The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00309

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text


eJewislb Flox*idLaxi
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
I Volume 12- Number 22
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 29, 1982^
frMShochti
Price 35 Cents
IN RABAT, MOROCCO South Broward's Lester Grossman becomes the first American to be
honored with aliyah at the bimah.
ephardic roots
Mission-goers tell
fascinating story
By STEVE KA TON
The dying Sephardic roots of the Jews
left in Madrid, Toledo, Granada, Malaga
nd Torremolinos are evidenced in the lack
Df congregants still practicing the religion
of Abraham and Jacob and the numbers
! still dwindling.
Twenty years ago in Morocco, 300,000 were proud
I to call themselves Jews, says Joseph Terkiel, recent-
ly returned leader of the 33 participants in the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward's Mission to Spain
land Morocco.
Today, Margarita Terkiel adds, there are only
Il8,000 Jews in the whole country. In Spain's Toledo.
[the South Broward Jews found Judaism alive in one
person, a Moroccan who returned to Spain to run a
Jewish restaurant called Sinai.
But the antiquity, temples and rich Sephardic his-
tory lifted the pall the visitors found.
Says mission participant Anna Grossman:
"It was the most exhilarating and informative trip
I've been on."
Evelyn Goldstein of HUlcrest says that "although
we were all saddened' by the fact that there's no
future for Judaism there, the countries provided the
most thrilling Sephardic culture to study."
One aspect of the mission, which preceded "The
Continued on Page 5-A
or country of the Jews.
>e gives feet, no regrets
By JOAN SILBERSTEIN
UJA Correspondent
HAIFA It is 10 o'clock at
Pjght when I meet Peter Bech.
Thin. Sun-tanned. Gloriously
hsalthy looking.
Except that he is lying in a bed
) a room in Rambam Hospital.
He is one of 1,000 young Israeli
Millers, together with Lebanese
civilians and even Syrian and
PI-0 prisoners, who were treated
pt Rambam in the first 30 days of
Operation Peace for Galilee
the mission to free northern
Israel from 14 years of PLO
katuysha attacks, ambushes and
physical and psychological
terrorism.
Peter Bech, a paratrooper did
not parachute into southern
Lebanon. He entered by land, in a
convoy of Zeldas, armored
personnel carriers.
"Outside of Sidon," he says,
"we went through a village. Not
so little. Quite a large place, very
long and narrow. It was a pretty
place. The people came out to
welcome us. They threw rice, for
good luck. My friends and I, we
were standing up in the back of
our Zelda. out in the open from
the waist up.
"We were moving slowly and
sometimes had to stop for a
moment. We could see their faces
and they were talking to us, but
we couldn't understand them. We
could see their eyes, though, we
made some kind of contact with
Continued on Page 5-A
'THE GATHERING' Arm and arm, hand and hand, the Jewish
communities of South Broward and Hod Hasharon wind their way
through the streets of Jerusalem, eventually to mass at the
Western Wall with team, of other Project Renewal cities and their
American counterparts.

t
-

__. .
-j -- "~- -
1 ~ ___
IN TOLEDO Founded before The Inquisition in Spain, this
synagogue is now a museum. Joseph and Margarita Terkiel,
leaders of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's Sub-Mission
to Spain and Morocco, report there is no Jewish community left in
Toledo.
Shopping for Israeli art?


arj
Attia admire. Y.'acov Heller's 'Death of Sam peon'
You needn't go further
than two county malls
By STEVE KATON
There are two business., in Hollywood and
Hallandale that are doing something good for the
economy of the State of Israel, doing something
good for the Jewish consumer in South Broward
and, of course, benefiting the owners, Eli. and Nelly
Attia of Hollywood.
The businesses also are doing something good for
the artisans of Israel names like Ya'acov Heller,
Agan, Sandu Liberman, Tikvah, Bar Zion. Aviv,
Gabriel and Shuller.
The Attias, who spend half their time in South
Broward and the other half in Israel, where they also
Continued on Page 6-A
yoay
features Anderso
.. See Page 2-A
:


Page 2-A
771* Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hotly wood
Community Calendar
OCtOBGR
30. SatuRday
31, Sunday
novemBeR
'Vegas Nite,' Men's Club of
Temple Israel-Miramar,
8 p.m. at the temple; call 961-1700
or 431-1294.
Political Debate: Larry Smith vs.
Maurice Berkowitz, Men's Club of
Temple Beth Shalom, breakfast
9:30 a.m. at the temple.
1. mon&ay Hillcrest Hadassah Meeting, noon at Playdium; call 966-2024.
2. tues&ay Election Day. Polls open 7 a.m.-7 p.m..
6, S&tuRday Country Western Nite, Sisterhood of Temple Solel, at the temple, 7:30 p.m.; call 989-0205.
'Shul-ln,' Temple Solel Junior Youth Group, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the temple.
7, Sunday 'Sun & Fun' City of Hollywood, at Young's Circle.
10. We&nescuy CRC Meeting, Goldie Goldstein, Holocaust Memorial Center, guest speaker, noon at the Federation.
< 'Social Aspects of Being a Parent,' JCC Singles Workshop, 8 p.m. at the JCC.
U,thuRsOay Jewish Book Month; JCC speaker Bryna BarOni. author of 'The Vapor' 8 p.m. at the JCC.
Your Community Calendar welcomes news of your
Jewish oriented organization. All meetings, times and
their locations, should be directed to Steve Katon.
associate editor, at the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd. Calendar information
must be received at least two weeks before-publication
date. __________________________________________
Vou can /earn tns. outs
of give and take Nov. 4
Whether you've solicited con-
tributions for the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward for years,
or have never asked for a contri-
bution in your life, Stephan
Schiffman can help you. Cam-
paign Chairman Saul Singer
believes.
Schiffman, former director of
Training and Special Appeals for
the United Jewish Appeal, will
offer his expertise on honing your
skills Thursday. Nov. 4, at the
Federation.
Dr. Singer says Schiffman is
recognized as a innovator in us-
ing videotape as a teaching tool
and employs a pragmatic ap-
proach to reaching campaigners
on a people-to-people basis.
Schiffman is the originator of
Operation Upgrade, a UJA pro-
gram designed to increase com-
munity campaigns.
Three sessions are planned at
the Federation:
10 a.m. noon for
Hollywood and Hallandale resi-
dents living in high-rises.
RELGO.INC.
Religious & Gill Articles
Israeli Arts 4 Craft;,
Hebrew BooksJudaica
Paper Sacks
Records 4 Tapes
Oo*n Su/idj*
1507 Washington Avenue. M.B.
"fctt-W 11 ^^^~"
Stephan Schiffman
3-5 p.m. for trainees living in
Hollybrook. Park Place and
Hillcrest.
7-9 p.m. for all other Metro-
politan Division campaign
workers and for the professional
staff of the Federation.
If you would like more infor-
mation on the Solicitor's Train-
ing Session or would like to re-
serve a chair, call the Federation
at 921-8810.
Survivor, liberator
set for Kristalnacht
One man who lived through the
tortures of 11 concentration
camps in Germany and another
man who discovered the remains
of hundreds at Herloch Concent-
ration Camp the day after World
War II ended will recall the
horrors of the Holocaust Nov. 17
at Kristalnacht.
The featured speakers are Paul
Orlan. who became an orphan at
age 15 because the Nazis killed
off his family, and Dr. R.A.
Miller, who was with the 12th
Army division in 1945 near
Landsburg, Germany. when
Herloch was discovered.
The Kristalnacht Memorial on
Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 7:30
will be at Temple Beth El in
Hollywood. It will be co-sponsor-
ed by the Southeast Holocaust
Memorial Center and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Orlan. chairman of the Holo-
caust Commission of the Com-
munity Relations Commission of
the Federation, was liberated
from Allach near Dachau. He was
hospitalized for the next year and
a half.
He emigrated to the United
States in 1947 and moved to
Canada 10 years later where he
became active in the Association
for Nazi Oppression. The group
was instrumental in the passage
Dr. R.A. Miller
of law to fight hate proproganda.
Five years ago the Orlans
moved to South Florida. Orlan
runs a construction business in
Palm Beach County.
The liberator. Dr. Miller,
joined the Army in 1942, serving
39 months. He was with Pat ton's
7th Division in Germany before
being transferred to the 12th Di-
vision, which discovered Herloch
concentration camp.
Paul Orlan
Dr. Miller is pastor of theS.W
Community Church in South
Miami, which he founded along
with the Kings Christian School
He had taught at Florida Bible
College in Hollywood for three
years before beginning his own
church.
His background also included
toiling as a farmer before doing
mission work in Cuba and
Ecuador for 10 years.
Kristalnacht remembers Nov
10. 1938. the night of a rampage
in Germany when synagogues
and Jewish homes and businesses
were destroyed. It means "The
Night of Crystal (Broken
Glass)."
Sn^FENSCHE^-Jn th Mb'"*' S"*h tradition wherein the citron, palm branch and myrtle ud
sSLi T.T g' '^ UTd T? iH a" dirertin- 'E-rog benschen' is performed. Sukkoth and
l^^tlZ ^Tr'^"^ ^f^ thM year at ,0 ^^ Broward nursing homes, hospitals and at th.
(left.' -TrS S Rabb'Harold R'chter director of Chaplaincy. Jewish Federation of South Broward.'
^V,"':,n SSH oT1f.r^"dent8 David Hannon and A,b*rt Sherr (right). A new Sukkoth prayer
ofThe Ch.PUn!ytcTm^iSee.b, ""^ "" "^ "" "* ""*" ^^'^ 5 Samud Me,ine' **
Anderson
due here
Dec. 9
America's foremost
muckraking journalist. Jack
Anderson, will be keynote
speaker Dec. 9 at Community
Day. The Pulitzer Priie-
winning columnist, who,
according to the Wall Street
Journal, 'has broken more big
stories than just about anyone
else in Washington,' will
address the afternoon session
of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Women's
Division event at the
Diplomat.
-CERTIFIED MOHELi
Your Baby Deserves
The Best!!
RABBI Y. SELMAR
Staff Mohel
Mt. Sinai Hospital.
Will Travel (305) 673-5062|
Rivirsid.. Mcmuri.ilChapel.inc. Funcr.il Directors
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Sponsoring Itu-Gunrrli.in Plan Pre A" mi .It uncrjl
Tradition*
lt% what makes usJewssj


Friday, October 29, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Grenter Hollywood
Page 3-A
Saltzman, Barron chair Dec. 9 event
Kalb to address Big Gifts
Internationally acclaimed
newsman Bernard Kalb will be
keynote speaker Dec. 18 at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Big Gifts event.
In making the announcement,
1983 Campaign Chairman Saul
Singer also appointed two chair-
men for the event which this year
will be at the home of Morris and
Annette Deakte.
Sharing the responsibility and
organization of Big Gifts are
Marge Saltzman and Dr. Howard
Barron. Only those pledging a
minimum of $10,000 qualify as
Big Gifts donors.
Kalb, NBC News' State
Department correspondent, has
been a professional newsman 36
years, starting with The N.Y.
Times as a reporter. In 1956, he
Saltzman
Barron
was based in Indonesia, covering
Southeast Asia.
He returned to the United
States in 1961 after winning a
fellowship from the Council on
Foreign Relations. A year later
he joined CBS in New York, and
later was named Southeast Asia
bureau chief.
CAMPAIGN
^) CUPS 85
Kalb, whose brother, Marvin,
is NBC diplomatic correspon-
dent, has reported in various
capacities from Paris, Hong
Kong, China and Vietnam. For
two years he was Washington
anchor for CBS' "Morning
News."
The Kalb brothers, in 1974,
wrote the biography "Kissinger."
Bernard Kalb also has written on
various subjects for The N.Y.
Times Magazine, Saturday
Review, McCall's and other
JCC names exec.
Tampa's Ed Finkelstein is the
new executive director of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward, President
Ronald J. Rothschild announces.
Finkelstein, who for five years
was director of the Tampa JCC,
9ees his initial role as fourfold in
South Broward. First, he plans to
review and evaluate with the JCC
officers, board and staff all cur-
rent programs.
Second, he would like to great-
ly expand community Outreach
programs, which "leads to the
third goal of polishing the image
of the JCC," the new director
says.
"Jews and non-Jews alike
must get to know and use our
programs ..." early childhood
supervision, after-school classes,
sports programs, Camp Kadima,
singles functions, adult work-
shops and classes and the multi-
faceted senior citizen events.
The fourth immediate goal is a
new building for the JCC, "one
that allows some room and
cohesion so that the other three
goals can be accomplished,"
Finkelstein says.
The new director spent seven
years at the Tampa JCC. Before
that he had been regional direc-
tor, BBYO. Cotton States.
He has his bachelor's degree
from Parson's College, Fairfield,
Iowa, and his master's in
guidance and counseling from the
University of Iowa.
After graduation, he taught
English and coached track for
one year in Eldon, Iowa. He
'Galilee' toll
368 killed
TEL AVIV Israel
suffered 368 men dead and 2,383
wounded in the war in Lebanon,
an army spokesman announced.
The official figures cover the
period from last June 6 when Is-
rael launched its "Peace for Gali-
lee" operation until Oct. 10.
In addition, eight Israeli sol-
diers are prisoners of the Pales-
tinians, three are prisoners of war
m Syria and five are "hated as
missing.
According to the spokesman,
the number of dead* include 10
soldiers killed in non-combat
incidents such as traffic accidents
nd training mishaps. The high-
est ranking officer to fall in action
>s a major general.
The others who died in action
ty rank, include one colonel; two
lieutenant colonels; 19 majors, 28
captains; 46 lieutenants; 132 ser-
vants; 90 corporals; and 49 pri-
vates.
Among the wounded, 106 were
seriously injured and 425 sus-
tained moderate wounds.
spent two years in the Army, 13
months of which as a chaplain's
assistant and acting rabbi in
Vietnam. After his discharge, he
became guidance director of the
Roscoe (N.Y.) School System.
He and his wife, June, have
two sons, Steven, 10, and Evan,
7.
Finkelstein says that with his
appointment he is opening the
doors of the JCC to the entire
community. "Here's your chance
to get involved not only in
what we are trying to do, but
what we can do in the future.
"Drop by, say hello Ill
come to your temple or group
organization, if you prefer."
Ed Finkelstein
periodicals.
The newsman also is an avid
collector of Oriental porcelain. He
is married and the father of four
daughters, the first born in Indo-
nesia, the second in New York
City and the last two in Hong
Kong. A native New Yorker,
Kalb is a graduate of the City
College of New York.
Chairmen Saltzman and
Barron are no strangers to the
Big Gifts event, having teamed
up last year as leaders of the
prestigious level of giving.
Mrs. Saltzman has been very
active in South Broward Jewish
activities since moving from the
New York-New Jersey area six
years. She has served three years
as a board member for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Women's Division and is on the
board of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital and the Hillel
School: is an nriirinator of the
Women's Shomrai Division (its
chairman in 1977); and has
served as Shomrai chairman in
1979.
With her husband, Jack, the
Saltzmans are members of Tem-
ple Sold in Hollywood, work for
Israel Bonds and for "Friends for
Life," University of Miami.
In addition, Mrs. Saltzman is a
founder of the Starting Place, a
drug rehabilitation center in
Hollywood.
Dr. Barron and his wife,
Judith, also have worked long
hours for the Jewish community
of South Broward. They are
members of Temple Beth Shalom
in Hollywood. Dr. Barron recent-
ly returned from leading the
South Broward contingent to
Bernard Kalb
"The Gathering" in Israel.
For the Federation, Dr. Barron
has served multi-terms as Phy-
sicians Division leader, and as
Young Leadership and Shomrai
chairman. He has been a director
of the Federation for four years,
and in 1979 received the Hy and
Belle Schlafer Award.
In addition to "The
Gathering," he is a frequent
Community Mission participant
and two years ago chaired the
President's Mission.


