The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00308

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
By BEN S ALTER
President, Jewish Federation of S. Broward
With the "Days of Awe" behind us, refreshed by
our prayers and inspired by our rabbis' sermons, we
Jews must appraise events in the Mideast and on the
world scene with thoughts that penetrate the
headlines.
We can take pride that in Israel's democratic
society, more than 400,000 people approximately
10 percent of her population called for justice in
the wake of the Palestinian camp tragedy. On a
proportional basis, it is as if more than 22 million
Americans took to the streets of our cities. Israel's
Our 'family'
In Israel
needs our
love, help
democratic process is at work, as evidenced by the
Israeli government's willingness to hold a full-scale
judicial inquiry. We in America do not help this
process by joining the anti-Semites, anti-Israelis and
anti-Zionists in their frenetic struggle to make
political capital out of the situation.
We don't condone the tragedy that took place in
the camps, but we should not forget:
Historians will be hard-pressed to find any
nation being held accountable for the rampages of
the soldiers of an ally.
This year, the Syrians murdered 20 times the
Continued on Page 2
T ]Tewis]hi Floridliami
and Shotar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 12- Number 21
Hollywood. Florida Friday, October 15,1982
I FndShochtt
Price 35 Cents
Killing school prayer bill extolled
:.:W:W:W:W:WxWS
4WK*:*:w::-K<^s^^
[HOSPITAL SERVICES On one of his long lists of High Holy
pays' visits to South Broward hospitals, nursing homes and
I correctional institutions, Rabbi Harold Richter. director of
[Chaplaincy, Jewish Federation of South Broward, brought two of his
three children, Saul (right) and Miriam (center). Shown with the rabbi
(blowing shofar), Hollywood Medical Center patients and staff is Eve
Steckel, director of volunteers (left).
Many Jews
had fought
Helms rider
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Washington
representatives of two Jew-
ish organizations in the
forefront of the fight
against bringing back
prayers in the public
schools have hailed the
defeat of the effort in the
Senate as a victory over
"the greatest attack on our
constitutional system of
government in this cen-
tury."
"The fundamental guarantees
of the church-state separation of
powers have been preserved," de-
clared David Saperstein and
Marc Pearl, Washington repre-
sentatives of the Union Of Amer-
ican Hebrew Congregations
(UAHC) and American Jewish
Continued on Page 7
Otto
.*.-;i.'ti, <>***-'
Stieber to receive
coveted ADL award
Jewish Federation of South Broward Associate Cam-
paign Chairman Otto Stieber, a Holocaust survivor who
[>orrowed a few dollars 43 years ago to make his way to
America, will be awarded the Torch of Liberty next month
>m the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) of B'nai B'rith.
At Dachau and Buchenwald, Stieber was brutally
eaten. He was expected to die from typhoid fever, but
he 96-pound survivor not only lived to tell of Nazi atroci-
i but now devotes much of his
Itime to Jewish philanthropy.
I After making his way from
Switzerland following World War
I", Stieber worked hard aa a ped-
I dler in his new country. America.
I But he could only sell to Jews; ha
|tould only speak Yiddish.
[Eventually, the current Hal-
[ndale resident saved enough to
jo send to Vienna for his mother
brother and cousin. His business
Merest grew aa he began selling
I line linens.
It was through this peddling
'hat he met Evelyn, whose father
*ned a lingerie business. Mrs.
I**t>er, Jewish Federation of
m
South Broward's Women's Divi-
sion campaign vice president, be-
Continued on Page 2
Earnest man
an Israeli?
LONDON Man's earliest ancestor may have
first appeared in Israel, not in Africa as many
scientists now believe, according to an article in
the scientific magazine Nature.
According to Charles A. Repenning of the U.S.
Geological Survey at Menlo Park, Calif, and Old-
rich Fejfar of the Geological Survey of Czecho-
slovakia, research at Ubeidiya in Israel has indi-
cated that material found there might be 500,000
years older than any similar artifacts of Homo
erect us found in Africa.
They said their evaluation of fossils and arti-
facts from Ubeidiya raises "no substantial reason
for considering the locality younger than two mil-
lion years and possibly as much 500,000 years
older than any record of Homo erectus in
Africa."
Otto Stieber
Oil in Israel? Bible tells 'em so
Brush with death makes Texan
true believer
By PEARL OEFEN
TEL AVIV A Christian oil
man from Texas is drilling a well
in Israel, based on readings in the
Bible and backed up by belief,
technology and hard cash.
The story began during World
War II when fighter pilot Andrew
C. Sorelle Jr. was strafing a Ger-
man truck convoy in Normandy.
His American Air Force Thun-
derbolt was hit by a German 88-
mm shell and went out of control.
"I knew I had lost my aircraft," the
recipient of the Silver Star and
Distinguished Flying Cross remembers.
"I knew I was going to die. What hap-
pened next, I am told, could not have
happened.
" Juat a few feat from the ground, that
Coatinued on Page 11


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Friday. October 16,1962
The Jewish Floridian and Shpfar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Elaine Bloom views politics
Active Jews can stem negativism
By STEVE KATON
While Elaine Bloom states
"things (Mideast, Soviet emigra-
tion, cults .) couldn't be worse
right now," the former state
legislator and current Florida
Federations' liaison to Tallahas-
see believes that only by getting
involved can Jews turn things
around.
Speaking to members of the
Community Relations Committee
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward at a recent afternoon
session, Ms. Bloom rhetorically
asked her audience, "Who is a
Jew? What is a Jew?"
Teviah looks like a Jew, with
his peyos and t'fflin, the long-
time South Florida political and
Jewish activist said, but today
| it's harder to recognize one.
Ms. Bloom defines a Jew as a
I person who considers working for
l the survival of Israel the most
I important thing in his or her life.
[The bottom line is political power
land media power, she said, "and
|we Mews) must work at both."
She pointed to the kind of
"press" Israel received during
^Operation Peace for Galilee" as
la prime example of Jews failing
Ito let their positions, policies and
I history find its way into the files
Id information that reporters and
(editors must know.
"The media simply was not in-
formed about Israel," Ms. Bloom
Isaid. And without the historical
[background needed to properly
interpret the news, the surface
Ifacts are distorted.
CMC's Mara Giulianti with Elaine Bloom
In the United States, and es-
pecially closer to home in Florida,
the Association of Jewish
Federations' spokesperson told
As Elections Near
New Nevada senator a Jew?
By MORRIE AMITAY
With only weeks to go before
II in Nov. 2 elections, a number of
I recent political developments of
linterest to the American Jewish
I community are worth noting.
In a pleasant surprise, a Jew-
h-li challenger won the Republ-
ican Senate nomination in
Nevada. He is Chic Hecht, the
Iformer State Senate Minority
lleader. Hecht, who has close ties
Ito the Jewish community, will
face incumbant Democrat Sen.
[Howard Cannon, who won in a
Ivery close and divisive primary
Irace.
ONE OF Hecht'a immediate
Iconcerns following his victory on
Sept. 14 was obtaining a seat in a
[synagogue in Washington, where
I he was spending Rosh Hashanah.
IHecht's race offers the best
opportunity to gain a new Jewish
Senator in 1982, along with
[Democrat Julius Michaelson,
I who is challenging incumbent
I Sen. John Chafee in Rhode
I Island.
In California, Democratic Gov.
jJerry Brown is running hard
[against San Diego Mayor Pete
[Wilson, who came out of the June
I GOP primary with a big lead.
Rep. Dante Fascell
Two recent statewide polls put
Brown, who has had a consistent
record of public support for
Israel, within ten percent and
moving up.
A September GOP poll shows
incumbent Republican Sen.
Lowell Weicker of Connecticut
retaking the lead over challenger
Toby Moffett. Weicker, who has
been an outspoken supporter of
Israel, is in a tough but winnable
race.
ON THE House side, a race of
key importance in Florida pits in-
cumbent Democratic Rep. Dante
Fascell against Glenn Rinker, a
former TV newscaster. Redis-
tricting has hurt Fascell, who is a
senior member of the Foreign
Affairs Committee and has been
a consistent and effective friend
of Israel.
If he wins, Fascell will be next
in line to become chairman of the
Committee. The current chair-
man, veteran Clem Zablocki of
Wisconsin, withstood a serious
primary challenge and unfor-
tunately can be expected to
maintain his critical attitude
toward Israel for the next two
years.
In Georgia, incumbent Demo-
crat Wyche Fowler, who has a
fine record of support on Israel-
related issues, was faced with the
possibility of a primary challenge
from State Representative Julian
Bond. The Georgia redistricting
plan placed a very high percen-
tage of black voters in Fowler's
new district. Bond, the nationally
prominent black leader, con-
sidered a bid for the seat, but re-
cently announced his decision not
to run in the primary against
Fowler. Bond had expressed
extreme anti-Israel views even
before it became fashionable.
the gathering at the Federation,
'we must welcome candidates for
office organizations must get
to know who is, or would, repre-
sent them."
Ms. Bloom suggests that a
"buddy system" be established
with politicians and the press to
influence those deciding where
millions of dollars are spent.
"There are new seats in Congress
... get involved ... get to know
who is seeking those seats .
contribute time and money to
their election."
Ms. Bloom stressed that in
politics and with the press like
in life it is often who you
know, not what. She handed out
a "public official contact in-
formation" sheet so residents can
list friends, relatives, neighbors
who might help set up a network
of influence.
Copies of the political-media
link sheets are available from the
Federation's Government Affairs
Committee. CRC. One of the
most important tools that con-
cerned citizens can use to tell
federal officials their feelings on
an issue is (202) 456-7639, Ms.
Bloom said.
That is the phone number of
the White House, and Ms. Bloom
says every call is registered as a
"for" or "against" a given issue,
and does matter and influence the
executive branch of government.
Ms. Bloom says she opposes
the new single-member districts
in Florida because it will turn
small areas into political wards.
An election can be won by so few
votes, she said, that a district be-
comes a neighborhood arena with
but a single voice, not a com-
munity-wide one.
Ms. Bloom thanked Jewish
Federation of South Broward
members who worked for the
passage of the increased sales
tax, saying it will have a great ef-
fect "on picking up the slack
created by President Reagan cut-
ting social services 70 percent."
Attention Burial Ground Buyers
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar o( Greater Hollywood
, .. ,.......,.,, n.i l^n n n ij i ii'i..... i
^OgfrfrrUUMa
Mttttsm
Hie facts say otherwise
Answering questions from the press the other
week, President Reagan categorically denied that he
was attempting to destabilize the coalition govern-
ment of Prime Minister Begin. Said Mr. Reagan: If
Mr. Begin truly represents the people of Israel, then
he is going to continue to do business with him.
