The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00307

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Perfect
Match?
Your gift could grow like wildfire
If you are a perfect match, you may be able to
double even triple your giving to the
Jewish Federation of South Broward, and at no
extra cost to you.
This is possible, according to Susan Singer,
matching gifts chairman, because the
Federation is initiating a corporate matching
gifts program. The way it works is employees or
retired employees can have their pledges
equaled by their company if that company has
or is willing to establish matching gifts.
Oftentimes, Mrs. Singer says, firms such as American
Express, Campbell Soup, Citicorp, IBM, Johnson and
Johnson or Southern Bell, have expressed guidelines for
putting up an amount equal to the worker's or retiree's
contribution. Generally, the ceiling is $5,000.
Let's take Southern Bell, for example, the matching
gifts chairman suggested.
In 1978, the local phone company began matching gifts
under an educational platform. Workers or retirees can
give $25 to $1,000 each year to any accredited junior
college, college, university, seminary or theological school.
Under Southern Bell's program, the company will
match the gift on a dollar-to-dollar basis.
If you are a contributor to the Jewish Federation of
South Broward and would like to support an agency to
which the federation already sends allocations, that
amount can be doubled or even tripled by the firm you
work for or are retired from.
If you have any questions or would like to know if a
particular company is taking part in matching gifts,
contact Michael J. Moskowitz at the Federation, 921-8810.
'ewislfo
Floridiami
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
|2 Number 20
Hollywood, Florida Friday, October 1,1982
f'U Sltochtl
Price 35 Cents
ig: Reagan plan
serious mistake
afcfeis
YORK Former Secretary of
exander Haig, in his first address
organization since he resigned
from the Reagan administration,
President Reagan's "fresh
for the Middle East.
Ing without a text to 300 United
Appeal leaders including Herbert
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward at the UJA's "Hineni I"
leadership meeting, Haig said that the
Reagan proposal was "a very serious
mistake."
Reagan asked for a freeze on Jewish settlements in
the West Bank. Haig said he had carefully examined
the record of the Camp David negotiations and had
concluded that "Israel never committed itself to
Continued on Page 14
At 50th GA
Begin will address
Federations' council
yi
Begin
NEW YORK Israeli Prime
Minister Menachem Begin will be
the featured speaker at the 50th
Anniversary General Assembly
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions.
More than 3,000 delegates rep-
resenting the 200 member P'eder-
ations of the council will gather
at the Bonaventure Hotel in Los
Angeles to hear the prime minis-
ter's address Nov. 13.
A Golden Anniversary Ban-
quet is planned to mark the com-
pletion of 50 years of service to
local communities by the CJF,
which was founded in 1932.
Continued on Page 4
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Four years young
f ^ BIRTHDAYThe Southeast Senior Adult Day Care Center for Frail Adults, operated b- he
Community Centers of South Broward. a Federation agency, last week celebrated its 4th bin hday
1 ala party. Clients and their families brought in their favorite foods, and staff provided entertain-
' hecking over the delectables are (from left) Ruth Svigals. Katherine Durin. Frieda Caldes, coord i-
i *nd Katherine Guglieri. Friends, families and clients also had an opportunity to see the handicraft*
?d t the center.
Admiral 'flies in
At 82, Adm. Hyman Rickover played the major role last week in
Operation Fly-In' which was a joint effort of UJA and the Jewish
Federation of South Broward. Shown with the admiral are Dr. Saul
Singer, local campaign chairman, (left! and Israeli Ambassador to
Germany Yitzhak Ben-Ari. According to Joyce Newman, coordinator
of the event at the Diplomat, a dozen appointments were kept by
South Broward residents to speak to Rickover, Ben-Ari and Gen. Zvi
Bar, commander of Israel's border police. In excess of $100,000 was
pledged during the meetings.
IDF interceded
to halt killings,
Ministry states
The following statement was issued by the Israel
Foreign Ministry in response to the massacre of
Palestinians in Beirut.
"Israel expresses its dismay and shock at the
killings in Beirut. After the assassination of Bashir
Gemayel, Israel repeatedly asked the Lebanese army
to take up positions in the camps. The Lebanese
army refused.
"Israel asked Ambassador Draper (U.S.) to use
his influence with the Lebanese army to persuade
them to do so. They again refused.
"The camps were at no stage under Israeli army
control. It should be pointed out that in those parts
of Beirut where the Israeli army was in control, there
were no such killings.
"As soon as Israel became aware of the killings.
the IDF immediately entered the camps and, using
force, stopped the killings and evicted the Christian
militiamen.
"Israeli troops sealed off the camps and provided
prompt medical relief to the wounded.
"It was only the presence of Israeli army units in
Continued on Page 14


! i ii ii i iti i iwr
Page*
.
ewish Flonaian a
Ov^ft "*
''kofw of Greater Hollywood
.... Friday, Qjl^ber 1,1982,
Cf?C keeps S.
For Mara Giulianti, chairper-
son of the Community Relations
Committee (CRC) of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, the
only good citizen is an informed
citizen.
To that end, Mrs. Guilianti
(who with Sue Gunzburger is
state public affairs chairperson
for the National Council of Jew-
ish Womenl wants every resident
especially the Jewish popula-
tion to know who they are vot-
ing for and why.
But elections are but one part
of the CRC's function in South
Broward. According to Mrs.
Giulianti, CRC is delegated three
ways:
Domestic Concerns: With
Rabbi Edward Davis of Temple
Young Israel and Joan Gross as
cochairpersons. Domestic Con-
cerns are directed toward en-
hancement of social conditions
conducive to secure and creative
Jewish living.
Goals must hinge on the prin-
ciples of democratic pluralism:
freedom of religion, thought and
expression (Interfaith Council):
equal rights, justice and oppor-
tunity: and thrive within a social
climate in which difference!-
among groups are accepted and
respected, with each free to culti-
vate its own distinctive values
while participating fully in the
general life of the society.
Specifically, CRC will be grap-
pling with the issue of prayer in
the schools, monitoring position
papers as well as legislation be-
fore Congress and in Tallahassee.
Handgun control is another is-
sue of concern; the Florida Coali-
tion to Halt Handgun Crime aims
From Israel, to voting, to prayer...
CRC EXECUTIVE BOARD The Community Relations Committee of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward recently conducted its first executive board meeting at the Federation. Seated from left are Ella
Jay, at large; Mara Giulianti, chairperson; Elaine Pittell, past chairperson; Rabbi Harold Richter,
Federation chaplain; and Sandi Khani. Interfaith Council representative. Standing from left are Melissa
Martin, director; Ruth Feuerstein, at large; Barbara Stein, cults chairperson; Rick Barnett, Soviet Jewry
chairperson; Abe Halpern, at large; Paul Orlan, Holocaust Commission chairperson; Bernie Meyer, at
large; and Stan Kessel, ADL representative. Other members are Jack Herman, Middle East Task Force;
Joan Gross and Rabbi Edward Davis, Domestic Concerns; Meral Ehrenstein, Betty Homans, Eleanor
Handleman and Ron Rothschild, all at large; Joe Kleiman, speakers bureau; and David Sachs, media
relations.
to secure favorable votes to make
waiting periods mandatory state-
wide.
Two other topics of CRC in-
terest and action are tuition tax
credits and cult counter-informa-
tion.
Soviet Jewry and Foreign
Relations: Chairperson Rick Bar-
nett stresses that Soviet Jews
face the most disastrous situa-
tion since 1970. The doors to emi-
gration are closing. Where only
two yeais aeo more than 4.000
were leaving each month, today,
less than 200 are being freed.
Parallel with the Soviet emi-
gration squeeze is the crackdown
on the Jewish movement.
Seminars in Hebrew and Jewish
culture have been closed; their
Comnrjurjity Calendar
Beth Shalom names
28-year-old director
leaders arrested, tried and sen-
tenced.
There is some power, however,
that can be exercised, by the
United States. And a concen-
trated effort by South Broward
Jews on their congressmen will
help. Unlike its response to other
Soviet interests such as Poland,
Afghanistan, Czechoslovakia or
Hungary, the Soviet Union can
be made to pay an economic price
if more Jews are not let go.
On the Ethiopian Jewish prob-
lem, continued pressure to allow
Jews to emigrate to Israel must
be applied.
Middle East Task Force:
Chairperson Jack Berman quotes
a recent quote of Julius Berman,
chairman of the Conference of
President's of Major Jewish Or-
ganizations, to sum up the posi-
tion his task force is supporting:
"Give the Palestinians time to
find their voice so that they may
negotiate with Israel."
In a letter to President Reagan
regarding the president's Sept. 1
proposals which stirred so much
controversy worldwide, the na-
tional leader suggested that the
United States urge the West
Bank Palestinians and King
Hussein of Jordan to come to the
peace table with no other precon-
dition than recognition of Israel.
By placing the power and pres-
tige of the office of the president
of the United States behind his
proposals. President Reagan has
affected the negotiating balance,
Jack Berman believes.
No Arab could be expected to
accept less than the United
Continued on Page 7
OCtOBCR
1, fRiday
2, SatuRfcay
6, WeOnesoay
8, f RiOay
10, Sunfc&y
11, monoay
13. Wednesday
ORT Hollybrook Golf Tournament.
First Day of Sukkot;
lasts six days.
B'nai B'rith Women,
8 p.m. at Jewish Federation
of South Broward.
JCC 'Vaudeville Jazz",
a musical, at 10 a.m.
at the JCC, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Simchat Torah.
JCC Adult Classes begin,
call 921-6511.
JCC Community Choir,
8 p.m. at the JCC
JCC Singles Workshop, 'Issues
of Children & Divorce,'
8p.mat JCC.
Temple Solel
Sisterhood luncheon,
11 a.m. at social hall.
Ship Ahoy! Bogey's of the
Waterfront Intracoastal Cruise &
Dinner,
Temple Solel Sisterhood,
6:30 p.m., call 989-0205.
Art Auction-Dinner,
8 p.m., Sisterhood of
Temple Beth Shalom,
call 981-6111.
Tour Community Calendar welcomes news of your Jewish
oriented organization. All meetings, their times and (heir
locations, should be directed to Steve Katon. associate editor, at
the Jewish Federation of South Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Calendar information must be received at least two weeks before
publication date. .
14, thuRsday
16. SatURday
At 28, Edwin R. Frankel al-
ready has a dozen years exper-
ience as a Jewish educator. His
latest feat is winning appoint-
ment as director of Temple Beth
Shalom Religious School.
In announcing the candidate,
Rabbi Morton Malavsky and
Allan Coplin, Beth Shalom presi-
dent, said Frankel will be re-
sponsible for students attending
secular schools in grades three-
seven. In addition to meeting one
day a week and on Saturday or
Sunday, a series of events
Sabbath dinners and lunches,
weekend youth conclaves and
junior congregation services on
various grade levels will be
featured.
"1 want our students to have a
full grasp of Jewish sources, but I
want much more. If I have my
way, my students will be
motivated to seek avenues for
their Jewish commitment, and to
become productive members of
the Hollywood Jewish commu-
nity," Frankel says.
"The soul of the Jewish people
is reflected in its literature, its
music and particularly in its li-
turgy," he adds. Study of liturgy
prayer skills has been made
a high priority of the course
studies.
Also, a Bible contest is planned
to inspire 6th and 7th graders to
reach great heights in their study
of Genesis.
Frankel had been principal of
the Pinellas County Jewish Day
School in St. Petersburg before
accepting the Hollywood posi-
tion. His background also in-
cludes being youth director at
two Long Island synagogues and
a counselor for 10 years at Camp
Ramah in the Poconos.
He has his BA from Columbia
and his BHL and MA from the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America. He is a doctoral student
at New York University, where
he is a fellow of the Jewish Edu-
cation Service of North Ameri-
ca s Administrators Training
Program.
The Temple Beth Shalom Reli-
gious School is open to the entire
Jewish community. Registration
already has begun for the Reli-
gious School, the Mechina for
students in grades K-2. and the
Judaica High School.
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Harvey Pincus, Manager
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial Chapels
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc./Funeral Directors
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Sponsoring the Guard Ian Plan Pra-ArranR'd Funeral
Tradition.
Itfc what makes us Jews.


FridayTOctober 1,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
U.S. firms give cash for Lebanese
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK group of American corporations
has formed an organization to
collect funds from U.S. firms for
the relief of the civilian popula-
tion of Lebanon in the aftermath
of Israel's military operation
there, it was announced by Ralph
Davidson, chairman of the Board
of Time Inc., who initiated the
project.
Speaking at a press conference
here last Thursday, Davidson
said the new organization, named
Fund totals $1.5 million
American Corporate Aid for Le-
banon Inc. (ACALl, already has
commitments for nearly S1.6
million from 21 American cor-
porations. He said that ACAL is
a non-profit group and solely mo-
tivated by humanitarian pur-
poses without regard to "narrow
political considerations."
Davidson said that ACAL's
firrt two grants are to the Ameri-
can University of Beirut Hospi-
tal, a 420-bed institution in west
Beirut, and to Save the Children,
a 50-year-old non-profit agency
that provides assistance in nutri-
tion, health and housing around
the world. Each organization,
Davidson said, will receive
$250,000.
But Davidson added the
ACAL is looking for a recognized
relief agency in Lebanon to chan-
Jewish survival theme of UJA contest
nel to it the contributions it col-
lected. He said that ACAL was
formed on a temporary basis and
its activities will be stopped "in
about 10 days." He said he hoped
that by then ACAL will get con-
tributions up to S3 million.
Asked if the group is planning
to provide similar relief efforts to
Israeli citizens in northern Israel
who suffered as a result of the
Lebanese crisis, Davidson said
"no," pointing out that the pro-
ject is meant to aid only Leban-
ese civilians. In response to an-
other question he said that Time
magazine is not connected with
| the efforts of the new group.
Davidson, who is serving as
president and director of ACAL,
said the companies that have
committed their support to
ACAL are among the largest in
the United States.
These include AT&T, Borg-
Warner Corp.. CBS, Chrysler
Corp., Deere & Co., Exxon Corp.,
Ford Motor Co., GTE, Gulf &
Western, The Hilton Foundation,
H. J. Heinz Co., ITT, Johnson &
Johnson, Joseph E. Seagram &
Sons Fund, Philip Morris, Proc-
ter & Gamble, Time, Warner
Communications, Westinghouse
Electric, Wheelabrator-Frye, and
Xerox Corp.
NEW YORK The United
Jewish Appeal announces the
second annual University Essay
Contest, funded by the Morris J.
Kaplun Foundation. The theme
of the contest is: "Jewish Exper-
ience as a Source of Survival
Strategies."
Robert E. Loup, national
* chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal said: "The current voices
of dissent concerning the crisis in
Lebanon remind us of the value
of educational programs which
provide a forum for Jewish youth
to add their voices to our con-
tinuing concern for peace and the
primacy of unity for Jewish sur-
vival."
The nationwide competition is
open to any American undergra-
. duate or graduate student less
than 27 years of age and enrolled
in an accredited institution of
higher learning. The 1,500- to
2.000-word essays will be judged
by a panel of educators and
writers.
An all-expense-paid trip to Is-
rael and a $500 commendation
stipend will be awarded to the
authors of the eight winning
essays. The lOday trip in August
1983 will include visits with Is-
raeli heads of state and tours of
fc feorder settlements, archaelogical
excavations and other events of
historical, social and educational
value.
'New Life' event
first for Bonds
in S. Broward
The South Broward Israel
Bond campaign will hold a "New
Life*' dinner Oct. 18 at the
Konover Hotel in Miami, accord-
ing to Joe Raymond, general
v^hairman of the campaign.
"New Life" dinners give recog-
nition to survivors of the Holo-
caust who achieved distinction in
the new life they have created for
themselves, and have made sig-
nificant contributions to their
communities and the State of Is-
rael. The dinner is the first of its
kind in this community.
Guest speaker will be Dr. Tsvi
Nussbaum, a prominent New
'ork surgeon and Jewish com
t munity leader. Nuasbaum is
famous for a picture taken of him
40 years ago which appeared in
newspapers and magazines
around the world. He was a
frightened Jewish boy, his hands
held high above his head, being
guarded by Nazi troops outside
the Warsaw ghetto before being
placed on a truck bound for
Bergen- Belsen.
Tourism dips
JERUSALEM Tourism
figures have dropped substan-
tially in the past three months,
wage the war in Lebanon erupted.
m August total, just released
y the government's Central
Bureau of Statistics, shows a 15
Percent drop compared with
August 1981.
'n July there waa a 16 percent
J compared with July a year
and in June, a 22 percent
According to Dr. Henry Fein-
gold of the City University of
New York, chairman of the UJA
University Essay Contest Com-
mittee, the focus of the contest is
educational. The objective is to
stimulate creative thought on the
perennial problem of Jewish phy-
sical and spiritual survival. Ap-
plicants are encouraged to inter-
pret the theme as broadly and
critically as they wish, using any
combination of disciplines as well
as personal experience. "The un-|
foreseen dividend of last year's
contest was that the maturity
and eloquence of the essays iden-
tified future leaders of the Jewish
people,'' Feingold commented
For contest rules and other in-
formation, contestants may write
to: Contest Coordinator, UJA
University Essay Contest, 4th
Floor Room 32, 1290 Avenue of
the Americas, New York, N.Y.
10104.
M.
SHALOM
MontOflM Chapela
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
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CHAPELS FROM BOCA RATON TO MIAMI
Se. rewaral
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UNITED KINGDOM/IRELAND Standard Discount Economy $2.08 1.56 1.25 $1.26 95 76 7om-lpm 1pm-6pm 6pm-7om
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PACIFIC Standard Discount Economy 422 3.17 253 158 1 19 95 5pm-llpm 10am-5pm llpm-lOam
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC Standard Discount Economy 168 126 1.01 1 13 85 68 4pm-l0pm 7am-4 pm I0pm-7am
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NEAR EAST Standard Discount Economy 368 2.76 2.21 133 100 80 8am-3pm 9pm-8am 3pm-9pm
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L For coonws lhot ore not diotoole. there's o 3-m*iute minimum and roles ore somewhat higher Different role schedules apply Conodo ond Mernco Owed with your tocol operator Federal exile to. of 1% is odded on all colls billed m the Unrfed Slows i
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at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
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and the new calling rimes:
Standard, Discount, and
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FIRST MINUTt/tADDITIONAL MINUTE


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The Jewish Ftoridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
fWd-y, October 1
.1982
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HOLLYBROOK HAPPENING I. order u> tee-aaaj the Jewisfa
Federata>a of Sooth Brow and s 1963 eaaipatgn effectiveness at Holh
brook. Caaipaisn Cabinet has bees retablished Chirmu of the
Cabiset 16 Harr> Rarp 'center* and eochainneo are Dr Joseph Stein
left and Nat Levine Next breakfast meetiag is Oct. 7 at 930 at the
Holly brook rhibbouse
Begin to speak
Continued from Page 1
According to Joyce Newman of the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Browmrd. vice chaxmac of the plan-
ning committee for the next CJF convention, the
51st. the general assembly is the largest single gath-
ering each year of North American Jewish com-
munal leadership
The theme of this year's nawetiiifc'i Nov. 10-14
The Next 50 Years Beginning to Meet the Chal-
lenges" will focus on the great variety of issues
confronting Jewish communities.
Plenary sessions, forums and more than 100 work-
shops will take place beginning Wednesdav after-
noon. Nov 10. with an address by CJF President
Martin E Citrin of Detroit, on "Insuring the Com-
mitment of the Next Generation."
On the following morning. Rabbi Harold Schui-
wess of Los Angeles, the General Assembly scholar
hvresidence. will discuss "The Role and Responsibi-
lity of Federations in Insuring the Commit men: of
the Next Generation '
Rabbi Schulweis talk wil] be followed immediate
ry by a series of 17 workshops, each rUaling with one
particular aspect of insuring commitment-
Leon Dulzm. chairman of the Jewish Agencv for
Israel, will speak a: the Saturday afternoon Oneg
Sbabbaton Israel-Diaspora Relations
Registration information for the CJF General As-
embly is available at the Jewish Federation of
South Breward-
JWB poster* honor '82 book Month
NEW YORK JTA Two
JWB posters, one for children,
the other of general interest, have
been issued in connection with
the 1982 observance of Jewish
Book Month, sponsored by the
JWB Jewish Book Council.
Dr. Robert Gordis. council
president, said the 1982 event
will be observed Nov 10 to Dec.
10. Jewish community centers.
Jewish Ys. synagogues and Jew-
ish schools and libraries sponsor
special book programs and Jew-
ish book fairs to focus attention
on new books of Jewish interest.
Gordis saxl a Jewish Book
Month Kit has been prepared
which contains two of the chil-
dreas posters and two adult
pasters: 200 bookmarks. 100 of
which have a list of recommended
Ex-SS officer
loses citizenship
CHICAGO A federal judge
has revoked the citizenship of
Conrad Scheilong. a former SS
officer living in Chicago, for
having made material misrepre-
sentation of his Nazi past when
he applied for U.S. citizenship
Scheilong. 71. is alleged to
have commanded a guard unit at
the Dachau and Sachsenburg
concentration camps during
World War II and to have trained
S^ recruits for concentration
camp guard duty
titles for children, and 100 of
which have a list for adults: a se-
lected list of books for a Jewish
book fair and a selected list of
publishers of books of Jewish in-
terest.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEl SECURITIES.
a
TRANSAC IK >NS DAILY VIA TELEX
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New York N Y 10017
Securities (212(7591310
Corporation Ton Free (8oo> 221 -48ie
May The New Year, 5743
Usher In An Era Of Peace
For All Mankind.
G*o&
titta
ye
County Commissioner
Proudly Endorsed For Election To The
Broward County Commission On
Tuesday, October 5 By...
Hank August
Frankie Bell
Sam Berlin
Mayor John Bertino
Claude Blocker
Bernard Chase
Janet Chase
Dorothy Duskin
Lillian Ellis
Bert Fragner
Martha Friedman
Abe Gold
Irene Gold
Arlyne Goodwin
Naomi Guralnik
Yetta Gould
Chip Harkow
Phyllis Harkow
Mayor Dave Keating
Frank Kodav
SamKoffler
Joe Kolb
Alan Kraut
Dr. Al Kudin
Harry Lampman
Arnold Lanner
Joanne Lanner
Hon. John Leban
Howard Leban
Molly Leban
Elaine Lerner
Dr. Larry Lerner
Dr. Herman Meister
Jack Milbery
Rhona Miller
Mayor Doug Parrish
Harry Posdamer
Comm. Rose Price
LouRagovin
Dorothy Raspler
Irma Rochlin
Mayor Sonny Rosenberg
Cheri Rothschild
Ronald Rothschild
Herbert Rubenstein
Thea Saunders
Marietta Shapiro
William Schwartz
Nat Sedley
Jack Shulman
Emanuel Sills
Sam Silverman
Paul Sneider
Eve Solomon
Shelly Spivack
IraSubin
Anne Subin
David Wagner
Abraham Walton
Howard Weinheim
Madelon Weinheim
Rose Weinstock
Comm. John Williams
...And Many Of Your Friends And Neighbors!

On October 5r Vote EVE SAVAGE...Punch #9
a *n <~ a *
-J


Friday, October 1, 1982
The Jeu]\sh Flarjdian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
On giving tangible personal property
This is the fifth in a series of
articles entitled "Modern Meth-
ods of Charitable Giving," by
Jonathon M. Lichter. assests
realization officer for the United
Jewish Appeal. For further infor-
mation, please call Michael J.
Moskowitz at the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward 1921-
8810).
An individual may donate an
item of tangible personal prop-
erty to charity. Tangible personal
property comprises certain types
of concrete appreciated capital
assets held by a person for more
than 12 months, other than se-
curities (which are personal, but
intangible) and real property
(which is tangible, but real). It
includes, for example, the follow-
ing types of property: Books,
works of art created by a person
other than the donor, antiques,
stamps, and coins.
An income tax charitable de-
duction Ls allowed for a charitable
gift of an item of tangible per-
sonal property but, as described
below, the size of the deduction is
dependent on whether or not the
use by the charity of the donated
property is related to the char-
ity's tax purpose or function.
Related Use Property The
donor is entitled to an income tax
charitable deduction for the
present fair market value of the
donated property and is not
subject to capital gains tax at the
charitable transfer with respect
to appreciation during his or her
term of ownership.
Private lead trusts
can cut transfer tax
This article comes from the ac-
counting office of Joseph J.
Bloom, chairman of the Legacy
and Endowment Committee of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Private lead trusts can provide
an attractive method of avoiding
both estate and gift taxes on
transfers.
A private lead trust is an ir-
revocable trust to which a
grantor transfers money or high-
yield securities. He retains an
annuity for himself for a set term
with the remaining principal go-
ing to designated beneficiaries.
Because the IRS valuation
tables are based on a 6 percent
return, if handled properly such
transfers can avoid both estate
and gift taxes.
For example, assume a grantor
transfers $50,000 face value of 13
percent bonds to a trust which
. provides that he is to get $6,500 a
: year for 11 years with the
principal to his children after the
term is up.
The IRS actuarial tables
provides that the present value of
$6,500 a year for 11 years is more
than $50,000 so that the bonds
will pass to the beneficiaries free
of gift tax when the trust ter-
minates.
If the grantor lives for the full
term of the trust there will be no
inclusion in his estate either.
A variation of the private lead
trust is the charitable lead trust
which provides an annuity to a
,/ charity for a term of 10 years or
less with the principal to non-
An-nell
Hotel
Strict*,
Kosher
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Maahglach & Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year Services
Near all good shopping
Wnte For Season Rates'
MIAMI BEACH I \ t31 1191
-RELGO. INC.
Religious & Gilt Ariic.cs
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Hebrew Books Judaic*
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Oo*n *iintta*
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|CERTIFIED MOHEL,
Your Baby Deserves
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charitable beneficiaries. The trust
can provide an immediate sub-
stantial tax deduction and avoid
or minimize estate and gift taxes
as well.
Since the IRS is thinking of
changing its 6 percent actuarial
tables, action must be taken
quickly if you are interested.
Please contact Michael J.
Moskowitz at the Federation of-
fice (921-8810) if you have any
questions or wish to implement
this tax saving device.
The deduction is limited to 30
percent of the donor's adjusted
gross income for the taxable year,
with excess carried forward up
to 30 percent in each succeeding
year up to five years. The
donor may also in the same
way as with appreciated long
term securities and real property
elect a 50 percent ceiling.
Unrelated Use Property The
donor is entitled to an income tax
charitable deduction limited to
the cost of the property to the
donor plus 60 percent of the ap-
preciation in its value, or, other-
wise stated, the present fair
market value of the property
minus 40 percent of the apprecia-
tion.
The deduction ceiling is 50 per-
I cent of the donor's adjusted gross
income, with carry forward of any
excess allowable up to five years.
Example A
Mrs. G. donated an original
Rembrandt oil painting to the
UK Fine Arts Museum, a tax
exempt organization. She had
purchased the painting several
years earlier for $150,000.
At the time of the charitable
gift, it was appraised at $300,000.
Mrs. G. should be entitled to a
$300,000 income tax charitable
deduction for the gift and not be
subject to capital gains tax with
respect to the $150,000 apprecia-
tion during her term of owner-
ship.
Example B
Mr. H. was considering donat-
ing an original Daumier litho-
graph to a local charitable organ-
ization providing services for the
disadvantaged. He had pur-
chased the lithograph several
years earlier for $15,000. It was
now appraised at $20,000.
Unless it could be shown that
the charity's use of the
lithograph would be related to
the organization's tax exempt
purpose, Mr. H.'s income tax
charitable deduction for a gift of
the lithograph to the charity
would be limited to $18,000
($15,000 plus 60 percent of
$5,000).

SUPER SUNDAY Although Super Sunday lasts but a day (one
very hectic, but highly rewarding day), many days of planning and or-
ganizing precede that day, Jan. 23, 1963. For months the Super Sun-
day Executive Committee meets to make sore all goes right in solicit-
ing contributions by phone. From left, committee members are Brenda
Greenman, Bee Mogilowitz, R. Joel Weiss, cochairman, Melissa
Martin, Steve Klein and Ron Rosen. Not attending the session were
Ron Rothschild, cochairman, Dr. Philip Levin and Judy Meyers.
**&
Enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
Win a$l,000 catered party from Maxwell HouseCoffee!
Let Maxwell House put $1000 towards the cater-
ing of your next special occasion We'll make it a
glorious anniversary1 A beautiful bar mitzvah' A
wondrous wedding' An affair#with family and
friends you'll always remember1 Maxwell House
is the perfect coffee to help you share the warm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century
feelings of those special occasions because it's al-
ways 'Good to the Last Drop* So make 5743
even happierfill out the entry form
and enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
from Maxwell House today
OFFICIAL RULES
1. Each entry must be accompanied by the m-
nerseal from a iar ot MAXWELL HOUSE" Instant
Coffee or a 2 square from the plastic lid of a can
Ol ground MAXWELL HOUSE" Coffee or MAX-
WELL HOUSE" ADC" Coftee or the words
MAXWELL HOUSE" printed >n block letters on a
3x5" card Entries must be on the Official Entry
Blank or a 3" > 5" card and mailed to Mazel Tov
Sweepstakes. General Foods Corporation P0
Bo3660 Grand Central Station New York New
York 10163
I. M0 PURCHASE REQUIRED TO ENTER
SWEEPSTAKES
3. Entries must be first-class mM. one entry per
envelope, postmarked no later than January 4,
1963 and received by January 11 1963
4. Winner will be selected in a random drawing
on January 18 1963. from all entries received
prior to the deadline The drawing will be con-
ducted by Joseph Jacobs Organization Inc in
independent organization whose decision is
final In the event the winner declines the prize or
if lor any reason the prize cannot be awarded
after the initial drawing, a supplemental draw
mg(s) will be held to award the prize Winner will
be notified by mail Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility ol the winner The odds ot winning
depend on the number ot entries received
S. Prize consists of one Grand Prize $1,000 to
cater your party Pnze will be awarded upon the
receipt ot bill from caterer
I. This sweepstakes is open to all residents ol the
United States who are 18 years of age or older
except employees land their families) ot General
Foods Corporation its advertising agencies
subsidiaries or affiliates, or Joseph Jacobs
Organization Inc Sweepstakes subiect to all
Federal State and local regulations Void where
prohibited by law
7. For the name of the winner send a sett-
addressed. postage paid envelope to Winner s
Name. P0 Box 3990 Grand Central Station
New York. New York 10163
MAZEL TOV SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
NUL
ADDUfSii.
STATF_
. ZIP1
MAIL TO: MaMl Tov IktateMSftM
Ccocrai Fooak Coroo>atfoa>
P.O. Boa 1**0
CraadCaralSa!
New York, New York lOIti
"lnn "iml kr rnmti by Joxnjjry 11 iaj

I
I
I
.J


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Friday, October l,m2
Soviet Jewry update
IDA NUDEL, the 52-year-old
refusenik who returned to
Moscow last March after serving
a four-year period of exile in
Kriyosheino, is living outside the
capital, and has now been banned
from returning there until at least
July 1983.
A close friend says that while
Ida is deeply appreciative of the
worldwide efforts to get her a
visa to Israel, she herself is now
convinced that her best interests
would be served if she could be
allowed to normalize her situa-
tion.
^I
I i&S&k
wkt
M Mfl
l
BK^HSI
"Sunsweet Prune Juice.
It's not just good for my body
It just plain tastes good."
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juice has a variety of
vitamins and minerals So when people see me drinking it.
they usually figure that I drink it to stay healthy Actually,
that's only half the reason It also happens to taste delicious
And why not .it's a rich 100 natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added 1 enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often. After all. how often do you find something
that s good for you and that rii^iriifrrT -
tastes good,, too? bUNbWtb I
To your health
Here's a good deal
on Sunsweet9 Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Mr Grocer Thit coupon is redeemable (or 10' (plus 7< handling I
when mailed to Sunsweet Prune Juice P0 Bo> 1404, Clinton.
IA 52734 provided it has been used (or a purchase in accor-
dance with this of far Anyotheruseconstitutesfraud Invoices
proving purchase of sufficient stock to cover coupons
presented lor redemption must be shown upon request Void if
use is prohibited taxed or othe'wise restricted by lew Cash
value 1/20* This offer expires October 31,1983 Offer limited to
one coupon per purchase SUNSWElT GROWERS. INC
70MS0 A00b21
I CERTIFIED KOSHER
I__________
10
OFF
What she wants most, she told
the friend, is to find a job, a
reasonable place to live and not
to be the focus of day-to-day
KGB attention.
Meanwhile, a report from
Mexico tells of a deputation on
Ida's behalf being received by the
Soviet ambassador in that coun-
try and being given the assurance
that he would raise the issue of
Ida's visa with the Soviet gov-
ernment.
LEV SHEFER and
VLADIMIR YELCHIN, both
Hebrew teachers in Svendlovsk,
have been sentenced to five years
for "defaming the Soviet state."
The basis for the defamation
charge was the possession by the
two men of Hebrew books.
The sentencing is part of a
larger plan of the Soviet
authorities to stop Hebrew
studies throughout the Ssoviet
Union. Ninety-five Hebrew
teachers in Moscow have been
warned to stop their activities.
Former POC GRIGORY
GEISHAS returned home to
Leningrad after completing his
two-year sentence for refusing to
serve in the Soviet army. He re-
applied for permission to emi-
grate to Israel with his wife,
Polina, and was ordered to ap-
pear for a military physical.
HALF WAY TO FREEDOM.
The following refusenilks ._
ceived exit visas:
Avshalum Avahiumov -
Baku; Yukkanan Benjaminov -
Tashkent; Frida Breslav _
Riga; Lev Faiman Moscow
Mikhail Fishbein Moscow'
Alexsandr Grinshtein Ivano
fronkovsk; Yadviga Khort -
Moscow; Aleksandr Leichenko
- Riga; Solomon Lokshin -
Vilnius; Aleksandr Lurie _
Tallin; Lev Podrabinok _
Bobruisk; Zigmund Rozntal -
Kishniev; Shmuel Shvartsband
- Riga; Dmitry Shvartsman -
Kishniev; Yusif Zufugarov
RUja.
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New
Year, we wish to
thank our community
for its support of
our Thrift Shops
during the past
year.
Your generous
5713N.W. 27Ave., Miami
donations of resalable
merchandise and your
continued patronage
of our stores, have
enabled us to provide
quality health care
and needed social ser-
vices to thousands of
indigent elderly persons.
DOUGLAS GARDENS
THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the
Miami Jewish Home
& Hospital for
the Aged.
3149 Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
Hallandale
500 N.E. 79 St., Miami 2800 N.W. 183 SL. Carol City
Free pickup
751 -3988 (Dade)
981 -8245 (S. Broward)
943-5688 (N. Broward & S. Palm Beach)
Irving Cypen
Chairman of the Board
Harold Beck
President
Aaron Kravitz
Chm. Thrift Shop Comm
Fred D. Hirt
Executive Director
Good Merchandise at a
Good Price.
Now at four locations.
TheTJen I^ost Qlarts of Israel*?
The Highland Scots, so the story goes, have laid claim to'being
dependents of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Whether they really are or
we'll never know. But one thing we do know for sure is that the first
Jews of modern times came to Scotland in the I600's, found it much
to their liking, and settled there.
Once established, the settlers undoubtedly discovered one of
Scotland's most famous pleasures. J&B Rare Scotch. Carefully
blended from a selection of the finest scotches, JckB has such a
smoothness and subtlety that it can truly be said to whisper. Mo
wonder it's become the favorite scotch here in America. Serve
J&.B to your tribe, clan .>r mishpocha. One delightful sip will see
the start of a tradition rh.u will never be bet
not,
j&a it
P-offBi"lM5coicnW>ly C 198? Tl.
whispers.
*
*


Friday, October 1,1962
The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Hollywood

-.-
S
New PAC created to help politicians who aid Israel
The National Political Action
Committee (NATPAC), a new or-
ganization that will endorse and
contribute to congressional can-
didates from both parties who are
pro-Israel, began operating last
month.
Marvin Josephson, NATPAC
treasurer, said the group was
formed in response to the serious
erosion of support for Israel in
this country, and the emergency
of the large and powerful pro-
Arab and "petrodollar" lobbies.
The weakening support for
America's only democratic ally in
the Middle East threatens vital
American interests in that
troubled region, NATPAC, which
is based in New York, claims.
The groups will begin nation-
Kristalnacht
Memorial
at temple
The Kristalnacht Memorial,
remembering Nov. 10, 1938
the destruction of synagogues,
Jewish businesses, etc. pro-
ducing The Night of the Crystal
(Broken Glass), will be held Wed-
nesday, Nov. 17, 8 p.m., at
Temple Beth El.
This year's program will be co-
sponsored by the Community
Relations Committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward
and the Holocaust Memorial
Center.
Featured speakers for
Kristalnacht will be Paul Orlan, a
survivor who is serving as the
Holocaust Commission chairman
of the Community Relations
Committee, and Pastor R. A.
Miller, from the S.W. Commu-
nity Church of Miami, who was a
liberator.
Goldie Goldstein, executive di-
rector of the Holocaust Memorial
Center, will also give a presenta-
tion.
right 'petro-lobbies'
wide advertising aimed at raising
funds and educating people about
Mideast issues from an Israeli
perspective. The ads will appear
in Jewish newspapers and maga-
zines.
The theme of the new group is
summed up in the headline of one
of its ads: "Supporting candi-
dates who believe in Israel is not
just good for Jews. It's good for
America."
NATPAC will not engage in
legislative lobbying or take
detailed positions on Mideast
issues, but will promote a general
spirit of support for Israel, ac-
cording to Josephson.
Officials point out that support
for Israel among elected officials
would mean, among other things,
adequate economic and military
foreign aid to the nation. "If
America does not support Israel,
Josephson said, "Russia will be
there (in the Mideast) in 20
seconds."
Working with Josephson in
managing and organizing the
new group is H. David Wein-
stein, formerly with the
Republican National Committee
and the United Jewish Appeal.
NATPAC already has raised
$350,000 in seed money for its
advertising campaign. It has set
NataMndlAniC051!JITTE Z *" ** *odensky (left) and
-Si?? S*?S* Jft?5 Shomrai business at Williams Island
vrinnEl' .trger',?AJ!eder"k,n Campaign chairman. The de-
velopers of Williams Island hosted the meeting in recognition of the
outstanding contribution that the Jewish Federation of South Brow-
ard has made to strengthening our community.'
...WANTED...
CONDO AND SOCIAL GROUPS
WHO WANT TO HAVE FUN
- ANNOUNCING -
AN EXCITING VARIETY OF BUDGET TOURS
*#
No Frills One Night Package Tours Our Specialty

Our Fully Packaged Tours Include
The World Famous BURT REYNOLDS DINNER THEATER
and the Popular MUSICANA SUPPER CLUB
PLUS ONE, AND TWO NIGHT PACKAGES
AND DAY TRIPS ARE AVAILABLE

PERFECT FOR FUNDRAJSING
Call Collect for our FREE TOUR BOOKLET
SOME INSURANCE
AGENTS ARE LOCKED]
INTO ONE COMPANY
MTMUM
noon,
f

"OVERLOOKING PALM BEACH"
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- WEST PALM BEACH 33401
655-8800
CALL THE PACKAGE PLAN MANAGER
NOW
Epcot Center
Package Available
1983 Booklet
FREEH
NOT Jack Herman
Insurance Agency, Inc.
There are 2 ways to buy Insuran-
ce. You can buy your Insurance
from a one-company agent. But
he's locked Into only those
policies that his company sells.
So his hands are tied.
Or you can buy insurance from
an Independent Insurance
Agent ...the More-than-one-com-
pany agent. You see. your
Big "I" Independent Agent
doesn't work lor one company.
We represent several. So we're
tree to give you an impartial, in-
dependent opinion and help ad-
vise you on the best coverage at
the best price.
THE MORE THAN ONE COMPANY
INSURANCE AGENT.
Jack B.rman
Insurance Agency, Inc.
2739 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
BWD. 921-7744
Dade 947-5902
a fund-raising goal of $5 million.
Contributors can give up to
$5,000 to the PAC, which in turn
can contribute up to $5,000 to a
candidate.
The group hopes to get in-
volved in every congressional
campaign in the country. In
addition to reaching out to 97
percent of the population that is
Jewish, NATPAC will send out
the message that you don't have
to agree with everything the Is-
raeli government does to support
a PAC for Israel.
Josephson pointed out that
PACs representing Arab in-
terests are run by a large number
of powerful corporations in the
country tied to Arab money, in-
cludng Mobil Oil. Bechtel.
' Boeing, Amoco and Grumman.
NATPAC has contributed to
six candidates so far, three
Democrats and three Republi-
cans:
Sen. Henry Jackson (D-Wash);
Sen. John Danforth (R-Mo.l;
: Richard Durbin, Democratic
candidate running against Rep.
Paul Findley (R-IU.I; Sen. John
Heinz (K-Pal, and two contend-
ers in the N.J. Senate race, Rep.
Millicent Fenwick and Frank
Lautenberg.
Both New Jersey candidates
received backing, in part to sym-
bolize that the group will not
walk away from supporting a
candidate just because he or she
is running against a Jew, in this
case, Lautenberg.
CRC
Continued from Page 2
States has demanded, according
to the view of the Israeli govern-
ment.
The CRC chairperson, Mrs.
Giulianti, has been a member and
officer of Women's American
ORT for 12 years, is active in
Temple Solel Sisterhood and is
president of the Board of Women
in Distress (battered wives). She
is married to Donald Giulianti
MD, a neurosurgeon.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward 's CRC is the local
voice of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council which is composed of 11
national and 111 local Jewish or-
ganizations. They collectively
evaluate developments of concern
to the Jewish community, plan
how to deal effectively with those
concerns, seek consensus on joint
policies and develop guidelines
for action.
The national council's 11 mem-
bers are:
American Jewish Committee,
American Jewish Congress, B'nai
B'rith Anti-Defamation
League, Hadassah, Jewish Labor
Committee, Jewish War Veterans
of the USA, National Council of
Jewish Women, Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations,
Union of Orthodox Jewish Con-
gregation of America, United
Synagogue of America Na-
tional Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism and Women's
American ORT.
H you need tt
for your home
^^ 9& at...
Housewares*Hardware*Paint*Locksrnith*Sriades*Gifts
Bath/Closet ShopPatio/Dinette Furniture*Floral Arrangements
Dinnerware*LightingElectrical*Plumbing*Garden
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily & Sunday
100 E. Hallandala Beach Blvd.
Tel 456-0506 (Broward). 949-1682 (Dade)
Membe' Halundilc Chimoef ctf Commerce Better Buuneu Dwton
DAVID SINGER
AND FAMILY WISH YOU A VERY
-----HAPPY AND HEALTHY-----
-------------NEW YEAR!-------------
L' Shonah
Tova Ti Kasevu


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, October 1,1982
cPtide
Choice
Sirloin
Steaks>
US CHOICE
' BEEF LOIN
$
POUND
US CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BO
Shoulder *
Roast 1
(SAVE 90t LB )
*
pcm
ASSORTED FLAVORS-OZ
La Yogurt.....
MAZOl A-UNSALTEO 5
Mm. !.ii
PHA.AOELPHIA SOFT
.'pS .89 10
PANTRV PRCE-SUCEO NATURAL
Swiss Cheees ..131.19 10
FRiENOSMlP C*L*OflNiA STvlE
Cottage Cheees 1.09 10
MNUTE MMD CHHXEO
Orange $-1 29
Juke _. JL 0
HALF
GALLON (SAVE 40)
COUNTRY MONtNG Bit NO SAlTEO O" UNS*4.TE0
Land O'Lakes .. ..1.39 10
sargento sliced cmeest
"1.19 10
HE DO WH#"
PKG
.. tup .69 10
oz
Cream Topping 1.19 10
PLAIN (SAVE 30)
IBreyo'sQQ
rogurt 77r
32-OZ.CUP
GENERICS
GENERIC 400 CT
SAVE
4 ROLL W|
. pug .77 48
.69 70
.^ug 1.39 126
GENEPAC-STEMS 1 PIECES
402
.... CAM
.48 37
GENERC tAXEO
>3S cam .>>y 10
COLA ORANGE ROOT BEER OnGCR Aii
7 LTR
, STL
.85 7.
QENEPJC
Cat Utter
25 si! 1.59 2 36
Towels
GENERC
Kosher Dills
.55 34
jar .89 60
G
32-OZ BTL (SAVE 40c)
Q6NEWC PINK UOUO
Dish Detergent
59l
U S CHOICE
WHOLE IN CRYOVAC
(CUT AND WRAPPED FrJc,
Beef Loiil
We sell only the best aw_____ 3"
-Why pay more when 1 eiKlenOill
/-^paying more doesn't ,our
f *A make it better?
U_S- CHOICE BEEF ROW J
^Top Roti Id
W Roast
Bond
\
PRICES GOOD
SEPT. 30-OCT. 6
ess
I PO
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyer's
Ice Cream
(SAVE 1 00)
III K>l>>
IOA
PRIC! S
fi\
BONOS
BUY
HALF
GALLON
12 0Z NO-RET
BOTTLES
Regular or Light
Stroh's i
Fyne
Paper
19 To"* $100
^^ GIANT
aval rolls
Whitehouse
Applesauce _
SAVE 38c)
BONUS
BOY
i vi Kvr>
I'HK I s
-199
(SAVE 86c I
25-OZ JAR
REGULAR OR
NATURAL
(SAVE 16c I
69
16-0Z CANISTER
Mr. Pibb, Mello Yello Carnation
k ____I (SAVE88C)________ ___I (SAVE 260
BONUS
BUY
PAK
12-OZ
CANS
l\l *>ll*.
KM
]
(
PRICES OOfDsE
PRODUCE f^^J^^SON EASTERN
Red Delicious (save
SWEET EATING (SAVE 30 Tokay 59
urapes lb
Delicious
^Apples**
.25
TPUMM. tw aoMjtv acuotrc mawajaji jat an
......ia 1.69 if
He. Avocados 2 .81
o S CHOCE BEE'
3 -BS ANOOVER
FAMILY PAK MEATS
SAVE
2.89 10
U S CHOCE BEEF Chuck
STEAKS ROAST BEEF STEWi
Shldr. Combo 1.79 20
U S CHOCE STewiNG
Baal...........lb 1.89 20
FRESh- GROUND
BaaffChuck.....a 1.89 20
FL* O" S**P" POEM fES-
Fryer Thighs... .. .89 30
FLA OX SHBfED PREM FRESH
.30
PERSONAL CARE
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
tablets SAVE m
Tylenol.......uSl2JBl^o^
VCA*. SAsSOON HpNSE OR
?l aaaaaaaa '. jj a A
n4wnpoo...... btl z.#7 52
ASS* -AWi'ttSOtOOOflANf
PACKAGED BAKERY-
hano scraper s cutter
Widget.......
REGuiAR OR UNSCfN'ED
Wondra Lotion
..R0. -E""RABOO<
Condition
can 1.97 82
. pkg 1.17 42
BONUS
BUY
, ____ioo
leyers pkg of6
Muffins
eoz
. B\
.97
PECAN FUOGE
32
. PKG
d 01
TUBE
1.97 62
Condition......'3.87 62
PAN'R* PRIDE RAlS ie o!
. LOAF
SAVE frcnch twns
10 AACRoSs p>
AOLERSPUMPERNCKlf
.89 io
(SAVE 77C) .
Sf
.73 12
LOAF mW
Steak Rods
.73 12
VELVET CREME GLAZED
.Of
K 1.19 3


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
-BONUS BOYS
SAVE
U S CHOICE BEEF ION
Ptrhse Steak B3.49 eo
US CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Shlder Steak 2.29 70
USCHOJCE BEEF ROUND BONELESS TOP ROUNO
leak........lB 2.691 00
ys CHOICE BEEF {WHOLE M CRY O VACl
Brisket......lb 1.49 20
US CHOICE BEEF ROUNO I SI CUI BNLS STEAK
Top Round... lb2.891 10
U S CHOICE BEEF ROUNO
1 ST CUT-THIN CUT BONELESS
Top Round
2.991 00
SAVE
U S CHOICE WHOLE OR POINT HALF
Boot Brisket lb 1.79 eo
U S CHOICE-FLAT HALF
Beef Brisket B2.19 so
FLA OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH QUARTERS
Fryer Legs lb .59 10
F^ OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH OUARTERS
Fryer Breasts lb .69 10
FLA OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH
(THIGHS BREASTS DRUMSTICKS)
Fryer Combo, lb 1.19 20
PANTRY PROS ASSTD SLICEO
Lunch Meet ^1.69 30
HEBREW NATIONAL MIDGET
Lots Of
Chicken
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
(3 BREASTS W BACKS
3 LEG QTRS W BACKS
3 GIBLET PACKAGES)
(SAVE 20e)
BONUS
BUY
cPtide
RAEFORO FRESH
TURKEY DRUMSTICKS OR
Turkey Wings lb .69 30
Sliced
BeefUver..ovfp L
.79 .30
lb 1.59 40
40
BONUS
BUY
CANADIAN-FROZEN
Turbot FHkrts
US CHOICE
Ox Tails.....lb 1.39
NEW ZEALAND-SPRING IAMB
Lamb Legs 1.99 20
LOUIS RCH-6 OZ PKG SLICED CHICKEN OR
Turkey Breast. 1.39 30
PKQ
MtBREW NAIL
Bologna
PANTRV PPiOE CHIPPED-? VO* PKO
tat Meats 2 for .89 10
12 \2A .30
eoz
PKG
.59 10
SUNNYLANO-JUMBO MEAT OR
Beef Franks '^1.99 20
MAMA S WINE OR CREAM
Herring....."pkq2.39 .30
^ ^Coronet
Bath
Tissue
ASSORTED
FLAVORS
)
8 S A Faygo
$79 piet4/$i00
.a,'"""- Sodas ss' M'-""
SAVE
DHL KOSHER OR PROCESSED
SAVE
1.19 60
c
pamh. MHiDt DEEP TONE OR PASTEL
Facial Tissue "".SI .59 10 Vlasic Pickles
_ ,.t 'REE TOP-REG 0 NATURAL
^ves......&& .79 10 Apple Juice *'& 1.49 34
FRENCH S BOLD N SPICv
Dell Mustard .M .79 20
SAVE
OCEAN SPRAY COCKTAIL 32 02 BTL REG OR LO CAl 'ARNATON DRY
Cranberry Juice 1.09 12 Instant Milk
"amr,pr ieoz can jamboree
Grape Jelly
-IMO^ME ORANGE OR PUNCH PANIR, PR.DE
Sqwincher 2 ",1.00 46 Instant Rice
I0OT n MA
bo 3.99 30
.99 30
.". .99 .32
FJNTlME SANDWICH
Glad Bags .99 45
BONUS PACK WHITE BL JE BROWN OR GOLD
Soft Soap .... cont 1.39 63
PANTRV PRlOf 1 1 OZ BOX
Snack Crackers .59 .51
TALL KITCHEN
'SCT kj%
B0 .99 1 00
Glad Bags
SWEET PEAS CU' GREEN BEANS
Ubby'Vegs2 .89 11
CREAM GOLO CORN W K GOLD CORN
Ubby'sVegs2 .89 11
ER
8-OZ PKG (SAVE 50t
Potato
Sunsweet
Prune
LAM6RUSCO ROSATO. BIANCO
SAVE
Riunrte Wines '\t 2.991 00
MOUNT AH WINES CHABLIS BURGUNDY NECTAR ROSE
RHINE CHENM BLANC FRENCH COLOMBARD
AJmaden Wines lVr 4*691.20
via REISUNO OR
Avla Cabernet 1.99 30
LIEBFRAUMILCH
Black Tower ^4.10 eo
f^EMUJ^HABUS^HABUSBU NC
RHINE PINK Of RED ROSE. HEARTY BURGUNDY
3 LTR BTL (SAVE 2.00) Cl
SERVICE
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING
SERVICE DELI DEPTS.
FINEST QUALITY
JACK t JKJ.
HALf
. LB
SAVE
40
I'-ORN APPLE VALLEY-OLD FASHK3NE0 FLAVOR
Liverwurst....... 1.59 40
WHITE OR YELLOW
V11.49 20
OVEN FRESH
BBQ Chickens
1.
USDA CHOICE RARE
Roast $
HALF POUND
2|
BONUS
BUY
5AV

GARDEN
FRESH
^<-r.~^- BUNCH
Broccoli
bag 1.4V 30
US *l ALL PURPOSE
WhUe
buy i get 1 free -naturall. fresh salad oressmq
"aS 1.79 1.79
us i all purpose- -upick
LB .28 .06
LQ. SUPER SELECT 80 COUNT
Garden rt
Cucumbers0
Ovenly Fresh
Baked Goods
Past 6 M ay hot food.
to take out
AVAILABLE AT 3TORES
HAVING FRESH BAKERIES
OLD FASWONED-WHOLE SAVE
Wheat Bread .99 10
JEWISH STYLE-CORN RYE OH
Onion Rye ....:. ea .96 oe
CHERRY OH APPLE
Turnovers ... 2 for .89 10
BREAKFAST TREAT
Corn Muffins 6 for 1.19 25
SOUTHEITN STYLE-* PCS IN BO
Fried Chicken.. bo, 3.69
9
m
i\
SA\e]
12
.16
30
There's a
PANTRY PRIDE
in your neighborhood
FROZEN FOODS-
* ->'*! I SB K-HIM
""to 4 sw i?;w aw
."* 'WiSl31UA
*KW humigtj,
> '*M IIKM*
*". >* ISO 15
.*" IN* IBS,
>-*l.S*|7l*
fL?"* *"m
M t io>a si
"r|.5C.iw.>M
^ *IS9'|M
"HI-CKTIIKI.OU
/XSxwOw ,,,
- 11 x.j. gw,
cMucAtiii-w mm
** I .* M
-sumnc Cam
"OIW-WUtSPIMMI
"'Mi-awn?!.*,
--11P.., tM *. 5l
UTMCAYW
C/ twg I MSIMM 0
< Muasuoi
l*G Of IK I9A
WUWSllHc SM
"WdSlwSRwigCwia
* XlAw ilftui
* Onon IV 'MM Si
'? IDE MAM
MM MAC*
. Awe*)*. isiSi
cam Mm a m Smm
Coms Mm a ?ti s*m
*" Si Caiioar s Bat v*
MaiFaMaiMSm
Antu GMrn Fig | p... a,
mm O 1 Fw wimi
"*Mj Mm a too tnm
MUAMUt-imirwOOO
o>!SZ^
h., MM
'510 S
UTMIT
H RllJ SMa>| Cw
MAAATH0N
liS M :|lSei
(SAVE 40e)
Birdseye
Cob Com
4 EARS IN PKG
$-119
MOflTON
Honey Buns
IAIER BO SHOESTRMG
9 I 802
BOX
JOOZ
. BAG
.69 16
.49 20
PANTRV PftlOC MIMED
2bc?,?M.OO is
PANIR> PRIDE
Waffles.....2^1.00 38
ASSORTEO
QiWPlzzai ;; .89 10
lACREME WHIPPED
OZ
. BOWL
PANtR. PPJOE ASSORTED
l_i- i.hlv( linirrtl
Topping
.89 20
Pot Pies 2bo\?s .79
Pound Cake
>o:oz 4 .a
PKG l.OW
21
30
Floral &
GiftBoutique
'ONLY AT STORES WITH BCXJTrOU D6PTS
BONUS BUYS
ASSORTED COLORS FRESHLY CUT SAVE
Floral Bouquets 1.49 30
ASaORTED COPPER
Musicals.....each 8.991.00
CURIO-WITH FLOWERS
MMel Vase ... each 7.991 00
EVERYDAV LOW PRICES
FOR REPOTTING PLANTS
PotttngSoli I.S .89 10
FOR HEALTHIER PLANTS
Jobe's Spikes 2. ... 1.00


*~ ";*"?""'"" iu/IuSS'Jnu37Cu)uf uTOreaiernouywooa
Friday. October 1,1982
*>***






"jwO
Coupon m*y not be
.''My


. < '>ood
UtTAlUR T-
coupon -t 'eo>*nv
*tt* tor U-1
rw1 /< handling
tha' jr* provided at
follOWS 'I(\**iV*d
onret*l i*WO*mw
product *p*< J.W nemn
You nujil it to Sun-D>*mond Ooweo o* C*>
tern* PO Bo UM Ci.n< ton
On rjueit you
-tor'*-
t-i"JBn Other
"--.Wjtet fraud
nol Of '->% Q
ltO"*""rtt _.
/ M/IPjM^U. VohJ *
/ **** pro-^Diied used *
Cfnyf required or np- r-
\tr-tted by ujw Cah value I 26* Good only
.n U S A Ofler
limited to on*
coupon pe pur-
EXPIRES D-
' ember ii 1983
S52D
When your family wants a snack treat
tl em to the natural sweetness and wholesome
goodness of Sun-Maid' Raisins.
Sunsweet' Prunes and Sun-Maid' or
Blue Ribbon" Figs.
Enjoy And save.
SUN-DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
KCERTKIEO KOSHER
C Sun-Damond Oowefl of Cjlifcwna '962

DRIVING FORCE Mapping the routes of throe free bus tours of-
fered by the Women's Division, Jewish Federation of South Broward,
are Chairwoman Avis Sachs (left) and Audrey MeUne, vice president
of Community Education. The tours Nov. 10 for Hilkrest and
Holly brook, Jan. 12 for Hollywood-Hallandalr Beach and Feb. 16 for
metropolitan (Emerald Hills and Grandview) for the first time will
visit the Jewish High School of South Florida, in addition to their
regular Federation agency stops. Contact Lisa Bernstein at 921-8810
for a bus pass.

News
For singles
The Jewish Community i
Centers of South Broward, 2838
Hollywood Blvd., announces the
formation of a new singles group
for ages 55 and over.
The first program will take
place Tuesday, Oct. 26, at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Beth El, 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood.
The program will include en-
tertainment and refreshments at
no charge.
The new 55-plus singles
program is being coordinated by
Alaine Stampler. For further in-
formation, contact Sherri at 921 -
6511.
> I nl
Thanksgiving at Miami Beach's
Finest Qlatt Kosher Hotel
4 Days-3 Nights
Nov. 25-28 Only
s84
Every Luxury
Ocaanfront
Facility
Pool
Private Beach
Religious Services
Dally '
5 Days Mights
Nov. 24 28 Only
s105
Pat Person
DoubHOec.
HstTsl
Por Porson
DmsMsOm.
PhwTai
Stay at adjoining
Atlantic Towers -
Meals at W.ldmin
INCLUDES 2 DELICIOUS KOSHER MEALS DAILY
LAVISH THANKSGIVING DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT
Room and Maals
at W.ldman
WALDMAN HOTEL
On The Ocean At 43rd Street
Phone 538-5731 For Reservations
The Southeast Focal Point
Senior Center. 2838 Hollywood
Blvd.. is offering a senior special
event; the Hippodrome Theatre
of Gainesville's mini-musical
"Vaudeville Jazz.'*
Showtime is Friday, Oct. 8, at
10:30 a.m. Tickets at $1.50 are
available now. The show will be
at St. Johns Lutheran Church,
2919 Van Buren St. (just behind
the Senior Center).
Classes
The JCC announces a wide
range of morning, after-school
and evening classes for children
of all ages: teens, adults and se-
nior adults.
Registration is at the JCC of
South Broward. Monday-Friday
9a.m.-5 p.m.
Fall Special Offer
Costa's
jy way to the
Caribbean on the
World Renaissance.
7-day cruises from $775*
What could be easier than flying tree to the heart of the'
Caribbean for a 7-day cruise to magical, mystical ports like
St. Maarten. Martiniaue. Barbados. St. Lucia. Antigua and
St. Thomas. More and better ports than any 7-day cruise from
Florida. And you'll love the intimate World Renaissance.
You'll dine on sumptuous food and enjoy international enter-
tainment. Just fly away. Free Any Saturday.
through December 11.1982
^IMpppHBHppppppppBpppB So take it easy and take
advantage of us.
World Renaissance of
Greek registry
wL
pe> person. douDie occupancy
Departures
From:
Miami
Tampa
Orlando
A Costa Cruise is easy to take.
f
?
?
?
?
?
ISRAEL
TOUR OF LEISURE-4 WEEKS
With Late Departures, Little Walking, Slower Pace,
3 Weeks Netanya Relaxation & Enjoyment # n__
1 Week Jerusalem #1UZZ plus air
Tour Includes* Accommodation in First Class Hotel-Twin Bedded Rooms* 2 Kosher
Meals Every Day-8 Days of Sightseeing-Transfers & Porterage-Travelers Insurance:
Medical, Financial & Personal
__________DEPARTURE DATES:OCT. 4, NOV. 8, APRIL 6,1983_______
ALSO WE HAVE OTHER TOURS
*&*
arfSST
a*"ifs*-
2 WEEKS DELUXE PACKAGE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL MIRIAM AT
TRIANGLE TOURS
18407 W. Dixie Highway-North Miami Beach-931 3031
CALL COLLECT
931-3031
4P
&
COWAN
COUNTY COMMISSON
DISTRICT 4 DEMOCRAT
PROVEN
EXPERIENCE LEADERSHIP ABILITY
ELECTED to Dtvie Town Council in 1978
RE ELECTED in 1980
Served
A 2 Years as MA YOR ': I Year as Vice-Mayor
v'r / Year as Councilman
OCTOBER 5-RUNOFF
Serves/Served
COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
(Appointed 0/ Gomm Ame Kmoi
BROWARD COUNTY CRIMINAL JUSTICE
PLANNING COUNCIL
(Appanied 0y Judge Lawrence Kada)
PORT EVERGLADES TASK FORCE
lApported by Bowards Legsi.iuve Delegation)
MEMBER ffNW B-RTTH BARUCH LODGE
scon i COWAN
COUNTY COMMISSION
DISTRICT 4 DEMOCRAT




y, October 1, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
The Southeastern Florida
HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTER, b*
LOCATED AT: 7
(305) 940n5690at'Onal University Ba* Vista Campus N.E. 151 Street & Biscayne Blvd. Miami, Florida 33181
Some Will Remember the Horror.
All Must Remember the Lesson.
Forty years after the Nazi Holocaust there are those who still live with
a vivid and personal memory of man's inhumanity to man. They remem-
ber the loss of freedom, the loss of dignity, and the loss of untold
millions of lives. Among those victims were Jews, slaughtered only
because they were Jews and I others who were killed because in
various ways they did not fit the Nazi ideal.
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center was founded in
[1979 by many of South Florida's educators and community and
business leaders. Their purpose is to memorialize the victims of the
Holocaust by providing a facility to: gather and record oral, visual, and
[written testimony of Survivors of the Holocaust, and their Liberators
land Protectors, thereby stimulating public awareness of and sen-
Isitivity to the Holocaust through education.
These histories are the most valuable resource for teaching the lesson
lof the Holocaust today...to people of all ages, religions, and
[nationalities.
[The Holocaust Memorial Center is seeking Survivors, Liberators,
[Protectors, and anyone who had any experience with the Holocaust, to
[help accumulate visual and oral testimonies. These resources are
[now being used in educational curricula for high school and college
students.
"he testimonies of over 150 Survivors, Liberators and Protectors, has
ilready been recorded by the Center with several thousand just in this
irea still to be done. At the moment, priority is being given to this
[phase of the goal since time is of the essence!
lany of the children of survivors have organized under our spon-
sorship and are equally involved in perpetuating the memory of the
lolocaust through this educational program.
"he Holocaust Memorial Center islseeking the support of the
^community. Educating an entire population, and keeping that
lesson alive for generations to come, requires a total effort by each of
is.
le are witness to the fact that the Holocaust left its permanent mark
>n some of us. The lesson of the Holocaust must be instilled in all of
is.
le urge you to participate by sending your check today so that all can
remember tomorrow.
W-**vh fiOfcr^-k
)r. Gregory B. Wolfe
President
^^ Goldie R. Goldstein
Executive Vice President
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President
DR. GREGORY B. WOLFE
President, Florida International University
Executive Vice President
GOLDIE R. GOLDSTEIN
Vice President
DR. A. HUGH ADAMS
President, Broward Community College
Vice President
DR. ROBERT H. McCABE
President, Miami Dade Community College
Vice President
DR. WILLIE C. ROBINSON
President, Florida Memorial College
Treasurer
DR. ABRAHAM S. FISCHLER
President, Nova University
Assistant Treasurer
ABRAHAM B.HALPERN
Secretary
REV. D.WAYNE MARTIN
First Baptist Church of Hollywood
Past President
SISTER M. TRINITA FLOOD, O.P.
Academic Dean, St. John
Vianney College Seminary
BERNYCEADLER
THE HONORABLE ELAINE BLOOM
THE HONORABLE MAURICE FERRE
Mayor, City of Miami
DAVID B. FLEEMAN
LUBA FREDERICK
PAULS. HANSON
Social Studies Supervisor,
Dade County Public Schools
DR. SAMUELZ.JAFFE
Senior Rabbi, Temple Beth-EL
DR. PAULJ. KIRSCH
Lutheran Minister
THE HONORABLE WILLIAM LEHMAN
United States Congressman
FRANK J.MAGRATH
National Vice President, National
Conference of Christians and Jews
DR. STAN-LEY I. MARGULIES
Chief of Radiology,
Hollywood Memorial Hospital
SISTER JEANNE O'LAUGHLIN, O.P.
President. Barry University
REV.PATRICK H. O'NEILL, O.S.A.
President, Biscayne College .
DR. DOROTHY J.ORR
Exec. Assistant to the Superintendent,
Broward County Public Schools
ARNOLD M. PICKER
ELAINE PITTELL
NATHAN PRITCHER
CARLROSENKOPF
FRED SINGER
President, Coronado Studios
PATLTORNILLO.Jr.
Executive Vice President
United Teachers of Dade
REV. LLOYD N. WHYTE
Director, Department of Interfaith
Witness, Southern Baptist Convention
Executive Committee
)lip and Mail to: Holocaust Memorial Center, Bay Vista Campus, N.E. 151 St. & Biscayne Blvd., Miami, Fla. 33181
[MBERSHIP ENROLLMENT "**' H|SJRY
>uld like to join the Holocaust Memorial Center. I am willing to be interviewed.
NAME
H5 Student
(25 Individual
550 Family
.100 Supporting
D $250 Sustaining
? $500 Patron
? $1000 Benefactor
? $1500 Founder (payable
over 3 years)
I] Other
lam:
? Survivor
? Liberator
D Protector
? Child of Survivor
Additional comments or information:
ADDRESS:
CITY/STATE/ZIP.
PHONE_______
Hom-
Office
itrlbutions reT?< Deductible


Page 12
~The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. October 1, 1982
i
Letters of Note




Dear Editor.
Reader asks that Begin government resign
further invasion of Lebanese soil!
It is terrible. And, in my
The Israeli ambassador was
shot! And the State of Israel re-
taliated launching a full-scale
war! Lebanon paid the price, in-
due! inn innocent people; women
and children were hit, many of
of buildings demolished and
many people left homeless.
In spite of PLO denial of their
involvement in London's shoot-
ing, Israelis entered Lebanon and
conquered practically all the ter-
ritory. PLO were condemned to
leave their camps in Lebanon and
assured the Israeli army shall
withdraw from Lebanon and
leave the country to be governed
by their own people.
Even in this chaotic state, de-
prived of food, water, electricity,
basic necessities, the PLO were
marching together with the suf-
fering. The people and the world,
and even the PLO themselves be-
lieved Israel would stick to its
agreement and evacuate from
Lebanon. And finally Lebanon
may. from that day on, and be-
cause of fulfilling the Israelis' de-
mand, finally peace will come to
this war-stricken land.
But Israel's present govern-
ment broke the promise given the
USA and the rest of the world.
Israel, in trying to justify their
action, said there was still some
PLOs left, in addition to the
Syrians.
I know only the heartbreaking
scenes when PLO leaving their
families, women and children be-
hind were left behind because
the world was made to believe
nothing shall happen to them if
and when the PLO leave the
country.
And nothing happened and
Israel did not prevent the car-
nage because I consider the
Israeli government in a way re-
sponsible for the brutal deaths
their families encountered. The
whole world cannot think other-
wise.
It was said on television that
the evacuation of PLO was ac-
complished in 17 days. Why did
not, then and there. Begins
government protest that this was
lot the fact? Only when Israel
.arted a new invasion, taken up
y the glory of previous con-
quests, and not receiving any re-
Mstame from the people in Leba-
w>n was the Israeli army under
liegin and Sharon continuing to
!* carried away by this
^apolfonic sentiment to conquer
he whole of Lebanon.
And who knows if they were
STUDIO
Continental^1.
Cuisine
FfiED JOISI
''J""(I
vCu OJC* 0
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
'or a ..1-io.ue
, Vi*-.-i .our 'aOit'o your
r-.OcC ,n one 0> 5 rlfliy duA>
'50"i Tie Tent
yV''ne Cen*r S'jdio Plan
P 14)1 if Swiff Chaie'
Tin* Entertainment
At tha Piano
Alto violin playing
for your plaasura
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
;' 'Urn Lunch*ont *v'ngai
E NJOY COCKTAILS IN
'TMI GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CRCOIT CARDS
HONORCD
:J40 SW 32 Avt.
445-5371
ClRMtf Manda V t
RR aaaaaaaaataataada/
not stopped by the brutal mur-
ders of innocent PLO women and
children and this strong reaction
of the world to the same, would
they maybe go beyond the Leba-
nese borders?
Even before the carnage of
PLO families, the Israel govern-
ment said presumptuously that
Israel was clearing Lebanon 90
that other forces can have it
easier. For goodness sake, who
put Begin's government in the
position of policing another coun-
try? And after the brutal murders
I saw on television, Israelis say:
"You see, now you have a
small sample of what would hap-
pen if we (Israelis) were not
there!" And many a spectator
understood that the Israelis must
have closed their eyes to this
massacre in order to justify their
Haig to be feted
JERUSALEM Former Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig
will receive an honorary doc-
torate of philosophy from Ben
Gurion University of the Negev
at Beersheba Nov. 22.
He will come to Israel a few
days before the award ceremony
and hold private talks with
Premier Begin and other top
leaders. The university is honor-
ing Haig "as a gesture of appre-
ciation for his devoted friendship
to Israel."
is terriDie. nna, in
opinion, the present government
should resign instantly, if
nothing else but to save the face
of Israel and the Jewish people.
There is enough anti-Semitism
going on in the world, and such
an attitude of the present Israeli
government can only inflame the
world's dislike for Jews. And
more bombs put out by the anti-
Semitic elements will kill more
and more Jews in teh Diaspora.
Do you think that the royal
welcome given Arafa* :s because
the world dignitaries e him so
much? No! But because they do
not approve of Israeli politics,
and with it, the dislike of Jewish
people. Just as in the last elec-
tion. President Reagan won not
because he was so much liked,
but because people disliked the
Carter policies.
And as for Mr. Bloom, the Is-
rali U.N. ambassador, I watched
him at the emergency meeting of
the Security Council. His way of
justifying the Israelis' seeming
imperialistic action was rather
lamentable, calling other people
names, and addressing his entire
speech to the Russian repre-
sentative and blaming him for Is-
rael's deeds. This was done in a
very arrogant way, Bloom had to
be warned to compose himself.
The consequence was the Russian
delegate came out looking, in-
deed, good.
This letter is indended to show
different views of Jewish people
on the same subject. I hope peo-
ple ponder it and wonder where
our American aid to Israel goes.
Should we Jews in the Diaspora
not be entitled to have some voice
to raise for our money going to
Israel? Should we not be proud,
living our lives carefree, safe and
feeling good, about our mother-
land Israel while living
among our Christian neighbors1
Z. ESTHER SLOMOV l< '
HoHywood. Fla
B'NAI B'RITH
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I
I October 1,1982
".
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly u
traight communication'
eeps coupie together
=-=
:w*
, 30, was well-dressed and
^telligent. She came for
at Jewish Family
because of her unhappy
Susan, the agency
>r, listened intently as
elated her marital prob-
ll want a trial separation
|y husband I've been his
whipping post for too
le's sarcastic and rarely
ly thing nice to me or pays
It nit ion to the kids.''
pointed out to Carol
[maritul separation would
ery traumatic experience
whole family, and es-
difficult for their two
children. "Separation
jr some couples, but most
Hit off having marital
Ing while living to-
f Susan explained.
agreed to try this ap-
and a session with just
husband was arranged.
inst'lor needed to find out
tgs about the marriage
led to hear his side of the
the start, both partners
|ny complaints about each
behavior. "Tom always
answer for everything.
[together is no fun any
secause he either nags or
iws. Nothing I do is
[complained Carol.
(countered, "She's so busy
i kids and other activities
night as well not be mar-
pounselor explained that it
lir problems; but mean-
she suggested that the
focus on one particularly
annoying situation between them
and develop a workable compro-
mise. A workable compromise is
similar to a contract in which you
both get something.
Actually, this is the beginning
of "straight communication," in
which you both begin to give
honest messages to each other
and ask for what you want. Of
course, neither of these two peo-
ple will always get what they ask
for, but this approach will be
helpful in all communications.
Tom and Carol slowly began
getting along better and decided
to remain in counseling to con-
tinue learning to communicate
effectively.
If you have any questions or
feel that we can help, please con-
tact us at: Jewish Family Service
of Broward County, 1909 Har-
rison St. Suite 109, Holly-
wood, 33020. Telephone: 927-
9288. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Familv Service of
Broward County, 3500 N. State
Happy New Year
Sally and Milton
M. Winograd
Road 7 Suite 399, Fort
Lauderdale, 33319. Telephone:
736-3394. Hours Monday,
Wednesday and Friday 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thurs-
day 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, 1800 W. Hills-
boro Blvd. Suite 214, Deerfield
Beach, 33441. Telephone: 427-
8508. Hours Monday, Tues-
day, Wednesday and Friday 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday 9
a.m. to 9 p.m.
Jewish Family Service is a
beneficiary agency of the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale, the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward and The
United Way of Broward County.
0MANO
Ribs & Steaks
1850 N. St. Rd. 7(441), Hollywood,
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Members of B'nai B'rith & Beth David Synagogue.
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3 pm to 6 pm
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A wide choice of delicious dinners
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HE CONSULATES GALA 1982
Honorary Gala
Chairlady
Gussie Green (Rep.)
Co-chairpersons
Cathy B. Thomson, M.D.
loberto Garcia, Consul General de Colombia

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Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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Tyre woman wants permit to visit her son in an Israeli hospital
By DVORA WAYSMAN
"PLEASE GIVE ME PERMIT I must go
to Israel to see my son in the hospital.'' The
woman in the blue dress with the anxious eyes
was not addressing me in the crowded public
square at Tyre. She was plucking at the sleeve of
the IDF spokesman who was explaining to me the
local situation they'd already had water for
two weeks, and the electricity was turned on,
facts and figures that seemed unimportant mea-
sured against the urgency of the woman's plea.
Wearily, he told her that not his function
and pointed out where to wait where he'd al-
ready directed scores of other <\ !e anxious
either to travel to Israel or to rejoin relatives up
north in Beirut. Most of them stood patiently
alongside a truck piled with blankets that would
later be distributed to those who needed them.
Later, I went over to her. "Can you help me get
a permit?" she asked, clutching at straws. Amira
would have been an attractive woman under dif-
ferent circumstances. She was about 40, well-
dressed, with a gold cross around her neck. But
the worry lines around her eyes and mouth were
already etched deeply.
LIKE MANY OTHERS from southern Leba-
non, now that the PLO had been routed, she had
returned to her home in Tyre from Beirut, where
she'd fled with her son. But he'd been caught in
the crossfire a week ago and flown by helicopter
to a hospital in Nahariya. "It is good to come,"
she told me. "My house is fine not even a
broken window, and it is wonderful to know that I
am safe from 'them.' But I can't start my life
again properly until my son is better and can Uve
with me. I want to go to visit him."
Tyre is a picturesque town and despite the
bomb damage, the profile and skyline remain. We
drove there from Naqoura, where the UNIFIL
forces have their headquarters not far from our
border it's a Western-style shanty town, like
something from an old cowboy movie. It-even has
a Silver Coast restaurant, clothing store, a barber
shop and "coiffure de dames" for the Swedish
nurses at SWEDMEDCO opposite.
But Tyre, 20 kms. from the border, is a real
town. The shopping center was doing a brisk
trade on this Sunday morning, particularly
"Patisserie Arabe" a giant cake shop with the
kind of mouth-watering confections that I 've only
seen in Groppi's coffee-house in Cairo. A 10-tier
wedding cake dominated the window.
THE PROPRIETOR, Mr. Ramlawi, was doing
business as usual, despite the war business
better than usual, one of my companions re-
marked cynically. Whether he was happy that Is-
rael nad cleared the PLO out of Tyre or was just
bene fitting from the influx of soldiers and
journalists in the town, Mr. Ramlawi did seem
very cheerful indeed. He even had the word
"Open" lettered in Hebrew on his door (in fact
there were many shops with Hebrew signs, some
even offering special discounts for soldiers).
"You are welcome in this country," he informed
me, noticing my IDF Liaison Officer waiting
nearby. "When the terrorists were here, they
would come in the shop ten at a time taking
whatever they wanted. Food, money, drinks. It is
good that you got them out." It is thought that
there are still many PLO terrorists in Tyre, but
we were told that the townspeople regularly in-
form on them, either to the IDF or to their local
Bishop. Some 90 were turned in the week before
our visit.
Tyre has a romantic location, situated round a
tiny bay with a marina for boats. Several fisher-
men were wading in the water, patiently waiting
for a bite. The skyline of minarets, spires and
domes reminded me of Akko (Acre).
JUST OUTSIDE TYRE, we visited the ar-
chaeological site of a Roman stadium from 13
BCE. The third largest in the world, it is beau-
tifully preserved. The enormous hippodrome was
used for chariot races and gladiatorial combat.
Behind the rows of seats were cleverly concealed
rooms built by PLO terrorists, the crude cinder-
blocks and freshly daubed cement contrasting
with the massive stones of olden days.
It was from this site that rockets were launched
at Nahariya. Israel knew this, but did not bomb it
n order to preserve the magnificent ruins. We
looked in the dark bunkers, now filled with the
ugly remnants of war: spent shells, tin helmets,
terrorist literature. There waa a rancid stench of
decay. It seemed almost sacrilegious to use this
wonderful relir of the past to attack innocent peo-
ple in the present.
When wo came out again into sunshine, there
was an elderly man with a cane and a smart straw
hat, who see/ned anxious to show us around. He
spoke a strange kind of English, very old-
fashioned. He was neither friendly or unfriendly.
motioned us to follow him, and I had to trot to
*L**t*P up witn nim- AU tne time ^ WM 8>ving a
nd of monologue about the amphitheater. "See
- these flat stones they were altars. Human
sacrifice." I would nod and try to interrupt with
questions of my own, but about today, not the
past.
THESE HE would ignore, pretending not to
understand. "Here you see three layers of
dvilization under this Roman road you can see
Israeli tank enters Tyre early in war.
the Greek and this is Byzantine.''
" I just wanted to ask you ..."
"Here is an aqueduct," he would interrupt me.
"It carried water out five miles. ."
"The bunkers, Mr. Zyklowi, did you know
about the bunkers?"
"I am guide," he said after a pause. "I work
here." He would say nothing more. He waited ex-
pectantly. We gave him a tip.
It was almost a holiday scene when we crossed
the Litani River. The banana plantations looked
splendid in the hot sun. Soldiers in bathing suits
did their washing in the river, with towels and un-
derwear strung up to dry. Every building we
passed seemed to be flying a flag. Over some flut-
tered the Lebanese flag two red stripes, a white
central one with a kind of stylized fir tree in the
center. A few houses had the Phalange flag, but
most to be safe flew a large white flag of
surrender. I thought that if I'd been living
through an eight-year war, I'd probably fly a
white flag too.
ON THE ROAD to Sidon, the scenery con-
tinued to be Beautiful, sparkling aea striped in
bands from light aqua to deep indigo; and the
green of figs, grapevines and lemon orchards.
Sidon reminded me of Haifa. When we reached
Sidon, there was some kind of demonstration by
women they were screaming and some were
crying.
I was told they were the women of Palestinian
prisoners. A soldier fired twice in the air, shock-
ingly close to us, and they dispersed. The whole
incident took half a minute, yet it is hard to forget
for it symbolizes so much of the pain of war.
There was bomb damage, but not a lot from
what I'd seen on TV, I'd expected something
much worse. What had once been an elegant villa
had the roof damaged. It sat at a crazy drunken
angle, ludicrous atop the white facade and fluted
columns in front. Through the open door I could
glimpse very high ceilings, crystal chandeliers,
velvet drapes and a parquet floor. A young man
came out.
"You can't go up," he said to our photo-
grapher, who wanted permission to shoot scenes
of the city from the top floor. "It's locked. I don't
have a key," he repeated several times. When I
asked him if he were glad that Israel had come to
his country, his face became guarded. "You do
good job, he finally acknowledged. "PLO bad
people get them out. But then you must go too.
PLO, Syrians, Israelis you must all go home."
IN THE CENTER of town there were again the
strong contrasts I'd come to associate with Leba-
non Silhouetted against the rubble and hulks of
unfinished buildings, was a ferris wheel. There
was no music or laughing children and I thought
it looked almost obscene, like a dump of delicate
pink hydrangeas I'saw growing next to a pile of
rotting garbage. Life seemed unexpectedly care-
free in the town people shopping, coming home
from church, licking ice-cream, enjoying their
Sunday.
A woman was directing a group of children
sweeping the street in front of a slightdamadged
building. She was blonde and looked American. I
went to talk to her, but she shook her head, she
only spoke Arabic. Suddenly I was surrounded by
children, all wanting to be photographed with me.
They laughed and chattered like happy children
anywhere- The decision to clean up the the streets
had been made by the Israeli officer in charge. .
After the photos, a fat boy in a red T-shirt de
tached himself from the group and came after me.
He said his name was Honni, and he was 13. He
learns English at the National Evangelical
School. "Maybe you help find my uncle," he
pleaded. "His name is Your soldiers took him
away to Palestine a month ago. He do nothing
he own two shops here. He was in Libya long
time, but not train to be soldier. He work there
for Italian company," he added. The children
were still smiling and waving as we drove off.
JUST BEFORE BEIRUT, where we were
turned back, the sounds of battle grew frighten-
ingly loud and 155 mm cannons were firing over
our heads. We headed for the mountains. En
route, we stopped for refreshments at a res-
taurant on the beachfront with the unlikely name,
Sands Rock Beach. It was unbelievable that the
war was just a few kilometers away. People sat on
the terrace eating grilled chicken and chips, sip-
ping cans of "Up. Pretty girls in bikinis showed
off their suntans, and below the swimnflng pools
and the beach were crowded with Sunday plea-
sure-seekers.
We were waited on by the proprietor's son,
Pierre Azzi, a young man in a 10-gallon hat. He
was home on holiday from San Antonio Univer-
sity in Texas, where he is studying hotel manage-
ment. Despite the crowds waiting to be served, he
was happy to chat. "You know, I was nearly
killed by the PLO twice," he informed me.
"Once they beat me until my father gave them .
a lot of money to stop. Another time they came to
rob us I got out the window and hid until they
were gone. Now they've left this town, thanks to
Israel, and we can get on with our lives." One re-
cords all these stories without any possibility of
verifying or disproving them. Only when it is a
Christian speaking, the impression is of complete
sincerity.
IT WAS HERE we triad to find a word to des-
cribe the Lebanese people who were swimming,
eating and enjoying themselves, seemingly com-
pletely indifferent to the battle sounds from Bei-
rut. We began with "placid," moving on the "cal-
loused," "impervious," "resigned" and "uncom-
mitted." None of them seemed to convey just the
right shade of meaning. Maybe "fatalistic?"
One of our last stops was at Jezin, a beautiful
Christian village high up in the mountains. It waa
an unbelievable scene considering where we were
a peaceful Sunday afternoon promenade. There
were no signs of the war at all no bomb dam-
age, nothing to convey that you weren't holiday-
ing in the Swiss alps. Girls walked in pairs, their
fingers linked, in high-heeled sandals, lota of
jewellery and make-up.
One pretty girl wore a T-shirt that proclaimed
in silver, blue and pink: "Sweet things remind me
of you." The only incident that brought us back
to reality was when the four of us, my three male
companions and I, went into a coffee house, where
men were playing backgammon and cards. The
sudden cessation of activity and uncomfortable
glances made us realize our faux pas. In Lebanon,
this kind of coffee house was for men the
women were home with the children or talking to
their women friends. The waiter served us with
averted face. A man at the next table, smoking a
nagila water pipe, talked to my companions, not
tome.
DARKNESS BEGAN to fall when we were on
the road to Nabatiye a terrible road fit only for
donkeys. (The Lebanese are not accustomed to
paying taxes, and the roads show it). The sun sat
low in the sky, an orange disc with drifts of blue
cloud floating across it. The light became pink,
blue and finally black. We drove back fast, trying
to reach the border before the curfew. We didn't
make it and were stopped angrily at various
checkpoints, where soldiers of different al
legiances shouted at us.
Eventually we crossed the Israeli border ai.
began the long drive back to Jerusalem, throu
the silent night where the only so nuaru
were the voices from Lebanon, rep .ng their
words in my ears like the rerun of an old movie.


NUEIAND
THE nan
In this article. Helen Davis speaks to two I of
the Israel Government Press Office Ze'ev Cmafets ana
Steve Leibowitz about Israel's ongoing media image,
the impact of Arab terror-tactics on foreign correspon-
dents and the controversial issue of the media's coverage
of Operation Peace for Galilee. Davis is editor of 'Israel
Scene,' where the article first appeared.
Israel make* good news in the
media abroad
It was Ze'ev Chalets woo went
into battle with the international
media when he saw an ami-Israel
oias taking; a more sinister turn.
Earlier this year, the ABC-TV
Israd 8 image m the world network in the United States ran
is not new. says Ze'ev Cha a feature on Judea and Samara
By HELEN DAVIS
Israel's difficulties with
foreign media have been
highlighted by the war in
Lebanon. But the issue of
fets. director of the Gov-
ernment Press Office in Je-
rusalem.
"Israei hosts, on a regular
basis. 230 accredited foreign cor-
respondents. Another 1.500 visit
the country each year on
assignment. And the amount of
reportage they generate is
enormous, he says.
Israei is. per capita, probably
the moat heavily reported-on
country, on a sustained basis, in
history." said Chalets
"OTHER COUNTRIES, dux
ing times of crisis, might experi-
ence or endure a giustu
blaze of publicity. But the
media s hunger for news from Is-
rael is apparently insatiable
Year in. year out. newspapers
radio and television, feature
Israel as if it were a giant B
astions instead of a mere speck
on the map
"Everything we do here
good, bad and indifferent m
magnified, broadcast, talked
about." said Chalets. 34. who
was born in the United States
and came to Israel in 1967.
"There are times when living in
the spotlight is uncomfortable.
But we have no choice.
"Israel is an open society That
is the nature of the people and the
country we have established. We
have a free domestic press and
wul continue to have one It is
important u> remember that
everything ttiat happens i.-. Israel
is reported first to the Israeli
public and only second to the
world.
"WHETHER that is beneficial
or harmful, il is basically a far of
life. You can | restrain freedom of
the pre*- without und*rm:r.:ng
democrat
The !--. major;'; of Israelis
would as.'T'v .hat press freedom is
sacmsar- ;3u ther :* i"T-ai-
BBgJy a gry avareness ta
Iarav- tl mil
beir., j barn israei
whet xrateiy or from the
it ..: ie*> that bad news from
(the West Bank) which, aid
Chalets, was one of the "most
malicious, distorted and one-
sided programs about Israel
shown on any American network
m recent years ."
THE NETWORK, he said, in
uncharacteristically harsh terms,
made and transmitted the
program in order to "pander to
Arab terror." The network also
hoped that as a result of the pro-
gram it would remain free of
further harassment from the
PLO
To achieve all this, charges
Chafeta. the network was ready
to distort the truth about Israel
on the screen "for the sake of
getting back into the good graces
of the PLO."
Chalets further charged that
other representatives of major
Western media had fallen foul cf
the PLO and the Syrian regime
and had tried to hide the in-
cidents.
He cited a gun attack on the
Reuters news agency bureau
chief in Beirut. Bernard
Debusemann. He waa first
threatened by a pro-Syrian fac-
tion of the PLO which did not
approve of his reporting on
Syrian actions in Lebanon and
then he was shot in the stomach
as he walked in the street, Reu-
ters played down the incident.
THE BBC's Beirut correspon
dent. Tun Llewellyn, saw the
-hootina from a window He
r.iznself fell fool of Syns after his
report was broadcast of an
assassination attempt on Synar.
President Hafez Assao Threats
attributed to "pro-Syrian,
eiements in Lebanon reached
Ki.ti and he was transferred to
Cyprus. The episode was re-
ported is only one BBC newscast
Contrary to its custom, the
BBC from ther. on omitted M
mention what city U*-
r"port:ng from, and it did DO)
K Beirut to replace
.
Lat* last year said Chafe;*,
YossiRoth
the Marxist PLO sprinter group.
the PFLP abducted five
Western correspondents in Leba-
non, held them for 24 hours and
threatened to kill them. One of
the five was a New York Tunes
correspondent .Another was a
reporter from the Washington
Post. A condition of their release
was that their papers did not
mention the abduction. The
papers complied .
THE International Herald Tri-
bune similarly failed to report on
Syrian threats to its correspon-
dent Joseph Fitchett following
his news item about Syrian polit-
ical prisoners being machine-
gunned from Syrian Air Force
helicopters.
Chalets also spoke of a Chris-
tum Science Monitor correspon-
dent being forced out of Beirut
after PLO threats against him
bees use of his social connections
with an Israel family.
Chalets describes the attitude
of the Western media involved as
"a type of self-censorship which
they want to keep secret, and as a
willingness to avoid publishing
news which the PLO and Syria
find unpalatable."
CHAPETS NOW feels that the
reaction to his charges of
deliberate self-censorship have
been, in the main, positive.
"Most of the journalists know
the situation in the Middle East
and have told me that they agree
with the main thrust of my
statements namely, that the
Arabs, particularly the Syrians
and the PLO, use ohvskal in-
timidation as a means of trying
to control the press corps.
"No one. in the whole contro-
versy, suggested that what I said
was wrong. Not in a single detail.
I was very cautious and. in fact,
know a great deal more than I
made public. But I cannot
support some of what I know and
I don't want to make unsup-
ported criticism.
"I WAS NOT, in any case.
critical of the journalists, but of
those who threaten and assault
them The journalists are the
victims, not the perpetraVI
"I was critical more of
news organisations for whom
they work These organizations
were les? than forthright about
what was happening to 'heir
correspondents" in the Middle
East.
"Since then, the subject of
press intimidation which had n
oeen air
discus'^ : in Sew
limes the Washington Poet :he
London Observer the Boston
Globe, the. Miami Herald, the
BBC. the Christian Science
Monitor, the London Tunes and
others
This in itself is important
The feaue is now being seen ins
more realistic light "
JOHN EJFNER of the New
York Times. fo. e -npte- "f^1
to Chafets's %^jx, writing
frankly of the *~+*W of
reportmg from Beirut or the
Beirut before Operation Peace for
Gahase-
To work here as a journalist.
he wrote, "is to carry fear with
yon as fakhfuly as your
notebook. It is the constant
knowledge that there is nothing
you can do to protect yourself
and that nothing has ever hap-
pened to an assassin.
"In this atmosphere, a journal-
ist must often weigh when, how
sssj sometimes even whether to
record a story.
In the Middle East, facts are
always somewhat elusive But
there is a pervasive belief among
the Beaut press corps that corre-
spondents should be extremely
wary of incurring the wrath of the
Syrian regime."
KIFNER COMPARED the
task of working in Israel
"where journalists can receive
government press release over a
special telephone line which rfogs
simultaneously in all correspon-
dents homes or offices" with
the Arab world, "where they
must operate in an seen and
frequently hostile environment
"The Arab states."' he wrote.
"are all. to varying degrees,
dosed, authoritarian, repressive.
societies. Statements from gov-
ernment officials are often falla-
cious or contradictory, or prove
to be non-existent, logistics are
SaaaaeV iiing. and SasaMsjSj can be
counted on to work."
Maddening for the journalist,
certainly. But maddening also for
Israelis who believe that the
closed. authoritarian Arab
regimes get the better deal in the
media war while the sheer open
nesof Israel works agamst her
Can anything be done? Chalets
believes not He takes the stoic
view that while unfair coverage is
distressing, the maintenance of s
free press is essential and wul. in
the end. prove to be the best
policy.
A MAJOR problem is the un-
fair double standard of world
opinion "We expect more of
you Israelis than of the Arabs
"I think it is a grossly dis-
torted perspective and one that
pieces an additional, unfair
burden on us.
"It is not a question of report-
ers having a special affinity for
the PLO most recognise it for
what it is. It is simply that we are
measured against a moral
standard that does not apply to
them or to any totalitarian or
authoritarian regime or country
at war."
Chalets considers, however,
that Israelis and Israel's friends,
should not be unreasonably
perturbed by the anti-Israel
coverage. The main thing to
remember is that pram, coverage,
whatever its nature, has little
effect on Israeli policy.
"The Government of Israel arfll
pursue policies b-ued on its
perception of national interest,
not on press criticism," he says.
Particularly not on criticism
from people with no direct stake
in the country.
"Prase coverage is a factor, but
not one that need be
exaggerated
HE NOTES that a 1960 Gallup
Poll of Americans placed Israel s
prime Minister 10th in the list of
the Ten Men Americans Most
\drrare. This year in the wake
of the destruction of the Iraqi
nuclear reactor and the Golan
Heights Law which both re-
ceived heav> fla trom the media
- the sai. scec!
Menachem Be*,
I not quite true that people
Dsrcssve the wortf as the media
potfrays it..or in (he way that .
porters believe it is perceived;-
hesaid ^
Chafeta. together with Z
highly efficient and much praised
press office, plans to continuTto
treat "journalists who like us tad
those who don't in the same
way." arranging interviews and I
press tours, providing a tran
station service of the Hebrew
press and background material to
current events
^ government." says Cha-
lets "has provided Un-
precedented services to the
foreign press out of a deep belief
in press freedom. There wul be no
threat to the press working in I*
reel"
They came mostly from Euro-
pe and the United States, but
also from Australia and Japan
and other far-flung places 3qq
journalists anxious to report on i
war. And Steve Leibowitz bad
the task of escorting these jour
nalists around Lebanon, letting
them see for themselves the facu
"on the ground." hoping to shake
UK preconceptions of those who
came convinced that Israel was
the aggressor without a just
"Very a?w came without any
preconceptions and very lew ,'
came to report what they saw,"
says Leibowitz
"Most had a particular view-
point, and it would be
unreasonable to expect them not
to.
"SOME, particularly among
the younger journalists, were
very committed leftists, very
anti-Israel and blind to anything
that did not fit their image of ui
as a militarist i
"Some, among them a reporter
from a very respectable American
paper, started referring to their
military escort officers as 'the
Gestapo.' They made it clear, in
the most vicious way. that they
were enemies of Israel At that
point we pulled their press ac-
creditation and withdrew our
facilities Let them go through
Cyprus to cover the war.
"Other journalists were sent
by papers which have long since
stopped publishing anything
positive about Israel. And the
mssswm themselves were expected
to fulfill their editors' expecta-
tions by filing reports on death.
destruction and refugees
"This attitude." ssys Lefco-
wiu. "has become very common
in Britain particularly, where
Israeli bashing in the press hai
almost become the norm
"SO WHAT we did was to take
the journalists into Lebanon and
let them see the relief of Lebanese
citizens at having the PLO off
their backs at last- We let them
Ze.ex Chafets. "Then wi
be no threat to the P"*3
working in Israel'


Israel and the media
ureater tioUyi
Kagel9
nU)
refugees streaming back
, Southern Lebanon from
.Where they'd fled from the PLO.
let them hear from the Leba-
-^ themselves the horror
WLfies of murder, rape and
*Kbbery at the hands of the
Krrorists.
to |j"A lot of journalists who'd
,me expecting to see an oc-
cupied people greatly resenting
Bhc Israeli presence, thousands of
ke Bmeless and massive
estruction, were surprised. But
m not sure that their stories al-
ays reflected this. Some did.
ut not all.
Most reporters came knowing
ut Bf the conflict in Lebanon. A few
people who come frequently to
jq ~mi,|, region knew a lot about the
ckground to the war, the
Political make-up of Lebanon, the
j. Boots of the civil war there and
u; Bsrat'l's past difficulties with
Berror attacks from across the
Birder. But some were ignorant.
Brhey'd come to cover a war Israel
U Bivades Lebanon. Simple.
_1 "OUB JOB was to try to fill in
background, and their reac-
ns depended on how interested
ey were in the boring facts as
iposed to the more exciting,
lorful media event of death and
struction and on how far
eir papers were prepared to go
rebalanced view."
Leibowitz recalls taking an
Old-timer" up to Lebanon, an
merican who'd covered the
Hied invasion of Italy in World
3^ar II. The American stood
pen-mouthed at the sight of
yre and Sidon. "Where's the de-
traction?" he asked.
' H "He said that before the Allies
10 'Bvent into a town in Europe they
Battened it first. He blamed the
te Houng reporters for the stories of
Bpassive destruction in Lebanon.
This was their first war and they
id no basis for comparison
nd no idea what real wartime
struction could be like."
LEIBOWITZ agrees that one
f the most damaging war stories
saor Israel was the early and
:e .Bastly exaggerated release by
, ^fciternational Red Cross officials
* Bf 600,000 homeless and 10,000
kj |B''"''" Southern Lebanon.
i ] I The Israelis took some time to
h. Home up with reliable figures,
t by then the damage had
ren(iy been done. It is doubtful
B'h'',lll'r lrlt' media, which had
Bcreamed 600,000 homeless (a
a !BKuri' lnat happens to represent
lore than the entire population
the region) and 10,000 dead
.wild carry, in similar banner
j Beadlines, the revised number of
BfiO dead and 1,600 wounded.
ff I Similarly, costly efforts made
n By IDF troops to spare civilian
-asasualties were lost in the
ge of horror stories.
THE IDF and the Israeli Gov-
nt have been criticized.
ys Leibowitz, for not letting
n-miliiary correspondents into
war zone during the early
ys of the fighting. Perhaps if
y had gone with the front-line
ps they would have seen for
mselves the humanitarian
tions of the army.
"But vou can't have 200 jour-
nalists floating around in a region
where fighting is going on," he
says.
"To have done so would have
meant risking the lives of
journalists and their escort of-
ficers, and to have compromised
military security.
"Most writers understood this
and were even glad of it
though they felt obliged to
register verbal complaints about
censorship. But from our point of
view, it meant that the concern
shown by Israeli soldiers for ci-
vilians went largely unreported."
LEIBOWITZ believes that, on
balance, the newspaper coverage
of the war was not too damaging
to Israel. He cites a day-by-day
breakdown of the top 50 U.S.
newspapers compiled by Israeli
consulates. These show that,
overall, the war coverage was
positive to Israel.
"By and large, the newspapers
in the United States which is
what really matters were fair.
It was the TV crews which did
the damage. Their only interest
was in visual drama pictures
of rubble, casualties, dead bodies.
"Each network was permitted
one crew into the area and they
headed straight for Beirut. They
just weren't interested in
anything else.
"There is a kind of mob men-
tality among TV crews why
did CBS get bombing shots while
we only got an old woman
weeping with happiness because
she can now return to her home in
the south?
"The bombing of a city looks
great on TV, and since basically
the networks are selling shampoo
and toothpaste, they want the
shots that will draw the viewers.
There is no time in 30 seconds or
a minute to fill in background.
With TV we are in a no-win situa-
tion."
SO IS the hard work of the
Government Press Office and the
IDF escort officers worth it when
the results are often so negative
for Israel?
"I think we have to do all we
can to let joumaliists measure
their preconceptions against the
realities," says Leibowitz.
"Sometimes it works. For
example, Roland Evans, a top
U.S. columnist who hasn't
written a pro-Israel piece in
years, came to Lebanon and
wrote a column that was ex-
tremely hostile to the PLO for its
treatment of the Lebanese. It was
remarkable from our point of
view.
"Some are going to write ma-
terial hostile to us whatever we
do. And it is frustrating. But
Israel is and is seen to be a
democratic, open society in which
the press operates freely even,
within the legitimate restrictions
of military censorship, in war-
time.
"We value that freedom, even
if at times the result is damaging
to Israel's image. We avoid
placing restrictions on the press
not at all cost, but at consider-
able cost to ourselves.''
Cleveland communal worker
beautifully writes memoirs
Personal and Professional:
Memoirs of a Life in Community
Service. By Sidney Z. Vincent.
The Jewish Community Federa-
tion of Cleveland, 1750 Euclid
Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 44115.
1982. 280 pages and VIII, 14
pages of photographs. $15.95.
Reviewed by Solomon H. Green
This is a beautifully written,
human book of Sidney Vincent's
life as a Jewish communal ser-
vant.
The Jewish Community Feder-
ation of Cleveland and its Ar-
chives and History Committee
are to be congratulated for select-
ing these memoirs as their first
publication. It is composed in
readable print and organized
around Sidney Vincent, the
Jewish person and the Jewish
professional.
Vincent has achieved his goal
of producing "a coherent account
ideally suited to help students
and colleagues and lay leaders in-
volved in Jewish affairs." There is
dignity and purposefulness
evidenced in Vincent's commit-
ment to the importance and value
of Jewish Federations.
They are illustrated through
briefly written, but detailed "case
studies" of the work he was
called upon to do locally, nation-
ally and internationally for the
Jewish community.
Headlines
Vincent's life is an illustration
that a professional can have
"both of each" (quoting his
youngest grandson).
He was a teacher and used his
skill in community work; he
worked assiduously for overseas
communal responsibilities and
communal responsibilities at
home; his work for the Jewish
community was also a fulfillment
of dedication to the welfare of the
general community, he found the
educational and bonding linkage
between fund-raising and contin-
uity and commitment "Both
of Each!"
Schools of Social Work and
educational programs for Jewish
Communal Service with a com-
mitment to educate for work in
Jewish Community Federations
must use this book as a text; its
case studies succinct as they are,
tells us volumes.
Teachers, practitioners and lay
people on scholarship commit-
tees, seeking clues to the charac-
teristics that make the profes-
sional, will want to study Sidney
Vincent's economical description
of his personal and family life
from childhood through his col-
lege years.
This book, altogether, is also a
lesson of how lay people work and
encourage the enhancement of
the development of the profes-
sional.
Solomon H. Green DSW is asso-
ciate dean of the Worzweiler
Scool of Social Work, Yeshiva
University; and secretary general
of the International Conference of
Jewish Communal Service.
New 'Parochet' for Chagall windows
Aviva Green, Israeli-American artist known for
her abstract painting and synagogue art, has
been commissioned by Frieda S. Lewis, national
president of Hadassah, to create a parochet and
table' covering to be placed under the famed Cha-
gall Windows of the synagogue at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Mediical Center, Ein Karem.
The work was installed and dedicated in the
synagogue last week by Mrs. Kewis in a cere-
mony prior to the opening of the 68th national
convention of Hadassah meeting here through
Thursday. The hand woven objects are soft sculp-
ture, which is reminiscent of the Israeli landscape.
Green used all natural materials, mainly wool,
with some silk and cotton. The letters embroider-
ed on the parochet are done in gold and copper
thread.
A total of 173 new immigrants and returning
Israelis left New York for Israel last week, contin-
uing the upward trend in Aliyah from North
America. Moshe Shechter, director of the Israeli
Aliyah Center of North America, called the one-
week total "significant" and pointed out that the
total for the month of August would exceed 600
the highest monthly total in more than two
years.
Meanwhile, Israel Aliyah Center has an-
nounced plans to begin a professional recruitment
campaign in the United States and Canada to fill
500 vacancies with Israel Aircraft Industries.
Shechter says the drive will be targeted for aero-
nautical, electronic and mechanical engineers and
computer scientists who wish to settle in Israel.
Judy Paikin has been appointed acting director
of admissions at Yeshiva University, Dr. Norman
Lamm president, announced, railrin will be
responsible for admissions to the University's
five-undergraduate schools for men and women.
She has been on the Admissions Department staff
for five years, serving as associate director for
more than three years. Paikin, a native of Syra-
cuse, N. Y., in the daughter of Ben and Baa Paikin
of Syracuse
Paikin has served as executive director of the
Women's Branch of the Union of Orthodox Con-
gregations of America, director of the National
Conference of Synagogue Youth for the Upper
New York State Region, and coordinator of the
scholarship fund for the National Conference of
Synagogue Youth.
The American Jewish Committee, repeating its
contention that bipotry in social dubs perpetua-
tes bigotry in the business world, is urging the
American Bar Association s House of Delegates
to reinstate the ABA resolution calling for legis-
lation to bar discrimination by private clubs that
receive a sizable part of their income from busi-
ness sources.
The House of Delegates passed the social-club
resolution in January, but rescinded it last
month. The resolution had been strongly sup-
ported by AJC and other human relations organi-
zations.
AJC's views on the repeal of the resolution
were stated in a letter 'to ABA officials from
Franklin K. Ornstein, chairperson of AJC's
National Committee on Social Discrimination.
Representatives of the Young Israel and reli-
gious Zionist movements have met with a delega-
tion of leaders from a West Coast-based group of
evangelical Christians which has expressed
strong support of the State of Israel. Evangelical
Ministries has organized support within the fun-
damentalist Christian community for Israel's ac-
tions in Lebanon, and, last year, the group spon-
sored a major campaign on the West Coast in op-
position to the AW ACS arms sale to Saudi
Arabia.
Thee meeting with the religious Jewish groups
was arranged at the request of the evangelicals,
who expressed many shared attitudes with Or
thodox Jews. These include a belief that the Jews
remain the "Chosen People of God," that "the
Holy Land is the inalienable possession of the
Jewish people" as a result of "the promises made
to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob," and that "Jeru-
salem is the eternal and indivisible capital of the
Jewish state"
These and other statements in support of Israel
and the Jewish people have been published by the
group aa the "Evangelical Christian Declaration
of Support for Israel and the Jewish American
Community." The evangelical declaration also
claims to "abhor anti-Semitism, mourn the Holo-
caust, and repent of the Church's silence."
Twenty-one French-speaking Catholic and Pro-
testant clergymen from Africa and Haiti an cur-
rently taking part in a two-month seminar on
Biblical Tradition and Community Development
being held at the Hebrew University of Jeru-
salem's Martin Buber Adult Education Center on
the Mount Scopus campus.
The seminar participants, among whom are
priests, theologians and six nuna, are residing on
campus.
Besides Haiti, there are participants from the
African states of Zaire. Zenegal, Cameroon, Togo,
Benin, Ruanda, Mauritius, Guinea and the Mala-
gasy Republic Some of the visitors serve as local
leaders in their countries, or occupy positions
which enable thern to mold public opinion and
exert influence in t neir communities. ;


Out of the bomb shelters. Out of
the nightmare in northern Israel
endured by three generations
of children now, in settlements
and developments we helped
establish pinned down again
and again by terrorist rockets and
artillery shells.
These children and their parents
are among the immigrant families
we have brought to Israel. They are
in the Galilee to stay, to do their
share in creating a free Jewish
society of the highest quality.
Their enduring security depends
on the future open to them as they
emerge from their shelters. On the
Jewish Agency's vital programs of
settlement, absorption, education
and community-building. On our
vigorous support of those pro-
grams. On us.
They look to us, they need us, more than ever now. Let our
actions show them we are with them. Let our support become
their true shelter as we begin the new yearthrough an out-
pouring of1983 campaign pledges and cashsay L'Shonah Tova
by making your pledge today to the
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Fl. 33020
921-881C
.
TOU\
cc
Prepared by the national United Jewish Appeal as a Jewish lifeline partnership service for American Jewish communities


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