The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00317

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

THI
IFloiTLdliamL
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 13 Number 4
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 18,1983
f Price 35 Cents
We must insure Israel's life
By STEVE KATON
L "If Israel should fall, no Jew
anywhere in the world will ever
again live a free and full life."
"The United Jewish Appeal is
your insurance policy to see that
Israel never does fall."
"The glorious story of Israel must
never, ever end."
TV newscaster-lecturer-author
''David Schoenbrun last week ad-
dressed the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's High-Rise
Pacesetter Brunch and Holly-
brook's Annual UJA-Federation
Dinner.
.Schoenbrun told the two audiences that
i he state of affairs in the Middle East "has
rarely been so bad" between the United
States and Israel.
Jerusalem and Washington haven't been
so f;ir apart in their points of view in recent
memory, said the journalist, currently news
analyst for a nationally syndicated TV news
program produced by WPIX in New York.
Newsman inspires
JFSB supporters
On the recent incident between the U.S.
Marine and the Israeli tank commander.
Schoenbrun called it "a setup, a phony
display of power" on the part of Ronald
Reagan and U.S. Secretary of Defense
Caspar Weinberger.
The newsman said the United States is
pressuring Israel to negotiate with Lebanon
. but who is pressuring Syria?
When will the hostilities in the Mideast
end?
Ask Arafat, Schoenbrun said. Ask Soviet
President Yuri Andropov, Schoenbrun said.
"The survival of the State of Israel" (the
stated topic of the newsman's speech) is
intertwined in a single security chain with
the Jews of the Diaspora and the United
States, Schoenbrun believes.
He told residents of the Jewish com-
munity of South Broward that their lives
Continued on Page 10
DAVID SCHOENBRUN fields questions during South Broward appearance.
Super
Sunday
March 13
Super Sunday 1983.
March 13.
Super Sunday 1983.
. March 13.
No, not Jan. 23. That
was the Jewish Federation
ot Greater Fort Lauder-
dale.
No, not Feb. 6. That
was the Jewish Federation
of Greater Miami.
Remember, Super Sunday
1983 Jewish Federation of
South Broward will be March
13. conducted from the offices of
the Federation at 2719 Holly-
wood Blvd.
According to Ronald Roths-
child and R. Joel Weiss, chair-
men, calls have been pouring in-
to the JFSB, asking about
.Super Sunday. "This is because
Miami did so much TV adver-
tising that residents of the
greater Hollywood and Hallan-
dale areas and other South
Mroward points are confused,"
i he chairmen say.
Unlike
SUPER
SUNLW'83
********** SUNDAY. MARCH 13. 1983********** ,
*r
OUR PEOPLE ARE OV THE MYE...
1 VS Iff R THE CALL!
********* ON MARCH 13*********
Jewish Federation of South Broward. 921-8810
in
years past,
Continued on Page 8
the
HT wor k
Jews not immune:
more unemployed
NEW YORK (JTA) Contrary to popular opinion,
unemployment is hitting Jews especially hard, according
to Alfred Miller, executive director of the Federation
Employment and Guidance Service (FEGS).
From the last-hired, first-fired Jews in executive suites,
to Russian immigrants at entry-level as well as
professional-level jobs, to many professionals in the area
of human services, a disproportionate number of Jews are
out of work, Miller said.
"While people think the unemployment rate, now approaching 11
percent, is not that bad in the Jewish community, budget cuts and
economic problems have occurred in areas where there's a high Jewish
concentration,'' he told a meeting of the United Jewish Appeal-
Federation Women's Campaign Advisory Board.
According to Herbert Bienstock, former regional labor com-
missioner fbr the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of
Labor, nowl head of CUNY Queens College Center for Urban Affairs
and consultant to FEGS, close to 100,000 Jews are unemployed in the
New York City area alone. Probably 250.000 to 300,000 Jews are
unemployed nationally, according to his figures.
Miller pointed out that 5,000 Jewish professionals in the greater
New York area are registered with FEGS. This number, which
represents only the people who have come to FEGS for help, is up
about 30 percent from a year ago. The number a year ago was up 40
percent from the previous year. Of the 5,000 professionals, about 500
to 750 are from the communal service and social service sectors.
The rest of the unemployed registered Jewish professionals have
been laid off from businesses. They include accountants, architects,
chemical engineers, architectural engineers, office managers, lawyers,
j Continued on Page 3
Adi, friends now halfway to somewhere
By DVORA WAYSMAN
UJA Special Correspondent
Adi lives with three roommates in an attrac-
tive apartment on a tree-lined street in one of Jeru-
salem's older neighborhoods. He is 24 and works in a
book bindery. The four occupants do all their shop-
P'ng. cooking and cleaning.
Nothing particularly unusual or remarkable ex-
cept that Adi, Eli, Shmuel and YiUhak are all re-
tarded adults.
A few years ago, the future would have been very
dim for these young men. If their parents were wili-
ng, they might have lived a "sheltered" life at home
an inactive and spirited kind of existence until
such time as the parents became too old to care for
.them or died, when they would have been institu-
wmalized probably for the rest of their lives.
They are fortunate to be part of the program of
Agudat Shekel" (Shikun Kehillati l'Mefagrim -
'nstitute for the Retarded), which aims to integrate
UJA-Federation dollars
allowing retarded boys
'non-sheltered' lives
the mildly retarded into society by making them as
independent as possible. The program is partly
funded through the UJA-Jewiah Federation's 1983
Campaign.
This live-in-the-community system is a recent de
velopment in Israel, and there are only seven or
eight apartments such as Adi's in the entire country,
although quite a few more are in the planning stage.
To the first-time visitor, Adi's flat is a delightful
surprise. The pictures in the living room are in
bright colors vivid posters, a Van Gogh print of a
wheatfield. The divan and easy chairs are modern
and inviting. There is a stereo and a TV set, and a
large bowl of fruit sits on the coffee table. The color
scheme is autumnal (brown-beige-orange).
You can see the sparkling kitchen, with its large
refrigerator, laminated cupboards and the modern
oven. The bedrooms have built-in closets, and the
kind of divan beds that make the rooms more like at-
tractive studies. They are immaculately clean and
tidy.
The four roommates were all born in Israel, two of
Moroccan parents. Eli also works, in a Jerusalem
chocolate factory. He does not earn a large salary,
but both he and Adi take special pride in being wage-
earners, and contribute one-third of their wages to a
special fund for the apartment. They are not waste-
ful with the remainder, often buying bank shares or
stocks as a hedge against inflation, just like the rest
of the population.
Both wage-earners were brought up at home and
went through the regular school system, but in,Spe-
cial Education classes. At 18, they went to the re-
habilitation center run by the Jerusalem munici-
Continued on Page 9-A


Pmge2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
'w~-*V"V- :fc5*?
'.yii-^w'i; ^nSffiggv^RK
fcadHrSliM BHUppHHeufi H

<-*.-, "vv^- 1 lufcHFB^A?. ^Hfc-wl*JiJa^aM B^H
.V* "'.'.!rri' tw<* i B^Ha^C^UttXJak


^S^^Bff :*:* llBW3^ttfil'WFV"* ^0* 3fi-PtfT5
-> 7pftu-.:w- ^^e^*^'^ """
Ift not easy to be a Riverside.
r
X
I
i
Being the best at what you do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best It began with Charles Rosenthal,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management
It is the kind of leadership which,
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service.
They understood that being a Jewish
funeral director had to be more than just a
business.
They knew it was a very special calling
that demanded a total commitment to Jewish
tradition.
And the knowledge and resources to
provide funeral service that was truly Jewiah.
That's why today, Riverside is the most
respected name in Jewish funeral service in
the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
Ncaarial Cka*i. \wx./T*nml Dfraeton
The most respected name in Jewish funeral
service in the world.


Friday, February 18,1983
The Jewish flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Many people are staging symbolic hunger strikes.
Some people do it once a week, some have vowed to refuse
food for as Umg as Tolik carries m his strike. 'Avital
Anatoly hanging by thread
By SAM SILVER
The 20th of January was
Anatoly Sharansky's birth-
day. For some years now,
people in Israel, as well as
in the rest of the western
world, have seized on the
occasion to send a message
to both Tolik and to his So-
viet overlords. There have
been large cakes, petitions,
and last year there was a
parade through downtown
Jerusalem with many
famous former refuseniks
participating. This year
people are more subdued.
After all, what is the best
way to celebrate a hunger
strike?
This year's uneaae is' com-
pounded by the reality that Ana-
toly s life is hanging by the
narrowest of threads. He has
been on a hunger strike since last
Yom Kippur. His health had al-
ready deteriorated from mal-
treatment, and when he began
what some suggest may be his
final protest, he weighed less
than 100 pounds.
He is alive courtesy of the
same government that im-
prisoned him; they are force-
feeding him because a dead re-
fusenik is not what they want
right now. Besides, didn't Yuri
Andropov report the other week
that Anatoly has quit his hunger
strike?
His wife, Avital, is presently
living in Jerusalem. She left the
USSR eight years ago. She ex-
plained with a wry smile that
they told her Tolik would follow
within six months. She and Tolik
married the day before she left,
and since her arrival in Israel she
peBPuaRy
20, Sunday
21,monoay
23, Wednesday
24, thups&ay
26, Satim&ay
27, Sunday
28, monday
Pancake Brunch sponsored by
the Mahi Oriental Band of the
Hollywood Shrine Club, 2900
Taylor St.; all you can eat,
beginning at 9 a.m.
Association of Parents of
American Israelis meets at the
JCC, W. Sunrise Boulevard,
Plantation, 1:30 p.m.; call 584-0598.
South Broward Chapter,
American Society for Technion,
Women's Division, meets at 12
noon at Galahad North. Lecture by
mind control expert.
"History of the American Jew" is
Meral Ehrenstein's topic at 10 a.m.
at Temple Solel in Hollywood;
call 989-0205.
Jeffrey D. Dekro, national
administrator of New Jewish
Agenda, will address the Grand
People of Temple Solel at 7 p.m.;
call 989-0205.
Golda Meir Hadassah Luncheon for
medical research, Dorai Hotel,
12 noon; call 923-9414 or 921-6494.
Jewish Singles (18-35) Dance,
sponsored by the JCC of South
Broward, at 9 p.m. at Miami Shores
Country Club, 10000 Biscayne
Blvd.,; call 921-6511.
Purim Party at Temple Beth El,
11 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; also at the
temple, at 6:30 p.m., the
Brotherhood will honor Milton
Jacobs as its "Man of the Year".
Purim Dinner, Sisterhood of Temple|
Israel of Miramaoat 5 p.m.;
call 961-1700.
"The New Anti-Semitism" will be
the topic as the Holly dale Chapter,
American Jewish Congress, meets
at 12 noon at Galahad South;
call 454-7254.
Your Community Calendar welcomes news of your Jewish
oriented organization. All meetings, times and their locations,
should be directed to Steve r^ton, associate editor, at the Jewish
Federation ol South -Ekoward, 5>71p Hollywood Blvd. Calendar
lnt|m#lon musi be received at last two weeks t
date,......... .._____
atMaeaHeaMaaBBMiMB
before pubMcarflori
has devoted herself to the freeing
of her husband. When we spoke
she had just returned from a trip
to the United States.
SHE SPOKE about the very
courteous and sympathetic way
that she was received by the
White House and added. "I met
with 35 members of the Congress.
Everyone said that they would do
whatever they could." As we
spoke, her eyes filled with tired
wonder at how it had come to be
that she has access to powerful
U.S. politicians, and yet Tolik re-
mains in Christopol prison in
Siberia.
Her trip was not confined to
Washington. She spoke of how
ordinary people have been active
on behalf of Anatoly. "Many
people are staging symbolic
hunger strikes. Some people do it
once a week, some people have
even vowed to refuse food for as
long as Tolik carries on his strike.
Everything because of his hunger
strike.
Her work does not go unno-
ticed, "I get mail every day from
whole classes of school children."
She worries about how to answer
them all but hopes that a letter to
their local newspaper will do.
Avital, of course, has not been
back to the USSR since she left,
but she is in close communication
with her mother-in-law, Ida Mil-
grom.
" WHEN ANATOLY was al
lowed to receive letters, his
mother was the only person to
whom he could write. Avital
would call or write to her, and Ida
would faithfully tell her son
whatever his wife said. Although
this was not a perfect arrange-
ment, while it lasted it kept
Anatoly s spirits alive. He began
his protest because authorities
were denying him both his letters
and the infrequent visits from his
mother.
Avital told how she has spent
whole nights trying to get
through to Moscow by phone.
She has been lucky of late, but
she reports that Ida Milgrom has
grown increasingly worried and
that Anatoly's mother and
brother were planning to travel to
the prison without permission
from the the authorities and in-
tend to wait ourside the gates un-
til they are allowed in to see him.
WE ENDED our short inter-
AVITAL SHARANSKY IN WASHINGTON.
view on a melancholy note. The
image of thousands of people
fasting for Anatoly's birthday is
far from a festive reflection.
One final thought that brought
a smile to Avital's face concerned
"psychological warfare." Avital
asked if it would not be a good
idea for thousands of Jews from
Europe and America to make
aliya specifically to wait in Israel
for Anatoly.
"Then perhaps they would
have to let him go," she mused.
Unemployment
Continued from Page 1
business administrators and computer programmers. In fact, about
10 percent or a total of 400, are computer programmers, according to
Miller.
"Nobody is safe from this," Miller said. "Unemployment is per-
meating the entire Jewish community, the whole gamut of the Jewish
economic base." He noted that, in addition, "Hundreds of
professionals such as social workers, psychologists, rehabilitation
counselors, teachers, as well as Jews whose small businesses have
failed, have registered with FEGS for jobs."
In addition to job placements, FEGS provides vocational training
along with mental health treatment services and a variety of
developmental business and industry projects in New York and
abroad.
Miller stressed that six percent of the FEGS budget received from
UJ A Federation Campaign provides leverage for the agency's $17
million funding for programs in 50 locations throughout New York
City, and Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties. Some 50 to 60
percent of FEGS' 70,000 clients are Jewish.

Oh/ who go feel not
Be pain of parting, it is
those who stay behind
tbatsuffer"
jQxigfelkxv.
The Menorah
Pre-NeedPlan.
Sanricat acoerdkif to your individual wiahat
> Free preawitauoni > conauhationa |
IntonM-frw payment* (up to yean)
Pryimntiirt put into Uutt and
100% rafundabla
Free oiiwatory oouMeime. and arranavrnants
throughout tht country
Worldwida thappina available
Chapels in Fort Laudardala. Manjate.
Deerfiald Beech. Wt Palm Beach. N. Miami Baach
Broward 742-600 j
Dade 945-3939
Parm Beach 627 2277
South Palm Beech 427-4700
I m nd nw frM pMnptiMt on MsnoraKi
fra-NaedWan.
I carl ma to Mt upa free plantation.
City.
P.
Menorah Chapels
20955 Biscayne Boulevard
N. Miami, Florida 33180




Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18.1983
Jewish Floridian Ron shows his own great line
id Stwlei ol Orealer Horlvwood C f'Mb'
FREOSHOCHET STEVE RATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Editor and Publish*. Associate Ed.ioi F.eculive Editor
Published Bi Waaaty Second Class Postage paid at Hanandaie f ia USPS U64S00 4
MOllYWOOD-FORT LAUOERDALE OFFICE. Am Savings 2500 Bi Blvd Suite TOTG. Hanandaie Fla 33009 Phone 454 0466
Abraham Ha learn. Advertising Supervisor
Mam Ottice t Plant 120 NE 6th St. Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 1 3/.1 4605
Poetmasler: Farm XT* return, m Jewish FNKKMan. P 0 Bos 01-2B7S. Mlamr. Fla 33101
Jewish Federation ol South B.o.ard Ottlcere President. Ban Sailer. Vice Presidenis Pnnio A
c!!!L? S"" S,n" M 'na m ***** T'""* Theodora Newman. Secret.., Olio
o,!!f#'Qfi**CUl"* D"#c''- Summer 0 K.. Submit m....,.i lor publication to Leslie Silas
PuOJic Relations Director
"" "*. een Arts. WNS. NBA. AJPA. and **.
___rJZ7?r?,m *" BO' ****** Kaahnilh ol Merchandise Advertised
SSSu*1m*1*MmmT' Hc",rw00* "* "o"*-** ** ww *<. MiXrN
Friday, February 18,1983
Volume 13
5 ADAR 5743
Number 4
Inquiry ought
to tell the world
where freedom is
President Reagan allowed last week in
a press conference on the state of the na-
tion's economy as how Israel was absolute-
ly at fault in that confrontation in Beirut
between three Israeli tanks and an Ameri-
can marine captain. We're hard-pressed to
see what relationship there is between the
two subjects, but it does tend to show just
how anxious he is these days, along with
the rest of much of the world, to make at
least one anti-Israel pronouncement a day
to keep the blahs away.
Actually, it has already been made quite
clear that the Israelis were in the right, but
that won't make the wire services now, will
it? We can't even expect one of those
perennial Reagan'' I misspoke'' apologies,
not when it comes to Israel.
So there appears to be no point in talking
to the rest of the world about the Israeli
massacre report released Tuesday by its
commission of inquiry into the Shatila and
Sabra operations. There appears to be no
point in declaring that a democratic nation
responded to a moral dilemma and has
finally fixed the blame for "blunders" and
recommended remedial action.
This is how a free people responds, even
if it hurts them, we are impelled to say.
This is a method of operation you will not
find in Araby, we would like to point out.
This is a form of behavior in which the
Lebanese themselves can not seem to en-
gage, we are anxious to declare, meaning
that even they are willing to confess that it
was Lebanese who did the killing, not Is-
raelis, and that they can't manage to pull
themselves together long enough to fix
their own blame for Lebanese "blunders"
anyway. Or to recommend remedial
action.
Certainly, these things deserve saying.
But who is there to listen in a world deter-
mined to redress past "grievances"
directed at the Arabs by courting them now
in a media love affair?
m Sou* AMca T
Tr Natal kkercury
WHEN PRESIDENT Reagan
was told about the heroic exploit
of Capt. Charles Johnson, he im-
mediately called up the marine
officer who single-handedly
turned back a wave of mean,
nasty, rotten Israeli tanks just
outside of their lines in Beirut.
As the phone rang overseas,
the President's heart thumped
with both pride and annoyance
all at the same time. Just as the
Captain picked up the phone, the
President decided he'd better
show only his pride. A secret leak
of the transcript of the call has
given me a most fortunate word-
for-word accounting of this
immortal conversation.
Ron: This is the President.
Congratulations.
Chock: The President of what?
I'm just a Wisconsin farm-boy
who did my duty. Hie, 'scuse me.
Ron: (Aside to Caspar Wein-
berger!. What a hayseed. He says
he doesn't know me. Someone
ought to let him have it smack in
the keister. And he has the hic-
cups. Sounds like indigestion
to me. Are they eating too good
over there?
Cappy: Do you want him
demoted? Or maybe have him as-
signed as special agent to Gen.
Sharon representing the Penta-
gon? But I should warn you that
I'm recommending him for spe-
cial commendation before you
decide.
Ron: (Waving his hand for
silence). The President, Chuck
... Of the United States .
President Reagan.
Chuck: Oh Lordy. my
pologies. Sir. We have been in-
ructed. sruced that is, not to talk
to those Israelis or anyone else of
importance roun' here. Least-
ways anyone who thinks they're
important. I thought you might
be one of them. My 'pologies.
Ron: Good show. Chuck.
Chuck: Sir?
Ron: (His hand on the phone,
aside to Weinberger). He's a
smuck.
Cappy: The word is shmuck,
Mr. President. There's a sh there,
like in keep quiet.
Ron: (He removes his hand
from the phone to address Capt.
Johnson). Good show. (Speaking
slowly). I said that was a good
show.
Chuck: Thank you. Mr. Pres-
den. I mean Residen. I jus' tole
em like it was. If they wanted to
pass, they'd havta go over my
dead body.
Ron: Great script. Chuck. It
reminds me of an old movie of
mine. Did you ever see "King's
Row'? Remember Ann Sheridan?
(The President stands thought-
fully, suddenly saying nothing.
After a moment. Secretary Wein-
berger digs a finger into bis ribs.)
Cappy: Tell him he acted for
the good of our country.
Ron: You acted for the good of
our country. Chuck.
Cappy: And that those Jews
there will have to learn who is
boss.
Ron: Captain, I tell you that
was a great script. Better than
anything I ever had handed to
me to play. Even better than
"King's Row." Did you see
"King's Row?" With Ann Sheri-
dan? What you did was to let the
Israelis, our good friends and
allies, know that at times there'll
naturally be differences between
us. And that they must respect
these differences.
Chuck: I was just doin my
duty as I. hie. saw it
Ron: Oh. great line. Chuck,
great line. Nobody ever handed
me a line like that. But you need
some lessons in elocution. Have
the hiccups, my boy?
Cappy: Say he's in the great
tradition of the Marine Corps
They shall not pass Damn
the torpedoes, that sort of thing.
Ron: Captain, I must be frank
to say that your great perfor-
mance there was in the great tra-
dition of our great Marine Corps.
They shall not pass Damn
the torpedoes, that sort of thing.
Our nation is rightly proud of
you, Captain. Secretary Wein-
berger is standing here by my
side, and he wants you to know
that he's recommending you for a
special citation.
Chuck: Jus' doin' dootee.
Ron: (Aside to Weinberger, his
hand on the phone). No one ever
let me at a script like that one.
He's got the hiccups again,
and his speech sure needs shar-
pening up. (Pauses. Gets angry).
Maybe John Wayne or even Gre-
gory Peck had scripts like that,
standing up to three tanks that
way. Never me.
Cappy: Say he contributed to
your Middle East peace initiative
of Sept. 1.
Ron: Captain, I'm obliged to
say you contributed to my Mid-
dle East peace initiative of Sept.
1, standing up to three tanks that
way. The nation thanks you.
Chuck: Oh yeah? Thank ya,
Mizzer Reziden, even if not sure
I unnersan*.
Ron: (Aside to Weinberger).
He's not sure he understands. I
think that's what he said. Maybe
it's not indigestion. Maybe he's
been doing more than just eating
too good.
Cappy: And maybe you need a
sudden emergency call from
Moscow so you can end this thing
and hang up. No sense crawling
to the kid.
Chuck: All I did, Sir, was to let
'em know that no Jew was gob'
to get the better of the good ole'
U.S. of A.
Ron: (Aside to Weinberger).
He says he wanted to let the Is-
Continued on Page 21
Letters of Note
C%i TTnienTian
Dear Mr. and Mrs. Stieber:
It was our considered opinion
that an interview with Jacobo
Timerman was better presented
as just that: an interview with
Timerman minus the filmed com-
ments we sought from the
Deputy Foreign Minister of
Israel, the former Israeli Ambas-
sador to the United States and a
former Israeli general who we
also filmed and (who is perhaps
more critical of Begin and Sharon
than Timerman is).
The decision was made to
quote, as we did verbatim, from
some of the things the present
Deputy Foreign Minister said to
us but not to include anything
from the former ambassador or
the former general. May I re-
spectfully remind you that when
Jacobo Timerman was being in-
terviewed on American television
and speaking at dinners and
luncheon in the United States
about what it was like to be a Jew
imprisoned in Argentina, no one
thought it. necessary to include a
rebuttal from the Argentine gov-
ernment.
By no stretch of the imagine,,
tion can this long time Zionist,
victim of anti-Semitic persecu-
tion, hero of Jewish groups when
he was recounting his experiences
in an Argentine prison be consid-
ered an enemy of Israel or world
Jewry. He is plainly and simply a
man the world applauded for his
courage in standing up to Argen-
tina and because of that a man
worth listening to.
You say in your letter, "The
media has unfortunately seen fit
to distort the tacts." That, I am
afraid, is ostensibly what so
many letter writers said to us
when we put Moshe Dayan and
Golda Meir on our air with no
comment from Deputy Foreign
Minister of an Arab country or
from a former Arab Ambassador
to the Untied States.
Sincerely,
Don Hewitt
Executive Producer
MINUTES
BediWBoys
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
The caricature by Hertz,
showing Habib, Shultz and
Weinberger astride a camel cap-
tioned "The Boys from Bechtel"
speaks volumes. Mr. Hertz has
captured the old Yiddish saying
"Here is where the dog lies
buried."
There are no two ways about it.
Caspar Weinberger has mes-
merized our president. Wein-
berger wanted former Secretary
Haig out, he got him out. He
wanted Shultz in, Shultz now sits A
in Haig's seat and, along with
Weinberger, runs our foreign
policy.
An ingenious scheme seems to
have been hatched by the Bechtel
trio which has created havoc in
our Jewish community and has
succeeded in dividing it tragical-
ly. Some of our Jewish organiza-
tions, and even some of our
rabbis, have succumbed to their
machinations. American Jews,
individually, and through their
organizations, have publicly
meddled in Israeli politics. They
have had the audacity to plug for
Peres, or Navon. or even Eban, as
against Begin. They would ac-
cept the Reagan "peace pro-
posal'' as opposed to the Camp
David Accords which had been
considered a contrast for peace
that was not to be deviated from
or superseded. They would give
up Judea or Sumaria (the West
Bank) and thus repeat the Sinai
blunder.
Our very own Bible has warned
us not to trust Egypt. Well, Isra-
el wanted peace so badly that it
gave up the Sinai in return for
peace, which turned out to be
illusory. Israel will not make the
same mistake again, despite the
meddlesome Rabbi Hertzberg
and his ilk, and the organizations .
such individuals say they repre-
sent.
The various news media have
been subverted by the Bechtel
team. Let's not fall prey to their
undermining propaganda. Now is
the time for the Israelis to decide
what is good for themselves. It is
for us to help them, to support
them, and not get involved in
their internal politics. It is Israeli
blood that is on the line. Let's not
permit ourselves to be brain-
washed by the news media any
more.
The Israelis will continue to be
set up for altercations similar to
the single, gun-slinging Marine
who recently confronted the
Israeli tank patrol. That Wein-
berger toasted such a Marine
instead of offering the United
State's apology to its ally Israel.
b a green light to our "peace
keeping" force in that arm to
continue such conduct with his
evident blessings.
Incidents such as this, may
continue to be orchestrated by
the "Bechtel Boys" who are now
at the helm in the U.S. Sute
Department.
HZ SMALL
HaUasdak


Friday, February 18, 1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Jewish High School offers 4 levels of biology class
By MERLE SAFERSTEIN
Boiling spinach in a science
classroom may seem out of the
ordinary, yet at the Jewish High
School of South Florida it's done
as part of an experiment in chro-
motography.
Through a relatively easy pro-
cedure, students learn to extract
chlorophyll from the leafy green
vegetable. This process shows
that the green really is a combi-
nation of orange, yellow and
green pigmentation.
Gary Feilich, head of the sci-
ence department and a biology
teacher at the Jewish High
School, believes:
"Students performing experi-
ments such as this better under-
stand the general concepts in the
science curriculum. In the Jewish
AT PACESETTERS
Noted author Michael
Medved will be keynote
speaker Sunday, Feb. 20, at
the Jewish Federation of
South Hroward's Metro-
politan Pacesetter Dinner.
Open to those contributing a
minimum of $1,500 ($1,000
husband, $500, wife), the
(event will be at Temple Beth
Torah, North Miami Beach.
Medved, whose latest book,
"Hospital," is being critical-
ly acclaimed, is a longtime
Jewish activist who is do-
nating all fees for speaking
engagements to Jewish
causes.
It DAYS FROM MIAMI
M Ckn.J_ Ui 2*27 99
tmlitkn An US2477.9*
*I UtfcniOrt SIS 2*27.0*
per peieon beted on
double occupancy
Departure Every Sunday
Tour Price Includes
Round trip airfare
4 nights Athens (Continental
Breakfast)
Superior First Class Hotel
3 Nights Classical Greece
(half Board)
First Class Hotel (Breakfast
and Lunch)
7 Day Cruise (All Meals)
Outside Cabins Sfrlla Solaria
Sightseeing, Transfers,
Entrance Fees, Deluxe ,
Motorcoach, Guide and Taxes.
Ask for Complete Itinerary
May be Upgraded
at a Supplement
Call
Trans Olympia Tour
1800 S. Young Circle
Hollywood. Florida
Miami 944-4879
Hollywood 925-5220
T
High School biology department,
stress is placed on conceptualiza-
tion rather than merely on me-
morizing trivial facts."
"We interrelate all units of
study so that the students can
learn through association and
continual review."
Four track levels of biology are
taught.
The bask biology class is for
underachievers and students
with learning disabilities; it gives
the students the essentials of
biology without the technicali-
ties. The regular class gives the
students a sprinkling of major
facets of biology, including a
focus on physiology and genetics.
The honors biology class
stresses in-depth study. It adds
biochemistry, evolution and
botany to the curriculum.
The Advanced Placement
course is a college-level class in
which students, for the most
part, work independently of the
teacher. The teacher serves as a
catalyst and a resource person.
Advanced Placement students
dissect the heart, kidney, eye and
brain of a sheep in addition to the
standard dissections which all
biology students at the Jewish
High School perform. Each Ad-
vanced Placement student also
Teacher Gary Feilich, who also is chairman of the science de-
partment, lectures his ninth grade biology class at the Jewish
High School.
examines a shark and a perch.
Feilich, formerly of Bronx
High School of Science in New
York, uses the N.Y. State Re-
gents syllabus as a guide to the
biology curriculum at the Jewish
High School. He says, "Students
have more pressure to think at
our school. They have to be able
to put things together and
analyze a problem. The answers
aren't laid out for them."
This spring, the biology classes
will be working out genetics
problems by computer. After
computations are concluded, the
students will experiment with
mating fruit flies and noting the
sex and eye color of the flies as
they are hatched.
The relatively small and per-
sonal nature of the Jewish High
School allows special projects,
like the interdepartmental
biology Jewish Studies class con-
ducted last semester.
Rabbi Louis Herring, principal
of the Jewish High School,
taught Jewish medical ethics.
The students wrote a biological
interpretation of a medical prob-
lems, requiring an analysis of the
ethical problems.
Topics such a heart transplant,
medical experimentation,
abortion. venereal disease,
smoking and euthanasia were
among those researched.
World ORT Union sent Giora
Mann from the Hebrew Univer-
sity to head the division of sci-
ence and technology at the Jew-
ish High School.
Because the areas of science
and technology are constantly
changing, the focus of ORT, as
well as at the Jewish High
School, is to teach generic scient-
ific and technological skills so the
students can apply those same
skills to the changing world.
Thirty of the Jewish High
School's 129 students are from
South Broward. The high school
is a beneficiary agency of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
K Certified Kosher
Fleischmann's Margarine would like
to show you how much healthier
traditional cooking can be with
June Roth's Low Cholesterol Jewish
Cookery. In it you'll find favorites
like noodle kugel and blintzes made
the sensible way. Fleischmann's
Margarine can be part of your
traditional cooking. Fleischmann's
is the only leading margarine made
from 100% corn oil. It's low in
Low fkolistf ol Jewish Cookery from
Fleischmann's Margarine. A $3.95 value for
only $1.95 plus $1.00 pottage and handling
with the front label from any package
of Fleischmann's Margarine, mite to:
Fleiichmann'i Margarine Cookbook
P.O. Box 1M
Teeneck, New {ersey 07666
N.me___
Adrfnni.
City____
. State .
Zip.
:_i
saturated fat with no cholesterol.
And it's certified Kosher, too.
Whether you prefer regular
Fleischmann's or parve
Fleischmann's Sweet Unsalted, both
have a delicious flavor perfect for all
your recipes. So order your cookbook
now it's a $3.95 value for only $1.95
plus $1.00 postage and handling
with the front label from any
package of Fleischmann's Margarine.
Fleischmann's Gives Every Meal A Holiday Flavor.

..a.
,...


. '.
-N.b.nn HrendiliK.