Page 4-A

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 29
1982
Jewish Floridian j^e fwo faces of Jimmy Carter
ami Shola. a. Greater Moli.ood C fn m mm^ Wee-W ^
end Sholar o> Gteeler HoU.wood C f'Mb1
FHEDSMOCMET STEVE RATON SUZANNE SMOChET
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor .ii* Editor
Published 8r Weekly Second Class Postage paid at Hanandaic Fia USPS864SO0
HOLLYWOOD-FORT LAUDERDALE OFFICE. Am Savings 2S00Bi.!ii 0P fc Maiiandale Beach
Blvd Suite 'O'G. Maiiandale Fia 33009 Phon.- tsa itv
Abraham B Haleern Adtrerlising Super MainOMice Plant 120 NE 6th St Miami Fia 33132 Pnone t JAMMes
Postmaster Form K7* returns to Jewish FkHidian P O Bo. 01 273 Miami Fia 33101
Jewiah Federation ol South Browaro Otticers President Ben Sailer. Vice Ptesidems Philip A
Levin M D Saul Singe* M D and Nat Sedjey. Treasurer. Theodore Newman. Secretary. Otlo
Slieoer. Executive Director Summer G Kaye Submrt material lor publication lo Leslie Silas
Public Relations Director.
Maan JTA, Seven Arts. WNS. NEA. AJPA. and FPA
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 SO Annual 12 Year Minimum s r> or by membership Jewish
Federation ol South Broward. aTtt Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fia 33020 Pnone 21 M10
Out or Teem Upon Request
Friday, October 29, 1982 12 HESHVAN 5743
Volume 12 Number ?2
Shultz muffs opportunity
Secretary of State George Shultz, in an address
before the 37th UN General Assembly on Sept. 30,
declared: "1 believe that the greatest advance in
human history was not the wheel, the use of elec-
tricity, or the internal combustion engine.
Indispensable to progress as these have been, our
most remarkable achievement was the slow, clumsy
but triumphant creation of language. It is words that
released our ancestors from the prison of the solitary.
Words gave us the means to transmit to our children
and the future the crowriing jewel of human
existence: knowledge."
Bravo.
Speaking further on in his address about the war
in Lebanon, Shultz declared: 'Today in Beirut, the
U.S. Marines together with our allies in Italy and
France are helping the Lebanese Government and
Armed Forces assure the safety of the peoples of that
tormented capital. Our Marines represent an ex-
tension of American power, not for war but to secure
the peace They are there to speed the moment
when all foreign forces depart from Lebanon."
Bull.
In using words, "the crowning jewel of human
existence," Shultz dissembled. By editing ex-
perience, he was making history tell lies. For how did
the United States come to Beirut? How did France
and Italy come to Beirut?
They came to Beirut because of the remarkable
achievement of Israel in Lebanon a fact which
Shultz refused to recognize and reward before the
General Assembly. Which, indeed, Lebanon's new
President, Amin Gemayel, refused to recognize and
reward on Monday before the very same body, when
like Shultz he called for the withdrawal of all forces
there, ignoring that Israel had also come to Lebanon
"not for war but to secure the peace."
The tragedy of the Shultz address on Sept. 30 is a
mirror image of this same tragedy since the
beginning of the Israeli operation in Lebanon as
reported in the equally dissembling media
newspapers and television which are also
presumably committed to knowledge as "the
crowning jewel of human existence," which also
trumpet the "triumphant creation of language." But
which in Lebanon distorted and recreated history by
doing violence to knowledge, language and words at
will.
For this reason, as seen in the media, Israel has
become the culprit rather than the victim lashing
back at tormentors. Israel has become the oppressor
rather than the liberator.
Is there any wonder that the Arabs in Nairobi
row seek to deligitimize Israel's facticity by plotting
to refuse its credentials as a member of the United
Nations General Assembly? Who gave the Arabs
the courage to do this in the first place?
It is the lying media. It is the NATO nations in
their churlish cowardice. Above all, it was George
Shultz in his address on Sept. 30.
This week Shultz found it necessary to pledge
America's withdrawal from the General Assembly
and from its membership in the International
Telecommunications Committee, a UN agency, if the
Arabs prevail in Nairobi. We could care less about
the media. We have as little regard and concern for
NATO.
But what about the U.S.? How would this drastic
plan as set forth by the State Department and
Secretary of State Shultz sit with the American
people, who have now been told that Israel is a pariah
nation? Who. have been told, not that without Israel,
Lebanon would still be hostage to the PLO and to
Syria, but that the shambles of Lebanon today is Is-
rael's fault.
Confusing, isn't it? And how needlessly violent
to the best interests of Israel, and therefore to
America itself. How unnecessarily violent, if only the
truth had been told about Israel all along!
I FREELY confess and make
public penance for having voted
for Jimmy Carter's candidacy in
1976. The alternative, I thought
then, would have been unbeara-
ble to contemplate.
In the greater calm of a retro-
spective view, I no longer believe
that Gerald Ford could have been
worse. And, in some self-punish-
ing moments, I even get the
sense he may well have been bet-
ter.
THE REASON lies in Carter's
emotional set. His acerbic reli-
gious beliefs are the way of his
life. He will not recognize that
American practice separates the
two not to the prescribed
detriment of the American
quality of being, but to its better-
ment.
It is not that, as a nation, we
operate on the basis that the
separation of church and state
means a bill of divorcement be-
tween morality and the reality of
daily experience, although one is
often tempted to conclude, by sad
observation, that this is so in the
American social condition.
Rather, it is that the Founding
Fathers never forgot the history
of Europe, with its endless cruel-
ties in the name of God, where
the church ruled as an equal part-
ner at the side of the kings and
exacted its pound of flesh when-
ever it could, including for
political reasons from the kings
themselves, let alone for religious
reasons from all those who did
not see God its way. The Found-
ing Fathers were clearly deter-
mined that this should not occur
in America.
IT IS precisely here that
Jimmy Carter's profoundest flaw
lies. He is of an emotional mind
that God must be invoked in all
of our thoughts and deeds both
with respect to ourselves and to
others and even if others do
not themselves believe this, or
possibly in God Himself, for
that matter.
And, typical of the zealot,
Carter thereupon adopts as his
own the right to punish those
who do not see these things the
way he sees them and es-
pecially those who do not believe
in his right to punish them or in
his personal deity either.
I am brought to this public
confession of mine and to these
reminiscences as a consequence
of the current publication of ex-
cerpts from Carter's new book,
"Keeping the Faith." In these
excerpts, you can see his pro-
phetic soul at work and hit pro-
phetic whip in hand.
Carter experienced profound
change in his four years in office.
This is true of other men who ex-
ceeded their original talents and
rose to the awesome respon-
sibility of the presidency. Harry
Truman was an example of just
such a man. Gerald Ford would
hardly have been another Tru-
man, but he might have been bet-
ter than Carter.
FOR CARTER'S change in of-
fice was not for the better. He en-
tered the presidency a more
human man than he left it. No
less zealous in his religious belief,
he was in the beginning never-
theless imbued with a native in-
telligence marked by the saving
grace of the political pragmat ist
When, for example, the Bert
Lance fiasco came thundering
down around him, Carter could
rise to the occasion of defending a
friend even in adverse (immoral)
circumstances at the same time
that, with no preachment, he
could accept the Lance betrayal
of him and. later, the Lance
resignation.
The embarrassment of his
brother, Billy, and the earthiness
of his mother, Miz Lilian, at least
publicly showed him to be al-
most, if not quite entirely, im-
perturbable.
BUT THE presidency did not
elevate Carter as it did Truman
and sven, to some extent. John
o
Miudliu
l
I
::-xv:.:.::.x:.::-:
Kennedy. The main issues of his
office, the Iranian hostage crisis
and the Camp David accord, on
the contrary increasingly
brought to the fore the religious
fundamentalism that he had kept
in the background more success-
fully earlier on. And that made
his decisions and actions all the
more questionable.
In "Keeping the Faith," writ-
ing of the hostages, he recalls: "I
was discouraged and almost ex-
hausted. Many agonizing hours
without sleep had removed any
bright visions of the future or
vivid memories of the past."
These are not the thoughts of a
politician tested in the crucible of
the history he was making. They
are the thoughts of a high school
valedictorian instead.
The crumpled helicopters on
the sands of the Iranian desert he
had sent to pluck the hostages
from their bondage in Teheran
showed Carter, he knew in the
end, to be a prophet without the
divine afflatus he was so sure had
possessed him: "America's
diplomatic, military and
economic forces were marshalled,
ready to respond to my com-
mand."
BUT THEN, on the last day of
his presidency: "I knew that in
large measure the reputation and
influence of our country were
hanging in the balance and I
cannot deny that I was eager to
resolve this crisis while I was still
president (sic) in order to justify
the decisions I had made during
the preceding months."
That last day, the hostages
still bound by the Khomeini
zealots, was Carter's own Cal-
vary: "I am still haunted by
memories of that day ... I took
full responsibility for the mission
(the aborted rescue attempt) ...
I reminded the world of the con-
tinuing Iranian crime ."
It was almost as if Carter's in-
ability to punish the Iranian of-
fenders was at least as pivotal to
his agony as the failure itself.
OF CAMP David, we do not
need his 'Keeping the Faith" to
know how Carter felt. Prime
Minister Begin, who uncon-
ditionally gave the Sinai Penin-
sula back to Egypt, is "intransi-
gent" and "difficult." Sadat, on
the other hand, struggled "to
find the peace for which he had
now given his life."
Sadat, in Carter's view, had in-
herited "the mantle of authority
from the great pharaohs" and
was a "man of destiny" and
"deeply religious." This was all
Continued on Page 14-A
Letters of Note
Reader writes back
EDITOR, The Jewish Fl.Tidian:
This is in answer to Esther
Slomovic's letter which appeared
Oct. 1.
I wonder if, in fact, you are a
Jewess. You sound more like a
Russian Communist.
Where was your voice when the
Israeli armed forces asked the
Lebanese civilians to leave the
PLO stronghold, and when these
poor people tried to leave the
PLO killed they by the
thousands? No one even made a
murmur.
Israel is the scapegoat in this
entire incident. If you read "Is-
rael and the Media' on page 18 of
the Oct. 1 Jewish Floridian, you
would find that the media is
threatened and their correspon-
dents physically intimidated by
the Arabs, particularly by the
Syrians and the PLO
That is the principal reason
why the media has been putting
Israel and Prime Minister Mena
chem Begin in such a bad light.
According to your article, you are
making saints out of the PLO
who are terrorists of the first or-
der.
Menachem Begin is the best
thing that happened to Israel.
Because Israel is a democracy,
the Labor Party acted very un-
wisely in demonstrating agains
tthe Likud and Begin. Our media
blew it out of proportion.
This could not have been done
in any Arab country because they
censor everything. What gives
you the right to talk for Jews. I'll
bet you don't even pay taxes, so
why are you so worried about
money going to Israel. Israel is
not your Motherland. I hope no
one judges us Jews by your stan-
dards.
I returned from Israel a month
ago and the Israelis are very
proud of their prime minister, ft
is only people like you and the
Labor Party that want him de-
feated.
ANNEGANS
Dania


Friday. October 29.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shqfar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5-A
Sharon: Lebanon shan't be in vain
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon is
calling on world Jewry to support
Israel in its insistence on mean-
ingful security arrangements in
south Lebanon.
Sharon made his call in an ad-
dress to 1.000 United Jewish
Appeal leaders from the United
States attending "The Gather-
ing" in Israel.
Sharon met with the group at
the West Bank settlement of
Elkana. "The Gathering" was led
by UJA National Chairman
Robert Loup and President Her-
schel Blumberg.
Sharon told the UJA leaders
that if Israel "does not stand firm
now ... we may reach the same
situation that we had before the
war" in Lebanon. "Nobody
wants to move the Israeli troops
out of Lebanon more than we do
ourselves." he assured the visi-
tors who responded with warm
applause.
"But it would be a major mis-
take if after so many sacrifices
and so many casualties we were
to move back without solving the
problem of the threat of terrorism
(returning to) Lebanon."
Standing on a hilltop in
Elkana, from which the Gush
Emunim settlers and visitors
have a wide view of the entire
coastal plain a spot where
Sharon frequently brings visitors
to explain his security views,
even though no UJA funds are
spent on the West Bank the
defense minister blamed the free
world for compromising with ter-
Rabbi Plotkin to be feted
Rabbi Paul Plotkin of Temple
Israel-Miramar will be honored
Nov. 18 by the temple's Israel
Bond Committee at its "Night
for Israel" beginning at 8 o'clock.
Rabbi Plotkin will be presented
with the State of Israel Scroll of
Honor, according to Arnold
Finer, chairman of the Bond
committee, for the rabbi's dedi-
cation to the enrichment of Jew-
ish lives and the perpetuation of
the Jewish culture.
Rabbi Plotkin came to Temple
Israel four years ago from Van-
couver. British Columbia. During
Peter's story
Continued from Page 1-A
them. They would smile. We
would smile. We gave chocolates
to the children.
"Ten meters after we passed
through the end of that village,
out on a dirt road, we were
ambushed by terrorists. We got
hit by RPGS, portable anti-tank
rockets. Our Zelda caught fire. I
was hit and I dived out of it, the
way you'd dive off a board into a
swimming pool. I couldn't walk
or run, so I just rolled away, as
far as I could, about 10-15
meters.
"It happened so fast. Every
man tried to save himself. There
was a lot of shooting and smoke
and the Zeldas started to ex-
plode.
"I found myself alone in a field.
a dry field with an orchard on one
"ide. Both my hands were hit.
There were bullet holes. My
!>ones were sticking out. I got hit
n the shoulder, too. There was a
"" lot of blood. An RPG is meant to
destroy a tank, so think what it
does to a man. I had my gun on
me. but I couldn't move my
hands to get it.
They're going to find me and
kill me. I thought, and I tried to
pull out a grenade, but I couldn't
use my hands. I was just lying
there. I saw half of one foot was
gone. It was 2 o'clock on a sunny
afternoon and I was scared I
, would die.
"It was a cold scene. Very cold
and strange. After maybe 20
minutes, my friend Shimshom
crawled out under fire and came
to me. They got me, I told him.
They got me really hard. I can see
it. he said.' I '11 get help.'
"After a while, four guys came
with a stretcher and carried me
out. They took me and some
others back to the edge of that
village we'd just come through.
At least we weren't out in the
open there and that's where I got
my first medical treatment. Then
*yy drove us to some spot where
a helicopter could land and the
helicopter came and brought us
here to Rambam Hospital."
I don't know what to say or do
when Peter stops talking. He's
not crying, but I am. I fiddle with
my tape recorder to hide my face
from him. Offer him a cigarette,
I'ght it for him and one for me.
we smoke in silence for a
his four years. Temple Israel has
grown from a congregation of 200
families to one of 350 families.
Daily Minyan has been insti-
tuted; attendance at Sabbath
services has more than doubled,
and "innovative programs have
been introduced and are now part
of the tradition of the temple,"
Finer said.
Rabbi Plotkin also produces
and hosts the weekly television
show "The Temple Israel Hour."
The three-year-old show is seen
on Storer Cable and Hollywood
Cablevision.
moment. I keep seeing Peter
Bech's five good toes on a dirt
road somewhere, without the rest
of him.
"You don't seem to be angry,"
I finally say. "Why aren't you
angry?"
Incredibly, Peter smiles.
"I was one of the lucky ones.
Very, very lucky. Just in our
Zelda. of the eight of us, seven
were wounded. One was killed.
I'm not religious. But I believe
that for a Jew, Israel is the only
place.
"When I came here from
Vienna. I went to kibbutz.' I
worked with the animals, helping
the veterinarian. I worked on the
land. That's how I learned what
it is to be an Israeli, to feel what
life is all about here, to become
part of it.
"I'm not angry at Israel or at
anybody because I'm not 100
percent anymore. It's part of the
price we have to pay. No one lives
here without going through the
bad times, the hard times... "
What makes it worth it to
Peter all he went through, all
he still has in front of him... ?
He searches for the right
words. Then:
"It's a question of standards,"
he says. If you're bom here, or if
you come to live here as I did,
then you have to give as much as
you can to make it better here.
Stronger. Even if you're a
student and you come for the
summer, if you work in the fields,
in the orange groves, you give
something. And Israel gives to
you.
"Everyone changes here, in a
good way I think. It's a simple,
hard but very beautiful way of
life. And young guys like me,
who give our feet, the guy in the
bed behind you, who is blind now
because he gave his eyes... we're
Jewish. That's what we have to
give to have a country of the
Jews."
Peter Bech stops talking.
It is nearly midnight. He is
tired.
But he has transferred
something to me.
Strengthened me.
He is a force for life.
Jewish life.
rorism instead of fighting terror-
ism.
Sharon declared that Israel
was determined that no "terrorist
bases, headquarters, units"
operate against her out of Leba-
non ever again. He said if the
United States was really inter-
ested in peace in Lebanon, it
could ensure that the Beirut gov-
ernment signed a formal peace
treaty with Israel "or at least
start a peace process."
Many in the audience ap-
plauded him and pressed him for
autographs.
The UJA gathering began
Monday evening at Modi 'in, the
ancient birthplace of the Macca-
bees. The group proceeded
directly there after arriving at
Ben Gurion Airport to meet with
President Yitzhak Navon.
The president dwelt on the
Rome terror attack, recalling
Italy's many past kindnesses to
its Jewish community. He noted
that Jews were not persecuted
under Mussolini's fascist regime,
and that Italians were coopera-
tive after the war with Jewish
"illegal" immigration efforts to
Palestine.
He called on Jews abroad to
Mission fascinating
Continued from Page 1-A
Gathering" in Israel, which kept recurring in com-
ments from the participants was the warmth and
friendships that were established or cemented
among the Jews of South Broward.
Mission-goers found the Jews of Spain and
Morocco to be open, honest and sincere. In
Nahariya, Israel, the Goldsteins received a "royal
welcome" from a couple extending their home as
part of the home hospitality program.
Mrs. Goldstein said the couple moved to Israel 20
years ago; she was born in Germany and he in South
Africa. They now run a hardware business, and have
a little but lovely apartment, Mrs. Goldstein said.
Nahariya is one of the northern Israeli towns
shelled so heavily by the PLO's katyusha rockets,
which led to "Operation Peace for Galilee."
The hardware storekeeper was anti- Begin, Mrs.
Goldstein said, "but he was not too crazy about
Peres either." The mission participants found that
politics were the talk of the day and there were
just as many Begin supporters as detractors.
Evidence of the work of the Joint Distribution
Committee, to which the South Broward Federation
contributes, was apparent in both Spain and Moroc-
co. Mission-goers were told and saw for them-
selves the food and clothing provided to the poor
there.
In Madrid, the Terkiels said, there was but a sin-
gle Jewish day school. Malaga, Spain, offered the
Jew a "freer" atmosphere and a large Jewish Com-
munity Center building.
The 33 from South Broward observed the Simchat
Defense Minister Sharon
express solidarity with Italy's
Jews who were speaking out
against current manifestations of
anti-Semitism in their country.
Torah holiday in Malaga, and it was a "joyous cele-
bration," Mrs. Goldstein reports.
During Simchat Torah services in Rabat,
Morocco, Lester Grossman was distinguished as the
first American to have the honor of aliyah at the
bimah.
In Casablanca, Morocco, Jews are protected by
the royal family to worship, that is; not to sing
Hatikva or speak of Israel.
The Sephardic influences of the sub-mission were
carried over as the South Broward Jews reached
Hod Hasharon, the project renewal site the
Federation claims as its "sister city."
On an informal tour conducted by one of the Hod
Hasharon singers who visited and performed in
South Broward last year, a new library was proudly
pointed out. And the city's residents "were happy
and overjoyed" as they took the South Broward en-
tourage to their newly expanded community center.
"Needless to say," Mrs. Grossman said, "they
thanked us over and over" for the project renewal
dollars that allowed for the construction. She called
the progress tremendous.
On a/riving in Israel "my one thought was that we
didn't have to tell the authorities there that we were
going to Texas," Terkiel says with a smile. In
Morocco, the mission participants were told to say
they were going to Texas not Israel next be-
cause of the extreme anti-Zionist sentiments in that
country.
"We all felt like we were going home to Israel,"
Mrs. Goldstein added, "where we would be free."
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Page 6-A
The Jewish Floridian and ShofarofGreater Hotly wood

