, M.D.
Richard S. Greene, M.D.
Joseph A. Arena, M.D.
Garry B. Gewirtzman, M.D.
Harold S. Rabinovitz, M.D.
,
2100 E. HaHandale Beach Bhrd.
Hallandala. Fla. 33009
(306)464-1060
4101 S. Hospital Drive
Plantation, Fla. 33117
(305)547-7196
Passover
The Southeast Focal Point
Senior Center sponsored by the
JCC announces its seder on
Sunday, March 27, at 4 p.m. at
the center. A full course dinner
will be served. Donation is $10.50
per person. Contact Rosalie or
Rachel at 921-6518 for further
information and reservations.
Schwartz named
vice president
Thomas R. Bomar, president of
AmeriFirst Federal, announced
the appointment of Margie Sch-
wartz to vice president. Schwartz
is manager of the Hallandale of-
fice, East Hallandale Beach Bou-
levard-
She has been with AmeriFirst
for four and a half years. Before
coming to Hallandale, she was
operating manager of 183rd
Street AmeriFirst office.
She is a long-time Miami
In Israels 35th Year
As Israel celebrates its 35th year of statehood,
your strongest and most direct link with Israel,
its people and their future is your purchase of\
____ State of Israel llotuls___________
ftotn iAe
South Broward
Israel Bond Organization
Arthur Marcus
Executive Director
William Littman Joseph Raymond
Chm. Brd. Govn. Broward Co. General Campaign Chairman
WSmmm


Friday, March 18, 1983
htmt
Jft mwiPV *a>.-**
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page13-A
GALAHAD III HONOREES Samuel D. and Frances Gold-
berg receive a United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of
South Broward mosiac plaque in behalf of the 1983 Campaign
from Chairman Jules Gordon (right). The award was presented
during a recent brunch at Galahad III.
PARKER TOWERS residents Samual Rabkin, Samuel H. Levy and Edward Gusten pose with
UJ A-Jewish Federation of South Broward guest speaker Jerome Gleekel before a recent break-
fast in behalf of the 1983 Campaign. Levy is chairman of Parker Tower's efforts for Federation;
* 'listen is co-chairman.

wn -. 1 n W W Hj J! M V0M m
] 1 Bn HH '-- -'--*.' i' fiSV* *
<~~i |y r ir M

mi t
tf
;n '
STEAKS a SEAFOOD
PLAZA TOWERS activists for UJA-Jewish Federation of South Broward gather for the 1983
Campaign breakfast. Pictured, from left, are Ruth Suss, Joe Jacobs, Al Lefton, Donald Lefton,
Max Taraza and Irma and Joe Deutsch.
The Perfect Setting for Special
Birthdays and Anniversaries.
Facilities A vailable for Group and
Organization Luncheons and Dinners.
2900 N.E. 12th Terrace, Fort Lauderdale
Broward 565-2929 Dade 940-2922 Boca 368-2990
Have You Heard?
AUDIOLOGIC CARE CENTER
Hearing Aids-Hearing Testing
Dennis C. Dubin, MA, CCC-A
Emerald Hills Medical Square fc* ***]
4490 Sheridan St. Hwd. 961-9900 |
tomorrow.
FREE **
FREE copy of Holiday Innt* large booklet containing dozens of
exciting Ideas for your condo group, club or organization.
Narrated Tours .Whdtaala Ous Meat
(HAND MUCH MUCH MOREIII
MaN tNs coupon or ell poron-toi>orson cottoct to the Package
Plan Manager" at (305) 655-8800.
The Inlormetlon You Went Will Be Mailed To You
NO COST NO OBLIGATION
Your: Name-------------------------------------------------
Address.
Phone.
Club Name.
Call or Mail To: Holiday Inn, 100, Datura gJJjjLj*
FlaglerDr.,W. Palm Beach, Ra. 3340^30^ 655*800^
CALL OR WRITE DO NOT DELAY
-SUPPLYS LIMITED-
We are pleased
to announce that
Ted Newman
Has joined our firm
as an Account Executive
whan you invest
Advest
2101E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
Hallandale, Florida 33009
(305) 456-1800
j
Members New York. American & Other Principal Stock Exchanges


Page 14- A
Tha Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Gnat* Hollywood
Friday, March 18, 1963
Soviet Jewry conference under way in Jerusalem
f
JERUSALEM- (JTA) The
first international Conference on
Soviet Jewry is being attended
here by delegates from 31 coun-
tries around the world, it was an-
nounced by Avraham Horman,
president of the Israel Public
Council for Soviet Jewry.
He noted that the two previous
world conferences on Soviet Jew-
ry, held in Brussels in 1971 and
1976, were followed by a marked
rise in Jewish emigration from
the Soviet Union and it is hoped
that similar results will follow the
third conference.
But Harman made it clear that
Soviet emigration policy will
have to change first.
He said the purpose of the
conference is to demonstrate that
the plight of Soviet Jews is an
international issue that will not
be forgotten.
"From the cutdown of emigra-
tion from the Soviet Union of
Jews from 51.000 in 1979 to a
; iltry few thousand in 1982, it
seems the Russians think that it
they continue with this policy,
the problem will get easier and
that people will forget it,"
Harman said.
"People are coming to Jeru-
salem from 31 countries in order
to demonstrate to them (the So-
viets) that people will not forget
it."
According to Harman, present
estimate is that there are 2.5 mil-
lion Jews in the USSR of which
number 400,000 have requested
and received invitations from
relatives in Israel so that they
can begin the emigration process.
But they have not been
granted exit visas. About 7,000
of these Jews are known to be
refuseniks, meaning Jews who
have applied for visas but have
been denied them.
Harman said, "The only way
this matter may be put to rest is
for the Soviet Union to honor its
obligations. It is obliged under
the Helsinki Final Act to give
Jews the right of free movement;
to give them the right to be
reunited with their families; to
give them the right to culitvate
their culture and their language."
The conference is being atten-
ded by, among others, Premier
Mcnachem Begin; Simone Veil of
France, former president of the
Parliament of Europe; former
Jewish prisoners in the Soviet
Union; former refuseniks,
relatives of refuseniks and Soviet
Jewry activists.
Harman stressed that the
conference is being convened in
Jerusalem to emphasize the soli-
darity between Israel and the
Jews of the Soviet Union.
'Silent no more
Soviet Jewry update
Jews in the USSR has a report
of a 2' j-hour "friendly chat" the
Kiev KGB had with LEV EL-
BERT on Jan. 31. The gravamen
of this conversation was that he
was unlikely to get permission
until 1992 and, they had enough
information on him to charge him
under Article 70 the same one
facing YOSIF BEGUN.
The point of the conversation
was quite clear, that Lev should
forthwith stop all connection
with his friends in Israel and the
West. To emphasize their
"friendliness," the officers
reminded him that as long ago as
July 1981 the newspaper "Rad-
lanskaya Ukraina" had already
published the fact that in a tele-
phone conversation he had slan-
dered the Soviet Union.
This and several other things
in the past were grounds for pro-
secution. Lev, we understand,
told them that he was not in a
mood to discuss fiction.
They thereupon reminded him
that he had a son. CARMI, who
in due course would no doubt like
to go to university. How would
he lie able to do that with his
father serving hard regime in a
hi I ><>r camp?
"Guardian Angel" NATASHA
KHASSINA of Moscow has been
informed by the KGB that a file
has been opened against her be-
cause of her telephone conversa-
tions with the West. Khassina re-
cently received a "refusal for life"
from the OVIR office along with
several other Jewish activities in
Moscow and Leningrad.
Former POC IDA NUDEL
was called into the police station
-in Bendery, where she now
resides, and questioned on her in-
ability to find a job. She informed
them that she hoped to obtain
work shortly, and was told that
they would check on her progress
in a few weeks.
* ALEXANDER MAGIDOV
ICII has completed his 2'/4-year
sentence in a labor camp for
"anti-Soviet agitation," and has
been permitted to return to Tula.
He is looking for a job there and
hopes to apply for an exit visa so
that he may join his parents in
, Israel.
Alexander has no known rela-
tives in the Soviet Union and
therefore was not entitled to any
visits during his term in camp.
He contracted tuberculosis while
in imprisonment and is now sick.
Send letters of support to:
USSR-RSFSR-Tula 300000-
Dzerzhinakovo 15-2-18-Magidov-
ich
The Soviet Union has with-
drawn from the World Psychia-
tric Association. In recent years,
the West has exerted great pres-
sure in this organization to
combat Soviet abuse of psychia-
try for political purposes.
SIMON SHNIRMAN of Kerch
was sentenced to three years
"strict regime" on charges of
draft evasion. Shnirman, 25, has
already served 2l/ years in a
labor camp on similar grounds.
He is the first refusenik to be
tried and sentenced twice on the
same charge. Shnirman was con-
victed on Feb. 15.
Seventeen-year-old ALEXAN-
DER KREMEN of Moscow was
sentenced last week to four years
in a labor camp on charges of
"assault with intent to commit
robbery."
His father Misha is in a state of
despair.
P.
THIS IS THE
MATZAHJj^Hg
^nai
%0 Wtftt tht* festival of
knap MlifVW Jem arc not fret to
tf| ^Without hTimaM; loham cfttwtr piinap i
paw oa U*ir raUtttm traattMOtTto l-nttfe
a W*'H\MM H?*' tointhet*ctir
- JWi prtoner
fere at Jews aad at
H
W JE*S rEQ^JRE OUTTPRAYERS AND OUR ACTION
i
|EAD TPflTMATZAH OF HOPE AT YOUR SEDER.
AND ALSO SEND A MESSAGE OF OUR CONCERN AND OUR SOLIDARITY
TO SOVIET SECRETARY GENERAL ANDROPOV DURING PESAH:
Gen Yuri Andropov
The Kremlin '
Moscow, RSFSR, USSR
i*.
We urge you to forcefully lee* tne USSR with Justice and
humanity. Release the Prisoners of Conscience and permit
than and all others who su-deilre to emigrate freely, as
Is their right. ..
- -
-

