The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00304

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
PLO Shield: 300,000 Innocents Trapped
WASHINGTON It all comes down
to how you deal with terrorists who take
hostages. In West Beirut, the PLO
makes its demand for political recogni-
tion by holding more than 300,000 inno-
cents hostage.
American policy in hostage situations,
set by Jimmy Carter in Iran and now
adopted by Ronald Reagan in Lebanon,
is to place the threatened loss of life
ahead of any other consideration. This
means interminable negotiations with
the terrorists, permitting them to
achieve their propaganda goals on U.S.
television. As we have seen, such ex-
tended appeasement encourages other
terrorists to take advantage of our hu-
manitarianiam, until our national inter-
est forces the kind of belated and desper-
ate rescue attempt that led to the
tragedy at Desert One.
Israeli policy, when its citizens or
others are taken hostage, has always
been to negotiate only long enough to
prepare a decisive attack on the terro-
rists. At Entebbe and on scores of other
occasions, this seemingly inhumane
poucy has saved lives in the long run:
Hostage-taking is no longer tried against
Israel because it doesn't work.
In West Beirut during the last eight
weeks, the PLO has employed a new
hostage strategy: using the frightened
citizens of West Beirut as a human
William
Safire
Safira.aNawYorkTimaa
cotumom. wroM kkkIim
tor former rrdnt Noon
shield, the terrorists appeal to the
American government, well known for
its revulsion at the threat of death of in-
nocents, to impose the Jimmy Carter
Hostage policy on the Israelis.
The ingenious new PLO hostage
strategy has been working. For eight
weeks, Israeli forces at war with the PLO
have been restrained from defeating
their enemy by the U.S. negotiator
Philip Habib, who has been assuring
them that peace was at hand, that the
PLO would leave Lebanon in just a few
days, that just a few more details needed
to be worked out, that our common ob-
jective of an independent Lebanon could
be achieved painlessly with one more
round of talks.
Of course, no final deal is ever reached
nor will the PLO ever leave Beirut so
long as its leaders are assured that the
Continued on Page 3-B
T ejewlslh Flor idHaira.
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 12 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 20,1982
f red Shochel
Price 35 Cents
(immigrants arrive ii) bronze
m
Peres Optimistic
Peace Very Near
An old man carrying the laws, teachings and divine knowledge of the Jewish people
leads an emigration path to Israel; others seeking their homeland follow. The
statues, created in bronze by a Russian immigrant, stand taller than life in Sfad.
northern Israel. This is but a single attraction the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Family Mission reports on in pictures on Page 5A
Just Ask the Grossmans
Why a Mission?
A vacation in Israel is a vacation in
Israel: but a Mission to Israel is an un-
forgettable experience.
The advantages of a mission are so
voluminous, say Herb and Susen Gross-
man, who have logged two Family Mis-
sions, that a conventional trip would just
be out of the question.
The Grossmans are signed up for this
year s Community Mission (Oct. 21-31)
with the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. The reasons the South Brow-
am couple is returning a third time, via
mission, are multifold.
We see things ordinary visitors can-
rk! r to ,muiUrv bases, the Museum of
the Diaspora before its open to the pub-
"cl. Harb Grossman says He adds that
the museum is a favorite for him; he can
and does spend hours and hours there.
"We have made some very good
friends in Israel on our two missions,"
Mrs. Grossman says, "and we're anxious
to see them again."
Another plus the Grossmans point to
is the quality of the tour guides provided
by the United Jewish Appeal. The South
Broward couple calls the guides their
private emissaries because of the per-
sonal attention they receive.
After the engrossing success of one
Family Mission, the Grossmans' 20-
year-old son Richard returned to Israel
on his own for an archeological dig. "We
felt so secure with the UJA people,"
Continued on Page 2-A
By STEVE KATON
The reason it took so long for
the Arab nations to agree to take
in the PLO from Beirut, Shimon
Peres told the press before a UJA
Florida Regional luncheon at the
Eden Roc, was because the Arabs
support the Palestinians terror-
ists out of fear only not alle-
giance.
Peres, chairman of the minority
Labor Party and former Israeli
defense minister who served as
acting prime minister in 1977,
cited the PLO as as a menace to
the Arabs.too.
The longtime political foe of Mena-
chem Begin said the peace plan proposed
bv the United States is generally agree-
able, and he is "optimistic that a peace-
ful solution (to the war) is very near."
Asked if "Operation Peace for Galilee"
was necessary and supported by the La-
bor Party, Peres said, "One-fifth of the
people of Israel went down to live in
(bomb) shelters." The government "was
left with no choice."
No permanent damage between the
United States and Israel will result from
the invasion of I^ebanon, the Labor
B'not
Mitzvat)
Climbing to
the top of Masada.
South Broward
mission participants
and residents of
Hod Hasharon ob-
served the b'not
mitzvah of Lisa
Barron (left) and
Rachel Kaye, both
Beth Shalom Day
School students. As
the sun rose over
the precious
remains of the
devasted
synagogue, the girls
sung their haftorah.
David Berger
reaffirmed his bar
mitzvah before
Rabbi Arnold
Levine of Berkeley,
Calif., (right) and
Cantor Chumi
Brown. After the
ceremony, in the Se-
phardic tradition,
candies were thrown
at the b'not
mitzvah. Someone
even came up with a
warm bottle of
champagne.
Party leader said.
"Common values, not experiences,"
bond the friendship between the two de-
mocracies. At his luncheon speech,
Peres added: "Freedom is a commit-
ment'' that Israel shares with America.
"Support for Israel was never limited to
the Jewish people."
Peres discounted the significance of
anti-war rallies in Israel:
'Israel is too small a country to be di-
vided as the United States was during
the Vietnam War. Yet we are democratic
enough so that we don't speak with one
voice."
Peres said, simply, Israelis have two
goals in Beirut:
Evacuate the PLO.
Enable the Lebanese to face an elec-
tion and elect a president.
On the Camp David accords, Peres
said the Mideast peace with Egypt has
not been shattered. "We must renew"
the agreements, he said.
Peres, 59, is traveling across the
United States, with other stops in
Washington, Atlanta and Dallas, to brief
Jewish leaders on the crisis in Lebanon.
With him on Miami Beach last week, in
addition to UJA National Chairman
Robert E. Loup, Council of Jewish Fed-
Continued on Page 4-B


Page 2 A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 20,1982
For a Sense of Community, Try a Mission
Continued from Page 1-A
Mrs. Grossman says, "that we had no
fears of him being there on his own."
Another reason the Grossmans are
sold on missions is the friendships that
are bonded among the Jewry of South
Broward. "Some friends we went with
became dear friends on the mission, and
the sharing we experienced in Israel with
our Hollywood neighbors will never be
forgotten."
Herb, a certified public accountant,
and Susen. vice president of leadership
development for the Women's Division
of the Federation, met Joseph and
Margarita Terkiel on a Family Mission
and became close friends in Israel. The
Grossmans just went to the Terkiels'
daughter's wedding.
The Terkiels will be leading the
Federation's Spain-Morocco sub-Mission
Oct. 3-10 to explore the Sephardic roots
of Judaism. The Community Mission
will be led by David Sachs DDS.
In addition to their Federation in-
terests, the Grossmans are active in
Temple Solel: he's been an executive
board member seven years and the
Grossmans were one of the founding
families of the synagogue.
The Grossmans moved to South
Florida from Rockaway. N.J.. where
they were instrumental in forming a
B'nai B nth chapter. For Israel Bonds
here, they served as new leadership co-
chairmen.
In missions, the Grossmans led the
1961 Family Mission for the Federation.
Herb believes joining a mission is es-
pecially important at this time:
"Israel should not feel alone in the
world now; money's one thing, letters
support-ng the cause in Lebanon is im-
portant, too: but to be there in person is
the ultimate commitment.
Cost of the Community Mission is
Si."494 per person which includes all
meals Minimum commitment to the
'Jewish Federation of South Breward's
1983 L'J A-Federation Campaign is
S 1.800. a total of $1,300 for head of
household plus a $500 gift to the
Women's Division. For individual
travelers, a minimum of $1,300 is re-
quired
Members of the Communitv Mission
will leave Fort i^uderdale-Hollywood
Airport Thursday. Oct 21. arriving in
Herb and Sosen Grossman are eagrosaed with Missions to Israel
B'nai B'rith Seeking Volunteers
The B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization serving Hollywood.
North Miami Beach." Fort
Lauderdale and Coral Springs is
recruiting volunteers to advise
high-school-age youth groups
If you are at least 21. com-
mitted to Judaism and the Jew-
ish life, have a genuine liking for
youth and enjoy working with
them, and are willing to be dose-
ly supervised and trained. BBYO
wants you.
The local program reaches more
than 700 young people in the
area. The girls component is
BBG iB'nai B'rith Girls) and the
boys is AZA lAleph Zadik
Alephl.
Those interested in helping
should call the Gold Coast Coun-
cil BBYO office at "92-6700 and
ask for Debbi Roshfeld to arrange
for an interview.
Tel Aviv Friday. A shabbat dinner is
planned-
After optional services Saturday, the
mission members will meet the pioneers
of Yemet and Sinai who gave up their
homes in the desert to Egypt and peace.
Back in Tel Aviv, dinner will be served
at the Tel Aviv Hilton, where the en-
tourage will be spending four days.
On Sunday, it's on to see the progress
of Progress Renewal in Hod Hasharon.
Also on Sunday's agenda are visits to
the Youth Aliyah Center, a kindergarten
and a senior citizen's home.
It will be onward and northward Mon-
day as mission-goers explore the new
mini-settlements of Akko, one of the two
last strongholds of the Crusaders, and
dine with members of a kibbutz.
Tuesday's goal is the Golan Heights,
where the South Broward residents will
meet the residents of the lower Jordan
Valley town of En Gev. A gala evening
of onstage entertainment is planned
next.
In Jerusalem Wednesday, sightseeing,
both organized and on-your own. will be
the order of the day. The afternoon will
be free for shopping and visiting. A key-
note speaker will address South Broward
residents that night.
Thursday will be reserved to walk
where the once luxurious palace of King
Herod stood: Masada, perched on a cliff-
top and reached by cable car or winding
footpath. It commands a breathtaking
view of the pink mountains of Moab and
the blue waters of the Dead Sea.
Friday will be a day of serious think-
ing as an Isareli who lived through the
Holocaust in Germany recounts the
courage and determination of Jewish
people who only wanted to stay alive. A
ceremony of remembering and tour of
Yad Yashem Memorial and Museum of
the Holocaust follows. Visitors will also
see all that remains of the splendor of the
Temple Compound: the Western Wall,
to which Jewish pilgrims came over the
centuries to pray for the redemption of
Israel.
Before returning to South Broward
Sunday, travelers will be treated to a
second "free day" to see Israel, a
treasure bouse of historical and biblical
echoes of ancient civilizations.
Comn^unity Calendar
august
21, SAUlOv\*\
22. SunftAN
28, SaUlQCUX
20. Sun&A\
SepiemBeR
2. tftUQSdAY
Shalom Party.
Western New Neighbors.
8 p.m. at home of Norman ahd
Esther Freedman. Rock Creek.
'"Prisoner of Second Avenue,
play presented Dy Men's Ckjb of
Temple Israel of Miramar.
8 p.m. at the temple.
MASH BASH. Senior You
Group of Temple Solel.
8 p.m. at the temple
in Hollywood.
Annual Picnic of Temple Solel.
10 a.m. 4 p.m. at TY Park
Pavilhon 10.
Rally Round the Candidates
National Council of
Jewish Women, Hill Section.
9 a.m. at the Haiiandale
Holiday Inn.
.
T
uht CateaaW
Al
be directed to See** Kaioa aaaaesate <
of Sowtk Broward. T! 19 Hollywood BNd
fc? receive* M I
Operation Apple
To Get at Core
Of Israeli Woe
With the lengthening of the
Peace for Galilee Operation in
Lebanon and the continued mo-
bilization of reserves from
northern settlements, an urgent
need is being made for volunteers
to pick apples in kibbutzim.
For years the kibbutzim on the
Lebanese border lAdamk. Afik.
Em Zivan. El Rom. Maayan
Baruch. Malkia. Manara. Merorr.
Golan. Misgav Am. Yiftach and
Y iron i have been under constant
threat of attack. And now. espec-
ially because of the peace effort.
the apple orchards need atten-
tion the fruit is ripening.
If you are at least 18 and not
over 35. in good health and with a
wul to perform hard physical
labor. Israel needs you.
Cost of the program, called
Mrvtaah Tapuacfa (Operation
Apple i. includes round-trip air-
fare from New York, four days of
organised touring, a three-day
seminar and land transportation
to and from the kibbutz, and is
$799 plus a $35 registration fee.
Operation Apple is set for
Sept. 1-Oct. 15.
For more information, the pro-
gram is being jointly sponsored
by the American 7isniin Youth
Foundation. 515 Park Are.. |212l
751-6070: and Kibbutz Aiivah
Desk. 27 W. 2oth Sc. (2121 225*
U2&. both in .Naes York C*>.
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel.inc. Funcai Directors
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531-1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523-5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg. President
Alfred Golden. Executive Vice President
Leo Hack. V.P.. Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
Sponsoring' theOuaraian Plan Prearranged Funeral
Traditions
Itfc what makes us Jews.
r
?
?
Temple Israel Of Miramar
6920 South West 35th Street
Miramar, Florida 33023
961-1700
High Holiday Scats Available
At
Our Main Services
Now Enrolling for Religious School
Sunday School and Msmbershtp.
A Caring Conservative Synagogue
For All of South Broward
1
?
?