Friday, October 29,1982

Israeli art in Broward
Continued from Page 1 A
have an art shop in the old city of Jaffa, know most
of the Israeli artists personally.
In fact, Attia says, renowned silversmith Heller
manages their gallery in Israel.
"It's actually less expensive to buy Israeli art in
the United States than in Israel," the owner of
Jerusalem Gate in the Hollywood Fashion Center
and Jaffa Gate in the Diplomat Mall says.
The reason for this irony? Taxes and inflation.
Attia says sales taxes are up to 15 percent in Israel,
and the inflation rate is 180 percent. He says he sold
a painting in Israel a few months ago for 70,000
sheckels ($5,000) and deposited the money on a
Sunday.
By Monday, that deposit was worth 5 percent less
than the day before: so he lost $250 on the tran-
saction.
The Sabra he was born in Tel Aviv also says
Americans get a nicer painting, lithograph or other
work of art in the United States than in Israel
because of the finishing that is done on the piece
before it is sold here.
Most art work in Israel is not framed; the
finishing touches are performed in the United
States.
Asked how business is, Attia responds that in-
terest in Israeli artists has fallen off of late. He now
is selling more jewlery than a few years ago.
"Some Jews in South Florida want to forget
they're Jewish," Attia believes. "Why they are not
proud to display their heritage I don't know. We like
to ahow our support, our love, for our homeland
every day."
The shopkeeper, who also is a jeweler, says that
by supporting Israeli artists, American Jews are
supporting Israel.
One artist the Attias are particularly close to is
Ya'acov Heller, the silversmith who manages their
shop in Israel.
Heller was bom and raised in Cleveland. He had
little inkling of becoming an artist until after
emigrating to Israeli in 1972. It was at Kibbutz
Urim where he first designed jewelry.
His silversmithing amply represented at both
South Broward locations primarily interprets
dramatic and passionate incidents taken from the
Bible. In 1974, his statute of David and Goliath was
presented to President Gerald Ford by then Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
In 1981, Heller's sculpture depicting the biblical
prophecy "the wolf will dwell with the lamb" was
presented to Egyptian President Anwar Sadat by
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, sym-
bolizing the peace between the two nations.
Other works in silver by Heller have gone to
Husni Mubarak, who took over as Egypt's president
after Sadat's assassination, Israeli President Yizhak
Navon and B.J. Vorster, prime minister of South
Africa.
16th CD Election update
By MARA GIULIANTI
Community Relations
Committee Chairman
In the newly created 16th Congressional District, two active
members of the Jewish community are seeking to become our
congressman. The two staunchly support the State of Israel, but
differ greatly in their stands on domestic issues.
Republican candidate Maurice Berkowitz of Plantation
supports President Reagan's economic policies. He opposes the
Equal Rights Amendment. He favors constitutional amend-
ments to ban abortion and to return prayer to the public schools.
Democratic candidate Larry Smith of Hollywood disagrees
with the president's policies. He supports the Equal Rights
Amendment and the "right to choose" abortion. He is opposed
to prayer in the public schools.
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Page8-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 29. 1962
Sholom Aleichem still wit it
Marienbad: A Novel. By
Sholom Aleichem. Translated
from the Yiddish by Aliza
Shevrin, G.P. Putnam's Sons,
200 Madison Ave.. New York,
NY. 10016. 1982. 222 pages.
$13.95.
Reviewed by Jacob Kabakoff
In his autobiography, Mark
Twain wrote that humor had a
life expectancy of only 30 years.
Yet Sholom Aleichem's writings
have retained their vitality to
such an extent that even a minor
work like Marienbad continues to
sparkle with wit and comic situa-
tions. Originally serialized in the
Yiddish press in 1911, it com-
prises part of the volume of the
seoDM
A N>>\ I I
author's collected works entitled
Zumer-Lebn (Summer Life).
Sholom Aleichem was obliged
for health reasons to spend a
good deal of time at various spas
and health resorts. Here he ob-
served the goings-on of nouveau
riche urban Jews and their social-
climbing wives.
In Marienbad he chose the ep-
istolary- medium a literary
from which he had perfected in
his celebrated Menachem Mendl
stories to depict the antics of
Warsaw Jews from the Nalevkis,
the central Jewish business tho-
roughfare of Warsaw. Marien-
bad, of course, is the resort town
famous for its mineral waters.
"You think Marienbad is just
Marienbad?" asks Beltzi
Kuriander in her letter to her
husband who has stayed home to
mind his business on the
Nalevkis. "Marienbad is Ber-
dichev, Marienbad is Warsaw.
Marienbad is the Nalevkis."
Or, as Beltzi's husband Shlomo
puts it: "Should someone in
Marienbad sneeze, someone in
the Nalevkis will say 'God bless
you!" The letters fly up and back
not only between the young, flirt-
atious Beltzi and her considera-
bly older and jealous husband,
but between a whole host of cha-
racters who become embroiled in
a three-ring circus of comic
events.
Their letters expose the foibles
and weaknesses of a whole seg-
Controllers
meet in D.C.
WASHINGTON The 1982
Controllers Institute sponsored
by the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions which annually brings
together controllers from Federa-
tions throughout North America
discussed the fiscal implica-
tions of Reaganomics and other
issues during its recent three-day
session here.
Fifty-five controllers repre-
senting 52 communities partici-
pated in the meetings, according
to Leon Sophian of Chicago, in-
stitute chairman.
Representing the Jewish
Federation of South Broward was
controller Irving Fox.
The Federation officials re-
viewed the impact of the Reagan
economic program on Federa-
tions as well as the issues of na-
tional pension programs, office
automation, delivery of central
services, endowment funds and
computer development.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions serves as a national instru-
ment to strengthen the work and
the impact of Jewish Federations
through leadership in developing
programs to meet changing needs
in the Jewish community;
through the exchange of experi-
ences to assure effective com-
munity service; through estab-
lishing guidelines for fund-raising
and operation; and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes.
commissioner
BROWARD COUNTY COMMISSION
DEMOCRAT DISTRICT 2
ment of middle-class types and
skillfully lay bare their character
traits.
We leave it to the reader to
discover how Sholom Aleichem
resolves his comedy of errors. His
novel has been ably presented by
Aliza Shevrin who had endeavor-
ed to overcome the many knotty
problems of translations by pay-
ing attention to the special
nuances and flavor of the various
individulistic styles of letter-
writing that make up the work.
Dr. Jacob Kabakoff is profes-
sor of Hebrew Literature at the
City University of New York and
editor of the Jewish Book
Annual.
BECOMING AWARE William Gramkk, director of the American
Jewish Committee, Southeast Region, focused the attention recently
of the Women's Division's Jewish Awareness Seminar, Phase II on a
"Critical Update of Current Issues." Going over the program of issues
are (from left) Naomi Prever, co-chairwoman; Susen Grossman Lead-
ership Development vice president; and Sandi Gelfand, co-chairwo
man and hostess.
RaaaaY
T ^ 43 Raft rf*^ rbW < ar" F>i
SB BflaflEJLw
-\^w.
PAYING TRIBUTE Marilyn and Albert Ponn wOl receive the Isel Bond City of Peace award
Sytegg!!!.*!? *WL'frl -J P---J" their honor at Temple Sinai. The Ponns. long active in
SliTS Federat'on of S B?Wttrl' 5? M ** drives, also serve on the board of governors of
Z2.S HI a ""iV v^ ? J? P**"*' ,ten,P,e Boad ** The Ponns had been leaders in
temple and UJA activities in Belmont, Mass., before moving south. Also on the agenda is a talk by Jerry
Gleekel. (above, riHht) who is associated with the Israeli Consulate.
Lung dub
will meet
Patients suffering from chronic
lung disease may attend a social
and support group which meets
on the last Thursday of every
month at Community Hospital of
South Broward.
The next meeting will be in the
Inservice Classroom at 2 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 25. Community
Hospital of South Broward is at
5100 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
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95
BBQ Chicken
Veal Parmigiana
Broiled Filet of Sole
Chopped Sirloin
Steak
95
T-Bone Steak C
Filet Mignon \J .
IncL Soup, House Salad, Potato, Garlic Bread, Beverage
After 6 pm
A wide choice of delicious dinners
from
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95
Including Soup & Salad
Now Serving Your Favorite Cocktails


Friday. October 2, 1982
The Jewish FJoridhn and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9-A
Mideast Forum leads with AIPAC speaker
"United States Relations in
'^ the Middle East-' will be the topic
Nov. 15 of Sara Ehrman, assis-
tant director of the American Is-
rael Public Affairs Committee, at
1 lallandale Jewish Center.
Ms. Ehrman will be the first
speaker in the Community Rela-
tions Committee's Middle East
Forum. According to Jack Ber-
man, the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Middle East
Task Force chairman, the forum
will be "an important vehicle to
communicate the issues affecting
AIPAC'sSara
Ehrman will
speak in Hal
landale Mon-
day, Nov. 15
Israel and the Middle East to the
community." The program be-
gins at 8 p.m.
'Arabs will never
accept Israel'
By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO (JTA) Ahmed
Ren Bella, the former president of
Algeria who was imprisoned for
many years under the regime of
Ilouari Boumedienne, said in a
recent interview with the French
periodical "Politique Inter-
nationale" that the Arabs will
never accept the Zionist fact.
"I am an Arab and Palestine
does not only concern Palestin-
ians; it concerns all Arabs. Even
if the Palestinians are forced to
accept some kind of solution, the
Arabs in general will never accept
the State of Israel," he said.
Asked if some territorial com-
promise was possible, Ben Bella
replied that acceptance of the
Zionist being would imply a
legitimacy to a non-Arab entity
in the Mideast.
.. "The Zionist State by its
internal logic," said Ben Bella,
presupposes economic, political
and cultural control over the
entire region. For us this is
-> nonymous with sterilization
and a loss of identity that no self-
respecting Arab could accept."
Ben Bella, released from an
Algerian form of house arrest
only a year-and-a-half ago, said
that while individual Arab lead-
ers might go to Jerusalem to con-
clude some form of peace with Is-
rael there would always be a
Moslem who would arise "to
liquidate traitors."
Using the terms "stranger"
and "cancer" to describe Israel,
Ben Bella predicted that the Is-
rael problem would be solved in
about 20 years.
Quoting Israeli statistics re-
garding immigration and emigra-
tion, Ben Bella noted that in
1981, 22,000 Jews had left Israel
while only 11,000 had entered the
country. The Arab population
was already 750,000 and growing
faster than the Jewish one.
The former Algerian president
pointed also to the technological
gap which once separated Jews
and Arabs. "The Arabs are
beginning to have their own tech-
nicians, scholars, their own
brains," said Ben Bella.
"Sooner or later they will have
the atomic bomb; this is inevi-
table. At that point we will weigh
down so heavily on the Israelis
that they will be unable to resist
us. They don't have a chance."
Asked whether this line of
thinking did not justify an Israeli
pre-emptive strike against the
Arabs, Ben Bella said: "That's
the classical threat. We are con-
stantly told: Watch out, the Is-
raelis have nuclear weapons, they
will blow up everything. They
have a Massada complex .
Well, I'll tell you what I really
think; if there is no other solu-
tion, let the nuclear war take
place and let us be finished with
it once and for all."
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104
Through her organization, .,, _
AIPAC. Ms. Ehrman conducts Process, to reject Western Euro-
political education workshops to P68" and Saud" proposals given
enhance the sophistication and **?. np*us by the Lebanese
involvement of the American cnaisand to deepen public under-
Jewish voter. AIPAC is the stomhng of the Camp David Ac-
major Washington lobby for the cords
State of Israel.
Herman lists the aims set forth
by the Middle East Task Force as
vital to keep Israel strong and
secure. The Jewish community
must insist that the United
States
Continue to support that, as
a condition of alliance, potential
Arab partners credibly denounce
any intent of destroying Israel.
Continue to provide Israel
economic and military aid as is
necessary for defense.
Provide such aid in a grant-
loan balance which is sensitive to
the new strains on Israel's
economy engendered by the Sinai
withdrawal and the explosive
growth of Arab armories.
Refuse to erode Israel
security by the sale of arms to
Arab regimes, which refuse to
negotiate peace with Israel.
The task force recommends
strongly urging the United
States to play a virgorous role in
supporting the Camp David
It is important to stress the
positive Western aspects of Is-
rael's politics, culture and society
as well as Israel's aspirations far
peace, despite its continued vul-
nerability.
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go lor Zooroni two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
enriched pasta simmered in lots of yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, tool
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TOUR OF LEISURE-4 WEEKS
With Late Departures, Little Walking, Slower Pace,
3 Weeks Netanya Relaxation & Enjoyment
1 Week Jerusalem
Tour Includes:* Accommodation in First Class HotelTwin Bedded Rooms* 2 Kosher
Meals Every Day*8 Days of Sightseeing-Transfers & Porterage-Travelers Insurance:
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CALL COLLECT
931-3031
18407 W. Dixie HighwayNorth Miami Beach931 3031
ENDORSEMENTS
Droword County Classroom Teoc hers Association
Association of Mobile Homeowners
Droword County Veterans, 9. AC
Soviet Jewry Committee of the South Droword Jewish
Federation, helping Jews leave the Soviet Union
AFFILIATIONS
Member, Droword County Dor Associations
Member, Ft. Louderdale Joycees '
Member, Michael-Ann Russell 6- Hollywood Jewish
Community Centers
Member, B'nai D'rith Justice Lodge
Member, Friends of the Droword Zoological Society
Member, Sierra Club
Member, Common Cause
. Member, Temple Israel of Miromor
ACTIVITIES
Member of Baseball Franchise Committee of South
Florida Sports Authority
Member of Community Volunteer Services of D'noi
D'rith
PUNCH #108


PagelO-A
I
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
-t.-.i y\ .....> -
> -
*ii_
Friday, Octobers, 1982.
'Silent no more
Soviet Jewry update
RECEIVES VISA
DUSHANBE, Tadz.SSR -
Former POC AMNER
ZAVUROV was granted a visa to
emigrate to Israel and is expected
to arrive there this month.
The long-term refusenik first
applied for a visa in April 1974
and has been the subject of KGB
harassment since then. He and
his brother, Amnon, who applied
together, were granted visas in
1975. However, the day before
their departure, they were
summoned to the OVIR and their
permits were confiscated.
Zavurov was arrested and jail-
ed for a brief period in December
1976 on charges of "parasitism."
Weeks later, he was rearrested
for failing to have an internal
passport, which was surrendered
when his emigration visa was
granted, as well as for failing to
have a job and for "hooligan-
ism." At his January 1977 trial,
he was sentenced to three years
in prison, which he completed in
April 1980.
HUNGER STRIKE
MOSCOW World Chess
Master BORIS GOLKO an-
nounced his intention to begin a
hunger strike Oct. 20 in protest of
the Soviet authorities' denial of
his right to emigrate. He was
interrogated by the authorities
for four hours Sept. 8 in connec-
tion with his public demand for a
visa. His wife. ANNA AKHAM
ARULOVA, also a chess cham-
pion, will join him in the fast.
HELD INCOMMUNICADO
NOVOSIBIRSK FELIKS
KOCHUBIEVSKY, who was
arrested Sept. 12, was interro-
gated four times before his arrest
and is being held incommunicado
in a Novosibirsk jail. The 52-year-
old engineer underwent-surgery
for a kidney ailment in August
and is due for another operation.
His wife, VALENTINA, has
appealed to authorities to permit
the surgery, but she has received
no reply.
PRISONER UPDATE:
VIKTOR BRAILOVSKY
was denied an early release Sept.
10 by officials who oversee his
HOLD
THE
DATE
HUMAN RIGHTS PLEA
Sunday. December 5. 1982
I 8 00 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
1400 North 46th Avenue
Hollywood
Keynote Speaker:
U.S. Senator Birch Bayh

.t*\\- :t'-'::n :r so;.-- nsvaiuts
,i -cl.'-ccc soi.L/-a; -c-.--.ccc. .i. ?::::
::-:j
JUST A REMINDER Members of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward are receiving 'Hold the Date' notices like this one, reminding
that Human Rights Plea night is Dec. 5. Appearing that night at
Temple Beth Shalom will be U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh, a friend to Israel
and the Jewish people.
REFUSENIK UPDATE:
Former POC IOSIF
BEGUN, who lives in Strunino,
has been unsuccessful at securing
employment for four months and
fears that he will again be arrest-
ed for "parasitism."
five-year exile sentence. The 47-
.vear-old cyberneticist. who in
September had completed three-
quarters of his term, was eligible
for "relief from punishment"
under Soviet law.
Mathematician wins
Soviet exit visa
NEW YORK (JTA) Prof.
Grigory Freiman, who revealed
details of discrimination against
Jews in the Soviet mathematics
establishment, has been given
permission to emigrate with his
family, the Greater New York
Conference on Soviet Jewry re-
ported.
Freiman first applied for an
exit visa in 1980 and was refused
without any reason. A respected
mathematics professor at the
University of Kalinin. Freiman
was dismissed from his post
following the publication of his
"samizdat" essay charging that a
group of prominent anti-Semitic
mathematicians had effectively
eliminated Soviet Jews from the
field.
Freiman had come under in-
tense pressure from the authori-
ties recently. Last month he was
summoned by the KGB in con-
nection with the arrest of two So-
viet Jewish mathematicians,
Boris Kanevsky and Valery Sen-
derov, who had accumulated
statistics on anti-Semitism in So-
viet academic institutions.
While Jews have made great
contributions to Soviet mathe-
matics in the past, Freiman,
along with Kanevsky and Sen-
derov, reported that Soviet
universities administer excep-
tionally difficult admission
exams to Jews and reject almost
all Jewish applicants.
Soviet authorities refuse to
grant degrees for dissertations by
Jews and editors of some Soviet
mathematical journals will not
publish research papers by Jews.
ONE GRAND' PARTY With a goal of $100,000 facing them, members of Holly brooks fund-raising
team plan to meet their challenge face-to-face, soliciting door-to-door. To meet their target, 40 canvassers
will be hard at work doubling last year's 20 solicitors. The Hollybrook Big Gifts ($1,000 minimum)
Cocktail Party is being planned for Jan. 9. Pictured above (clockwise) are Morris Levinsohn. Nathan
Silberberg. Harold Rudin. Abe Steirn, William Katz, Susan Marx, Max Eisner and David Weinstock
Below (standing) are Martin Eisenberg (left) and Al Rosen, and (seated, left to right) Milton Hersh
kowitz. Irving Meyers, Lester Weil and Ben Spencer.
OUR HOMEOWNERS
INSURANCE
IS AS GOOD FOR
YOUR HOME
AS OUR CAR
INSURANCE IS
FOR YOUR CAR
mill The Travelers you get lull-
coverage policies. toll-tree
telephone claim service, and
ompetitive rates for both your
iome and your car.
JACK BERMAN
Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD. 921-7744
Dade 947-5902
Representing
The Travelers
Indemnity Company
and iti
Affiliated Companies
Hartford, Conn. 06115
'Fly-In' totals
$24.6 million
nationwide
NEW YORK Teams of
Israeli dignitaries, American
Jewish leaders and public per-
sonalities, sweeping into 57 cities
across the nation in the United
Jewish Appeal's "Fly-In" pro-
gram raised $24.6 million for the
1983 UJA-Federation Campaign
and Israel Special Fund.
UJA National Chairman
Robert Lout said the combined
total represents a 51.6 percent in-
crease over last year's pl fes.
In South Broward, more than
$100,000 was pledged during the
appearance of Adm. Hyman
Rickover at the Diplomat, re-
ported Dr. Saul Singer, campaign
chairman, and Joyce Newman,
local coordinator of "Fly-In."
Sandra Weinex of Houston, a
UJA national vice chairman and
chairman of "Fly-In," said 21
Israelis, 28 national Jewish
leaders and eight American
personalities made up the teams
that met with 469 donors during
the intensive week of solicitation.
Members of the teams also
participated in public meetings,
educational programs, news con-
ferences and radio and television
interviews. In all, Mrs. Weiner
said, donors from 77 communities
were reached by "Fly-In."
>P
&
COWAN
COUNTY COMMISSON
DISTRICT 4 DEMOCRAT
PROVEN
EXPERIENCE LEADERSHIP ABILITY
ELECTED to Davie Town Council in 1978
RE ELECTED in 1980
Served
A 2 Years as MA YOR :": I Year as Vice-Mayor
v'r I Year as Councilman
NOVEMBER 2 ELECTION
Punch #81
MMSmai
COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
(Apconled by Comm Anne Koibl
BROWARD COUNTY CRIMINAL JUSTICE
PLANNING COUNCIL
(Apconlea by Judge Lawrence Korda)
PORT EVERGLADES TASK FORCE
lApcomed by Browaids LegeJ.nwe Delegation)
MEMBER B-NAJ BRTTH BARUCH LODGE
VOTE
scott i COWAN
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 4 DEMOCRAT
j



f. October 29. 1982
.....
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 11- A
WE GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR YOUR AOE
Announcing the
20% Senior Discount,
For years, we've given you
special vacation rates, weekend
specials, dinner discounts and
lots of other good reasons
to stay with us. But,
beginning October 1st,
we're really going to
spoil you.
You Only Have to Be 55 to
Get 20% Off Your Hotel Bill.
From October 1st through
January 31st*a great time to
see FloridaHoward Johnson's
participating lodges will offer
all senior citizens a 20% room
discount And thafs not all.
You'll Even Get a 10% Discount on Your Dinner.
Not just a 20% discount on your room, but
10% off your dinner, too. For participating lodges
and more information on the way we treat senior
citizens, call toll free 1-800-654-2000, and
ask for the Senior Double Discount offer, or
bring this ad to a participating Howard
Johnson's Motor Lodge.
At Howard Johnson's, we give
you credit for the things
that count most
HOWARDjOHMOriS
All rooms subject to availability. Offer not valid December 20 through
January 2. or in conjunction with any other Howard Johnsons offer.
O Howard Johnson Co 1982
~J?


I'atfe 12-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 29, 1982
'Group' helps Mr. L
brighten self-image
Mr. L., 34, lives in Hallandale
and came for counseling because
of a chronic inability to make
friends and socialize.
Although extremely in-
telligent, he had never done well
in school, but managed to become
a dental technician. Mr. L.'s poor
self-concept and his fear of
authority have always made him
extremely uncomfortable in any
situation in which he had to
relate to other people.
Through his life, he has been
dependent on his parents. He still
lives with his mother and father
and feels as though he will never
1m? able to be on his own.
The reality that he eventually
will have to be independent
causes him severe anxiety which
he confronts by drinking too
much.
them.
In addition, Mr. L. was able to
test out new social skills within
the confines of the group to see if
this new behavior could be
beneficial to him in adjusting in
his troubled world of isolation.
Group members helped him to
understand that his social
feedback was very perceptive and
enlightening to them. Mr. L. also
felt a sense of belonging and
accomplishment in helping
others.
Although he has a far way to
go in his counseling, he now finds
socializing with fellow workers
more pleasant. He has come to
everybody has
at one time or
help in finding
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8608. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
For gamblers
Gamblers Anonymous, a non-
profit fellowship of compulsive
gamblers, and Gam-Anon for
wives, friends and families of
compulsive gamblers meets every I -
night in Dade and Broward coun-
ties.
Call 525-7656 in Broward or
447-2696 in Dade to find out
times and locations.
Wolkoff honored
Prince George B'nai B'rith in
Hallandale will hold an Israel
Bond Breakfast in honor of
Isadore Wolkoff, it was an-
nounced by Jerome Mallet, chair-
man of the Bond committee.
The breakfast will be Nov. 14
at 10 a.m. at Prince George.
Within one year of individual
counseling, Mr. L. agreed to
attend group counseling. Tne
support and self-awareness
gained in individual sessions
gave him the strength to face
other people with similar
problems and to share his
common experiences.
The group experience provided
Mr. L. with support for accepting
himself in a more positive light.
Group members acted like a
mirror to Mr. L. showing him
that he is intelligent, sensitive
inn', most of all. accepted by
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
realize that
problems and
another needs
solutions.
Mr. L. now displays more
confidence in many areas. One
primary example of his
achievements is the new job
secured in which he does private
work for a specialist.
His alcoholic consumption has
also virtually decreased to the
point where He has stated, "I now
don't need to be relaxed by a
drink when I go out. I now feel
l>elter about myself."
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 1909 Har-
rison St. Suite 109, Holly-
wood. 33020. Telephone: 927-
9288. Hours Monday, Tues-
day. Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Itoad 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale. 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
SmLI? R^ m I E^V/i* P*??,1**'Hillcrest, Hollywood. Fla., to people of Israel: one brand-new
frZ bT f K^? n'd (teft? ^r88> ambu,M<* Dignitaries on hand at the condominium are.
JosTphR SamdKott*r' Brt Mock- Hollywood Mayor David Keating, Rabbi Morton Malavsky and
MyjSon,
The Knight!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally hoasted, and justifi-
ably st>, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
parts of the world can a Jewish parent proudly proclaim: "Meet my son, THE
KNIGHT!"
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland prtxJuced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the only Jewish
pipe-band inthe entire world!
Of course Scotland's most famous product is scotch whisky.
And America's favorite scotch is JckB. We carefully select the fin-
est scotches and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The
result is why we say that JckB whispers. '
Incidentally, you don't have to wait until your son becomes
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in order to enjoy JckB. Any
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86 Proof Blended Scotch Whisky. 01980 The Paddington Corp NY
J&B. It whispers.
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FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
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-TEDDY K0LLEK,
Mayor of Jerusalem
"Beautifully reflective of
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ittualrated with photo* S10 96. now at your
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October 29, 1982
Ee insurance can
\e on and work
Jewish cause

The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13-A
is the seventh in a series
bcles entitled "Modern
is of Charitable Giving,"
Uhon M. Lichter, assets
in officer for the United
Appeal. For further in-
in, please call Michael J.
vitz at the Jewish
lion of South Broward
10).
^eraon may make a
ble gift of a policy of life
ice on his or her life by
; a charitable organization
neficiary and irrevocably
; all "incidents of
p" in the policy to the
term "incidents of
lip" is not limited to
lip of the policy in the
al legal sense, but refers
to the right of the insured
or her estate to the
Jic benefits of the policy.
eludes, for example, the
change the beneficiary,
ender or cancel the policy,
the policy or to revoke
nment, to pledge the
Ifor a loan, or to obtain
pe insurer a loan against
ender value of the policy.
iddition, it includes a
)nary interest in the policy
is if the value of the
Jonary interest im-
>ly before the death of the
It exceeded 5 percent of
be of the policy.
[donor is entitled to an
tax charitable deduction
date of the gift for the
; value of the policy. In the
la policy which has been in
}t some time and on which
I premium payments are to
b, the value generally may
iximated by adding to
ilated terminal reserve
| date of the gift (slightly
than cash surrender
the proportionate part of
premium paid before the
lich covers the period
ig beyond that date.
>nor will also be entitled
come tax deduction for
kts either to the insurer
or to the charity in an
; to cover premiums on the
i case of a paid-up policy,
be of the gift is the amount
pe insurer would charge
ngle premium policy of the
cified amount on the life
son the same age as the
he donor's death, the
bmount passes to charity
Wally is not includible in
ors estate.
the law prior to the
bic Recovery Tax Act of
income tax charitable
on was available only to
dividual taxpayer who
his or her deductions
to the taxpayer who
to take the standard
>n.
the new law, pursuant
chedule shown below and
IS seeking
fs of Minsk
YORK (JTA) HIAS,
ebrew Immigrant Aid
is seeking to locate Jews
in or around the towns
Brisk, Kaidanov (Koid-
|and Dukara, Byelorussia
[the vicinity of Minsk),
1941-1944.
persons are sought as
witnesses in an ongoing
nent of Justice war
prosecution. They are
call or write Joseph
at HIAS, 200 Park
I South, New York. N.Y.,
the telephone is (212) 674-
the limits set forth therein, a
taxpayer taking the standard
deduction will also be entitled to
an income tax charitable
deduction for his or her charitable
deductions during the taxable
year.
1982-83 Deduction allowable
up to 25 percent of first
*100 $25 maximum.
'984 Deduction allowable up
to 25 percent of first $300 = $75
maximum.
1985 Deduction allowable for
50 percent of the value of all
donations.
1986 Deduction allowable for
full value (100 percent) of all
donations.
After 1986 Unless extended by
Congress, the deduction will
expire at the end of 1986 and will
not be available for charitable
gifts made after 1986 by an in-
dividual who does not itemize his
or her deductions.
FACE-TO-FACE The 1982-83 FederationUJA Campaign at the Hemispheres promises to top even
last year a record-breaking contributions. 'Peace for Galilee' efforts will be stressed by campaigners, face-
to-face. They are (standing from left) Jack Udis. Otto Stieber. high-rise chairman; Ethel Gould. Jean
Jacobs. Morse Engleman and Kalman Rado. Seated from left are Lila Brecker. Molly Roth, chairwoman:
Rose Pollen and Ada Engelman.
Bell Intioduces
The World B/The Minute
NEAR EAST *22ffBO
EUROPE $142*/8Q
UNITED KINGDOM ^257.76
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Have family or friends in Israel,
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UNITED KINGDOM/IRELAND Standard $208 $126
Discount I 56 95
Economy I 25 .76
7am-1 pm
lpm-6pm
6pm-7om
EUROPE
Standard
Discount'
Economy
2 37
1.78
1.42
1.33
100
80
7am-1 pm
lpm-6pm
6pm-7om
PACIFIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
422
3.17
253
158
1 19
.95
5pm-llpm
K3am-5pm
llpm-IOam
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
168
126
1.01
1.13
85
68
SOUTH AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
277
208
166
I 18
89
71
NEAR EAST
Standard
Discount
Economy
368
276
221
1.33
100
80
CENTRAL AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
262
197
1.57
1 13
85
68
AFRICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
289
2.17
173
148
III
89
INDIAN OCEAN
Standard
Discount
Economy
522
392
3.13
217
163
130
For countries that ore not dotable. there's o 3 -minute minimum and rotes ore somewhoi higher
DiHerent rale schedules applv to Conodo ond Memco Check with your tocol operator
federal excise la ol IX is added on all colls billed i the United States
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
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rates, the lower rates for
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and the new calling times:
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Want to know more?
Call our International
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lpm-K)pm
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jmrwmmrm
Bell BringsThe Word Closer
- FIH MIS, II M.-IMIUiNAI MINIUM