Page 6
-..-..-. ... '.....'
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
CAMPAIGN
)CUPS8J
Kehillah leaders
announce speaker
PARKER PLAZA PLANNING Rhona Miller, chairwoman,
(left, seated) leads organizers for UJA-Jewish Federation of
South Broward at Parka Plaza in discussion of the building's
first-ever cocktail party-buffet. The event is set for Sunday,
Feb. 27, beginning at 4 p.m. in the Gold Room. With Mrs.
Miller, from left, are Fannie Schifrin, Betty Neft, and Lucile
and Mel Baer. Honorees will be Joe and Martha Goldman.
15 events, 2 Sundays
in red-hot fundraising
In terms of fundraising for the 1983 UJA-Jewish
Federation of Campaign, the next two weeks are the
busiest of the entire year.
The next two Sundays, beginning Sunday, Feb. 20, a
grand total of 15 functions are planned through Sunday,
Feb.27.
SUNDAY. FEB. 20
Three breakfasts are set to begin at 10 a.m.: Parker Dorado; Golden
Surf Towers and Galahad South.
Parker Dorado will honor Norman Lappin, involved in Jewish
activities in and around Paterson, N.J., and South Broward. Chair-
woman is Mary Liebman and co-chairmen are Lappin and Ike Wenger.
Speaker will be Israel Maj. Gen. Ya'akov Even.
Golden Surf Towers will honor Ted Chester, originally from the
Passaic-Clifton section of New Jersey and who still lives half the year
up North. Irving Baum. Julius Cooper, Seymour Deutsch and Ben
Kdelman make up the presidium. Speaker will be Jerry Gleekel.
yx Galahad Court will honor Martha and David Lerman, active in
Jewish causes in South Broward and Syracuse, N.Y. Chairman is
Milton Kritzer and co-chairmen are Morton Harris, Frances Briefer.
-Allan Greene, Matilda Kimelblot, Alfred Olkin and Jeannette
Sussman. Speaker will be Israel Amitai.
At 11 a.m.. Oceanview Park will honor Miriam and Bernard
Friedman, both active in Jewish causes. Hosting the Oceanview
brunch will be Lubie and Lorraine Himmel. Chairman is Dr. Abraham
K. Dokson. and co-chairmen are Walter H. Mayer and Bernard
Friedman. Israel Amitai will speak.
At 11:90 a.m., Trafalgar I will serve breakfast to UJA-Federation
supporters in honor of Hilda Kaplan and Abe Tarler. Chairman Abe
Levine is being helped by Al Goldberg and Murray and Rosalie
Oremland.
At 2 p.m.. Olympus residents will be treated not only to a per
formance by the Habimah Players, but to the resounding words of
Israel Amitai. The function, which will take place in the 500 Building
Social Hall, will be chaired by Samuel Aptner and Esther Rosenberg.
At 5 p.m.. Plaza Towers will hold a cocktail-buffet for contributors
of a minimum of $200. Sponsors of the party are Mr. and Mrs.
YVeisberger and other contributors. Music will be provided, according
to chairpersons Max Taraza and Ruth Suss (North! and Albert
Lefton. Joe and Irma Deutsch and Joe Jacobs (South).
SUNDAY. FEB. 27
At 10 a.m., Parker Towers will dedicate its UJA-Federation 1983
Campaign complimentary breakfast to the residents of Parker
Towers. "Please join us in expressing solidarity for our fellow Jews the
world over" is the message. Chairman is Samuel H. Levy and co-
chairman is Edward Gusten. Speaker will be Jerry Gleekel.
At 10:30 a.m. at Plaza Towers, a complimentary breakfast honoring
residents of the building will be served in the recreation hall. Those
interested in attending may call Max Taraza or Ruth Suss (North! or
Albert Lefton or Joe Jacobs (South). Guest speaker will be Don
Lefton.
Also at 10:30. at Galahad III. Samuel and Frances Goldberg will be
honored during a UJA-Federation breakfast. Galahad III Chairman
Jules Gordon announces that the guest speaker will be Israeli Abbie
Ben Arie.
At 11 a.m.. Lake Point Towers will serve a complimentary brunch
honoring Ruth and Bernard Brusin. who since their teens have been
active in Jewish concerns. The 1983 UJA-Federation Campaign
function will be co-chaired by Seima and Sam Buchman. Guest
speaker will be Jerry Gleekel.
At 8 p.m. at Sea Air. residents will pay tribute to Harold and Kay
Lowy. According to Ben Rabinowitz and Abraham Mallet, chairmen
of the UJA-Federation 1983 Campaign at Sea Air, guest speaker is
scheduled to be Israeli Abbie Ben Arie.
Arlene Ray, chairwoman, and
Janie Berman, co-chairwoman,
are this years leaders of the sec-
ond annual Kehillah Champagne
Brunch.
The event Thursday. March
17. beginning at 10 a.m. at the
Emerald Hills Country Club is
expressly for Metropolitan and
Western area contributors
pledging a minimum of $100 to
the Women's Division. Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Arlene Ray
According to the chairwomen,
this year's guest speaker will be
Dr. Yitschak Ben-Gad. current
deputy mayor of Netanya. Israel,
who as a journalist in 1977
covered the first historic peace
conference with the Israeli dele-
gation in Cairo.
Ben-Gads topic will be "The
PLO and Israel Is a Dialogue
Possible?"
More than 200 women are ex-
pected at Kehillah. the chair-
women report. Kehillah means
community in Hebrew, and the
event celebrates what the South
Broward community is doing
through Federation on a local,
national and international level.
Mrs. Ray. immediate past vice
president of Leadership Develop-
ment, augmented the highly suc-
cessful Jewish Awareness Semi-
nars. Her object was to promote
and educate the Jewish consci-
ousness in order to raise its level.
For her efforts, last year Mrs.
Ray was awarded the Hy and
Belle Schlafer Award for Young
leadership.
Her other accomplishments in-
clude being chairwoman of the
Yonah Division, Women's Divi-
sion. Jewish Federation of South
Broward. and, later, leader of the
B'not Shalom Luncheon. Mrs.
Ray also is active in the National
Council of Jewish Women and
Temple Solel.
Mrs. Berman has served on the
Women's Division board for
three years. She is one of the
writers and producers of the
award-winning multimedia pro-
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
duction "Together We Grow."
In addition, Mrs. Berman lent
her creative talents in writing
and producing the new film "Life
Behind the Lifeline."
Co-chairwoman of fundraising
in the Metro and Yonah Divi-
sions in Emerald Hills and Holly-
wood Hills, Mrs. Berman also co-
chaired the Women's Division's
Awareness Seminars.
Last year, she was chairwoman
Janie Berman
of Young Leadership.
Hostesses for Kehillah are
Barbara Rosenberg, Mary Cohen,
Terry Greenberg, Beverly Hol-
lander and Elayne Topolski. Ar-
rangements co-chairwomen are
Fran Haskin and Gloria Burman.
Reservations co-chairwoman
are Lynda Wilentz, Dina Kaye,
Ann Lane and Linda Patraka.
With G. Washington V Seasoning
and Broth you'll never have
mish-mash kasha!
I'dSftS.
K Cartilied Kosher and Pane
_G. WASHINGTON'S
RICH BROWN KASHA
V'i cups buckwheat groals
1 egg, well beaten
3 cups boiling water
When you're trying to give
your kasha an extra special
flavor you can sometimes add
too much ot this, not enough
of that, and end up with a
mish-mash Next time, use
one complete seasoning. Use
6. Washington's Rich Brown
Seasoning and Broth when you
cook your kasha No mere food
enhancer. G Washington's
special blend of herbs
and spices flavors your food
more ways than one for one
great dish So don't settle for
mish-mash kasha Enjoy
geschmak kasha!
3 packets G. Washington's
Rich Brown Seasoning and Broth
Combine the groals and egg in a saucepan over low heal, until the groats
separate Stir in water and G Washington's Cover and cook over low
heat for 15 minutes All water should be absorbed if not. drain Serve as
a side dish with melted butter Serves 6
I
DO YOU REMEMBER THE
BEAUTIFUL CATSKILL MOUNTAINS
IN THE SUMMER? ESCAPE THE
FLORIDA HEAT AND COME ON UP!
THE WORLD FAMOUS CONCORD RESORT HOTEL
OFFERS YOU A SPECIAL SUMMER
ALL FOR
n083
per person, dbl occ. standard
room, air fare not included
Superior Room$1,233
Executive Room$1,323
Tower Room$1,4 73
2 Weeks
15 Days and 14 Nights
Round trip transport from
La Guardia to Hotel
Concord representative will
meet you and handle your
luggage and transfers
Gratuities for waiter and maids
during your stay
Local and State Taxes
14 Breakfasts
14 Lunches
14 Dinners
Special diets available
2 Cocktail Parties
Welcome drink upon arrival
ADDITIONAL WFFK
Standard Room$520
Superior Room-$595
Executive Room$640
Tower Room$775.
I Full time Fitness Director
I1 Speakers. Social Programs
and Daily Fun Activities
Entertainment every night
D Dancing to 3 orchestras
D Monticello Raceway Nearby
11 Free 9 hole gott. tennis (indoor
& out). Hearth Club. Indoor and
Outdoor Pool
11 Relatives and friends can visit
r
For reservations or any further information, please don't hesitate
to call us direct Toll Free 800-431-3850. or contact Lynn Green Asso-
ciates Norm Levin in Florida at 305-485-8861 (They will also assist
ou in making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Agent
ONLYATTHE
CONCORD
Kiamesha Lake. NY 12751 \^S


Friday, February 18,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Answer
The
Call To life
On Super Sunday, March 13, volunteers will be
calling Jewish households throughout South Broward
County.
You can help Jews around the world, in Israel,
and right here.
Give generously when you answer the Call to Life. Jewish
people everywhere are counting on you to make it a really
Super Sunday.
W
8.
Sunday
Amw&r
ITDa
Tfoytf
Say YES on Super Sunday...
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, Florida 33020 Phone: 305/921-8810

^
*"W
v..:-' 0vW^'vW
'


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,19&3
Super Sunday
WOMAN OF THE HOUR AT CLIFTON is Violet Blackman Ney, honored recently at a
breakfast for the 1983 UJA-Jewish Federation of SouthBroward Campaign. Mrs. Ney has
been involved in Jewish causes for many years, both in New Jersey and Florida. Shown with
her, from left, are Clifton's Abraham Melter, Abraham Slifka and Sylvan Solomon.
Continued from Page 1
South Broward Super Sunday
will be conducted after nearly
all of the major fundraising
activities have been conducted.
In other words, the chairmen
say, most of our regular con-
tributors will have already
answered their commitment to
the 1983 UJA-Federation Cam-
paign.
A total of 3,500 new residents
have been added to the Federa
tion's computer files, in addi-
tion to those who traditionally
are contacted on Super Sunday.
One phase of Super Sunday
that is being brushed up now is
training.
According to Chairmen
Rothschild and Weiss, again foi
1983 Dr. Phil Levin and attor
ney Ron Rosen are being
charged with the major training
of all volunteers throughout the
day.
"The main purpose of the
training," Dr. Levin says, "is to
give the callers the story of the
Federation what Federation
CAMBMCM
(g)CUPSffi
means and does in the commu-
nity ... so they can pass along
the message on the phones."
"We would love to turn $0
givers into contributors, both so
that Israel can offer social serv-
ices a little better, and the same
holds true locally."
Rosen sees the training role in
a slightly different light. He
says he tries to excite the
volunteers. "We must create a
positive reaction within the
group, for, like selling, if the
volunteer is not enthusiastic
about Federation, will the caller
(giver) be?"
A few volunteers are still
needed for Sunday, March 13.
Call the Federation at 921-8810.
Family Mission
]
Under the leadership of Dr. Saul and Susan Singer, j
the Jewish Federation of South Broward announces a !
!
unique experience in Israel
July 17-27. |
The Family Mission will draw together generations -
of South Broward Jews with the Jews of Jerusalem, |
Tel Aviv and Hod Hasharon.
For further information, contact Suzy Briskin at the Z
Federation [921-88101 or submit this coupon to
JFSB, 2719 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla. \
33020, with your name and address.
oooi
M

Shi/urn ^e/e&uztiott
9
*A
JEWISH
rwnocw.
fuio
Beloved Gabbai, and Vice-Pres.
Hallandale
Jewish Center
Auditorium
Sunday
February 27,1983
9:30 A.M.
Entertainment by Claude Kadosh, Israeli Artist
HONORED at Quadomain
last week by the 1983 UJA-
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Campaign were
residents Natalie and Har-
vey Cohen. The Cohens have
a strong knowledge of Jew-
ish community, both in their
former hometown of New
Milford. N.J., and now at
Quadomain.
TUDI0
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JO**
aalromaa
you back 10
MW1
STUDIO
MCSTAWUNT
'of tumquo
dining aipananca
Mat your taMa to youT
mood in on* of 5 indmdual
room* Tha Torn
Win* Collar. Studio. Placa
Pigana. Swim Cnalat
Flna) EntarUtnmeni
t tha Piano
Alaa vtaftn playing
lor your pUarjum
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
privaia Utncnaow arrangad)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
ooooooeoopdei
BBSS

*340^tfAVE.
445-5371
a*.
We sit round the Seder table each year, ana celebrate The Exodus
through traditions passed down to us over thousands of years. These
traditions have become so much a part of our heritage they are
Inscribed In the Maggadah for all the world to see the matzoh the
MaNishianah. the \phlkoman. the recitation of the plagues, the
& Pa^nu: and on and on through the night, closing with
Chad Gadya.
At each Seder, however, there are other kinds of traditions
traditions which are lust as strong just as cherished They arc our
personal lamily traditions I nwriuen and unsung thev are as much a
part of our Seders as the hard-boiled eggs and Wtier herbs. And
MUM: these, one of the most popular traditions is the wine that is
used throughout the Seder evening That is Manlschcwttz. of course
In millions of homes. It just wouldn't be Passover without a bolue of
Man.sohev.it7. Kosher wine. It is a wine that spans the generations
and somehow, symbolizes the continuity of the family Seder races
may change, we grow older, some-
times there is a new youngster
to ask the "MaNishianah but
always there is the Manlschcwltz.
It holds a traditional and hon-
ored place at our Seder table
au*t
takMDc
MUX i
l%r*
B Sfcaaaro
ttHrCa.
M 11232
OrtJnr.tr


Friday, February 18,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
*

Halfway to somewhere.. .with no dead-end
Continued from Page 1-
pality to learn vocational skills.
Adi has been at the book bindery for two years
and is so conscientious that he leaves home soon af-
ter 6 every morning, to make sure he won't be late
for work at 7:30 although the trip takes 20
minutes.
Shmuel and Yitzhak are still being trained, but
also hope to find jobs in the near future, either in
sheltered workshops or in the open market.
Although there are only four residents, the apart-
ment has a staff of three half-time Agudat Shekel
employees: Yehudit Beiner, the director; Karen, the
house-mother, and David a counselor.
There is no institution-like atmosphere it is re-
laxed and friendly, with the boys and staff all on a
first-name basis. The staff supervises the shopping,
cooking and cleaning, advises the residents on
handling their money and helps with any problems
they might have with family or friends.
Hobbies and other interests are strongly
UJA-Federation dollars allowing retarded boys 'non-sheltered lives
en-
couraged. Adi has expressed a wish to leam English
and is making good progress. Shmuel wants to learn
Tanach, and David, who is a religious studies
student at the Hebrew University, sits and learns
with him.
The four decide what clothes they want to buy,
which friends they want to invite and when, and how
to spend the petty cash left for them every day. In
fact, their lives are not very dissimilar to normal
men in their peer group, and their standard of living
is much higher than many.
None of the staff stays overnight at the flat, so the
residents feel independent and unsupervised. They
recently asked for and were granted Tuesday
as staff-free days also. They can entertain friends, go
to restaurants or movies, or do whatever they want.
At times when no staff member is in attendance,
an upstairs neighbor is paid to be available if they
need any help or advice. The neighbors are all sup-
portive and kind to the four young men, whose re-
tardation is classed as mild and all of whom are
functioning well in their new community setting.
Yehudit and Karen have taught them all kinds of
recipes, and they can cook eggplant parmesan,
baked fish, thick vegetable soup and a variety of
casseroles.
Jerusalem already has two other similar apart-
ments operating one for six retarded young
women in Kiryat Yovel and another for four men in
the prestigious neighborhood of Rehavia. Soon
Agudat Shekel plans to open one for six children
(who will have a live-in house-mother).
In this way, Israel's mildly retarded are being
brought out of the shadows into the sunlight, where
they are learning to make valuable contributions to
society while they enhance their own self-image and
self-worth.
Instead of facing a life with no future, they are al-
ready halfway to somewhere ... on the road with no
dead-end.
Hillel plans studying Israel-style
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
For the college student who
wants to learn about Israel first-
hand, or who seeks to find the
meaning of his Jewish identity,
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tions again offers a summer
study program in Israel that has
been described by previous par-
ticipants as "intellectually and
emotionally stimulating."
Co-sponsored by the United
Jewish Appeal and developed in
cooperation with the Center for
Study in Israel, the 1983 program
consists of a two-week traveling
seminar, June 19 to July 2, and
two simultaneous four-week
seminars, July 3 to Aug. 2.
The program is supported by
the American Zionist Youth
Foundation. As an added incen-
tive, a number of colleges and
universities will accept three col-
lege credits for the short course
Smith wins appointments
mil six credits for each of the
)thers.
According to Rabbi Stanley
Ringler, director of Hillel's Israel
Programs, scholarships are
available for those who demon-
strate need and commit them-
selves to participate in their cam-
pus UJA campaign during the
academic year following their re-
turn from Israel.
The seminars are open to both
undergraduate and graduate
students, ages 18-25. The dead-
lines for applications is March 31.
SHARE A SEDER
// you wish to have a guest who doesn't have a
Seder to join you at your Seder, Monday,
March 28, and/or Tuesday March 29, Please
call Rabbi Richter or his secretary Raquel
King at 921-8810.
Also, if you'd like a guest for your Purim
Seudah (Feast) Sunday, February 27, call at
the above number.
Sixteenth District Congress-
man Larry Smith has been
selected to serve on two Foreign
Affairs subcommittees:
Europe and the Middle East,
and International Operations.
"Current tensions in the Mid-
dle East and the vital interest
this nation has in that region
concern residents of the 16th Dis-
trict, and all of Florida," Smith
said. As a member of the sub-
committee on the Middle East,
Smith will be in a position to
oversee the interests of the
United States and her allies.
South Florida has many cul-
tural and trade ties with the
European community as well,
and Smith anticipates being in a
position to contribute to a better
and stronger international rela-
tionship through his committee
work.
The House Foreign Affairs
Subcommittee on International
Operations oversees the work of
the State Department and Inter-
national Communication Agency.
Many of Smith's constituents
have a vital interest in the opera-
tions of the Voice of America and
the proposed Radio Marti
project.
Queen sleeps
safely, thanks
to Israeli firm
TEL AVIV Queen Elizabeth
is now protected by an Israeli-
made security system, according
to a report published in the "In-
ternational Security" magazine
in London and reprinted in
Haaretz.
The security system, tested by
export throughout the world, was
installed after Michael Fagan
broke into Buckingham Palace
and smoked a cigarette while
seated on the quean bed.
Installation of the million-dol-
lar system manufactured by
subsidiary of the Israel Aircraft
Industries, was not announced
earlier because Britain was afraid
of the reaction by Arab states,"
stated the British mass-circula-
tion daily, TheSun. .
Ounce for Ounce
AMERICA'S
PROTEIN BARGAIN!!