Friday, August 20,1962
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3-A
Ellis Island: Where America
Began for Many Jews
For Gene Greenzweig, scholar-
inresidence for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Mission to New York City, "the
nost intense, emotionally in-
credible" part of searching Jew-
ish roots is Ellis Island.
"New York City is the heart-
bed of the Jewish people in the
U.S.," he says, "and Ellis is
where it all began."
The "Gateway to America"
lies in the shadow of the Statue of
Liberty; better than 200,000
European Jews became official
immigrants on Elba until 1924
when the drab gray buildings
were closed forever.
From its silence now, it is hard
to imagine there were thousands
of new Americans, our ancestors,
shouting, laughing and crying in
the buildings. Greenzweig will
| help those buildings come alive
with accounts of what went on
I there.
Community Mission (Oct. 21-31)
to Israel. Although the NYC
Mission is tied to the Community
Mission, all those intested in
tracing their' families beginnings
in America are welcome.
the NYC Mission is
person, double occu-
Gene Greenzweig
The South Broward entourage
will explore the Big Apple for
three days, Oct. 19-21, as a pre-
Cost of
$250 per
pancy, and includes accommoda-
tions at a deluxe hotel, all meals
and entrance fees. Airfare is
additional and will be based on
the lowest prevailing rate.
A minimum commitment of
SI ,000 is asked for the 1963 UJA
Federation Campaign. That in-
cludes a head-of-household con-
tribution of 8650 and a $350 gift
to the Women's Division.
In addition to Greenzweig, who
is executive director of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, a JFSB service agency
based in Miami, a tour guide also
will be along to answer any and
Continued on Page 10-A
JFSB Lauded As Model
MISSION CONTROL
Please send me additional information on the
following Mission:
_________Spain/Morocco Oct. 3-10
."The Gathering" Oct. 11-15
.NYC Mission
Oct. 19-21
Name,
Address.
.Community Mission Oct. 21-31
Phone Number________________________________
Submit this coupon to the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, 2719 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Fla. 33020
William Kahn, executive vice
president of the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York, began his talk hut weekend
to the leadership of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
with praise, spiced the middle of
the address with praise and
ended his speech with praise.
Joining the JFSB at Bonaven-
ture's Inter-Continental Hotel
and Spa, Kahn reminded the
fundraisers they have a lot to live
up to his year in the 1983 UJA-
Federation Campaign.
The Federation's increase last
year led the country, the New
Yorker said. "With Houston, you
fare setting the pace and the pat-
| terns for the entire nation," were
Kahn's words.
In an unusual move for a
speaker. Kahn opened the floor to
members of the Board Institute
| but not in the routine ques-
tion-and-answer fashion. He
asked the audience to get with
someone in the room whom the
participant did not know to dis-
cuss the needs of the South
Florida Jewish community.
The results:
More face-to-face high-rise
solicitation is needed.
-RELGO.INC-
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books-Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Oorn .Sunday
1507 Whingtop Aveaue. MB
'532-SH12*
Spreading the word of the
community's support for Israel in
this crucial time is a must.
New residents in the South
Broward area, especially in the
Western sections, should be con-
tacted and given a place in which
to settle their Jewish roots.
The Federation must become
more involved in the political
process of the communities, state
and federal government.
Educating residents about Is-
rael is. of course, a prime goal;
but developing a sense of Jewish
community in South Broward is
vital.
More services are needed for
the elderly.
A Jewish Community Center,
perhaps two, and a home for the
aged should be put on the draw-
ing board.
These responses from the audi-
ence led the way for Kahn to dis-
cuss Federation. He said that in
1900 there were three Federa-
tions in the United States; now
Continued on Page 8-A
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The Menorah
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Sarvina. chap** throughout the US and Canada and all South Florida Camttaran.
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In Palm Beach, 833-0887.
Chapalt in Sunrna. North Miami Baach. Oaardald Baach and Margata
Menorah Chapels Cemetery Counseling, Service is available at no charge


Page4-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 20,19^
~Jewish Floridian
FREDSMOCMET STEVE RATON SU2ANNE SmOThPr
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*** f" Salt mtmm W tmm WarHMn. 0 Saa 01 -JtTi. Mwk Fia MIDI
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ga^g.*! *!!'?,lj^'*ni* "-T-* fc*, HaT^d. FU US *".. W.O
1ELUL5742
Number 17
Friday. August 20,1982
Volume 12
Clearing Muddled Waters
The announcement by the American Jewish Com-
mittee that it will begin a project designed to study
the relationship between the American Jewish com-
munity and the State of Israel is both timely and
warmly welcomed. While the war in Lebanon un-
ravels, the importance of the role of American Jewry
in Israel has become increasingly clear. The support
for Israel remains unswerving but complicated. Thus
the project can help relieve any ambiguity and bring
into focus a discussion of critical issues facing both
communities.
The project, to be known as the Institute on
American Jewish-Israeli Relations, is described by
Bertram Gold, executive vice president of the
AJCommittee. as "an American-based centered en-
terprise that will seek to understand the relationship
between American Jews and Israel. It will identify
areas of tension and delineate opportunities to
achieve a more effective interaction between them. It
will also undertake specific programs both in the
United States and in Israel aimed at improving un-
derstanding between the two communities."
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It's a Fine, Fine
Contribution. Mr. Fine
By BARBARA SHELDON
It's a world of glamour and
prestige and endless demands.
It's Ted Fine's life, his profes-
sion, his career. And among the
furniture, the lamps and the
swatch books of fabric. Fine's
dedication reaches far beyond in-
terior design and deep into a
world of community involve-
ment.
Ted Fine, a member of the
Board of Directors of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens,
provides a great service to the
residents of Douglas Gardens.
Each year, as he designs and
furnishes the homes and apart-
ments of thousands of affluent
clients. Fine educates the com-
munity while helping the aged.
"Now that you've decided to
redecorate your home, what are
you planning to do with your old
furniture? Instead of selling it,
why don't you consider donating
your merchandise to the Douglas
Gardens Thrift Shops.'' he asks.
The thrift shop picks up furni-
ture, at the giver's convenience,
free of charge. The donation is
tax-deductible, and the money is
used to buy medicine and medical
supplies for needy residents of
the Home.
Nine out of 10 times. Fine
helps both his customers and the
residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital, a 376-bed
geriatric care center with com-
munity outreach programs that
provide service to 14.000 persons
each year.
Ted Fine
Fine has been a friend of tk.
Home for nine years, establishing
a mutually fulfilling reUtionahiS
when he first moved to Florida.
"I had been involved with
health-related facilities for many
years in New York, especially
Montefiore Hospital and Medical
Center. That's where I met Fred
Hirt, who is now the executive
director of the Home," Fine said
"When I moved to Miami, 1 n>
newed my friendship with Fred
and at the same time became in-
vovled with Douglas Gardens,"
he continued.
"Working with the Home has
been an incredibly rewarding ex-
perience. I feel very strongly
about the institution and the
staff who do so much for elderly
Continued on Page 11-A
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Proudly Announces its
Kosher Catering Division
Exclusive caterers to
Temple Zion Temple Or-Olom
Weddings, Bar-Bat Mitzvahs, Anniversaries
On & Off Premises
For Personal Service (No Obligation)
Call Betty at:
591-2559 592-8948
PUT YOUR
BODY
WHERE
\OUR
HEART IS.
This year put your body
where your heart is Because
this year when you have
the time of your life in Israel,
you'll be giving her
what she needs most-
support, strength and love
So go waterskiing on the Sea
of Galilee, play tennis in Tel Aviv,
or wander the streets of
an exotic Jerusalem bazaar
Come to Israei
You'll be doing more than just
warming your body. You'll be
taking a vacation that will
warm your soul
EC7JSAC7M
ISRAEL RIGHT NOW.


Friday, August 20, 1982
Th* JewishPloridtahand Shofaf of Qreaier Hollywood
Page 5-A
^ i^&iwUd.
m O! m mi
JERUSALEM IN MINIATURE South Broward Family Mission goers are taken on a
tour of a model of the ancient city of Jerusalem at the Holy Land Hotel.
ffll ii) fel^G Farqily Missioi)
MOTHER AND CHILD From the row of bronze statues in
Sfad depicting 'Celebration of Life,' a much larger than life new
mother hoists her offspring into the air.
THE FAMILY MISSION Takes part in services remembering 'The 6 Million' at Yad Vashem
Memorial and Museum of the Holocaust.
SOCCER TO 'ER It'a fun time at Hod Haaharon as South Broward'
youngsters join their slater dty compatriots in a mixed duel; the older j
folks served as the audience.
BAR MITZVAH The Barrens (Marina, Lisa.
Gary, Alexander and Ron, from left) celebrate the
bar mitzvah of Cary at the Wailing Wall.
SING-ALONG The South Broward en-
tourage and the Hod Haaharon Singers share a
musical afternoon at Giora, our Project
Renewal site.
saan^^Baaa^^smBlMBBB^MaaaBnBBam
AT CONTROLS 'It'a a lot like Pac Man.' says Federation of South Broward inspected military equip
Alexander Barren who is at the helm of an Israeli tank meat.
while others on the Family Miaaion with the Jewish


Pe6-A
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 20.1982
ESSSOur Pantry Pas
Everyday Low Prk
cPade
Fryer
Leg Quarters
..-..- EATING ()
Honeydew
Melons
..
D;ET PEPSI OR
Pepsi
Cola
Choice Meat Dept
US CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Underttade
(SAVE 60c i
Tp POUND
SUNNYLAND 16-OZ PKG
MEAT OT BEEF
Jumbo Franks
169
Select from our wide
variety of U.S. CHOICE
graded beef, veal, lamb and
lop quality poultry and
pork.
U S CHOICE BEEF LOIN (SAVE 1 30)
Whole Beef
Tenderloins
CUT AND
WRAPPED
FREE
Fresh Fruits
Vegetables
750-ML BOTTLE
"-* Pick from our
* loose displays.
Buy only what
you need!
LAMBRUSCO ROSA TO. BIANCO
Riunite
Wines $099
(SAVE 50C)
2
GARDEN FRESH SNAPPY
Green Beans
16-OZ BTLS FAYGO ASSORTED
Diet Sodas
$169
3
(YOU PICK)
LB
CRUNCHY FRESH (LG 90 CT
49* 4/$l
sa s*^ dKr g^^isAVEii
POUND
PANTRY PRIDE ALL MEAT
ASSORTED SLICED LUNCHEON MEATS
U-PICK-
1
SAVE 50c)
:*naoua sou turbo- madooo
SAVE
Party Pack
$^69
Peppers
49<
750-ML BTL UEBFRAUMILCH
Blue Nun
12-OZ
PKG
TOPS IN VITAMIN A GARDEN FRESH
Carrots
(SAVE 70e>
$199
3
(SAVE 30CI
SAVE
49
-6
1.59
40
QPEA- 3 S"EWS SOUP
.0OA OR s"pfo muuu ERESf
BONELESS ANC SMLESS
Chicken
3.BS I 0VEB
Ground
ls 1.39 40
B 1.79 20
PANTR PROS ALL f
ahns eor ;
2.69 30
1.99 26
.69 20
AMCACAN -OS^-EO FRAMES O*
QRA0C *"OZB* WUMSTCKS 0"
Turkey Wings ... .49 20
'J 0* SI "ID PWEMUM >hes-
! BBt*S" 0TS ILfOO'OS BAOS 3 OaSlE'P"iS
Loto Off Chicken .. .59 10
. pkg 1*99 44
"ebre* sa'ona, mom' sa^u* 0
wi2.49 30
.0ms pjc-res* soct
OSCAB UA-ER MEAT-OR BEE'
Most or Beef
2 LB
BAG
aoc ;ts-to SAtAos "sk SAVE
Ra. Avocados 2 1.00 is
ASSORTS OCOlORS PRSMl Cu'
Floral Bouquet 1.69 10
SEA jtRSE- GROWN- L, PC
Plum Tomatoes .49 10
GAROEN fPtSH- u-PC-
O* ES?UCCHN
Squash.........lB .29 10
OOOO EOR PCk^KO OB is a sa. AC
Kirby Cucumbers .39 10
u S A. PURPOSE WHITE
Pofsoss......5 bag .89 10
-APJGE SUPER SE..EC C COUN*
Cucumbers...3m .59 40
OEi MONTE nARGE 6 SITE.
i wmw e> jet
PERSONAL CARE
SAVE
TWO 2 02 BOT'^ES p. PACK
% DC 3" LABE.
J OZ SOlC 2 iOZ RCV. ON
OB 4 02 CAS SPRA-
4.57 61
1.97 73
CftCSSC Gaxap 0" e**U BO0>
PAS*B P*D
."1.47 52
.BOTTLE .9*
oz tuet or '-0: bo"^e
REG OR CONDITION EORMUCA
Head & Shoulders 1.67 58
APPETIZERS
AVAILABLE ONLY AT STORES
HAVING SERVICE COUNTERS
BREYERS 32 OZ CUP (SAVE 30ei
Plain
Yogurt S
99
SEAL TEST SMALL CURD 12 OZ CUP
iSA iti
<: Cottage
69
JU* SCX E2E-
SAVE
^tVf .79 40
STQ Atu-*S
SAVE
,'m 1.59 io
Floral & Gift Boutique
ONLY AT STORES HAVING BOUTIQUE OEPTS
EASY TO GROW mm m^mm.
Bonsai $!Af9
SAVE
(HEST OUAUT*
Jack* JW
WMLTI MAO
>> PWOE
Soil
OEANSPRENCm
Onion Dip
UtAf
/'1.49
. iowt .47 12
"cS .89 io
fuasoMRn s corn oa.
TURE assorts o colors
CUT
lB
. PKO
20
PXSBU BUTTMH< OR
BUTE" TASTK HLMOPIT JAC
2c^r .79 10
gaM.19 io
....'1.09 10
BOROEN rPOSTEO
Yogurt......
3>1.09 38
BKkAVAOOBNOSAU fWeMBfW-MWGfT
Si 00)
a a*SAVE
.BUNCH 1.7V
*S*v CUT
DsMss.......buno.1.59
MEO HOH UQHT MED MATER
KAMGMQ BASHE'
Boston Fsrn .. i> 4.99
LOW UOHT e NEANTME
Bsis Palm.....t*> 4.99
OWT CHEAP (EOS EPOnC PI ANTSl
aUMTONTS
OT
. BAG
MRS RESSCERS SMOXEC
Turkey
PAUL* BRAND SWEET
THORNAPPit v>uf>
CHUNK OR SUCEO OlO f AaMA>D
u,1^9 40
Sf.19 20
.1#49 20
... .79 10
Com'd Beef raid.. 2.09
0VNf4BH ^_
B8Q Chickens .1.69
l'CHi* .
SUCEO TMB. PASTRAMI OR
BJBa


. August 20,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page7-A
the Test!...
Save You More!
cPride
PRICES GOOD THURS., AUG. 15 THRU WED., AUG. 25, 1982
1900
|89
3 ways in our Groceiy Department
Save on National Brands, Save More on Pantry Pride
Brands, Save Even More on Generics!
GENERIC HEAVY DUTY LIQUID
PANTRY PRIDE
bTTLP
BBQ
$]39
Laundry Detergent Mayonnaise
$"179 QQ^
^L (SAVE 20c) |H^ ^0
64-OZ
JUG
BES PAK
hoe
Bags
99
GENERIC
Facial Tissue
BOX OF
200
55
PLANTATION PRIDE-46-OZ JAR
Kosher Dills
$-119
64-OZ BTL. WHITEHOUSE
Apple Juke
(SAVE 26) ^ I ^^
40-OZ BTL SUNSWEET
Prune Juice
(SAVE 44)
3 BOLL PK JUMBO PAPER
1
REGULAR OF
WITH PULP
(SAVE 14)
$119
1
SAVE
IALL (PKG OF 15)
99
OENER*C TALL
Kitchen Bags
15 CT
, BOX
Mr. Big Towels 1.49 20 SfcrinkTsiias
CA\/C PLUM PASTE OR CRUSHED
.79 40
CAN
.88 .11
PANTRY PRIDE GRAPE CHERRY ORANGE
FRUIT PUNCH OR LEMONADE
24 OZ
. CAN
ORANGE APPLE FRUIT OR LEMONADE-'O PACK
SAVE
1.19,26
(SAVE 30'
ZEN FOODS
"TEC FAVORS SAVE
IYogurt
3 LB
BAG
.'c0tn1.29 .36
Long Grain Rice
GENERIC
paper isafHuns pkg
GENERIC
I GAL
, JUG
iPlzza...7B8. .89 60
I Cut or French
GENERIC STEMS PIECES
|Besns2 bo'?s .89 29
.59 24
boxes
(shoestring
1 Fries. 20^
ATE VANILLA BANANA
.'21.89 30
."<& .79 .20
I Pops
3 CONT 1.00 .11
Black Pepper
GENERIC TAGLESS
Tea Bags.....
GENERIC
Paper Towels
GENERC
Cat Utter
GENERIC PINK
Dish Detergent
402
. CAN
4 02
. CAN
I00CT
BOX
GIANT
ROLL
.89 50
.69 60
.69 70
.48 65
.69 36
.991 00
.55 34
LA ESTRELL A MARIA
Cookies .
36 7 02
I
.99
1 ROLLS
FRUIT PUNCH GRAPE OR ORANGE IN GLASS BOTTLE
64 02 AA
. CONT .W 20
Hl-C Drink
PANTRY PRIDE
Kitchen Bags
46 OZ
CAN
ISCT
. BOX
.99 10
.99 32
KITTY WHITE
CatUtter ...
PANTRY PRIDE LONG GRAIN
.20eiS1.79 46
5 HiS 1.39 20
Capri Sun Drinks' 2.29 40
12 02 SQUEEZE BOTTLE
Guidon's Mustard .79 10
BACK TO SCHOOL
200 COUNT
FMer Paper........69
70 COUNT
Theme Books 2 for 1.00
COUNT
BicPens........
14 COUNT
25 B.o 1.59100
FYNE SOFT-2 PLY WHITE OR ASSORTED COLORS
Bath Tissue v
DELTA
Corned Beef
12 OZ
CAN
.89 30
1.19 10
I 20 COUNT
PANTRY PRIOE TWIN PACK
REGULAR onPN CHIP
... .69
... .79
PACKAGED
BAKED GOODS
SARA LEE FAMILY
u
HMJZNfc.
iaBife>M
liiim
iktmiSi
H*lM
ilia Mi Si
**'SM
ItWISl
lex*
M*M]
i*r-v
-ana aw
vaa.
-BUM
mm
lmm
Ncea.
ii
*
AwnQMIktMllMl
NCI2MSltMK M
'WJTSMr
Ommi IX iM
128*Si Im
or we
^&sa>i
le-oz
. LOAF
J^T
10
SAVE
<&
'iii't't'ii'i't'i'M'Mi'i'i'lll'I'i'l'i'l'I'l'l'l'I'i'j'l'l'l'i'l'V,
MaMMalM*
rn......iiimmj
(MiiiWta
7M* C.iln Mil*
u M ion Sm
"W MMt N I *m
K1IMKIIM
WMBift
1510 sisnj"!
1'xmrMi
OYWttT
wtiinS
US Hi UMai
SAVE
SA^eI GUARANTEED
s/we istattissmafflmk uwmm
CAVF ^T- pmouc* .na m rm wn an UMoW outtim.) OK* on. ot
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
am!
SrWE
SAVE
leVME
.eaaai
PANTRY PRJOE
Rye Bread.
COCONUT OR CINNAMON
Pecan Twtris 2 5. .99 39
ADL ER S JEWISH ONWN
Rye Bread
1 C FRENCH TVWNS OR
Steak Roas pkg .73 .12
VELVET CREME PLAJN OR
>...? .59 .20
2002 an __
loaf Mw 20
AAa4 .In..
wiosi stores
MaamM>M*vf
WOimu
open
UllDf
8am 'til 11pm daily
All stores
open Sundays
i>