There is in fact no other way, he said, because the
United States expects to continue to do business
with the State of I srael as a valued ally.
On its face, this comes across like Gang Busters.
Until, that is, you study another one of the
; President's remarks. Said he: The United States has
never engaged in any activity intended to destabilize
the leadership or government of another sovereign
nation.
But this is pure fiction. From the political turmoil
of I ran to the agonies of Central and South American
countries, from the sabotage in which we engaged in
Southeast Asia to our covert activities on the con-
tinent of Africa, our own government has long been
active in the arena of governmental destabilization.
The result of all of this is either that Mr. Reagan
simply does not know our own history, or else he is
guilty of telling an absolute untruth. In any case, it
makes a shambles of his comment on the
Administration's intentions in Israel specifically and
the Middle East generally. The bald fact is that
President Reagan and the new Bechtel Corp. State
Department under the hand of Secretary of State
George Shultz are dedicated to ousting the gover-
nment of Menachem Begin.
The pitfall Is clear
Enter former President Jimmuh Carter. If there is
any amendment that truly should be added to the
United States Constitution, it ought to be one that
limits former Presidents to be seen only rarely and to I
be heard not at all.
In Mr. Carter's case, that would be a welcome
thing, but no such luck. Now that two years have i
passed since the American people sent him back to
Plains, Ga., the former Commander-Ln -Chief is about :j:
to give birth to a book telling everyone why they
were wrong to send him back to Plains, and how ab 1
surdly inefficient all his successors are. He needs the 1
advance publicity. and so he's set his mouth in mo- $
tion.
Unfortunately, it does not end there. Mr. Carter I
also has much to say about Israel, a nation with
whose destiny his Administration is inextricably
linked. The bonding glue is Camp David, where Mr. f<
Carter sure is getting himself stuck in his own
cement these days.
In next week's Time Magazine, after telling .
one and all how saintly was the slain Anwar Sadat,
he pontificates on just what kind of an impossible
person Prime M inister Begin is. The curtain speech '#
to this little operetta is that Israel, after all, was
meant to be by God's design, and that the people of %
Israel should not be confused with the government of
Israel. ig
In effect, according to Jimmuh, one may wish that $
Prime Minister Begin would disappear somehow, and |
so long as he does not oblige the world, we must suf- %.
fer his follies, but we must never forget that Prime
Minister Begin is not Israel. 'i
We would not mention this in and of itself because ?:
it is not worth mentioning. Remember? Former %
Presidents should be seen only rarely and heard not %
at all. Still, Mr. Carter's assessment of Mr. Begin is %
precisely what President Reagan is doing these days $
though in his question-and-answer session last &
week he averred otherwise: Both men encourage our S
own nation to distinguish between the people of Is-
rael and the government whom they elected. %
If this is not an attempt at destabilization, we
don't know what is. ^
Jewish Floridian
end IM ol Onseter Hollywood C FredS'i
FRE0SMOCHET STEVE KATON SUZANNE SMOCMET
Ediioiand PuBiin*r Associate Editor Eiecutive Edilo'
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StieDer Executive Oirector. Summer G Kaye SuDmii malarial tor publication to Leslie Silas
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Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
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Federation ol South Broward, 271t Hollywood Blvd Hollywood. Fla 33020 Phone 921 M10
Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday. October 15, 1982 28 TISHRI5743
Volume 12 Number 21
Arrogance of an
's lecture
THE OTHER day, I was dis-
cussing with a friend some finan-
cial problems about which I
believed she had considerable
knowledge and experience. Sug-
gesting that there was something
unique and symbolic in my
dilemma, I sighed in what I
thought was a playful tone and
asked: "Why me?"
f The "why me?" refrain has
: long been a private joke between
us, which we both have used for
; years now to act out a sense of
! frustration over one predicament
; or another and to pretend in a
: self-pitying way that only we,
and we alone, were being singled
[ out for calamity.
I have no idea how this thing
: really began, or when, but it cer-
tainly had been pleasant up to
now. Only this time, the joke
didn't work. This time, she said:
"Oh, you poor persecuted Jew,
you."
I AM reminded of a letter that
the Czech novelist, Franz Kafka,
who was Jewish, wrote to one of
his secret lovers, Milena
Jesenska. in which he talked
about anti-Semitism and why,
among other reasons, marriage
between them was out of the
question, if only because of the
difference in their religions.
In the letter, Kafka examined
her observation about him that
he suffered the typical anxious-
nessof Jews." Said Kafka:
"And then Milena still talks
about anxiousness, gives me a
blow on the chest or asks (what
so far as sound and rhythm are
concerned, comes to the same
thing in the Czech language):
'Jstezuf 'Are you Jewish?' "
MILENA, in her own letter
which stimulated Kafka's
response, merely used "anxious-
ness" and "Jews" as equivalents.
When she had asked him if he
were Jewish, in effect she meant
whether this was why he had,
from the beginning of his life,
complained of being anxious.
But Kafka deliberately misun-
derstood her point to make a far
more important one. His final ob-
servation in the letter to Milena
is the crux of the whole thing and
a powerful insight into anti-
Semitism in general, especially
because part of Kafka's genius
gave him the capacity to make
physical equivalents of emotional
conditions.
"Don't you see," he asked
Milena, "how in the Jste the fist
is withdrawn to gather muscle-
strength? And then in the zid
(comes) the cheerful, unfailing,
forward-flying blow?"
In effect, argued Kafka, an
anti-Semitic remark is a physical
assault. And that is precisely
how I felt when my friend aban-
doned the years of banter be-
tween us about "why me?" and
when she suddenly called me a
"poor persecuted Jew."
IT WAS a remark not made, or
so my friend said, from any
motive other than "profound
affection." But it was the
"cheerful (italics mine), unfailing,
forward-flying blow" Kafka
talked about in his letter to
Milena that I saw instead. It was,
in the end, a physical assault.
I am reminded of this incident
because of an article the other
week by Miami's Archbishop
Edward A. McCarthy which, of
course, the Sunday Herald was
thrilled to feature if only because
its scurrilousness is disguised by
a grudging patina of make-
believe Jesuitical scholarship. I
have been mulling the article over
in my mind since then, wondering
how to write about it without be-
coming scurrilous in return. My
talk with my old friend was pre-
cisely what I needed to inspire
me.
There is a difference. My friend
is a Protestant. The Archbishop
is a princeling of the one and only
Church of Rome. The distance
between these two forms of
Christianity is cosmic. Even a
casual drive through predomi-
nantly Congregationalist New
England tells the story better
than any book can. Still, both
share the same God it is the
vilest corruption of anything
Jewish to talk about that comical
delusion known as Judeo-Chris-
tianity. Worse, both share a pre-
dilection for anti-Semitism.
ARCHBISHOP McCarthy's
article in the Herald bristled with
it in the most classical sense of
that Christian device. In millenia
past, there were other churchly
reasons for the ugly encourage-
ment of anti-Semitism. Today, of
course, there are newer ones. For
instance, there is petroPolitik,
which loosely translates into
money, a commodity Christians
skillfully maneuver on an
anagogic level at the same time
that they engage in their time-
honored Jew-baiting by teaching
the faithful about Jewish power
aay, in the world of movie and'
dress-making.
A second reason lies in the
realm of the Vatican itself, where
there is a renewed political ac-
tivism let loose on a tide of
revolution in Latin America and,
of course, of mischief-making in
Jerusalem.
The excuse for anti-Semitismiii
the Christian community today,
if ever there is the need for an
excuse to let loose anti-Semitism,
comes from the war in Lebanon
and its aftermath. They, who
have lived on a tide of Jewish
agony and blood for 2,000 years,
now point their finger at a single
event in Lebanon which suddenly
makes Israel specifically, and
Jews generally, guilty of Nazi
atrocities, genocide and any other
word in a similar vocabulary they
can think of.
SUDDENLY, they are Alices
all in a wonderland of jabber-
wocky cleansing, they think,
their own crudities and bestial-
ities going back through the ages
with the scouring powder of this
single event.
Archbishop McCarthy shows
the way. What angers him in his
piece is the "arrogance" of Mena-
Continued on Page 14
Letters of Note
Reader defends Israel's defense
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian
I consider it my moral obliga-
tion to respond to Z. Esther
Slomovic's letter, published in
the Jewish Floridian Oct. 1,
I will be charitable and say
that the lady is suffering from an
advanced state of gullibility. If
the lady had beep keeping up
with the news, she would have
known, just as the world knew.
that Israel was preparing for an
assault on the PLO positions in
Lebanon weeks before the at-
tempted murder of the Israel am-
bassador in London.
Of course, the PLO denied re-
sponsibility, as they generally do
when they fail in their objective.
It was a well-known fact that
the PLO maintained their
military installations in the midst
of civilian population, in the as-
sumption that it would deter the
Israelis from an all-out attack on
their camps.
This tactic worked exceedingly
well for the PLO as it obliged the
Israelis to give the civilians ad-
vance warning of an impending
bombing raid. This, so that the
civilians would seek shelter. Un-
fortunately, to hold on to their
human shield, the PLO forcibly
prevented the civilians from flee-
ing to safe areas.
Israel had the means to mount
a full-scale attack to quickly rid
Beirut of the swaggering PLO
terrorists: but the safety of the
civilians was foremost in Israeli
planning. And, so, Israel was
forced into a waiting game.
The news media had a field day
with this situation, creating an
atmosphere of antagonism with
their misrepresentation of the
facts and their sensationlist re-
porting. After all, the media rep-
resentatives received their infor-
mation from the PLO.
Do you think that this infor-
mation would not be slanted or
biased? The TV cameras showed
the departure of the PLO as con-
quering heroes not as a defeat-
ed army. The cameras showed
them arriving at their destina-
tions to a hero's wekome.
Even King Hussein of Jordon
got into the act by kissing the
PLO terrorists. Twelve years ago
he slew them by the thousands
when they attempted to take over
his kingdom, even as they tried
to do in Lebanon.
How many of the PLO disap-
peared into Beirut alleys to pre-
pared hideouts with the inten-
tions of continuing their mur-
derous activities at another time?
What was the intended purpose
of the huge stockpiles of Soviet
weapons that the Israelis un-
covered and more being dis-
covered by the Lebanese army?
Were the arms for defense or to
be used in a massive sneak attack
on Israel? *
Despite the shrill criticism
leveled against Israel because of
the killings in the PLO camps.
the presence of the Israeli army
prevented a wholesale massacre
of Palestinians by the Christians
Phalangists bent on exacting
vengeance for the murder of
thousands of Lebanese Chris-
tians by the PLO and their
Syrian allies.