KASHA
If you can't resist a bargain, Wolffs Kasha is for you.
Kasha costs less than 109 per % lb serving and
it Is the heart of the buckwheat kernel which
has been roasted to bring out Its nutty flavor.
Buckwheat Is highest in balanced protein of
any food in the plant kingdom... higher than all
other grains, fruits and vegetables... almost as
high as eggs. Yet Kasha doesn't have the
cholesterol problem of eggs... nor the perisha-
bility of eggs.. and it costs less per serving
than eggs? One of nature's near perfect foods,
use Kasha instead of rice or potatoes with your
next dinner. And if you'll send us $1.00 for a 36
page full color recipe book, with dozens of dif-
ferent recipe suggestions, we'll send you the
book and a coupon saving 15? on a package of
Wolff's Kasha. You'll find Wolff "s Kasha in the
Kosher, gourmet, or specialty food section of
most good supermarkets.
Write for the Wolffs
Kasha Cookbook &
Wolffs 15* coupon
Try Wolff's Kasha now for your
protein bargain... and for
enjoyment, too!
Send to The Birkett Mills
BoxFL
IVnn Van, New York 14527
Please send me Wolff's Kasha Cookbook and Wolffs 15c coupon
Niimo
Address
CHv
SUli'
/.lp
I enclose $1.00 in cash or check (NoStamps)
And look for NEW WILD WINDS FARMS Kasha & Honey Bread
in the Puhlix Supermarkets Fresh Bread Section...
It's made with Wolffs Kasha!
11 IWIIIli>


Page 10

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
Beact) Pacesetters
ONE GRAND BRUNCH was served last week in behalf of the UJA Jewish Federation of
South Broward 1963 Campaign. The High-Rise Pacesetter Branch, according to Otto Stieber,
chairman, (left) brought together JPSB supporters from South Ocean Drive, Golden Isles and
Three Islands. Pictured here, in addition to Stieber, are from left, speaker David Schoenbrun,
Sumner G. Kaye, JFSB executive director; and Dr. Saul Singer, Campaign chairman.
SETTING THE PACE with TV journalist-author David
Schoenbrun is Nat Sedley, vice president of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and its 1983 Campaign. Sedley in-
troduced the guest speaker at the Beach Pacesetter Branch at
the Sheraton Bal Harbour.
' We must insure Israel's life
SPEAKER DAVID SCHOENBRUN deft) meets and greets HoUybrook notables (from left)
Harold Goldberg, co-chairman of HoUybrook UJA-Jewiah Federation of South Broward
Campaign '83; Ruth Goldberg; Harry Goldstein, chairman of the '83 Campaign. Missing is
Evelyn Goldstein, who could not attend the dinner.
HoUybrook Dii)i)er
Continued from Page 1
are linked to the lives of the Jews in Israel.
For if one falls, so does the other, he said.
Schoenbrun told the crowds that Egypt's
president Anwar Sadat learned after four
wars with Israel and four losses to Israel
that peace is the only avenue.
"And the only way that peace can be
maintained," Schoenbrun said, "is to keep
Israel strong." The stronger Israel is the
less anti-Semitism there will be in the
world, he said.
A weak Israel invites the anti-Semites to
spread their venom; and Jews will live in
fear around the world, the newsman said.
"Israel is the most important piece of real
estate in the entire world," he told the
audiences.
It sits on the turntable of three con-
tinents, and people like Alexander the
Great, Caesar, Napoleon, Hitler and
Andropov know what that means,
strategically.
In closing, Schoenbrun listed the six
greatest men who ever lived and, not
oddly, they were all Jewish:
Moses. Jesus (reformed), Karl Marx,
Sigmund Freud, Albert Einstein and
Sholom Aleichem.
<" r
HONOREES Dr. Joseph and Sylvia Stein meet TV journalist-author David
Schoenbrun at the HoUybrook 1983 L'JA-Jewish Federation of South Broward
Annual Dinner. The Steins (he's past campaign chairman for HoUybrook and
she has served as co-chairperson of the HoUybrook Dinner) were honored by
their neighbors and fn H at Temn>- 1 Toah.
ANNUAL DINNER for HoUybrook UJA-Jewiah Federation of South Broward
activists this year was at North Miami Beach's Te.. > Beth Torah With
author-journalist David Schoenbrun are Hollybrook's Khea Kreiger and Al
Uonen I right I. ^


Friday, February 18,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
L&E Dept. helping
residents in trouble
Generally articles about the Legacy and Endowment Fund of
the Jewish Federation of South Broward concentrate on the tax
and charitable reasons to contribute to the fund. However, this
article wdl focus its emphasis on a few of the unusual cases that
the fund lay leaders and staff have helped in recent months.
By MICHAEL J. MOSKOWITZ
Federation Staff
The lady was a German Jew who had survived the Holocaust
and emigrated to the United States many years ago. She was
having difficulties in dealing with the German bureaucracy
concerning her restitution payments.
She needed an affidavit, prepared on the letterhead of an
official Jewish organization, verifying her identity and back-
ground.
To make matters worse, the lady was not active in South
Broward Jewish affairs. Many organizations denied her request
for the affidavit. The Legacy and Endowment Fund speedily
arranged, without compensation, to have the affidavit prepared
and executed.
THE CASE OF THE UNHAPPY TESTATOR
The gentleman was a retired professional from the Northeast.
He lived alone, with no relatives and few friends. A few years
ago, he prepared a will, specifying various charitable bequests
for a variety of Jewish organizations.
After reviewing this will, he decided he was unhappy with the
types of organizations and the nature of the distributions as
outlined in the document. He sought help from many Jewish
organizations concerning the nature of various Israeli in-
stitutions and the ways in which to best help them.
Many organizations offered to help, but only in regard to their
own narrow interests.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund of the Federation arranged
to give this gentleman an overview of the main types of social
and educational institutions in Israel. His will was then
redrafted, and specific bequests were inserted in accordance with
his desires.
THE CASE OF THE LONG DISTANCE BURIAL PLOT
A couple visited the Legacy and Endowment Department at
JFSB and told an unusual story. A relative of the couple had
died, leaving two burial plots in a small town in a northeastern
state. The couple wanted to donate these plots to charity, but
was unsure of how to proceed.
The Legacy and Endowment Department explained that it
could not use these plots because they were distant from South
Broward. As an alternative, the procedure for donating the
plots to a worthy Jewish institution near their site was outlined.
The couple left feeling thankful that a simple solution to a
complex problem had been found.
THE CASE OF THE STRANGERS WILL
A newly graduated law student visited the Legacy and
Endowment Department and told an interesting tale. The
student was from out of state and was visiting an elderly
relative in this area. Problems had arisen with regard to the
relatives will and a speedy consultation with an attorney was
vital. The Legacy and Endowment Department arranged the
consultation with the attorney to all parties satisfaction.
THE CASE OF THE UNHAPPY LATIN
Sometimes, the Legacy and Endowment Fund finds itself
working with strange bedfellows. Recently, the Chaplaincy
Department asked the Legacy and Endowment Fund to work
with it on an unusual tale of misfortune.
A Latin Jewish family, living in our community, had recently
been swindled of most of its assets, by a business partner. The
Latin family had no telephone, no income, no employment, no
automobile only mounting bills.
The Chaplaincy Department, Jewish Federation of South
Broward, and the Legacy and Endowment Fund began a joint
attack to help this family get employment and a loan to give
them a start in their new world.
To this date, there has been partial success. The family now
has a telephone and the husband temporary employment. Work
is continuing on this case and the fund earnestly solicits your
advice and help.
The Legacy and Endowment Fund not only preaches
"deductible mitzvahs." The bottom lineof its work is people.
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK
The Sid* Splitting Comedy that tut New York Audiences in StHchM
Raymond Ariel and David Carey
present
THE FOLKSBIENE ENSEMBLE
In the hUarioua Yiddish comedy rrth musk
Cues! Artist
UEONUEBGOLD
ontract
By Ephraim Kisnon
ANOYUvrrr wiuunuii
ZVr>0*tA SPAISMAN
I.W. FMKrtTONC
RUTH KAIMNSKA
Oi'tciMl by ISMAIL MKM lot Hatxmih)
MIAMI BEACH4 PERFORMANCES ONLY
l------i.T. "I TU13DAY, FEBRUARY 22 2P.M.&8P.M.
1 J*s WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 23 2P.M. A 8P.M.
TICKETS S11 00 4 f 00
FOR TICKETS ANO GROUP SALES CALL 673.(300
TICK!TS 41 $0 JMftHASK HW Mn* 1 im,
I WASHINGTON AVE
MIAMI BEACH. FLA 3313*
SPECIAL 2 PERFORMANCES-FT. LAUDER0ALE
AUY CONCENT HAU
1501 SW 0AVIEROA0
FT LAU0ER0ALEFLA
cauW SATURDAY, FEBRUARY II 2P.M. & 8P.M.
TICKETS 11100-111 00-IS.00
FOR TICKETS ANO INFORMATION CALL: 475 *
500 STRONG AT HILLCREST The ninth annual Hillcrest Women's Division luncheon
for the 1983 UJA-Jewish Federation of South Broward drew more than 500 Hillcresters to
the Sheraton Bal Harbour on Miami Beach. As the Habimah Players entertained, the women
realized their goal of $300,000 was in reach. With credit toward that goal are, from left,
Eleanor Lerner and Gertrude Kronovet, co-chairwomen of reservations, and overall WD
Chairwomen Gloria Hess and Dorothy Chernuchin.
Maxwell House" Coffee
Is AfterTheater Enjoyment.
Having a good cup ot coffee after
theater is almost as much a pan of
the entertainment as the perform-
ance itself. And Maxwell House
Coffee is always right on cue to help
get the good conversation going. A
lively discussion after is a big pan of
the enjoyment.
Along with the fun of recalling a
panicular scene, a bit of action or
memorable linegoes the
flavor of Maxwell House
Coffee because
Maxwell House
never fails to
turn in a star
K Certified Kosher
performance. For over fifty years, cof-
fee lovers have applauded its full-
pleasant aroma, and its great tasting,
satisfying flavor. And, "May I have
another cup, please',' is one of the
most rewarding requests for an 'en-
core' any hostess can hear.
So, no matter what your preference
Instant or groundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour enjoy-
ment. At its warmest.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.

(NM*U *OOM
1 l GPMPBjf JlWdB
ftBRJM
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
.

Visit <
Wine Sale.
PAISANO BURGUNDY RHINE. CHABUS
--" *3"
1 5 LTR
Carlo Rossi
ROSE RHINEFLEUR. GOLD CHABLIS^^ -_
3 LTR BTL WINE ^4^T MSm
Franzia Wine*5*'
DINNER WINES CHABUS BURGUNDY
NECTAR ROSE RHINE CHENIN BLANC. _^
FRENCH COLOMBARD-1 5 LTR C JM #*)
Almaden *4W
LAMBRUSCO BIANCO ROSATO ^ AM QO
Cella Wine *4W
SERVICE DEU>
^NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORf S^
jac l JU
Finest Quality
MrBi.i9
OOR-KOSMEH BOLOGNA on
"lb 1.99
MRS RESSlERS
Turkey Breast.......S 1.19
lOHfUINE-WUTTV FLAVOR
H^2.09
Garden Salad
h\b1.19
USOA CHOICE-RARE
gf *279
DCQ w lb Msb
__ HOT FOODS! READY TO GO!_
SERVICE BAKERY"
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING FRESH BAKERIES
JOWSH STYLE-* OB 0 SEEDS
Rye Bread...........* .89
.2.39
.OAOE? w*
Frurt Boats .......... .39
! VEGETABLES ROl.
Meat Loaf Dinner .... 2.19
JUMBO
French Bread........< .79
R{AE TO SERVf
Blueberry Pie........
2.49
/^PERFECT PARTNERS"
SUNNYLAND ALL MEAT OR BEEF
Frankfurters
LB
SILVER FLOSS 2-LB BAG
Sauerkraut
$149
59<

3 BREASTS. 3 LEG QTRS W/BACKS. 3 GIBLET PKG
U S CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
LIMIT 2 PKGS PLEASE
Boneless ^tlflCk
Shoulder Roast $1***
JONES-CHUB
Braunschweiger
AMERICAN KOSHER ALL BEEF
Knockwurst
AMEfMCAN KOSHER ALL BEEF
Frankfurters ....
8-OZ PKG 99
1.99
1.99
U S CHOICE BEEF CHUCK
12 0Z PKG
I 2 OZ PKG
Shoulder Steak *2P
U S CHOICE GENUINE AMERICAN ^ *%\
Lamb Legs...........lb Z.33
SAVE MORE ON FAMILY PAKS
3 LBS. OR MORE
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH jm {\
Fryer Leg Quarters *K#
FLA OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH SPLIT {\\C
Fryer Breast............Wi
FLA OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH A/,
Fryer Thighs 79*
FRESH LB. ^ __
Ground Chuck *179
LB
in
GREAT FOR SOUP #***
Beef Oxtails 1.29
EXCELLENT FOR BARBEOUE #*
Baby Back Ribs 1.29
SUNNYLANO BEEF pmtt
Smoked Sausage lb 1*79
LOUIS RICH FRESH SLICES ^-. g%f\
Turkey Breast.......lb Z.cttJ
FAMILY PACK
Coast *%*%
Beef Liver 3W
ISAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVEI
GARDEN FRESH BUNCH
TENDER fJ{\
BroccoliOzf
IP1CK YOUR OWNi
U S NO 1 ALL PURPOSE
Temple Oranges White Potatoes)
NORTHWEST-ETRAFANC 110 K VE >AR BAGl
Red DeHclom Apples
UPlO NORTHWEST-SWEET EATMG
Anjou Pears.........
V"C* EAS> 'O PEEL-CAUFORMA
Navel Oranges......
FLAVORFUL > REFRESHING IS M PltGl
SunWst Lemons
.BAG 1.59
. LB .99
, 5 FOR .99
......... .PKG mlW
FRESH CUT ASSORTED COLORS
U PC US II til PURPOSE
Yellow Onions..
UPCK NU'PJTWUS 1 DtLCIOUS
Southern Yams .
GARDEN FRESH TOPS IN VITAMM A
Florida Carrots .
OEIMONTE-LARQE e SUE
.19
,3^ .59
, bag .3*
. EA
1.89
d


Friday, February 18,1963
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
our Stores
yourF
Dollars
SAVE
HERE
12 PACK OF 12-02 CANS (SAVE 1 081 ^ C\ GENERIC-GALLON JUG ^m ^a>. V
Budweiser *4tm Liquid Bleach 69*
WALDOBF 6 BOLL PAgK (SAVE 40CI .- ^Q cONTAdSa (SAVE 26c) 5-OZ CAN TOMATO SAUCE 14 W-OZ CAN
Bath Tissue ES */*l<
V^VNT ROLL (SAVE 20e) JJ a*W* IIAJV2* aW JL
Kleenex Towels oST AnnlMMnr# fiQ*
PANTRY PRIDE 1 5-OZ CAN UGHT OR DARK Cfl AH *"f^|^*^^*OU\XL........\J aaf
PANTRY PRIDE 1 5-OZ CA^UGHT OR DARK A^AA y|^- -^-w
|\l/frif3k\/ r^^^iriC ^/ H^^^ RED CHEEK HALF GALLON REGULAR OR NATURAL
10, OZ CAN CHICKEN W RICE. CHICKEN NOODLE OS OR XXl^l^jIVi UU1\A3 JK.
i^m^jKT O/S100 -a/t,^PR1DE24.0ZMR#SPEARSOR32.OZ g%0%/t
Campbells 3/ 1 Kosher Dills 99c
olx_PACK OF 1 2 OZ CANS 4^afl g*% I'ANKIY PRIDE 46-OZCAN UNSWTND PINK OR REG ^)**jjVVt
GoebelBeer ^l99 Grapefruit Jirice 69*
from fi ORIDA
?'.'
BOHDEN
pantry pride-whole on si ice o
Ketchup........^1.39 Cremora
PunU-LAUNOB* pANTRy
Detergent.......".1.19 Carrots
WSK-LAUNDRY PANTRY PR!DE
Detergent.......VK 1.69 Tomato Juice
i6 oz
JAR
DISTILLED NATURAL SPUING 4 PURIFIFO
2IMJ
CANS
1 OAl RO
JUG ,39
le-oz ,
480Z
. CAN
HElNZ-VEGETARIAN
Beans ........
PANTRY PRIDE-MIXED
Vegetables....
<0AMv-llOU!0
Dish Detergent
PANTRY PRIOE-ASSORTEO
Napkins......
iCM
PANTRY PRIDE
.99 Crystal Water
EAYGO-ASSORTED FLAVORS
.79 Diet Soda.....4 'SS 1.00
PANTRY PRIOE-ALL VEGETABLE
.79 Oil...........
SUNS WE El
"1.69
PANTRY PRIDE-CHUNK LIGHT IN WATER OR Oil
2 c2i r*
DON JUAN
. CAN .fW
32 OZ
. BTL
3O0CT
PKQ
.89 Tea Bags.......,00bS.1.49 Prune Juice..... 1.49
PANTRY PRII
.79 Tuna
PANTBV PftlDf
.69 Cocoa Mix ..
DAWN FRESH-MUSHROOM
1.29 Steak Sauce
.79 Bucket Olives
OELTINA
CREAMY, LOW FAT. CALIFORNIA STYLE
Breakstone $139
Cottage Cheese JL
9 24-OZ CONT
PANTRY PRIDE
Cream Cheese ..
oz 7Q
. PKG f V
BREAKS! ONE
Sour Cream........ P1LLSBURY HUNGRY JACK-FLAKY OR BUTTER TASTlN
Biscuits.........2 c?s1.09
CUSTARD STYLE OR REG 6-OZ CUP |
Yoplait 2/OC<:
Yogurt BD,J
** ASSORTED FLAVORS ^ t^j
PANTRY PRIOE
Half Half .... pt
KRAFT-MAXI BOWL
Soft Parkay ... lb
SEALTEST-100'. PURE-CHILLED
Orange Juice ...
PANTRY PRIDE-COLOREO
American Singles
.59 -SS.
.79
GAL 1.59
1.49
.2 c2n 1.59 Tomato Sauce 5 21 1.00
GENERIC-TAIL
4ca2s1.O0 Kitchen Bags
1SCT TO
I BOX ,1V
GENERICS"
IHEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS
REG MINT OR GEL 8 2-OZ TUBE
; self-service:
BAK
MEYER S FIBRE OR
QENERIC-4 ROLL PKG
Path TTC Crest $167 Ra^in 2 QO<
Tissue it Toothpaste 1 Muffins Vzf
'itNtRlC
Rice..........
.INERIC-ASSORTEO FLAVORS
Soda.........
. bag .89
sollo deodorant-reg or unscentfo
.... j:ont 1 .57
.77
;ont .69
Black
.1 NE RlC JUMBO ROLL
Paper Towels .55
MRiC-e 4 0Z SIZE
Styrofoam Cups .kg .59
Creamer 1.19
BTL 1 .97
^11.77
[.Coffee
"f N> RlC
Facial Tissues 2
200 CT 4 r\t\
BOXES 1 .QQ
OM Spice
ACT-FLOURIOE
Dental Rinse
ST JOSEPH-ASPRm FREE
Baby Tablets
HEAD SHOULDERS-LOTION CONO REG 1 TUBE
Shampoo......... 2.47
ASSORTED
OralB
Toothb
KR6PY KREME-APPIE BLUEBERRY CHERRY OR LEMON
.....PKG .33
Fruit Pies
ADLER S-PUMPERWCKEL
Bread......
ieoz n
i loaf ,DV
A 1 C ITALIAN OR
French Bread... .5$ .59
AOIER S-ASSORTED
Dinner Rolls
12 m -mn
, PKG if*
VELVET CREME -^
Glazed $
Donuts BOXOF12
129
^ mmutu
'9t.S.I3l,,r
ZXl*" ""
rll I? ***
^*l*0*Sll||
MMIMrall
** I'm A*
MJSM-amaMti
200 Sum oh. im.
AUM-
__ HTBKATM
omb ax t mm r>
n mun h mam much
""(HI OIK 19**
NEIZMSIftK KM
* N,IK i3H,si
IZMIIINtMlta
MHUMSli
rw iiiiiwii
cam mm t. ..
naii cmmk ta mi
awNMaiWlnai
s-WA'air
UJAU-lll
US No uuntow
FOR DETAILS SEE DISPLAY IN OUR STORE)
4 PIECE PLACE
SETTING*
Service for 8!
32 pieces for only 3.92
Pill in your Cash Saver Card with Cash
Saver Coupons, everytime you shop.
___________________
4 piece place settings consist
of: Dinner Plate, Cup, Saucer
and Dessert Dish
"10-OZ VEAL PARM 11 OZ SALIS STEAK. CHICK
FRICASSEE 12 0Z STUFFED OR PEPPERS
Dinner $
199
I FROZEN
FROZEN FOODS
&RDSEYE-REG OR EXTRA CREAMY
Cool Whip.......
PANTRY PRIDE PEAS CORN OR
Mixed Vegetables 2 1.00
COLE S
Garlic Bread........V'oS? .99
oz 7(1
aowi mlW
Chocolate Eclairs ....'.8 1.19
PANTfl. PRIC6
Coffee Ughtoner.. 3 ,6c% 1.00
PANTfly PRIOE
Grapefruit Juice .. 2 '&. 1.00
TREE TOP
Apple Juice.......
SUMMERDAlt REG OH CPJNKLE CUT
French Fries.....
I20Z pn
CAN lOV
... 1.39
K OF 16 OZ RETURNABLE BOTTLES
$169
DtET PEPSI. M LIGHT PEPSI
ORMOUNTAINDEWNOTAVA.L-em '
KEY WEST I MARATHON
1
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD FEB. 17-23, 1983
cPride