1
Page 14-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 29, 1982
The two faces of Jimmy Carter ,srae, seeks $3 bmion
Continued from Page 4-A
Carter needed to see his kinship
with Sadat.
But it was for these very sam<
"religious" reasons that he also
felt so warmly and unselectively
disposed to Leonid Brezhnev
when the two met at the SALT II
arms control talks in Vienna in
1979. Writes Carter: "... he
(Brezhnev) startled me by plac-
ing his hand on my shoulder and
saying, "If we do not succeed,
God will not forgive us.' I felt
close to him This simple and
apparently natural gesture
bridged the gap between us more
effectively than any official talk."
And who was Brezhnev, the
talker, but an atheistic Kremlin
Communist? Apparently, foi
Carter this does not matter.
ON THE other hand. Prime
Minister Menachem Begin at
Camp David, Carter sees as a
man who was "preoccupied with
language, names and terms
(which) could severely impede
free-flowing talk," a man who
"wanted to see the text."
It is precisely here that Carter
reveals himself most. For him,
religion is emotional and non-ver-
bal as men, themselves, must
be and Sadat appeared to him to
be. For Carter, Begin was not
this way at Camp David, al-
though he is willing to acknowl-
edge that Begin was also "cast in
a biblical role as one charged with
the future of God's people" and a
"student of the Bible."
Still, Begin was intellectual
and therefore to be trusted less
perhaps even than Brezhnev in
Vienna who could throw God
around with the best of the Bap-
tist preachers that TV can offer.
Because, in the end. he saw Begin
at Camp David as intellectual, as
the man of the Word out of the
people of the Book, Carter could
only conclude that Begin was of a
lesser order, not merely of a dif-
ferent order.
BEGIN, the intellectual Bible-
thumper, offended Carter, the
gospel hour Bible thumper.
Beheld through the eyes of his
Christian fundamentalism,
Carter saw in his Israeli opponent
just another Jewish upstart, and
an upstart who relentlessly frus-
Will the real Jimmy Carter please stand up?
t rated his punitive soul at that.
Not being able to punish Begin
was and still remains at the root
of the Carter rage so far as Camp
David is concerned. At Camp
David, the divine afflatus left
Carter in the lurch again. He
could not ordain; he could merely
propose, and this still infuriates
him mightily.
The consequences of all of this
is the new Carter: a smarmy
simperer who has recreated him-
self as hero in Iran and as ad-
mirer in death of Anwar Sadat, a
smarmy simperer, too, in whose
mythic end Carter believes his
own view of Camp David has
been elevated to biblical
prophecy.
IF CARTER and Sadat ad-
mired one another, it was that
each saw himself in the other, a
mirror image of mutual self-de-
ception, the will to see what was
not real. For Sadat was no more a
man of peace than Carter is a
man of good-will.
The excerpts from "Keeping
the Faith" show him in a defen-
sive mood of constant justifica-
tion of his failures, a romantic
painter drawing anew the image
of things as they were into senti-
mental portraits of what they
Religious directory
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION LEV1 YITZ-
CHOK Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley
St., Hollywood, 923-1707,
Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus.
Daily Services 7:55 a.m., 7:30
p.m.; -Sabbath Services 7:30
p.m., Sabbath morning 9
o'clock; Sundays 8:30 a.m. Re-
ligious School Grades 1-8.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLY-
WOOD, 3291 Stirling Road,
Hollywood, 966-7877. Rabbi
Edward Davis. Daily Services
7:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
Services 7:40 p.m., Sabbath
morning 9 o'clock.
CONSERVATIVE
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER, 416 NE 8th Ave.,
iiallandaie, 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily Services 8:30
a.m., 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
6:30 p.m., Sabbath morning
8:45 o'clock.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM.
1400 N 46th Ave., Hollywood,
981-6111. Rabbi Morton Mala-
vsky. Daily Services 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath 8:15 p.m.,
Sabbath morning 9 o'clock.
Religious School Kindergar-
ten -h
TEMPI.K IN THE PINES. 9730
Stirling Koad, Hollywood, 431-
5100 Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter.
Stindaj t) 10 a.m., Mon. and
Thui n.; Sabbath eve 8
o'clo bath morning 8:45
oiii iigious School -
> in ir Mitzvah.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRA
MAR. 6920 SW 35th St., Mira-
mar, 961-1700. Rabbi Paul
Plotkin. Daily Services 8:30
a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:45 o'clock. Reli-
gious School Kindergarten 8.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood, 920-1577.
Daily Services 8:25 a.m., 5
p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:25 o'clock.
Religious School Pre-Kinder
garlen 8
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood, 920-
8225. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe.
Sabbath Services 8:15 p.m.
Religious School Grades 1-10.
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines
Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road, Pembroke Pines, 431-
36:18. Rabbi Bennett Green
spun. Sabbath H p.m. Religious
.School Kindergarten -
TEMPLE SOLEL.. 5100
Sheridan St., Hollywood, 989-
0205. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Sabbath Services 8 p.m., Sab-
bath morning 10:30 o'clock.
Iteligious School Preschool
12.
RECONSTRUCTION I ST
RAM AT SHALOM. 11301 W.
rlroward Blvd., Plantation,
472-3600. Rabbi Elliot Skid
dell. Sabbath Services 8 15
p.m. Religious School I're-
Kindergarten- 8.
could have been had God's hand
worked for him as he forever
imagines it does even when,
apparently, it doesn't.
Friendship seen
as key to U.S.-
Israelties
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
rael's friendship with the United
States is "the cornerstone of its
foreign policy ... in no circum-
stances will it allow that friend-
ship to falter."
This pledge was voiced here by
Deputv Foreign Minister Yehuda
Ben-Meir of the National Re-
ligious Party to a group of top
American business executives
visiting Israel under the auspices
of the Israel Bond Organization.
Ben-Meir's remarks were
plainly intended to contrast with
statements critical of the United
States recently voiced by Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon.
Ben-Meir said the United
States played "a positive role"
and made 'a constructive contri-
bution" to the pursuit of peace in
the region and to the resolution of
the Lebanese crisis.
Israel would do "everything in
its power," Ben-Meir continued,
to maintain and develop its close
relationship with the United
States. It knew that it had no
better friend and ally than the
United States iust as the
United States should know it had
no better friend and ally than Is-
rael.
But Ben-Meir spoke out
strongly against President Rea-
gan's peace proposals, saying
they "do not bring peace nearer
ana were totally at variance with
the Camp David accords.
Bond response
up 40 percent
More than $50 million in Israel
Bonds have been purchased as a
result of High Holy Day Appeals
on Rosh Hash an ah and Yom
Kippur in 1,000 synagogues in
the United States.and Canada.
Rabbi Leon Kronish of Miami,
chairman of the Israel Bond
Organization's Rabbinic Cabinet,
reported that this year's holiday
Bond subscription represented a
40 percent increase over last
year s appeals.
In South Broward, Bond
Chairman Joe Raymond said
more than $180,000 in Israel
Bonds were bought during ap-
peals at local synagogues.
This year's appeals culminated
a special Emergency Develop-
ment for Peace campaign which
was launched by the Israel Bond
Organization last June to help
offset the impact of the war in
Lebanon on Israel's economy.
in assistance from U.S.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has submitted an aid
request to the U.S. government
for the coming fiscal year which
totals S3 billion.
The request was presented here
by Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor to U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis, and a simultan-
eous submission was made in
Washington.
The request is identical to that
put forward last year, when the
figure eventually approved was
$2.2 billion. Proposals in Wash-
ington to increase that figure by
another $425 million have been
shelved recently due to the
Lebanon war.
The Israeli request breaks
down into $1.25 billion in civilian
aid, which Israel seeks as an out-
right grant, and $1.75 billion in
military aid, which Israel seeks
half in grant form and half in loan
form.
In explanatory material ac-
companying the aid request.
Israel says its civilian balance of
payments deficit is likely to
widen by half a billion dollars in
the coming fiscal year. (But this
will be set off, it is hoped, by a
decrease in military imports.)
Israel says it plans to keep un-
employment down to below five
percent of the labor force, and,
while inflation will top 130 per-1
cent in the coming year, it will
hopefully decline steadily there-
after.
Naturally, Israeli officials
regard the new aid request as
something of a test of U.S. sup-
port and sympathy which some
experts believe have been seri-
ously eroded by the Lebanon war.
I wwW1
News
Sculpture tour
The JCC will tour the Grove
Isle Sculpture Gardens in Coco-
nut Grove on Wednesday, Nov.
The tour of the 35 pieces of
contemporary sculpture dotting
the landscape on Grove Isle will
be conducted by .Martin Z. Mar-
gulies.
Bus transportation will be pro-
vided. For reservations and in-
formation, call 921-6511.
Singles.workshop
The JCC of South Broward an-
nounces a single-parent work-
shop, "Social*Aspects of Being a
Single Parent," Wednesday,
Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. at the JCC,
2838 Holly wood Blvd.
A fee of S3 for members, S3.50
for non-members will be charged.
Advance registration is required.
Registration for the workshop
will be closed two, weeks before
the actual workshop date.
nUil
Post Hast* Shopping Center
4S25 Sheridan St.. Hollywood, Fla
_____ Phone 961-6998
Personal Service Book Store
HITLER'S
WILL
Receive a copy of Adolf Hitler's last will and]
two political testaments, in English, written by'
him the day before his suicide.
Also, I have a full production, ANTINAZI
46 record called "Stormtrooper" and the "Soul
of Man".
Send $3 for the will, or $2 for the record, or
$4 for both to:
HIRDLER ENTERPRISES
P.O. Box 757
Pompano Beach, Fla. 33061
Both items are quality productions


dPaoWV^wwr
ctober29, 1982
>*.
The Jewish Fhrididn aria^hofarof Greater Hollywood -----------........."PageT5-A

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Pagel6-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Wl MiJ, October 29. m,
Larry
FOR CONGRESS
NEW DISTRICT 16, DEMOCRAT
a
t
I

t
F
0
ti
t
TRADITION
STILL MATTERS!
TRADITION
STILL MATTERS
TO THESE
LARRY SMITH
SUPPORTERS:
Brian & Jane Berman
Fred & Evetyn Blumenthal
Herbert & Nancy Brizel
Charles & Sandy Friedman
Donald & Mara Giulianti
Phil & Joyce Gould
Hy & Marcy Kameron
Sherman & Jo Ann Katz
Joyce Newman
Robert & Elaine Pittell
Harry & Jackie Rosen
Otto & Evelyn Stieber
Joseph & Benita Schwartz
Joel & Linda Wilentz
Nat & Dena Sedley
Peter & Barbara Keller
Lewis & Ann Cohen
Irving & Reva Wexler
James Fox & Barbara Miller
Alan & Elaine Coplin
Doug & Joan Gross
AJan & Joyce Roaman
AJ & Florence Rosenthal
VOTE TUESDAY,
2
Larry
I I I I I I
My Dear Friends
THE WORD TRADITION MEANS DIFFERENT THINGS TO
DIFFERENT PEOPLE...
Webster's Dictionary defines TRADITION as the handing down of customs and
beliefs from generation to generation "
To my parents, who raised me m Brooklyn. TRADITION means the bridging of the
wisdom of Eastern European Culture with the pursuit of the Great American
Dream To me TRADITION inspires us to make a better life for our children while
sb* maintaining our old world heritage
IN OUR COUNTRY. IT HAS BEEN A TRADITION TO PROVIDE
SECURITY AND "PEACE OF MIND" TO THOSE WHO HAVE
RETIRED AFTER DEDICATED YEARS OF WORK.
As your Congressman. I pledge to use af of my energies to preserve our
TRADITIONS:
TRADITION to continue our hfetong support for Israel and our government's
commitment to Israel's security
TRADITION to insure that the money we have contnbuted to the social
security system will be there for us to survive as retired citizens.
TRADITION to make sure that medicare adequately funded to guarantee
our health and welfare
TRADITION to hve in peacefree from crime, violence, and destruction.
AS YOUR CONGRESSMAN. I PLEDGE TO TAKE YOUR
MESSAGE TO WASHINGTON AND I PROMISE TO RETURN THE
WORD TRADITION TO THE HALLS OF CONGRESS
For the past four years in Tallahassee I
With your vote on November 2nd. I will
the TRADITIONS of America
to do the same m Washington
PUNCH #8
Ronna 330?i
Ol7UmjwujJBuU>iwu
Me Smith is going to Washington!
f*on Se-SMTTH


November Nostradamus
After voting, what to expect
on Capitol Hill next Wednesday
Jewisfi floridiar
and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 29.1982
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
What should friends of
Israel look for on Election
Night, next Tuesday? The
1982 Races for Senate and
House involve a number of
contests of unusual in-
terest, some of which are
still too close to call.
Strong Israel supporters in the
Senate who should have little
trouble being reelected for a six-
year term are: Ted Kennedy of
Massachusetts, Henry "Scoop"
Jackson of Washington, Pat
Moynihan of New York, Spark
Maisunaga of Hawaii, and Bill
Proxmire of Wisconsin, along
with Republican John Heinz of
Pennsylvania.
A FEW of Israel's Democratic
backers in the Senate are having
a tougher time but should pull
out victories. Howard Metzen-
baum of Ohio, who is staving off
a late challenge from a State
Senator; Paul Sarbanes of Mary-
land, who seems to be clearly
ahead; Don Riegle of Michigan,
and Dennis Deconcini in Arizona,
who have become the favorites
for reelection, along with
Minority Leader Robert Byrd of
West Virginia and Lloyd Bentsen
of Texas, who are maintaining
strong leads. In the same cate-
gory are Jim Sasser of Tennessee
and Lawton Chiles of Florida.
Closer races are predicted for
Democratic Freshman George
Mitchell of Maine, and Senator
Quentin Burdick of North
Dakota.
Republican stalwarts Lowell
Weicker of Connecticut and Dave
Durenberger of Minnesota are in
see-saw races and the outcomes
bear watching election night. The
results of the crucial Connecticut
race will probably be the first in.
REPUBLICAN Senate friends
of Israel who look good for reelec-
tion at this point are John Dan-
forth of Missouri and Bill Roth of
Delaware.
There are a number of Chal-
lengers running for the Senate
who have expressed positions
supportive of Israel and stand a
reasonable chance of election.
They are Democratic Gov. Jerry
Brown of California who is in a
very tight race but appears to
have momentum in his favor;
Chic Hecht, the Jewish former
Republican State Senate
minority leader, who is mounting
p. strong challenge in Nevada;
Democratic Julius Michaelson,
the Jewish former Rhode Island
attorney general, who is running
hard; and Jeff Bingaman of New
Mexico, who may pull off an up-
set.
In a few races, the supportive
Senate challengers are clearly be-
hind but may have a long shot
chance at victory. Republican
Haley Barbour, running in Mis-
sissippi, is looking better each
day. Democrat Ted Wilson in
Utah is still running hard. Demo-
crat Jim Guest in Vermont has
made good progress, and Wyom-
ing Democrat Rodger McDaniel
is conceded an outside chance. In
these races, however, they are
clearly underdogs trying to un-
seat popular incumbents.
There are a number of Senate
races where both candidates are
strong supporters of Israel.
Notable examples are in New
Jersey where Rep. Millicent Fen-
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The Jewish Floridian and would
like to, also let us know. Every
issue of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's newspaper
contains news you won't want to
miss. Simply call 921-8810.
wick and Frank Lautenberg are
facing each other. A similar
situation occurs in Delaware
where Dave Levinson is running
against Senator William Roth.
Jewish State Senator Harriet
Woods has been strongly chal-
lenging Senator Danforth, al-
though her prospects are not con-
sidered good.
TURNING TO the House of
Representatives, there are literal-
ly hundreds of Israel's supporters
running for reelection or chal-
lenging for the 435 seats. But
some races take on considerable
importance due to selected
factors such as the candidates
seniority and influence in Con-
gress, a position on a key Com-
mittee dealing with Foreign Af-
fairs legislation, an opponent's
record on Israel-related issues,
and the closeness of the races.
In California, Democratic Rep.
Phil Burton is running in the
toughest campaign in his long
career as an influential supporter
of Israel. At this time, he is neck-
and-neck with his opponent.
First-term Rep. Sam Gejden-
son of Connecticut, a member of
the Foreign Affairs Committee,
seems to be staving off a strong
challenge from his 1980 oppo-
nent.
A race of considerable impor-
ta nee has shaped up in Florida,
where a senior member of the
Foreign Affairs Committee and
strong friend of Israel, Rep.
Dante Fascell ID), is being
Hang Tough for Victory
Sen. Kennedy
Sen. Chiles
Rep. Fascell
strongly challenged by Re-
publican Glenn Rinkier.
TWO RACES of significance
are taking place in Illinois. Senior
House Member Sid Yates (D),
who sits on the important For-
eign Operations Appropriation's
Subcommittee, is facing strong
opposition but should pull out a
win. The second, a race of un-
usual interest, Dick Durbin (D)
challenges Rep. Paul Findley (R).
Findley, a longtime spokesman
for the PLO and ranking
Minority Member of the Foreign
Affairs Subcommittee on the
Middle East, has been out-
spokenly critical of Israel. Durbin
has a good chance of defeating
Findley, which would be a major
accomplishment in the House.
Maryland is the scene of a race
of considerable interest where
veteran Chairman of the Appro-
priations Foreign Operations
Subcommittee Rep. Clarence
Long (D), a staunch Israel sup-
porter, looks like a winner at this
time, but not for certain.
A New York race which will
impact on legislation effecting
Israel is between two incumbent
Congressman forced to run
against each other due to redis-
tricting. Rep. Ben Oilman, a
senior Republican member of the
Foreign Affairs Committee, is
running against Rep. Peter
Peyser (D) who has also been
supportive. But keeping Oilman
on the Committee is a priority,
given its anticipated composi-
tion.
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Page 2-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 29,19^
Shamir Reveals
Secure Lebanese border 'a must'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
has made it clear that
security arrangements for
the Israel-Lebanon border
must be worked out be-
tween Israel and Lebanon
before the Israeli army will
withdraw from that coun-
try.
He stressed this to reporters
after an hour-long meeting with
Secretary of State George Shultz
at the State Department, at
which he was briefed on Lebanese
President Amin Gemayel*s meet-
ings earlier with President Rea-
gan and other Administration of-
ficials.
SHAMIR, at Shultz's request,
briefed the Americans on his visit
to Costa Rica. The Israeli For-
eign Minister appeared less op-
timistic than he was when he met
with Shultz last week over the
chances of an early withdrawal of
Israeli. Syrian and Palestine
Liberation Organization forces
from Lebanon.
He had said, after talking to
Shultz previously, that he hoped
an agreement on withdrawal
could be reached by the end of the
year. Asked later, if he still felt
that was possible, he replied, "I
cannot say."
But Shamir said. "I believe we
are going to solve the problem."
He indicated that Israel would
like to see a Lebanese-Israeli
working committee make
security arrangements for south
Lebanon and work out an agree-
ment on withdrawal. Presuma-
bly, he has in mind a committee
similar to the Israeli-Egyptian
working committees which made
arrangements during the peace
process between those countries.
However, a senior U.S. official
said later that the problem is not
the arrangements for withdrawal
but Israel's demand for a formal,
written agreement with the
Lebanese government. He said
Gemayel and other Lebanese of-
ficials talked in Washington of
rebuilding the "national consen-
sus" in their country, and this
rasied problems of how far Leba-
non could go toward a formal
agreement with Israel.
THE U.S. official also indi-
cated that Lebanon does not
want a formal agreement because
it might hamper its efforts to ob-
tain financial aid from other Arab
countries.
The next step in the process
will be the return of Morris
Draper, the special U.S. nego-
tiator for Lebanon, to the Middle
East. He was expected to go to
Lebanon first and then visit Is-
rael and Syria and, possibly,
Saudi Arabia, according to an of-
ficial here.
Meanwhile. Shultz was
scheduled to make a formal call
on King Hassan of Morocco,
chairman of the Arab League,
who arrived here for a meeting
with President Reagan.
Hassan, accompanied by the
Foreign Ministers of Syria,
Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan
and Algeria, and by the Secretary
General of the Arab League.
Chedli Klibi. had a working lunch
at the White House with Reagan
Friday, followed by a meeting
with Shultz. They met with
Yire President George Bush later
in the day.
Postcard mailed anonymously from behind Raoul Wallenberg has.not been forgotten
the Iron Curtain reminds the world that
After Reagan's vow
Wallenberg's memory on wane
Nearly one year after the
President of the United
States voiced a commit-
ment to the Wallenberg
family on behalf of the
American people to "do
everything in our power" to
find the truth about the
fate of this great humani-
tarian, a postcard was
bravely mailed by an
anonymous source from be-
hind the Iron Curtain, re-
minding the world that he
has not been forgotten.
The card, now in the posses-
sion of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles, was
mailed from Leningrad, USSR, to
...WANTED...
COTDQ EJfD SOCIAL BUNTS
WEOWUVTTOHIVEnn!
- ANNOUNCING -
A WIDE VARIETY OF I.IM.M TOURS
* #
BURT REYNOLDS DINNER THEATER
MUSICIANA SUPPER CLUB
TOURS OF PALM BEACH AND
MUCH MUCH MORE!!
g. cai 1 cot ncr tun "i ran km b aooai > i

I
WfST PA1M BEACH 11*
(305) 655-JWOO
AI 1 mi r*< *(. PLAN tMMI.I*
(All NOW DOfTT OOAY
HA.NY DM TTS HAVl AJ KADY f/> SOLD
King Carl Gustaf XVI of Sweden
and then forwarded to the Inter-
national Wallenberg Committee
in Stockholm. On the message
portion of the picture postal card
the words Raoid Wallenberg Lebt
(lives) are printed with a rubber
stamp.
OFFICIALS OF the Wiesen
thai Center were contacted by the
Wallenberg Committee and were
asked to make "every effort" to
bring this information to the
American public.
"This latest communication is
an indication that the plight and
legacy of Raoul Wallenberg can-
not be stifled even by the
strict Soviet regime," a spokes-
man for the Wiesenthal Center
said.
Wallenberg, 70, is a former
Swedish diplomat credited with
saving thoi sands of Hungarian
Jews during World War II. He
was subsequently arrested by
Soviet occupying forces in 1945
and has not been heard from
t since.
As a further reminder of Presi-
dent Reagan's pledge made dur-
ing the citizenship ceremony at
the White House on October 5,
1981, members of the House For-
eign Affairs Committee, led by
Rep. Tom Lantos ID., Calif.),
urged the President in a letter
bearing 31 signatures to honor
the commitment made on behalf
of the U.S. to the quest for Wal-
lenberg's freedom.
REPS. JACK KEMP (R. N.Y.I
and Millicent Fenwick (R., N.J.)
joined Rep. Robert Doman (R.,
Calif.) and the 28 other congres-
sional members who signed the
letter in stating: "This is an ap
propriate time to reaffirm our
commitment to a man who exem-
plifies those ideals which we, as
Americans, hold sacred. We urge
the administration to take all
possible steps to locate Raoul
Wallenberg and secure his return
to freedom."
Statements of support were
also made separately by members
of the U.S. Foreign Relations
Committee, led by Sen. Clay-
bourne Pell (D, R.I.)
Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abra-
ham Cooper, dean and assistant
dean of the Weisenthal Center,
urged that "no door should re-
main unopened and no avenue
unexplored in our search to learn
the truth about Raoul Wallen-
berg."
A SENIOR Administration of-
ficial, briefing reporters on these
meetings,;'. said they' -were not
negotiating sessions but an
"exchange of views on how best
to restore momentum to the
Middle East peace negotiations."
He said the Arab League dele-
gation sought "clarification" on
President Reagan's peace initia-
tive, while the Administration
sought clarification of the com-
munique issued at the Arab
League summit conference in
Fez. Morocco last month.
In particular, the official said,
the U.S. would like to know if the
implications in the plan proposed
by King Fahd of Saudi Arabia
last year and in the Fez summit
communique, that the Arabs are
willing to recognize and live in
peace with Israel, are actually the
Arab view. "If this is what it
meant, why not just say so?" the
official said. He said it was time
for the Arabs to "come out of the
closet" on this issue.
THE OFFICIAL stressed that
Reagan's proposals were aimed
at broadened Arab participation
in the Middle East peace talks
"Negotiations for peace must
take place around the table be-
tween Arabs and Israelis," he
said. He observed that negotia-
tions cannot be between the U.S.
and the Arabs and the U.S. and
Israel, but the U.S. can partici-
pate in negotiations at the table
with Arabs and Israelis.
The official also stressed that
all negotiations must be based on
United Nations Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338 and on
the Camp David accords. He,
noted that the negotiations are1
in two stages, the first being the
autonomy talks which the U.S. b
now trying to revive and. after a
transition period following im-
plimentation of an autonomy
agreement, a final stage of peace
talks.
He said Reagan in his Sept. 1
speech, did not outline a plan but
only proposals to facilitate the
autonomy talks and suggestions
that could form the basis for a
just peace settlement. The official
stressed that the President's
proposals aimed at getting the
Arab countries to join the
autonomy talks.
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Complete Social Program
Free GoH(ec. Son)
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Friday, October 29,1982

Ugly Campaign
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3-B
Arab agents challenge aid to Israel
* By BORIS SMOLAR
A massive and ugly
propaganda campaign is
now being developed in this
country by Arab agents
and pro-Arab elements to
influence Congress to vote
against giving American
aid to Israel. The campaign
is being carried through
large advertisements in
newspaper in 50 cities.
The basic text of the costly ad
is the same for all the newspapers
accepting it not all newspapers
accept it, recognizing its mali-
ciously misleading contents
but the text is slyly adjusted to
each city to appeal to innocent
Americans locally.
Asserting that Israel "spent
S2.5 billion in three weeks to kill
people in Lebanon," the inciting
ad asks provocatively whether
the money given to Israel could
? not be "better spent" for the
| benefit of the population of the
city where the advertisement is
carried. The ad is placed by a
group calling itself American-
Arab Anti-Discrimination Com-
mittee and gives an address in
Washington. It urges the readers
"to write or call Congressmen
and Senators to stop American
foreign aid to Israel."
THE CAMPAIGN obviously
speculates on the fact that the
forthcoming session of Congress
will have a substantial number of
new representatives and senators
who might be influence by voters
in the cities where they are cur-
rently running for reelection. The
Arab propaganda machine is
clearly figuring that its ad may
influeence also older members of
both houses of Congress who are
not up for reelection this year but
are confused about Israel because
of the Lebanon issue.
The expensive advertisement
which is obviously funded by
Arab oil governments and by
some American firms dealing
with these governments does
not mention, naturally, that Arab
countries are also receiving sub-
stantial financial aid from the
United States.
Nor does it mention the fact
that the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization is being financed by
Saudi Arabia to the tune of SI
million a day, and that the Soviet
government is according to a
report by the Central Intelligence
Agency allocating about $200
million annually for "national
liberation" movements abroad,
the largest part of which goes to
the PLO for terrorist activities.
NATIONAL JEWISH or-
ganizations are mobilizing them
Admiral Hyman E. Rickover, USN fret), is shown planting a
tree in the Jewish National Fund's American Independence
Park in Jerusalem during his recent visit to Israel as a guest of
Herut USA. Admiral Rickover said the high point of his trip
'seeing the fruits of JNF's land development and affore-
was
station work." Shown with Admiral Rickover is his wife,
Eleonore, who accompanied him on his trip.
selves to fight this Arab cam-
paign. Because the inciting Arab
ad is focusing on sensitive issues
through a local approach, the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has alerted its regional of-
fices across the country to react
in the form of a letter to the
editor campaign in any news-
paper in their region carrying the
deceptive ad.
The U.S. government is com-
mitted to Israel for the year 1983
under the Foreign Aid Bill 6370). The bill provides for $1.7
million in military assistance and
$785 million in economic support.
It has already completed the
Congressional committee
process, and is awaiting action on
the floor of both the Senate and
the House when Congress re-
sumes its session, A congres-
sional debate on the bill is antici-
pated this fall.
It is feared that there may be a
tendency on the part of some
members of Congress to take a
position that Israel needs less in
terms of military supplies and
equipment because of the demon-
stration of Israel's strength in
the war in Lebanon. Jewish
leadership is therefore preparing
itself for working with President
Reagan and Congress to insure
the support of the request of close
to $2.5 billion for Israel in grants
and loans in the 1983 budget.
THERE IS special need now to
demonstrate to the American
public and to Congress that it is
in America's interest to maintain
militarily and economically a
strong Israel as the only demo-
cracy in the Middle East upon
whom the U.S. can depend to th-
wart Moscow's ambition to make
inroads into the area. The Krem-
lin has already gained strong in-
fluence in Syria and Iraq. In the
Lebanon war alone, Israel de-
feated two surrogates of the So-
viet Union the PLO and Syria
thus weakening Soviet in-
terests in the area.
With the PLO and their sup-
porters now choosing Washing-
ton as their real battlefield, Jew-
ish leaders fear that while Israel's
operation in Lebanon resulted in
the military destruction of the
PLO, pro-Arab petrodollars may
obtain a PLO victory in the U.S.
Members of Congress are
aware of the close ties that have
existed for years between the
PLO leadership and the Kremlin.
At least 70 summit meetings
have taken place during the last
five years between the PLO top
leaders and Soviet military com-
mand.
THE COMPLETE backing of
the PLO by Moscow and its
satellite countries in the United
Nations and at every interna-
tional forum is also well known.
The PLO representative to the
Alba back In
intensive care
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Doctors at Hadassah Medical
Center have ordered Aliza Begin
back to the intensive care ward of
the hospital. The Premier's wife
was admitted to the hospital on
the eve of Yom Kippur, suffering
from severe respiratory
problems. She was discharged
from the intensive care ward and
^ transferred to the general ward
\ after her condition improved last
week. Over the weekend,
however, Mrs. Begin's condition
deteriorated again. A hospital
spokesman described her con-
dition as stable. Premier
Menachem Begin has postponed
a visit to Zaire because of his
wife's illness.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's & 123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's &123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
fP^Sw-^' are tasty
r^\MV J P3513alphabet
WJ***^ letters and
*Ar numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
ft
<^r
tf
Jb
iM-t'
ww>

\x,B^\
SO WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
UN. Zehdi Terzi, has admitted in
an interview, carried by the Pub-
lic Broadcasting Service, that
Palestinian terrorists are getting
training on a regular basis in the
Soviet Union.
It is estimated by competent
authorities that approximately
4.000 PLO terrorists were trained
in the last few years in Soviet
training camps in the use of
weaponry, sabotage tactics, ex-
plosives, terror and guerrilla war-
fare. In the current operations in
Lebanon, Israel captured
thousands of weapons supplied
by the Soviet government to the
PLO, including enough heavy ar-
tillery pieces to furnish six
brigades, many Katyusha rocket
launchers, tanks and anti-tank
missiles, armored personnel car-
riers and more than 4,000 tons of
ammunition.
The PLO has made it very
clear that it stands against the
United States. Its security chief,
Abu Ayad, openly stated in an
interview quoted by the Asso-
ciated Press that the PLO would
have allowed the Soviets "a
thousand bases" against the
United States if it controlled
land.
IN LIGHT of the intention of
the PLO to secure control of the
West Bank and the Gaza area,
now held by Israel, and declare
itself a government in these terri-
tories, it can be realized by every
thinking American what the
United State stands to lose to the
Soviet Union by cutting military
and financial support to Israel.
Gaza, which lies on the shores of
the Mediterranean, can easily be
converted into a Soviet naval
base, if the PLO succeeds in
reaching its goal of establishing
an indendent Palestinian state.
JTA PtmturwSyndicate
Our Family Urges You To
Exercise Your Right To Vote..
Irwin and MaiitM Hart Bcrkowili and daughter Ann*
ELECT
BERKOWITZ
Broward County Court Judge
Group 12 Non-Partisan
Endorsed by:
* THE AFL-CIO
* Concerned Democrats of Broward County
* The Republican Party of Broward County
* Broward County Veterans P.A.C.
* The Screening Committee of the Women's
Political Caucus
Paid Political Adv., I. Sarkowiti, Treat.


Page4-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of (greater fiolly wood
Friday, October 29, H82
Pantry Pride has Eveiyday Low
Prices all over the store...no
need to stock up. Bonus Buys,
too. Fill your pantiy at our
Pantry. Overall we save
more on food!
PRICES AND COUPONS
GOOD OCT. 28NOV. 3, 1982
cPtide
SERVICE DELI-
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH DEU COUNTERS
HANSEL 4 GRETEL
Bologna
(SAVE 20c)
HALF
LB
$129
1
SAVE
HEBREW NATIONAL
Bologna or
Salami.....
."2.09
40
LOW IN CHOLESTHOL
Turkey Ham...... 1,1.39 20
CREAMY-GERMAN
^1.49
OVEN FRESH
BBQ Chicken 1.69
DAIRY & DELI
(SAVE 30C)
LOWFAT SMOOTH N CREAMY OR
CALIFORNIABREAKSTONES
Cottage
Cheese 16czp
ASSORTE0 FLAVORS
Light 'N' Lively
89
CUPS
JUS SOUEE2D-CMU.t0
half
. OAL
SAVE
.42
40
OSCAR MA. EH SLCEOMEAI
Variety Pak ...... 1.89 40
I.VKIS-MIA' OX BEE'
Plumper Franks ."".1.69 40
PAN'M. PfUOt
Sour Cream .....c .79 20
FUISCHMAN S-UNSAlTE D OUAR I RS
Margarine ........iJS .89 20
COOPfcR COlORtO AMERICAN
Country Singles p." 1.19 40
-PERSONAL CARE-
ISO* BH -SHAMROO OR CONDITIONER oAVb
R0 GENTLE OR EXTRA BOOv
Heavenly Body......1.87 32
CONVENIENT
Bic Shaver.......^1.29 70
JOHNSON S-KITCHCN ASSORTMENT 10 CT PKG
Band Aid Brand.......147 32
HAD CHEST-TABLETS OR CAPSULES 12 | Cold Remedy........1.97
H I f<[ SH 'JNSCS NTED
Ladies*
Choice
Deodorant ^?^ck
iSAvE 6^'Ci
GUARANTEED//!
it mw'**'omi <**''*'**""< """*" ^
-wwt Pra. u Oom. t> omc ^..
m iw n Mima m w wo "o *wn <;
Am co^m rcM i. iw. w *. ^
Mlliml. Mr ID. tfl owr wiuld 5*
mMnaanwindMoMi Man ma ;~.
0ouM.Th.0NnriLllnCMW
(LIMIT 2 PLEASEl
3 LBS. AND OVER (SAVE 50)
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Whole
Fryers
3 LBS. AND OVER
Fresh
Ground Beef
U.S. CHOICE BEEF ROUND BONELESS (SA'
Bottom
Round Roast
BOTTOM ROUND STEAK, BONELESS LB $1.90
fla on Shipped premium fresh
Lots of Chicken...........* .4$
US CHOCt ri*>Nl [ (|f ROUND
Rump Roast..................2.29 50
, CMOtCt -BON(i( SS Bt H ROtJNO
Eye Round Roast........... 2.99 70
SWIFT BEEF
Sizztean................... 1.59 40
HOUSE Of RAEFORO
Fresh Sliced
Turkey Breast............2.69 so
U S CHOICE BEEF ROUN0 .WHOi IN CRv o VAO
Bottom Round.............. 1.59 40
FAMILY PAK MEATS v
Buy Big Save Morel
3 LBS. ft OVER
US CHOlCl -B*H BO'AlISS oAVfc
Cube Steak .. 2.69 30
Stewing Beef 1.89 30
Round........ 1.99 40
ob CHOtCE- BEtF ROUND *1*m o*s*S VI* awowwo.
Combo Pkg..lb 1.79 30
<^* ")R .wiPPrDPREM fntSM
Fryer Combo f 1.19 40 '
THIGHS 3REASTS DRUMSTICKS f
PRODUCE
(SAVE 30)
Bonus
BUY
Western
Cauliflower
(SAVE 50) U.S. NO. 1 ALL PURPOSE
Yellow
Onions """ ....3
(SAVE 30) U.S. NO. 1 ALL PURPOSE
White
Potatoes
(SAVE 70C) CRISP AND JUICY
Mclrrtosh
Apples
LB.
BAG
BONUS
BUY
10
LB.
BAG
Bonus
BUY
3
LB.
BAG
99
69
<:
U PICK FRtSM-LG SUPER SELECT B0-CT ^**
Cucumber*..........ft for 'V 21
u PCK NOIAN RIVER-SEEDLESS EXTRA lG 1' SIZE
OrapafruN...........4 forI.OO 20
SAVE
2bag .49 10
MDOOR OUTDOOR PLANTS IHNCM ROT IMLft-m, ^a
Schafflara............%" 6.991 00
IOPS IN VITAMIN A -GARDEN FRESH
CfTOU...........
FARMFRESH(HO' REG OlAROMERA CAUUFiOWfP PE
Oilv Salad
SOMETHING NEW SOMETHING DIFFERENT
VIP PfPPfRpNiCWAl
JM.89 10
>
j


Friday, October 29,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood______________________ PageS-B

m

> +
/>AC|| if wed
VIVaI save you
~S-jL>T\ PLAIN 0R SELF-RISING __ ^_^ _
Gold Medal /IQC
Flour 5b.bo rliJ
(WITH $10 PURCHASE AND COUPON BELOW)
32-OZ. BOTTLE _^_^^^ ^^^
Heinz p7fiC
Keg O' Ketchup M Z7
(WITH $10 PURCHASE AND COUPON BELOW) MdRM
SUNSHINE-BONUS PACK (SAVE 40) tfrrflj
Chip-A-Roos Cookies G 89*
12-OZBTLS (SAVE 1.60) t***M m
Stion's Beer 12 ^ $419
12-OZ. CANS (SAVE 30*) _
Old Milwaukee Beer13^ *. $169
FROZEN LITTLE EARS (SAVE 70*) F***?*1 J^ JU J-
Birdseye Cob Comli 8 pack 99c
DELTA (SAVE 10*) ^^ aW.Tl.Jl
Delta Paper Towels o,aNTROLL 59*
SENECA (SAVE 20*) *># "l A
ocncci Apple Juice 44ozjar a
ASSORTED FLAVORS (SAVE 25C) ^^ ^_ .
KtlZ OOQ3S O 12 OZ CANS V9
JIFFY (SAVE 19*) ____ M ^- g^g*
Com Muffin Mix 4.. bo*^!00
SEVEN SEAS VIVA ITALIAN (SAVE 10*) #%a*
Salad Dressings 59?
(SAVE 20*) ^- -^
Mr. Big Paper Towels 3 sa 'l49
GREAT FOR PIES! !"*#%/*
Libbys Pumpkin ,.,. 551*
12-OZ. CANS ASSORTED FLAVORS (SAVE 40*) ^_ ^ ->.
Shasta Sodas 6 $149
/w^wFVC^i imn|l ~V| PEPSI UGHT. MOUNTAIN DEW.
(Bwl ^ilwNES 1 Diet Pepsi or
iJI'^N^JSk save III nonC| 122a
HI iritoS "itmjti oo 11 rWm
/l/Cab^t 1.99 M C-HIQ
/[ HaXfower'^4.19 so 01 ^ ***
IK C^S^W^^'^iM^ Jil ^ LITER J^ (SAVE 64.,
PRICES AND COUPONS
GOOD OCT. 28-NOV. 3, 19S2
cpride
PACKAGED
BAKERY
Brown & Serve
^ -- 'TWIN ROLLS CLOVERLEAF
Rolls -*party^ke .
PANTRY PRIDE B^aBS^F f^^_W
PKG OF 12 bS^
PANTRY PRIDE
Raisin Broad ....Si
MEYERS
English Muffins 2
PUMPERNICKEL
Mar's Bread
AUNT HANNAH
AngetfbodBar
A i C ITALIAN OH
French Broad.
SAVE
.89 10
PK&S
c*s
.99 19
.69 16
.89 20
.59 12
FROZEN
18 OZ
LOAF
soz
BAR
8-02
.LOAF
ASSORTED FLAVORS
MRS SMITH S
Pumpkin Pie
IS 1.19
SAVE
26
28 02 4 -0
. box 1.4V
vvnippea lopping
40
.59 38
.89
PANTRY PRlDf
,8 02
J BWL
MWUTE MAIDREG OR WITH PULP
>2 02
, CAN
PANTRY PF.DE
2402
. BAO
SYVANSON ONNER-WMITE OR DARK MEAT
BOX 1.1H
FREE2ER OU6EN-COOK M POUCM-
>3 Bosti1.09 .25
PANTHY PRIOC MlXEO
^ 18
30
Fried Chicken
20
.20
24
2b!s1.00
OOWNYFLAKE BUTTERMILK OR HOMEMADE
<2 02
......PK0
Waffles
.69
CLIP AND
' SAVE
VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE 48C
PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
Gold Medal M*X.*>
Flour
I
5-LB. BAG
LIMIT ONE BAG WITH Ho OBOER EXCL TOBACCO PRODUCTS
QOOOOCT 28-NOV 3 1982
49
I
I
VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE 66*
Z 32-OZ BTL.
I Heinz
SiHl I Keg a Ketchup
791
UMITONCBTL WITH 110 OROCT EX TOBACCO PWXUCTS
QOOOOCT 28-NOV 3 IM2


Page 6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 29, 1982
At the sixth annual Negev Award dinner of
American Associates, Ben-Gurion Univer-
sity,at the Hotel Pierre in New York recently
are (left to right) Shlomo Gazit, president,
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Mrs.
Anna and CoL Jehiel Elyachar, Jane Fonda,
and Robert Arnow, president, American As-
sociates, Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev. Mrs. Elyachar holds the Negev
Award, an ancient pottery jug, dating back
to the period prior to the Persian invasion.
Fonda admires her special award, a Roman
glass perfume bottle from ther era of 63
BCE.
Headlines
Strongman says Libya to quit UN
The World Jewish Congress reports that
Libyan strongman Col- Qadhafi has informed UN
Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar that he
is requesting the withdrawal of his country from
the United Nations and is calling on other nations
to do the same.
According to the UN Office of the WJC,
Qadhafi addressed a letter to Prez de Cuellar early
last week in which he states: "I shall call on my
country to leave this organization and shall do my
utmost in this connection to incite all the small
nations also to leave this Assembly."
Qadhafi cites his "lack of confidence" in the
UN as the motive behind his decision. He has re-
quested that his letter be circulated to the mem-
bers of the UN General Assembly.
Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, U.S. permanent repre-
sentative to the United Nations, will receive the
1982 American Mizrachi Women Distinguished
Public Service Award at the annual Mizrachi New
York-New Jersey region scholarship dinner at the
Waldorf Astoria Hotel Dec. 5.
Joining in the tribute to Mrs. Kirkpatrick will
be Israel's Consul General in New York, the
Honorable Naphtali Lavie.
The dinner is one of the major events on the
AMW yearly calendar. Funds raised in connec-
tion with the dinner help pay for the educational
and extra-curricular needs of disadvantaged
students in AMW's network of 13 schools and so
cial welfare projects in Israel.
The dinner is part of a series of regional events
planned under the guidance of regional co-chair-
women Rhoda Miller and Norma Holzer.
Moshe Arens, Israel's Ambassador to the
United States, and Zevulun Hammer, Israel's
Minister of Education and Culture, will be guests
of honor at the American Zionist Federation's
seventh biennial convention Nov. 7-9 at the
Homowack Lodge in Spring Glen. N.Y., it was
announced by Ruth Jacobson. chairwoman.
"Sustain the Vision, Strengthen the Reality" is
the theme of the convention which is expected to
draw persons from across the country. A
new two-four year slate of officers will be elected
at the convention. Outgoing president is Rabbi
Joseph P. Sternstein.
Ambassador Arens will be keynote speaker and
will focus on present American-Israeli relations.
The Justice Department's Office of Public In-1
tegrity "claims they've been investigating cover-
up charges (regarding U.S. government agencies'
smuggling Nazi war criminals into the U.S., then
using and protecting them) for some time. The
fact is that they did nothing except sit on
them, as in the past."
So declares a retired Immigration and
Naturalization Service Counsel in Charles Allen
Jr. s article, "A Review of John Loftus' Allega-
tions," in the just released Fall issue of the Jew-
ish Veteran. John Loftus, a former employee-of
the Justice Department's Office of Special In-
vestigations, stunned the nation on May 16,1982,
on the "60 Minutes" television program with
charges of American government agencies' giving
sanctuary to Nazi war criminals in the U.S.
mmmmmmmmm$mmmmmmmmmm
A Rochester, N.Y., youth, president of the Ex-,
ploring program of the Boy Scouts of America,
has been named one of four 1983 national youth
representatives of the 4.4-million member or-
ganization.
David R. Greenfield, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry R. Greenfield, joins young people from
three other areas of the country representing the
BSA at a variety of major programs during the
73rd anniversary year.
The annual Scouting anniversary celebration is
scheduled for the week of Feb. 6 under the theme,
"Catch the Scouting Spirit." Greenfield was
elected to his post as national Explorer president
last March during an Explorer convention in
Philadelphia. He serves in this capacity for a
year.
World rank pianist Artur Rubinstein failed to
appear at the Oct. 18 dinner in his honor given by
supporters of the Weizmann Institute of Israel in
New York. Explanation was that the pianist was
"not strong enough to travel" from his Geneva
home. The Maestro's son, Broadway actor John
Rubinstein, represented his father at the dinner at
the Waldorf-Astoria.
Chairpersons of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science, Elga K. Stul-
man and Maks Birnbach made the announcement
after receiving the news from Institute president,
Prof. Michael Sela, following his visit with the 95-
year-old Maestro late last week.
The dinner program featured young Israeli
violin virtuoso Shlomo Mintz in a command per-
formance at the special request of Maestro
Rubinstein. Zubin Mehta, musical director of the
New York and Israel Philharmonic Orchestras,
and arts patron Avery Fisher, honorary co-chair-
man of the Weizmann tribute to Rubinstein, ad-
dressed the 1,200 dinner guests.
Avner Yaniv, director of the Institute for Mid-
dle Eastern Studies and chairman of the Jewish-
Arab Center, both at Haifa University, has been
appointed visiting Israeli professor at George-
town University for 1982-83.
Annually since 1976, a distinguished Israeli
professor has joined the faculty of Georgetown's
Department of Government through the support
of the Jewish Community Council of Greater
Washington and Georgetown University.
A native o'. Jerusalem, Yaniv was previously a
visiting academic in both England and Germany.
He was a lecturer and later senior lecturer in the
Department of Political Science, Haifa Univer-
sity, from 1973 to 1979. From 1973 to 1975, he
was director of a research project on the European
Community at the Jerusalem Van Leer Institute.
The National Foundation for Jewish Culture's
second annual Playwriting Award for the best
unpublished play illuminating an aspect of Jew-
ish life or experience has been awarded to Crispin
Larangeira for his play, "Whispers."
Over 150 plays were submitted to this competi-
tion which seeks to encourage playwrights "to in-
vestigate the richness of the Jewish heritage in its
many facets and to offer the community new
works which reflect fresh perspectives on Jewish
life and culture."
$5 Million Drive
Team seeks to rescue
Polish-Jewish artifacts
LOS ANGELES (JTA> -
The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations launched a $5 mil-
lion drive here this week to res-
cue, restore and reacquire long-
lost documents and artifacts rep-
resenting 1,000 years of Polish-
Jewish history.
The funds will go toward the
UAIIC's Polish Judaica project,
initiated last year following the
signing of a unique cultural ex-
change agreement between the
Reform Jewish group and the
University of Warsaw.
Dr. Armand Hammer, presi-
dent of Occidental Petroleum
Corp., served as chairman of .the
$500-a-plate dinner in the Beverly
Wilshire Hotel attended by 600
guests.
HAMMER CALLED the
UAHC-Polish agreement "a
breakthrough because for the
first time a Communist nation,
Poland, has agreed contractually
with an American Jewish
organization to provide Judaic
objects, manuscripts and art,
much of which has been inacces-
sible to Western scholarship." He
continued:
"The agreement will serve also
as a model to other nations, par-
ticularly those within the Com-
munist sphere, hopefully en-
gendering additional religious
and cultural exchange and sig-
nificant humanitarian gestures."
Dr. Maury Leibovitz of New
York, president of the Knoedler
Galleries and co-chairman of the
dinner with Guilford Glazer, an-
nounced that the UAHC would
issue a limited edition of 300 full-
size, full-color facsimile reproduc-
tions of the Kalonymus Codex,
an illuminated Bible manuscript
in Hebrew and Aramaic dating
from the year 1238 that is re-
garded as one of the oldest and
most beautiful treasures of Jew-
ish religious art. A Limited edition
of 300 copies at $5,000 each will
be published.
KALONYMUS CODEX was
one of 20 works of rare Jewish art
from Poland on exhibit at the
dinner. It will move to the Skir-
ball Museum of the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in Los Angeles, where
more than 100 articles of Polish
Jewish art, on loan from various
Polish institutions to the UAHC,
will be on display through
December.
Many of the works of Polish
Judaica were thought lost or des-
toryed in the Holocaust. Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, president of
the UAHC, told the dinner
guests:
"We cannot bring back the
martyrs of our people, or restore
the burned scrolls and precious
manuscripts that have been lost
forever. But through this historic
agreement we can and will carry
out our proud obligation to pre-
serve, for today and for the years
to come, the precious fragments
of a vanished world. In doing so,
we will more vividly remember,
more fully comprehend and more
nobly honor the vitality: and
genius of one of the great com-
munities in our people's history."
SINCE THE agreement was
signed, Schindler reported, the
project has been broadened to in-
clude the restoration and recon-
secration by teh UAHC of Jewish
cemeteries in some 400 cities and
towns in Poland, as well as the
restoration of several syna-
gogues, the furnishing of a new
synagogue in Lublin and the con-
struction of a Jewish chapel af .
the site of the Maidenek conceV
tration camp.
Rabbi Philip Hiat, assistant to
the president of the UAHC,
negotiated the agreement with
Polish church, governmental and
university officials during several
trips to Poland. He pointed out
that while the UAHC is a Reform
Jewish group, it has invited Con-
servative and Orthodox rabbis
and scholars to join in the work of
"rescuing and restoring the ar4.
artifacts, historic documents and
treasures of Polish Jewry for the
entire Jewish people."
The exhibition, which goes on
v.;w in Los Angeles will
be returned to Warsaw for the
40th anniversary of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising next April.
Later, the collection will be sent
to Israel, where it will be on view
at Bet Hatefutsot, the Museum
of the Diaspora, in Tel Aviv.
Former Miami rabbi stumps
for reelection of Rep. Fascell
A former Miami rabbi, who
was for several years director of
Hillel Foundation on the campus
of the University of Miami, has
come out in support of Rep.
Dante Fascell in his reelection bid
to the United States House of
Representatives next Tuesday.
Rabbi Stanley Ringler, director
of community affairs for B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation in
Washington, D.C., declared that
"the election of 1982 is crucial.
Members of the Jewish commu-
nity who reside and vote in the
19th Congressional District must
demonstrate now more than
ever" that they are behind Fas-
cell.
Ringler, in a letter to the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Asso-
ciaton, and writing "as campaign
manager for Fascell and as a vice
president of Beth David Congre-
gation." noted that Fascell
should be reelected "not just be-
cause he is a friend of the Jewish
community and one of Israel's
chief supporters, but because he
is an effective and outstanding
member of Congress.''
Said Ringler: "His service to
the entire community is one of
which we call all be proud." He
said in his letter that Fascell "is
an extraordinarily respected and
influential Congressman on
Capitol Hill He is a man of
integrity and dependability."
Russian Jews circumcised
CHICAGO (JTA| More
than 1,000 Russian Jewish men
and boys who have settled in the
Chicago area have been cir-
cumcised through the voluntary
services of several ritual cir-
cumcisers, according to the
Friends of Refugees of Eastern
Europe.
Mrs. Yitzchak Kosofsky,
president, said the Rev. Noah
Wolff was one of the cir-
cumcisers who had been in-
strumental in obtaining the
participation of Mount Sinai
Hospital in FREE's circumcision
service. Rabbi Shmuel Notick,
FREE executive director, aa>\
chat since the start of the
program. the circumcisers,
doctors and the hospital have
donated $1 million in facilities
and support staff help.
He said Bethesda and
Highland Park Hospitals also
have made their facilities
available to FREE for the
program.


aber 29, 1982
.....
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7-B
fish revisionist, Ditlieb Felderer,
the veracity of Anne Frank's
ie is shown at right. Left is the
home in Amsterdam where she and her
family hid out from the Nazis, and where she
wrote the diary.
>l>uia ml a Spurs Invitation
IAN BARNES
\h ronicle Syndicate
i of this year, Joseph
tor of the National
|h magazine "Bull-
sentenced to six
Jrisonment for incit-
atred. The issues of
cited as evidence
becution carried ma-
[national newspapers
Imps or mistakes in
medical staff by
isian people, under
kes as "black crime."
this "situation,"
litorials encouraged
loin the white army,"
{multiracial society,"
, for white power."
lirrors similar trials
ancerned with race-
Citement to murder.
clarian call for race
|to recruit volunteers
i economic and intel-
li c is such that anti-
and neo-Nazi ideas
' response among
the population.
l-style literature can
le to society out of all
fto its circulation,
rht-wing ideas are
ed into society to
Btituency hospitable
Mi-Semitic, anti-par-
nd extreme national-
)MPRISE a direct
a liberal heritage
freedom of speech
lost repulsive form.
it is necessary to
[understand the "re-
itegy underpinning
revisionism is a
lemic technique
ellectuals" of inter-
bism seek to divest
the overwhelming
[Nazi atrocities, the
ad war crimes perpe-
te Gestapo and SS
Third Reich. Revis-
fronts this past,
litewash and vindi-
by rewriting his-
the Holocaust as a
^nted by a Jewish
bent on world
and attacking Allied
being the real war
ceptive process is
|and internationally
awning texts, spon-
ences and utilizing
if liberal academics,
deceived by the
credentials" of the
Furthermore, ex-
ving political organ-
>mote and purvey
Brsions of history to
minds of a youth
to Join Rising
'White Army9
separated from the Second World
War by over a generation.
NAZIS REALIZE that repos-
session of the past is an im-
portant element of political and
cultural struggle. Their rewritten
history is an assertion of their
identity and their beliefs and is a
central political strategy foster-
ing a revitalized consciousness in
thi>.search tor a political voice.
The extreme right, therefore,
use rejigged "facts" to interpret
their own history, injecting pre-
judice which overshadows real-
ity. This binds Nazis into a
mythology from which they can-
not escape lest they lose their
identity; the defense of their re-
written past simultaneously
dupes and imprisons them.
Generally, revisionism con-
ducts a propaganda campaign
against Jewish communities,
racial minorities, and Israel. A
revamped "Protocols of the
Elders of Zion" points out a mas-
sive Jewish conspiracy seeking
world domination by encouraging
colored immigration and misceg-
enation to dilute the power of
"white blood." Hence, "Bull-
dog's" calumny that "colored
immigrants can seriously damage
your health."
The Holocaust, the six million,
and genocide are proclaimed a
"hoax": Germany was innocent
of starting the Second World
War; Hitler was an anti-Commu-
nist protecting Western civiliza-
tion in a crusade against Soviet
aggresion; and the death camps
were a fabrication designed to ex-
tract reparations from a con-
science-stricken West German
Government as a basis for an Is-
raeli State.
THUS, the major thrust of re-
visionism is political hostility to-
wards Jews, Israelis and Zion-
ism, as well as whitewashing the
Nazi regime. At the same time,
an anti-American strain accuses
the U.S.A. of fighting the "wrong
enemy" in the Second World
War; and the Allies perpetrated
the real "atrocities" of that
period: the British initiation of
civilian saturation bombing in
May, 1940, and the nuclear
strikes against Japan.
The particular function of re-
visionism is designed to present
Nazism in a positive light, and to
eradicate German guilt by show-
ing that Jewish plots have vic-
timized Germans and Pales-
tinians. It is both a denial and a
vindication of anti-Semitism.
Allied "atrocities" are intended
to "exonerate" Nazis by a com-
parative strategy, and this goes
deeper.
There have been three anti-
Churchill moves: the bombing of
Coventry, the "murder" of Gen-
eral Sikorsky, and the new alle-
gation that he advocated drench-
ing Germany with anthrax
bombs. These accusations may
not be Nazi inspired, but they are
in a similar vein to Nazi allega-
tions, and certainly play the Nazi
game.
THE POINT is that if Chur-
chill was such a reprehensible
person, then Hitler cannot have
been that bad. Hence, together
with the other conjectures, what,
they ask, is wrong with Nazism?
Revisionist literature is ex-
tensive. Iu 1950, Paul Rassinier's
"The Drama of European Jewry"
questioned the number of Holo-
caust deaths, claiming the six
million as an inflated figure; an
extensive Jewish emigration
from Germany, Poland and
Central Europe between 1933 and
1939 was not taken into account.
Christopherson's "Auschwitz:
Truth or Lie?" asserts that its
author was in that camp during
1944 and disclaims all knowledge
of the ovens, suspecting that
they were erected after the war,
presumably to provide evidence
at Nuremberg. The Swedish re-
visionist, Ditlieb Felderer, ques-
tions the veracity of Anne
Frank's diary, while Diwald's
1978 revisionist history of Ger-
many incorporates lies arguing
that the Birkenau ovens were
used to control typhoid, and that
the Dachau gas chambers were
unused "test models."
THESE GRIM fairy tales
would be laughable but for a
novel revisionist tactic. Two phe-
nomena illustrate a policy of gen-
erating a "revisionist school of
history" to compete with real
history: Butz's "The Hoax of the
Twentieth Century" and the Ins-
titute for Historical Review
(IHR).
Butz strove to discredit the
Holocaust in a subtle and sophis-
ticated manner by writing with a
veneer of scholarship. The style
of the book creates the impres-
sion of seriousness and objectiv-
ity. The inclusion of exhaustive
footnotes and a large bibliog-
raphy all contribute to .a scholar-
ly image,'as"does confronting es-
tablished authorities on the
Holocaust and making acknow-
ledgements to the Imperial War
Museum, the Dutch Red Cross,
and official U.S. archives.
More dangerously, Butz cites
evidence used by the prosecution
at Nuremberg, thereby display-
ing "balance." He criticized and
rejects other anti-Holocaust writ-
ers' allegations that Nazis on
trial at Nuremberg testified to
the existence of extermination
camps after torture; concedes
that SS Einsatzgruppen may
have murdered civilians; does not
defend German anti-Semitism:
and admits that perhaps one mil-
lion Jews died during the war
a devious stroke.
The book purports to be schol-
arly, plausible and reasonable
and, to the non-historian, accept-
able.
BUTZ'S TECHNIQUE
symbolizes the new revisionist
methodology: an attempt to be
"objective" aimed at a reader's
critical faculties, inviting the sur-
render of common sense. Revis-
ionism's "scientifically based"
investigations are compared with
"subjective" official history. Re-
visionists are, therefore, con-
structing a new, alternative
"school," thereby breeding an in-
tellectual enviornment which
causes confusion, doubt and ob-
fuscation to such an extent that
new generations might be unable
to distinguish historical truth.
In this way, inherently evil
political ideologies might become
more acceptable or remain un-
questioned. In strengthening
their myths, fascists and Nazis
can enter into existing reality via
them, and then perhaps trans-
form reality according to the
myths.
A second important feature of
revisionism is the current, coor-
dinated extremist campaign
emanating from the U.S.A. and
Britain. The California-based
Institute for Historical Review,
with its quarterly journal and
British outlet, the Historical Re-
view Press, is posing a threat to
democracy and history.
IT HOLDS academic-sounding
revisionist conventions: at
Northrop University. Los Ange-
les, in 1979; at Pomona College,
in 19K0: while a third, for 1981. at
the University of California's
Lake Arrowhead Conference
Center, was banned. Instead, the
i/os Angeles Hacienda Hotel's
International Room was booked
under a different name.
This right-wing masquerade
thus gained entrance to two rep-
utable institutions winning an
academic cachet by association.
Convention representatives
derived from America, Australia,
France. Sweden. Britain, Asia and
Arabia.
The importance of the conven-
tions lies in the inclusion of gen-
uine academics and men claiming
academic affiliation. Dr. Austin
App. author of "The Six Million
Swindle" and a former as-
sociate professor of English at
LaSalle College. Philadelphia:
Dr. Arthur Butz. of Northwest-
rn University; and Dr. Robert
aurisson. of Lyons University,
ire among those who have at-
ended.
THE OFFER of a $50,000 re-
vard to anyone who could pro-
vide proof that the Nazis had
gassed Jews, and a $25,000
reward for a bar of soap produced
from Jewish fat, illustrate the
Institute's general trend of
thought.
The third convention included
a paper entitled "Axis Involve-
ment with Arab Nationalists,"
and Issa Nakhleh. head of the
Palestine-Arab delegation in New
York, spoke of Zionist genocide
against Palestinians, demon-
strating a growing united left-
right front against Jews and Is-
rael. A similar anti-Zionist cam-
paign can be seen in the British
National Front's opposition to an
"expansionist Israel" and the
British Movement's claims that
Jews forcibly seized Arab land by
capitalizing on "alleged atro-
cities" during the Second World
War.
JNF official reported
wounded in Rome
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM JTA) A
Jewish National Fund official
was one of the two Israelis who
were among the wounded at the
Rome synagogue terror attack
early in October, the JNF here
has announced. Max Shamgar.
55, until recently served as JNF's
emissary in Rome. He returned to
Israel to take a position in the
JNF's Council of Teachers and
was visiting Rome briefly on a
special JNF assignment when he
was wounded. The other Israeli
hurt in the attack was Prof.
Jacob Sarmonetta, a Hebrew
University don.
in a cable to Chief Rabbi Elk)
Toaff, JNF Chairman Moshe
Rivlin wrote, in part: "The
Jewish National Fund in Israel,
whose emissary and whose
supporters were among those
hurt, sends its wishes of en-
couragement and consolation to
our brothers in Italy. We will
work together to uproot the
pestilence of anti-Semitism, to
consolidate the State of Israel
and to strengthen the Jewish
people and preserve its existence'
and honor everywhere."
?ffl:::WxW:W:^
1
g:
V
x
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Oct. 29-6:23
Friday, Nov. 5-5:19
?ina
' t it :l v -:
I
V.
xM *?# "u P'4?"!"4?
i' :
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elo haynu Melech Ha-olam.
Asher kid shanu B mitz-vo-tav. V'tzee-va-nu
L had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat
Blessed an Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe.
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
mmmmmmuttimmmmum


Pi
Page 8-B
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of OrmUr Hollywood
Friday, October a
Behind the Facts
Why Arabs backed down in UN
to remove Israeli delegation
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Only a few days
before Israel's credentials
were scheduled to be
presented for approval in
the General Assembly, the
Arab countries retreated
from their decision of two
weeks ago to seek Israel's
suspension from the
Assembly.
According to reports here, the
shift was decided upon at a closed
meeting of the 21 members of the
Arab League recently. The
decision not to seek Israel's
suspension meant in effect that
the Arabs succumbed to
American pressure and the
warning from Secretary of State
George Shultz that if Israel were
expelled from the Assembly the
U.S. would walk out of it and
terminate its payments to the
world organization.
ANOTHER REASON for the
Arabs' retreat, according to
diplomats here, was that a move
at this time to suspend Israel
would be incompatible with
President Reagan's Middle East
proposals and the declaration the
Arab states adopted at their
summit meeting in Fez, Morocco
last month. That declaration
urged guarantees for countries in
Lebanese woe
far from over,
Chiles says
South Florida leaders were
guests at a reception in honor of
U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles at the
home of Judge and Mrs. Irving
Cypen last weekend.
Expressing their support of
Chiles' candidacy in the cam-
paign he is running in next Tues-
day's election, they expressed
special satisfaction at Chiles'
comments following the cessation
of hostilities in Lebanon.
"For years now, Lebanon has
been torn by civil war, bickering
internal factions, foreign troops,
and the PLO. It seems we seldom
see good news there without a
tragedy following at its heels.
Recently, though, the situation
has quieted down a bit. Israel has
pulled its troops out of Beirut, to
be replaced by Lebanese civilian
and military authorities. In the
meantime, peacekeeping forces
from Italy, France, and the
United States have had a stabili-
zing effect.
"Things appear to be looking
up again, as they were before the
brutal murder of Lebanon's Pres-
ident-elect. Bashir Gemayel. Life
there is as close to normal as can
be expected under the circum-
stances. Israel's northern settle-
ments are free from the threat of
a PLO terrorist and military pre-
sence across the border. At the
very least, the guerilla group has
had the wind knocked out of it."
But Chiles warned that "The
Eroblems in Lebanon are far from
eing solved, though. The
chances of quickly concluding a
peace treaty with Israel are less
under the new President than
they were under his brother. And
the tensions in Lebanon are deep-
rooted and strong. Amin
Gemayel does show promise
toward being able to draw the
different factions together. If he
can also maintain a cooperative
attitude toward Israel, we may be
back on track.
the Mideast. The Arabs view the
Fez declaration and Reagan's
proposals as generally positive
steps.
Instead of seeking to exclude
Israel from the Assembly, the
Arabs have decided to issue a
joint statement condemning
Israel for what they contend are
repeated violations of the UN
Charter and its defiance of
Security Council resolutions.
Arab and Moslem delegates held
'ong consultations on the text of
the statement presented to the
General Assembly Monday when
the credentials of Israel and other
member-states were offered for
approval.
The Arabs' decision to drop the
suspension bid did not come as a
surprise here. Apart from Libya
and Iran, which spearheaded the
suspension drive, all the Arab
countries seemed to be aware of
the grave consequences such a
move would have on the UN as
an organization in general and to
the Arab cause in particular.
THE U.S. contributes 25
percent of the UN's annual
budget of $600 million. If the
U.S. withdraws its financial
support, the UN will lose its
ability to operate effectively.
Secretary General Javier Perez
de Cuellar also made it clear to
the Arabs that suspending Israel
would be a severe blow to the
UN's prestige and would curtail
dramatically its humanitarian
programs for Palestinian re-
fugees.
Diplomats here said, however,
that the drive to deny Israel its
credentials will probably come up
again next year during the 38th
session of the General Assembly.
THE OLD MANHOLES CTEURpPe
;'"<*
-v *-.
'^^S^^^Z^
-OT*V
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INTRODUCES
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it matured to get your money back without a
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But now, with an American Savings
7-Day Wonder Account, you get it alL With
a minimum deposit of $20,000, you receive
a market interest rate. Every penny
of your money (up to $100,000) is insured
by the FSLIC, an agency of the Federal
government. And since the term of the
account is only 7 days, you have quick
access to your money.
Market interest rates, government
insurance, and quick access to your money.
No money market fund can match that.
So come in and open an American
Savings 7-Day Wonder Account. It's a
wonder you on get so much so quickly.
HELPING, YOU MAKE THE MOST OF WHAT YOU HA/E |H|
AMERICAN SAVINGS^
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