These are the facts, and not the
Arab progaganda fed to a gullible
public which is ready and willing
to believe the worst of the Jew.
ALEX MASLIN
3801 South Ocean Drive,
Hollywood. Fla.
From convict
Dear Editor:
I'm an inmate, confined at the
state correctional facility in
Pennsylvania. Sir, I'm trying
very hard to establish correspon-
dence with anyone on the outside
that would be interested in ex-
changing letters frequently, on a
friendship level.
I have no family. Establishing
correspondence and making new
friendships would help me out
considerably by decreasing the
depression in my situation.
Sir, I'd like to ask if you'd be
considerate enough to help me,
by printing a correspondence re-
quest for me, in your publication.
As my desire is very sincere, I d
be grateful.
Printed below is some informa-
tion about myself that I've in-
cluded.
Age 28. Single. Sincere.
Mature, caring personality. Jew-
ish-Italian descent. Black hair -
dark eyes. 1 am a firm believer of
respect and appreciation. In-
terests include classics, physical
fitness, sports.
MICHAEL PERNO No. Matt
Drawer R
Huntingdon, Pa 16652


Friday. daah^-Jfi.lftto---^
TH Jewish jPiofidiaA-wtdShofar ofOrtater Hollywood
Page5.
New Life Award goes to Rado
Hallandale's Kalman Rado has
been named a South Broward
recipient of the State of Israel
Bond New Life Award, according
to Joe Raymond, general chair-
man in South Broward.
Rado will receive his- award
Oct. 18 during ceremonies at the
South Broward New Life dinner
at the Konover Hotel in Miami.
New Life awards are designated
for survivors of the Holocaust
who have achieved distinction in
their new life through significant
contributions to their communit-
ies and the State of Israel.
Bom in Hungary, Rado came
to the United States in 1952. Now
retired, he works on behalf of the
Jewish people as vice president of
the Hemispheres B'nat B'rith
Lodge. He had received the
Lodge "Man of the Year" award
and the State of Israel United Je-
rusalem Award.
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Arnon talks to Hrstadrut in Hollywood
The Israel Histadrut Councils
of South Florida will hold its
annual luncheon for the North
Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
areas at Emerald Hills Country
Chib, Hollywood, Sunday, Oct.
17, at noon.
Keynote speaker will be Israel
Consul General Joel Arnon.
"Since its formation, the Israel
Histadrut Councils of South
Florida has assumed a two-fold
purpose: to help support "Kupat
Holim," Histadrut's health pro-
gram, which provides compre-
hensive and modern medical care
to 86 percent of the Israeli popu-
lation through its 1,400 clinics
and 19 hospitals, and also
support the 40 "Amal" vocation-
al high schools in Israel by con-
tributions to the Israel Histadrut
Scholarship Fund, which since
1957 has granted more than
66,000 scholarships to underpri-
vileged Israeli youths."
Looking at the situation in
Israel, the military operation
"Peace for Galilee" has placed a
financial burden on Histadrut's
medical facilities, which were
made available not only to the
wounded Israeli soldiers but also
to the wounded Lebanese
civilians.
For additional information,
contact Irving Gordon, executive
director, at 420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 389, Miami Beach. The
telephone numbers are in Dade
531-8702 and in Broward 945-
2248.
Speakers are available without
charge to organizations.
Classes begin at Hallandale K
Hallandale Jewish Center an-
nounces classes, covering a
period of five months, will begin
Monday, Oct. 18.
At 10 a.m., there will be classes
in Beginner's Hebrew and
Elementary Hebrew Conversa-
tion. At 11 a.m. there will be
classes in Shabbat Prayers and
Intermediate Hebrew Conversa-
tion.
In the evening, there will be a
class in Talmud at 7 and a Bible
Class at 8.
On Wednesdays, starting Oct.
20, there will be a class in Ad-
vanced Hebrew Conversation at
10 a.m.
On Thursdays, starting Oct.
21, there will be a weekly lecture
at 7 p.m. covering the following
Books of the Bible: Proverbs,
Song of Songs, Ruth, Lamenta-
tions, Ecdesiastes, Esther,
Daniel, Ezra and Nehemiah.
At 8 p.m., there will be a
Yiddish Conversation Group.
A registration fee of $10 per
person or $16 per couple entitles
the registrants to participate in
any or every part of the program
of Adult Jewish Education.
Registrations are being ac-
cepted at Hallandale Jewish Cen-
ter office, 416 NE 8th Ave., at
Fourth Court. Further informa-
tion may be obtained by calling
454-9100.
/' RAVIOLI SAUTE SPECIAL V---------------------------s
I The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking
1 Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ar-dee Cheese Ravioli.
V* cup chopped or whole small
onions
1 'i cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
Vi package (10 oz.) ft ozen whole
1 can (15 Or.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash garlic salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
green beans, cooked and drained Vi cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.
and you
thought
empire
kosher
Only made Great
Kpsher Poultr/...
We now offer you a great line of Beef, ^>.
Franks,Knockwurst,Salami, & Bologna,all(U)
Distributed by:
Mandalton, Inc.
Miami Beach
(305)672-5800
_.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 15, 1962
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
KHARKOV-In the following
f,*cerpts from a rocent letter to
Western friends, refuaenik
DAVID SOLOVEICHIK. who
first applied for a visa to Israel in
1979. details the trauma of
refusenik life:
. .We have been living in
the refusal for 1.000 days.
What does it mean? Those
who didn't experience the re-
fusal are absolutely unable to
imagine what it means. I'll
try to give you a clue.
. .We live from refusal to
another refusal. Every six
Shcharansky begins
hunger strike in cell
NEW YORK (JTA> -
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Shcharansky has begun an inde-
finite hunger strike in the Soviet
Unions notorious Chistipol
Prison to protest confiscation of
his mail and refusal by the au-
thorities to allow visits by his
family.
This was reported here by the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry (SSSJ) and the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews (UCSJ).
Shcharansky began his hunger
strike on the eve of Yom Kippur.
In Moscow, his mother. Ida
Milgram. said "a long fast means
inevitable death. I don't think we
will survive." the two Soviet
Jewry groups reported.
She said her son had not been
allowed to send letters since De-
cember 1981 and that she had
twice been prevented from seeing
him lust April and July.
"In January, when I last saw
him. he looked like a virtual
skeleton." Mrs. Milgrom was re-
ported as saying. "Now they
(Soviet authorities) are doing all
they can to see that he dies."
Avital Shcharansky. Anatoly's
wife, said in a statement in
Jerusalem where she resides:
Jews around the world have
just completed a fast for one day.
Yom Kippur. but Anatoly has
begun an unlimited hunger strike
in a Soviet prison to protest his
complete isolution from the out-
side world and from being cut off
from his wife in Jerusalem and
his family in Moscow.
In spite of his deteriorating
health, after serving for more
than a year in isolation in strict
regime during his imprisonment,
and appeals to the Kremlin to no
avail, he decided to go on a
hunger strike."
Meanwhile, in Washington.
State Department spokesman
Alan Komberg said "We wish to
emphasize how thoroughly we
HIAS seeking
Jews of Minsk
NEW YORK (JTA) HIAS.
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society, is seeking to locate Jews
who lived in or around the towns
of Rudensk, Kaidanov (Koid-
anovol. and Dukara, Byelorussia
(all in the vicinity of Minsk),
during 1941-1944.
Such persons are sought as
possible witnesses in an ongoing
Department of Justice war
crimes prosecution. They are
asked to call or write Joseph
Kdelman at HIAS, 200 Park
Avenue South, New York, N.Y.,
10003; the telephone is (212) 674-
6800.
Gordon Leland
ter Piano Craftsman
nmg Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr member
p'ano Technicians Guild
432-7247
deplore the Soviet authorities'
willful abuse of Mrs.
Shcharansky s rights which has
led to thj> desperate decision.
"We call on Soviet authorities
to reconsider their treatment of
Mr. Shcharansky and restore his
ability to be allowed to communi-
cate with friends and relatives.
Shcharansky. 34. a computer
scientist. was accused of
espionage and treason and sen-
tenced in 1977 to 13 years in
prison and labor camps.
months I visit the OVIR. As
you know, we have had no
refusal on security reasons.
Thank Gd. Now, after the
refusal, we can live another
six months. These six
months are colored only
black in our lives. It is like
going down in an elevator
with all my family. Pitch
dark. The elevator is des-
cending down and
down implacable and
ceaseless descent.
Normal life is far away
from us. We have been con-
stantly going down since
that memorable day in 1979
when we took our first appli-
cation to the OVIR in accor-
dance with Soviet law. I was
an associate professor,
doctor of economics, author
of numerous scientific papers
and an expert in economic
cybernetics ... All this is far
away.
Now our life is in a cave
under the Earth's surface. I
am a stoker! My salary
dropped fivefold, but this is a
trifle. What is important is
HOLD
THE
DATE
HUMAN RIGHTS PLEA
Sunday. December $. 1982
at 8O0 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
1400 North 46th AvaaMe
HoOywood
Kaynot* Speaker:
U.S. Senator Birch Bayh
:-;9 -c-ooe iouu!vo ->ol.'ooc. _>. jjasi n:-u.:
JUST A REMINDER Members of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward are receiving 'Hold the Date' notices like this one, reminding
that Human Rights Plea night is Dec. 5. Appearing that night J
Temple Beth Shalom will be U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh, a friend to Israel
and the Jewish people.
that I am not a "parasite"
and the militia has stopped
harassing me.
But what can I expect
from life in the future? This
is the only work I can do in
my present state. This is my
limit, my destiny. .
My 19-year-old daughter
cannot get used to the re-
fusal. Kissing me goodnight.
she is asking me again and
again:
"Why don't they release
us?
Will they ever release us?
My heart is bleeding. I
cannot get rid of the fear for
my daughter. What will be
her destiny? Youth is the
best time of life everywhere,
but not when you are a r*
fusenik.
What helps us to liveto
endure and to survive in re-
fusal? It is our inborn opti-
mism and untiring hope in
the confidence of our nation-
al right to leave this country.
The support and care from
our relatives and friends lie
in distant Eretz Yisrael.
k (.ertifted kohhe-r
Fleischmann's Margarine would like
to show you how much healthier
traditional cooking can be with
June Roth's Low Cholesterol Jewish
Cookery. In it you'll find favorites
like noodle kugel and blintzes made
the sensible way. Fleischmann's
Margarine can be part of your
traditional cooking. Fleischmann's
is the only leading margarine made
from 100% corn oil. It's low in
Low Choteataroi Jewish Cookary from
| Fleischmann's Margarine. A $3.95 value for
I only $1.95 plus $1.00 postage and handling
j with the front label from any package
| of Fleischmann's Margarine. Write to:
I Fleiachmanns Margarine Cookbook I
P.O. Box 10*
Teaneck. New Jersey 07666
| *-----------------------_------------------
I Addmt________________
- Stalf_____Zip
saturated fat with no cholesterol.