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTERS OF
SOUTH BROWARD
I!
2838 HOLLYWOOD BLVD HOLLYWOOD. TLORIDA 33020
Income tax
The JCC of South Broward,
2838 Hollywood Blvd., is offering
a free lecture on income tax re-
turns, "Are You Shortchanging
Yourself on Your Tax Returns?"
on Wednesday, Feb. 23, at 8 p.m.
at the center.
Albert Robert, CPA, partner in
the firm of Ilowit, Ilowit and
Leventhal P.A., will speak on the
changes in tax laws and how they
affect you individually mar-
ried, single, employed or self-
employed.
The JCC is offering a course
called "Sholem Aleichem," an
easy way for adults to learn He-
brew to participate in services.
The course will be taught on
Thursday mornings, 9:30-11:30,
for six weeks starting March 3. It
will be taught by Esther Gordon.
Call Dene for information and
registration at 921-6511.
epigraphy
The JCC is offering calligraphy
on Wednesdays from 6:30-8:30
p.m.. starting March 2. This
course will run for eight weeks in
two-hour sessions. The instructor
will be Edith Gottlieb who will
be teaching both Spencerian and
Italic style. Cost is $40 for me-
bers and $45 for non-members.
Art gallery
The Jewish Community Center
will journey to Palm Beach on
Wednesday, March 23.
Beginning with coffee and
bagels at 9:15 a.m. at center,
next stop is the Norton Gallery of
Art for a guided tour, including a
special exhibit of artist of Max
Weber's paintings.
Next you may enjoy the shops
on famous Worth Avenue. Re-
turn to center by 5 p.m. The cost
is $8 for members. $9 for non-
members and includes morning
refreshments, all transportation
from the center and back, and the
museum tour.
FWmseries
The JCC presents "The Chosen
People Through Film," a fine film
series at the center. A discussion
will precede each film, and coffee
and cake will be served. All films
are to be shown on Tuesday eve-
nings at 7:30.
Series schedule:
March 8, "Lies My Father
Told Me"; April 12, "Topele";
May 10, "Aprenticeship of
Duddy Kravitz"; June 14, "Life
of EmileZola"
Fee for the series is $9 for
members, $11 for non-members.
Individual tickets are $2.50 for
members, $3 for non-members.
Outreach
The Outreach Department of
the Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center at 2838 Hollywood Blvd.,
sponsored by the Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South Brow-
ard. will visit homebound senior
citizens (60 years or older)
Object: assess their needs, help
with solving problems, answer
questions and make referrals to
appropriate agencies when the
need has been determined be it
socialization, recreation,
counseling, day care, nutrition,
homemaking, legal aid or em-
ployment.
For more information, call
Aida Santoro or Carmen Porte at
921-6518.
Amadeus
The JCC is offering tickets to
the Broadway award-winning
show "Amadeus" on Wednesday
evening, March 30. Fee is $25 for
members, $30 for non-members.
Round-trip transportation will be
provided.
Computer dass
Due to the response to its first
basic computer programming
course, the JCC is offering
another course starting March 7.
There will be five sessions on
Thursday evenings from 6:30-
8:30 at the Radio Shack Compu-
ter Center, 429 State Road 7.
Learn the basis of all computers,
basic commands and how to
create simple programs; There
will be 15 people per class, each
has his or her own computer.
Cost is $30.
Noschool
On Monday, Feb. 21, the JCC
is off to see the flying dolphins,
man-eating sharks and other
marvelous attractions at the
Miami Seaquarium.
Transportation, snacks, ad-
missions will be provided for stu-
dents out of school that day.
of the Royal Academy of
Dramatic Art and the Royal Aca-
demy of Music, London, Eng-
land, and will teach the would-be
actors and actresses.
On acting
A new class for 3rd to 5th
graders is now forming at the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward, Wednesday
,10 1:30 p.m. Class begins
:h 2. Ruth Feit is a graduate
Fiddler on the Cfyde.
By the banks of the river Clyde in the bonny town of Glasgow,
there thrives a small but active Jewish community center. And here a
simple stage boasts shows put on by its proud members. You might be
stirred by bagpipes wailing to the strains of Hava Nagila. Or even see the
hora danced by men in kilts.
While productions like these do the heart good, the Scots have
an encore that does the palate good, as well: A wee sip of fine scotch
whisky. Americans have also taken kindly to this tradition and made
J&B Rare Scotch the one preferred above all others. For so delicate and
m i refined is its taste that J&.B is the scotch that whispers. And that is
why we recommend it as the perfect libation sunrise, sunset or when-
ever the curtain calls.
ft, P-oof Btond.0 Scotch VVhaky. C 19 Th Ptottnglon CorporMion. NY
]&B. It whispers.
Night
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward announces
a special benefit performance of
the Beth Shalom Players
"Broadway Daze" on Sunday,
March 6, at 7 p.m.
The show will be at the Holly-
wood Hills High School and the
cost is $10. Seats are reserved.
For more information, call
Dene at 921-6611.
fftness class
The JCC at 2838 Hollywood
Blvd. will be offering Dance Fit-
ness with Keri Lynn Fair on Fri-
day mornings at 9:30-10:30
starting Feb. 25 at the center.
The class includes a complete
workout, cardio-vascular training
and simple dance routines
suitable for all ages.
Special introductory offer
eight weeks for $25 for members
and $30 for non-members.
If you have a new address or
are planning to move, please let
us know. Also, if you know some
folks who are not now receiving
The Jewish Floridian and would
like to, also let us know. Every
issue of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's newspaper
contains news you won't want to
miss. Simply call 921-8810.
When your fomily wonts o snack,
treat them to the natural sweetness
and wholesome goodness of
Sun-Maid* Raisins, Blue Ribbon Figs
and Sunsweet* Prunes.
Yum. Yum. Yum.
SUN* DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
: suN-0i*MON0orvcwEici CAiifcnwA
'
i*
?


riday, February 18,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
After two years, family growing together
and Mrs. L. were referred
Jewish Family Service for
riage counseling. Fortunate-
Mr. L. worked in a setting
|h a social worker who recog-
the severity of this family's
fhlems and encouraged Mr. L.
ek counseling.
the L's have three children:
daughters entering their
is, and a young son.
eking marital couseling was
Jtself a big step for the L's.
were reluctant and re-
^ed, but they recognized the
King up of their family was
jming more and more a
lity and they felt helpless and
Ible to even begin to work out
Ir differences.
I ver two years, the caseworker
; family worked through many
fcult areas. Things at the L.
le were chaotic. Mr. L. was al-
ls yelling, the children crying
Mrs. L. trying to placate
/one while she became more
itful and overburdened.
|r and Mrs. L. came from
different emotionally ex-
fsive backgrounds. Mr. L. is
mic and is volatile and used
rguing. Mrs. L. came from a
(rt religious background, with
mother dominating the
tly and Mrs. L. always trying
Pease her parents.
first things were great with
I L's. Mrs. L. catered to her
pand, brought him breakfast
t>iil. etc., admired him and
to please him just as she al-
had tried to please every-
[This worked well since Mr.
p used to being catered to.
over the years, change oc-
1: Children arrived, Mrs. L.
He more and more burdened
these were more people to
She began to feel pres-
I. overworked and unappre-
I, but she went along doing
b, trying to make everyone
jnomic pressure forced Mrs.
go to work, but she still
f to clean, cook and maintain
susehold. She did not ex-
her feelings, denying them
Irying to do all her jobs.
h L felt the children didn't
help. He would holler and
J L. would interfere and side
[the children. Mr. L. began to
\he was conspiring with the
against him, and his family
being pulled apart.
in all, each person was con-
and upset. The parents
worked so hard, tried so
but felt unloved, uncared
nd unappreciated.
the marital relationship,
II. was a very private person
Dgnizing and showing her
kgs and thoughts were very
hut
L. felt the need to be in
"I and maintain his
\i it v. and it was difficult for
< examine areas that needed
t,
11 he L's relaxed and became
{fearful of revealing them
very decent, very loving
k' emerged.
|. L. felt very threatened by
fife's increasing indepen-
and new ideas acquired at
He responded to his fear of
jf&SS FAMILY SERVICE OP BROWARD COUNTY
4517 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla. 33021 (306) 966-0966
losing her by becoming jealous
and more critical. As he com-
plained more, she withdrew more
and would try to make excuses
for herself.
Little by little they were able
to look at what they were doing
to themselves and each other.
Mrs. L. began to realize how
much of her unexpressed angry
feelings for her mother were
directed toward her husband.
Mr. L. finally began to realize
how his angry outbursts, name-
calling and criticism were creat-
ing a great deal of hurt.
The L's took a course L
parenting skills; and while dur-
ing the time of the course they
were at the height of their marital
discord, Mr. L. continued in the
course and made a real effort to
learn to listen and hear what his
wife and children were saying.
It also took Mrs. L. great effort
to admit she wanted some things
for herself and to learn to ask for
help from her husband and tell
him what she wanted.
As Mrs. L. expressed some of
her desires and Mr. L. responded
by trying to understand and be
more helpful at home, many of
the old, fixed, unworkable roles
dissolved. They became much
more relaxed and the deep affec-
tion and caring they had for each
other surfaced.
The kids were basically very
decent, with good values like
'their parents. The older daughter
had delayed developmental prob-
lems which created peer relation-
ship problems. Kids at school
teased her and she was shy, hurt
and tense. Her school work suf-
fered.
The other daughter entered her
teens with a bang, with all the
concomitant hysteria, life-and-
death dramatics, phones-ringing,
jetc.
While setting limits and being
firm, the parents were able to let
their children express their feel-
ings and opinions, and they be-
gan to learn to negotiate with
each other. Our family sessions
became fun and the kids looked
forward to them.
The family feels they are now
on firm ground. They are han-
dling a difficult financial situa-
tion well and feel confident they
are able to work things out with
each other. The girls particularly
expressed reluctance to terminate
family therapy since "things are
so much better at home."
The family is well on the way,
so meetings went from every two
weeks, to once a month, to as-
needed.
The L's are warm, loving peo-
ple.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 4517 Holly-
wood Blvd., Hollywood, 33021.
Telephone: 966-0956. Hours
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Thursday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale, 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hilla-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9 a.m.
to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency for the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
Does your cracker go topieces
when It meets cream cheese?
: FAMILY JACOBS _^ VI YEAR to'aM #
MlA'^OCEANFRONT 1 BOARDWALK ? 25th & COLLINS *MI BEACH, FLA. U139 <0SHEB o.n .ii ,..,
PASSOVER
ODays* 11 Nites
March 27
to April 6
3 Meals Daily
(625. Per Person
Dbl.Occ. 1
PALL 1-538-5721 \ <
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
9T9S55 OOEhT
The Speadabie Cream Cheese
SAVE KX ON TEMP TEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
Temp lee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
10C
STORE
Mr. Grocer Kraft, Inc. will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
plus 7C handling allowance provided
you redeemed it on your retail sales
of the named product(s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod
uct to cover all redemptions Coupon
] is void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C Customer must pay
applicable tax For redemption, mail
to Kraft, Inc. Dairy Group. PC* Box
1799. Clinton, Iowa 52734
Offer expires August 31.1983.
14300 2Er2fllfi


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
'Silent no more
Soviet Jewry update!
There is no further information
about YOSIF BEGUN, the 50-
year-old mathematician who is
being held incommunicado in
Vladimir prison under investiga-
tion for charges brought under
Article 70 of the R.S.F.S.R. Penal
Code.
His friends, who have warned
that if the authorities insist on
bringing him to trial it could be
the most serious anti-Jewish
show trial for several years,
believe that he may be held in-
communicado for as much as a
year before any action is taken.
ANATOLY SHCHARAN-
SKY, who was investigated
under Articles 64 and 70, was
held incommunicado for 15
months.
INNA SPERANSKAYA from
Moscow has seen the governor of
the prison and asked permission
to formalize her marriage to
Yosif. This request has been
turned down.
VALENTINA
KOCHUBIYEVSKY was able to
visit her husband FELIKS in
Novosibirsk prison. He has been
sentenced to 2'/i years in labor
camp of ordinary regime for
allegedly defaming the Soviet
Visas lowest In history
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Charlotte Jacobson, chairman of
the Soviet Jewry Research
Bureau of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, reports
that Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union hit its lowest
monthly figure in history as only
81 Jews arrived in Vienna in
January.
According to Jacobson, "more
than half of those visas were
granted in only two cities Riga
ind Odessa which indicates
that hundreds of thousands of
Jews throughout the USSR were
unable to emigrate to Israel, their
homeland.
"The first month of the new
year has shown that the Soviet
authorities have not relented in
their strangling of Jewish
emigration; in fact, they have
tightened their grasp."
he LUXURIOUS, KOSHER
S.ixony
ft* On In* Ocaan 32nd lo 34m Sta Miami Baach
tun
HOLIDAY SEASON KOSHER GET-AWAY
Any S days
and 4 nights
Mar. Mar. 27
3 Glatt Kosher Meals Daily 3 on fhe Sabbath
FREE PARKING -
COMPLIMENTARY BEACH BAG
129
Of ptnon
doubt* occ
plus i* and tips
?j*.n u. ForTh. FESTIVE PASSOVER HOLIDAYS'
/ffk i***ttm 1 i|mant Sarvicn Cmucln If
L Cantors JACOB EMLICM t ROBERT VEEH
^ Inquire About Our Special Packages
^K, 11 Days & 10 Nights I Including 3 Kosher Meats Daily
jrjCn PLUS! Full Hotel Facilities
IrMi DwU I Olympic Pool. Private leach.
Dancing 4 Entertainment
For Reservations Phone
538-6811
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHTAND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
***
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAE STOCK EXCHANGE.
Leumi
Sank LawtiM le-laraei S M
NASD
18 East 48th Street
New York, N.Y. 10017
5*CUf1ttS (212)750-1310
Corporation Ton Pmim 22i-4838|
state, and is awaiting the result
of an appeal which is expected to
be held in Moscow before the end
of the month.
STANISLAV ZUBKO, a
doctor of chemical sciences from
Kiev serving a four-year sentence
for allegedly possessing firearms
and hashish, has been moved
from a camp in the Ukraine to:
USSR, 342228, Donets kay a
Oblast, Telmanovsky rayon,
Myrnoe, 1-OE 312-1-9-92 ZUBKO
STANISLAV.
Zubko was arrested on May 15,
1981; his trial took place on July
21,1981.
NADEZHDA OVSISHCHER,
wife of prominent refusenik LEV,
died in Minsk having suffered a
heart attack. The funeral was
Jan. 12.
SIMON SHNIRMAN, the 25-
year-old metallurgist who
completed in 1980 a 2'/-year
sentence for refusing to accept
his callup, has been rearrested on
the same charge.
Simon, who comes from Kerch
in the Crimea, is detained in the
town of Simferopol, the capital
city. The trial is expected to be
held next week. His wife, a
Kishinev girl, is expecting a baby
in eight weeks.
The family first applied to
leave in 1959, when Simon was
only 1-year-old. They received
refusal after refusal until 1976,
when DAVID was allowed out.
At that time Simon was refused
on the grounds that he had not
worked long enough since
completing his education. He was
then working in a steel factory in
Zaparozhe, an eight-hour journey
from his home.
Shnirman is the first young
refusenik to be rearrested for
evading conscription after
serving a time in labor camp..
Some years ago young
refuseniks who were called up
opted to serve prison sentences,
rather than two years in the
military service followed by the
inevitable five year ban on
emigration. Several, indeed, were
allowed out after doing their
time. More latterly, however,
there have been cases of refuse-
niks who have served their
sentences and been 'refused'
again on their release.
As we reported last week
SIMON SHNIRMAN's ap-
plication for an exit visa was
refused earlier this month.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123's
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
v-
ABC's&123's
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
r^TSw-^'' are tasty
TaK Sa pasta alphabet
Wi***^ letters and
*** numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
PASSOVER
A
ON SALE!
DOM'T
WAIT!
Sale Prices
Won't Last
Forever!
$228
plus 1SS la> & lips
5 DAYS/4 NIGHTS
FINEST KOSHER CUISINE
f 3 Meals Daily
J Traditional Sedars-Mar 28th & 29th
Famous Cantor Ed Todras
a Starlight Nightclub Shown
a% Private Beach Color TV Cabana Club
10 Days
9 Mights
Sale Price
s475.50