:
Soviet Jewry Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Refusenik rules tightened
New reports have surfaced
from the Moscow refusenik com-
munity which indicate a further
chilling in the Andropov regime
toward Soviet Jewry.
Firstly, the laws on parisitism
have tightened, in that the origi-
nal time frame of four months to
search for a job has been short-
ened to two months.
Another change in regulation
concerns the surrounding borders
of Moscow. As of March 1. the
lowest emigration rate since
1970, are dramatic evidence that
the new Soviet regime plans to
increase further its crackdown on
the Soviet Jewry community.
Only 123 are freed
NEW YORK The Soviet
Jewry Research Bureau of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported that 123 Jews
were permitted to leave the Sovi-
et Union in February.
greater borders of Moscow will
encompass the town of Strunino
(home of Mark Nashpitz, Iosef
Begul and other refuseniks for-
bidden residency permits for
Moscow).
However, if a person owns pro-
perty in that town prior to March
1. the law will not be applicable.
Its most serious effects will apply
to refuseniks whose residency
permits are pending.
It is apparent that these regu-
latory changes, coupled with the
and
If s been an honor
a pleasure for generations.
mmmmM^Mm/mJiw^'Mm^w/mm

farm*
ixr
Manischewttz
PASSOVER I fvlATZOS 2
-'IttMIAIiii mu
^maSS ^CUy QUAUTY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649 V^fT"
Kosher for Passover
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision B
, For Kashruth Certificate write
Board of Rabbis PO Box 214 Jersey City NJ 07303
noifr-rao


Friday, March 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and
'^
of Greater Hollywood
Page 15-A
COLONY POINT MOVERS AND SHAKERS for the IJ A Jewish Federation of South
Broward 1983 Campaign include (above, left to right) Ed and Pearl Goldenberg, breakfast
chairmen; Jerry Bocian, Colony Point chairman; and committee members Tom Cohen and
Harold Marks. Below, left to right, are committee members Murray Borenstein, Manny Arnold,
who sponsored the breakfast; Lenka Rose, Simon Goldberg, Jack Pitchman and Ephraim
Miller. Missing is Jack Gossin. More than 170 residents of Colony Pojnt attended the recent
breakfast; UJA-Federation contributions more than tripled.
PUBLIX WISHES
YOU AND
YOUR FAMILY
A JOYOUS
PASSOVER
CELEBRATION.
May the Seder table find you full of the
happiness and hope this time^honored
festival inspires.
Yeshiva
courses
innovative
NEW YORK (JTA) To
train a cadre of Jewish educa-
tional teachers and administra-
tors, Yeshiva University has
expanded its graduate Jewish ed-
ucation programs and has
renewed its pioneering Block Ed-
ucation Program, Dr. Yitzchak
Handel, acting director of the
programs, announced.
The Block Education Program
is underwritten by the Louis Pin-
cus Fund for the Diaspora of the
Jewish Agency. The Jewish edu-
cation programs offered by the
university lead to master's and
doctoral degrees, as well as a spe-
cialist's certificate.
This summer, graduate stu-
dents will be able to train as
Jewish educational supervisors
and administrators in the Block
Education Program.
Students taking classes this
spring have been able to choose
from several innovative courses.
A new course in the methods of
teaching the Pentateuch in the
Jewish day school'is being taught
by Dr. Ayala Levy-Feldblum, as-
sistant professor of Bible. Levy-
Feldblum is the first female
faculty member to teach a gradu-
ate Jewish education course at
the university.
Handel is teaching a course in
"Moral Development and Jewish
Education," which analyzes the
nature of morality from philoso-
phical, psychological, theoretical
and practical standpoints in light
of Torah. "To my knowledge, it is
the only course of its kind being
offered in the United States,"
Handel said.
MELVIN D. ROSS, M.D., P.A.
CARDIOLOGY, INTERNAL MEDICINE
921 North 35th Avenue, Hollywood, Florida 33021
Telephone 961-3333
Best Wishes For a Healthy and Happy Passover
Dr. and Mrs. Melvin D. Ross and Family
Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Its not just good for my body
It just plain tastes good!'
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juke has a variety of
vitamins and minerals. So when peoplesee me drinking it.
they usually figure that I drink it to stay healthy Actually,
that's only half the reason. It also happens to taste delicious.
And why not its a rich. 100c natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added. I enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often After all. how often do you find something
that's good for you and that ertt IVIC1A/E CT
tastes good, too' ^UmI^VVLLI
To your health
Here's a good deal
on Sunsweet8 Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Mr G roctr Triii coupon if redeemable f or 1W (plus 7 handling)
when mailed to Sunsweet Prune Juice. P.O. Box 1404. Clinton,
IA 52734. provided it has boon used for a purchese in accor-
dance with this offer Any othor us* conatitutai fraud Invoices
proving purchase of sufficient stock to cover coupons
presented for redemption must be shown upon request void if
use is prohibited, taxed or otherwise restricted by lew Cash
value \/10i This offer expires October 31,1s3. Offer limited to
one coupon per purchase SUNSWEET GROWERS. INC.
7DMS0
Kosher For Passover
aoo?ao
10
OFF


I'age 16-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 18, 1983
On the bookshelf
Diaspora Jewish
tale good reading
PARKER PLAZA HONOREES Martha and Joe Goldman (center) receive the 1983 UJA
Jewish Federation of South Broward Award from Chairwoman Rhona Miller during Parker
Plaza's first UJA-Federation cocktail party. The condominium's Judge Joseph Deutsch and
Lucile Baer witness the event.
LAKE POINT TOWERS honorees Bernard and Ruth Brusin (left) are greeted by Helen
Mermelstein, hospitality chairperson; and Co-Chairmen Selma and Sam Buchman (right) at a
recent United Jewish Appeal-Jewish Federation of South Broward Campaign '83 brunch.
The Springs of Jewish Life. By
Chaim Raphael. Basic Books, 10
East 53 St. New York, N.Y.
10022. 1982. 288pp. $16.50.
Reviewed by Paul Cowan
In The Springs of Jewish Life,
Chaim Raphael poses questions
which force him to write a more
heartening, accessible book than
many other Jewish histories.
"Where do Jews get the will to
live, defying every attempt to
destroy them and, equally, every
seduction into safe anonymity
. How was the spirit that
comes out in the Jewish will to
live forged in antiquity and kept
alive today?"
Those are issues which make
the book pertinent to readers
with a historical interest and
to those Americans who wonder,
even at idle moments, why Jews
continue to resist the allurements
of assimilation.
In a way, Raphael's is the clas-
sic view of a Diaspora Jew
proud of his heritage, skeptical of
exaggerated claims, worried by
the militarism that the responsi-
bility of statehood demands.
For example, instead of ac-
cepting the biblical story that
Joshua simply led a successful
charge on Jericho, he assumes
that the Jews entered the
Promised Land after using diplo-
matic means such as making al-
liances with other tribes, and
through covert actions such as
infiltrating Israel in order to
place kinsmen there who would
make a common cause with the
invading army.
Ezra the Scribe, who helped
end the Babylonian exile and who
helped make the synagogue the
center of Jewish life, is one of
Raphael's heroes. For Ezra was a
man of words, not arms; he
helped democratize and diffuse
the faith which, in Raphael's
view, brought so much pleasure
to so many people.
Like most Jewish historians,
Raphael grieves over the destruc-
tion of the Second Temple. But.
unlike many modern writers, his
heroes are not the zealots who de-
fended Masada.
Instead, he admires Johanan
ben Zaccai, who got permission
from the Roman general Ves-
pasian to found a school at Javna
"turning Judaism from a na-
tionalist revolt into Jewish
Marvin Gottlieb's
GOLDEN HORN branched recently with Sumner G. Kaye, executive director of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, in behalf of the UJA-Federation 1983 Campaign. Kaye (left) is
standing beside Louis Levin, Arthur L. Green, Julius Slotoroff and Herman Waldman. Seated
from left are Jules B. Newman, Michael R. Schlander and Mitchel Bricker.
Lomar Rental Apt's
3501 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Florida
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Broward:
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OKP


iday, March 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17- A
JANK ON IT Laura Drucker (right) of the American
Savings and Loan Association accepts a certificate of ap-
ciation to all participating S&L employees in the 1983 UJ A
Jewish Federation of South Broward Campaign. Representing
the Federation is Reva Wexler.
'It is up to us'
Continued from Page 1-A
ace the possibility of losing vital human services.
"In 32 other countries, oppression and desperation have
pscalated, affecting the lives of tens of thousands of Jews. In our
bwn community, the needs of our fellow Jews are constantly grow-
ing and changing.
"It is up to us," the campaign chairman said, "to respond to
[these cries and display our utmost commitment."
Dr. Singer thanked those who already have committed their time
and dollars to Campaign '83, saying, "Despite the uncertain
Bconomic situation, the Jews of South Broward are doing some-
thing extra for the Jews of their community and the Jews of the
World.
Nationwide, Seventh day Adventists rank No. 1 in charitable
riving, contributing $2,300 per person annually to their church,
lewish givers are ranked third, Dr. Singer said of the statistics,
lonating an average of $600 per person to all Jewish philan-
,Lropies.
The campaign leader went on to say:
"The Judaic admonition to be righteous, compassionate and,
bbove all, help one's fellow man is called tzedakah. This is the
blosest word for charity in Hebrew or Yiddish; for Jews never
eparate chairty from duty."
Dr. Singer said that the "triumphant results" of this year's cam-
paign are proving that South Broward residents "are concerned for
[their brethren, and their actions are commensurate with the needs
and concerns of their people, locally and in Israel."
I If A hi I
We sit round the Seder table each year, ana celebrate The Exodus
through traditions passed down to us over thousands of years. These
traditions have become so much a part of our heritage they are
inscribed In the Haggadah for all (he world to see: the malzoh. the
MaNishtanah. the Aphikoman. the recitation of the plagues, the
chant of Dayenu. and on and on through (he night, closing with
"Chad Gadya"
At each Seder, however, there are oUier kinds of traditions
traditions which are jusi as strong. |ust as cherished. They are our
personal family traditions. Unwritten and unsung, they are as much a
part of our Seders as the hard-boiled eggs and bitter herbs And
among these, one of the most popular traditions Is the wine that la
used throughout the Seder evening. That Is ManlschewlU. of course.
In millions of homes, it fust wouldn't be Passover without a botUe of
Manlschewltz Kosher Wine. It Is a wine (hat spans the generalions
and. somehow, symbolizes (he continuity of the family Seder. Faces
may change, we grow older, some-
times there Is a new youngster
to ask the MaNishtanah ... but
always there Is the ManlschewlU.
It holds a traditional and hon-
ored place at our Seder table.
Propers aa4 battled
rtrtrt RakMalral
Ratoi Ok Jawf* L
IB.
iWlarCa.
New lark. NY 11232
lOrUAcalr
&
AV ANT GARDE honoree
Clara Weissman accepts a
I '.I A Jewish Federation of
South Broward plaque
from CoChairman
Herman Margolies during
a recent breakfast in be-
half of the 1983 Cam-
paign. Below, are Avant
Garde activists (from left)
Hilda Arlen, Chairman
Irving Rubin, Reba Kalin-
owsky, Alfred Shaffer and
Bernard Beck.
When you fly EL AL to Israel between March 6th and
May 281h, 1963 you'll be getting a great deal. And a
great deal more. That's because we're giving every
one of our New York-Tel Aviv-New York and Miami-Tel-
A*v-Miami passengers a voucher that's good tor a
20% discount on their next round trip to Israel
This special non-transferable, non-refundable voucher
is good until May 31,1984. But you'd better hurry. Time
is short and space is limited. For details and reserva-
tions call your travel agent or EL AL today.
The Chosen Airline.
- ,*


Page 18-A
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18, 1983
Ask the rabbi
Passover signifigance
essence of Judaism
A t the request of the Jewish Federation of South Broward, the
South Broward Rabbinical Council is providing this column of
learning and information. It is to appear regularly on this
Synagogue Page. Should you have a question you would like a
rabbi to answer, please address a letter to Rabbi Avrom L.
Drazin, c-oJFSB, 2719 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, FL 33020.
By DR. CARL KLEIN, Rabbi
Hallandale Jewish Center,
President. South Broward Council of Rabbin
As we approach Passover, I wish to express some thoughts
about the holiday's meaning.
The Book of Exodus covers three main features for which
Jews have been recognized in the history of mankind. These
three represent the essence of Jewish existence. They were
responsible for the preservation of the religious as well as the
national entity of the Jewish people.
1. The Exodus from Egypt. The freedom won in Efrvnt induced
) Jewish people to become the champions of freedom in ail
generations. The Haggadist expresses the thought that if
freedom at that time would not have come, we still would have
been slaves in Egypt. Most probably the Jewish people would
have assimilated themselves into the culture of Egyptian
civilization.
It is noteworthy that we find 46 references in the Bible to the
Exodus from Egypt. This is indicative that the Jew had to be
reminded in each phase of his life that without freedom, without
remembering Egypt, we could not justify our existence as a
nation. We who have experienced the pains and pangs of slavery
were told not to forget that very period in our history which was
responsible for Jews to champion freedom in the world.
2. The event at Sinai noted in the Book of Exodus describing
Divine Revelation to the Jewish people emphasized the idea that
the Jew has to be guided by law and not by man. In this respect,
we became different from other nations. Other nations that were
directed and governed, whether by kings of dictators, were
subordinate to the whims and whips of individuals.
The Jews were the first ones as a national group to have
accepted a moral code, a constitution based upon Divine Law.
From that time on, the Torah became the spiritual force that
governed the existence of the daily life of the Jew. It is
remarkable that from the ancient nations, we are the only ones
still alive and still influenced by the same Divine Law
proclaimed at Sinai.
The genius of the Jew rested in the very fact that he was able
to preserve this body of laws, to interpret and reinterpret it to
the existent conditions in each period in its history and make
these words again and again "Divre Elokim Hayim" "as the
living words of G-d."
The Jew was able to maintain his drive for freedom, his ap-
preciation for liberty and his persistence to preserve the set of
Laws of the Torah in spite of the enchantment and attempt of
other nations to make him to assimilate into the culture of other
civilizations. That the Jew was able to accomplish this, he
needed the third feature of the Book of Exodus.
3. The Building of the Desert Tabernacle. G-d does not need
the Tabernacle, we need it. G-d does not need a House of
Worship nor does He need a school to be taught, we need it. G-d
foresaw that in order to have an appreciation for freedom and to
safeguard human conduct, not promoted by the law of man, an
agency or institution had to be established wherein the two
previous concepts will be nurtured, fostered, taught and re-
taught in each generation.
This agency or institution the synagogue preserved the
vitality of the Jewish people. The synagogue remained till today
the repository of those ideals which have made us to move
forward from generation to generation. Jewish communities
were always ready to give forth these truths and this vitality to
each succeeding generation.
Seder packages delivered
Kabbalah
To be taught at Temple
NEW YORK American
Jewish military personnel, their
families and patients in V A hos-
pitals will be able to enjoy the
Passover holiday with ail of its
special and symbolic meanings,
thanks to the close cooperation of
the U.S. Armed Forces, VA,
Jewish Welfare Board (JWB),
Jewish chaplains and military lay
leaders.
The first seder is Monday
night, March 28. Passover lasts
through April 5.
Details of Passover arrange-
ments were announced by Rabbi
Herschel Schacter, chairman of
JWB's Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy.
Rabbi David Lapp, director,
JWB Armed Forces and
Veterans Services Committee
and Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, said that sederim
and services will be conducted by
active-duty and part-time
chaplains and lay leaders
throughout the world.
JWB's shipping department
sent hundreds of Passover food
packages, Haggadot, prayer-
books, Passover leaflets and
greeting cards, wall calendars
and other items to chaplains and
Jewish lay leaders at installa-
tions in the United States and
overseas, VA hospitals and
aboard ships at sea.
Special Solo Seder packages
were shipped to Jewish service-
men stationed at isolated areas
throughout the world, and to men
on duty at remote weather and
radar stations. The Solo Seder
packages contain all the in-
gredients for a seder meal for one
person.
Other food packages which
JWB sent for the military in-
cluded gefilte fish, Passover tuna
fish, chicken soup with mat/.oh
balls, matzot, mat/oh meal, mat-
zoh ball mix. cake mix,
macaroons and other goodies.
Jewish patients in VA hos-
pitals will also participate in
Passover observances conducted
by chaplains. In some hospitals,
a cassette recording of the Pass-
over melodies will be brought to
the patients' bedsides over the
hospital's public address system.
At many installations in the
United States and overseas, spe-
cial kosher Passover meals will be
provided for the entire eight days
of the holiday.
JWB is the U.S. government-
accredited agency and the repre-
sentative of the American Jewish
community for serving Jewish
military personnel, their families
and sick and disabled patients in
Veterans Administration hos-
pitals.
At the same time, JWB is the
network of and central service
agency for Jewish Community
Centers, YM-YWHAs and camps
in the United States and Canada
serving one million Jews.
Sinai
Kabbalah, "A Journey into the
Sea of Practical Jewish Mystic-
ism." is to be taught in 12 ses-
sions with Rabbi Reuben Luc-
kens at Temple Sinai, 1201 John-
son St., Hollywood.
The course is planned for Mon-
. days and Wednesdays, starting
April 6, from 3-5 p.m. A fee of $20
for members and $60 for non-
memlRTs of the congregation is
asked.
The course is designed to in-
troduce the student to the broad
ripectrum of teachings of Kabba-
lah as they apply to everyday
living in today's world.
Dr. Luckens, rabbi, scholar,
lecturer and marriage counselor,
has been a rabbinical seminary
deun. a professor and a nationally
syndicated columnist ("The
Kubbi Answers").
His teaching will be "directed
to the questing individual whc
leds that the jrfjBJf^ world
with all its charm and joys, is not
the whole of existence."
Rabbi Luckens will help the
student "find the passway to self-
identity as a synchronized and
unified whole or holy person."
Temple Solel
A Liberal Reform
Congregation
5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood
Will Be Having an
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, April 10th, 7:30 P.M.
For Prospective Members
Meet the "Family of Solel"
Refreshments will be Served
For Information Call
989-0205
_______________the Jewish Community will
commemorate the 40th ANNIVERSARY of the
WARSAW GHETTO
and the
CHILDREN of SURVIVORS
at the
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
416 NE 8th Avenue
with
ABRAHAM ). BAER
DIRECTOR
INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION
National Jewish Community Advisory Council
Moloc.u.t Common of the Con-unity Mlitiau Coeeilttee of th. Je.j.h red-
.ration of South Broward. for further intonation, call Mellaea 10-
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 WUey St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath services. 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood, 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:46
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Miramax 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 pan.;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Dairy services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten- Judaic* High School.
FJefornr,
Temple Bath El 1361 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8226.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 1-10. ^^
Temple Bath Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road. Pwmbrok* Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
Sabbath services, 8:15 pjn. Religious school: Pre-kinder
garten10.
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0205. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o'dock.Heligioue school: Pre-school-12.
F}econstrucUoi)ist
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 472-
3600. Rabbi Elliot Skidell. Sabbath aarvicee. 8:15 p.m. Religious
school: Pre-kindergarten-8
*J
-



Tht Jtwith Ploridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19-A-
iLE MEGILLAH Purim, the Festival of Lota, is
rated with Rabbi Harold Richter, Chaplaincy Division,
Lh Federation of South Broward, at a constituency agency,
Lutheast Senior Adult Day Care Center for Frail Adults,
Ited by the Jewish Community Centers of South Broward.
1 the rabbi (right) are, from left, Sophia Kahn, Jack Tir
\, Esther Levine and Hyman Steinberg.
SEA AIR residents greeted Israeli guest speaker Abbie Ben Arie (standing, second from left) at
a recent breakfast honoring the UJA-Jewiah Federation's 1983 Campaign. With the former
Israeli U.N. delegate are (standing, from left) Ben Rabmowitz, Harold Lowy and Abe Mallet;
and seated, from left, Rose Rabinowitz, Kay Lowy and Bea Mallet.

k

ARE A
aeration
SEDER Going over plans for the Jewish
of South Broward-sponsored 'Share a Seder'
ram are (standing, from left) Dr. Samuel Rand, Rabbi
-Id Lasker, Rabbi Harold Richter, Rabbi Raphael Ten-
haus, Jean Rand (seated, left) and Miriam Lasker. If you
Id like to open your home during the first or second seder of
sover (or both), contact Rabbi Richter, director of
plaincy Services at Federation, at 921-8810.
^^^^^ ^Bftk
r%

-- ^fl
Jm

1 Wa
iW
-
-
Wsv"
Coping With Bereavement
bup to begin Wed. March 16, 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by
immunity Counseling Center Hollywood (State
censed)
ider trained with Elisabeth Kubler-Ross M.D., author
Death and Dying.
wyou are in need of working through grief Due to Death
IDivorce.
call us at 966-7751
Moderate Fee.
IELVIN D. ROSS, M.D., P.A.
JNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
IRDI0L0GY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
to
921 NORTH 35th AVE.
(FIRST FLOOR)
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33021
toCE HOURS
APPOINTMENT
NCWTELCPMONi NUMMft
(305) 9*1-3333
B'NAI B'RITH MAZEL TOV A new B'nai B'rith Lodge and Women'a Chapter hasbeen
chartered at Colony Point in Pembroke Pines and the two new presidents a> husband and
wife. Jack and Toby Pitchman (center). Shown with them at the official joint charter presen-
tation and installation of officers are (from left) Betty Gerhman and Bet^Homana, South
Florida region officers, and Lou Hymson and Marvin Beckerman. men s district 5 officers.
Jewish minister
in France loses
PARIS France's only Jew-
ish minister running in Sunday's
nationwide municipal elections,
Culture Minister Jack Lang, was
heavily defeated in Paris' predo-
minantly Jewish Third District.
Lang, a Socialist, had wooed
the Jewish electorate, which
seems, according to first poll
studies, to have failed him. His
competitor, Gaullist Jacques
Dominati, known as pro-Israeli,
did not specifically seem to court
the district's Jewish electorate.
r CERTIFIED MOHEL
Your Baby Deserves,
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
jWill Travel (305) 673-5062
Working Together
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
.. careful attendance to the family's
wishes. dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidance
when the hour of need arises
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument. Inc.
Phone 759-1669
in Florida
Bteap* BJui and 2 WS 94S-WW
J*H W Hilkhvo BM DrrrfirM Btath. FL H441
101 427-4700
SJ I S Park Dmr fll U S 441 Maraalc FL H1061
WS/427-4700
WK) W Oakland Park BM
Fl Lauderdak iSimnsrt. FL mil
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Palm Beach WS/83VOM7
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GRATCHMANOEL
HARTMAN MILLER
HERSMEY
JOEl A ROBERT


Page 20-A
7Tb Jewish Fhridian and Skofar of OrmUr Holly wood
Friday. March 18, igg
a
i
s
Ti
/
Soybeans can change lives of diabetics
Those diabetics who are depen-
dent on medication to control
elevated blood sugar levels are
finding a friend in the tiny soy-
bean.
Researchers at the Technion-
laraal Institute of Technology in
Haifa have found that an en-
rk'hed diet of soybean fiber re-
duces the "after meals" effect, or
post-prandial glucose response.
in which blood sugar rises
nalK-allv after eatmi:
In non-diabetics, high "after
maafo" ghnoaa levels are lowered
after alxiut an hour as a result of
lh' parn-rva-i" secretion of insulin.
But fordialM-iit-s. whose pancreas
pmdun* an insufficient quantity
of insulin ami who cannot absorb
high glucose levels efficiently.
paak k'M-N of t>l<>od sugar can
circulate in the blood as long as
SU to eight hours before being
* ahsocW.
Prolonged high glucose levels,
doctors warn, can lead to com-
plications such as blindness, kid-
ney and nerve disease. These
diabetics must take anti-diabetic
pills called suHonyfurenas which
assist in absorbing blood sugar
into the body.
"The addition of soya to the
diet leads to the blood's sugar
content rising much less." says
Dr. Yoram Kanter of Technion's
Faculty of Medicine and head of
the Diabetes Service and Re-
search Unit of the Rambam Hos-
pital in Haifa.
"Diabetics on pills can cut
down on the number of pills, and
those diabetics on insulin injec-
tion* may be able to cut down on
the dosage." he says
Dr Kanter s patients at the
Diabetics Service and Research
Ink were given two to three
spoonfuls of a commercially
available nutritional supplement
called Sobit. consisting of 45 per-
cvnt soy protein and 45 percent
soy fiber, as well as soybean
polysacchandes-rich material
from soybean hulls. Doctors
found that the dietary supple-
ment which can be baked into
bread or cookies lowered glu-
cose level-
Dr Kanter s findings lend sup-
port to current theories claiming
a link between diabetes and a
lack of fiber in the modern diet.
Investigations have found that
diabetes is rare among African percent suffered from diabetes
communities that consume high when they came to Palestine 60
fiber diets. For example, in the years ago. Today, this population
case of Yemenite Jews, only two has the highest rate of diabetes in
Israel
Dr. Kanter s findings Jjl
presented to the annul nK-etinggi
the Israeli Diabetics Association
and is part of a three-year stud,
on the effects of enriched fib,
diets on insulin response
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Israel nights
COASTAL WATERWAYS
and State of Israel Bonds will
pav tribute to Fa\ Stein at a
\ii.-ht for Israel March 22 at 7 30
n the recreation room. Mrs
Stein, a former vice president of
the Northern Hebrew Day
Nursery and life-member of
Deborah and Link, will be
presented with the Israel Scroll of
Honor for her lifelong dedication
la the State of Israel. Entertain
rrxnt will be provided by Emd
Cohen Chairpersons of the event
are Dr Samuel Bornstein.
Florence Hurwitx and Judge Max
Ra PARKER DORADO Israel
Bond Committee has set Sunday.
March 27. as its annual Bond
Night for Israel Comedian Emd
Cohen will be on hand as Parker
Dorado residents and Israel
Bonds jom forces beginning at 8
p.m to sell bonds to strengthen
I srael's economy
LA MER B'nai B rith Lodge
of HaUandale wil hold iu annual
Israel Bond brunch on Sunday.
March 27. beginning at 9:30 am
m the social hall- The announce-
ment was made by Sat Nevins
chairman, who said Israel Bonds
will prtjmt its Scroll of Honor to
the Lodge, to the La Mer
Women's American OUT and to
the La Mer Women's League for
Israel Working with Nevma are
Sydney L Jacob. Baa Schwab
and Otto!
"LET MY
PEOPLE GO
As we ;^
, v celebrate Passover
in commemoration of
the ancient Israelis' return to
their homeland from bondage,
let us pray for the
l safe return to their homelands
h of all people held captive
Bk in foreign lands
anywhere in the world
today.
WW

AMERICAN**
SAVINGS^
A LOAM ASSOOAX3N Of
(u^JLj
Chaernan
Serving Florida sine. 5711


Americanizing of Soviet
Jemsti floridi<311
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida
Friday, March 18, 1983
emigres:View from inside
By ELSA SOLENDER
| Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Reprint by Special Arrangement
Last Thanksgiving some
aviet Jewish families
jsted on turkey and cran-
erry sauce just as if their
iwn ancestors had landed
rith the pilgrims at
j>ly mouth Rock. Some
|dults at the table, though,
mtinued their very
Russian custom of sipping
|traight vodka along with
lemeal.
They were following symbol-
ally in the footsteps of many
ther immigrants to the United
Itates, and similar modern
mplex nations, merging their
rmer ethnic identities and their
national identities into an
triguing blend of coexistence.
IT'S THE same phenomenon
hat enables Italian, Polish,
erman and other "hyphenated"
unman groups to participate
roudly in an ethnic festival, yet
|ing The Star Spangled Banner
ith genuine patriotic ardor on
'uly 4.
Dr. Pearl Katz, an anthropolo-
ist, has always been fascinated
ith the process through which
migrants le*rn to identify with
ie national culture of the land
here they have settled, and
imultaneously retain a sense of
onnection with their previous
Hurt'. Not merely her training,
it also her personal experiences,
ve qualified Dr. Katz for this
jdy: she is the daughter of
migrants to the United States,
nniigrantin Israel.
Dr. Katz is currently employed
a medical anthropologist at
he University of Maryland
School of Medicine, but she is
llso completing the final sessions
If a course for elderly Soviet
i-v. s that began last autumn at
tin Baltimore Hebrew College
h"<' the Northwest Senior Center
American Culture, Values
(iniI Ways of Life."
SHE HAS acquired unique in-
kights into how Soviet new-
comers to the city behave, and
Why they behave that way, as
(veil as what they think of life in
Xmerica generally, and of Jews in
particular.
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"The course was designed for
elderly Russians because they
seemed to be the people most in
need," Dr. Katz explained in an
interview. "They are the most
dissatisfied here. Frequently,
they didn't choose to come, but
emigrated because their children
wanted to come. In many cases
the children couldn't have left the
Soviet Union unless the parents
accompanied them."
The Soviet authorities have
insisted that the elderly parents
of prospective emigres be
provided for. Sometimes they
have held up exit passes unless
parents expressly permitted their
fully-grown children to leave
or they have used the parental
permission as a pretext for hold-
ing up or denying exit visas. (In
the celebrated Panov case,
permission for the two ballet
dancers to depart was withheld
because Mrs. Panov's non-Jewish
The Russians regard
American authority
figures as agents to be
reared, mistrusted and, if
possible, manipulated.
enable the elderly Russians to
become more self-sufficient, less
dependent upon their children,
more effective contributors to the
Jewish community, their children
and families, and able to enhance
their personal sense of dignity
and purpose.
THREE ADDITIONAL by-
products of the two-hour, once-a-
week course were also hoped for:
that participants' proficiency in
English might improve; that the
course sessions might provide a
forum for discussions of personal
and family problems, which the
elderly were reluctant otherwise
to discuss, and that the class-
room group might emerge as an
intimate social support system
which might endure after classes
had been completed.
About 40 Soviet senior adults
participated in the two sections
of the weekly class. Dr. Katz be-
lieves that the initial goals were
realized for them, and that there
had been additional dividends
which neither she nor anyone else
involved in planning had fully
expected.
For one thing, the participants
acquired in Dr. Katz not only a
reliable informant about
American life "from the inside"
whom they could trust and
like but also someone who
could tactfully intervene on their
behalf on occasion. She could
make inquiries, clear up mis-
understandings before they
became magnified into problems,
or refer individuals to appro-
priate organizations for help
not necessarily Associated
agencies.
DR. KATZ'S credentials as an
academician were enhanced by
her personal warmth and her
realistic commitment to the
values of an open society, a
commitment which, combined
with teaching skills, enabled her
to stimulate her students to live,
as well as possibly espouse, the
virtues of freedom.
A 42-year-old native of Chi-
Continued on Page 2-B
mother was supposed to have
objected to her daughter's
departure.)
IN THE Soviet Union, many
of the elderly had earned pen-
sions: working women are en-
titled to them from age 55, men
from age 60. They were forced to
forfeit that right when they had
to renounce Soviet citizenship to
obtain their exit visas. Not only
the money, but also the status
and independence it represented
within the family and the
community, had to be relin-
quished.
As children and grandchildren
become "Americanized" here,
and turn increasingly to peers for
social life and approval in the
American style, the Soviet
Jewish elderly tend to become
more isolated and dissatisfied.
They avoid complaining directly
about their children's treatment
of them and their dependent
status, often projecting their
unhappiness into complaints
about America, most frequently
about crime and medical services.
In many instances, they are as
much chafing under what they
perceive to be their family's
neglect of them as criticizing the
strange American system.
Dr. Katz's course had as its
stated objectives to provide a
pilot program which will teach
elderly Russians bask skills of
living in American society in
general and in the Jewish
community in particular and to
Passover
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May your Passover season be filled with happiness.


^mk.
Page2-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18, \^
Soviet emigres: View from inside
Continued from Page IB
cago. Dr. Katz was educated
at Grinnell College in Iowa, the
Albert Schweitzer College in
Switzerland, Syracuse University
and the State University of New
York (Buffalo!. Her doctoral
dissertation at SUNY was on
"Acculturation and Social Net-
works of American Immigrants
in Israel." a study that developed
from her experiences in an ab-
sorption center and ulpan in
Israel.
Married and the mother of
three. She was equipped by both
training and life experience to
serve as a kind of interlocutor
with and for the elderly Soviet
Jews here.
"What I study as an anthro-
pologist is how people go about
their everyday lives," she ex-
plained. This means the simple
tasks, the trivia, of everyday life
that native-born people take for
granted but which may confuse
someone from another culture.
Such as how to get around on
public transportation. How to
USe a bank. How to purchase all
kinds of commodities.
BUYING A carpet in the
Soviet Union, for instance, may
be quite a different operation
from.buying a carpet in the Unit-
ed Swu's In the USSR, it's first
a matter of fincjing^out via one's
iiersonal information network
where carpets are to be found.
Next it's a matter of finding
which line to stand on and main-
taining one's position in a line
than are ways of reserving plnces
if one waits on a line for ovyr 20
hours (not an uncommon exper-
ience in the USSR). Then one has
to discover how to break through
the curtain of secrecy that is
standard operating procedure in
the Soviet Union in regard to
sought-after consumer goods.
Does the store have the par-
ticular kind of carpet one is seek-
ing? If it is not on display as is
likely does the clerk know
whore it can be had? Will the
clerk make the effort to find it?
1 low can one enlist the clerk as an
ally in making the purchase? Or
coerce him into helping.
THERE'S ALSO a basic
assumption in Russia that
bureaucrats and clerks of all sorts
all of whom are part of the
As children and gmndchildren fall into our lifestyle here,
thp. .Tarnish, pldadii became more isolated and dissatisfiec
government have all the
commodities one seeks in their
possession to give or withhold as
they wish not only carpets,
but also jobs, apartments, access
to grants, and just about
anything else worth having.
Success in Russia is measured by
how well or aggressively
one manipulates the system to
get what one wants or needs.
"When I lived in the absorp-
tion center in Israel, I was able to
interpret the behavior of the
Soviet Jews there to the Israelis
because of my training in cultural
behavior," Dr. Katz explained.
"Here in Baltimore, when I was a
consultant to the pediatrics and
primary care unit at Sinai
Hospital. I could explain this
behavior to the doctors, who then
said they could understand the
behavior of Soviet Jews in deal-
ing with the hospital. What I was
doing was a practical application
of anthropology, which is always
concerned with cross-cultural
matters."

Having a cultural anthro-
pologist on one's staff is still
something of a luxury at most
institutions, but with the in-
creasingly tight job market, and
grants for travel to distant
"untouched" lands. anthro-
pologists are. of necessity,
shifting their focus to modern
urban society.
Anthropologists are cus-
tomarily trained in four major
areas: physical anthropologists
study the biology of human
development, archaeologists take ,
a historical tack, linguistic an-
thropologists study the relation-
ship between language and cul-
ture, and cultural or social an-
thropologists, such as Dr. Katz.
study human culture by in-
vestigating everyday life,
comparing and contrasting the
mores of different societies.
DR. KATZ lectured and led
discussions in English for the
elderly Russian Jews with inter-
pretation provided into Russian
by Stephan German.
"The immigrants learned a lot
of English by listening to the
lectures in English and 'checking
out' the accuracy of their under-
standing with the subsequent
translation," she says. The
Soviets felt they gained greater
appreciation of American culture
because it was presented to them
in their own language, but they
enjoyed hearing the English and
felt that it supplemented their
English-language classes.
"They are hungry for learn-
ing," Dr. Katz says, "both about
America and for mastering the
English language." Some of them
are involved in several English
language classes each week, and
spend a consiajrable amount of
time studying the language at
home.
BUT WHILE the language ex-
perience was valuable, it was not
Mrs. Katz's principal objective.
Although her students were well
educated, and many had ad-
vanced academic degrees, she
found the extent of their
ignorance of American culture
amazing. They knew very little
about basic geography, govern-
ment, law or education. "And as
might be expected, their knowl-
edge and awareness of American
values was virtually non-
existent," she observed.
To immerse her two classes of
elderly Russian-born immigrants
in the culture, values and mores
of America. Dr. Katz would first
give a lecture on a specific
subject, and then try to stimulate
questions and discussion with
. rkolaXter-comporfent oTtbe session more difficult for the par-
, tkipaats -because, -they-were *in-
accustomed to freedom of dis-
cussion or viewing the teacher as
something less than an absolute
authority figure.
Dr. Katz never whitewashed
her presentation. She invited stu-
dents to challenge her state-
ments. For instance, in a pre-
sentation on crime, a deep con-
cern among the Russians, she did
not shy away from controversy.
The John Hinckley insanity
decision was heatedly discussed,
as was the entire Watergate
scandal.
"WHEN A particular crime
was mentioned in a class, there
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was a heated discussion about
fears of crime, gun control laws
and punishment of criminals,"
Dr. Katz reported. "They are ex-
tremely frightened about crime."
The near-obsession with cru^i
is often a way of displacing vagi*
general fears about the free, alien
society in which the immigrants
now live. They may recall with
nostalgia a near-perfect Russia it
which there was "no" crime or I
drugs. They may long for the
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Friday, March 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page -3-B
.**
security ot a system with rules,
. not choices; punishment for
criminals, not leniency, un-
derstanding or rehabilitation.
'Although many of their fears
about crime may be justified by
actual events, many of their fears
were also projections of their
general anxieties," Dr. Katz said.
She observed that the ways in
which the Russians might
propose to remedy the faults they
see in American society in order
to achieve security would be
likely to be anathema to
American concepts of freedom,
such as foregoing trials, evidence
and appeals, or allowing indis-
criminate search and seizure of
weapons in private homes and
streets, or abolishing the insantiy
defense.
IN DISCUSSING American
government, laws, individual
freedom and privary, Dr. Katz
recognized that the Russians
habitually regarded American
authority figures whether they
were in the government, in
private or voluntary agencies, in
schools or hospitals as agents
to "be feared, mistrusted and if
possible manipulated." The Rus-
sians found it nearly impossible
to believe that most authorities
here act according to rules and do
not make decisions based on
coercion, bribes or personal in-
fluence.
"The Russian immigrant does
not believe that information
communicated to any authority
including doctor, social work-
er, or even rabbi is private.
They assume that it becomes
l>art of a person's 'file,' Dr.
K;ii/ indicated.
Kxtensive attention was paid
lo ethnic and racial groups. Var-
iations in the family life of Jews,
WASPs. blacks and single
persons were examined. In
studies of the Baltimore Jewish
community, such factors as
immigration patterns, syna-
gogues, occupational patterns,
neighlM>rliood patterns, orga-
nizations, volunteers and volun-
teerism. and independence from
the government were examined.
"Members of the classes also
attended synagogue with me and
spent a Sunday afternoon at my
home." Dr. Katz said.
COPIES OF the course outline
were printed in Russian and
Rnglish and were distributed, as
were copies of a discussion guide
on "American values." which
was designed to be as likely to
stimulate controversy in a class
of native-born Americans as
readily as it did among the Rus-
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Consider, for instance, such
propositions as this: "Success is
based upon fame and-or wealth.
Signs of success are 1) belonging
to exclusive clubs; 2) dressing
expensively with fashionable but
conservative clothes; 3) living in
an expensive neighborhood; 4)
driving an expensive new car."
In addition: "Success, in itself,
is good." And: "Friendship with
people of lower status may inter-
fere with success."
OBVIOUSLY these state-
ments were intended to arouse
discussion and controversy as
they did. Dr. Katz recognized
that it was very uncomfortable
for the Russians to experience
and participate in freedom,
including criticizing the content
of lectures, even though the
teacher, herself, encouraged such
criticism and suggested some of
her own challenges of the very
values she had identified as
prevalent here.
Dr. Katz's success is
measurable on several levels. The
most obvious is the regard for her
which developed among her stu-
dents. G. Zalevsky praised her
clarity and enthusiasm, and
observed that the discussions she
stimulated found her audience of
students expressing their points
of view and thoughts on some
burning issues such as crime and
medical services." Zalevsky
characterized himself and his
fellow participants as "people
from a not her world."
A former teacher, Emily
Yudena. said that Dr. Katz
"opened the unknown to us .
both the positive and negative
side of American life." Observing
that she, herself, "did not always
approve of the lack of discipline
which exists in American
schools," Mrs. Yudena found Dr.
Katz's discussion of the situation
in American education partic-
ularly interesting.
AMONG EDUCATIONAL
topics discussed were the com-
petition between the "3 Rs" or
back-to-basics" philosophy and
liberalism in education; parent
involvement in schools; public
and private schools; relation-
ships between teachers and stu-
dents, and the varieties of col-
leges, universities and degrees.
Yudena also observed, with some
slight sense of surprise, that "in
the class we had the opportunity
indeed permission to clear
up our doubts and to raise ques-
tions. And we immediately have
had the full satisfaction of an-
swers."
"It was very interesting to
learn about the specific relation-
ships that exist between elderly
parents and their children in
America," said David and Polina
Napadov, "particularly in the
Jewish family." Among the
controversial value propositions
that Dr. Katz had presented was
the idea that "youth is good and
old people have no role in
society."
Has recognition that Ameri-
.. the ways in which the Russians might
propose to remedy the faults they see in
American society to achieve security would
be anathema to American concepts of free-
dom ...
cans, by and large, have different
attitudes toward elderly parents
influenced the Russians' expecta-
tions of their own children, whom
thev observe to be very quickly
Continued on Page 4-B
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P^e*ti
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
"
Friday, March 18,1933
Soviet emigre
iPat%-B
becoming "Americanized"?
IMMIGRANTS in the course
increased their participation in
activities with their own age-
peers," Dr. Ku reported In
each apartment building where
there were many Russians
residing, extensive acquaintance-
ship and mutual help networks
developed. The knowledge that
their children and grandchildren
were more independent of them
and their understanding of
reasons many have influenced
them to depend upon their own
network resources.
"These acquaintanceship bonds
with their age-peers were
new American network forma-
tions and unlike their social net-
works in Russia." she continued.
"The new social networks in-
cluded more neighbors who were
of different local origins but
not different social classes. The
relationships involved less sus-
picion and greater trust than
acquaintanceship networks in
Russia.
The relationships were also in-
dependent of family relation-
ships. In fact, they appeared to
be substitutes for intimate family
relationships." Still, the elderly
immigrants held themselves in
readiness if their children needed
them and canceled all plans if
asked to babysit for grand-
children.
DESPITE THEIR new peer
associations, they continue to feel
isolated from Americans. They
complain that they receive few
invitations from American fam-
ilies, and they have few occasions
to try out their English because
they are separate" from Ameri-
cans
It may be intellectually helpful
to be told that Americana value
behaving in a friendly manner,
but that friendliness does not
necessarily indicate willingness
to become intimate or to "help.
But does it relieve an elderly
Russian's loneliness if he learns
that Americans find it preferable
to pay professionals to talk about
personal matters, rather than
talk about them to friends or
relatives?
Dr. Katz would be the last
person to insist that Americans
have everything to teach, and
Russians everything to learn.
IN THAT, she resembles some
of her predecessors who have also
been fascinated with the process
by which immigrants become
Americans, yet retain something
of their former selves. So far as
anyone locally knows, there is no
other Jewish community in
America where precisely the
same kind of course that Dr. Katz
designed is currently being
taught.
But she is not the first Bal-
timorean to have designed such a
course for Russian Jews.
Near the turn of the century,
another scholarly Jewish woman
set out to help Russian Jewish
immigrants integrate into
American society. She wrote in
her diary that she "lived and
breathed Russians." Eventually
she learned that she was learning
virtually as much from them in
the cross-cultural exchange as
they were learning from her a
sentiment Dr. Katz shares.
Dr. Katz's eminent Baltimore
predecessor was the founder of
Hadassah. Henrietta Szold.
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U.S. parents too lax,
Soviet emigre believes
Soviet emigre Dalia Kira be-
lieves American children lack a
strong sense of discipline, and
responsibility.
Speaking before the Soviet
Jewry Committee, Jewish Feder-
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despite all the Soviet Union'a
drawbacks, Russians learn it is
important to have an obligation
to the community, again a point
most Americans would do well to
pick up on, she says.
Mrs. Kira and her husband
now live in Cooper City. The
Kiras run a real estate firm.
The former Soviet citizen was
bom in Kishniev where there was
!>ut a single synagogue and very
little indentification with Jewish
Delia Kira
life. She said government pres
sure kept Jews from the temple.
In 1956. Dalia's family applied
to emigrate to Israel. Ten years
later they were granted perrnis-
sion, and at 19 Dalia became an
Israeli. She married a Sabra and
nine years ago moved to the
United States The Kiras have
two children.
Mrs. Kira tells of fond memo-
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growing up in Russia. She says
censorship is far less severe there
now. She reads numerous
magazines from the Soviet
Union.
Mrs. Kira would like to involve
more Soviet emigres now living
in Broward in Jewish activities.
She may be contacted through
the Federation, 2719 Hollywood
Blvd.. 33020.
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During the months of March and
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BBSS


Friday. March 18. 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page5-B
Holocaust 'massive event' in life of Christians, Methodists say

By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A leading Methodist schol-
ar and author asserted that
the Holocaust, while a cat-
aclysm in the history of the
Jewish people, also "re-
mains a massive event in
the life and death of Chris-
tians."
"When the Christiana under-
^ ^atand the meaning of the Holo-
caust and what it reveals of the
spiritual condition of Christen-
dom, they will mourn it more
than the Jews." the scholar. Dr.
Franklin Littell, professor of
religion at Temple University
and corresponding member of the
Institute of Contemporary Jewry
at the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem, said.
HIS COMMENTS were made
to more than 2,000 people who
- ^attended the first public dialogue
on the "Origins of the Holocaust:
Christian-Jewish Relations in
Historical and Contemporary
Perspective," sponsored by the
Holocaust Survivors Memorial
Foundation, at A very Fisher
HaR.
The dialogue, moderated by
NBC-TV News diplomatic corre-
spondent Marvin Kalb, also
featured Prof. Yehuda Bauer of
the Hebrew University; Prof.
Raul Hilberg of the University of
Vermont; and Prof. Krister Sten-
dahl of the Harvard University
Divinity School.
Littell contended that there
tj "Exists a "credibility crisis"
within the church and the educa-
tional system. He pointed out
that the Holocaust was "planned,
supervised and rationalized" by
men and women who supported
the Nazi ideology and who had
graduated from the university
systems of Europe. He noted that
the notorious Dr. Joseph Men-
gele, known as the "angel of
death" for his experimentations
on Jewish inmates in Auschwitz,
^possessed two doctorates and
was educated in "the greatest
universities of the world."
REFERRING TO what he
termed a "credibility crisis of
Christianity,*' Littell said that
"six million Jews were
murdered in the heart of Chris-
tendom by baptized Christians."
Noting that these Christians
were never excommunicated nor
rebuked by the church, he
declared: "Adolph Hitler died a
church tax-paying Roman Catho-
lic to the end."
Littell, the author of 20 books
and 275 major articles and a
member of the U.S. Hotocauat
Memorial Council, said the Holo-
caust "must never be idle conver-
sation. It must never be enter-
tainment. It must be in the
context of saving lives." He
" -added: We must speak the truth
that we know and the lessons to
be drawn drom it."
Stendahl, who is the Andrew
Mellon Professor of Drvinitv at
the Harvard Divinity School
where he teaches the New Testa-
ment and the arts of preaching
and worship, said it would be
"simplistic to blame Christianity
pure and simple" for the Holo-
caust. But he added that it would
"be naive to deny that Christian-
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
for tasty
Instant
Soup
Gravy__
Seasoning
ity has a strong streak of anti-Ju-
daism."
STENDAHL OBSERVED
that there were two Christian re-
a!tt*S? -**' "th* Holocaust:
"hambk excuse" and a feeling of
"gWlt." .Elaborating on the
"guilt feeling"- theme; he said
Christian theologians and
preachers- "are accustomed to"
solving problems by applying
this feeling or, as he put it,
"technique," so that "it always
feels good to feel guilty. "
Referring to the "humble ex-
cuse," Stendahl said this is the
argument that Christianity is
"perfect, full of love, goodness"
and that when things turn for the
worse, individual Christians are
said to have gone astray on their
ideals of Christianity.
According to Stendahl, some
western support for the estab-
lishment of the State of Israel
following World War II was a
result of this "guilt feeling." But
had the Jewish State been estab-
lished on the basis that it waa
right, he continued, Israel would
have wider support internation-
ally then it has today. Rererring
to the plight of Israel in the inter-
national community, Stendahl
declared: "Don't put your trust
in guilt."
BAUER POINTED out that
the reasons for World War II
went beyond strategic and politi-
cal issues, but focused more on
Nazi ideology. "They (the Ger-
mans) chose war ... for ideologi-
cal reasons," he declared. This
ideology included the desire of
the German people to rule Europe
and the world, and to do this the
extermination of the Jewish
people was seen as a necessary
element in this process, Bauer
said.
Hilberg, a professor of political
science at the University of Ver-
mont, and author of several
books and numerous articles on
ghettos, concentration camps
and the psychology of Nazism,
asserted that the destruction of
European Jewry by the Nazis
was not an all-out encompassing
plan at the outset. He said the
policy of the Nazis first centered
on the forced emigration of Jews
and then advanced to the stage of
the complete destruction of a
people and their culture.
Questioned by Kalb aa to the
possibility of a reoccurrence of
the Holocaust, not one of the
panelists would say unequivocal-
ly that it could not happen again.
Hilberg noted that he was not a
betting man, while Bauer ex-
pressed a lack of faith in con-
fidence-setting trends but said
people must watch early warning
signs similar to those which led
to the rise of Nazism. He in-
dicated that pluralism was a
central element in maintaining
just societies.
STENDAHL WAS more the
optimist, saying that the new
generation can provide positive
steps for the future. While the
Holocaust will be remembered
with precision and hopefully with
enough detail, he said. "I think
that it is true to say for Jewish-
Christian relations and dialogue,
that the primary barometer for
the years ahead is the State of
Israel and not the Holocaust."
Czeslaw Miloez, winner of the
1980 Nobel Prize for Literature,
who was unable to attend the
dialogue, said in a statement read
by Kalb that the development in
the early 20th Century of Dar-
win's theory of survival of the
fittest and the popularity enjoyed
by the theory of biological na-
tionalism which made nations
analogous to biological
organisms marked by genetic
characteristics, began to take
hold with the German people.
Milosz said that the wide pop-
ularity enjoyed by the theory of
biological nationalism opened the
path to the extermination of the
so-called "inferior race" and for
the first time, educated masses
who had earlier rejected the sup-
pression of the rights of minority
members of the community
accepted this position.
CU~t**t3a
"cinDol^By HI QBAOE FOOO CO
MIAMI. FIJ3I3S
[**


Page6-B
w... ;. iv.-\v
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18. 1983
>
4
Reaganites feel ire
Aid to Israel debated in House
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration felt the ire
of members of the House
over its refusal to recom-
mend the additional $200
million grant in foreign aid
to Israel for the 1984 fiscal
year that Congress
authorized for 1983.
The displeasure was directed at
Nicholas Veliotes, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
as he testified before the House
Foreign Affairs Committee's
subcommittee on Europe and the
Middle East on the
Administration's request for
$2,485 billion in aid to Israel in
1984, the same as this year.
THE PROPOSAL includes
SI 7 billion in foreign military
sales financing, $550 million of
which would be a grant and $785
million in economic aid, all of it a
grant. While the Administration
is proposing that the military aid
grant be $50 million more than
the $500 million it recommended
in 1983. the proposal is actually
$200 million less than Congress
approved.
When Rep. Lee Hamilton (D.,
Ind.) the subcommittee chair-
man, suggested that this amount
is a reduction in aid to Israel,
Veliotes replied. "I don't believe
the question is relevant," since
the Administration opposed the
grant franchise last year. "In due
course, you'll find it is relevant,
Hamilton told him.
In his prepared testimony, in
which he called the U.S. aid
program to Israel "the. material,
manifestation of" our" traditional
commitment to Israel," Velioles
said that the $50 million increase
the Administration recom-
mended "for the military grant"
is motivated by our on-
derstanding over Israeli concerns
over their debt burden, coupled
with our own analysis of that
situation and our own budgetary
constraints."
THROUGHOUT his
testimony, Veliotes stressed that
the Administration believes that
the amount recommended for
Israel is "sufficient" particularly
in an "austerity 'year." He
stressed that to provide the
additional $200 million in grants
would mean tailing funds "out of
the hides" of other countries that
also need U.S. aid.
Rep. Mel Levine ID., Call said
that, as a freshman Congress-
man, he could not understand
how the Administration could
"ignore" the will of Congress.
Rep. Stephen Solan .. N.Y.I
pointed out that since the $785
million economic aid figure has
remained unchanged since 1978,
it is a decrease in aid in real
terms.
Veliotes aaid that the
Administration waa "trying to
run a worldwide program, not
just a Middle East program and
certainly not just an Israeli
program."
REP. ROBERT Toricelli (D.,
N.J.) said by not new mending
the additional $200 million grant,
the Administration might be
perceived as attempting to
exercise some "coercion" on
Israel. Veliotes replied that this
would be true only if $2.5 billion
could be considered a "sanction."
He stressed that the foreign aid
proposal is a "strong vote of
confidence in Israel."
Rep. Ed Zschau (R., Cal.). a
freshman, suggested that con-
ditions be placed on Israel aid to
get Israel to cooperate on such
issues as freezing Jewish set-
tlements on the West Bank.
Veliotes rejected this. He said
one purpose of the aid program
was to encourage Israel to teel
secure "perhaps super-secure,"
so that it could "take risks for
peace."
The only other opposition to
the Israeli aid program came
from another Californian, Rep.
Mervyn Dymally, a Democrat in
his second term, who said that for
the first time since entering
public life, he found that people
in his district had been raising
questions about aid to Israel.
Levine quipped that his Los
Angeles county district is next to
Dymally's, and he gets the
opposite reaction
constituents.
from his
DYMALLY SAID that from
1974 to 1982, the United States
provided Israel $22.8 billion in
aid, twice the amount given all of
Africa and 25 percent more than
Latin America.

Every Passover
people cover us, break us,
ana hide us.
GOODMAN
fi
PASSOVER MATZ0S
-1 LB. PACKS
We must be doing something right.
DOS'?
.-.-
*> Vw>
VII


is Passover.
?


Friday, March 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7-B
' +7
American Gathering of
Holocaust Survivors still
taking reservations
WASHINGTON With over
8,000 paid registrants and some
2,000 applications still awaiting
processing, Benjamin Meed,
president of the American Gath-
ering of Jewish Holocaust Sur-
vivors, to be held here from Apr.
11-14, announced on behalf of the
Steering Committee that as of
-Mar. 25, no further applications
will be accepted.
"We have reached a point
beyond our best expectations,"
Meed declared, "and in order to
assure a logistical balance of
comfort and safety, we are insti-
tuting a Mar. 25 deadline on all
further applications.
"When we began," Meed said,
"we thought we'd have half the
response. The momentum has
' ^"now reached such proportions
that we must maintain proper
control and assure those who
have registered and those whose
registrations we have in hand,
full participation in all events."
Thousands of survivor families
in the 50 states of the U.S. and
major provinces of Canada are
preparing to participate in the
American Gathering.
Meed said that the American
Gathering, designed to comme-
morate the 40th anniversary ot
the Warsaw Ghetto uprising and
all forms of Jewish resistance
during World War II to Nazi
tyranny, "will be the largest as-
semblage of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors in American history."
High government dignitaries
and Jewish community leaders
are expected to participate in one
of the half dozen scheduled
events which include opening
ceremonies at the Capital Centre
with 20,000 persons in attend-
ance, Capitol steps, Lincoln Me-
morial, Arlington Cemetery,
Constitution Hall and the Wash-
ington Convention Center, which
is being converted into a four-day
"Survivors' Village."
There will be a national and
Second Generation register which
has thus far reached over 45,000
names of survivors fed into com-
puters at the Survivors' Village,
enabling high technology to
reunite families and friends at the
Gathering.
Events will be under the aus-
pices of the Days of Remem-
brance Committee of U.S. Holo-
caust Memorial Council which is
preparing special programming
in cooperation with the American
Gathering.
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Saguy resigns as IQ chief
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Maj. Gen. Yehoshua Saguy
has resigned as chief of
military intelligence, an
army spokesman an-
nounced. His resignation
had been called for by the
commission of inquiry into
the Beirut refugee camps
massacre. Another senior
officer. Brig. Gen. Amos
Yaron, cited by the com-
mission for negligence, has
been stripped of his com-
mand.
The army spokesman said
Saguy would be replaced tempo-
rarily by Brig. Gen. Arye Ben
Tov until a new army intelligence
chief is selected. Saguy had ap-
parently hoped to remain in his
post until a permanent replace-
ment was named.
THE THREE-MAN inquiry
panel, headed by Supreme Court
President Yitzhak Kahan, sev-
erely criticized Saguy for failure
to provide sufficient warning that
a massacre of Palestinians was
likely if Israel allowed Christian
Phalangist forces to enter the
Sabra and Shatila refugee camps.
Yaron, commander of Israeli
troops in Beirut at the time of the
massacre, was blamed by the
commission for not taking suffi-
cient measures to end the mass
killing. The commission recom-
mended that he not be given a
front line command for three
years. Yaron was relieved today
of his divisional command but
will remain commander of para-
troops.
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^^
Page8-B
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 18.1963
Making plans for the B'nai B'rith Passover Phon-A-Thon are,
left to right, Paul L. Backman, chairman, Florida Fond Rawing
Cabinet; Harry Yablin, chairman. Sooth Dade Council Phon A
Thon; Jerry Feinberg, Palm Beach Council Phon-A-Thon, and
Bud Homans, South Broward Council Phon-A Thon.
B'nai B'rith Foundation
plans phon-a-thon
The B'nai B'rith Foundation
will conduct an inaugural Pass-
over Phon-A-Thon from March
20 to April 8. Paul L. Backman.
chairman of Florida Fund
Raising Cabinet, announced. The
Phon-A-Thon will be conducted
in various locations throughout
Florida.
"Although the number of con-
tributors to the B'nai B'rith
Foundation is considerably larger
in this area than in other sections
of the country, we have not been
able to reach all our members,"
Backman said. "The Phon-A-
Thon will enable us to contact all
the members of B'nai B'rith who
will be asked to make a direct
contribution to help support the
prestigious Youth Services of
B'nai B'rith.
BBYO needs
teen advisers
B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza- -
lion, the largest Jewish youth or-
ganization in the world with
3H.0OO members, is recruiting
volunteers to serve as advisers to
local high school age groups.
I-oral BBYO programs reach
more than 700 young people in
the North Miami Beach, Holly-
wood, Fort Lauderdale and Coral
Springs areas alone. The girls
component is BBG (B'nai B'rith
Girls) and the boys is AZA
(AlephZadik Aleph).
I f you are interested in becom-
ing involved, call Marsha Gordon
1925-4135) at the Gold Coast
Council BBYO office for more in-
formation and to arrange for an
interview.
Old cemetery
desecrated
BONN (JTA) The old
Jewish cemetery of Aschafen-
burg. south Germany, has been
desecrated. Five tombstones
were completely demolished and
many others were painted with
Nazi and anti-Semitic slogans.
Police are investigating, and the
municipality has promised to
repair the damage without delay.
Free key
duplicating service
A key duplicating service is
being offered to visitors to East
Sunrise Amerifirst office March
14 through 25 during regular of-
fice hours, Monday through
Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.. and
Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Any
visitor may have one standard
home or auto key duplicated free.
"We are happy we can provide
this useful service to our cus-
tomers and visitors," Janet
Levin, assistant vice president
and manager, stated.
"The Hillel Foundations all
over the United States, B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization and B'nai B'rith Girls) and spe-
cial National Programs such as
the ILTC, Kallah, and Summer in
Israel are the foremost priorities
of B'nai B'rith fund raising," he
added. "They represent the
primary thrust of B'nai B'rith to
reach out to young people and
transmit to them the beauty and
richness of our heritage.
Serving on the committee are
Jerry Feinberg, Alfred Golden,
Bud Homans. Bill Seitles. Rubin
Binder, and Harry Yablin.
The South Broward Council
phones will be located at the
South Broward Jewish Federa-
tion, Hollywood, on Wednesday
and Thursday, March 16 and 17,
and Wednesday and Thursday,
March 23 and 24.
Ifstimefor
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Have a joyous feast t
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Mark R. Fried
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Hollywood Federal Building, Suite 201
2101 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
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[Friday, March 18. 1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
<.
Page 9-B
Filling in background
Israel can't be armed
WASHINGTON -
|JTA) President Reagan
i cautioned Israel that it
it "go on forever
Eving as an armed camp"
id said its security de
ided on "the same kind
>f relationship" with its
Neighbors as it has now
nth Egypt.
The President spoke at some
ength on the Middle East during
i question-and-answer session
rith about 50 newspaper editors,
eporters and columnists invited
> breakfast at the White House.
In the course of his remarks he
poke of the need to provide
''something in the nature of a na-
tional home" for the Palestinian
ople. But he promptly qualified
lhat by asserting that "no one
is ever advocated creating a
ation."
THE PRESIDENT said he
vas "a little surprised at the
rind that started blowing" when
he pledged that the U.S. would
jar an tee the security of Israel's
northern borders after Israel
withdraws its army from Leba-
non He made that offer Tuesday
speech to the American
egion convention here during
vhich he emphasized that it was
krgent for "Syria, the PLO and
srael to withdraw their forces
om Lebanon in the shortest
mssible time."
Asked to amplify on his offer
guarantee Israel's -"runty,
leagan stressed: "This is not
anything different than has been
said before by me and by several
presidents before me, that this
1'ountry has always maintained
lhat it has an obligation, ta the
ecuirty of Israel."
But, he added, "in this partic-
ilur instance I was answering the
Question. And I thought I made
plain that I was talking about
Iho withdrawal that in the af-
rmath of that withdrawal, we
prepared to guarantee their
Israel's) safety on the northern
)rder."
[THE PRESIDENT declined to
ler any specifics as to how the
|S. would act to guarantee the
Jcurity of northern Israel. He
Iserted, however, that "we, in
Insultation with our allies in the
jltinational force, would be
spared until Lebanon was
tually stabilized and able to
karantees this safety we
puld be willing to enlarge the
jltinational force. This is of
jrse, in consultation with our
es."
Considerable attention was to-
ssed on the President's use of
word "homeland" with refer-
to a solution of the Palestin-
problem. White House offici-
i said it was consistent with the
Iddle East peace initiative
Jgan proposed last Sept. 1
^ich called for Palestinian gov-
iment on the West Bank and
Strip in association with
rdan. Israel rejected the
^agan proposals immediately.
The Palestine National Council
4C) meeting in Algiers,
dared the Reagan plan "unac-
ible" because it failed to rec-
Inize Palestinian self
rmination and opposed a
Mestinian state.
iUT THE President seemed
Ifawd by those reactions. He
|d the reporters at the White
ise breakfast, "I don't take
> seriously the statement of po-
tions in advance of negotia-
)ns. Everyone wants to
ve their position at their
tiest price before negotia-
18."
le added, however, that "The
estinian problem has to be a
or in the solution. We cannot
Ion. That's been the biggest
problem now for a number of
gW We cannot go on with
these people in not providing
them something in the nature of a
homeland. On the other hand, no
one has ever advocated creating a
nation. And so I just believe that,
as I say, that you wait until you
get to the (negotiating) table."
The President asked rhetoric-
ally, "What is at stake for Israel?
The stake is security. Can they
go on forever living as an armed
camp? Their economy's suffering.
They have 130 percent inflation
rate. And they're having to
maintain a military presence that
is out of all proportion to their
size as a nation. And so the great
security for Israel, and this is
what's back of our plan, is to
create new Egypts, more nations,
more neighbors that are willing
to sign peace treaties with them."
HE ADDED: "Now, Israel
proved its willingness to nego-
tiate and to comply with things
that weren't, certainly, appetiz-
ing to them in the giving up of
the Sinai to Egypt. Well, what
we're looking to is the same kind
of relationship with most of their
neighbors. Maybe not all the
Arab states will be moderate.
Maybe some of them will still
continue to be holdouts. But I
believe there's real evidence that
the more moderate Arab states
do want peace and this would in-
volve recognition of Israel's right
to exist."
salem to take office aa Defense
Minister, reiterated Israel's con-
tention that the Palestinians al-
ready have a state, "Jordan."
Arena paid a farewell visit to
the President. He told reporters
afterwards that Reagan had con-
veyed to him "a sense of
urgency" over the withdrawal of
foreign forces from Lebanon and
repeated his offer to guarantee
the security of northern Israel.
Marion Sato
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This Year Do it For Israel By Doing it In Israel
Israel s outgoing Ambassador
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Reagan's remarks a "repeat
maybe in somewhat different
verbiage" of his earlier position.
Arena, who returned _to. Jeru-
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Page 10-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 18, 1983
Official says U.S. wants
to build up Lebanon
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Nicholas Veliotes,
Assistant Secretary of
State for Near East and
South Asian Affairs, main-
tains that the U.S. wants to
build up the Lebanese army
so that it can "protect" the
people of Lebanon and stop
any "hostile" forces from
entering that country.
"Any group that would come
into Lebanon with a hostile at-
tempt against Israel would also
be viewed as having a hostile at-
tempt against Lebanon,"
Veliotes said in testifying before
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee's subcommittee on
Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs.
WHILE HE did not spell it
out, this apparently is the same
argument the U.S. is making to
convince the Israeli government
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a 15 Days and 14 Nights
G Round trip transport from
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a 14 Breakfasts
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a Welcome drink-upon arrival
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a Full time Fitness Director
a Speakers, Social Programs
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a Monticello Raceway Nearby
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' I Relatives and friends can visit
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
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to drop its insistence on having
military outposts in south Leba-
non after the Israeli army with-
draws.
Lt. Gen. Philip Gast, director
of the Pentagon's Defense
Security Assistance Agency, told
the subcommittee that, within
two weeks, the Lebanese army
will have four brigades of 20,000
men, fully equipped with so-
ehisticated arms bought from the
LA
But when Sen. Paul Sarbanes
(D., Md.) asked if this would al-
low the U.S. marines to leave
Lebanon soon, Gast replied that
how long the marines stay in
Lebanon will depend on the
"peace process," the withdrawal
of foreign forces, how much
popular support is given the
Lebanese army, and the "mis-
chief from outside.
GAST SAID, however, that
the four brigades would enable
the Lebanese army to make a
"contribution" to the security of
Lebanon after the withdrawal of
Israeli, Syrian and Palestine
Liberation Organization forces.
But it could not cover all of Leba-
non, he said.
The Reagan Administration is
asking Congress for a supple-
mental foreign aid appropria-
tion for 1983 of $251 million for
Lebanon. This includes $150 mil-
lion in economic aid which will be
spent in 1983-84, $100 million to
allow Lebanon to buy weapons in
the U.S. and $1 million to cover
the cost of training the Lebanese
army.
Robert Basil, chairman of the
American Lebanese League's
policy committee, praised the
Administration's efforts to help
rebuild Lebanon. He observed,
however, that 80-85 percent of
the destruction in Lebanon oc-
curred during the "seven years of
Syrian-PLO occupation" and
only 15 percent resulted from the
Israeli invasion last summer.
THOMAS DINE, executive
director of the American Israel
Public Affaris Committee
(AIPAC), stressed that U.S. aid
to Israel has declined 63 percent
in real terms because of inflation
and other factors in the last nine
years. United States aid to Israel
in 1984, he said, would be one-
thirteenth of the American ex-
penditure on NATO" at a frac-
tion of the cost of the support to
the security of South Korea.
Moreover, unlike many allies, Is-
rael seeks no contribution of U.S.
combat forces on its behalf."
SHARE A SEDER
If you wish to have a guest who doesn't have a
Seder to join you at your Seder, Monday,
March 28, and/or Tuesday March 29, Please
call Rabbi Rlchter or his secretary Raquel
King at 9218810.
Also, if you don't have your own Seder but
would like to attend one, call Rabbi Rlchter or
Raquel King 9218810.
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(305)576-4000
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ly. March 18,1983
tetv/sAi convert
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11-B
hop says Gospels are anti-Semitic
IAURICE SAMUELSON
)NDON (JTA> -
[Bishop of Hirmingham,
land's most prominent
jh convert to Chris-
ity, has acknowledged
Christian anti-Semi-
makes it "quite
fealistic" to expect Jews
to want to become
istians, except in rare
is like his own.
Hugh Montefiore, who
s an Anglican while a pupil
Jugby public school, said the
of Christian anti-Semitism
the words of Christ himself
Dted in the Gospels.
iis virulent anti-Semitism,
Jl forms of racial hatred,
to be resolutely opposed
[shown up for the lies and
I that it is," he said in a lent
to Anglican clergy in the
; London parish of Stepney.
)NTEFIORE' is a member
lie eminent Sephardi family
Be greatest figure was Su-
es Montefiore, the 19th
jry philanthropist and
idant of oppressed Jewry.
sferring to "an atmosphere of
in the Gospels of St.
thew and St. John, Bishop
ktefiore said: 'ih-ixhere, right
lwartyju|fl,. center of the
L'stanjht writings that we
the beginning's of anti-
Stism which has been so
pant in the church."
fritings of some of the church
its and of Martin Luther
"not very far from the
roui:)n afne*rxm<
attitudes of Der Sturmer, the
Nazi anti-Semitic newspaper," he
said. The image of the Jew in the
minds of Christians was that of
"a deformed monster," that was
the folk memory about the Jews
on which Nazism drew, resulting
in cruelty and indescribable
bestiality, Montefiore said.
THE BISHOP also defended
the right of Jews to be faithful to
their own religion. Jews who
lived by their beliefs could be
regarded as*' "anonymous
Christians," he said, adding:
"The Jews are not to be judged
for remaining as Jews: and in-
deed their experience of suffering
down the ages bring them very
close to the central mystery of
our faith, the passion, death and
resurrection of Christ." Yet lio
Christian church had yet
adequately repudiated its anti-
Semitic history, he said.
Montefiore was preaching at a
church which is staging an
exhibition of Holocaust material
on loan from the official Ausch-
witz Museum in Poland. The six
weeks exhibition, which has the
support of the Board of Deputies
of British Jews, is intended to
show youngsters aged 13 and
over the implications of in-
tolerance and racism, it will later
be taken to Manchester and
Newcastle.
THE EXHIBITS include
photographs, documents and
railway tickets bought by un-
suspecting Greek Jews for trains
that transported them to the gas
chambers, instruments of tor-
ture, cloth made of human hair
and pairs of young childrens
shoes.
Camp Personnel Requirei
byJ.C.C.
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EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
St. George in the East Church,
whose crypt houses the
exhibition, is in the heart of what
was once the most heavily Jewish
populated area of London, before
the war. It was the stamping
ground of Oswald Mosley's
British Union of Fascists. Today,
the Jews have been largely
replaced by Asian and West
Indian immigrants, but racism
lingers on.
The Bishop of Stepney, who
authorized the exhibition in his
diocese, has received letters
accusing him of being "A Jew
lover" and reminding him of the
anti-British activities of Jewish
terrorists in Palestine.
A Very Happy Passover
To All Our Friends
Wan/*if *fi. SPfuUg, tAi.
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
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20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
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SUN DIAMOND GROWERS



Page 12-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 18. is
In Israel,
thou shah not
just sightsee.
Strolling on the beach at Caesarea.
OnTWAonty$46850
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On a vacation to Israel, thou shalt not Rome, Athens, even a Greek Island cruise,
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Land packages from $319 to $ 1385 per person, double occupancy, excluding airfare.


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