And it's certified Kosher, too.
Whether you prefer regular
Fleischmann's or parve
Fleischmann's Sweet Unsalted. both
have a delicious flavor perfect for all
your recipes. So order your cookbook
now it's a $3.95 value for only $1.95
plus $1.00 postage and handling
with the front label from any
package of Fleischmann's Margarine
Fleischmanns Gives Every Meal A Holiday Flavor.
' fM.! NabiirnBrtndiliK


Friday, October 15,1982
1 /wlui-it' 'uihii'1!
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
'p'1"-' "M j .'.. ]>------,; ^ l'.i'.-. -., .\>.-,f.iJ. v- ,
mmm
AlPAC's Dine sets S. Broward dates
With congressional and public
sentiment in support of Israel re-
ported on the downside, the work
of Thomas A. Dine, executive di-
rector of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), in Washngton becomes
even more crucial today.
But PLO and Arab propagan-
dists have a worthy adversary in
AIPAC, says The Washington
Post, which calls the Israeli lobby
"a power to be reckoned with at
the White House, State and De-
fense Departments and on
Capitol Hill."
The N.Y. Times lauds AIPAC
as "the most powerful, best-run
and effective foreign policy in-
terest group in Washington.
The man running that "best-
run" group will be addressing
South Broward residents two
times on Sunday, Nov. 21. Dine
will speak at 5 p.m. at AlPAC's
Big Gifts cocktail reception at
the home of Esther and Allen
Gordon.
And at 8 p.m., the AIPAC
director will meet Hillcresters at
the Playdium.
Prayer-in-schoo[ bill defeated
Continued from Page 1
Congress, respectively.
The effort by Sen. Jesse Helms
(R-N.C.) to attach a rider permit-
ting officially sanctioned prayer
in public schools to a bill raising
the national debt ceiling ended
when the Senate by a 51-48 vote
rejected a move to end a week-
long filibuster by opponents of
school prayer.
Sen. Edward Zorinsky ID-
Neb.) was the only one of the
Senate's six Jews, who voted
with the minority in an attempt
to break the filibuster. .,
Saperstein and Pearl, in &
thank you letter to the senators
tional freedoms and limit the
jurisdiction of the Supreme Court
and other federal courts in cases
involving school prayer.
But Helms said he would re-
introduce his legislation in the
next Congress.
Pearl and Spaerstein main-
tained that Helms' proposal was
"fundamentally wrong" because
"it was a blatant attempt to by-
pass our normal constitutionally
approved means of changing" the
Constitution, a constitutional
amendment.
They noted that if Congress
was able to prevent the courts
from declaring the law unconsti-
tutional, as the Helms bill
who led the filibuster, expressed
the hope that the vote would end
attempts of the religious and new
rights groups to curtail constitu-
provided, then freedom of speech,
press and assembly were as much
in danger as the separation of
church and state.
But they stressed the proposal
was also "wrong because it would
have brought back government-
sanctioned and sponsored prayer,
violated the religious rights of
children and teachers, trivialized
prayer and have a traumatic
impact on any children who did
not want to pray with those
words, in that manner."
The two Washington represen-
tatives noted that no domestic
issue in which they had worked
on had received more broad-
based support among Jews
throughout the country.
Jews wrote more letters, made
more phone calls to their sena-
tors and spoke out more ef-
fectively on this issue than any
other domestic issue in recent
years, they said.
UAHC and the AJCongress
worked on Capitol Hill to defeat
the legislation in cooperation
with the American Jewish Com-
mittee, National Council of
Jewish Women B'nai B'rith,
B'nai B'rith Women, Anti-De-
famstion League of B'nai B'rith,
and a broad coalition of
educational, civil liberties and
"mainline" Christian organizers.
Cochairmen for the Big Gifts
function are Otto and Evelyn
Stieber, Paul and Rochelle
Koenig and the Gordons. Coordi-
nating at Hillcreet are Tom
Cohen, Harvey Fell, Ben Mishler,
Joe Raymond and Rose Sarner.
AIPAC is charged with
securing economic and military
aid for Israel by strengthened
support in Congress. It also aims
to reduce arms sales to Arab
states, help Soviet Jews emi-
grate, obtain aid for resettlement
of immigrants in Israel and, gen-
erally, counter the tremendous
influence of Arab petro-dollars."
Thomas A. Dine
Average age of Jew
higher than Gentile
The Jewish population is aging
at a higher rate than the general
population, according to a study
published by the Rosa Coplon
Jewish Home and Infirmary in
Buffalo.
While the average age for the
U.S. population is 30 years, for
the Jewish population, it is 35
years. Persons 60 years or older
head 31 percent of all Jewish
households in this country.
The greater numbers of Jewish
elderly is crucial to planning the
provision of health and social
services, the Home states. For
example, the proportion of
Jewish elderly in long-term care
institutions is twice that of the
general population, and about 40
percent of the total institutional-
ized elderly are Jewish.
Although Jewish traditions
and values emphasize the family,
only seven percent of Jewish
households contain three genera-
tions. Eighty-seven percent of
Jews 65 and older live alone or
only with their spouses.
The support of elderly Jews by
their relatives has decreased and
will continue to decrease, the
report finds. Because of the
economy, Jewish women are
increasingly becoming part of the
work force and, therefore, are not
available for day-to-day care giv-
ing.
For the Jewish elderly aged 85
and older, their children are
themselves elderly, or may no
longer be alive. The net effect is
that many elderly Jews must
manage alone or seek care in
long-term institutions.
WHATS NEW in
VILLAGE, USA
\ Four NEW Varieties
TarmTreshWxtures
When you start with better vegetable*
.. .you get better mixtures
You get only the tenderest broccoli, the sweetest
cauliflower and the crispest carrots in Farm
Fresh Mixtures from Birds Eye. That's because
we pick all our vegetables at the peak of perfection.
And now you can try any of our 9 exciting
varieties all in 16 oz. family size bags...
and SAVE 15C with coupons below.
nom cotton
when you buy one package ol any ^SSS^ntSmtSSSm ''. ''ii miTS
C[iil> r,a,| jgymn i. i >
tW *T 1|. **-<.* *,!.* .USA. ?>>. He.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, October 15,1%
PRICES GOOD OCT. 14 THRU
OCT. 20. 1982
?ff^plU.S.D.A. Choice beef, Florida or shipped
premium fresh chickens and grain-fed pork.
We sell top quality lamb, we sell top quality
veal. And you'll save during our sale!
ASSORTED FLAVORS
REGULAR BBQ SOUR CREAM
BONUS
BUY
t K
__ Lay's
IceCream Chips,.k_^
$"189 AQ
(SAVE 90C)
1 2-GAL
CTN
corn muffw oAVE
Jiffy Mix............4 2o.fs1.00 19
PANTRY PRrOt
Vegetable Oil......
SNK<
Apple Juice..........."^1.19 20
SCNECA
.."1.29 30
SAVE
' .99 10
%^1.89 30
PANTRY PRDC REG OR PINK
Grapefruit Juice
DEL MONTE GREEN BEANS CUT OR FRENCH OR
can .OW 02
.2 S3 .89 11
2 c'^1.00 18
DEL MONTE WHOLE KERNEL OR CREAM STYLE
Com............ "
CHUN KING
Chow Mein NooOleo ... can .89 10
GREAT FOR MARMATMG
Chun King Soy Sauce 2SS .89 17
DEL MONTE-SLCED PEACHES FRUIT CCCKTAA OR CHUNK MIXED FRUIT
Lite Fruit.............'<; .89 10
jsc off la8ej.-0ish detergcnt
....."b REGULAR OR CUE I
A&WRootBeer
DlSWfECTAN'
LysolSpray...........'2c2,1.99 30
SUNSHINE BONUS PAK
ChipARoos.........."b2g1.09 20
PANTRY PRiOt OQMN MEAL OR
ChackOrtts..........5* .99 40
OCEAN PRA JUICI
Cranapple Drink......n& 1.49 20
60* BOX THW SPAGHETTI ZlTl OR LINGUW
Pasta Romana Pastas 2 1 .OO 46
FOR SPAGHETTI-MUSHROOM OR MARMARA
Button! Sauces........'\% .89 20
MR BIG
Bathroom Tissue.....%"& 1.89
DON JUAN
Salad Olives
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Fayg Diet Sodas ... 4 'ttl 1.00 16
PANTRY PPJOE-DEEP TONE OR PASTEL
?rvirT m
10
I0OZ
.CONT .
Cheez-it
(SAVE 14C)
10-OZ
BOX
77
SYFO
<: Seltzer
Water
.BONUS BUYS! BONUS BUYSIl
2-LTR
BTL
bo .OW
(SAVE 20c)
99
PEPSI UGHT. WET PEPSI.
MOUNTAIN DEW OR
Pepsi Cola
REGULAR OR DOUBLE STUFF
Oreo Cookies
$|69
L(SAVE 26c)
19-OZ
BAG
IBONUS BUYS! BONUS BUYS!!
Sa
ONY<
FAVO]
Seattest Yogurt. 3 e' ft
KRAF I PARMf SAN
Orated Cheese .. \i
SARGENTO SHREDDED
Mozzareaa Cheese 1aj
''ART SKIM
Mozzareaa Bails /, 1|
KRAF I MARGARINE
Squeeze Parkay .. *&
(RlENObHIP
BUNSfTelelK........ctm
LtOMT N LIVELV
Cottage Cheese ^1
KRAFT COLORED
American m
Singles $
12-oz
PKQ
1
A full selection of
Imported and Domestic...
LAMBRUSCO ROSATO BIAI
Riunite Wii
(SAVE 1 00) S^ I
750-ML
BTL
2
GALIOCHABIIS BLANC RHINE PIW CmABLS
HEARTY BURGUNDY OR RED ROSE
Premium wines en I
MOUNTAIN-CMABUS BURGUNDY NfCTA0a|
Rhine chenp* Blanc or frincm coiuM3DJ
Almaden Wines
REISLUGOR
A via Cabernet
BTl
BAKED
GOODS
m
APPLE CWNAMON NATURAL GRAi'. OK S
"eyereraumns PANTRY PRIDE
Rye Bread
COCONUT OR CINNAMON
to:

Twiris 2
A A C ITAUAN SPOLETTS OR
Onion Rons ..
AOLERSONKX-20 0/ LOAF
Pumpemtek'l Bread
VtlVE T CREME SUGAR OR __,
w
. .0F
There's
PANTRY PRIDE
in your neighborhood
MB wmtimm
SltalK|lMW CilWK |Htt
to* la Mm Cm ma
iMii)ii;a hub Cm (k 1 m it *
ijiiia* ;mvh
M MMB-caiiflMtf iimua* t> *M wn UOOSMOMMINMr HMAIAWWIIIMISMM
Sh>incawN auMWr-iniTMa
C0M1 6AILIS auai *** *
3Wtaf7iJ*7 """....."
i!kanCUii all mst
-MMItPMU il!
SMMI i? Nr
(I L 5 to 1 I am SMti
INSTORE
BAKERY
ONLY IN STORES
WITH A FRESH BAKERY
CPJSP'
. EA
FLORAL & GIFT
BOUTIQUE
NOT AVAILABLE IN aTlSTORES
WATER-4 PAU, (A SAVE
save 'whelieeum 8.99 1 00
""vt MODERATE WATER-6 AMOENEA
.89 20 Dktflenbachia 4.99 1 00
SANDWICH MAKER ASST COLORS-SPRAY 1 WATERING
HoegieRotts 4 .99 10 Plastfc Cans ...1.79 20
OeiXlOUS ASST COLORS_fREmY Cut
Pepperoni Bread 2.39 Pom Poms bunch 1.79 20
OVEN FRESH __ ASSORTED VARKTts
a 1^9 ,0 Smai Vases 1.89
OPJENTAl FEMALE
a 1.99 30 Figurines.... E* 8.991 00
OOCKMEAl FOR REPOTT(G PLANTS
BBQ Chickens ...1.89 Potting Sol ^g ,0
DUMER HAS I VEO I ROU AND
APPETIZl
ONLY AT STORES WITH SERVICE (
FWEST OUALITY JACK *L j
. UJ
Turkey Roll
1(2 POUND PASTRAMI OR
4
LB 1
NUTTY FLAVOR-CHEESE
. Li
"U
RvENROASTlD CATERING
Ti
LB


Friday. Octobar 15, 1962
. ,'. ....
The Jewish Floriditin and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
"Pride
IVE
42
V
120
120
MORE ON
Generic
Foods!
PLAIN PACKS!
OMNG SAVE
Kosher Dills..... 32 02 .89 eo
JENERC
Mac 4 Cheese 3 7%-OZ OX .79 .38
GENERKJ TAQLESS
Tea Bags........ IOO-CT BOX .99 .30
GENERIC
Trash Bags...... ?o<;t 1.49 70
GENERIC
iTn nil m i-lB .55 24
Facial Tissue..... 200-CT ox .55 30
GENERC
Napkins......... ib&ct PKO .69 eo
GENERIC PWK LOIHO
Dish Detergent .. 3j GENERIC Tomatoes
(SAVE 39c) l*fc pj| H I*
16< k f W
CANS i 1 *?
FROZEN FOODS
PANTRY PPJOE SAVE
OrapafruttJiaca2c^ 1.00 70
ASSORTED
Lender's Bagals20^ .59 is
lACREME WWPPEO
Topping......... 9 0Z BOWL .89 20
ANTRY PROE MIXED
Vegetables 2 10-OZ BOXES 1.00 18
OMESTYLE POTATO SUCES OR WEDGES
Ore-Ida Potatoes 240Z BAG 1.09 36
BIROSEYE
Cob Com.......4 EARS MBAO 1.19 40
FREEZER QUEEN COOK NPOUCH ASSORTED
Frozen Meats ...3 SOZ 1 BOXES 1.09 .25
CWSP 4 TASTY -AS80RTE0
Jeno'sPlzzas 1002 OX 1.19 30
(SAVE 60*) Jfcg 1 9
26-OZ ',
BOX | aaV
Choice
(SAVE 1.00)
US CHOICE BEEF LOIN
r u-v un onirrcu mcMiuw mesh mmm (SAVE 1 00) mbbm
(3 BREASTS & 3 LEG QTRS W/ BACKS, pHn"l' RPPF _|K1
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Lx>tsOf >>q^ Sirloin $^4
Chicken 3**P Steak afi
(LIMIT 2 PKGS PLEASE)
SAVE
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH-SPLIT
Fryer Breasts i, 1.39 20
FLA OR SUPPED PREMIUM FRESH-FRYER
Drumsticks .. lb 1.19 20
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Thighs, lb 1.09 20
FLA OR SMIPPEO PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer Wings lb .79 10
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
US CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Porterhouse
StCclK |SAVE 90c)
$139
3
POUND ______
HOUSE OF RAEFORD-FRESH FILLETS SAVE
Turkey Breast lb 2.69 90
HOUSE Of RAEFORD-FRESH WHOLE
BBQ Chickens 1.39 30
US CHOICE BEEF LOIN BONELESS
2 LBS OVER-SUCED bAVt
Beef Liver-----u> .79 30
GRAOE A FROZEN DRUMSTCKS OR
Turkey Wings .49 20
GENUINE AMERICAN SPRING LAMB
SHOULDER BLADE
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(SAVE 20C)
POUND
Lamb
Chops
(save 1 20) S^^|V7Cg)
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Bologna.....Mi 1.09 20
U S CHOICE GENUINE AMER SPRING LAMB
LAMB SHOULDER ARM
LB 1.99 1 20
U S CHOICE GENUINE AMERICAN
SPRING LAMB (NECK CUT)
POUND
CHUNK 16 07 PKG
Kahn's
ln- SM .ill
or avew
LB .
.30
SWEDISH MEAT BALLS
LASAGNA VEAL PARMESAN
On-Cor Dinner
2 12.39 .50
FRESHLY
Ground
Round.......lb 2.29 20
STEAKMAKER ALL BEEF
.'^2.39 eo
Braunschwalgsr1.29 20
KNEIPU S CHOICE
family pack i Corned Beef
Brisket
Buy 3 Lb. or mora and Save!
us choice beef save
lb 2.69 30
FLA OR SMIPPEO PREMBJM FRESH
5 3 DRUMS TICKS
3 THIGHS 3BREASTS 3DHUMS
Fryer Combo
U S CHOICE BONELESS
.99 .40
li 1.89 20
lb 1.89 20
US CHOICE OENLXNE AMERICAN
FRESHLY
Qrnd.
US CMOtCE
SMOULDER BLADE
Lamb Chops. l.1.69-
US CHOICE BEEF BOTTOM ROUNO
Rnd.Steak ...lb2.39 30
30
(SAVE 50C)
$169
I
POUND
OSCAR MAYER MEAT OR BEEF SLICED
..'pko1.09 20
lanoo frostchippeo vap*ties2soz pkg
2for .89 20
GWALTNEV
'2 02
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20
NATHANS ALL BEEF
Franks ..
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PRODUCE
TENDER
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BUNCH
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Cucumbers ...... Sro* .59 is
TOPS *' VIAMM A -GAROEN FRESH
Carrots..............2^ .49 io
JUICY. FLAVORFUL MOUNTAIN GROWN
.........AS .89 .10
TOP QUALITY RED FLAME
Tokay
BONUS
BUY
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LB
59

FRESH TENDER
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U PICK -GARDEN FRESH GREEN
GARDEN FRESH ITALIAN
Frying Peppers
U S No I ALL PURPOSE LJ PICK
Yellow Onions .
WALDEN FARMS LO-CAL
.49 40
.20
.20
lb .23 06
GARDEN FRESH SWEET TENDER
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SAVE ;
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<:


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Israel is ma
Friday. October 16. 1962
TT
news, too
Reviewed by David C. Gross
Israel has virtually dominated
the news since its forces invaded
Lebanon in mid-June in pursuit
of the Pl.O. and then headed
north to Beirut in an effort tc
make the PLO's defeat total,
both militarily and politically.
Chances are that the world's
readers are a little tired of Israel,
and would prefer to turn their at-
tention elsewhere. But history is
a fickle phenomenon she does
what she wants, and not what the
man in the street wants.
With that in mind,' we ap-
proach several new books about
Israel with some trepidation.
Scholars, politicians, strategists,
philosophers, statesmen, jour-
nalists, analysts of various
stripes and backgrounds have all
been struggling to unravel the
Mideast situation, and offer solu-
tions or prophecies or both.
Most of the time, the swift
march of events in that part of
the world makes all their efforts
terribly dated. Nevertheless, we
see these new volumes'and hope
that these authors will have
something to tell us< will help us
understand what is going on:
The Yom Kippur War by Peter
Allen (Scribner's $17.95) is a
minute-by-minute account of the
1963 disaster when Israel lost so
many people and when it seemed,
for brief time, that Egypt and
Syria had indeed triumphed.
The author, a skilled xeconteur
of military battles, makes it clear
that politics persuaded the
Israelis not to strike pre-emp-
tively, leading to heavy losses,
and if there is a lesson'to be
leaned vis-a-vis the Lebanon in-
cursion it is that the new Begin-
dominated government seems
willing to ignore politics and
push ahead on purely military
terms. For the military buff es-
pecially, a very well-documented
volume.
Israel Now: Portrait of a
Troubled Land by Lawrence
Meyer IDelacorte, $16.95) is an
ambitious efforts by a know-
ledgeable journalist to paint a full
picture of Israel, a country he
admires, believes is under siege,
and with which he can also find
fault.
The trouble is, despite a very
genuine attempt by the author to
tell the whole story of Israel in a
single volume, he is not willing to
acknowledge that it cannot be
done for the simple reason that
Israel is constantly changing,
and because there are so many
Israelis.
Israelis who have lived there
all their lives cannot tell the
whole story, so how can a skillful
newsman, even with the best of
intentions?
There are some informative
and even moving parts to the
book but on the whole there is
something of a flatness, which is
regrettable.
Among Lions 6y J. Robert
Moskin (Arbor House, $16.95) is
a powerful, deeply moving ac-
count of how Jerusalem was
fought for in those brief few days
of June 1967, in the Six Day War,
and became again whole and the
capital of Israel. It is a book very
worth reading.
RELGO, INC.-
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Carefully researched and docu-
mented, the three-day battle that
reunified Jerusalem and brought
the whole of the ancient city back
into the mainstream of Jewish
life is told with elan and the kind
of low key excitement that re-
mains with the reader.
Readers who remember the
Holy City before 1967 and after
owe it to themselves to read this
book.
The West Bank Story by Rafik
Halabi IHarcourt Brace Jovano-
vich, $12.95) is a vexing book.
Written by an Israeli Arab who
works closely with Mayor Teddy
Kollek and is also a newsman for
Israel radio and TV, it presents
the history of the troubled West
Bank p.ior to the Six Day War,
when it was taken over by Israel,
and since.
Halabi offers the reader the
viewpoints of Gush Emunim on
one hand and the pro-PLO Arabs
on the other hand. He is generally
and genuinely sympathetic to
virtually everyone, and in the end
one must conclude that he sees no
solution to what has to be one of
the world's most dangerous
tinder boxes
Journalistic objectivity is fine
and desirable, but a book nowa-
days, and the explosive West
Bank issue ought to offer some
kind of solution, even if the
w ?
JUUB
Jewish Books
in Review
is a service of (he IWB lewiih Book Council.
75 last 26th St., New York, N.Y. 10010
reader disagrees with it totally.
Nevertheless, a very informative
volume.
The Triangular Connection by
Edward Bernard Glick (Allen and
Unwin, $12.95) is an academic's
assessment of America and
Israel, and the special relation-
ship that exists between
American Jews and Israel.
The historial background is ac-
curate and interesting; the
special sense of attachments so
many American Christians feel
toward Israel is also well told:
The author does not do as well
with the special link that con-
nects American Jews with Israel.
The factual data are no doubt on
target, as are his conclusions on
the changing scene in America in
general and in American Jewry in
particular.
With all due respect, this re-
viewer feels he has not stressed
enough the profound emotional
ties that bind Israel and U.S.
Jewry, ties that are not always on
the surface, and not always
voiced but ties nonetheless
that make that relationship far
more powerful than Prof. Glick
has indicated.
American Immigrants in Israel
6y Kevin Avruch (University of
Chicago Press, $22) is a social
scientist's study of American
Jewish Aiiyah, stretching over a
period of a century.
What is immediately apparent
from this absorbing study is that
American Jews who came to
Israel out of idealistic choice are
looked up (to this day) as odd,
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
and their absorption into the
mainstream of Israeli society is
therefore not easy.
The author stresses the desire
of most American olim (immi-
grants) to find for themselves a
traditional ambience in Israel,
one they felt was lacking in
America.
By and large, Americans who
made Aiiyah rejected the U.S.
emphasis on competitiveness and
the widespread malaise of loneli-
ness, seeking in Israel a sense of
belonging and acceptance.
Unfortunately, the reality of
Israeli life disappointed many
immigrants. Certainly a very
provocative and informative
piece of work.
David C. Grots is editor of The
Jewish Week (New York). His
most recent book is The Jewish
People's Almanac.
776 6272
ROWARD
ftPfR 6.
ACKAOING
IMC
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT LAUDERDALE
Some faces are recognized
all over the world.
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From New\brk to New Delhi, and throughout
the world, American Express Travelers Cheques
are known and accepted.Which isn't surprising
when you consider that American Express has
been the leading travelers cheque for years.
Or that we have 105,000 refund locations.
O Amtncan tpre Company. IW2.
And nearly 1000 worldwide Travel Service
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a travelers cheque refund to travel assistance
So carry American Express Travelers
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American ExpreaTnvden Cheques


ctober 16, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
tie to lead to oil discovery in Israel?-
Continued from Page 1
Lrn old plane snap rolled. Instead
[-rolling, nose down, it was sud-
ring a steep climbing turn."
ine continued to do the impos-
ed Andy Sorelle arrived intact
Ids base. "After I turned off the
[switch, I sat quietly in a super-
man. In that silence, God be-
Itome."
Experience changed Sorelle from
figious hell-raiser into a believer,
[he spent years "wondering why
cd my life, when I saw so many
kys get killed. I felt I had a
I that God save me for a purpose.
Inow know what it is."
Sorelle and his wife visited
part of a 13-nation tour,
[that. I had never thought about
aut I became hooked, and I
i do something for the country.
,iy thing I knew, being a
engineer and in the oil busi-
es that Israel needs oil and
[could help."
si years later, he came to Israel
oil exploration job. "We sur-
est of the country, and found a
^k prospects, but nothing we
i drill. Then they asked us to go
| the Sinai We stayed there a few
napped five very promising sites
1 for a license."
fiat was in November 1977, and
ater. Egyptian President Anwar
I made his historic trip to
). "They began the peace nego-
ind asked us to wait. We waited
[years, and then they gave the
ck to Egypt, with the oil fields
promising sites.
e's a scripture in the Bible where
\s, 'They that bless Israel, I will
rell, wed tried our best. But that
[like the end of our venture in
sn't. Two years later, a college
[f Sorelle's came to him with a
the twelve tribes of Israel,
a passage in the Old Testa-
Deuteronomy 33:24," noted
Sorelle. "where Moses, talking about the
blessings of the twelve tribes, said Asher
would dip his foot in oil. Well, on that
map. the leg of Asher started in Leba-
non, the heel of the foot was drawn in
Haifa, and the toe in Caesarea.
" I suddenly realized that the only area
we had not surveyed in Israel was be-
tween Haifa and Caesarea. along the
coastline. So back we came to Israel."
Sorelle brought with him new equip-
ment which his company, Energy Explo-
ration Inc. of Houston, Texas, has devel-
oped. Use of this equipment, followed by
seismographic and geological readings,
confirmed Sorelle's belief that the
Caesarea-Haifa stretch was "one of the
most interesting geological prospects
ever to be mapped in Israel."
He points out that he is drilling not far
from Megiddo, the prophesied site of the
battle of Armageddon. "The Bible says
that Israel will be attacked by, and
rapidly defeat, the Russians, who will be
coming after 'spoil,' which means some-
thing of great value. They wouldn't come
for cucumbers and tomatoes. So there's
got to be something big here, and that's
oil. An oil discovery in Israel would
certainly make its enemies mad.
"Everyone knows what Golda Meir
said, that when Moses crossed the Red
Sea, he turned the wrong way. Well, I
don't believe he did. It simply wasn't
God's time for Israel.
"When you study the Bible, you see
that God told the Jews He would scatter
them throughout the world because of
their disobedience, they would be persec-
uted and downtrodden, and then He
would gather them together again and
Israel would become a nation once more.
"There was another prophecy which
said Israel will be blessed above nations.
That certainly hasn't happened. But it
will. The reason I love the Bible is that
it's the only thing I've found to be com-
pletely truthful and accurate, and I know
the prophecies will be fulfilled."
Sorelle's belief is infectious, and he has
gathered people around him who share
it. Manager of operations at the well is
Aerial photographs at drilling site in Ii
geologist Jack Sherman.
Andy Sorelle of Texas (left) consults with manager of well
operations Victor Kenneth Lambert at Bible-inspired oil
drilling site in Israel.
Victor Kenneth Lambert, one of the top
oil men in the world who can handle very
deep wells.
"I wouldn't be here if I didn't believe
it was God's will," explained Lambert.
"We've had a lot of problems, but before
the birth of anything great, there's a lot
of pain and tribulation."
Geologist Jack Sherman admits: "To
be honest, as a geologist I was skeptical
at the idea of drilling according to the
Bible. But there are unique things about
this well that I can't explain. We've
nearly lost the well on 14 separate occa-
sions. Whenever we've been stuck, there
has been some concentrated prayer, and
a day or two later the trouble has cleared
up. I'll tell you something. I'm begin-
ning to read the Bible more than ever be-
fore in my life."
When things were looking particularly
gloomy, Mrs. Sorelle lost a solid gold
bracelet while swimming in a turbulent
sea near the well site. A week later, when
it should have been buried fathoms deep,
Sorelle found it in the water, sticking out
of the sand in a sort of 'V," as in victory.
"It was such a powerful sign. Every
time we felt we were at the end, God
would answer our prayers. Sometimes,"
Sorelle conceded wryly, "He waits until
the last split second. But He's there."
Thanksgiving at Miami Beach's
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ays-3 Nights
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|CLUDES 2 DELICIOUS KOSHER MEALS DAILY
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Room and Meals
at Waldman
WALDMAN HOTEL
On The Ocean At 43rd Street
Phone 538-5731 For Reservations
Fall Special Offer
Costa's
easy way to the
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What could be easier than flying free to the heart of the
kribbean for a 7-day cruise to magical, mystical ports like
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Thomas. More and better ports than any 7-day cruise from
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ill dine on sumptuous food and enjoy international enter-
iment Just fly away. Free. Any Saturday,
through December 11.1982.
So take it easy and take
advantage of us.
World Renaissance of
Greek registry.
FIRST WE MEET
KOSHER STANDARDS.
THEN WE MEET
TOUGHER STANDARDS.
OURS.
Kosher standards are tougher than the U.S. Government's.
But they're not tough enough for us.
Because while kosher law forbids many non-meat fillers
and additives in meat, it does allow by-products and artificial coloring.
We don't.
We not only make sure our hot dogs, bologna, salami,
and knockwurst are 100% pure beef, but we also make sure they're
100% natural. Qualities everyone has a taste for.
At Hebrew National, we make our kosher meat by the
only law we can live with. Our own.
pwoeton doooie occupancy
Departures
From:
Miami
Tampa
Orlando
A Costa Cruise is easy to take.
on any package of
Hebrew National franks,
knocks, salami or bologna.
Mi Gracrr rWtonrw Nanonal Hath** fooda Itk
w* iwrfwm thH coupon tot 20- piu* 7< h*n
dhna 4 you rtcmt and handW > Ufi.*y m c
cut Jane* wHn In* Inmi of thia u#ln and il upon
iraml you tabmit vvtdanc* th**ol ulnJacioty
w IWwcw Naiional Foodi lix Swcfcavtd****
*! mdud* nwoki lot Dm ouannty ot ptodud
lot whKh (owpom are tvdavtnvd Coupon* ma%
* tw a*on*d ot rtanMVtrtd Wwd -h#re pto
hrtxHjd iiuditwrwwlbvln. Good only in
U S A C*ah van* l/20t r ot wdvtnpoon
| SAVE 2(K
I
I
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l2(K
STORE COUPON
:sto
National bw PO Boa
lowaS?734 Ofl*
Apttl.hl lt LMMMdto
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pvt putihaa*
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i nil ininimi mmmmrttf, mm* v ..-.--.?--
. IJ.
Page 12
FA* JeiaiaA Floridian andShofarof Greater Hollywood
Fra, bctdb^ is. I**
includes self-made art
i
On donating income property
This is the sixth in a series of
articles entitled "Modem Meth-
ods of Charitable Giving" by
Jonathan M. Lichter, assets
realization officer for'the United
Jewish Appeal. For further infor-
mation, please call Michael J.
Moskowiik at the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward Y9W-
8810).
An individual may rirake a
charitable contribution of or-
dinary income property, consist-
ing of those lands of property,
which, if sold, would produce
gain other than long-term capital
gain, i.e., ordinary income.
It includes the following types
of property:
Property not treated as a capi-
tal asset; short-term appreciated
capital assets, i.e., appreciated
capital assets held for 12 months
or less; works of art created by
the donor.
An income fax charitable
deduction is allowed for a charit-
able gift of ordinary income pro-
perty. It is limited, however, to
the donor's cost basis in the pro-
perty, generally his or her cost to
acquire the property or, in the
case of a work of art created by
the donor, the cost of the materi-
als.
The deduction ceiling for a tax-
able, year, is 50 percent of the
Knesset
member talks
Oct. 16
Ibrahim Shebat, an Arab
member of the Israeli Knesset,
will address an Israel Bond South
Broward-North Dade New Lead-
ership group Oct. 16 on Miami
Beach.
The meeting will take place at
the home of Gary and Sandy Dix,
co-chairmen of the group. Shebat
is also the editor of a weekly
Arabic magazine and a television
producer.
Professional Jewish 30
seeking meaningful relationship
with a sincere, warm & slim
woman. Please send picture and
phone number. P.O. Box 8427
Hollywood, 33024

STUDIO .
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Cuisine
FED JOiSI
you Oo *o
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STUDIO
RESTAURANT
tor S unique
^. j rig tpf fnce
vta'cl your taBif to your
"iood m one o' 5 ndivduai
'Oomi The Tenf
w.ne CeMar studio Place
P'gaiie Swisi Oaiet
Fine Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
I of your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
D'val Luncheons ranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORCD
2340SW32Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondays
. A
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donor's adjusted gross income,
with excess carried forward up
to 50 percent in each succeeding
year up to five years.
From a tax standpoint, a gift
by an individual of ordinary in-
come property is not as advan-
tageous as the other forms of
gifts described in previous ar-
ticles. '
Example A
Mrs. I. purchased 100 shares of
LMN Corp. common stock in
April. She paid SI,000 for the
shares. In November of the same
year, she donated the shares,
then worth SI,250 to the Legacy
and Endowment Fund. The
donated assets were held for
seven -months, and treated,
therefore, as short-term appreci-
ated capital assets.
Mrs. I.'s income tax charitable
deduction is limited to S1,000, the
cost of the shares to Mrs. I. Had
Mrs. I. held them for more than
12 months, the assets would have
qualified as long-term appreci-
ated capital assets, and Mrs. I.'s
deduction would have been for
the full fair market value of the
shares at the date of the charit-
able transfer.
Example B
Mr. J. donated an oil painting
he painted to the Legacy and En-
dowment Fund. The paint cost
was S30 and the canvas was $50.
Mr. J. is entitled to an income tax
charitable deduction for $80, the
cost of the materials*.
Mrs. -K. donated a painting
painted by Mr. J. She had pur-
chased the painting two years
earlier for $1,000. At the date of
the gift, the painting was ap-
praised at $2,000. Mrs. K. is
treated as having made a gift of
tangible,personal property, since
the painting was painted by
someone other than her.
The value of her deduction is
dependent on whether or not the
painting is related to the Legacy
and Endowment Fund's tax-
exempt purpose.
PLANNING SESSION The new Israel Bond Women's Division
met recently at Temple Beth El to plan its Golda Men- function and
fashion show. Gueet speaker was Evelyn Bhim (left), Palm Beach
County Israel Bond Women's Division chairman. With Mrs. Blum are
Irma Rochlin. South Broward Women's Division chairman; and
Marge Saltzman, co-chairman (right).
r
T
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koc^JM*2
.
The Jewish Floridkm and Shofar.ofGtiiittrHiMy wood
PgeI3
Counseling whole family
repairs father-son ties
Irs. M. called Jewish Family
/ice asking for career counsel
for her son.
graduated from high
al a year and a half ago. He
junior college and worked
time, but he's dropped out
He has no plans for the fu-
My husband says Larry's
ling his life. There's so much
lion at home, I can't stand
|rs. M. was told the situation
described sounded like more
career counseling was
i'd. She was asked how she
feel about asking her
ly to come to meet with a
selor.
rs. M. agreed in a few days,
she, her husband and Larry
to the agency. Mr. M. sat
to Larry, but they seemed
js apart. Larry was staring
floor. He was looking sad,
' and humiliated.
|c counselor asked him what
elt had happened to the
"I don't know; I just
talk to my father anymore.
so angry. I'm doing my
| but I can't find a decent job.
1 don't believe me. They just
tougher
JNN (JTA) Justice
ster Juergen Schmude of the
Democratic Party has
ed legislation to tighten
against neo-Nazi activities
fest Germany. His legisla-
which has been discussed in
iindestag subcommittee and
ited to the press, calls for
tiwering state prosecutors to
to trial any person who
is publicly that the Holo-
occurred or that the Nazis
litted genocide.
would also ban the import
distribution of Nazi emblems
)ther propaganda material in
juntry. But the legislation
I not include a ban on the dis-
[tion and sale of Nazi books
[records which orginated in
Germany, such as Hitler's
Kampf. A proposed ban on
material was dropped fol-
ng protests by scientists and
emicians that it would curb
rch.____________________
iiement of Ownership, man-
kement k Circulation (re-
tired by S USC 8686):
lUe of pubUcatlon: The
kwlah Floiidlan A Shotar of
eater Hollywood. Public*
No. 864800. 2-Date of fll
September 80, 1882. 8-
equency of laaue: Bl weekly
|No. of lames published an
illy: 28. B-Annual lubacrlp
rn price: 18.80. 4-Locatlon of
own office of publication
K Hallandale Beach
vrt.. Suite 70TQ. Hallandalr,
33008 6-LocaUon of head-
artera of pubUahera: 120 N.
6th Street, Miami. Florida
132. 6 I'ubllaher, editor,
uglng editor: Fred K.
DChet, 120 NE 6 Street,
ami. FU. 88182. 7-Owner,
ed K. Shochet. 120 NE 6
ft, Miami, Fla. 88182. 8-
hown bondholders, mortja
kes and other security holders
tiding or owning 1 percent or
ore of total amount of bonds,
rtgagca or other securlUes.
[any: None. B-for completion
non-profit organlxaUons:
10-Bxtent and nature of
fculaUon, given In this order:
erage no. copies each Usue
Irlng preceding 12 months
uowed by actual no. copies
Igle Issue published nearest
filing date: A) total no.
Iples printed (net press run):
I.HT3. 12,700; B) paid clrcula
pn: l-sales through dealers
pd carriers, street vendors
kd counter sales, 0, 0; 2-mall
fbscrlpUons: 12,879. 12.167;
total paid clrculaUon:
|379, 12,167; D) free dlstrlbu
by mall, carrier, or other
tans, samples, compllmen-
and other free copies, 88,
E) total distribution,
-62. 12.267. F) copies not dis-
puted: l) office use. left
er, unaccounted for, polled
Mr printing. 411. 488. 1)
urns from news agents 0. 0.
Total: 12.878, 12,700. I
"<>' that statements made
me above are correct and
nplete.
'"red K. Shochet. publisher
don't know what it's like out
there."
Mr. M. interrupted claiming
that Larry does nothing and lies
to them his parents. Mr. M.
said, "He tells me he's looking for
work, but then he doesn't go. You
know what he's doing with his
tfe? He's parking cars. It's time
e got going."
The counselor listened careful-
ly, hoping to make each member
of the family feel understood.
MrSj, M. cried. It was clear she
was trying to smooth things over
between her husband and her
son, and she felt trapped between
them.
The counselor told them there
were a lot of families in similar
situations families struggling
to survive economically. Families
are concerned about high unem-
ployment, decreased job training,
increases in the cost of housing,
food and so on in other words
survival.
Larry was told the agency
could not find him a job, but it
could help get the family back to
talking and supporting each
other. Somewhere in all the con-
cerns about Larry not finding a
job, the family'8 communications
had broken down. Family coun-
seling was recommended as well
as a group for young adults.
The family agreed to meet
weekly with a Jewish Family
Service counselor to begin to re-
open the lines of communication.
Mr. M. came to understand that
what Larry needed most was his
father's support and belief in
him. Larry needed his parents to
recognize his adult status.
Mr. M. began to pull back a lit-
tle, and as he did, Larry began
accepting more responsibility by
contributing some money each
week to the family budget. Mrs.
M. learned not to interfere be-
tween father and son. She and her
husband went out socially with
friends, feeling more united
again.
In the group, Larry met with
other young adults experiencing
the same kinds of problems he
was having. They supported each
other in applying for jobs, in ex-
ploring their new adult roles and
in their frustration and sadness
in not being able to achieve im-
mediate success.
Six months later Larry called
the counselor to say that he had
found a job in sales. "It's gonna
be hard work mostly commis-
sion but I think I can do it,"
he said proudly.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 1909 Har-
rison St. Suite 109, Holly-
wood, 33020. Telephone: 927-
9288. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale, 33319. Telephone:
735-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
Bell Introduces
TheWorld B/The Minute
NEAR EAST *22V80
EUROPE $1.42*/80'
UNITED KINGDOM $1.25X76'

NcwYxi Can Dial al-Minute Overseas Call.
Have family or friends in Israel,
Europe, or the UK? Now you can dial
1 Overseas Rate For Dtabble Countries 1
Dial Rale
Region Role Levels First minute Additioncil minute Hours
UNITED KINGDOM/IRELAND Standard Discount Economy $208 1.56 1.25 $1.26 .95 76 7am-1pm lpm-6pm 6pm'-7om
EUROPE Standard Discount Economy 237 178 142 133 100 80 7am-1 pm lpm-6pm 6pm-7om
PACIFIC Standard Discount Economy 422 3.17 253 158 1 19 .95 5pm-llpm I0am-5pm II pm-IOam
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC Standard Discount Economy 168 126 1.01 1.13 85 68 4pm-IOpm 7om-4pm I0pm-7am
SOUTH AMERICA Standard Discount Economy 2.77 208 1.66 1.18 89 .71 7am-Ipm Ipm-lOpm I0pm-7am
NEAR EAST Standard Discount Economy 368 276 2.21 1.33 100 80 8om-3pm 9pm -80m 3pm-9pm
CENTRAL AMERICA Standard Discount Economy 262 197 157 1.13 .85 .68 5pm-1 Ipm 8am-5pm llpm-8am
AFRICA Standard Discount Economy 2.89 2.17 173 1.48 111 89 6am-12Noon l2Noon-5pm 5pm -6am
INDIAN OCEAN Standard Discount Economy 522 392 3.13 2.17 1.63 1.30 6pm-lam lam-Horn Horn-6pm
L For countries that oie no* datable, meres o 3-mnuie mnmum and rotes oe somewhat (ughe* OHerenl role schedules apply K> Conoda and Mexico Check with your local ooeroKx Federal ecise ia of 1% is added on 0* cols billed m the United Saws. ^; t
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
countries that are not
dialable.
This chart gives you
the new 1-minute dial
rates, the lower rates for
each additional minute,
and the new calling times:
Standard, Discount, and
Economy.
Bargain rates are
available 7 days a week,
day or nighteven to
countries that never had
reduced rates before.
No International
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still get the new 1-minute
dial rate as long as special
operator assistance is not
required.
"Hello World" costs
less than ever before.
Want to know more?
Call our International
Service, toll free:
1 800 874-4000.
Bell BringsThe World Closer
FIRST MINUTE/tADDITIONAL MINUTE



Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 16,1962
*l
14**
News
Art show-sale
Join the Jewish Community
Centers of South Broward for
a major art show and sale on Sat-
urday evening, Oct. 23.
Original oils, watercolors,
sculptures, etching and litho-
graphs by great contemporary
masters Brisson, Chagall,
Picasso, Miro, Appel, Jenkins,
( aider, Simon and many others
will be on view and available for
sale.
For reservations and further
information, call Shorn Klinghof-
fer at 921-6511.
Singles,workshop
The JCC of South Broward an-
nounces a single-parent work-
shop, "Social'Aspects of Being a
Single Parent, Wednesday,
Nov. 10, at 8 pjn. at the JCC,
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
A fee of $3 for members, S3.50
for non-members will be charged.
Advance registration is required.
Registration for the workshop
will be closed two,weeks before
the actual workshop date.
Sculpture tour
The JCC will tour the Grove
Isle Sculpture Gardens in Coco-
nut Grove on Wednesday, Nov.
10.
The tour of the 35 pieces of
contemiorary sculpture dotting
the landscape on Grove Isle will
be conducted by%Martin Z. Mar-
gulies.
Bus transportation will be pro-
vided. For reservations and in-
formation, call 921-6511.
x -^
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Oct. 15-6:35
Friday, Oct. 22-6:29
.r.atf hv -i: p'birb
_ "U u iv f it i / WlXl'g
T v I : : ,t : x:
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye. Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
g: Asher kid shanu B mitz-vo-tav. V'tzee-va-nu ::
: 1. had l.vk \,i\ r shcl Shabbal
1 Blessed urt Thou, O Lord our (iod. King of the Universe, :j:j
i:i Who ha sanctified us with Thy commandments
A n :**xx*xx:::x^^
Religious directory
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION LEVI YITZ-
CHOK Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley
St., Hollywood, 923-1707,
Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus.
Daily Services 7:55 a.m., 7:30
p.m.: Sabbath Services 7:30
p.m., Sabbath morning 9
o'clock; Sundays 8:30 a.m. Re-
ligious School Grades 1-8.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLY-
WOOD, 3291 Stirling Road,
Hollywood, 966-7877. Rabbi
Edward Davis. Daily Services
7:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
Services 7:40 p.m., Sabbath
morning 9 o'clock.
CONSERVATIVE
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER, 416 NE 8th Ave.,
Hallandale, 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily Services 8:30
a.m., 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
6:30 p.m., Sabbath morning
8:45 o'clock.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM.
1400 N 46th Ave., Hollywood,
981-6111. Rabbi Morton Mala-
vsky. Daily Services 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath 8:15 p.m.,
Sabbath morning 9 o'clock.
Religious School Kindergar-
ten-8.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730
Stirling Ifoad, Hollywood, 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shotor.
Sunday 9:30 a.m., Mon. and
Thurs. 8 a.m.; Sabbath eve 8
o'clock. Sabbath morning 8:45
o'clock, Religious School
Nursery Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF M1RA-
MAR. 6920 SW 35th St., Mira-
mar, 961-1700. Rabbi Paul
Plotkin. Daily Services 8:30
a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:45 o'clock. Reli-
gious School Kindergarten 8.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson
St.. Hollywood, 920-1577.
Daily Services 8:25 a.m., 5
p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:25 o'clock.
Religious School Pre-Kinder-
garten 8.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood, 920-
8225. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe.
Sabbath Services 8:15 p.m.
Religious School Grades 1-10.
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines
Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road, Pembroke Pines, 431-
3638. Rabbi Bennett Green-
spon. Sabbath 8 p.m. Religious
School Kindergarten -
TEMPLE SOLEL\ 5100
Sheridan St., Hollywood, 989-
0205. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Sabbath Services 8 p.m., Sab-
bath morning 10:30 o'clock.
Religious School Preschool
12.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAM AT SHALOM. 11301 W.
Broward Blvd., Plantation,
472-3600. Rabbi Elliot Skid-
dell. Sabbath Services 8:15
p.m. Religious School Pre-
Kindergarten 8.
Leo Mindhn
Continued from Page 4
chem Begin to lecture Pope John
Paul "as to how he should
conduct his role as peacemaker,"
the questioning of the Pope's
motives in his meeting with Yaair
Arafat.
, In effect, McCarthy warns us
"poor persecuted Jews" of still
more persecutions to come if we
don't mind our p's and q's, a
thing at which the Church has
excelled since its beginning. Says
he: "Criticism of the Holy Father
in this instance, I fear, could
actually induce a reaction against
the Jewish community. ." I'll
say as if this instance is any
different from any other instance
going back to John Chrysostom
and before to let loose a tide of
Roman anti-Semitism.
WHILE McCARTHY assures
us he deplores such a possibility,
the threat stands: "I feel that
repeating these ugly and irre-
sponsible statements (Begin on
the monumental indifference of
Pope Pius XII to the Nazi on-
slaught during the Hitler era) is
feeding discord and anti-Semi-
tism in our community." In
essence, if we do not accept the
infallibility of Rome, if we dare
question its palaver on this issue,
then we've bought another geno-
cidal assault.
So it is not only our p's and q's
we must mind at the Vatican and
its environs. We also must mind
them right here in Miami, which
means anywhere else that the
Pope's forward-flying blow has
us recall Franz Kafka's Jste zid.
Talk about Begins arrogance
as McCarthy sees it! The shoe
fits just as well on his foot. As
McCarthy sees it, we are respon-
sible individually to that papacy,
that church, that religion to the
end of time for each one of our
acts that offends them, and for
the acts of all Jews generally in
all of history past and future
though we reject the power of
these agencies to judge us that
papacy, that church, that reli-
gion.
IS THAT not the libel of dei-
cide resurrected and brought to
bear upon us once again the ir-
rationality that the sins of one or
some are visited upon us all? In
this case, that we are responsible
for Mr. Begin s words and deeds,
and will be punished for them
right here in Miami? '
What, in Archbishop McCar-
thy's view must we do to avoid
this orchestrated threat? How
shall we hold our hat in our hand
now? How genuflect in abject
obedience? How show that we are
being properly contrite?
What act of cowardice, in
short, does the Archbishop
demand? For more on that,
another time. .
Roth leads campaign
at Hemispheres
Molly Roth, last year's Ocean
South chairman for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, is
taking over responsibility for all
four buildings at the Hemis-
pheres, Dr. Saul Singer, UJA-
Federation Campaign chairman,
announces.
The former Indianapolis, Ind.,
resident had been a "snowbird"
with her husband, Samuel J., in
Hallandale for 10 years until
moving down permanently four
years ago. Up North, she says,
she only had time to do minor
work for the Federation, but was
active in her synagogue.
Mrs. Roth is aiming for a
"bigger and better" campaign for
1982-83, she says. And to make
that a reality, she announces the
appointment of her four building
chairmen:
Rose 1'ollin, Ocean South;

-*fc
\
f
\
Molly Roth
Ethel Gould, Ocean North; Ada
and Morse Engelman, Bay
North; and Jack Udis and Lila
Brecker, Bay South.
Some kids would rather die
than bring home grades
like these.
In the next hour, 57 Amencan
kids will try to kill themselves.
Many over problems that may
seem small to adults. But to
children, even little things
can be matters of life
and death.
Grades that weren't
quite high enough. A
broken date. A game
that wasn't won. One
more reason for feel
ing they've failed to
measure up. To
others' expec-
tations. Or
their own.
Suicide is
the second
leading
cause of
death among
young people.
But its
preventable. If only
someone recognizes
the danger signals in time.
Sudden changes in eating
and sleeping habits. Withdrawal from
friends and activities. Becoming accident
prone. Talking about being "gone" or "better
off dead." The most dangerous sign of all is
making final arrangementsgiving away
favorite records, books or other treasured
possessions.
And don't think lads who talk about sui-
cide won't try it. They will.
As a parent, the most important thing
you can do is show you care.
Ask your children about their feelings.
And listen to what they have to say. Without
making judgments.
If you're concerned about self destruc-
tive behavior, call your local suicide
prevention, mental health or crisis center.
Professional counseling can help suicidal
children, and
their families, learn
better ways of deal-
ing with problems.
One of the tragedies of youth suicide
is that children just don't always understand.
That problems are temporary. And death
is permanent. They're not experienced
enough to realize their options. So some of
them choose the way that should not be
an option at all. And some of them don't
live to regret it.
rl
UBERTTllinOUI.
UFE INSURANCE COMPANY
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA
For a free brochure on youth suicide and what you can
do to prevent it, wnte Liberty National, Advertising
Dept. RP, P.O. Box 26ia Birmingham, Alabama 35202


-..*'. -.V: !
I viioV\ -mosiO ^o v ,\? | mi noifcr,^ fttta-A. AT
ctober 15, 1982
ThfiJewtok Floric
ler Hollywood
^NUMBER ONE TO
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MIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th St 822-2500
' MIAMI AIRPORT
W 25 St & MHam Dairy Rd 593-1191
* WEST MIAMI
Bard & Galloway Rds 552-6656
r FT. LAUDCNOALE
1740 E. Sunns* Bivd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N Stale Rd 7 587-2186
TAMARAC
* LAKE PANK/N. PALM BEACK
532 N Lake Brvd 848-2544
t DCERFIELD BEACH
2265 W HiHiooro Brvd 427-8
* FT. PIERCE
KENDALL DR VHIQATE SQUARE '" W C?TSSSS 735"2"2 "^ ??* LET"
'387^s.vHot;;lTmA^"o,28 Nu"^-,cRd 72,-4700 i^i^sa^^
^rsSES-- -iS5SS ^-^^487
497 S Stal. Rd 7 987-0450 515 South DM* 832-lo44
tOAVIE SI Rd 84|utwlofUrwrrfyDr 473-4700
f 'NAPLES
2085 E Tamiami Tr 774-4443
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