SHELBORNE
Call For Free Color Brochure
OCEANFRONT
Miami
Beach
Fla
Information & Reservations
531-1271E*. 2200
PASSOVER AT THE
CONTINENTAL HOTEL
11 Days10 Nights
Rooms & Meals
All Rooms
s495,00pp
Doubt* Occupancy
$700.00
Single
STRICTLY O
KOSHER
Synagogue on Premises
All Special Diets
Full Entertainment. Program
Sedurlm Conducted by
Cantor, Masglach, on Premises
Pool
Free Parking
Continental Hotel
4000 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140
Please call for information
Phone
305-538-6721
SUPER SAVER
l

It's cheaper to ship your car via
trans Auto and fly... than it is to drive!
FLORIDA AUTO TRAIN
Florida Reservations: 1-800-432-9989
National Reservations 1-800-327-5353
Orlando 1-3OM2S.0797 Now Jam* VSoVses-SiM
. %
See your Trawl Agent
t.C.C.F.F. 565
.


lay, February 18,1983
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17
'!) i M"OH TOMCCOCO
VANTAGE
7H TASTE OF SUCCESS
f%



Page 18
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
HONORING JUDGE
Members of Hallandale
Jewish Center paid tribute
to the late Judge Maxwell
M. Stern, who had chaired
the last two UJ A Jewish
Federation of South
Broward Campaigns at
the synagogue. The judge,
who died Jan. 18, just 12
days before he was to be
honored, was remembered
by friends and family. To
the side, from left, are
Edwin M. Ginsberg, 1983
UJ A Federation Cam-
paign chairman; Dr. Ruth
Gruber, Mideast expert
who spoke; and Dr. Carl
Klein, rabbi at Hallandale
Jewish Center. Below,
Richard Stern, the judge's
son (center), accepts the
posthumous award from
Alex Rubin as Myer
Pritsker looks on at HJC.
c- -
*' 7
Stravinsky wort* going to library at Hebrew Univ.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mayor Teddy Kollek has donated
a rare manuscript by composer
Igor Stravinsky to the music de-
partment of the Jewish National
and Hebrew University Library.
The manuscript is the only
complete manuscript version of
"Abraham and Isaac," a ballad
for baritone and chamber or-
chestra. It consists of 34 pages,
with a market value of about
$40,000.
"A document such as this
should not be in private hands,"
Kollek said in a brief ceremony.
Commissioned by the Israel
Festival in 1962, the ballad was
first performed in 1964 in Jerusa-
lem as part of that year's festival.
Stravinsky dedicated the 12-
minute work "to the people of the
State of Israel." The composer
gave the original manuscript of
the work to Kollek. It will be on
display throughout this month at
the library exhibit.
Death penalty topic of religious leaders
On Thursday, Feb. 24, at 10:30
p.m., Channel 2's public affairs
production Viewpoint looks into
the death penalty from the point
of view of South Florida religious
leaders.
Host Del Frank welcomes
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff, Tem-
ple Bet Breira; Father James
Fetcher, pastor of St. Louis
Catholic Church; and the Rev.
Luther Jones, chaplin at Jackson
Memorial Hospital.
Viewpoint is repeated on Satur-
day, Feb. 26, at 3 p.m.
'v
HOLD
THE
DATE
SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 1983
8:00 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 SOUTH 14th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD
An ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN DIALOGUE
the Peace Process
Participants and Non-Participating Elements of
it i
Ele
GIDEON SAMET currently serves as u.s. corre-
spondent of ha-aretz having held
the PQSlTIQtLfiF managing editor
GHASSAN K. BISHARA currently serves as Wash-
ington, d.c. correspondent
al-fajr newspaper of jerusalem,
WEST BANK SINCE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD
2719 HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33020
921-8810
Boys Town Jerusalem
dines on Miami Beach
South Florida Friends of Boys '
Town Jerusalem will hold ita
annual dinner Tuesday,March 1,
at Temple Emanu-El, Miami
Beach. Philanthropist and
Jewish community leader Sidney
Cooperman, who serves as chair-
man of the Southeast Friends of
Boys Town Jerusalem, is
chairing the dinner.
The school's founders, Ira
Guilder, international president,
and Rabbi Alexander S. Linch-
ner, dean emeritus, will attend
the event.
"Boys Town Jerusalem is a
unique educational institution
which offers comprehensive aca-
demic, technical and religious
education to poor but talented
Israeli youth between the ages of
12 and 20," Cooperman stated.
"The school has earned a repu-
tation for providing skills and
knowledge which enable these
boys to go on to productive and
valued vocations much needed in
Israeli society."
Founded in 1949, the school is
Sidney Cooperman
attended by youth from over 105
towns and settlements through-
out Israel. Mostly Sephardic,
students come from families
originating from 35 countries.
Marion Salter
j
tir' Post Haste Shopping Center
4525 Sheridan St.. Hollywood. Fla.
Phone 961-6998
Personal Service Book Store
PASSOVER PACKAGES FOR
OUR SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
11 Days-10 Nights
March27-April6
From
$650.
Per Person
Double
Occupancy
Includes Room And Meals
At Waldman Hotel

Holiday Services Conducted
By
Cantor Rueven Blum
10 Days-9 Nights
March 28 -April 6
$575.
Per Paraon
Double
Occupancy
850. Single
Room At Adjacent Atlantic
Towers Hotel-Meals At
Waldman
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt
Kosher Cuisine Included
Enry Oceenlront Facility
Dally ReHaloue Set. ices
All Spec lei Diets
Full Entertainment Preoram
Sedurt and Holiday Services
WALDMAN hotel
ON THE OCEAN AT 43 ST.
PHONE: 538-5731
FLY FREE
TO SAN JUAN
And see more of the Caribbean on Costa s
Carla C, World Renaissance & Daphne.
We can show you how tree and easy it is to spend 7 days sailing
the Caribbean on a Costa Cruise You II sail from San Juan in the
rieart ol the Caribbean so you II see more portsup to a port a day
Sail to Caracas St Maarten Guadeloupe Barbados St Lucia
Antigua and SI Thomas among others
Combine any two 7-day cruises for a luxurious 14-day vacation,
ind visit up to 12 ports at a special low price
Ask us about our special (all otters Good space is still available
tor Christmas .md New Year s sailings
Call and let us help you select the Costa cruise that s right tor you
FROM
*895
ii.
par pereon double occupancy Round-trip ode.
selective 12/1W82 Peak eeaeon and holiday pncee
.slightly higher
Deoertutee from Miami, Fl
Juat call your travel agent.
Than take It easy Take Costa.
.^-.wy.^-x .
A Costa Cruise is easy to take.
ji
s r\
ApiMiin*riyan>irrMw**s...,,i.....(,,..,. -q>Mry Can*!'.


f, February 18,1983
1 i rr
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19
>n the bookshelf
Herzog
Arab-Israeli Wars. By
i Herzog. Random House,
t 50 St., New York, N.Y.
J2. 1982. 392 pages with bib-
aphy and index, illustrated
\maps and photographs. $20.
ewed by David Szonyi
|aim Herzog, a co-founder of
Israeli military intelligence
e and the former UN ambas-
k has done what seemed im-
Ible: written a fairly succinct
readable history of the six
l-Israeli wars.
Iincludes the 1967-1970 "War
Ittrition" and this past sum-
Is "Operation Peace for Gali-
(excluding the siege of Bei-
i well as one major military
lition (the Entebbe rescue).
clear, if sometimes stark
B, Herzog captures the key to
el's recurring military suc-
: flexibility, improvisation,
use of night attacks and,
Ire all, the leadership in battle
Israeli officers (23 percent of
] casualties in the 1967 Six-
< War).
le does a particularly fine job
(elating the extraordinary de-
kpment of military technology
Tie region. In the War of In-
i-ndence (1947-1949). Israel
ended largely on Czech-made
Is and light artillery; its "air
le" consisted of a few Piper
K. Ill
ires Israeli wars in readable prose

Jewish Books
J UJ B in Review
is a service ol the IWB lewish Book Council,
15 fast 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
In Lebanon last summer, the
Israeli-built, hyper-sophisticated
Merkava tank bested the Russian
T-72, while squadrons of F-15s
(one of the most advanced Amer-
ican airplanes) strafed PLO and
Syrian strongholds.
Herzog also details some of Is-
rael's internal military debates
e.g. when to cross the Suez Canal
during the Yom Kippur War
(1973) and provides short,
often piquant profiles of military
leaders.
Thus, "Arik" Sharon is "a
Patton-like, swashbuckling
general" with "an uncanny feel
for battle" who is also "a difficult
person to command. Few, if any,
of his superior officers over the
years had a good word to say for
him."
Most impressively, Herzog is
candid about Israeli blunders and
fair-minded in assessing the
various Arab armies. He con-
cludes that, generally, the Arabs
have been impressive when de-
fending, but often uncoordinated
and unimaginative when attack-
ing.
Unfortunately, The Arab-Is-
raeli Wars is more impressive as
a reference work than as a histor-
ical account. Herzog sticks too
closely to straight military histo-
ry. The profusion of names and
geographic details in the ac-
counts of operations and cam-
paigns may be bewildering to
someone unfamiliar with Israeli
geography or unaccustomed to
war accounts.
Herzog writes very little about
the "home fronts" during the
wars, or about the larger geo-
political picture. And sometimes,
his priorities seem skewed: while
devoting a 10-page chapter to the
Entebbe rescue (1976), Herzog
dispenses with the remarkable
two-day conquest of the Golan
Heights (June 9-10, 1967) in only
four pages.
Still, though not an easy book
to read, The Arab-Israeli War* is
ultimately worthwhile for its de-
tailed, coherent chronicle of what
really been the Jewish state's 36-
year war for independence.
David M. Szonyi, associate di-
rector of The Radius Institute in
New York, is contributing editor
of the Baltimore Jewish Times
and the Long Island Jewish
World.
lands Across Campus' coming
pair of schools in Dade
MIAMI (JTA) A pilot
>ject aimed at promoting racial
|<) ethnic understanding among
$h school students in this eth-
ically diverse area will be
inched next September, it was
run hi need by the Miami Chapter
' the American Jewish Commit-
and the Cuban National Plan-
OUR HOMEOWNERS
INSURANCE
IS AS GOOD FOR
YOUR HOME
AS OUR CAR
INSURANCE IS
FOR YOUR CAR
With The Travelers you gel full-
coverage policies, toll-Iras
telephone claim service, and
competitive rates for both your
horns and your car.
JACK BERMAN
Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD. 921-7744
Dade. 947-5902
Representing
T
The Travelers .
Indemnity Company
and it*
, Affiliated Companies
Hartford, Conn. 06115
ning Council, co-sponsors of the
program.
The project, "Hands Across
the Campus," is modeled on a
program developed in 1981 by
AJC's Ixis Angeles chapter. That
program has begun in five Los
Angeles area high schools and
has been extended to an addi-
tional five schools.
The Florida version of
"Hands" will be carried out in
two Dade' County high schools
under the supervision of the two
sponsoring organizations and the
county school system. Like the
Los Angeles version, it will in-
clude both classroom courses and
extracurricular offerings.
The courses will deal with such
subjects as the American tradi-
tion of pluralism, the roots of
prejudice, the Holocaust and the
Iwliefs of different ethnic groups.
Extracurricular facilities will
include role-playing sessions,
weekend retreats, theatrical
presentations and other pro-
grams designed to help the
youngsters look at their own feel-
ings and beliefs regarding
various ethnic groups.
PASSOVER
Decpipwille
Florida Warmth With
Gncioui Hospitality
H0CHD0RF FAMILY
& MEHL FAMILY
In Association With Tha '",,
BERK0WITZ FAMILY fc glatt
KOSHER FOR
PASSOVER ONLY
lOOAYSaSNKHTS
Beg With Dinner
Sunday March 27
To April S Attar Dinner
600 King Size AeeasisxWsllans Widespread ssk 2 *sli
PesUlde CMMrsn't Heck Pee* On Precise Tsnais oeneinp
. fnitnalMNsl Snewi IMlclsua GLATT KOSHER Cuisine
Tea Ream Cecklsll Parties SEOURIM Services Will ke
Censuctes sy CAWTOP TIIOP HEPOOW
For Complsts Intormatlon Csll
1-865-8511
Evsnlnge A Weak-Ends Call 1 -673-8133
On The Ocean st e7th St. Miami Bosch
Books ate sought
The Greater Hollywood Chap-
ter of Brandeis University Wom-
an's Committee again is asking
for books from attics and over-
stuffed shelves for its annual
book sale in March at the Holly-
wood Mall.
All proceeds go for materials
for the libraries at Brandeis. All
leftover books are given to vari-
ous charities in South Broward.
Call Sophie Bobb at 927-1215
or Tess Goldman at 458-2694 to
arrange a pickup.
ZOA to fete Keating
The Zionist Organization of
America will present its Brother-
hood Award to Mayor David
Keating of Hollywood for his
many years of outstanding ef-
forts to foster understanding,
friendship and a united commu-
nity spirit in this area.
The presentation of this ZOA
award will be made at a special
Friday night brotherhood service
at Temple Sinai, Hollywood, on
Feb. 25, at 8 p.m.
The Zionist Organization of
America will be represented by
Anne Rosenthal, ZOA national
vice president and coordinator of
the Southeast Region of ZOA,
and Dr. Michael Leinwand, direc-
tor of the Southeast Region of the
ZOA. Services will be conducted
by Rabbi Richard Margolis and
Rabbi David Shapiro.
Praising the "cooperation and
enthusiasm" of the school per-
sonnel who had helped to develop
Dade County's "Hands," Barton
Udell, past president of the
Miami AJC, said that the project
would seek to involve students,
parents, teachers and the entire
community "in an effort to pro-
mote better understanding and
relations among individuals of
different ethnic and religious
groups."
David Perez-Gerard, deputy
executive director of the Cuban
National Planning Council, called
"Hands" "particularly appro-
priate" for Dade County because
of the area's ethnic mixture, add-
ing:
"It should also be especially
beneficial, because the many ten-
sions and confusions of present-
day life can make it increasingly
difficult for ethnic and religious
groups to live together."
The Cuban National Planning
Council, established in 1972,
seeks to help Cubans now living
in the United States adjust to life
in this country.
FAIRWAYS ROYALE
Committee for State of Israel
Bonds on Feb. 23 will bestow
a Scroll of Honor on Rozia
Stolzenberg. Chairman of
the event is Helen Water-
man.
Israel, Hungary
join in pate
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Paris correspondent of Moariv
reported that Israel and Hungary
have concluded a cartel agree-
ment for the sale of agricultural
products almost entirely goose
liver to France. The paper said
that Hungary exports to France
some 800 tons of goose pate,
while Israel sells about 250 tons a
year, but obtains a higher price.
Under the new agreement,
both countries will unify their
prices and market their product
under joint agreement.
An-nell
Hotel
Strictly
Kosher
3 Full Course Meals Dally
Mashglach & Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year Services
Near an good shopping
VV'i'e loi Season Rales
700EUCLIDAVE/ CALL
MIAMI BEACH
531 1 191
uuflbi]
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadassah today!
Your Will can continue Hadaaaah's achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow.
hadassah
MAN. TO HADASSAH. WILLS 1 BEQUESTS OEPT
SO West SSTh Sue* New Voffc, N Y 10019 (212) 3SS-7900
Pimm moo me informative Brochure -Thy She" Be flemevnoento hi Prmtt'
V