Page 8-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. Augu^ I
William Kahn
S. Broward
Federation
Wins Praise
Continued from Page 3-A
there are 200.
He traced the history of the 82-
year growth of Federation,
pointing to the tremendous in-
crease in services provided. He
said today's problems need spe-
cial treatment in Jewish commu-
nities across America.
One example Kahn quoted is
the 44 percent divorce rate
among Jewish families; another
is an intermarriage rate of 40 per-
cent. "The great need for family
counseling is apparent,'' he said.
On Israel. Kahn used one sta-
tistic: Fewer than 2,000 lives
were lost in the entire Operation
Peace for Galilee. 'Amazing,'" he
said, in light of the statistics that
were used by the press.
Of course, he added, one Israeli
life is too many.
On Giving Securities, Real Property, ft,
This is the second in a series of articles entitled "Modern Methods
of Charitable Giving" 'by Jonathan M. Lichter. assets realization
officer for the United Jewish Appeal. If you have any questions or
comments, please call Michael J. Moskowitz at the Jewish Federation
of South Broward (921-8810).
Long-Term Appreciated Capital
Assets Securities and Real Property
Long-term appreciated capital assets are items held by an individu-
al for more than 12 months and which have appreciated in value dur-
ing the holder's term of ownership.
Essentially, they consist of securities and real property.
An individual may donate a long-term appreciated capital asset to
charity. As in the case of a cash gift, the donor of a long-term appreci-
ated capital asset is entitled to an income tax charitable deduction in
the taxable year of the gift for the full value of the gift.
In addition, he or she will not be subject to capital gains tax at the
time of the gift with respect to the appreciation in value during his or
her term of ownership.
The maximum deduction that may be taken in any taxable year is
limited to 30 percent of the donor's adjusted gross income for the tax-
able year. To the extent that the value of the gift exceeds the 30 per-
cent limit in the year of contribution, the donor may carry forward the
excess up to five years, remaining in each year subject to the 30 per-
cent adjusted gross income ceiling.
The donor may elect a 50 percent ceiling. In that case, the deduction
is reduced by 40 percent of the amount of gain that would have been
long-term capital gain had the property been sold at its fair market
value rather than donated, or, otherwise stated, the deduction is
limited to the donor's cost-basis in the property (generally, the cost at
which he or she obtained it) plus 60 percent of the appreciation.
If the election is made, the deduction for all gifts or long-term ap-
preciated capital assets made during the year or being carried forward
from prior years must be similarly reduced. To the extent that the
value of the deduction exceeds the 50 percent limit, the donor may
carry forward the excess up to five years.
Example A.
Mr. B. donated 100 shares of XYZ common stock to charity. The
fair market value of the stock at the date of the charitable transfer was
$3,000. Mr. B. had purchased the stock five years prior to the gift for
$1,000. His adjusted gross income in the year of the gift was $35,000.
Mr. B. is entitled to an income tax charitable deduction of $3,000.
the value of the gift, for the year in which the gift was made. He will
not be subject to capital gains tax with respect to the $2,000 apprecia-
tion in value of the stock during his term of ownership. He may take
the full $3,000 deduction in the same taxable year as the gift since it is
less than 30 percent of his adjusted gross income for that year.
Example B.
Mrs. C. donated a parcel of real property appraised at $20,000 to
charity. She had purchased the property two years prior to the gift for
$15,000. The gift is her first and only charitable gift of a long-term ap-
preciated capital asset. Her adjusted gross income for thet
of the gift is $38,000. She wishes to obtain the largest powjkj
tion for the gift in the year of the gift.
Mrs. C. may elect the 50 percent, rather than 30 percent c
will be entitled to an $18,000 income tax charitable deductiona!!
cost and 60 percent of the $5,000 appreciation in value). Asth '
than 50 percent of her adjusted gross income for the taxable \*
entire $18,000 deduction may be taken in that year
Example C.
Mr. D. donated a parcel of real property appraised at $2Qj
charity. He had purchased it 10 years prior to the gift for $2 oqq]
Mr. D. to elect the 50 percent ceiling, his deduction wouidl
$12,800 ($2,000 cost and 60 percent of the 118,000 appreo,
value) and he would forego a deduction for the remaining 401
appreciation ($7,200).
temple sinai of hollywooG
Conservative
AX again proudly presents
v at the
DIPLOMAT HOTEL
5743High Holiday Services
conducted by
Dr. Reuben Luckens, Rabbi
Cantor Leo Rosenblum
Irving Renzer
Baal Shacharit. Baal Koreh Baal Tekiah.
#
Rosh Hashanah
September 17,18,19
Yom Kippur
September 26,27
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Prayer Books, Taleisim & Skull Caps Provided
Tickets May Be Purchased At Temple Sinai Office
1201 Johnson Street Hollywood 920-1577
- i
Jewish High School
Of South Florida
A Very Demanding High School Experience
If you want your children to grow up proud of our people, fascinated by our
long history and enthralled by our unique faith,
SELECT THE JEWISH SCHOOL OF SOUTH
FLORIDA (located at the Michael Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center NMB), a school committed to academic excellence, providing
..an intensive education in a academic environment
..small classes with individualized attention
..a chance to learn about Jewish Heritage
..special preparation for SAT and standardized tests
..a chance to learn Hebrew as a spoken language
..a most advanced high school Computer program
..a dual curriculum of General and Judaic studies
..an extended day to accomodate regular classes and enrichment programs
..intense academic competition from classmates interested in the finest
education available.
..extensive physical education facilities of the Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center
305/935-5620


riday. August 20, 1962
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9-A
NORTON
-8 TIRE C
t*m
T RADIAL WWTEWAU8
sat
P155/80R13
P175/75R13
P185/80R13
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P205/75R15
IP215/75R15
IP225/75R15
P235/75R15
mice
50.84
58.90
69.39
72.74
74.86
78.70
84.16
89.87
84.56
92.67
95.88
104.10
RET.
1.46
175
2.20
1.79
2.14
224
251
2.62
253
268
286
321
T RADIAL WWTEWALIS
SIZE
BR78x13
CR78x14
DR78x14
PRICE
73.91
75.34
76.88
ER78x14 78.17
FR78x14
GR78x14
HR78x14
79.87
87.64
100.14
GR78x15
87.18
F.E.T.
2.07
2.27
2.26
240
2.66
2.81
2.92
2.86
XVSTUBELESS
SIZE
185/70x13
185/70x14
195/70x14
205/70x14
PRICE
TOT
"3858"
106.03
XZX TUBBfSS BUCK
SIZE
155x12
145x13
155x13
165x13
165x14
PRICE
44,33
39.74
46.88
51.81
175x14
185x14
165x15
57.35
59.24
70.80
57.65
FEf
1.35
1.28
^M
1.5!
1.1
1.1
2.11
1.72
Of
165/70x13 53.06
175/70x13
192 '1
185/70x13
85/70x14
2 01
195/70x14
55.91
61.67
72.76
77.01
1(
.90
206
| 2.35
I 240
ASK ABOUT OUR NEW PUNCTURE-SEALING TIRE
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Howard
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has offered quality brands,
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pay no extra for our service and experience.
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RADIAL
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SPECUL LOW PRICE
iFGoodrich
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BELTED CLl
P155/80B12
iv
X.

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BfijflBMnMf
i Fiberglass cord belts for strength and
stability.
Polyester cord body for a smooth,
quiet ride.
Belted construction for good mileage
and traction.
Wide whitewall for up-to-date styling
BELTED CLM P -METRIC POLYESTER CORD I GLASS BELTED WWTEWALLS LIFESAVER XLM.mRADIAU
SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
SIZE PRICE F.E.T. P155/80R13 49.19 1.53 1
P155/80B13 31.97 1.44 P165/80R13 51.18 1 69 1
P165/80B13 33.81 1.50 P175/80R13 53.05 1.78 1
P175/80B13 35.75 1.63 P185/80R13 54.45 1 92 1
| P185/80B13 37.93 1.69 P195/70R13 55.50 1 98
' P175/75B14 38.79 1.70 P205/70R13 57.15 2.14
P185/75B14 39.88 1.79 P205/70R14 62.17 223
P195/75B14 41.82 1.95 P175/75R14 51.88 1 83
P205/75B14 42.92 2.07 P185/75R14 57.15 204
P215/75B14 44.25 2.20 P195/75R14 62.17 2 18
P225/75B14 46.57 2.35 P205/75R14 64.85 234
P215/75R14 66.01 248
P1R^/RORIS 35.75 1.68
i 1 JJ/ OL/D 1 ij P225/75R14 70.58 268
P165/80B15 37.44 1 83
P195/75R15 65.20 233
P205/75B15 44.14 2.15
P205/75R15 67.42 2.47
P215/75B15 45.60 2.34
P215/75R15 69.99 2.59
n*V* /7CD4 C 47.78 246
P225/75B15 P225/75R15 72.56 278
50.10 2.65
P235/75B15 P235/75R15 77.83 3.01

FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFG _
r/MHIGH TECH1
TM
RADIALS
ASK ABOUT THE
T/A
DADE: Export/WhotMato
66NW82*. 593-7040
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iira & Ooogla Road 446-8101 1275 49tnSt 822-2500' 1740 E Sunoae fltvd 463-7588 532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
NORTH MIAMI MIAMI AIRPORT PLANTATION DEERFIELD BEACH
13360 N W 'ch Ave 681-8541 NW 25 St & Milam Dry Rd 593-1191 381 N State Rd 7 587-2186 2265 W Hrtlaooro Brvd 427-8
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AMERICAN EXPRESS
DINER $ CLUI
N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N E 163rd St 945-7454
- MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH OAOE
9001 S Dixie Mwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S Di*Hwy 233-524'
WEST MIAMI TAMARAC I FT. PIERCE
Bird & Galloway Rd 552-6656 441 & w Commrcw Btvd 735-2772 2604 Soutti 4t* St 464-8020
. KBNOALL DR ,/HIOATE SOUARE 1 TAMARAC VERO BEACH
13872 S W 88m St 387-0126 N University Or at McNao Rd 721-4700 755 2lBt Straet 567-1174
* HOMESTEAD POMPANO BEACH
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622 3151 N Peoerai Hwy 943-4200
W. HOLLYWOOD WEST PALM BEACH
49'S StataRd 1 987-0450 515 South Dma 832-3044
DAVtE St Rd 84 |ut wast ot Urwerarrv Or 4-3-4TQ0
DAVTONA BEACH
907 voiuaia Ave 255- T48 7
' NAPLE&
2085 E Tamiami Tr 774-4443


_e
Page 10-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 20, \<&2

News
DAY CARE
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward. 2838 Hol-
lywood Blvd., is now registering
for the new after-school day care
program in both the Hollywood
and Pembroke Pines areas.
Transportation, snacks, a wide
variety of daily activities, and all
"no school" holidays are all in-
cluded in the program.
Call the JCC of South Broward
for further information and regis-
tration at 921-6511.
PICNICKING
JCC of South Broward invites
everyone to join in in its second
annual fall picnic.
The entire family will be of-
fered a fun-filled day of food,
games, sports and meeting new
neighbors and friends.
The picnic will be at C.B.
Smith Park Pavillion 15 Sun-
day, Sept. 12, at 10 a.m.
For tickets and reservations,
call the Jewish Community Cen-
ter of South Broward (921-6511).
CLASSES
The JCC announces a wide
range of morning, after-school
and evening classes for children
of all ages: teens, adults and se-
nior adults.
Registration is at the JCC of
South Broward, Monday-Friday
9 a.m.-5 p>m.
NYC Mission
Continued from Page 3-A
all questions South Broward resi-
dents may have.
"We are today, in essence,
what our ancestors began in New
York." the CAJE director, a na-
tive New Yorker, says.
The scholar-in-residence
studied at the Salenter Yeshiva,
and also attended the Teachers
Institute of Yeshiva University
and the Herzliah Teachers
Academy. He is a graduate of the
City College of New York and has
studied on a master's level at the
Wurzweiler School of Social
Work, under the auspices of
Yeshiva University.
The second major attraction of
the mission is a guided tour
through the Lower East Side.
Walkers will see such streets as
Canal. Orchard, Rivington, East
Broadway and Bowery, an area
Greenzweig says was more
densely populated (almost totally
with Jews) soon after the turn of
the century than Bombay, India.
And, while many of the immi-
grant Jews have assimilated into
the mainstream of American so-
ciety, the remnants are still there,
Greenzweig knows, and will be
studied to give South Broward
Jews a feel for their heritage.
According to Dr. Robert and
Elaine Pitted. leaders of the NYC
Mission, participants also will:
Tour the prestigious and
memorable Jewish Museum on
Fifth Avenue.
Visit, and perhaps pray at,*
the Spanish-Portuguese syna-
gogue, one of the oldest in the
United States.
Be briefed at the headquar-
ters of three major Jewish or-
gnaizations: Anti-Defamation
League, B'nai B'rith and the
American Joint Distribution
Committee.
Lunch at the home of the Is-
raeli consul general.
Dine at showcase ethnic res-
taurants: Ratner's, Sammy's and
Moshe Peking.
ADVISE
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investment broker who'll listen while
you talk, call Advest.
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With over forty offices from Maine
to Florida, Advest is one of the oldest and
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East. We can provide you with a full range
of investment alternatives as well as the
modern, up-to-date service that you
demand.
And because the Advest approach
to investing peoples' money has been
founded on a "back-to-basics" philos-
ophy, you'll get more personal attention
than you may be accustomed to.
Our group of experienced account
executives specializes in conservative
investment vehicles, with safety of
principal and dependable income as
primary concerns. A member of the New
York Stock Exchange and other principal
securities exchanges, Advest also
offers strong expertise in municipal and
corporate bonds and government
obligations.
You see, Advest still feels the client,
not the stock market, is the foundation of
every financial plan. We start our investor
relationship by listening to your ideas
and objectives and then designing an
individual program to achieve them. The
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If you'd like to learn more about
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August 20, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11-A

Fine
Fine For
Volunteer
ontinued from Page 4-A
community."
relationship between Fine
the Miami Jewish Home has
a professinal one as well. He
sponsible for the intrerior
of the Baron and Polly de
Meyer Building and other
gs on the Douglas Gar-
campus. He now is active on
^suiting basis.
"he Miami Jewish Home is
mate to have a man of Ted
caliber active on our board
I u in our community. His
ibutions to the elderly have
been outstanding," said
e Irving Cypen, chairman of
oard of directors.
uch like the owner, Fine
rators Inc. is unique. The
Bar showroom, at 1051NW
it., Hallandale, encompasses
0 square feet and is filled
furniture, paintings and one-
iind art objects. The show-
is exclusively for customers
ne Decorators, who include
ess Caroline of Monaco and
i stars John McEnroe and
Gerulaitis.
d's involvement with the
and the thrift shops has
tremendous. His customers
donated thousands of dol-
orth of furniture and goods
> thrift shops, all of which
enhance and enrich the lives
residents," said Executive
tor Hirt.
re are three thrift shops in
County and one in Broward
y, at 3149 W. Hallandale
Blvd. Tax-deductible mer-
[ise can be donated by call-
11-8245. and will be picked
'. of charge.
rood Woman
is Her Master'*
Lynn Sampson of Holly-
Iwas among 65 students
I- states, Canada and Israel
five a master of social work
; from the Block Education
am of Yeshiva University's
kiler School of Social
Block program allows stu-
1 to complete MSW degree
Jements during three sum-
[in New York City, while
png their academic years in
me field jobs at agencies in
fome communities.
i Wurzweiler School of So-
lork is a division of Yeshiva
Ifsity, America's oldest and
It university under Jewish
N, now concluding its 96th
'"' cM/fii/cj
In 1982 Federation! across North America are celebrating the 50th
Anniversary Year of their national association, the Council of Jewish
Federations.
This is the third of five "Semi-Centennial Minutes," decade-by-
decade chronicles tracing the major events which shaped Jewish Fed-
eration life in the past half-century.
1951-1960
1951 With Federation support, Israel continues massive effort to
absorb 43,000 Yemenite Jews resettled by "Operation Magic
Carpet."
Z V&KiVW RePrt on Jewish Community Relations, sponsored
y ui n manda,e of Federations, presented to General As-
sembly. Recommendations include closer cooperation among
national agencies, local community relations councils and
NJCRAC, along with elimination of duplication and allocation
of program tasks.
CJF establishes Controllers Institute to assist Federations in
fiscal management.
Federations celebrate CJF's 20th Anniversary:
"Jhere was a vacuum in Jewish life which had to be filled
the need for communities to counsel together on their needs
and responsibilities, to learn from each other, and gather strength
from each other, so that they could face more intelligently and
more successfully the local problems which pressed upon them-
and act jointly on the national responsibilities which all share.
That Mas the vision on which the Council was established. And
the movement has grown because it has worked."Julian Free-
man, CJF President, 1951 General Assembly.
Stalin's brutal campaign to eradicate Jewish culture in the
Soviet Union continues with murder of 24 leading Jewish poets,
writers, intellectuals.
CJF reports 40% increase in Federation support for Jewish
education since 1948.
CJF William Shroder Awards established to honor outstand-
ing social welfare programs.
1953 "Black Years" of Stalinist anti-Semitic policies culminate with
"Doctors Plot." Six Jewish physicians arrested for alleged mur-
der of Soviet military leaders. Stalin announces "World Zionist
Conspiracy," severs diplomatic relations with Israel. Soviet Jewry
braces for pogrom. Stalin's death eases anti-Semitic campaign
in USSR.
With steadfast support of North American Jewry, Israel lays
foundation of modern economy and builds secure lives for her
people:
"The State of Israel is a responsible and increasingly efficient
government, and it should cease to be regarded as a philanthropic
object. No matter how much American fund raising appeals may
lay stress on self-development as distinguished from suffering,
the habit of giving only for suffering is deeply engrained."-
Dorothy Kahn, New York, 1953 General Assembly.
1954 Responding to Federation leadership's vision of Jewish life in
second half of 20th century, LCBC recommends CJF conduct
major survey of Jewish cultural activities and institutions.
CJF and Federation leaders support expanding role of women
in Federation life:
"Recognizing the growing importance of women's leadership
in our organized communities and the need for stimulating even
greater participation, service and leadership by women in our
central community organizations, this Assembly urges the com-
munities to develop more effective participation through their
whole-hearted support and encouragement."1954 GA Resolu-
tion.
1952
0udJlM

'ish Authors I
Wanted
atorian and an autobiog-
specialist are collabor-
collecting accounts of the
If Jews born in Russia or
ft Europe between 1895
lorld War I and who emi-
|to the United Sates.
onal manuscripts, five to
ps long, will be protected
lynght, and the confident-
1 f}he authors will be res-
I" desired. All papers will
Tied.
1 queries to Susan Waugh,
Hemiston, St. Louis, Mo.
w Eli Zaretaky, 504 Clay-
'franrisco, Calif. 94117.
School
Wanted 2 days
; In S.W. Broward.
, lalary.
Nl 961-1700."
I
Candlelighting Time
Friday, Aug. 207:34
Friday, Aug. 277:27
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
Asher kid shanu B mitz-vo-tav, V tzee-va-nu
L'had-leek Nayr shel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who has sanctified us with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
1953 Continuous attacks on Israel by Egyptian-trained fedayeen
operating from Oaza, Jordan and Syria escalate into largest
battle since War of Independence. Egypt-Soviet arms deal re-
vealed. Federations, through CJF, call on U.S. Government to
enter into formal treaties with Israel.
Federations pledge solidarity with 50,000 Moroccan Jews
awaiting release to make Aliyah.
Herbert Abeles, Metropolitan N.J., elected CJF President.
Philip Bernstein named CJF Executive Vice President.
Federation leaders at 19S5 General Assembly ponder the
future directions of the Federation movement:
"On the one hand, there is the contention that the Federations
should remain active only in the philanthropic and humanitarian
spheres. On the other, there is the feeling that the central agency
must keep pace with the times and move into the educational,
cultural and spiritual needs which are pressing for attention at
this time. Every age has had its Shammais and its Hillels argu-
ing pro and con the burning issues of the time. But Jewish life
has accepted the synthesis of the various schools, instead of
decisions of one over the other. And so it must be in our own
day."-Arthur Geller. Toronto, 1955 General Assembly.
195$ Israel occupies the Sinai in pre-emptive strike:
"The knock-out blow which Egypt was readying against Israel
was designed not merely to conquer Israets territory but to
destroy its people. No country could reasonably be expected to
tolerate a situation of this kind or fall to take necessary acts to
protect its existence."Av-raham Harmon, Jewish Agency, 1956
General Assembly.
Federations call on CJF to address the growing shortage of
Jewish communal professional personnel.
e CJF launches landmark four-year study, financed by U.S.
Public Health Service, on chronic illness among aging.
1957 Federations celebrate Israel's 10th Birthday:
"On the forthcoming 10th Anniversary of the establishment of
the State of Israel, we pay tribute to the remarkable accomplish'
ments of the young country We assure the people of Israel
of our deep concern for their great needs. We rededicate our-
selves to continue and intensify our efforts ."1957 General
Assembly Resolution.
1959 Irving Kane of Cleveland elected CJF President.
Delegates to General Assembly call for establishment of a
National Foundation for Jewish Culture, as recommended by
major CJF study. Foundation will define priorities in scholar-
ship and research, identify emerging issues, stimulate activities
by agencies:
"The prospects of a dynamic cultural growth in America are
vastly better than they were a generation ago, and the most
pressing immediate need is to forge a union between scholar and
layman, between agency and community ... Their joined insights
and know-how can provide the basis for an American Jewish
community of doers and thinkersa community that will take its
place with Babylonia and Spain and destroyed Europe as a crea-
tive center of Jewish life in the Diaspora."Sidney Z. Vincent,
Cleveland, 1959 General Assembly.
CJF National Scholarship Fund established by Federations to
recruit and train Jewish communal professional! of superior
ability and commitment.
1940 American Section of the Jewish Agency made autonomous,
with 20 of 21 Governing Board members American. CJF leads
effort to organize election process to reflect American Jewish
leadership.
Federations plan for 1960's amid changing demographics of
Jewish life: rising family income, increased leisure time through
automation, 15% rise in population over one decade, increasing
percentage of elderly, massive shifting of Jewish population to
suburbs.
e North American Jewry affirms commitment to civil rights:
"The dignity of the individual-regardless of race, religion,
color, national origin or ancestry, to live, to work, and to be
judged in accordance with his individual meritIs basic to our
Judaic and our democratic heritage alike."-1960 GA Resolution.
Religious Directory
ORTHODOX
CONGREGATION LEVI YITZ-
CHOK Lubavitch. 1504 Wiley
St.. Hollywood, 923-1707,
Rabbi Rafael Tennenhaus.
Daily Services 7:55 a.m., 7:30
p.m.; Sabbath Services 7:30
p.m., Sabbath morning 9
o'clock; Sundays 8:30 a.m. Re-
ligious School Grades 1-8.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLY-
WOOD, 3291 Stirling Road.
Hollywood, 966-7877. Rabbi
Edward Davis. Daily Services
7:30 a.m., 7:30 p.m.; Sabbath
Services 7:40 p.m.. Sabbath
morning 9 o'clock.
CONSERVATIVE
HALLANDALE JEWISH
CENTER. 416 NE 8th Ave.,
Hallandale, 454-9100. Rabbi
Carl Klein. Daily Services 8:30
a.m., 5:30 p.m. Sabbath
6:30 p.m., Sabbath morning
8:45 o'clock.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM.
1400 N 46th Ave., Hollywood,
981-6111. Rabbi Morton Mala-
vsky. Daily Services 7:45 a.m.,
sundown; Sabbath 8:15 p.m.,
Sabbath morning 9 o'clock.
Religious School Kindergar-
ten-8.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730
Stirling Road, Hollywood, 431-
5100. Rabbi Bernard P. Shoter
Sunday 9:30 a.m., Mon. and
Thurs. 8 a.m.; Sabbath eve 8
o'clock. Sabbath morning 8:45
o'clock, Religious School -
Nursery Bar Mitzvah.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRA-
MAR. 6920 SW 35th St.. Mira-
mar, 961-1700. Rabbi Paul
Plotkin. Daily Services 8:30
a.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:45 o'clock. Reli-
gious School Kindergarten 8.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson
St., Hollywood. 920-1577.
Daily Services 8:25 a.m., 5
p.m.; Sabbath 8 p.m., Sabbath
morning 8:25 o'clock.
Religious School Pre-Kinder-
garten 8.
REFORM
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S.
14th Ave., Hollywood, 920-
8225. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe.
Sabbath Services 8:15 p.m.
Religious School Grades 1-10.
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines
Middle School, 200 N. Douglas
Road, Pembroke Pines. 431-
3638. Rabbi Bennett Green-
spon. Sabbath 8 p.m. Religious
School Kindergarten
TEMPLE >SOLE~L ,1 5100
Sheridan St., Hollywood, 989-
0205. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Sabbath Services 8 p.m.. Sab-
bath morning 10:30 o'clock.
Religious School Preschool
12.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST
RAMAT SHALOM. 11301 W.
Broward Blvd., Plantation,
472-3600. Rabbi Elliot Skid-
dell. Sabbath Services 8:16
p.m. Religious School Pre-
Kindergarten 8.


.
Pag*12-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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Friduy. August 20.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Page IB
Na'amat Exec Asks
I Are Women's Rights In Israel Losing Out to Begin?
By BARBARA PASH
(upynghl BmlttmonJtuitk Timn
Hiprint by Sptcial Arranfmint
Though women make up half
the population in Israel, they are
not treated equally. That's the
view of Masha Lubelsky, secre-
tary-general of Na'amat, the
largest women's organization in
Israel, during a talk she gave last
week to her group's sister organi-
zation here, Pioneer Women
Na'amat. Mrs. Lubelsky asserted
that, il anything, the women's
movement for equality in Israel
has regressed under the Begin
government.
In an interview before her ap-
pearance at a Pioneer Women
annual donor dinner, Mrs.
Lubelsky assessed the status of
omen in Israel, and rather than
delivering a message sugar-
coated in optimism, she spoke
with a frankness characteristic of
[naelis
"I WANT to share what is
going on vis-a-vis the social situ-
ation the budget cuts and
what that means for social
services.'' said the 45-year-old,
dark-haired veteran of Israeli
politics, explaining why she had
made her first trip abroad.
But first she offered some
background on the organization
she represents. In Israel,
Na'amat has a membership of
750,000 women. (Pioneer Women
Na'amat members in America
number 50,000, and there are
additional sister groups in 11
other countries.)
In Israel, Na'amat has several
arms. On a practical level, it op-
erates day care centers, vocation-
al and training schools, commu-
nity centers and adult education
courses for working women,
housewives and young women.
On a theoretical level, its goal is
to promote the status of women,
which it does by serving as a
powerful lobbying group in the
Knesset. Israel's parliament.
GOLDA MEIR helped to
found Na'amat in 1921, and sub-
sequently served as National
Secretary from 1931 to 1933.
When Na'amat was founded,"
Mrs. Lubelsky explained, "the
main goal was to achieve equality
with men. But the meaning of
equality' was not the same as it
is now.
Then, equality meant to share
responsibility with men in build-
ing the country. Since that time,
Na'amat has started to work out
certain plans for bridging the
gaps between men and women in
Israeli society."
When the Labor Party was in
powei. some of those social and
educational gaps began to nar-
row. Hut not, Mrs. Lubelsky
pointed out, "Agudah Israel,"
the religious party, has too much
influence on the Begin Govern-
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lor
ment, and it affects the status of
women in Israel."
SHE EMPHASIZED that she
does not oppose the Agudah
party on religious grounds, but
because of its political leverage.
While it holds only four seats in
the 120-aeat Knesset, it is an im-
portant link in the Likud
Coalition, the basis of the Begin
Government.
Mrs. Lubelsky points to
specific examples where past suc-
cesses have been wiped away, to
the detriment, she believes, of
women. For example, she points
to the Knesset-approved abortion
law.
Previously, that law stated
women could receive abortions in
government clinics "for social
reasons." she observed, "such as,
if she was poor or already had
several children." Now, abortions
are granted primarily "for mental
reasons," forcing women to use
various subterfuges in order to
obtain an abortion.
She also cited the exemption
on religious grounds given young
women from serving in the Israeli
army. This, she feels, not only
harms women but the country as
a whole.
"JOINING THE army means,
in a way, self-realization. The
army made for equality. Before,
the image in Israel was that
women were equal. Of course, it
wasn't true then, but it was a
positive image," she said. "Now,
joining the army isn't considered
feminine. No one checks very
hard if a girl wants an exemption
for religious reasons. It per-
petuates a certain atmosphere."
Not only have some past suc-
cesses been cancelled, Mrs. Lub-
elsky continued, but the Begin
Government's attitude seems to
be one of ignoring the needs of
women.
The United Nations declared
1975 the International Year of
Women, and Israel formed a g >-
ernmental committee to examine
the status of women. The com-
mit' finished its work in 1978,
summarizing the results of the
three-year-long effort into 220
recommendations for improving
the status of women.
"Among the recommenda-
tions,'' Mrs. Lubelsky remem-
bered, "were equal wages, job
promotion opportunities, the
need for social and educational
services. The chairlady (of the
committee) gave the recommend-
ations to Begin. He kissed her
nicely and said, 'nice work," and
since then, nothing has hap-
pened."
RECENTLY, Na'amat un-
dertook a two-part examination
of its own: first, to find out why
there is this gap in Israeli society,
and second, Mrs. Lubelsky said,
"to see if we should blame only
the men or if women themselves
must do something to bring
about a change."
What Na'amat discovered, she
continued, is that while very few
women ever reach the top execu-
tive positions and very few
women earn upper income salar-
ies, the blame rests partly on the
women themselves.
The problem, she pointed out,
women in Israel who will agree to
take these top executive posts.
"Most of the working women
consider their jobs as a second
salary, to supplement the family
income. They think, 'when we get
the car or color television or
whatever, then I'll stop working.'
That is not the way to rise in the
Continued on Page 2-B
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Page2-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 20,1982
Na'amat Exec Asks
Are Women's Rights in Israel Losing Out to Begin?
Continued from Page 1-B
hierarchy."
ONE OF Naamat's goals,
therefore, is to encourage women
to aim for those top positions
while, she added, acknowledg-
ing the difficulties of a two-carrer
family."
Operating with a $50 million
deficit budget. Na'amat has other
goals as well. In hte face of gov-
ernments budget cuts (part of its
funding comes from the Israeli
government). it wants to
maintain the social and educa-
tional services it currently offers.
It also wants to continue its
special departments, such as a
legal advice department (dealing
with issues of particular concern
to women) and a status-of-women
department (providing informa-
tion and data to all Knesset
members).
Mrs. Lubelsky. who* was
elected Secretary-General for a
four-year term last September,
has some priorities of her own.
She hopes to increase the num-
ber ot day care centers available
to working mothers and voca-
tional training programs for girls.
At the same time, she pledged. "I
will fight to improve the status
women in Israel."
MARRIED AND with two
sons. Mrs. Lubelsky herself has
faced the conflicts of being a
career woman and working
mother. She is a sabra. born in
Herzliya. Her parents emigrated
from Poland in 1935, ardent
Zionists who followed a dream.
Mrs. Lubelsky comes to the
top Na'amat post with several
different types of work ex-
perience. After receiving
teacher's training in Jerusalem,
she spent a year teaching in an
elementary school before moving
up to become the headmistress.
She was then elected head of the
teachers' trade union in the Haifa
area.
In 1974. she joined Na'amat. as
head of the child care depart-
ment, "for a year, because I
wanted to try it. I got to leam the
variety of activities Na'amat
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does, and I fell in love with
Na'amat.'' she said with a smile,
"if it's possible to fall in love with
an organization." She spent
several years as the deputy
secretary general, the number
two post, before her election.
SHE IS particularly proud of
one of Naamat's special depart-
ments, which brings together
women from all over Israel for
seminars and cultural events.
"In Israel, there are conflicts
between the Ashkenazi and Sep
hardic Jews. But in Na'amat,"
she said, "all come under our um-
brella. It contributes to the belief
that we are one nation.
As proof of progress towards
that goal, she cites the results of
recent elections withing Na'amat.
Na'amat is organized into a cen-
tral office in Tel Aviv and 85
branches throughout the
country.
"Every branch has a local
elected secretary," Mrs. Lubel-
sky said, "and 40 percent of our
local elected secretaries are of
Sephardi origin. This was not
done by quota, but because the
local groups considered these
women capable.
"We're very proud of that."
All Publicmtmt Hifkti H,i,n
Masha Lubelsky: women themselves are partly to blame
Maxwell Home' Coffee
Is A Vfarm Welcome.
"Breaking bread" as a symbol of
peace, friendship, warmth and hos-
pitality is a tradition that is as old as
the Bible itself.
Although far from being as old as
the Bible, Maxwell House Coffee
has been pan of that tradition for
over a half a century. The reason is
simple: the full-pleasant aroma and
great tasting,
satisfying flavor of
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blends right in with the good food
and hospitality that is part of
inviting people into your home.
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instant or groundwhen you pour
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tality. At its warmest... consistently
cup after cup after cup.
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


Friday, August 20,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page3-B
Federation goes West.
For the Brat time in the rapidly growing- Western regions
of Broward County, a joint venture of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward and two area temples is
being attempted. Object of the venture, a 'Get-to-Know-
Your- Jewish -Neighbor' night, is to bring together new
residents in an informal, social atmosphere to become
acquainted with the Federation and Temple-in-the-Pines
and Temple Beth Emet. More than 100 residents are
expected Aug. 21 at 8 p.m. at the home of Norman and
Esther Freed man. Rock Creek. On hand to welcome and
address the guests will be Abby Rosenfeld and Susan
Yon kin. Federation Young Leadership chairmen; Rabbi
Bernard Shoter and President Bob Sims of Temple-in-the-
Pines; Rabbi Bennett Greenspon and President Marlene
Bloom of Temple Beth Emet (on phone at left); and
Sumner G. Kaye, Federation executive director. In photo
at right, Debbie Lundy, Federation Western Young
Leadership immediate past chairman; and Bob Kdelman,
Temple-in-the-Pines membership chairman, go over as-
signments for the evening. Contact Susan Mara at the
Federation for more details.
PLO Shield: 300.000 Innocents Trapped
Continued from Page 1 -A
U.S. government will restrain the
Israelis from moving in. Habib, who
spent nine months failing to negotiate
Syria's Soviet missiles out of Lebanon's
Bekaa Valley, has not been a closer of
deals because he views a ceasefire as a
success when terrorists view it as their
victory.
The reason Habib has so far failed,
while always seeming to be on the brink
of success, is that the Reagan adminis-
tration is publicly stating that negotia-
tion is the only way to get the PLO out.
That is a self-defeating lie: the only in-
centive for the PLO to release its hostage
city is the certainty that the soft
American hostage policy will be followed
by the hard Israeli hostage policy.
Anything that undermines that certain-
ty such as "tough talk" by Reagan
warning Israel not to attack destroys
the chances of a peaceful withdrawal.
The sole impetus for the PLO to leave
is the real alternative of its destruction.
Incredibly, however, Habib's current
alibi for the failure to close is the noise of
Israeli guns as if that is not his only
bargaining tool. Israeli military pres-
sure, not sweet State Department rea-
son, is what can "give Habib a chance."
Of course, the impact of American
television news is doing its share in help-
ing Congressman Pete McCloskey enlist
the U.S. government in the PLO cause.
Repeatedly, NBC's John Chancellor de-
nounces the "savage" Israeli attacks,
hammering home the anti-Israel editorial
position to which any dovish commenta-
tor is entitled with only an inadequate
angry letter response. The time has
never been riper for "Op-Ed" on network
news.
Eight weeks of restraint has brought
the Israelis sustained criticism, threa-
tened sanctions by the White House and
one-sided intervention by the U.N. The
same observers who told Britain that a
final assault on Port Stanley would be
inhumane, and would anger Argentines,
are now warning Israel that a final as-
sault on the PLO holding West Beirut
hostage would offend world opinion.
This week, the Israelis have taken
their own war back into their own hands.
The misplaced annoyance of the Reagan
White House, caused by the president's
willingness to be swayed by television
pictures, places Israel in this dilemma:
either to knuckle under to White House
pressure and hand the PLO a triumph, or
to go it alone and take the punishment
1 from those who disagree with its hostage
policy.
The first phase of the move into West
Beirut has evidently begun; there will be
no Israeli Desert One. There could be a
pause, a brief opening to give diplomacy
backed by reality a final opportunity,
which if ignored would lead to the blood-
shed nobody wants. Tragically, George
Bush and William Clark seem blindly re-
solved to make the Israelis pay for not
obeying orders to wait another couple of
weeks or months or years, and the White
House may miss the last chance to press
the PLO to peaceably release the hostage
city.
N. Y. Timts Co.
Reprinted by permission
Computer Age Comes Alive
At S. Florida High
The Jewish High School of
South Florida has been sent 12
micro-computers by the Ameri-
can OUT Federation in con-
nection with ORT's first effort to
extend its expertise to the Jewish
school system, according to Sid-
ney Leiwant, American ORT
president.
The micro-computers were pro-
vided to faciliate an ORT-spon-
sored program of computer edu-
cation for the 200 students at the
Miami high school.
That program began last Sept-
ember when ORT agreed to co-
sponsor a pioneer program, inter-
grating modem technology into
the teaching aspects of the
school, with a concentration on
science and technology, Leiwant
said.
He said the first year of the
two-year program was so suc-
cessful that enrollment will be all
200 students in the school during
the 1982-83 school year, double
the number of students in the
program in its first year.
The new micro-computers re-
present a new generation which
cost less than first-generation
desk computers and also come
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The Mustard good enough to cook with **.**, rr


Page 4-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, August 20 1^
.
Continued from Page 1-A
eration's Albert Ratner and Florida
Regional Chairman Alan L. Shulman,
was Jewish Agency Treasurer Akiva
Lewinsky.
Lewinsky said, "our historic task of
oneness" is vital because "peace is being
held hostage and has to be defended to
be secure."
The treasurer said, "We had to mort-
gage our future in order to secure peace.
The budget of Israel mirrors the pro-
gress of Israel, and last year we were $50 '
million short."
The cost of this war, Lewinsky said,
"cannot be evaluated without the exist-
ing burdens of the past." One-third of
the Israel budget is spent to pay off debt
service.
In the last week, Lewinsky said, $1.5
billion in loans were authorized for the
Peace for Galilee. "We had no choice but
to shoulder the additional burden."
Peres, speaking at the luncheon, said
the Lebanon incursion was carried out
'to correct a danger, not to change the
character of our nation." He said the
PLO has been stalling for time, to win
world empathy, and only "squeezing and
negotiations," can force them to leave
Beirut.
In Washington, U.S. Sen. John Glenn
(D-Ohio) asked Peres if Israel has
changed its peace-loving ways.
Peres responded with the analogy of
the Mideast situation being like Cuba
shelling Florida. Going into Lebanon
was self-defense, he said.
"As we grow up. we (Israelis) impm.*
our view of ourselves, Peres said he told
Sen. Glenn. The young Israeli gen*
ation is different. They are a conscien.
tious generation, extremely sensitive in
a moral code:
Respect for life, Peres said.
The Israeli closed his remarks with:
"We will never be dominated by any-
one else and never want to dominate
anyone else."-
ORT Helping Train \
Would-Be Defense Force
Because ORT's network in Is-
rael is well-known, Israel's army
officials have asked ORT's direc-
tors to help develop special pro-
grams to deal with the young
people who are educationally and
socially unequipped to handle
military service.
This resulted from an Israeli
Defense Force policy which pro-
hibits the acceptance of problem-
atic, hard-core dropouts who are
likely to make unsuitable sol-
diers.
Thus, the first training center
was established 16 years ago at
the Julia Army Base by ORT Is-
rael and the Israeli Defense
Force, in partnership with the
State of Israel's Ministry of La-
bor and Welfare. Bank Leumi Le
Israel also helped to fund the
project.
Currently, more than 5,000
youths are involved in various
"army base" programs.
"The success of this program,"
says Israel Goralnik, director of
the Ministry of Labor, "is that
people who would not have done
so years ago are now completing
army service. Not completing
army service in Israel is somehow
like having been in jail: some-
thing is deficient in your
documents."
The ORT army programs have
a diverse curriculum combining
vocational training with
academic studies and extra-
curricular activities. In order to
develop motivation for these stu-
dent soldiers to complete their
education, ORT selects highly
qualified teachers both army
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to value the work-study ethic of
Israel.
Bernard Milloff, M.D.
Howard J. Fuerst, M.D.
Stanley M. Silver, M.D.
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riday. August 20,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5-B
lere's Review of Best New Books on Israel
By DAVID C. GROSS
|The Bible tells us that of
aking many books there is no
" Today, little Israel remains
focus of innumerable books
books about its difficult
litical and security situation,
>ks about its unique achieve-
nts, books about its evolving
and culture.
Herewith is a handful of such
ks. which will help the reader
ieve new understanding and
ights into the mores and the
,es confronting the Israelis.
i and learn and enjoy! If you
n't find these books in your
;al bookstore, ask for them!
Historian Howard Sachar has
iuced a lucid appraisal of the
Kgypt-Israel Camp
vid peace accords, and has
own in for good measure a fas-
ating account of both coun-
' histories in the past half
iiry His excellent book is
,pi and Israel. (Marek,
95).
wo American newsmen,
anley Blumberg and Gwinn
wens, have collaborated on The
urvivnl Factor, (Putnam,
(5.95). an account of Israeli in-
lligence efforts from the First
War to the present era, ex-
tining that Jews are especially
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adept at undercover work be-
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(The Dial Press, $19.95) by
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Gemma Levine, is for young peo-
ple or adults is problematical, for
in this beautiful volume of Is-
rael's younger generation we are
brought face to face with the next
generation of Israel's youngsters
from every conceivable back-
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heart of countless people in the
world is examined, in a work
titled Jerusalem: Problems and
Prospects, edited by Joel
Kramer. The thorny questions of
demographics, construction,
architecture, religious observance
are among the many issues
tackled by an impressive list of
contributors.
The sage of American Immi-
grants in Israel (University of
Chicago Press, $22) by Kevin
Avruch is a serious and yet high-
ly readable account of American
Aliyah to Israel, the stories of the
nearly 60,000 American Jews
who have settled in the Jewish
State since its founding in 1948
their unique problems of in-
tegration, their contributions as
Americans to Israel's develop-
ment, and their evolvement into
genuine Israelis who have re-
tained definte vestiges of their
American heritage.
Song of Sona Jerusalem:
(Doubleday, $39.95) by Leon Uria
(text) and Jill Uris (photos) is a
marvelous coffee table book that
offers a great deal more than
furniture decoration. The author
of Exodus has produced a re-
markable history of the ancient
city of peace, as seen through the
eyes of a proud Jew who is not
afraid to fault the Gentile world
for the wrongs it has inflicted on
Jews through the ages. His wife's
photographs are stunning.
William Frankel, for many
years the editor of the London
Jewish Chronicle, has in Israel
Observed (Thomas & Hudson,
$14.95) turned out a clear, il-
luminating work that details the
democratic structure of the Jew-
ish State, elucidating all of the
government's structures, and
presenting sharply the myriad of
social, political and economic
problems that face Israel today
and tomorrow.
Although this reviewer cannot
think of any one novel with an Is-
raeli background that has the im-
pact Exodus did in its day, two
books that the reader will find
both entertaining and illuminat-
ing are Cynthia Freeman's No
Time for Tears (Arbor House,
$13.95) and Michael Barak's
DoubleCroM (N.A.L. Books,
$12.95). The former centers on
the historic Nili spy operation of
World War I, while the latter is a
fast-moving thriller involving a
plot to assassinate the pope dur-
ing a visit to the Old City in
Jerusalem.
David C. Gross, associate
editor of The Jewish Week
(N.Y.), is the author of the re-
cently published The Jewish
People's Almanac.
mm Satter
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i-


Pae6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
F"dy.August20 ]t
Stevie, 6, Needs Firmer Hand, Parents Find Out
The Ks called Jewish Famih
Service- They have four children,
a daughter age 9. and three boy?
ages 8, 6. 4 Their 6-year-old soc
Stevie is a behavior problem at
home and at school. It was
decided to handle this as a famih
problem and the K s were re-
quested to bring all the children
to our first interview.
During the first interview it
became apparent the Ks are con-
cerned, responsive parents. The
children were verbal and relaxed.
Although both Mr. and Mrs. K
tried to protect Stevie's feelings
and tried not to designate him as
the problem, everyone ended up
expressing annoyance at some of
his behavior He teases and
starts fights
Mr. K uses humor and makes
many joking comments. It be-
came apparent that Stevie was
also trying to be humorous and
emulate his father but his efforts
created more problems for him.
At the end of the first inter-
view. I felt Stevie would feel he
bad been picked on and sure
enough the next week he was out
m the hall and not wanting to
come in. I convinced him to talk
to me alone and he sat there like a
regular client and gave me the
lowdonw on how life was for him
in his family who teased
whom, what changes he would
with Stevie. the older daughter
was able to relinquish some of the Mto$?2*&*$* ]
parenting habits ^ *'
she had devel
oped. She also became much less
annoyed with her parents for per-
.-nitting her brother to get away
with stuff
Ths older boy responded to
hearing his brother express
feeling badly because he didn't
Stevie shaped up. "il wSt^l
for them to play with each ojjf
The school and familv both-i
pressed satisfaction with the1\
gress made and Stevie no f
felt the only hope was
him to military school.
'tosnJ
like and how he created lots of the
problems
We also discussed naps and his
wanting to stay up late what
he really wanted was some time
alone with mommy and daddy.
Younger brother got home early
and older sister and brother
stayed up later.
The next week. I gave each of
the other children 15 minutes
alone with me. This time 1 taped
'hit conversations as I regretted
not taping my previous weeks
conversation with Stevie and the
family. When I came out to bring
.n the entire family. Stevie was
Again in the hall obviously angry
with me.
I again convinced him to come
in and tell me how I might have
offended him This time he sat on
the chair and for about a minute
x>nsidered how to express him-
jelf
Our Family Urges You To Exercise Your Right To Vote.
BERKOWITZ
Broward County Court Judge
Group 12
Finally, he said. "When I came
here last week you didn't tape me
and today you taped Janie. Billy
and Bobby. I don't want to come
in here and waste my words.
Luckily I had complete notes
from our previous conversation
so Stevie was reassured he would
not be wasting his words or time.
As we progressed k became
apparent this really is a well-
functioning family. The parents,
in trying to be responsive to
Stevie's feelings, were permitting
him to get too out of bounds and
he did better with quick setting
of limits. The other children
responded well to their relaxed
discussion with children parent-
ing style, but Stevie needed a
firmer hand.
The parents took a Parent-Ef-
fectiveness-Training class offered
by Jewish Family Service and the
Jewish Community Center to
*arn ways of helping all the chil-
vn express their feelings and
cam to solve their own problems.
As they stepped in more
quickly and established limits
If you have a new address or
an planning to move, please let
us know. Also, if you know sod, I
folks who are not now receiving |
The Jewish Floridian and would
like to, also let us know. Every L
issue of the Jewish Federation of |
South Broward s newspaper
contains news you won't want JI
miss. Simply call 921 -8810.
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DYER
VOTED QUALIFIED
BY BROWARD
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Here is how the local newspapers evaluate Rep. Dyer
Dyer was what one colleague called a hidden
Hero He is quiet and hard-workingadmirable
charactenstics in a legislature fiHed with flashy
poWcans who say a lot and do little
Miami HeraldJune 23,1960
Slate Representative District 98Democrat
Hollywood/Hallandale
(Non-Partieen)


[riday. August 20, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page7-B
Silent No Mote
Soviet Jewry Update
Ida Nudel, the only Jewish
loman to serve a term in Siberia
a -prisoner of conscience," has
Isappeared.
] Nudel, 54, has spent the last 11
gars trying to get out of the
Wiet Union to join her sister in
trael. For her efforts, she was
Enlenced to four years of intern-
I exile, living part of the time in
(rracks that housed hardened
Je criminals.
In March she was released but
Lid she would never be allowed
V leave Russia. Her last contact
fith the West was July 13, when
L spoke with her sister, and
1 off in despair.'
[ she was being made a home-
i person.
DR. LERNER
The patriarch of Soviet refuse-
niks Jews who have been re-
fused permission to emigrate
is Aleksandr Y. Lerner.
A distinguished scientist, the
69-year-old Dr. Lerner has been
trying to leave for Israel since
1971. Like others who apply for
exit visas, he lost his job as a
mathmatics professor at once.
He has been harassed by the
police; his wife died a year ago,
and the authorities would not let
her body be taken to Israel.
By now one might expect
Lerner to be an embittered figure,
bowed by his treatment. To the
contrary, he is a man of extraord-
inary serenity.
Iducators' Institute On Tuesday
I More than 300 synagogue and
school nursery and kinder-
lven teachers from South Flor-
i will participate in an All-Day
ofessional Growth Institute
onsored by the Jewish Council
Early Childhood Educators
bd the Central Agency for
Cwish Education Tuesday, Aug.
|, at Temple Beth Shalom, Hol-
wood.
Arlene Greenberg, JCECE
president, noted, "The institu^
provides our teachers with a host
of new ideas, techniques, ap-
proaches and strategies to en-
hance their instructional skills.
In addition, the entire day
strengthens the bonds of colle-
giality between the teachers from
Miami all the way to West Palm
Beach."
Dr. Lerner expressed confi-
dence that he would eventually
get to Israel. He would find it a
wonderful country. I said.
"Well," he replied, "if it's not all
that I think, I'll try to improve
it."
"I believe these 11 years have
been the happiest of my life," he
said.
"Before, I was unable to be an
honest person. I was obliged to
work for people I didn't respect. I
was unable to express my own
views. Since then I've been able
to be myself.
"Before, I was practically in-
different to my country. I felt
that people here didn't regard me
as a compatriot, and I wasn't a
citizen of Israel. They made me a
citizen in 1972 I have the
paper. Now I feel of some use to
my country. I help on the immi-
gration question. I've learned
1,000 words of Hebrew.
"The third reason I am happy
is that I did what I was obliged to
do for my children. Maybe that's
enough? I have many more rea-
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sons!
Lehman:
[The Most Asked Questions
Slate Representative, Dr. David J.
chmjn. a Democrat who has
represented South Broward for the
past eight years, is in the midst of his
le-election campaign. Dr. Lehman
lias already seen thousands of peo-
ple in his district this year, and he ex-
pects to see thousands more before
[he primary election, September 7th.
Nevertheless, Dr. Lehman realizes he
pull not he able to see and talk to all
the approximately 81,200 resi-
dents ol his district.
Dr. Lehman feels strongly that an
nformed voter is vital to the success
government at all levels. Here,
|hen, are the questions most asked
Dr. Lehman on the campaign
trail. along with his replies:
With the new single member
wstrkts, I 'm not sure if I live in your
wisirici any more.
\. This has caused a lot of confusion for everyone. Any day now, you should
k receiving a new voter registration card that indicates your new precinct
Dumber and voting place; and your congressional and legislative districts,
lo help you further, a map of my district (District 98) is shown below:
(-'
County Line
2- Because of the redistricting, both you and another incumbent are in the
ne race. Why do you feel you are more qualified?
. Well, there is no doubt we both have a lot of experience. However, when
fai look at the demographic makeup of the new district, you'll find that
[he average age of our residents is among the highest in the entire state.
*mong senior citizens, concerns about health care and protection against
rime are usually their two greatest concerns. What could be of greater benefit
|o them than to be represented by a legislator who has made the areas of
ftalth care mrr criminal justice his primary areas of expertise for the past
pight years.
Your opponent has raised substantially more campaign funds than you,
* a gmtt deal comkig from special interest groups. How do you counteract that?
I've got a secret weapon that money can't buy ... my wife, Pat. She's
lone door to door with me all over the district. 1 don't know where she
ls the energy. All I know is, she believes I can serve the people of the
Pistrict better than anyone else. Her faith in me inspires me to campaign
|hat much harder.
f- Lehman, very few medical doctors serve In public office. Yet, you 've
n*d the people for four terms. What motivated you to become so Involved?
K Medicine and politics are probably the two most demanding professions.
it hlpeoplc don,t Perceive ,hem b*in* mil*r- Bu,wnen vou tnink about
11 both share a common goal ... helping people.
L*.*.
Stress can squeeze years
off your life if you don t know
how to handle it.
_____|
Hifl
i ini ifOMn_ '
^ <+2
' '&'". !?:!-,i5y, 'rw
I ...SiSSS,,?;i.;|


The problem with stress is not how to get rid of it. It's a part of
life. And it's not even all bad. The real problem with stress is how to
recognize it and control it. So it doesn't control you.
Your body reacts to stressful situations with its nerves, glands and
hormones. And because these systems function throughout the body,
what affects them can affect other parts of your body that may be
vulnerable at the time.
That's why stress is a factor in many people's heart attacks,
hypertension, ulcers, asthma, possibly even cancers, and probably
many other ailments. That's also why, in these times of many stresses,
it's a major factor in increasingly costly health care.
You can recognize stress by heeding the warnings of your body
and emotions. Frustration. Anger. Hostilities that build up. Heavy
pressures of responsibility time demands and conflict. Headaches,
insomnia, muscle tension.
The key to handling stress is learning. Learning to air your
feelings in constructive ways, to train your body to relax, to repair a
lifestyle before you're faced with expensive medical repairs. You have
to learn what your stresses are and the best ways for,you to deal
with them.
But they must be dealt with.
Because the longer you remain in the
grip of stress, the more crushingand
costly its effects.
1
BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA
J
I
For a trot) booklet tboul strea and preventive health are. write
Liberty Nation*!. Communication Department. P.O. Bom 2612. Birmingham Alabama 35202
NAME-
ADDRESS-
CITY-
STATE-
ZIP.-


Page8-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August
20.
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That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
ULTRA LIGHTS
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