1
Page 20
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. February 18.1983
To Life
Brightening the darkness
By LESLIE KLINEMAN
UJA Special Correspondent
JERUSALEM For the first
four years of her life, Sara's world
was a corner, a rag doll her only
company. Ignored by seven
brothers and sisters, barely ac-
knowledged by her mother, like a
small, tightened animal, Sara sat,
sightless, alone.
Yossi's mother died in a car ac-
cident when he was a baby,
leaving nine children behind.
Yossi was born blind. His father
had no use for an "imperfect"
child.
Avi, a teenager, knew for some
time that his advancing blind-
ness would one day be final and
irrevocable, but it's a fact of life
he found extremely difficult to
accept and deal with. How can
you give up the sky?
Today, Sara is not alone. Yossi
has found a home where he is
wanted. And Avi is beginning to
understand that the gathering
darkness need not leave him
helpless.
They are among 50 children
suffering from total, partial or
advancing blindness who are
living and learning to help them-
selves at the Jewish Institute for
the Blind in Kiryat Moshe, Jeru-
salem supported in part by
funds from the United Jewish
Appeal 1983 Israel Special Fund.
Like many of their resident
classmates. Sara and Yossi and
Avi have more to overcome than
blindness. Sara is retarded and
has autistic tendencies. Yossi has
speech and physical coordination
difficulties. Avi entered the In-
stitute in a state of severe
anxiety and depression.
But all the children who find
their way to the Institute are
being actively and lovingly
helped to overcome all handicaps
and to realize their potential for
contributing to Israeli society.
Along with his completely
( blind classmates, Avi is learning
to read and write in Braille, to
operate special typewriters and
to use a comprehensive Braille li-
brary; a new world opening up to
him as the world of sight closes
down. Extensive counseling and
psychological services have
softened the acuteness of his de-
pression.
Sports and music activities,
combined with patient speech
therapy. have strengthened
Yossi's coordination and sense of
self. Judo instruction has given
him a feeling of control and con-
fidence. He is learning carpentry,
ceramics and weaving and will be
well trained to make a living in
the outside world.
Sara has no time to sit apart
Ballet Monday
on Channel 2
Israel's Bat-Sheva Dance
Company performs Igor Stravin-
sky's ballet Pulcinello, on Chan-
nel 2, Monday. Feb. 21. at 10:30
p.m.
In honor of the Stravinsky
Centennial Celebration, this new
interpretation of the renowned
ballet is choreographed by Mur-
'V ray Louis, with music by the IB A
- Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra
under the direction of David
Shallon.
The colorful and light-hearted
Pulcinello was first produced by
the Paris )pera in 1920 with set
designs ar Picasso, aul Salzberger bases
his set d- ign for this perform-
ance- on *:he original Picasso
ske les.
and never feels alone now. Uncer-
tainty and loneliness fade in the
face of group learning experience,
individual grooming help and
summer camp fun. There is no
stigma of retardation in her slow
movements during the sewing
and home economics classes;
each newly learned motor skill is
a landmark triumph.
Mobility training is the key to
progress for the Institute's blind
children. Today, Dov, who has
been blind from birth and has
taken unaided steps only within
the confines of the Institute,
faces a crucial test. His "lesson"
is to walk to the corner grocery
store and to buy himself any
candy he wants a wonderful
treat for any eight year-old.
He is learning to guide himself
GALA FOR HOPE
Comedian Bob Hope will
help celebrate the silver an-
niversary of the National
Parkinson Foundation of
Miami Feb. 27 at the Diplo-
mat Hotel in Hollywood.
Dick Clark will be master of
ceremonies for 'A Gala for
Hope' and Connie Francis,
Zsa Zsa Gabor and other
entertainers will be on hand.
The fund-raising event helps
support the Bob Hope Re-
search Institute in Miami.
Tickets, at $125, are avail-
able by calling 547-6666 in
Miami.
with the white cane of the blind.
His instructor follows at a
discreet distance, flinching with
each obstacle encountered, but
! allowing the boy to find his way
and his satisfaction for himself.
' Dov's world is expanding,
brightening the darkness.
The 50 children living and
learning full-time at the Jewish
Institute for the Blind are excep-
tions to the prevailing rehabilita-
tion pattern in Israel. Most
handicapped children in the
Jewish state today live and are
cared for within their communi-
ties, if at all possible. Educators
believe this process of "main-
streaming" is more beneficial be-
cause it allows the children to
lead as normal a life as they can.
Blind children who are main-
streamed have special tutors who
begin instructing them in bask
life skills at an early age. Special
kindergartens are available to
them in some areas, and an in-
creasing number are being ac-
commodated in regular neighbor-
hood schools.
Many who live at home in and
around Jerusalem come to the
Institute in the afternoon for
special after-school instruction in
dealing with their individual
needs. The Institute also offers
evening courses for blind adults,
helping them develop new skills
and experiences. Many richly
contributory lives have been
fashioned by these part-time pro-
grams.
But for the Saras and the Yos-
sis, the Avis and the Dovs
those who are not wanted at
home. who have additional
physical or emotional problems,
who need intensive individual
training, or whose homes are in
outlying areas where adequate
facilities are not available the
brightness in Kiryat Moshe that
dispels darkness is the fulltime
answer.
Life at the Institute is full for
these small souls full of learn-
ing, hope and warmth. They are
valued and appreciated for what
they are. They are taught and en-
couraged to be whatever they can
become. Their every resource is
developed. They learn to live in
spite of their handicaps.
They are what is special about
the Israel Special Fund.
Pictured from left are Alfred Golden, Dr. Joseph Davis, Rabbi
Pinchas Weberman and Leo Hack.
Orthodox rabbis honor
doctor, chapel official
The Orthodox Rabbinical
Council of South Florida honored
Dr. Joseph Davis, chief medical
examiner of Dade County, and
Leo Hack, vice president and re-
ligious advisor to Riverside
Memorial Chapels of Florida, at a
recent reception at the
Casablanca Hotel.
Rabbi Pinchas Weberman.
president of ORC, presented the
awards. He noted Davis' and his
staff's "sensitivity and compas-
sion in regard to the concerns of
traditional Jews" and Hack's and
Riverside's "complete dedication
not only to the matter of medical
examination as it pertains to tra-
ditional observance but the en-
couragement of religious tradi-
tional funeral procedures."
Among those attending the re-
ception were Rabbis David Lehr-
field and Yaacov Spring of the
ORC and members of the Rab-
binical Council of America, South
Florida. Rabbis Solomon Schiff
and Albert Schwartz, who head
the Miami and Fort Lauderdale
chaplaincies of Jewish Federa-
tion, also attended.
Both honorees gave recogni- #
tion to the cooperation and sup-
port of their staffs, at the Medical
Examiner's office and at River-
side Chapel, headed by Executive
Vice President Alfred Golden.
MELVIN D. ROSS, M.D.. P. A.
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF
CARDIOLOGY AND INTERNAL MEDICINE
821 NORTH 35TH AVENUE
(FIRST FLOOR)
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33021
OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT
NEW TELEPHONE NUMBER
(308) 961-3333
Medicare Is
Not Enough^'
Edward and Selma Kaplan
\ou Probably
NeedB'naiB'rltlrs
Senior Security
Supplement, loo.
(MOO-AS-13077)
rot many medical
charges, il pays the
difference between
the actual fee and
what Medicare pays.
II includes private
duty nursing in the
hospital.
It includes doctor's
ollicc and hospital
visits beyond what
Medicare pays.
Hospital deductible*
covered.
Acceptance is
guaranteed."
tin member, age AS ami
HWI I'n t'|S||i|(||>|K|llHHIS
mil cuM.-n.-d loi Ihe fit-.1 G
miMilhs oil ,.w r.iqr
for tl n.ii rl rith members ont\
Wr MMM new members
B'nai B'rith's
Group Insurance ..
Underwritten by '
r*rarM*w.
Mutual I ik' Insurance
(Hiip.iii, ih flew York
W
Jules L. Solomon
Bernard G. Kaltman
Solomon & Kaltman
Health & Life Insurance Consultants
2632 Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood. Florida 3302ft
925-7766 or 925-7768
-.;
Tl
us
it.
*
|)hot
ew-
ffrr
-hei
ecej
Ul|

---------r tm




'
February 18,1983
\raeli exports
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 21
LURICE SAMUELSON
)N (JTA) Israeli
to Lebanon have "taken
jm leap" since last June,
Dm a mere $800,000 to
llion in October, according
[Financial Times of Lon-
paper's Beirut corree-
^t, Nora Boustany, quotes
ael army spokesman as
ting that Israel's trade
Lebanon is already
|ing $20 million a month,
transit goods and half in
[made exports, which is
10 percent of Lebanon's
|ted imports last year.
trade is flourishing
threats by Lebanese
it Shafik Wazzan that
in Israeli produce will be
1 of their nationality.
ireds of Lebanese entre-
jr.s have been requesting
\s and catalogues about
suppliers from David
livas, an Israeli trade of-
1 based northeast of Beirut,
financial Times added.
:>rting that hundreds of
nese tourists, smugglers and
Jessmen are entering Israel
day, the paper said this de
normalization was most
Int at Christmas when
Bands of Lebanese took
age tours to Jerusalem, Tel
| Haifa and other places.
the opposite direction,
lli businessmen and truck
Irs visit Lebanon freely.
\y to 60 trucks laden with
Israeli bananas, apples,
avocados, tangerines, passion
fruit-sugar, poultry, candy and
biscuits, plastic ware and cons-
truction materials file through
Rosh Hanikra daily," The Finan-
cial Times reported.
The Lebanese government,
worried by this "dumping" of
cheap Israeli goods, is said to
have approached Eastern bloc
countries to find markets for local
agricultural production which
would otherwise be unsold.
Twenty litres of Israeli olive oil
were selling at 150 Israeli Shekels
in south Lebanon, half the cost of
producing the same amount in
Lebanon. The Financial Times
described the southern town of
Nabatiyeh as "brimming with
Israeli goods" and quoted a local
trader as angrily rejecting
Lebanese government com-
plaints. "We buy what we can
afford," he said.
On the streets of Beirut, the
paper's reporter saw Israeli
avocadoes being sold in boxes
labeled "new fruit." A Moslem
vendor of Israeli tangerines said
his local Moslem priest had told
him "it was all right as long as
Israel was not written on the
boxes."
Lebanon may also be serving
as a conduit for Israeli goods
entering other Arab countries,
The Financial Times suggested.
It quoted Katarivas as saying
that at the beginning of the
Israeli push into Lebanon last
year, Lebanese interest was
mainly focused on food products.

"Now this is dying out and
giving way to other goods, such
as shoes and plastic ware."
The Israeli port of Haifa was
ilso being used by Lebanese
mporters, cutting Lebanese
;overnment income from
customs income. The tranship-
ment through Haifa opened
during the Israeli seige of Beirut
and is still operating.
p/ocaust museum planned
JONTREAL (JTA) The
Igner of a Holocaust museum
J Toronto, which will cost an
fmated $750,000, said it will be
first to deal with the
caust in the context of the
p of Jewish history.
Borley Markson, the designer,
I the projected Holocaust
feeum will celebrate the history
the Jews from the days of the
Iriarchs and will pay tribute to
fel. Jewish culture, customs
religion, according to The
nadian Jewish Jewish News.
Two Toronto real estate
elopers David Smoskowitz,
artisan in Poland during.the
izi invasion, and Jack Israeli, a
lish survivor who lost his fam-
in the death camps have
Jdged to contribute about
50,000 for the museum.
It will be housed in a 4,000-
|uare-foot corner of the new
n Family Jewish Commu-
Ity Services building being built
W the Jewish Community Cen-
- on Bathurst Street. It is to
m sometime this year.
Israeli said the sponsors do not
Ian a fund-raising drive and
Ppe that contributors will
olunteer money for the project.
The two developers said the
luseum will comprise seven
mils. At the entrance, there will
>e a sequence of drawings and
ihotos tracing the progression of
lews from biblical times to pre-
*^rld War II Europe.
Next will be the main space
'here there will be an alcove and
"ceptktn area with a number of
culptures. Further on there will
be a curved panoramic wall, hold-
ing images of the Holocaust, each
image about 13 feet high and 20
feet wide.
Markson said plans call for
images in which the edges are
softened and seem to fade into
the architecture. At preset
scheduled times, a slide program,
"The Eternal People," 20 to 25
minutes long, will be shown.
The visitor will then be able to
move to a research and resource
area to study aspects of the
Holocaust, including its art, pro-
paganda, ghetto life and Nazi war
criminals, Markson said.
Another component will be an
area of several freestanding
columns. The top of each is to be
covered with a clear plastic dome
and within each dome will be a
momento of the Holocaust: a
child's shoe; a can of Zyklon-B
gas, the type used to kill the
Holocaust victims before they
were cremated; a Jewish identi-
fication patch; a pair of glasses.
The last section will be an
exhibit of photographic images
which pay tribute to the sur-
vivors, to Israel and to Jewish
culture.
Go out, multiply,
Navon advises
Mature woman to care for
children 6 month8 & 2%
years, my home. Good
Pay. Own transportation.
References. 431-5607.
ebrew Religious School
Teacher wanted Tues.,
Thurs. & Sun. for
Synagogue in So.
Broward. Excellent
Isalary. Call 961-1700.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
President Yitzhak Navon
believes the Jewish people must
multiply to respond correctly to
the Holocaust. Another response
is to strengthen Israel, he said at
a memorial service at Yad
V as hem.
In an emotional speech to an
audience which included high
school students and visitors from
the United States, Navon said:
"We must double, triple and
quaduple our numbers and we
must preserve and strengthen
our state.
Navon stood before a stone
slab on which the names of con-
centration camps are engraved.
After lighting a memorial torch,
he said:
Our people, who have been dis-
persed among many countries,
found itself united in the concen-
tration camps. Hitler did not dis-
tinguish between Ashkenazi and
Sephardi Jews, between Jews of
different origin. And along with
the six million, most Sephardi
Jews were exterminated."
Navon added, "Fate unites us.
It united us during the Holocaust
and we must unite here in our
homeland." He said the mul-
tiplication of the Jewish people
and the strengthening of Israel
must be undertaken jointly by
world Jews and Israelis.
The president cautioned, "We
should be careful before we call
people (today) Nazis or talk
about a (new) Holocaust. These
are terms that should be applied
only to that specific event."
Health clinic
In the Pines
In association with the Area
Agency on Aging of Broward
County, a Primary Geriatric
Health Care Clinic is located at
the Southwest Focal Point Senior
Center, 6700 SW 13 St., Pem-
broke Pines.
This clinic is open each Thurs-
day 9 a.m.-noon, and is adminis-
tered by the Broward County
Primary Health Care Division. It
is available to elders residing in
the Southwest sector of the
county. Payment for services is
on a sliding scale in accordance
with the client's ability to pay.
For information regarding ap-
pointments or available services
at the Primary Geriatric Health
Care Clinic in the Pembroke
Pines Senior Center, call 981-
2283.
Leo Mindlin
Continued from Page 4
raelis know that no Jew was
going to get the better of the
good old U.S. of A. For the
record, should I object to his way
of putting it? Politely, I mean.
Cappy: Why that little mam-
zer.
Ron: Is that a cuss word,
Cappy?
Cappy: Like keister, Mr. Pres-
ident.
Ron: (Aside again, hand
clutching the telephone). Why
get mad? You just told me to tell
him the same thing.
Cappy: But you didn't tell
him. Why not? / can say it. I'm
entitled. He isn't.
Ron: No one ever gave me such
a great line. Remember the Duke
in "Red River Valley"?
Cappy: That was Montgomery
Clift, a faggot coward who killed
himself.
Chuck: Yer Honor, still there?
Ron: Just a minute, please,
Captain. I may be getting an
emergency call here. Hold on.
(Aside to Weinberger, still
clutching the telephone). The
Duke was in it, too. Remember
the lines when they have a fist
fight? I still get goose flesh.
Cappy: Ought to have that
mamter transferred. Maybe we
should send him to Moscow.
With his mouth, he could be an
advance man in disarmament
talks with Andropov. Or they
could discuss Soviet Jews. How
to send them to Israel, not Brigh-
ton Beach. (He laughs crazily).
Or maybe, with his experience
now, reassign him for traffic cop
duty in Tel Aviv. Begin owes us
at least that.
Ron: Nobody ever gave me any
lines like that. Not a single damn
script, not even in "King's Row,"
and that was the best.
Chuck: Lo? Hie.
Ron: (Aside to Weinberger, his
hand still clamped on the tele-
phone). Who's this I'm talking
to? Why do I have to take these
dumb calls?
Cappy: A traffic cop. Remem-
ber? (He pauses). Mr. President,
you have that emergency call
now, but it's from Tel Aviv. Our
Embassy there. They say the
Captain was drunk.
Ron: What a line. A great line.
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabu-
lous "Fun Ships"* Camivale, Festivale.
Mardi Gras and Tropicale depart from
Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports. Vir-
tually everything's included for one low
price of your cruise: eight meals and snacks
a day... a full gambling casino... live enter-
tainment nightly... dance bands... parties...
and dozens of shipboard activities. You get
value no land vacation can matchl
Ships of Ranarranlan oM Uberian Registry


Page 22
The Jewish Floridian and $hofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, February 18,1983
* >
Chassidic Purim gala at circle's bandshell
A free Chassidic Purim Festi-
val with original Purim shpielers
(entertainers) will take place
Wednesday evening, Feb. 23, be-
ginning at 7:30 at the Young
Circle Bandshell in Hollywood.
The bandshell is at Federal High-
way and Hollywood Boulevard.
Sponsoring the festival will be
Congregation Levi Yitzchok-
Lubavitch. The congregation
organized and sponsored the
Chassidic Chanukah Festival
that drew 3,000 participants.
Rabbi Raphael Tennenhaus,
coordinator of the festival,
stresses that the Purim Festival
will be filled with entertainment
geared to the entire family.
There will be a live band, playing
the most recent (and most an-
cient) Israeli, Chassidic and
Jewish songs. A cantor will lead
in the singing of holiday songs,
as will a local choir.
Children dressed in costumes
will be eligible to receive Jewish
holy books, watches and elec-
tronic games. The Purim story
will be told, Purim kits (with
goodies) will be distributed and
every boy and girl will receive a
gragger (Purim noisemaker).
According to Rabbi Tennen-
haus, the intent of the festival is
to bring Jews from all walks of
life together in celebration.
"Many Jews will be introduced
for the very first time in their
lives to the customs and beauty
of the Purim holiday, while
others, already committed to Ju-
daism, will strengthen their bond
and commitment an account of
the festival," he says.
Purim actually begins Satur-
day evening, Feb. 26, and con-
tinues through Sunday, Feb. 27.
Congregation Levi Yitzchok-
Lubavitch is at 1504 Wiley St. in
Hollywood. More information
about the festival is available by
calling 923-1707.
Synagogues
Bat Mitzvah with refuser*
During Shabbat services Sat-
urday, Feb. 19, Rebecca Lynn
Glassman will be called to the
Torah to become a Bat Mitzvah
at Temple Solel. She will become
B'not Mitzvah with Tamara Tel-
aevofUzhele.US.S.R.
Tamara is the daughter of
Russian refuseniks and will be-
come a Bat Mitzvah in absentia.
The government of the Soviet
Union makes it not only impossi-
ble to learn Hebrew, but impossi-
ble for a Jewish child to become a
Bar or Bat Mitzvah.
The significance of stating
Tamara Talaev becomes a Bat
Mitzvah is, in fact, recognizing
that our Jewish brothers and dis-
ters in the Soviet Union are not
forgotten, Rebecca believes.
Rebecca is in the seventh grade
at Nova Middle School and in the
seventh grade of the Abe and
Grace Durbin School of Living
Judaism. She is a member of
Temple Solel's Junior Youth
Group.
Purim Carnival planned
Feb. 27 at Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai is hosting a
Purim Canival on Sunday, Feb.
27, from 10:30 a.m. to3 p.m.
In addition to games, prizes
and raffles, kids of all ages are in-
vited to partake in loads of food,
video games and a performance
by "The Chosen People."
A pre-Purim Carnival Party
will be held following the reading
of the Megillah. Temple Sinai is
at 1201 Johnson St.. Hollywood.
Hallandale JC
To honor Joe Frank
Dr. Carl Klein, president of the
Jewish National Fund of Hallan-
dale, has announced that Joe
Frank, gabbai and vice president
of Hallandale Jewish Center, will
be honored at a JNF-Hallandale
Jewish Center Purim Celebration
to be held Sunday, Feb. 27, at
9:30 a.m. in the Hallandale Jew-
ish Center Auditorium.
Dr. Klein, spiritual leader of
the center, will speak at the
event. Zev W. Kogan, JNF
Southern Region president,
stated, "Rabbi Klein's unparal-
leled achievements, and his un-
matched dedication, have been an
inspiration to his fellow man."
Rabbi Klein has served as
spiritual leader of congregations
in Europe, Canada, and Mexico,
as well as other cities in the U.S.
While serving as assistant to the
president of Bar Ilan University
in Ramat Gan, Israel, Rabbi
Klein helped organize the first
student body and faculty of the
school.
He has worked as a professor
of Hebrew, philosophy, and
Jewish history at University of
Judaism in Los Angeles, Univer-
sity of Alberta in Edmonton,
Canada, and Phoenix College in
Arizona. Rabbi Klein also wrote
the books. The Credo of Maimo
nides. The Anatomy of Judaism,
and the Eternal Book and Prayer
Book, published in Spanish.
The United Jerusalem Award
was presented to the rabbi in
1978, and his name appeared in
the 1978 volume of Who's Who in
World Jewry and the 1979
volume of Men of Achievement.
Meyer Pritsker, president of
Hallandale Jewish Center, said of
honoree Frank, "During his
many years of devoted service to
the Hallandale Jewish Center, he
has distinguished himself in his
activities in adult education,
ritual and rabbinic committees,
and currently as congregation
Gabbi and vice president." His
wife, Jean, is active in the cen-
ter's Sisterhood.
STAR OF DAVID Memorial
Chapel, 3201 N. 72 Ave.,
Hollywood, has dedicated
and consecrated its facilities.
Here, Rabbi Carl Klein of
Hallandale Jewish Center
(left) and Rabbi Morton
Malavsky of Temple Beth
Shalom, Hollywood, bless
the mezuzah at the chapel's
entrance. The new chapel is
the only one in South Florida
located at a Jewish ceme-
tery. U.S. Rep. Larry Smith
delivered the keynote ad-
dress to the 500 who attend-
ed.
-CERTIFIED MOHEI-
Your Baby Deserves.
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital,
^ill Travel (306) 673-5062|
CkadM%hUaThM f
Friday, Feb. 18-5:58 P.M. ?
Friday, Feb. 25-6:02iP.M. ?
T V IV ." T. f
*
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam,
Asher kid'shanu B mitz-vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
? Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God King of the Universe, i
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments T
jf Andcommanded^^kindl^theMmM^, ?
Temple Solel creates
Israel information group
Rabbi Robert Frazin and con-
cerned Temple Solel congregants
have formed an Israel Informa-
tion Committee which meets one
Thursday each month at noon in
the Solel library.
Its members clip news items
from the daily press as well as
editorials and articles of conflict-
ing opinion from monthly publi-
cations about Israel, and bring
them to the meetings for discus-
sion.
The committee reviews these
stories and puts together a
digest, which is mailed to each
congregant family.
The underlying need for the
formation of the Israel Informa-
tion Committee was generated by
the press reports about the
Israeli Army's attacks on PLO
strongholds in Lebanon.
"It is interesting to note,"
Rabbi Frazin commented, "that
the start up of Solel's Israel In-
formation Committee parallel.;-1
our Jewish Federation of South
Broward Israel Emergency Fund
drive, and I hope it will help the
1983 Campaign."
Committee members are Meral
Ehrenstein, Alvin Hess, Roz Mi-
chaels, Joyce Newman, Rodger
Popkin, JoAnn Schoenbaum and
Ricky Zucker.
/ r\
Religious directory
Orthodox
Congregation Levi Yitzchok Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley St.,
Hollywood; 923-1707. Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus. Daily services
7:55 a.m., 5:30 p.m.: Sabbath services, 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
morning, 9 o'clock; Sundays, 8:30 a.m. Religious school: Grades
1-8.
Young Israel of Hollywood 3291 Stirling Road; 966-7877.
Rabbi Edward Davis. Daily services, 7:30 a.m., sundown;
Sabbath services, one hour before sundown; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock; Sunday, 8 a.m.
Conservative,
Hallandale Jewish Center 416 NE 8th Ave.; 454-8100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily services, 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m.; Sabbath, 8
p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45 a.m.; Sabbath afternoon, 6 o'clock.
Temple Beth Shalom 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood; 981-
6111. Rabbi Morton Malavsky. Daily services, 7:46 a.m..
sundown; Sabbath evening, 8:15 o'clock; Sabbath morning, 9
o'clock. Religious school; Kindergarten8.
Temple In The Pines 9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood; 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter. Services Sunday, Monday and
Thursday, 8 a.m.; Sabbath, 8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:45
o'clock. Religious school: Nursery, Bar Mitzvah, Judaica High
School.
Temple Israel of Ma-amar 6920 SW 35th St.; 961-1700. Rabbi
Paul Plotkin. Daily services, 8:30 a.m.; Sabbath. 8 p-nv;
Sabbath morning, 8:45 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-
kindergarten 8.
Temple Sinai 1201 Johnson St., Hollywood: 920-1577. Rabbi
Richard J. Margolis. Daily services 8:25 a.m., 5 p.m.; Sabbath,
8 p.m.; Sabbath morning, 8:35 o'clock. Religious school: Pre*'
kindergarten-Judaica High School.
FJefoni)
Temple Beth El 1351 S. 14th Ave.. Hollywood; 920-8225.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe. Sabbath services, 8 p.m. Religious
school: Grades 140. V
Temple Beth Emet Pines Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road, Pembroke Pines: 431-3638. Rabbi Bennett Greenspon.
Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m. Religious school: Kindergar-
ten- 10.
Temple Solel 5100 Sheridan St., Hollywood: 989-0206. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin. Sabbath services, 8:15 p.m.; Sabbath mor-
ning, 10:30 o'clock. Religious school: Pre-school-12.
F)ecoi)slruclioi)ist
Ramat Shalom 11301 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation: 472-
3600 Rabbi Elliot SkideU- Sabbath aervicas. 8:15 p.m. Religious
0 .school; P^ldndargarte*{-8.. t


, February 18.1983
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 23
News Briefs
UJA COLLECTED OVER S367 MILLION
IN 1962
iEW YORK (JTA) The United Jewish Appeal collected a
ti total of $357.5 million in calendar year 1962 to help provide
sanitarian programs and services to the people of Israel and
around the world, according to UJA national cash
i Bernard Borine.
jrine stated that the 1982 cash collection total represents an
ease of $56.3 million or 18.7 percent over the $301.2
lion transmitted to UJA in 1961 by 638 campaigning com-
lities throughout the United States.
PRO-ARAB PROPAGANDA NETWORK
SPEARHEADING ANTI-ISRAEL CAMPAIGN
JEW YORK (JTA) A pro-Arab propaganda network of
than 30 organizations is engaged in a heavily financed
lpaign to change American public opinion and policy on the
East and curtail U.S. economic and military aid to
ael, the Anti- Defamation League of B'nai B'rith has
closed.
structures, backgrounds and activities of the
[ganizations are detailed in a 100-page "handbook" entitled
Jro-Arab Propaganda in America: Vehicles and Voices." The
^DL publication also identifies dozens of individuals some
isely linked to the Palestine Liberation Organization as
earheading the campaign which escalated sharply since the
li military action in Lebanon last summer.
'A TASTE OF TORAH' GOES NATIONWIDE
NEW YORK (JTA) "A Taste of Torah," the premier radio
ogram in the New York metropolitan area, announced its
ins for syndication across the United States and Canada.
According to Michael Rothschild, executive producer of the
Program, the aim of the show "is to enliven and educate Jewish
kudiences by offering them the opportunity to appreciate
Various aspects of Jewish life from the perspective of halacha
knd Torah Hashkafa in a format that avoids politics and
prejudices of all kinds."
JEWISH GROUPS URGED TO STAY AWAY
NEW YORK (JTA) The Workmen's Circle has rejected an
invitation from the Polish government to participate in the
ivernment-sponsored commemoration of the 40th anniversary
the Warsaw Ghetto uprising next April and has urged all
[>ther Jewish organizations to do the same.
Dr. Israel Kugler, president of the Jewish labor fraternal
Drder, cited among other things the Workmen's Circle's support
>f the Polish Solidarity movement, outlawed by the regime of
IWojciech Jaruzelski. He said the invitation was extended
through "a Polish government puppet front the Jewish
! Cultural Farband."
EL AL SUSPENDS SABBATH FLIGHTS
NEW YORK (JTA) As part of the new labor agreement
(that has enabled El Al to resume its worldwide operations, the
airline announced that it has suspended all flights on the
Sabbath and Jewish holidays worldwide.
El Al never had flights on the Sabbath between Israel and
North America. There were only some Sabbath flights between
Israel and Europe.
ITALY REFUSES TO TAKE TRIFA
WASHINGTON (JTA) A Justice Department official has
admitted that a second country has turned down a U.S. request
for permanent residence for Rumanian Orthodox Archbishop
\ alarum Tritaot Grass Lake, Mich.
Kathleen Coleman, the Justice Department attorney who
presented the government's case during Trifa's deportation
hearings in Detroit, said that Italy has joined Switzerland in
turning down the U.S. request to take in Trifa. Coleman said the
U.S. will continue its efforts to find a foreign home for him.
EVANGELICALS AND JEWS TALKS
Talks between Evangelicals and Jews have been taking place
in New York and other cities. After years of mutual alienation
and distrust, the Christians are offering support for Israel and
seeking a new relationship with Jewish groups. Jewish leaders
say there is a surge of support from a wide range of conservative
Chris tains, including fundamentalists. N. Y. Times
TRUDEAU WILL INTERVENE WITH ANDROPOV
ON BEHALF OF SHARANSKY
MONTREAL (JTA) Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
met in Ottawa with Avital Sharansky, wife of Prisoner of
Conscience Anatoly Sharansky, and promised her he will in-
tervene with Yuri Andropov, Soviet Communist Party leader,
for the release of her husband on humanitarian grounds.
Mrs. Sharansky later told a press conference that she was
going to Paris to meet with Georges Marchais, leader of the
French Communist Party, and give him her personal letter
addressed to Andropov, appealing for her husband's release
from Christopol prison where he has been on a hunger strike
since September 26.
Marchais, who is scheduled to meet Andropov in Moscow this
week, released a letter last weak from the Soviet Communist
leader stating that Sharansky had ended his hunger strike.
PUBLIC ACTION URGED
TO HELPFALASHAS
JERUSALEM (JTA) A Knesset member who recently
toured Falasha communities in Ethiopia has called for increased
public action on behalf of Falasha emigration from Ethiopia to
Israel.
Dror Zeigerman (Likud-Liberals), reporting on his visit to the
World Zionist Organization Executive here recently, called on
the WZO and the Jewish Agency to put the Falasha issue at the
forefront of their public endeavors because as ha said, "The mora
we talk about them (the Falaahas) the greater their chances of
being able to Uava for land."
SEMANTICS?
I DON'T
KNOW
FROM
SEMANTICS!
Lflh^ < ^fl
fl
fR L -X

1 ^^H AV

Stars shine for Technion

In a glittering crowd of over
1,000 guests Barbara Walters
(left) and Burt Lancaster (right)
were among the many celebrities
who attended a Los Angeles
dinner to salute actor Kirk
Douglas who received the Albert
Einstein Award highest honor
given by the American Society
for Technion Israel Institute
of Technology.
Part of the evening's program
was a screening of a short film
made by Mr. Douglas during a
recent visit to the Technion's
campus in Haifa, Israel.
During his acceptance speech,
Douglas recalled that his com-
mitment to Israel began in 1947
when he went to Israel to film
"The Juggler," the first U.S. film
to be made in the newlv-bom
State. He also told the audience
of going to Jerusalem's Wailing
Wall for the first time in the late
60's, writing his dream on a scrap
Cound elects Seigel
GENEVA (JTA) Leila
Seigel, the International Council
of Jewish Women's representa-
tive here, has been elected vice
chairperson of the Non-govern-
mental Organization (NGO) sub-
committee on the status of
women. The Council has consul-
tative status in the United Na-
tions Economic and Social Com-
mittee. Ma. Seigel was previously
the Engliah secretary and
convener of the working group on
women and employment in the
' lOamsatttee.
of paper, and wedging it into a
crevice. The dream, he said later,
contained two words: "Israel
Forever.
Aims sales
to dictators
frowned on
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
public opinion poll published by
the Jerusalem Post shows strong
bipartisan opposition to Israeli
arms sales to countries governed
by dictatorships.
The poll shows that 35.2
percent of the respondents are
against selling arms to "racist
and dictatorial regimes." The
breakdown by party of persons
holding that view was 36.4
percent pro-Labor and 34 percent
pro-Likud.
Respondents who favored arms
sales only to democratic regimes
amounted to 27.9 percent of
whom 32 percent were pro-Labor
and 26 percent pro-Likud. A total
of 9.4 percent was undecided.
Among them 8.4 percent were
pro-Labor and 7.2 percent pro-
Likud.
Asked if Israel should take into
account the kind of regime it sold
arms to, 27.5 percent of the
respondents said Israel should
sell to any country, irrespective
of the kind of government it had.
In that category, 32.8 percent
were pro-Likud and 23.2 percent
pro-Labor.
Questioned specifically about
arms sales to Argentina, 53.8
percent responded positively.
29.1 percent were opposed and
17.1 percent were undecided.
That sampling was not told
before they answered the
question that Argentina is ruled
by a military dictatorship.
For Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The late Arthur Rubinstein left
half a million dollars in his will
for the beautification of Jerusa-
lem, the Jerusalem Post reported.
Rubinstein, who died Dec. 20
at the age of 95, left the bequest
to the Jerusalem Foundation, the
fundr.-iising-for-.Jerusalem orga-
nization which is closely associ-
ated with Mayor Teddy Kollek
We Hope
' You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
76^0 No'theast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
Working Together
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
. careful attendance to the family's
wishes dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidance
when the hour of need arises
in Florida
Bix.ni>ir Bin/ mi 2 10S 94S-W1Q
2*>S W Hmh WS 427-47(X>
SQIS Par* Dmr St US. 441, Margate. FL WMtl
WS 427-4700
6800 W OtiMnnd Port; Bhrf.
Fl LumlrnMr iSMirKd. FL 11W
*)S 742-hOOO
Palm beach K)S'8}?-0887
GMTCHMANOEl
HAMTMMtMH.Lt*
MfRSHEV
J061 A AOWf


Pa*e24

The Jewish Ptoridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. WfcruAy 18,19^
...1
TAKE THE TRIP YOU
WERE BORN TO TAKE
Maybe your family came from Cracow Or Casablanca.
Or Cologne. It makes no difference. "Next year in Jerusalem,"
is the promise at the end of every Seder. So why not
bring your family to Israel this year, and fulfill a destiny
40 centuries old.
Come, know the joy of visiting a whole, new, exotic
country; that's still somehow your own. Visit King Davids
tomb, travel the land of your forefathers. Or look up some
cousins you've never met.
As for relaxation, Israel is surely the Promised Land
come true. A place of gardens and greenery Beach resorts.
Water sports. Spas. International cuisine. Modern, luxury
hotels. And so many low-cost packages to get you there.
Visit Israel this year. It's our 35th anniversary You'll see
why; it's so much more than a great vacation. It's where the
warmth of belonging begins.
COME TO ISRAEL
The miracle on the Mediterranean^'
\umi muck hem inarm* Uan rmm poolr think R in**ma>*i .i kw-oaC pariugn. a pur trprl j*- hnrl (iowrnmrni Turw Off*. 4151S* Fierwiy Hiuam. Teat 77027


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E9JK3WT81_7PTZCU INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T21:33:11Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00317
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES