The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00294

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
^Jewish Florid fan
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 12 Number 6
Two Sections
Hollywood, Florida Friday, March 19,1982
FmtShochi
Price 35 Cents
Record Attendance
Expected At
Emerald Bills Dinner
Record attendance is expected
at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Emerald Hills
Dinner, set for Monday, Mar. 22
at the Emerald Hills Country
Club, according to Abe Meister,
Dinner chairman.
Special guest speaker will be
Yigael Yadin, former Israeli
Deputy Prime Minster.
Meister and Nelson Dembs,
Emerald Hills chairman, attri-
bute the success of this year's
event to the hard work and dedi-
cation of the Campaign Cabinet
including Jerry Feiler, Malcolm
Feldman, Jeff Fellan, Eli Field.
\rnold Goldstein, Sol Kurtz,
Henry Morgan, Charles Moses,
\1ort Orenstein, David Peskin,
Nathan Rakita, Sam Sabin,
Leonard Schiff, Leo Sklar and
Harry Swartzman.
"We are expecting a superior
campaign in Emerald Hills. The
West Germany to Decide Whether it
Should Modify its Arms Sales Policy
Abe Meister
cabinet has pulled together to
make our efforts on behalf of the
1982 campaign a tremendous
success," Meister and Dembs
added.
Paul Sigel serves as Grandview
chairman.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Ex-
perts of the ruling Social
Democratic Party (SPD)
and its junior coalition
partner, the Free Demo-
crats, will hold a special
meeting to decide whether
to support any deviation
from West Germany's long-
standing policy of not sell-
ing weapons to countries in
"areas of tension."
The government, and Chancel-
lor Helmut Schmidt, have been
pressing in recent months for a
relaxation of that rule in the case
of Saudi Arabia. While members
of both coalition parties concede
that the government alone is in
charge of arms exports, they
demand a voice in the special
consultative body on the subject.
THE DEBATE has been
prompted by the pending arms
deal with the Saudis who are in-
terested in buying the recently
updated model of Germany's
I other weapons systems. The
Saudi government has been
negotiating for the past two
years with arms manufacturers in
West Germany. Agreements
have been reached with two pro-
ducers involving the Leopard
tanks. All that is required to con-
summate a deal is political ap-
proval.
Schmidt is said to be cam-
paigning within his own party for
a modification of the arms sales
rules. But with the coalition in
trouble on both domestic and for-
eign policy fronts, he is not likely
to provoke a quarrel with oppon-
ents of arms sales to the Saudis.
Meanwhile. Hans-Juergen
Wischnewski, one of the archi-
tect's of Bonn's pro-Arab
policies, has accused Premier
Menachem Begin of disturbing
efforts to improve West German-
Israeli relations. Wischnewski,
an aide to the Chancellor, was
referring to Begin s attack on
Schmidt la9t week for having
allegedly told a Paris periodical
that he would not visit Israel un-
k-ss Begin apologized for his per-
sonal attack last June.
Association of Florida
Federations F*romises
Super Weekend
Family Mission Parlor Meeting Planned
\ Family Mission Parlor
Meeting, to be held at the home
ol Joan and Jerry Raticoff, has
been planned for Wednesday,
Mar. 24 at 7:30 p.m.
The meeting will answer ques-
I ions about the upcoming Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Family Mission to Israel,
scheduled for July 11-21.
This mission will be an unique
opportunity to experience Israel
with your entire family. High-
lights will. .include climbing
Masada. visiting military instaF
lations. meeting with Israeli
families in their homes, swim-
ming in the Dead Sea and much
more.
A tentative itinerary and costs
will be discussed at the meeting.
A visual presentation will be
shown. Refreshments will also be
For further information, con-
tact Rae Bein at the Federation.
The leadership of Florida Jew-
ish communities are urged to at-
tend the Association of Florida
Federations Conference in Or-
lando on Apr. 2 4.
The conference will have Rabbi
"Yitz Greenberg" as scholar-in-
residence. an entire afternoon of
^.omi'.^.r_I^iY'^iPJ3.P.r4lgJi^mjruni{
shops on community centers,
Jewish education, singles, the
elderly, government affairs and
endowment fund development, as
well as a superb U.IA session on
developing new gifts.
Congressman Claude Pepper,
Council of Jewish Federations
President Martin Citrin, Consul
General of Israel from the State
of Florida Joel Arnon, Tom Dine
of AIP AC and many more will be
'" For ^rnore lniormauon on
registration, contact Rae Bein at
the Federation office.
Mideast Urged to Maintain Fragile Cease-Fire
Philip Habib, President Ronald Reagan's special en-
voy to the Middle East, who managed to achieve cessa-
tion of hostilities in the Middle East last July, has been
urging Israel, Syria, Jordan, and the forces in Lebanon,
including the PLO, to keep the peace.
The Administration is fearful that some provocation
might spark a renewal of the war in Southern Lebanon.
Secretary of State Alexander Haig warned the Israelis
that they faced an arms cutoff, further condemnation in
the UN, and even commercial sanctions if the Israeli
forces invade Southern Lebanon to strike at the PLO
liased there.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin is reported to have
exploded at Habib with the remark: "Instead of warn-
ing the Arabs, you warn us. Your constant warnings to
Israel have created a 'war atmosphere' in this area."
Meanwhile Israel was having its difficulties with
squatters in the Sinai area scheduled to be returned to
Egypt by April 26 as the Army continued to move in
to evict them.
Begin has promised to live up to the Camp David
treaty commitments with regard to the remainder of
the Sinai. The Army has moved in on several small
settlements. It is hoped that a compromise can be
reached to get the settlers in Yamit, the largest Sinai
settlement, to move to new settlements in the Negev in
Israel.
The three-day state visit by President Francois Mit-
terand of France and the goodwill developing from it,
gave hope to Israelis that the relations between Israel
and other Western Europe governments might be im-
proved.
In Egypt meanwhile, despite a letter from Begin to
President Hosni Mubarak and a long talk between Dan
Pattir, Begin's former press spokesman, and Mubarak,
there's no indication whether Mubarak will visit Jeru-
salem or whether Israel will withdraw its invitation to
him to visit Israel.
Robert Segal
Tax Exemption for the Bigoted
It was shortly before
Martin Luther King's date
of birth, Jan. 15, that the
Reagan Administration
was putting out word that
it was going, in effect, to
sabotage that part of the
1964 Civil Rights Act that
forbids federal financial as-
sistance for any racially
discriminatory program.
Specifically, Mr. Reagan had
decided to grant tax-exempt
status to schools and colleges
that discriminate against blacks.
This astounding action, invali-
dating policies instituted by
Richard Nixon 11 years ago and
subscribed to by Gerald Ford and
Jimmy Carter, runs counter to
rulings by the Supreme Court
and every federal appeals court
that has considered the tax
exempt issue.
LEADING THE fight to
regain tax exemption is Bob
Jones, Jr., president of the Bob
Jones University in Greenville,
S.C. Sen. Strom Thurmond is a
trustee of the religious institution
which granted Ireland's fiery
Protestant leader. Rev. Ian Pais-
ley, an honorary degree in 1965.
Mr. Paisley, seemingly oblivious
to some teachings of his great
faith, called the Pope "old red
socks" and refers to Prime Min-
ister Thatcher as "that perfidious
woman of 10 Downing Street."
Pause for a moment to absorb
a few pertinent quotations:
Bob Jones Jr. (1972): "The
question is not whether we are
discriminatory We are, and we
have never tried to hide the fact."
President Reagan (1982): "1
deny that any racism is in-
volved" (in the matter of grant-
ing tax exemption to educational
units that discriminate). Again:
"It is the bureaucrats we are
after, not the blacks."
Martin Luther King (1968):
"We will not hate vou, and yet we
cannot obey your evil laws. Do to
us what you will, and we will
wear you down by our capacity to
suffer: and in earning our free-
dom, we will so appeal to your
hearts and consciences that we
will win you in the process."
NOW IN backing Bob Jones
University, the National Associ-
ation of Evangelicals said it did
so because it saw in the denial of
tax exemption an ominous threat
to religious freedom. John Baker,
counsel for the Baptist Joint
Committee on Public Affairs,
held that once the IRS is allowed
to force you to choose between
your tax exemption and your
theology, the IRS would have the
power to destroy many churches.
Again, Mr. Baker acknowledged
that there will be racist scoun-
drels who cloak their actions in
religion, but "we are going to
have to allow some of that to take
place."
Indeed! Suppose tomorrow,
the Ku Klux Klan, the leaders of
which boast loudly of their devo-
tion to God and the highest prin-
ciples of religion, decide to con-
stitute that movement as a
church. Shall the KKK Church of
the Burning Cross go tax
Continued on Page 4
B'not Shalom Luncheon Raises $293,T14. .See Page 7-A


"Ke 14-A
The Jewish #7/_--i.-
Page2-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. March 19,19^
New Israel Ambassador to U.S. To Be Welcomed At
International Israel Bond Dinner On March 29
The New Israel Ambassador to
the United States. Moshe Arens.
w-ill be welcomed by leaders of
North American communities at
a gala dinner launching the 1982
Israel Bond campaign on Mon-
day evening. Mar 29. in Miami
Reach, it was announced by Sam
Roth berg Gereral Chairman of
Israel Bonds
The dinner, which will mark
Ambassador Arens' first major
public appearance in this coun-
try, will be under the auspices of
the Bond Organization's Prime
Minister's Club and Ambassa-
dor's Society of Trustees
Norman Braman. prominent
South Florida Jewish communal
and business leader, is chairman
of the Florida committee for the
dinner
Prior to the dinner. Rabbi
Kronish of Miami. National
Campaign chairman of Israel
Bond*, wil host a reception for
Bond leaders who will be coming
to the international event from
Ambassador Arens
Jewish communities in the
I'nited States and Canada
In his announcement. Roth-
berg said that the gala event, to
The Metropolitan Division raised S100.000 at their recent phon-a-thon.
Metropolitan Division
Phon-A-Thnn
Th. Metropolitan Division of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward recently held a phon-a-
thon on behalf of the 1982 United
Jewish \ppeal-Federation Cam-
paign
Cn-Chairmen Ted Newman and
Norman Morrison report that
*10n.OO0 was raised during this
Raises $100,000
week long effort
Participating in the phon-a-
thon wa Paul Rodensky. M.D..
chairman of the Physicians'
Division, who announced that the
vent reached several new physi-
cians and added 25 new gifts to
the Federation's annual cam-
paign
Share a Seder
Project Organized
Samuel Mehne. D.M.D.. chair-
man of the Chaplaincy Commit
tee of the Jewish Federation o.
^v his committee, together with the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Broward arid the Jewish
i Family Service of Broward
wCounty, is organizing a Share
3 Your Seder project. The aim of
3 this new venture, according to
l)r Meline. is to bring families
who are making Seders together
with individuals or couples who
do not have a Seder to attend. We
will also attempt to bring smaller
z families together so that they can
w enjii) their eders in a more
3 meaningful setting
According to Dr.
Share Your Seder'
Meline. the
participant*
will be matched by the mem-
bers of the new Hospitality com-
mittee composed of the Chap-
laincy Committee. Jewish Com-
munity Centers of South
Broward and Jewish Family-
Service. The committee includes
Marilyn Kaplan. Lillian Mandel.
Victoria Eichler. MS W and
Dina Gross The guests at the
Seders will be chosen by referrals
from rabbis, synagogues and the
local Federation agencies. He
added that families who will be
celebrating Passover with Seders
and those who wish to join these
families are asked to call the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward
and submit their names, ad-
dresses and telephone numbers to
Rabbi Harold Richter or Racquel
King.
Women's American
ORT Medicare
Supplemental
Insurance Program
IS A WINNER
includes Private
Du Can: 45ft-1557
in Hallandale
Please Sand Me Information
Nama____________________
Addraas__________________
Cty----------------------state___
Zip-
to
Womens American ORT District VI
Members Insurance Program
2101 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallandale. Fla. 33009
be held in the Konover Hotel."
will focus North American
JewTy s attention on Israel's
economy and help strengthen it
for the manv challenges which lie
ahead in 1982 "
He added: "We are proud to
welcome Moshe Arens to our
shores As chairman of the For
eign Affairs and Defense Com
mittee of the Knesset, he has
played a very significant role in
Israeli affairs We are confident
that in his new post, he will bring
to the American people a deep
understanding of Israel's efforts
to achieve peace with its Arab
neighbors."
The Prime Minister's Club is
an international honor society of
purchasers of $25,000 or more in
Israel Bonds The Trustees
society consists of subscribers of
s 10.000 or more in Israel Bonds
Vens lived and was educated
m the I'nited States for several
years before settling in Israel in
u- He served in the United
States \rmy from 1944 to 1946
One of Israel's leading aero-
nautical engineers, he partici-
pated in the design of the Kfir
airplane
The Israel Bond Organization,
a principal source of development
capital for Israel, has provided
over 15 5 billion since its incep-
tion fofc every aspect of Israel's
economy In 1981 it produced
- I 9 million in cash for Israel s
Development Budget, the largest
amount in Israel Bond history
with the exception of 1973. the
year of the Yom Kippur War
For information, contact the
Hollvwood Israel Bonds Office
Familial Dysautonomia
dysautonomia-
By EDWARD
SALTZMAN. M.D.
One of the diseases exclu-
sivelv affecting Jewish chil-
dren is Familial
Dvsautonomia (also called
the Riley-Day Syndrome
after the doctors that identi-
fied it I This disease is the
second most common Jewish
genetic disease after Tay-
Sachs Disease.
Dysautonomia is a reces-
sive genetic disease present
from birth I Recessive means
that both parents carry the
gene despite the fact that
they are perfectly normal).
This disease may occur in
more than one child in the
family, and the risk of hav-
ing another child with the
same problem is 25 percent
with each pregnancy. All
cases have been in Jewish
families of Eastern European
lashkenaziml and boys and
girls are affected in equal
numbers.
Unfortunately at this time
there is no means of detect-
ing who is carrying a gene for
Dysautonomia in the general
population until an affected
child is born It is also not
possible to determine if a
child is affected prior to
birth Thus, one of the main
research goals now must be
in the development of a test
for the prenatal diagnosis
and carrier state identifica-
tion
Familial Dysautonomia is
a disorder of the nervous
system. specifically the
autonomic nervous system
which controls involuntary
body processes such as heart
rate, digestive system and
reflexes, intense body tern
only YOU
can ensure
their
tomorrow
perature. sweating, etc. The
symptoms of dysautonomia
include lack of tears, inabil-
ity to feel pain, repeated
corneal ulcerations. impaired
swallowing, uncontrollable
vomiting attacks, repeated
attacks of pneumonia,
skeletal defects such as scol-
iomv speech and motor diffi-
culties, stunted height, ina-
bility to distinguish between
hoi and cold and absense of
taste buds.
Children who are affected
by the disease have normal
intelligence, and despite the
handicaps associated with
t he nervous system disorders
described above, are able to
survive into adulthood with
expert care.
The next column will deal
with a disease description
and avenues of research.
The most respected name
in Jewish funeral service.
In the world
Not surprising.irs River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden. Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack. V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zwe genthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Golland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Soma Gale
Bernard Eilen
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
Ira Goldberg, Manager
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton
Road (19th St.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250
Normandy Drive/ 531-1151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W. 17th St.
(Douglas Rd.)/443-2221
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480
N.E. 19th Ave./ 947-8691
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 Hollywood
Blvd. '920-1010
FT.LAUDERDALE(Tamarac):
6701 West Commercial
Blvd. (E. of University Rd.)/
587-8400
WEST PALM BEACH: 4714
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676
Five chapels serving the New
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RIVERSIDE
"wi* "c Funarai 0**cnr*
Tradition. It's what makes us Jews.
Sooosor.nf th* Guardian Plan
Pre-ArranajKj Funeral.
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PUin-


Friday, March 19,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3-A
I IRA Investors Can Help Build Israel
Investors in directed Individual
Retirement Account (IRA's) can
direct their trustees to buy cer-
tain Israel Securities for these ac-
counts, according to Joe Ray-
mond, chairman of the South
Rroward Israel Bond campaign.
Securities in which IRA funds
can be invested include 4 per cent
Sixth Development Issue State
March 22-23
Women's
Division
Phon-A-Thon
The Women's Division of the
.Jewish Federation of South
Rroward will hold a phon-a-thon
on Monday, Mar. 22 and Tues-
day. Mar. 23 at the Federation
office, according to Bea
Mngilowitz, chairwoman.
The phon-a-thon will be held
from 911 a.m. and 7 9 p.m.
on both days and is for the pur-
pose of cleaning up all gifts out-
standing from the 1982 United
.Jewish Appeal-Federation Cam-
paign.
Mrs. Mogilowitz served as
Women's Division representative
for Super Sunday.
Upcoming
Hallandale
Events
Three important events are
taking place on Mar. 21 on behalf
of the 1982 UJA Federation
campaign.
The Avant Garde building is
holding a complimentary brunch
at 10 a.m. Jerry Oleekel, an ex-
pert on Middle East and foreign
Jewry, will speak.
Israel Amitai will be the guest
speaker at the Presidential build-
ing's breakfast at 10:30 a.m.
Amitai has been a leader in the
field of communications in Israel
since the birth of the state.
Plaza Towers is holding their
breakfast at 10:30 a.m. Audrey
Meline, a prominent member of
the South Rroward community
will be the guest speaker. Arline
Kasakove and Louise and Joseph
Rrerhner will be honored.
For further information on any
of these events, contact the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward.
RELGO.INC-
Religious &-vGift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
OpitSumfy
1570WMhi.,ton Avmoc M.B.
8-M121-
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
(CERTIFIED MOHEL-
Yoot Baby Deserves
The Beat!!
RABBIYSELMAR
StaffMohal
MtSfasi Hospital
_wjiTrmvf] oojatPMoe. j
of Israel Bonds or Coupon Bonds
($250 or $500 minimum purchase,
respectively), 5.5 per cent Fifth
Development Investment Issue
Coupon Bonds ($2,500 minimum
purchase), 7.5 percent Industrial
Development Bank of Israel
Limited (IDHI) Preference DD
Shares ($1,000 minimum pur-
chase) and Variable Rate Issue
Bonds ($25,000 minimum pur
husband and wife, if both are em-
ployed or otherwise eligible, may
each set up a plan and can contri-
bute $2,000 each or a total of
$4,000 to an IRA. An employed
person with an unemployed
spouse can contribute up to
$2,250 annually, if they file a
joint return."
"The money an individual con-
kuiius i4>.-i,uuu minimum pur- .,------".., ... wmH tun-
chase) for employee benefit plans ^"butes each year to an IRA is
only. deductible from gross income for
income tax purposes. It is taken
For details on investing IRA
monies in Israel securities, in-
vestors or trustees are urged to
contact the local Israel Rond of-
fice. If an individual's IRA does
not allow for the purchase of
these securities, the Bond office
can furnish information about
transferring into an account that
does.
"Now that employees and selt-
employed persons can set up In-
dividual Retirement Accounts,
even if they are already covered
by another employee benefit
plan, we want to remind all IRA
investors that they can use their
savings to help build Israel,"
Raymond said.
"Under the revised tax laws,
all employees and self-employed
persons can contribute up to
$2,000 annually to an IRA. A
off the top," Raymond con-
tinued. "In addition, earnings on
the principal balance are not sub-
ject to tax and may continue to
grow on a tax-free basis until re-
tirement. No taxes are due until
monies are withdrawn from the
IRA."
The Israel Bond Organization
is a major source of development
capital for Israel, having pro-
vided over $5.5 billion since its
inception to help build every
aspect of the nation's economy.
Israel Bond proceeds, channeled
through Israel's Development
Budget, help to finance industrial
and agricultural projects, the
construction of highways and
harbors, the expansion of com-
munication and transportation,
the building of new towns and the
development of new sources of
energy.
Passover Mission participants attend Ulpan classes.
Departs March 31
Final Preparation Underway
For Passover Mission
Passover Mission participants
are completing their final
preparations for their upcoming
departure to Israel on Wednes-
day. Mar. 31.
Due to a change by El Al Air-
lines in their flight schedule, mis-
sion participants are advised to
arrive at Delta Airlines at the Ft.
I.auderdale International airport
no later than 8:30 a.m. on
Wednesday, Mar 31.
The final Ulpan class will be
held on Monday. Mar 29. Follow-
ing the class, at 4 p.m., a final
meeting will be held. At this
time, hats, jackets and shoulder
bags will be distributed. A copy
of the day to day itinerary will
also be available. All mission
participants must attend this
final meeting.
If there are questions, please
contact Rae Bein at the Federa-
tion.
Menorah Chapels,
Broward County's oldest, largest, most reliable
Jewish-owned chapels,
cordially invite you to a
FORMAL DEDICATION & RECEPTION
THURSDAY, APRIL 1ST 2 P.M.
at their chapel on North Miami Beach
Dade County's newest, largest and most beautiful.
between Hallandale Beach Boulevard and
Ives Dairy Road, Menorah Chapels will serve our
Jewish friends in Dade as well as
South Broward County with its
easily accessible location.
Please join us for refreshments, a tour of the chapel
and receive a free gift with our compliments.
Menorah Chapels. Eight years of serving individuals,
families and the community by maintaining the
traditions of our faith. Now serving both Dade and
South Broward with the same sensitive,
responsive concern.
CljapdS
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
20955 Biscayne Boulevard. 945-3939
FORT LAUDERDALE (SUNRISE)
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard. 742-6000
DEERFIELD BEACH
2305 West Hillsboro Boulevard. 427-4700
MARGATE
U.S. 441 at Park Drive. 427-4700
In Palm Beach County, call 833-0887
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and all South Florida cemeteries.
NEW YORK: Kirschenbaum Bros., Inc.
CHICAGO: Piser Menorah Chapels
Weinstein & Sons The Original
MASSACHUSETTS: Stanetsky Memorial Chapels
Schlossberg-GoldmarvSolomon Memorial Chapels


The Jewish FlnmiJ;
1
u
Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19, 1982
"Jewish Floridian
Leo Mind I'm
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* *rd SHocn*
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HOCLYWOOO^OUT LAOOCRDALE OFFICE. Am S*mg. 2900 Bkjg MOO E M.u.mMi. cf
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Philip A Lvm M 0., Nat Sadtey. Sacratary Jo Ano (Utt Traatufar Thaooofa fcwmai
Eiacutiva Diractoi. Sunw 0 Kayo Submit malarial oc publication to Elaina Paaaaotl. P*iic
natations Oiractot. or laalia Slla*. Aaaociata Public Raiatana 0'acto
MIWBll JTA Sara" Arts. VVNS NEA. AJPA. and FPA
Jaiiari Floridian doaa not guaiantaa Kaahrutn ol Mafchandiaa Advaniaad
SUBSCMPTION RATES Local Araa S3 SO Annual (2 '* Minimum ST), or o mamba "aoaralion ol South Broward. 27lt Hoiirwood Bi.d Hollywood. Fia 13020 Phona 2t rut ol Town Upon Raauast______________________________________^____
24 ADAR5742
Number 6
Friday. March 19, 1982
Volume 12
He Went to Jerusalem
One final accolade: In going to Israel, President
Mitterrand went to Jerusalem, the capital city of,
that nation. He made no fuss about it as others have
done from Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak on
down. That show of good faith is something Israel
will not easily forget.
None of this tempered Mitterrand's statement
about his firm belief that Israel must come to recog-
nize the need to accept a Palestinian state on the
West Bank and in Gaza.
On the other hand, it performed the important
service of separating Palestinian identity from the
person of Yasir Arafat. And suggested that Palestin-
ian doesn't necessarily mean the PLO.
Whether or not we agree with him is beside the
point. Mitterrand's trip was an act of courage and
friendship. As such, it must be treated with care.
Russian Mind-Control
We are heartened by Carl Alpert's report that
the Russians are preparing to take over the world by
mind-control and other trickeries in the grab-bag of
parapsychology.
Have we made a mistake? No. We are heartened
because it suggests that people have minds in the
rWVoTffraryVwe'come'up'on the happy side."
Do people have minds when there is so much
bigotry among them? Do they have minds when they
are prone to such high levels of violence? Do they
have minds when they hail charlatans with hosan-
nahs? When they crown mediocrity with encomiums?
Our problem is to figure out what the Russians
arc going to do with these minds once they attempt
mastery over them by mind-control. The Russian as-
sumption must be that mankind, controlled, will be a
perfect zombie, performing as commanded.
But what if Moscow is wrong? Frankenstein's
monster ran amok. If things are bad enough now, be-
fore their parapsychologists get to work, how will
they be if the Muscovites fail?
Tax Exemption
Continued from Page 1
exempt?
Or consider the new pro-
nouncement of Rev. Greg Dixon,
national secretary of Moral
Majority. He says that Bishop
James Armstrong of the United
Methodist Church now heads an
organization (the National Coun-
cil of Churches) "the goals of
which parallel those of the Com-
munist Party."
Nor is there any question in
Preacher Dixon s mind that
"Communists are in many pul-
pits of the old-line denomination*
in America," and these are
church leaders determined to
subject the entire world to
slavery and tyranny. Tax exemp-
tion for such as these? Would this
be permitted by Sen. Jeremiah
1 irnion of Alabama, chairman of
the Senate Subcommittee On
Security and Terrorism?
AND WOULD one of Amer
tea's best-known religious sects
want now to Jose its tax-exempt
status by renewing its practice of
polygamy which Congress out-
lawed in 1862?
Pithily and graciously, the
Rev. Charles Whelan, a Fordham
law professor, has urged the in-
jection of reason along with
morality into the issue of tax de-
ductions as related to religious
institutions: "Christ came to
save us," he has said, "not to
exempt us."
Mr. Reagan, who has asserted
he opposes discrimination with
every fibre of his being, holds
that the IRS, by denying tax
exemption to Bob Jones Univer-
sity, has been guilty of making a
social law without authority to do
so. He's dead wrong. Congress
made the law now in dispute; and
the courts have upheld it. But in-
asmuch as the entire matter is
due to bubble up in Congnsv
again, we may be witness to an
exercise not only of banality but
of cynicism.
Hypocrisy in Likely Places
WHAT IS whiskey if not for
drinking? Some drinkers have
fun. Others get serious about
their drinking, and it tends to be-
come a problem for them. For
still others, a growing de-
pendency becomes an illness,
which gives rise to despair.
None of this is meant to be
taken as a message in the cause
of sobriety. Nor is it a warning
that alcohol can harm, even kill
you. as well as others.
MORE IMPORTANT, alcohol
is a reflection on one of our major
national hypocrisies, running
perhaps at an even pace only with
sex. We know that by volume it
does more harm than good. We
know that the statistics on de-
pendency and outright addiction
are incomplete at best, yet they
are devastating enough.
Still, we wrap alcohol in an
aura of sexual excitement, thus
removing the competition be-
tween the two for primacy, and
cast them in the role of symbiotic
relationship instead. We glomor-
ize the drink, the drinker, the
drinking hour. We ignore the
paradox that alcohol equals anes-
thesia that sex, or indeed any
exalted sentiment, without feel-
ing is a wild improbability and
not worth experiencing.
All of our heroes and heroines
drink. Their trysts are alcoholic.
Their fulfillments are a fountain
of bubbles and laughter fired by
alcoholic fumes. They never over-
drink pathologically. They never
kill themselves or anyone else.
Except when they do. Then, it
liecomes "news."
COMES NOW F. Lee Hailey,
the hotshot defense lawyer and a
model for sometime in the com-
hasn't seen Hailey enthroned in
the swwt recesses of a deep
leather chair, a crystal goblet of
vodka in his hand, a bottle of
Smirnoff on a table at his side?
After all. if Bailey drinks Sniir
noff, it hus to be good, even
moral, for Bailey in the ad vows
that "The Truth is, I would speak
for the quality of Smirnoff any-
time." And then, the clincher in
legal ethics: "Everyone admitted
to the bar at my house always
gets Smirnoff. And no one ever
raises an objection."
Then how can anybody else,
which is to say anybody who is
really anybody?
COMES NOW, as I say, F. Lee
Bailey who, along with American
Lumpenkultur hero Johnny Car-
son, was just recently arrested
for drunk-driving. This is no
mean charge. It is news without a
doubt. Worse, it means that
Smirnoff can be lethal.
And so, quite naturally, the
Smirnoff outfit no longer wants
Bailey 8 endorsement of their
product. Exuent Bailey, the
leather chair, the crystal goblet of
vodka in his hand and on the
table at his side. Exuent the bar
at his house and everyone ad-
mitted to it by his invitation.
Exuent omnes, including the de-
licious additions to the Bailey
bank account. One poet put it
popularly when he noted,
"Exuent the whole shebang."
What did Smirnoff want us to
think, that their vodka can't
intoxicate? Or that, well maybe it
can, but most people who drink
Smirnoff are too tasteful, too
moral, too respectable to let that
happen to them?
OR IS IT that the Smirnoff-
drinker is more discreet in his
drunkenness and doesn't get
caught? And that Bailey, no
k>nger discreet, and now exposed,
must be dumped ?
The hypocrisy is clear But it is
not hypocrisy that is being
dumped. It is Bailey as fallen idol
who is being dumped for some fu
ture god to take his place on the
Smirnoff throne who will be im-
mune to the backlash of alcohol.
The hypocrisy is merely com-
pounded by a nation too in-
temperate to care.
ONE MUST be frank to say
that even the temperate have
problems with hypocrisy. The
nation's media, as an example,
are one giant Smirnoff ad. Each
newspaper, each TV news "ana-
lyst." each network presses its
intoxicated and intoxicating
cause, sure and certain of its high
moral purpose, sleazy in its
boik'r-room methods to broadcast
them.
Whether it is the compulsive
madness seizing them to latinize
a vast area of the nation or to
litanize over coming Armag-
gedons in Central America, the
media slug us 24 hours a day with
the urgency of their pontifica-
tions.
One such papal nuncio so to
speak takes his nunc dimittis
when he rests on Sundays. Then
it is that a piece of his appears
periodically on English as a lan-
guage, the art of its use, the sad-
ness of its murder and demise in
the hands of mindless marauding
millions whose illiteracy has be-
come monumental, whose con-
cern for English as a language
has as much relevance to them as
the gutteral groans of Cromag-
non man did.
WHEN HE is not busy lec-
turing us on the virtues of
conservatism and the vigorous
life, James J. Kilpatrick talks of
such sweet things as he did last
Sunday when he mourned "the
ancient art of editorial writing.
which h'ad seemed to be mori-
bund just a few years ago ."
Kilpatrick, who delights in
quoting from Thomas Babington
Macaulay, reported with con-
siderable glee that after all
editorial writing is not dead. It
"is in fact alive and well."
I have considerable regard for
anyone who has ever even heard
of Thomas Babington Macaulay,
let alone anyone who takes
delight in quoting from him. I am
not dissuaded from this regard
by Kilpatrick s slavish adoration
of the New Federalism, whose
obituary someday I am sure he
will write with literary finesse.
BUT I MUST inform Kil-
patrick that he is wrong. Editori-
al-writing never did die. It has
simply moved to the front pages
of. the newspapers where edi-
torials have no right to be. If this
is news to Kilpatrick, of which
front pages these days are
seemingly divested, he might
take a gander at some of the front
pages of the newspaper that
carried his column here last
Sunday.
I have in mind the almost-daily
"reports" from Jerusalem by one
Danny (Joodgame, whoever he
may be. Whoever he is, one thing
is sure: he is a hatchetman for
whom the State of Israel can do
nothing good. Not ever. He is the
latest in a distinguished line of
such hatchetmen. Which suits
the editorial policy of the front
pages on which his "reports" ap-
pear just fine.
Talk about hypocrisy.
South Broward Reps Support An
~~~ Increase Of One Cent In
Florida Sales Tax
Two of our local state repre-
sentatives came out in strong
support for an increase in the
Florida Sales and Use Tax. If this
increase is not approved, over
S280 million could be cut from
human services programs (based
on Reaganomics and the Florida
fiscal budget).
Following are excerpts from
letters that Rep. Harold Dyer
and Rep. David Lehman sent to
Federation president. Dr. Bob
Pit tell.
"Thank you for your recent
letter supporting an increase of
one cent in the Florida Sales and
Use Tax.
I am aware of the need for
additional revenue income for the
State and Local Government. In
this light. I filed HB &19 calling
for a one cent increase in Sales
Tax.
You can assure the Jewish
Federation that I will work for an
increase in the Sales Tax."
Rep. HAROLD DYER
"Thank you for your recent
letter supporting an increase in
the state sales tax of one percent.
I wholeheartedly support the
House's proposal to increase the
sales tax."
Rep. DAVID LEHMAN


Friday, March 19.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page5-A
'4
*-
Perceiving Time Relation
By ELAINE PASEKOFF PINES
. "One of the things I cannot grasp .
unm u, me trungs i cannot grasp ,, 'time relation At an
hour when Jews were being done to death nt Tm/i/;i. "*""" /* "
camp, the overwhelming plurality ofZTarTbi^stwa^T'T^
Polish farms, five thousand mile's a'way in ^7VoriZ7r7leTpZZ
wit mo or ummiina about ,k" J__?-- ""
eating or worrying about the dentist
simultaneous experience are so different
The two orders of
rogation that the Palestine
Liberation Organization provided
the Red Brigade with arms and
explosives while officially con-
demning that Italian terrorist
organization and disclaiming any
their coexistence is blmiUam^rZ: ^ PU"le Ver tim-^m ^phj^sChoicl ^"^" w.th it
by William Styro
An incident involving the
Metropolitan Museum of Art in
New York recently clearly
demonstrates how wide-reaching
t he effects of terrorism really are.
The incident came to a head in
early March when the Museum
reconsidered its decision to cancel
an exhibit of Israeli archeological
material. Museum officials now
state that the museum will go
ahead and mount the show. How-
ever, the show will be planned by
the Smithsonian Institution
Traveling Exhibit Service rather
than the one the museum was to
have mounted originally.
The museum's reversal fol-
lowed an exchange of letters be-
tween Mayor Edward Koch and
Douglas Dillon, chairman of the
museum's board of directors.
Koch charged that the museum
had "surrendered" the political
freedom "conferred on the arts
and cultural institutions" and
had "subordinated curatorial
considerations to political hallu-
cinations and speculative fears of
reprisals by terrorists."
Koch was referring to the
museum's announcement that it
was cancelling the exhibit be-
cause some of the artifacts came
from the West Bank, which the
museum described as "disputed
territory," and that showing the
artifacts would involve "security
risks from radical elements."
Spokesmen for major Jewish
organizations denounced the
museum's decision as capitula-
tion to fear and pressure.
Dillon, in his response to Koch
said. "The Met is and remains'
firmly committed to the fun-
damental doctrine that curatorial
and cultural decisions must not
be politicized." He added that the
museum would now work "with
our colleagues in Israel" and with
the Smithsonian Institution to
move quickly towards a solution.
But Shmuel Moyal, spokesman |
for the Israel Consulate in New
York. said. "To the best of my
knowledge and recollection, the I
representatives of the Metro-
politan Museum of Art have not'
made any contact with the repre-
sentatives of Israel since last
July. 1981."
Metropolitan president
William Macomber said that if
the Smithsonian show, due in
1984. does not materialize, the
Met will stage its original show
as planned. The show includes
artifacts from the earliest times
to the Crusades.
Red Brigade Defector Says
PLO Provided his
Group with Arms
Antonio Savata, a Red Brigade
defector, has stated under inter-
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
THE FULL LINES OF
EMPIRE
Kosher
Poultry
& Foods
ARE PROUDLY DISTRIBUTED B('
MENDELSON, INC.
Miami Beach (305) 672-5800
TROPIC ICE COMPANY
Hialeah (305)624-5750
According to Savasta. the Red
Brigade's military chief. Mario
Moretti. arrested in Milan last
year, reached an accord with the
PLO whereby the weapons
smuggled into Italy would be
split between Palestinians there
and Red Brigade cells.
Savasta said he helped Moretti
unload arms smuggled into Italy
from Lebanon in 1979 and 1980
aboard a private yacht, the
Papago. owned by Dr. Massimo
(ihidoni. a psychiatrist in
\ncona.
Although other captured Red
Brigade terrorists. such as
Pntrizio Peci. have implicated the
PLO in the past, the widely held
H'lief here has been that it was
lot the PLO but certain "ex-
reraiftt" groups, mainly the
Popular Front for the Liberation
>f Palestine, which supplied the
Red Brigade with arms. The PLO
propagated that notion and
fervidly denied involvement with
terrorists active in "friendly"
F.uropean countries.
According to Savasta. Red
Brigade members were angered
by the PLO's disavowals but
Moretti kept them in line in order
lo continue the flow of arms from
(he PLO. Savasta also said that
cooperation between the Red
Brigade and the PLO was limited
to "military" matters because
t he Red Brigade refused to accept
the PLO's position on Israel in its
entirety.
Argentine Government
Condemns Desecration of
Jewish Cemetery
the United States, Eateban
Takacs. conveyed to the World
Jewish Congress the official con-
demnation of his government of
the desecration of the Jewish
cemetery at Mardel Plata,
Argentina's main seaside resort.
The main cemetery of the Jew-
ish community of Mar del Plata,
situated some 250 miles south of
Buenos Aires, was vandalized on
the evening of Feb. 25. Reported-
ly, the incident involved the
daubing of swastikas in addition
to three headstones that were
overturned.
ELIJAITS CUP
It was always the fanciest one on the Passover
table Remember?
You used to watch with delight as Grandpa
filled it with Manischewitz wine-for it was your hon-
or (of all the grandchildren1) lo run to the door
and open it fa Elijah.
Now, even though you practice all the same
familiar Seder rituals you did as a child-the Four
Questions, chanting the plagues. Dayenu. eat-
ing the bitter herbs and hard boiled egg. seeking
and finding the Aphikoman, singing Chad Gadya
-the ritual of Elijahs cup is the one you particu-
larly enioy. tii _
Only now. you're the one who fills the cup I he
same fancy cup. The same Manischewitz wine
And it's your grandchild who opens the door for
Elijah
Manischewitz wishes you
a Zissen and Kosher Pesach
Manischewitz Wines are produced and bottled
under strict Rabbinical supervision by Rabbi
Dr Joseph I Singer and Rabbi Solomon B Shapiro
Manischewitz Israeli Wines are
bottled under the strict supervision of the
Chief Rabbinate of Petah-Tiqva. Israel
A complete assortment ot Traditional.
Cream Cordial and Cocktail type wines.
as well as Israeli wines
MANISCHEWITZ WINE CO.. NEW YORK, NY 11232
Shown at the Woman of the Year Luncheon. American Friends of the
Hebrew University. Women's Division, at the Doral Hotel, recently,
pictured at right. Dr. Bernard Cherrick. senior vice president of the
Hebrew University, expressing gratitude to benefactor. Bernice Engel
of Hallandale. and Haverhill. Mass. A hand-drawn scroll was pre-
sented to Bernice Engel for her generous gift to the scholarship fund in
memory of her late husband, Arthur, and late daughter Rosalie June.
Otto Stieber. chairman of the State of Florida brought greetings to the
honoree. Rose Pascoe, Woman of the Year. Seated next to Stieber is
Belle Lehrman.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOTMEALISEASlYAS
ABC's &123's
from
ChefBoy-ar-
ABC's&123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee*
"2^^-5 are tasty
C \"nV-S pasta alphabet
WJJ^ letters and
v/v^ numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!

Not since Noah's time has
something so tiny made N so big.
Its Tetley's tiny little tea leaves They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years Tetley knows that |ust as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true for
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea. Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier1
TETLEY
1 BAGS
K Certified Kosher
TONV HANDAli
TETLEY. TEA t.n .. <-*
.


The Jewish FlnwtM
Page 6-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19,1982
Residents of Park Place gathered recently at an event held on be-
half of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1982 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation Campaign. Seated from left are Miriam Cogan,
Helen Krasnow and Dorothy Jarow. Standing from left are Ted
Hodes. Harold Nestler and Harold Cluck.
Art and Culture
Center Events
MARCH EVENTS
March 21, Sunday at 1:30
p.m.: Guided tours of the exhibi-
tions. 2:30 p.m.: Sunday After-
noon Concert Series: Solos and
Ensembles from the South Brow-
ard High School Band. Mr. Ed
Parsons. Director.
March 23. Tuesday at 2 p.m.:
Tuesday Afternoon Movie:
Traditions of European Paint-
ing" early Renaissance to 20th
century, and Drawings of
l^eonardo Da Vinci."
March 24. Wedensday at 10
a.m.: Docent Meeting: Lecture
on the Fort Lauderdale Museum
of Art Collection.
March 25. Thursday at 7:30
p.m.: Drama Workshop with
Jerry Trichter.
March 28. Sunday at 1:30
p.m.: Guided tours of the ex-
hibitions. 2:30 p.m.: Sunday Af-
ternoon Concert Series: Benefit
concert by Ernest W. Webster,
concert accordion.
March 30. Tuesday 2 p.m.:
Tuesday Afternoon Movie: "For-
eign I/egion." 1950, Bud Abbott,
Iaiu Costello; an American
comedy classic.
March 31 Wednesday 10 a.m.:
Docent Meeting: Lecture by
Frank Monaco, artist.
f
;
American Red Magen David for Israel was presented a
proclamation by Mayor Arthur Rosenberg marking national ARMDI
membership month. Receiving the proclamation were "^bers of the
Hashomer and Galilee Chapters who are m the HoHywood Beach and
Hallandale areas. Pictured from left are Bill Broder, president
Hashomer; Jack Kuscher, president, Galilee; Mayor Rosenberg and
Bob Schwartz, director.
1
M0LLIE GOODMAN
ACADEMIC HIGH SCHOOL
IN ISRAEL j
FOR AMERICAN STUDENTS
(10th, 11th, 12th grades)
On the Z0A Ktar Silver campus Full academic program in
English credits transferable lo US high schools, enrich
ment in Hebraic studies, field trips, agricultural experience
Supervised Dy the Israel Ministry ot Education with the coop-
eration ol the WZ0 SchoUrships ivatUbta.
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA
Dtpi ot High School Education in HnN
Jacob & Libby Goodman ZOA Houm
4East34thSt NtwYork.NY 10016 (2121481-1500
/ ,
Pi
a

From left are Dorothy Jarow, B. Z. Sobel. guest speaker; Miriam
Cogan and Helen Muser.
Seated from left are Hilda Gary and Olga Gorman. Standing from left
are Louis Fine, Irwin Blumberg and Irving Pross.
Tan raasons why you should stay at our Brooklyn hotal.
1. You'll UN 40%-50% on
your hotal bill.
2. You'U avoid Manhattan',
nolsa, traffic and expanse.
3 You'll ba noar Brooklyn
ralstlvas and occasions
4. You'll banoar entertain-
mant, shopptncj, alojfitaaa
log and raotaurants.
5. You'll ba only 30 subway
minute* from Manhattan.
JUl
Call or write for our brochure
6. You'll love batng In this
cnarmmcj annronmani.
7. You'll (ova our luxurious
accommodaMona.
8. You'll (ova our sumptu-
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10. You can do your own
cooking, bacauaa aach
studio and suits has Its
own kitchenette.
1206-48th Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11219
(212) 871-8100
J Pilots When the subiect is
- pilots Israel is all aces
Because our flight training
is unmatched anywhere
m the world So that
when you fly EL AL
you really relax
After all. you
are in the
hands of
a he-
ro
Food
All fresh
AHOglatt Ko-
sher planned
by master Euro-
pean chefs Likelox
n bagels for breakfast
duck a I orange for dinner
and delightful snacks in be-
tween You re in for a real treat
Service
We have
the lowest
scheduled fares
and the best on-
time departure rec-
ord m the world One
daily called ours the best
service on any of the
naior international earners
3 Route When ELAL takes
. you to Israel that is where
you go Non-stop or direct
every time No wasteful
layovers in Brussels
No baggage to re-
check m Rome
No changing
to smaller
planes m
Amster-
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5.
6 Baggage Care ELAL has
the lowest baggage loss
rate in the airline industry
And you can enioy early
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downtown Tel Aviv
Jerusalem and
Haifa on the
evening be-
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depar-
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Jets
Big 747s
m beautiful
blue and white
on every single
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Complete with stereo
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movies and every amenity
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Six points that make EL AL
The Chosen Airline
Experienced travelers choose EL AL because we run an
outstanding airline But EL AL is more than a great way to
travel EL AL is ft* litetme ot the Jewish People, the carrier
ot Israel From Mezuzahs on our doors to spotless galleys
which have never seen a non-kosher morsel. EL AL is the
standarcHiearer of Zion throughout the tree world
Even our history rs unique It was EL AL that brought
home the first President ot Israel m 1948 It was EL AL that
ferried thousands of refugees during emergency airlifts m
the 50 s It was EL AL and only EL AL, that kept supplies
coming during the Six Day and Yom Krjpur Wars
EL AL is the onry airline which grves you the leeling ot
being m Israel from the momerfl you step on board
The Chosen Airline'.
Sc
Pt
I'r
!
V
_


Friday, March 19, 1982
The Jewish Ploridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7-A

r
B'not Shalom
Raises $293,414
Esther Gordon, Women's
Division B'not Shalom chair-
woman, reports that $293,414
was raised at the B'not Shalom
Luncheon held recently on behalf
of the Jewish Federation of South
Rroward's 1982 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation Campaign.
This figure represents a 48 per-
cent increase card for card over
last year's gifts.
Mrs. Gordon attributes much
of the success of the event to the
five category chairwomen: Carol
Morgenstein, Shomrai; Helen
Cohan. Shoshana; Beverly
Shapiro, Chai; Joan Raticoff.
Meirah: and Gloria Hess, Yonah.
Guest speaker for the event
was Jackie Irvine, chairwoman
of the American Jewish Congress
National Governing Council.
Nancy Brizel. vice president,
campaign, complimented the
group "on the phenomenal job so
far in the 1982 campaign.
"Our accomplishments could
not have been made without your
help. Thank you for your sup-
port, for without joining forces
wp would have no strength," she
added.
\4
From left are Esther Gordon, chairwoman; Jackie Levine,
.nuest speaker; and Nancy Brizel, vice president, cam-
paign.
Seated from left are Helen Cohan, Shoshana chairwoman;
Beverly Shapiro, Chai chairwoman; and Jacki Reichbaum,
Upgrade chairwoman. Standing from left are Carol Mor-
genstein, Shomrai chairwoman; Joan Raticoff, Meirah
chairwoman and Nancy Brizel, vice president, campaign.
From left are Florence Roth, Merle Schneider, Susen
Grossman, Beverly Shapiro and Janie Herman.
Seated from left are Marge Salt/man, Gert Entin, Marilyn
Ponn and Sally Winograd. Standing from left are Pearl
Press, I*e Schatzberg, Raye WoUman and Ella Kahn.
Seated from left are Betty Karmiel, Theresa Cohen. Ida
Freedman and Ella Upsher. Standing from left are Gerry
Morrison, Helen Rittenberg, Estelle Glattman, Suzanne
Gunzburger and Helen Cohan.
Seated from left are Mary /.inn. Rose Greenberg, Irma
Oeutsch and Sadie Berger. Standing from left are Jessica
Feibusch, Arrangements committee; Reva Harris, Susen
Grossman, Arrangements committee; and Sylvia Kalin,
Arrangements committee.
Eg?..ttJS *ft *** ** "** N"<* Tobin- From left are Jo Ann Katz, Vivien Goldstein. Susan [ Mi "* Ruth G"'vin' N"talie HeJden ",d B-rb
Muriel Pickard and Leon a Bra user
Singer and Rhona Miller.
Miller.
!
From left are Sarah Sherry, Betty Homans and Rhea
Krieger.
From left are Audrey Meline, Fannie Schifrin and Evelyn
Stieber.
From left are Jeanette Sussman, Matilda Kimelblot and
l mm left are Valerie Sussman, Judee Barron, Eileen Robs prom left are Sylvia Sperber, Margarita Terkiel and Jo- Anne Lowe.
and Arlene Ray. sephine Budasoff.


/ ne Jewish FlariMimm
. j r
Page 8-A
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday. March 19.1982
Jewish Family Service
The Jewish Family Service is a
non-profit service organization'
that works to promote and
strengthen sound family life in
the community, and to prevent
personal and family breakdown.
Described below is a typical
problem which the Service must
deal with on a daily basis. It
addresses the problem of family
counseling.
Mr. and Mrs. Cohen are in
their mid-40's. Their first session
was conducted with their eldest
daughter Laura, who is 15,J
two other daughters are Barbara.
13. and Tina. 9. This family came
to therapy for 15 sessions. Most
of these sessions were conducted
with the entire family present.
Upon two occasions the parents
were seen alone. During one ses-
sion Laura was seen individually
and another was held with Bar-
bara being the only one present.
The presenting problem was
Laura's behavior problem. The
Cohen family had recently moved
to the Fort Lauderdale area and
Laura was upset by the transi-
tion, having left behind her
friends, school, and her familiar
environment. The family moved
into an area where the children
Laura's age were heavily in-
volved in drug taking. In order to
achieve peer acceptance Laura
quickly adopted similar behavior,
becoming involved with smoking
marijuana and the consumption
of alcohol and barbitutes, i.e.
Quaaludes. valium, librium, etc.
Her school work was neglected,
and her grades reflected this
negligence. She began stealing
money and breaking into neigh-
boring homes to get more availa-
ble cash so as to be able to pro-
cure drugs and clothing. The
family was put into a crisis situa-
tion as a result of two experi-
ences. Firstly, Laura was ar-
rested for breaking and entering
a family parly wriere she over-
dosed on 'alium and liquor and
had to b< rushed into the emer-
nCV pom of a local hospital to
have H 8tomacn pumped. It was
at tr" P'nt tnat tne family be-
.iherapy at Jewish Family
gr;,
Sf
ice.
The family dynamics were
.implex. There was much love
and devotion amongst all family
members, which was seen as a
very positive aspect. Mrs. Cohen
was somewhat manipulative,
though, claiming that Laura's
behavior was "killing" her, and
as a result of the tumultous ex-
periences she was not able to
sleep. This was hard for every-
bodv to cope with. Barbara, also
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felt xtremely sad and guilty be- i
cause being the middle child, she
was constantly being compared
to Laura, resulting in Laura ap-
pearing to be more of a problem
child. Barbara was extremely at-
tractive, doing very well in
school, and had an exemplary
record. Tina was somewhat of a
peripheral part of the family
organization at this time as she
was too young to understand the
drug-taking. Laura, on the other
hand, could find no acceptable
ways of gaining positive atten-
tion from her parents especially
when Barbara was the model
child, so she choose the negative
route as a means of getting at-
tention.
Several goals and methods
were apparent as therapy pro-
gressed. The first goal was to
eliminate Laura's drug-taking
and stealing behaviors. Two be-
havioral contracts were drawn
up. The first was for Laura: She
agreed to no stealing or further
involvement with drugs until
therapy was to be terminated.
The second was Mr. and Mrs.
Cohen: They were to consistently
punish Laura and to supervise
her at home free hours. The
Cohen's had a history of being in-
consistent in their disciplinary
actions where Laura was con-
cerned. A second goal in therapy
was to eliminate Mrs. Cohen's I
guilt invoking comments to her
children and also her constant
verbalizations of comparisons be-
tween Laura and Barbara. This
was done by giving consistent
verbal feedback to Mrs. Cohen
and pointing out the ramifica-
tions these behaviors had on the
family system. The third goal
was to allow Barbara to accept
her behaviors as worthy and sig-
nificant in order to improve her
self-concepts and to prevent anv
possible future involvement in
self-destructive behaviors which
might have occured in order for
her to be accepted by Laura and
Laura's friends. This was ac-
complished through supportive
counseling. Her family was to en-
courage her positive behaviors,
but no longer to compare her to
Laura. A fourth goal was to allow
more freedom to the children. Mr.
and Mrs. Cohen wanted complete
control over the family. When-
ever one of the children would
strive for autonomy their parents
would enforce more together time
and discussions. It became ap-
parent that the children resented
this and saw this as a means to
grill them and pry into their per-
sonal lives. This goal was
achieved by teaching communi-*-
cat ions skills to the entire family,
and by processing the effects of
Mr and Mrs. Cohen's constant
questioning. The final goal was to
find something Laura excelled at
n i hat she would be able to:
(at get positive recognition. (b|
more money to spend on herself.
Ic) improve her self-concept: and
Id) give her future goals.
This goal was obtained by first
finding an area of interest, which
for Laura was child-care, and
then by implimenting a program
where she would be carefully
supervised. This was answered
by a part-time job where she
would be taking care of young
children.
As a result of counseling all
goals were achieved. The be-
havioral problems ceased and the
Cohen family is communicating
more effectively. The living
situation is more harmonious,
due to in part that they have
moved to a new neighborhood
which is seen as a positive step.
Shaw Wants
Coverage for
Medicare
Hospice
1
WASHINGTON Expenses
for hospice treatment, an in-
creasingly recognized alternative
to full-time hospitalization for the
terminally ill. would be reim-
bursed by Medicare under
legislation co-sponsored by U.S.
Rep. Clay Shawl R-Fla.l
"This legislation will allow the
terminally ill patient to choose
hospice care as a substitute to
costly hospitalization." Shaw
said. "This won't be an add-on'
to existing coverage, but it will
provide a choice. The special care
provided in a hospice setting can
be enormously beneficial to the
dying patient and his or her
family."
Hospice care, a mode of care
that emphasizes palliative care
(medical relief of painl rather
than curative care for patients, is
designed to address the physical,
psychological. and spiritual
needs of the patient and the emo-
tional needs of the family.
"Most terminally ill person.s
would rather be cared for in their
own homes in familiar surround-
ings." according to Dr. Daniel C.
Hadlock. the medical director of
the Hollywood-based Hospice.
Inc. "Furthermore, the per- day
cost of hospitalization is esti-
mated to be ten times the cost of
hospice care."
Medicare does not presently
recognize hospice care as a
separate category of provider, al-
t hough some hospices are par-
ticipating in Medicare within
existing provider classifications,
such as "home health agency" or
"skilled nursing facility." As a
result, most terminally ill pa-
tients use the costly hospitaliza-
tion. rather than hospice treat-
ment, which is primarily home-
based.
Teachers,
Soc. Workers
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ISRAEL
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Certified teachers.
MSW's and BSW's are
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Financial assistance
available.
Interviews now being
scheduled for orienta-
tion courses to be held in
the fall in Israel. If you
think you qualify, call to-
day.
ISRAEL ALIYAH
CENTER
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fl 33 i37
(305) 573-255677
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CAFF-BARTERRASSE
-


larch 19, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9-A
South Broward High Rises Support
1982 UJA-Federation Campaign
Several South Ocean Drive and
Hallandale high rises recently
held their annual events on behalf
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward s 1982 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation Campaign.
The buildings include Golden
Surf Towers, Lake Point Tower,
Sea Edge, Quadomain. Golden
Horn. Fairways Riviera, Ocean-
view, Galahad Court, Galahad
South. Allington Towers, Golden
Bay and Hemispheres.
ri.
of
Residents of Lake Point Tower are from left Max Margol-
ii's. Mildred Friedman, Ruth and Bernard Brusin, Annette
,'0i ^ dWOT T. frm ,eIft1.STuel Lewis and Norman Morrison, guest speaker.
Alfred and Freda Rosen, honorees, Julius Coo-
ray Green.
Accepting an honoree plaque is Annette Lewis
from right). Others from left are Ruth Brusin,
Abramson and Bernard Brusin.
I second
George
-
Sea Edge are from left Herman Schulman,
Frances Schulman, Miriam Ludwig, co-chair-
1 Shapiro and Bert Shapiro, co-chairman.
Residents of Quadomain are from left Sam Koffler, co-
chairman; Nat Sedley, honoree, Dina Sedley and Sam
Staff, chairman.
Residents of Golden Horn are seated from left Sam Stein-
glass, Evelyn Saidel. Sy Kahn and Sidney Wexler. Stand-
ing from left are Michael R. Schlanger, Elmer Levenson,
Joseph Lazard and Louis Levin, chairman.

>


I

Residents of Oceanview are from left Dr. Abraham R.
Dokson, chairman; Sylvia and Morris Berger, honorees;
and Bernard Friedman.
of Fairways Riviera are from left Henry Klee,
ner, Ruth Feuerstein and Murray Feuerstein,

From left are Walter H. Mayer, Dr. Abraham R. Dokson,
chairman; Betty Fox and Bernard Friedman.
Residents of Galahad South are from left Soils Cantor and
_______ Ida Rakoff. Standing from left are Sydney Holtzman, Saul
______ I Singer, M.D., Federation Campaign Chairman; and
I of GalahadCourt are from left Allan Greene, Da- S""uel SPectOT^
nan, David and Frances Ehrlich, honorees;
timelblot. Milton Kritzer and Maurice Kimball.
Bea Singer, (left) presented Allington Towers honorees
Ruth and Morris Ritt with an honoree plaque.
Is of Golden Bay are from left Sam Stept, Henry Hemispheres residents are sealed from left Ada Engel-
est speaker: H vman Ekus and Jerome Gevirman. man, Ethel Gould and Jack Udia. Standing from left are
Morse Engelman, Molly Roth. Norman Morrison, guest
speaker; Sam Roth and Ben Klein.
Residents of Golden Horn seated from left are Phil Rubel,
Milton Natenblut, Rose Orszag and William Strumwasser.
Standing from left are Max Hurwitz. Abe Herah. Murray
Scotch and Jack Schultz.



Page10-A
The Jewish FlnWrffe- j
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19,1982

PLE BETH EL
Sundetf, Mar. 21, Sisterhood
and Brotherhood will sponsor
another Blood Bank drive from 9
a.m. to Boon when the Mt. Sinai
bloodmooile will be at Temple
Beth Et A delicious breakfast
will be served to all donors.
Sunday, Mar. 28, Sisterhood of
Temple Beth El is sponsoring a
Spaghetti and Meatballs Dinner,
6:30 p.m. in Tobin Auditorium.
Entertainment will be furnished
by the Choruspondents, a
talented group of 50 singers. Do-
nation is $7 per person. Please
call Sally Zuckerman or Renee
Tropp for reservations.
Tuesday. Mar. 30, Sisterhood
and Brandeis are sponsoring a
special presentation by Dr. Moke
Williams, Director of the
Southeast Biological Social
Institute and former Chief of
Psychiatry at Jackson Memorial
Hospital, from 1 to 3 p.m. in the
Chapel Lounge. The focus of the
programys tobuild self-confidence
and self-esteem where there is" a
need through body chemistry
studies and diet. Open to the
public.
A Model Sederim will be held
for the Religious School on Sun-
day, Apr. 4, at 9 a.m. The food-
stuffs will be prepared by the
children themselves.
Sunday evening, Apr. 4, the
Jewish National Fund, in con-
junction with Temple Beth El,
will honor Mrs. Bert Goldberg
with a Vienese Sweet-Table re-
ception in Tobin Auditorium at
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 7100 w Oak-
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
ANeu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9*08
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
ZimrTwman.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative Rabbi Paul Plotkln.
Cantor Joseph WicheiewsKi
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School. 200 NW Douglas Rd.,
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Bennet
Greenspon
TEMPLE IN THE PtNES. 9730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rab-
bi Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION. 400 S. Nob. Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheon J. Harr
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St.
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Cart Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob
Danziger
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SfNAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max!
Land man
TEMPLE BETH EL 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur,
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morion
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold.
CONG LEVI YTTZCHOK. OR
thodox. Rabbi Raphael Ten.
nenhaus. 1504 Wiley St
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson St Con-
servative. Rabbi Seymour Frtedrnan.i
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Robert Ungar.
TEMPLE SOLEL 5100 Sheridan St
Hollywood, Fla 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr.
YOUNG ISRAEL Of HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDEROALE 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Edward
7:30 p.m. for all those who wish
to join in the worthy cause of rep-
lenishing the loss of trees in
Israel from Arab missiles. Mrs.
Bert Goldberg has been a
devoted and faithful member of
Temple Beth El for years and is
an enthusiastic and dedicated
participant in numerous philan-
thropic organizations and a
staunch supporter of Israel. She
is a life member of Hadassah,
B'nai B'rith, Sisterhood. Fight
For Sight, Women's League for
Israel, the Cancer Unit of Aqua-
rius. City of Hope and Brandeis
University Women's Committee.
She is also a member of Women's
American ORT. International life
member of Hashomer Chapter-
Hollywood, and Red Mogen Da-
vid for Israel. There is no admis-
sion charge for this reception.
Wednesday. Apr. 7, Temple
Beth El will hold its annual con-
gregational Passover Seder con-
ducted by Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe,
our senior rabbi. A delicious tra-
ditional kosher Pesach dinner will
be served at 6:15 p.m. in Tobin
Auditorium. Reservation for
Temple members only should be
in the Temple office by Mar. 22.
Adults $23 Children (Under
13 years of age) $18.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
MIRAMAR
This is the last week to make
reservations for the Passover
Seder to be held at Temple Israel
on Wednesday evening, Apr.
7.Tickets are $35 for adults and
$20 for children under 12. Call
Temple Office, 961-1700 for
further information and reserva-
tions.
The Temple Israel Hour is now
available twice on Sundays. It
airs at 9 a.m. on Storer Cable TV
Channel "P" and Hollywood
Cablevision Public Access Chan-
nel as well as the Jewish National
Television Network carried by
local cable outlets as well as Ultra
Cam in Miami between 1 and 4
p.m.
There are still spaces available
to join the Temple Israel Pilgrim-
age '82 to Israel June 16 thru 30.
This deluxe tour will be led by
Rabbi Plotkin.
Shabbes Shul, a special family
oriented Sabbath Service will
take place Saturday morning,
Mar. 27 at 8:45 a.m. with Rabbi
Plotkin and Cantor Wichelewski
officiating. This service features
shortened service, much of it in
English followed by singing and
dancing and Kiddush luncheon.
Model Seders will be held Sun-
day morning for all children in
the Hyman Drooker Religious
School.
Minyan is held every morning
at 8:30a.m.
Abraham and Betty Slifka have
been named the Recipients-Elect
of the coveted Israel Bond Scroll
of Honor for their devotion to
numerous Jewish philanthropic
and service organizations. They
will receive their award at the
Clifton Condominium Night for
Israel on Tuesday, Mar. 24 in the
Recreation Hall.
r
i
i
i
^iH^
< ;iinllrliuhlinn Timr
March 196:13
March 266:16
Ba-ruch A-tah Ado-nye, Elo-haynu Melech Ha-olam.
AshtT kid shiinu B mitz vo-tav, V'tzee-va-nu
Lhad-leek Nayrshel Shabbat.
Blessed art Thou, O Lord our God, King of the Universe,
Who hus sanctified u.% with Thy commandments
And commanded us to kindle the Sabbath lights.
Jewish Community
Center News
Dance Aerobics Classes
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward invites
you to join a Dance Aerobics
Class. The class will meet every
Tuesday and Thursday for six
weeks beginning on Mar. 2 at 9
a.m. to 10 a.m. They will meet at
the Center located at 2838 Holly-
wood Boulevard. The fee is $35
for members and $42 for non-
members.
For further information con-
tact Sherri Klinghoffer at 921
6511.
Yom Haatzmaut Festival
Save the date! The Com-
munitv-wide Yom Haatzmaut
festival (Israel's 34 Anniversary)
is scheduled for Sunday, May 2
at Young Circle. The Jewish
Community Centers of South
Broward is coordinating the
festivities, under the direction of
chairman Harry Eichler.
A fun filled day of art exhibi-
tions, entertainment, children's
art show, maccabeah games and
competitions and organizational
booths is planned. If you are in-
terested in helping to plan the
day or wish to display art work or
man a booth for your organiza-
tion contact Sherri Klinghoffer at
921-6511.
Last year we attracted over
7,000 people to the Yom Haatz-
maut festival; let's make the day
even more successful this Year!
lit
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward invites all
parents to a workshop series on
'You. Your Child, and Plain Talk
About Sex." The series of four
two hour sessions will run every
Wednesday evening at 7:30 be-
ginning Mar. 10 through 31. The
fee for each individual session
will be $12 (members) or $14
(non-members) per family, which
includes educational materials'
used in the workshop. .
Sex is a touchy subject ... no
matter what the age of your
child. Since parents are the first
and most important sex edu-
cators of their children, this
workshop will offer information
and techniques to help mothers
and fathers learn to feel more
comfortable in this role.
The facilitators for this series
will be Selma Birzon, MSW,
ACSW, and Nancy Conn-Levin,
MA.
For further information call
Sherri Klinghoffer at 921-6511.
Tutors Needed
To Teach Adults
The Literacy Council of Brow-
ard County is a group of volun-
teer tutors who teach adults to
read and write on a one-to-one
basis. There are at least 25,000
adults in Broward County who
can not read or write.
The Council has two continu-
ing problems: getting illiterate
adults to know this tutoring help
is available, and getting enough
tutors to teach. Right now 40
students are waiting for tutors. If
you are interested in becoming a
tutor call 537-3394 for further in-
formation.
United Way
PARENT EFFECTIVENESS
COURSE
Family Service Agency, a
member of United Way, will offer
a Parent .Effectiveness course
which began Monday, Mar. 15, in
Hollywood. Classes will be held
weekly from 7 to 10 p.m. for five
weeks through Apr. 12.
This educational course
teaches specific practical and
every day skills for improving
family life. For further informa-
tion about fees and registration,
call 524-8286 or 523-2589.
SIS
ANNOUNCING
SHALOM
Mamonal Chapala
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
No* Central
ammii-wi
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FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily & Sunday
100 E HaiatldX, Beech Brrd
Tel 450-0900 (Broward). 040-1002 Mantar IHHinMi Chambar of Commarca. Ban*


larch 19, 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
*- ~
ilFGoodrich
SIZE
PRICE
P155/80R13 46.88 1.53
P165/80R13 48.72 1-69 P155/80B12 31.03 1-49
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P185/80R13 51.83 1.92
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P205/70R13 54.37 2.14
P205/70R14 59.21 2.23
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Most of our mechanics have been
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below with a star (*).
DISC
BRAKE
ISPECIAL
Install front wheel disc pads
Check rotors & calipers Re-
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(if needed) Adjust and bleed
brakes (if needed) Add brake
fluid (if needed) Check & Ad-
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FOR MOST (AJQC
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The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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Tnday^arch l. 1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page IB
CRCUpdate
of Remembrance of the Victims
of the Holocaust.
Elaine Pittell, chairman of the
Community Relations Committee
of the Jewish Federation of South
llmward and Carl Rosenkopf,
rhairman of the Subcommittee on
the Holocaust, have announced
that the annual commemoration
of the Holocaust will be held at
the Hallandale Jewish Center on
Wednesday. Apr. 21 at 7:30 p.m.
David Schoenbrun, noted tele-
vison commentator, author and
journalist will be the guest
speaker.
Schoenbrun coordinated the
television presentation of the
Vorld Gathering of Holocaust
Survivors held in Jerusalem in
June.
Program participants will in-
clude Mindelle Wajsman in a
dramatic presentation and
Sender Wajsman, who will render
some ghetto Yiddish songs.
Members of the South Brow-
.11H Council of Rabbis will also
participate in the program.
A special presentation will be
made to concentration camp
liberators of the area by Rev.
Paul Kirsch of the Holocaust
Memorial Center.
Survivors of the Holocuast,
children and grandchildren of the
Holocaust will participate in a
candlelighting ceremony.
The following have joined Carl
Rosenkopf in planning for the
Holocaust Memorial Observance;
Elaine Pittell, chairman of CRC,
Joyce Moss, Temple Israel, of
Miramar; Ella Jay, ReginaORT;
Charlotte Goldstein, Women's
Bnai B'rith; Lillian Roberts,
Massada Hadassah; Carl Gold-
stein, ORT: Abe Halpern, Tem-
ple Beth El; Rabbi Seymour
Friedman, Temple Sinai. The
Solel Singers of Temple Solel will
be rendering appropriate music
that evening under the director-
ship or Carol McKenzie.
Carl Rosenkopf and Rabbi
Harold Richter were part of a
committee representing Florida
Jewish Federations seeking
recognition of the Holocaust ob-
servance when Gov. Bob Graham
declared Holocaust Observance
Week Apr. 18 24. The commit-
tee met in Tallahassee on Mar.
10.
Rosenkopf and Rabbi Richter
also met with legislators to help
secure funding for social service
programs greatly needed due to
recent budget cuts.
Rosenkopf was representing
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Relations
Committee on the Holocaust.
Rabbi Richter represented the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Following is
proclamation:
a copy of the
Silent No More
Soviet Jewry Update
Emigration Slips Further
MOSCOW-Emigration con-
tinued to slip, as 283 Jews
arrived in Vienna in February.
The trickle is reflected in the 290
i'vis.is granted to Soviet Jews in
January. The monthly average of
visas granted over the past six
month now hovers near 350.
Emigration Official
Ousted From Post
MOSCOW-Soviet emigration
chief, Colonel Konstantin I.
Zotov, who headed the office of
Visas and Registration since
I''77. was relieved of his post on
charges of corruption. Commonly
known as OVIR, Zotov's organi-
zation, which is believed to be
KCiR dominated, handles visa
applications from Soviet Jews
> and others who wish to emigrate,
ribery, as a meams of securing
I visas, was among the primary
I charges,
Prisoner Update
\ medical board has decided
I that former Kiev physicist
VLADIMIR KISLIK, sentenced
I in May. 1981 to three years in a
l)or tamp alleged "malicious
hooliganism," is physically unfit
I to perform the rigorous hard
labor customarily given to pri-
soners. Kislik currently works as
|a welder at his Ukrainian camp
location.
Refusenik Update
On February 15, the KGB
rudely disrupted a Hebrew class
-onducted by MIKHAIL
VAKRASOV. in Moscow. Con-
fiscated were Hebrew teaching
materials including textbooks,
notebooks, dictionaries and re-
cords. Nakrasov was threatened
with transfer away from the city
should he continue his Hebrew
instruction.
MIKHAIL TARATUTA, the
of veteran Leningrad acti-
* ^ ABA and IDA
'MfATUTA, who was con-
"I into the Soviet military
' November 1981, was suddenly
"wferwd from his Viborg
'iion assignment near Lenin-
l" a northern location,
^'ilhails army duty will further
delay the Taratutas' emigration
to Israel.
A PROCLAMATION
"DAYS OF REMEMBRANCE"
OF THE VICTIMS OF THE
HOLOCAUST
April 18-24,1962
Whereas, less than forty years
ago, six million Jews were mur-
dered in the Nazi Holocaust as
part of a systematic program of
genocide, and millions of other
people suffered as victims of
Nazism;
Whereas the people of the
State of Florida should always
remember the atrocities com-
mitted by the Nazis so that such
horrors never be repeated;
Whereas the people of the
State of Florida should con-
tinually rededicate themselves to
the principle of equal justice for
all people;
Whereas the people of the
State of Florida should remain
eternally vigilant against all
tyranny, and recognize that
bigotry provides a breeding
ground for tyranny to flourish;
Whereas Apr. 20, 1982 has
been designated pursuant to an
Act of Congress and interna-
tionally as a Day of Remem-
brance of Victims of the Nazi
Holocaust, known as Yom
Hashoah: and
Whereas it is appropriate for
the people of the State of Florida
to join in the international com-
memoration.
Now, therefore, as the
Governor of the State of Florida,
I proclaim that, in memory of the
victims of the Holocaust, and in
the hope that we will strive al-
ways to overcome prejudice and
inhumanity through education,
vigilance and resistance the week
of Apr. 18 through Apr. 25, 1982
is herebv designated as the Days
29 Other States joined Gov.
Graham in issuing the
Proclamation.
The Thursday, Apr. 22 meet-
ing of the Inter-Faith Council will
feature guest speaker Rabbi Her-
bert Tobin. who will present a
"Prisoners of Conscience" seder
emphasizing Soviet oppression of
religious faiths.
Reaganites Remove Iraq
From List of Terrorists
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON
The Reagan Administration has
removed Iraq from the countries
it lists as a "supporter of interna-
tional terrorism" and replaced it
with Cuba. The other three coun-
tries on the list, required by the
Export Administration Act of
1979, remain the same Syria,
Libya and South Yemen.
The State Department said
that it and the Department of
Commerce, in making their
annual review of which countries
"repeatedly provide support for
international terrorism," found
that Iraq's record in 1981 "did
not warrant its continued in-
clusion on the list."
However, the Department
stressed that Iraq's removal from
the list does not mean the U.S.
plans to sell arms to that coun-
try. "We have no plans to estab-
lish a military supply relation-
ship with Iraq," the Department
said. "It has been our policy since
the beginning of the Iraq-Iran
conflict not to supply military
equipment to either side."
The Department added that it
is continuing to block the sale of
General Electric engines for
Iraq's Italian built frigates since
this could contribute to Iraq's
"war-making potential."
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Page 2-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19,19^
Organizations In The News
David Ben-Gurion Culture Club
THE WORKMEN'S
CIRCLE
The Southern Region of Work
men's Circle announces the ap
pointment of Velma K. Kellert a.
its new Regional Director. Ms
Kellert has been active in com
munity affairs since moving to
Florida almost 22 years ago.
Workmen's Circle is America's
oldest and largest liberal Jewish
cultural and fraternal organiza-
tion with 58.000 members in over
300 branches nationwide. Mem-
bership includes major benefits of
insurance, medical-dental, legal
and cemetery plans. In South
Florida alone, they have 12
branches organized from Kendal'
to Palm Beach with 4.00C
members.
Please contact Ms. Kellert at
(Broward) 9221144 or (Bade)
945-9K96 for any information
regarding membership.
HADASSAH
Sabra-Scopus Chapter
An evening too great to miss!
Sabra-Scopus Chapter of Hadas-
sah is proud to present their sec-
ond annual show "It's Your
America.'- Saturday. Apr. 17, at
Temple Beth Shalom, 46th and
Arthur. Hollywood, at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets may be purchased from
any member or by calling 96.3-
7925 or 962-7999
DELTA PHI KPSILON
TO HOLD REUNION
The Delta Kappa Chapter of
Delta Phi Epsilon ;.; the Univer
-its ol Florida i> in th( process of
reforming its \lumnae Program.
Reunion lunc-hion- will be held
during the summer in various
Florida cities
Mumnae of Delta Kappa who
have no) been contacted should
write to Lauren Barrett, Member
\t targe, in care ol Delta Phi
Rpsilon, Hi:. S'.V 9th W<
('..in.'-\ Die, Kla. 32601,
B'NAl B'RITH
WOMEN
Randee Lefkow. Fund Raising
vice president Twin Countv
Council RHW and Betty Ho-
mans, president Twin County
Council. RHW were among the
BOO delegates who attended the
B'nai B'rith Women's Conven-
tion in Washington. DC. Feb.
21-24
The new Israeli ambassador,
Moshe Arens. made his first pub-
lic address in Washington to the
convention. "What is going on in
Lebanon." he told them, "is note
struggle between left and right,
but a blatant and brutal attempt
by Syria and the PLO to take
over that country."
"That that attempt has only
succeeded to the point of 70 per
cent control of I,ebanon and not
100 percent," he said, "has only
been because of Israel's deterrent
effect on Syria and the PLO."
In the economic area, he said,
Israel is restructuring its
economy with an intensive em-
phasis on science and technology.
He pointed to the Israeli manu-
factured Westwind plane, which
today has close to 20 per cent ol
the American market for execu-
tive jets and the Israeli developed
CAT scanner produced by Els-
cint. which has 15 per cent of the
market in American hospitals as
the kind of capability Israel has
1 o offer.
Prior to the Ambassador's
visit, the convention body had
passed a resolution calling for the
Administration and Congress to
abandon the proposed sale of I-
Hawks to Jordan.
In other resolutions, BBW
leaders from communities
throughout the country took
stands on domestic issues
resolving that the government
preserve the basic freedom of in-
dividuals on issues including
prayer in the schools, abortion
and voting rights all of which
B'nai B'rith Women consider to
be matters of personal freedom
and choice, not to be governed by
restrictive legislation.
The more than 800 delegates
had the opportunity during the
convention to demonstrate their
conviction on these issues by
making a visit to Capitol Hill,
where they went by state delega-
tion for visits with their respec-
tive senators.
ARGENTINA ORT SCHOOL
CELEBRATE DEDICATION
Argentina will be the site of a
celebration on Apr. 1 when
Nathan Gould. National
Executive Vice President of
Women's American ORT, is hon-
ored by having the ORT
Technical Institute in Buenos
Aires dedicated in his name.
Some 7.300 students of a Jewish
community of 100.000 have been
studying without part of their
technical and vocational facilities
due to a terrorist bomb which
extensively destroyed the
existing premises. For more than
a quarter of a century Nathan
Could has been the Fxecutive
Director and National Vice Presi-
dent of Women's American ORT.
"To have ORT Technical Insti-
tute in Buenos Aires named in his
honor is testimonial and com-
mitment to the Argentina
program is spectacular" said Koz
Klein. President of the South
Broward Region, Women's
American ORT. The Junior
College level program housed at
the Technical Institute will be
sections on building construc-
tion, computer sciences,
humanities, Jewish education,
electronics and chemistry. It will
also have a synagogue with a
seating capacity of 500 to 600
people, available to serve both
the spiritual and social needs of
the Jewish community.
PASSOVER DINNER
A Passover dinner will be held
at the Southeast Focal Point
Center 2838 Hollywood
Roulevard on Monday Apr. 12 at
1 p.m. Donation $9 per person.
Limited reservations on a first
come basis.
Contact Rachel at 921-6518.
American Jewish
Congress
Hoolydale Chapter of the
American Jewish Congress will
feature Sophie Primak at its next
meeting, scheduled for Monday,
Mar 22 at Galahad South, 3801
south Ocean Dr. Primak will dis-
cuss "Jewish Humor" at the
noon meeting.
Dear Members and Friends:
Our special meeting will be
held Sunday evening, Mar. 28 at
7 p.m. sharp at the Hallandale
Jewish Center, 416 NE 8 Avenue,
Hallandale.
On the agenda: 1. Reading of
the Minutes 2. Committee Re-
ports 3. Report on progress for
Yom Hashoah Apr. 18 at Hallan-
dale Jewish Center. 4. Our enter-
tainment for the evening will be
the famous singing star, Lydia
King with her piano accompanist.
Refreshments will be served.
Please get your tickets at the
door. Donation for members $2;
and guests $3.
Please note this important date
for Yom Hashoah April 18.
A Memorial Service of six mil-
lion Jewish Martyrs Apr. 18 at
2 p.m.. at the Hallandale Jewish
Center. Guest speaker Dr. Carl
Klein. Cantor Jacob Danziger
and members from our Club.
CARL ROSENKOPF
President
CHAIM SWINTELSKI
Recording Secretary
PS. Please send your dues for
1982 to our Financial Secretary.
Helen Jakubowski, 1307
Buchanan Street. Hollyw3 1
Fla. 33021. Phone 921-1494.^
For New Membership apDlj,,
tions, please call David StZ
weis, phone 931-5366.
ImporUnt: Please mark your
calendar for May 9. A Gala CeU
**** Yom Haatzmaut
Independence Day for the Sun*
of Israel at the Hallandale Jewish
Center. More information will
follow.
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Friday, March 19.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page3-B
Filling in Background
Mitterrand Assures Israel of "Right to Live'
President Francois Mit-
terrand told the Knesset
that the position of France
in the Middle East is predi-
cated on Israel's funda-
mental "right to live," but
it is a right, he declared,
which cannot be denied to
the Palestinians. They can-
not be expected to give up
this right, he asserted.
Mitterrand's address to the
X Knesset, the highlight of his
three-day visit to Israel last
week, summarized both the point
of his trip here and the course his
Socialist government can be
expected to follow in the Middle
East. He came to Israel to end
the coolness, often bordering on
hostility, which had character-
ized Franco-Israeli relations
during the administrations of
Charles de Gaulle and his succes-
sors.
AT THE same time, he em-
phasized that while France does
not presume to preach to the na-
tions of the Middle East which
must work out their own solu-
tion, he believes the Palestinians
must be given a homeland.
Premier Menachem Begin
offered a lengthy, emotional
response. There is now a "basis
for hope" that under Mitterrand
the strains between France and
Israel would end. "But there are
obstacles chief among them
France's support for a Palestin-
| % mn state," Begin declared.
He followed that statement
with a bitter, scathing attack on
Mitterrand's Foreign Minister,
Claude Cheysson who accom-
panied the President in Israel, for
having said on recent visits to
Arab countries that he viewed
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation as the sole legitimate rep-
, resentative of the Palestinian
people.
THE MITTERRAND-Begin
exchange during the packed fes-
tive special session of the Knes-
set echoed the differences ex-
pressed by the two leaders in
their private conversation,
shortly after Mitterrand arrived
in Jerusalem.
Despite claims by Israeli
spokesman that Begin s presen-
tation of Israel's positions had
left the French Leader "very im-
pressed," informed French
sources insisted that Mitterrand,
in his questions and remarks
during their meeting, made clear
to Begin his own belief that the
autonomy proposal for the Pales-
tinians, advanced by Israel, was
"a non-starter" mainly because
the West Bank and Gaza popula-
tions rejected it.
But the sharp differences be-
tween Mitterrand and his host
over the Palestinian issue came
as no surprise to either leader and
were not allowed to mar the
historic significance of the oc-
casion. Mitterrand was the first
French chief of state ever to visit
Israel. Although he has been in
Israel several times in the past, it
was not in the capacity of Presi-
dent of France. He is regarded as
a strong, sincere friend of the
Jewish State.
AS HE declared in his
Knesset speech, "The time has
v 'me after a too-long absence"
for the dialogue to be resumed at
the highest levels. After a period
of "alienation," the two countries
"must start afresh," he said.
Begin concurred, asserting
that Mitterrand's visit marked
an end to the period of "unilateral
love" of France on Israel's part
which was not reciprocated by
Paris.
Mitterrand spoke to the Knes-
set in French, with simultaneous
translation into Hebrew. To
many observers, his speech re-
called the historic address of the
late Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat to the Knesset in Novem-
ber, 1977. Today, as then, there
was an outpouring of warmth for
the man coupled with deep-seated
reservations over the solutions he
proposed.
Mitterrand insisted that the
Palestinians must be entitled to
decide their own fate, provided
that they respect the rights of
others (Israel) and abandon
violence in favor of dialogue. He
said France did not intend "to
come in place of the nations in-
volved" in the conflict or to
preach or praise or condemn. But
France is certainly one of those
states which, because of her
status and historical ties to the
region and friendship with its
peoples, sought to study the core
of the dispute with a view to
being helpful in its solution, he
said.
MITTERRAND stressed his
unwavering friendship to Israel
throughout his career and his
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symnathy for its aspirations. He
obstr/ed that there was no in-
consistency in his positions. He
supported the Camp David
accords in 1977, opposed the Eu-
ropean Community's Venice
Declaration in 1980 which sought
an "impracticable" solution. In
1981, as President, he was
determined to end any French
compliance with the Arab boy-
cott of Israel. In 1982, he sup-
ports French participation in the
Sinai peacekeeping force.
His visit to Israel was another
link in the change of France's at-
titude, Mitterrand said. Noting
that he spoke "in the same lan-
guage" to all the parties, he
declared: "That is why I am pro-
posing a homeland for the West
Bank and Gaza people Be-
cause they cannot be asked to
forgo that right." He urged, in
effect, mutual recognition by
Israel and the Palestinians. He
added that it was not for him to
determine who represented the
Palestinians.
The FLO could hardly demand
a place at the negotiating table
while continuing x to oppose
Israels right to exist, he said. He
spoke against "unilateral ac-
tions" and "predetermina-
tion of borders," an appar-
ent reference to Israel's
annexation of the Golan
Heights last December. He re-
called that when Sadat came to
Jerusalem in 1977, Begin himself
had declared that everything was
negotiable.
MITTERRAND warned that if
the Palestinian problem remained
unresolved, disaster could over-
take the region because the
superpowers naturally looked
toward areas of instability and
strife for opportunities to wield
their own strength and influence
and could thus trigger a world
conflict.
With respect to Jerusalem, the
French President noted that in
Hebrew the name meant city of
peace.
His hope, he said, was that
"one day all disunited brothers
will come together in this city."
He closed his address in Hebrew,
wishing long life to Israel and all
nations of the area, and
"Shalom."
Begin opened his response
speaking in Hebrew which was
translated into French with a
lengthy discourse on the Dreyfus
affair which, he said came to be
regarded by Jews and Zionists as
an epic struggle between the
forces of good and evil in France.
Had Mitterrand been alive then,
he would surely have "marched
alongside Zola and Clemenceau"
in that fight.
He traced the ups and downs of
French-Jewish relationships,
dwelling on the "black days" of
the Vichy regime during World
War II and the prolonged freeze
that followed the Six-Day War.
Now there is "a basis for hope"
that under Mitterrand "the situ-
ation will be fundamentally
changed,'' for he was a longtime
friend, 'and he will surely strive
for a renewal of the friendship
and alliance," Begin said.
BUT THE Israeli dwelt at
length on the "obstacle"
French support for a Palestinian
state and passionately
defended Israel's offer of
autonomy to the Palestinians
which Mitterrand had character-
ized as a dead end.
"I ask, what is wrong with the
proposal for full autonomy?" Be-
gin said He enumerated the
areas of civic responsibility which
the Israeli plan would confer on
the Palestinians of the West
Bank and Gaza Strip. Under this
plan, he declared, they would en-
joy self-rule such as they never
had under Turkish, British, Jor-
danian or Egyptian governance.
He warned that a Palestinian
state posed a mortal danger "to
our existence" as it would be a
Soviet satellite with Russian
cannons and rockets in posses-
sion of the FLO. "Will France,
champion of justice, support this
proposal that threatens our eli-
mination?" Begin asked.
HE MAINTAINED that there
was neither "justice nor sym-
metry" in the idea that the Pales-
tinians should have a state be-
cause the Jews have one. There
are 21 sovereign Arab states over
12 million square kilometers. "Do
we need a 22nd that will seek to
spill our blood day and night?"
he thundered.
Begin said he was deliberately
asking rhetorical questions
which, he hoped, would "echo in
the French Parliament, in the
media, in the press and in the
Elysee Palance, residence of our
dear friend. President Francois
Mitterrand." The Premier added
that "our faith is that justice will
triumph" and the "obstacles will
be removed from the friendship
between France and Israel that is
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Also responding to Mitterrand
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leader of the opposition Labor
Alignment, a close friend of the
French President and a comrade
in the Socialist International.
Mitterrand. Peres said, was not
locked into any particular
solution for the Middle East and
knew, morover, that a one-step
solution was unrealistic.
THERE WERE differences, of
course. Peres acknowledged, over
the PLO, for example, which the
Labor leader called a disaster for
the Palestinians themselves. But
these differences need not cause
"a short-circuit in the dialogue"
with Mitterrand, a dialogue
which Israeli Socialists have par-
ticipated in for years, he said.
Peres outlined the Labor
Party's program, which includes
a desire not to rule over another
nation and not to evolve into a
binational state which annexa-
tion would lead to.
"Tell your people," Peres said
addressing Mitterrand, "that we
are by no means indifferent to the
fate of the Palestinians Hut
they. ((mi. must find an honorable
compromise ..." He urged the
Jordanian-, and the West Bank
und (iazu inhabitants to join the
peace talks, lie said Mitterrand's
visit, hopefully, would open a
"new page" in France's relation-
ship with Israel. It is no ordinary
diplomatic act but perhaps "a re-
turn to the golden days," Peres
said.
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Page4-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19,1982
London's New Hitler Play
Nazi Accusations Against the Jews Go Unanswered
By MARTIN GILBERT
London Chronicle Syndicate
As a historian, I found
this a most unsatisfactory
play. Of course its aim was
to provoke. But in doing
so, it also, in my opinion,
distorted. It had a funda-
mental flaw: Hitler's self-
defense, presented in the
second half of the play as a
series of accusations
against the Jews, went un-
answered.
The historical aspect was ir.
two parts. In the first, a Jew re-
cites some of the evils and tor-
ments of the Holocaust. In the
second, "Adolf Hitler" accuses
the Jews of racism, and launches
into a monologue against the Jew
in history. Hitler's defense of
himself does not deny the actual
events of the Holocaust. These
are, indeed, not even at issue.
Hitler's defense is to blame the
Jews for being the originators of
a series of evils, including Marx-
ism, elitism, racism and Zionism.
THE FIRST part of the play,
the Jewish recital of the Holo-
caust, contains a number of re-
marks which show how far cur-
rent fashion in misrepresenting
the Jewish response to the Holo-
caust has permeated even the
theatre. Thus it is a Jew who
says, "unless Hitler was a Jew,
how else would he know we would
walk so calm into the fire?"
Here we have the total ig-
norance of the Jewish response to
the persecutions of the way
years: flight and escape, armed
resistance in dozens of ghettos,
tens of thousands of acts of indi-
vidual resistance, courage in the
face of overwhelming odds, the
heroism of the starving and the
unarmed against the military
might of victorious armies, and
armed thugs. All this ignored,
becoming "walk so calm into the
fire."
After the play. 1 complained to
a friend in the audience that Hit-
ler's accusations went unan-
swered. He replied that the an-
swer lay in the recital, by a Jew,
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The stage adaption of George Steiner's 'The Portage
to San Cristobal of A.H.' opened at London's Mer-
maid Theatre last month. Martin Gilbert, the noted
historian, discusses its historical implications.
of holocuast atrocities sc
graphically described in the first
part of the play. These were, in
themselves, very moving, at
times sickening. But they were
totally unconnected with (and
certainly no answer to) the de-
tailed philosophical diatribe
against Jews. Judaism and Zion-
ism put in Hitler's mouth in the
second part.
EVEN ON points of detail,
there were historical errors in this
first part, such as an offhand re-
mark about Churchhill. and his
reaction to the Jewish appeals to
bomb the railways and crem-
atoria. We are told in this play:
"The Old Man didn't want to
know anything about that it
was not his sort of war." In fact,
Churchhill was deeply disturbed
by the accounts of Auschwitz,
listened to the Jewish request for
bombing, and wrote immediately
to Anthony Eden: "Get anything
out of the Air Force you can, and
invoke me if necessary."
As for Churchill's attitude to
the war being separate from the
persecution aspect, this is not
borne out by the evidence.
Speaking in the House of Com-
mons in September, 1942,
Churchill described the deporta-
tion of Jews as "the most bestial,
the most squalid" of all the Nazi
offenses, which illustrated "as
nothing else can the utter
degradation of the Nazi nature
and theme, and the degradation
of all who lend themselves to its
unnatural and perverted pas-
sions."
Hut the fundamental flaw i.,
this drama remains the Hitler
monologue with which the play
ends. This is presented as Hit-
ler's defense. Point after point is
raised by Hitler, to which no
answer or argument is even at-
tempted. This leaves Hitler not
only the last word, but in fact the
first and only word on these new
and complicated issues. The Jews
on the stage Sit around listening
to him. silent and pathetic. The
audience must also listen, but
unless you have a strong triple
training in theology, political
philosophy and recent history,
you will have no means of know-
ing whether what Hitler says is
true or false.
At several points, 1 personally
felt quite unable to test what
Hitler was saying, when he was
quoting the Bible, dashing
through passages in which the
Jews brandished the sword in an-
cient times, and themselves com-
mitted atrocities. The author
made absolutely no effort what-
soever even to suggest the sort of
answers that might be given in a
theological debate, of which this
might have been one side.
"MY RACISM," Hitler tells
the Jews on stage, "was a parody
of yours, a hungry imitation." He
gives his evidence from biblical
quotations. 1 am not a Bible
scholar or a theologian. Thus, in
common with ninety percent of
the audience or more, I could not
judge whether quotations were
accurate, in or out of context, or
misused. No counter-argument
was presented. Powerfully
selected and powerfully-pre-
sented quotations were used to
condemn the Jews for racism.
At one point. Hitler quotes
from the Bible that the Jewish
God is "a God of vengeance unto
the 30th generation." Hitler then
declares: "These are the Jews'
words, not mine." But on raising
this particular quotation with a
rabbi, he pointed out the correct
quotation, and its context. God
does indeed describe himself as a
God of vengeance, in fact unto
the 3rd or 4th generation (not the
30th), but limits his ven-
geance "to them that hate me,"
and goes on to describe himself as
"showing mercy unto a thousand
generations to them that love me
and keep my commandments."
Few in the audience could have
known the correct quotation.
Even fewer, 1 suspect, would
have had a rabbi to telephone in
the morning, or have had cause
(as I did) to write the words down
as they were spoken in the
theatre.
I ALSO doubt whether even a
dozen of the hundreds present
were aware of the long-standing
theological debate and conclu-
sions concerning the phrase,
chosen people." about which
Hitler in the play made such
devastating use, as proof of Jew-
ish exclusiveness and racism.
This phrase has long been known
to have been misused.
There is in fact no biblical term
for "the chosen people" as such.
In the Bible story, every act in-
volving divine "choice" is im-
mediately followed by some
specific obligation. One is
"chosen" in order to do some
definite act, such as keeping the
Sabbath or observing the com-
mandments, just as other biblical
nations beside the Jews are also
"chosen" for a particular act.
Thus the Philistines were
"chosen" to go out toCaphtor,
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and Aram was "chosen" to go
out of Kir.
The Jew is chosen for obliga-
tions, not for privileges, and not
for eminence. Yet Hitler, in this
play, rubs in that "chosen"
means elitism and dominance and
self-vaunting, and that the
superiority of the Nazi man was
only a derivative and a copying of
the Jew's own self-aggrandiz-
ment. This is a false interpreta-
tion, that the author of the mono-
logue may or may not be aware
of. but which the majority of the
audience had no means of know-
ing. Why did the author at least
not give some clue that the
"chosen people" accusation
might be a well-worn, and
frequently abused, myth?
THE DEVIL quoting the
scriptures is an old device.
Normally, as here, he quotes
them selectively. But while read-
ing a book, one can check quota
tions. No one, as far as I know
had a Bible in the theatre. Only a
very few in the audience, with a
real knowledge of the Bible and of
biblical interpretation, could
have caught the distortions in
Hitler's (that is the writer's)
presentation.
Some of the accusations
against the Jews were com-
plimentary. The Jew had "in-
vented conscience." Through the
Jew Jesus, he had invented
meekness. Through the Jew
Marx he had invented social e-
quality. The Jewish ideals were
man's "bad conscience," the as-
pirations he could not maintain,
the goodness which he hated to
be bound to pursue, the "bacillus
of perfection" as Hitler derisively
calls it.
These theoretical charges, bril-
liantly expressed linguistically,
are no doubt good subjects for
philosophical debate.
Although not a theologian, and
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Friday. March 19,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5-B
London's New Hitler Play
Continued from preceding page
therefore as at risk as the rest of
the audience, as a historian I
was constantly aware of a series
of totally unanswered charges,
which do not stand up to the
scrutiny of historical research.
These charges were based on an
ignorance of recent history. For
example, one blatant error: Hit-
ler, talking of Zionism, says,
Would the Jews have come to
that barren patch in the Levant"
had it not been for the Holo-
caust?"
THE ANSWER to this, not
-given to the audience, most of
4 whom were surely in complete ig-
norance of it, is that half a million
Jews had already chosen that
"barren patch" before 1939, and
that after 1945 more than three
quarters of a million Jews from
Arab Lands were also to choose
it: that the coming of the State
was part of long diplomatic and
political efforts of a powerful
Jewish community, inside Pales-
Aline itself, the Yishuv, with its
own strengths and strategies,
y quite apart from the Holocaust.
Far from creating Isreal, the
Holocaust led, in its immediate
aftermath, to the refusal of the
Mandate power to allow even
UK).000 of the survivors to enter
Palestine.
Hitler also says in this play
that it was the Holocaust "that
made you drive the Arab out of
the field because he was lice-rid-
den and without resources."
Again, this is a current cliche of
newspaper summaries and televi-
sion surveys. But it in no way
.-corresponds to the complex
truth, ignoring, for example, the
Arab's own massive immigration
and increased prosperity
throughout Palestine in the 1930s
as Jewish cultivation spread, the
role of the neighboring Arab
States in urging the Palestine
Graham Praised for Bar
jo paramilitary Camps
TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith praised Gov. Bob
Graham and the Florida state
legislature for enacting a law
designed to bar paramilitary
training camps run by the Ku
Klux Klan and other extremist
groups.
According to Arthur Teitel-
baum. ADL's Southern Area
director, the new law, signed here
last week, "will give impetus to
vigorous investigation by law en-
forcement agencies of
paramilitary activities meant to
deprive persons of their civil
,v rights."
STUDIO ;
Arabs to leave, and Jewish ef-
forts to persuade them to stay:
again a long-standing debate, nr*.
even hinted at. Many of theauci-
ence were, however, unaware of
that debate, or of the actual is-
sues involved in so crude a
simplification.
As with the "sheep to the
slaughter" charge, the audience
were given no clue as to the
superficiality of the statement. It
appeared as a perverse but bril-
liant and discomfiting truth.
Yet had someone on the stage be-
gun to answer it, its superficiality
would soon have become clear. I
took my doctrines from you,"
Hitler declares, having shown in
a distorted survey of Jewish his-
tory, how Jewish racism perme-
ates both the Bible and Zionism.
But the fact that this was a
distorted survey was in no way
made clear. Indeed, by following
current, fashionable talk and
prejudice so closely, the play
clothed it in a bogus intellcctual-
ism. The writer, Anthony
Burgess, is quoted on the pro-
gram notes as saying: "Even his
(Hitler's) condemnation of the
Hebraic gift to Western civiliza-
tion has a speck of reason in it."
ONE OF Hitler's defenses dur-
ing his monologue was par-
ticularly disturbing, because,
once more, the audience could
only have believed it to be true,
and thus been even influenced by
it. "When I turned on the Jews,"
says Hitler, "No one came to his
aid, no one." In fact thousands of
non-Jews helped Jews.
At one death camp alone,
Belzec, 1,500 Poles were executed
for helping Jews. The Bulgarian
Parliament refused to allow the
deportation of even one of the
then 48,000 Jews living in Bul-
garia. The Danish King and
Parliament warned and then fer-
ried nearly 2,000 Jews across the
sea to safety in neutral Sweden.
The Finnish Government refused
to deport more than a thousand
Jews from Helsinki to Germany.
The Archbishop of one Greek Is-
land, Zante, saved all the Jews of
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his island by giving them havens
in remote villages, and threaten-
ing to share their fate if deported.
Tens of thousands of French,
Belgian and Italian Jews were
saved by villagers and priests
who took them in.
But could the audience know
all, or even a part of this? So few
people are aware of such details.
Yet surely in a serious play, in
which so much history was
bandied about. Hitler ought to
have had his statements chal-
lenged, at least to hint at their
untruth. The author gave U3 no
such hints. Instead, there was the
constant, embarrassing feeling
that the words put into Hitler's
mouth did have some truth in
them. Thus the dramatist aimed
to shock us.
MOST OF those who left the
theatre, not being historians, will
have left with many miscon-
ceptions, and many current
cliches reinforced, whether it was
the wartime Jew who did not re-
sist, or the post-war Jew who
drove the Arabs from their lands:
all this by default ends up ap-
pearing to be a justification for
terrible crimes, whether the
author intended it or not.
A non-specialist theatre-going
audience, presented with only one
side of the case, cannot be ex-
pected to have at its fingertips
the knowledge of the historian or
the theologian or the dialectical
skills of the philosopher, who
here gets a free run for some very
perverse and unanswered
opinions. The author may well
make the assumption that the
audience is intelligent, knowlege-
able and critical, but this is a
dangerous assumption in the
modern age. Much of the success
of the real Hitler was due to the
fact that his audience was neither
knowlegeable nor critical enough
to see the distortions in his actual
monologues.
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Page6-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19,1982
Israel's Arava Blossoms in the Dust
By WENDY ELLIMAN
ARAVA CORRIDOR
ISRAEL, February 19 It ii
the kind of place where you hac
best help yourself becuase nc
help will come to you from the
land. The Arava Desert stretches
120 miles from the vast salt lake
of the Dead Sea all the way south
to the Red Sea at Eilat. It is a
barren landscape of unsettling
beauty, with Israel's Negev
Desert on one side and the
Jordanian Desert on the other.
It is a cruel land. Temperatures
soar into the hundreds through
the long summers, when the light
is glaring and the heat intense.
The rare winter rains are to be
feared more than welcomedi for
they cascade through the wadis
in flash floods, sweeping roads,
rocks and homes before them.
The rocky sandstone and lime
stone lies inert and lifeless, ex
cept when stirred by the winds
into choking clouds of dust.
Israelis call it the Arava, the
Wilderness. Yet 4,000 people live
here in 15 rural communities
established by the Jewish
Agency, mainly with funds from
annual United Jewish Appeal
campaigns. They went into the
wilderness because they chose to.
And they and the land have pros-
pered.
Out of the Arava last year
came 470 tons of dates. A quarter
of the crop exported to Europe
and South America, earning
much needed foreign currency.
From this cracked, crusty moon-
scape came thousands of bushels
full of onions, green peppers,
tomatoes and grapes to swell Is-
rael's own markets and to help
feed her people. Roses the size of
grapefruits blossomed in the
dust. And on this harsh land, 750
dairy cows produced 5,285,000
quarts of milk.
What makes such astonishing
achievements possible is a blend
of faith and modern technology,
stubbornness, hard work, the
courage to take risks, and
suprisingly an ample supply of
water. Specialists in desert re-
search estimate that there is a
sufficient supply of underground
"fossil" water to produce 25 to 30
cubic meters for 30 years to come.
"Fossil" water has a high salt
content. When the first settlers
here used it to water their crops,
Family Mission
(please detach here)
The Jewish Federation of South Rroward Is sponsormq their
Annual Family Mission to Israel
July 11 21. 1982
I/We are interested in receiving more information on this unique experience.
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salt deposits formed on the
leaves, killing the plants. Break-
throughs in desert agriculture
have, however, diminished this
problem.
Drip irrigation, an Israeli inno-
vation of the 1960s, trickles con-
trolled amounts of water directly
onto plant roots, which are more
salt-resistant than the leaves are.
To rinse out accumulated salt
deposits at root level, a procedure
has been introduced for "wash-
ing" the soil once each season. In
addition, drip irrigation permits
farmers to feed fertilizers and
fungicides to crops along with
water so that plants receive extra
nutrients and protection. These
techniques, combined with year-
round sunshine, favorable tem-
peratures, and the high degree of
radiation characteristic of this re-
gion, make two planting seasons
possible, thereby doubling pro-
duction and earnings.
While breakthroughs in
modern agriculture are helping
the Arava's 4,000 settlers suc-
ceed, recent political changes de-
mand that their numbers be
significantly increased. As a con-
sequence of the Peace Agreement
between Egypt and Israel, Is-
rael's border will recede in April,
1982. Once the Sinai Peninsula is
n-turned to Egypt, Eilat will
ngain become Israel's southern-
most city, at the tip of the Arava
corridor. Off the center of that
corridor is Beersheba. And a
short distance from the top are
Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
Clearly, when the Sinai pull-
back is completed, the Arava's 15
communities, with no more than
290 men, women and chlidren in
each, will not be enough.
Boston-born. Lesley Litman is
at 25 one of the older settlers of
Kibbutz Yahel, where she has
lived for the past four years. "I'm
certainly not lonely here," she
says. "Yahel is a very close, car-
ing and loving community. But
we do feel alone out here, and
very much thrown in on our-
selves."
What is needed, for both
security and growth, is a large in-
fusion of money and people to
expand settlements already in
existence and create new ones.
However, suit when the need to
accelerate is critical, development
is slowing down. The cause is
primarily a shortfall in funds
from U J A-community campaigns
to the Jewish Agency. The only
site scheduled for building in
1981, Shizafon, remains in the
planning stage because the cash
simply isn't available to proceed.
For lack of $600,000, nothing at
all was built in the Arava last
year.
Nonetheless, hopes are high for
the future. Near Yotvata, now
the regional center of the
southern Arava, mangoes, pome-
granates, and papayas are being
raised on an experimental su
tion. At Kibbutz Faran, another
experiment is being conducted
with melons. Here, use of irriKa
tion water from underground hot
springs has resulted in a crop rir*
for harvesting three weeks ahead
of time, giving Israel a jump on
the international market. And
most exotic of all, are probes be
ing made along the Red Sea coast
to determine possibilities for
marine agriculture, such as drill-
ing holes in rock and planting
crops in warm water pools.
But farming is not the only
business flourishing in the
Wilderness. Tourism is growing,
in a region becoming more at-
tractive to visitors from both Is-
rael and abroad. A network of
camping areas, picnic grounds,
roadside stands selling souve-
niers and local produce, eating
places is developing. Tours to
desert and Red Sea sites are ex-
panding.
Light industry is also being
woven into the primarily agricul-
tural life of the kibbutzim and
moshavim. Yotvata operates a
date storage and packing plant
which services the entire Arava
ns well as a regional dairy which
processes and markets milk and
other dairy products. Elot. the
southernmost kibbutz, manufac-
tures parts for electrical trans-
formers.
The desert, empty and dead for
so long, is springing to life. What
is most needed now is for the long
arm of American Jewry to reach
out and help.
%
"Let All Who Are Hungry Come And Eat...
And Celebrate The Passover."
The traditions of Passover are not
only ancient but beautiful. Just as im-
portant, they are as relevant today as
they were centuries ago. And inviting all
those who are hungry to come and eat
has become a hallmark of the Jewish
way of life
Preparing fine Jewish food has al-
ways been the hallmark of Manischewitz.
For almost a century, we have been
helping families honor Passover with an
array of delicious products specially pre-
pared for this festive occasion. And we
like to fed that. In some way, we add to
the Joyousness of the holiday.
Happy Passover!
J>
& Manischewilz &
QUAUTY JEWISH FOODS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision B
For Kashruth Certificate write
Board of Rabbis PO Box 214, Jersey City. N| 07303
*%


Friday, March 19,1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page7-B
4 '
LJ
- -j>.
More than 50 years ago
Maxwell House* Coffee
was invited to the Seder.
We've been invited back
every year since.


Page8-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, March 19,1982
Junket Circuit
PLO Woos Evangelicals With Free Trips to Lebanon
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A concerted effort by the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization to entice Chris-
tian clergymen in the
United States to visit
Lebanon, with all expenses
paid for by the PLO, has
sparked a bitter contro-
versy between conservative
fundamentalist Christian
leaders who are opposed to
the PLO ploy and liberal
ministers who appear to be
taking the bait.
At the same time, leaders of
major Jewish organizations have
assailed liberal ministers who
have already visited Lebanon
under the auspices of the I'LO
and have expressed concern that
such visits would tend to legi-
timize the terrorist organization
and lend credence to its anti-Is-
rael and anti-Zionist propaganda.
THE CONTROVERSY erupt-
ed last month when five Seattle
ministers went to Lebanon at the
invitation of the FLO and re-
turned with praise for the
Palestinian cause. The ministers
said they recoiled at the violence
in Lebanon, where the PLO has
bases, but were touched by what
they heard during their meeting
with PLO Chief Yasir Arafat.
The Rev. Richard Younge, of
the Campus Christian Ministry,
said upon his return from
Lebanon: "The Palestinians are
now trying to achieve by political
means what they failed to achieve
by military means. I think we
ought to encourage that."
Rev. Rodney Romney, pastor
of the First Baptist Church in
Seattle, commented that Arafat
impressed him as a "magnetic
leader with an electrifying per-
sonality" He said, I can't think
of any time I've met anyone so
completely dedicated to a cause."
He added: "I feel a strong sense
of commitment to work any way
I can for the cause of justice for
the Falestinian people."
Rev. William Cate, head of the
Church Council of Greater
Seattle, said the trip confirmed
Greek Composer Writes
Anthem for Palestinians
NEW YORK Monitoring sources of the World
Jewish Congress report that Mikis Theodorakis, com-
poser of the score for the film, "Zorba the Greek," has
written a "Palestinian national anthem" produced at the
request of PLO Chief Yasir Arafat.
The report of this development originates from a
monitored broadcast of Tunis-Afrique Presse (TAP) early
this week. According to the broadcast, Theodorakis
arrived in Beirut last week on an official visit to Lebanon,
having been invited by both the Lebanese Tourism Minis-
ter and the PLO.
Reportedly, Arafat had requested the Greek mu-
sician to produce a Palestinian national anthem during
the visit of the PLO leader in Greece at the end of last
year. The TAP report stated that Theodorakis arrived in
Beirut to present his finished work.
Arafat's visit to Greece came in the aftermath of the
Greek elections which swept Andreas Papandreou and his
party to power. Theodorakis is a member of Parliament in
the new government. He is best known as composer of the
musical scores for numerous films, including"Z."
his suspicions that the American
news media isn't telling the whole
story of the Mideast war. "We
have seen the other side of the
story." he said. "If there is going
to be a solution, this story has to
be considered." The ministers
agreed that the Palestinians need
a homeland, and that homeland
should be on the West Bank.
THESE MINISTERS and the
others who took the trip were
blasted by eight fundamentalist
Christian leaders who described
the PLO as "the world's most
ruthless terrorist band." Douglas
Shearer, a painting contractor
from Sacramento, Calif., who be-
longs to TAV Evangelical Min-
istries, a Sacramento-based pro-
Israeli Christian group, said:
"We want the Seattle area to
understand that these five Chris-
tian ministers (who went to
iA-banon) do not represent the
\ iews of Seattle area Christians."
The Rev. Owight Kinman, a
Tacomu hospital chaplain, said
Christians all over the world
should support Israel. Douglas
Krieger of TAV Kvangelical
Ministries, declared: "God's plan
is for Israel to exist as a nation."
Shearer stated that peace was not
possible in the Middle East
"until the PLO renounces the use
of terrorism and recognizes Israel
as an entity."
In support of their stand, TAV
Evangelical Ministries last
month purchased a large ad-
vertisement in The Seattle Times
with a long list of endorsers,
many of them leading evangelical
clergymen from California to
British Columbia in Canada. The
ad, which noted that the story of
the PLO-financed trip was
broken in the Seattle Post Intelli-
gencer by reporter Eric Nalder,
stated, in part:
"We Evangelical Christians do
NOT condemn the trip itself.
Certainly, the clergymen can
justifiably lay claim to a right
and perhaps even a moral obliga-
tion to independently ascertain
the veracity of the accusations.
However, we find unconscionable
the use of PLO funds ... We
deeply regret the obvious impu-
tation of Christian legitimacy to
one of the world's most ruthless
and unprincipled terrorist bands.
We protest against an almost
complete lack of discretion a
crude insensitivity which has
joined the name of the Prince of
Peace to brutality, cowardice,
and implacable cruelty."
THE PLO-sponsored trip was
also assailed by spokesmen for
Seattle area Jewish organiza-
tions. Dr. Michael Schuffler.
chairman of the Federation s
Community Relations Com-
mittee, said: "This trip by a
group of Christian clergymen is
immoral. Money for the trip
(was) provided by a bunch of,

fes*.

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The Hadttuh Zionist Youth Commission also
sponsors Hashachar Year Course In Israel-Jerusalem
Institute, and Israel Hadrache Summer Seminar.
murderers."
Dr. Arthur Abramson, director
of the Seattle chapter of the
American Jewish Committee.
mm in I "That Christian
ministers of the Gospel, com-
mitted to peace and reconcilia-
tion, could take a trip sponsored
and paid for by a group com-
mitted to the destruction of inno-
cent civilians, both Christians
and Jews, is inconceivable." He
noted that the trip "cannot avoid
helping legitimize" the PLO and
plays "into the hands of both
America's and Israels enemies."
David Stahl, director of the
Northwest Anti-Defamation
league of B'nai B'rith, said:
"It is difficult for me to compre-
hend how individuals who are
taken on a PLO financially-
sponsored trip and only offered a
select diet of interviews and ex-
periences can return with a clear
understanding of the multi-
faceted conflict" in Lebanon. He
also said he was disturbed by the
"gentle" way the ministers
described Arafat on their return.
In his pastoral letter to his
congregation, Romney de-
scribed the trip to Lebanon as a
venture "financed by the Insti-
tute for Palestinian Studies and
the Palestine Research Center in
Beirut." He did not mention the
FLO connection.
THE PALESTINE Research
' Center is a PLO-sponsored or-
ganization, headed by top PLO
leaders, according to Hisham
Sharabi, editor of the Journal
of Palestine Studies in Washing-
ton. DC. The Institute for Pales-
tinian Studies is an independent
organization financed by the Ku-
waiti government and some
wealthy Lebanese, Nalder
reported in The Seattle Post-In-
telligencer.
According to Nalder, the trip
was arranged locally "by two
U.S. citizens who were born in
the Middle East. Fawzi Khoury,
a Lebanese-born Christian who
runs the Near Eastern library at
the University of Washington,
got the ball rolling when he
suggested to a brother living in
France that a tour would be a
good idea."
The other organizer, Nalder re-
ported, was Farhat Ziadeh, a
Palestinian who was born on the
West Bank and is now chairman
of the University of Wash-
ington's Department of Near
Eastern Languages and Litera-
ture.
Khoury and Ziadeh. who are
not members of the PLO, Nalder
said, claimed they didn't know
anything about the PLO con-
nection, but Khoury said airline
tickets were provided by the
Palestine Research Center and
the Institute for Palestinian
Studies.
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March 19.1982
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9-B
r.
nee Helsinki Accords
Anti-Semitism On Increase in USSR
HELEN SILVER
IINGTON (JTA) -
litism in the Soviet
increased since the
[of the Helsinki Accords,
of decreasing as was
by the signatories,
to Max Kampelman.
of the U.S. delegation
ladrid Conference of the
[ice on Security and Co-
in Europe (CSCE).
|dor Kampelman ad
^his problem at a recent
enary session in Madrid.
ive noted on several oc-
luring the past year that
eni and mistreatment
ssion have intensified in
Union," he said.
persecution of in-
and persecution of
Many ethnic and reli-
linorities have been par-
tctims."
PELMAN said that offi-
nctioned patterns of
id religious oppression
repressive legal
i on Crimean Tatars
them from returning
listen it homeland; forced
ition of the Baltic
)iased employment prac-
lst Evangelical Chris-
and prohibition against
itions of Ukrainian cul-
jviet anti-Semitic cam-
'has become more fear-
iiring our meeting here in
Kampelman said.
I latest surge, I assert
hesitation, is an offi
inctinncd campaign,
by state-controlled
11" hi and exhibition of
anti-Semitic books, arti-
toons and exhibitions."
/ided details about a
of cases of blatant anti-
selected from hundreds
|i! examples books, car-
paintings. and the Soviet press.
nces ol anti-Semitism
in the official Soviet
.eluding derogatory refer-
ences to persons with obvious
Jewish names. There are frequent
references to Jewish ownership of
"death concerns," "growing fi-
nancial might." the "Zionist
Mafia of death," and Jewish
control of media and banks,
crime, multilateral corporations,
government, and the theater."
ARTICLES have appeared
widely which even accuse Jews of
collaborating with Hitler to
destroy the European Jewish
community, to destroy the Soviet
Union, and to strengthen a
Jewish state. The Soviet press
has also accused Jews of stimu-
lating anti-Semitism and setting
fire to synagogues in order to
settle in Israel.
In addition, anti-Jewish mate-
rial has been distributed to
recruits of the Red Army and
published in official journals of
the Soviet armed forces.
The Soviets also export anti-
Semitism to Arab, African and
other Third World countries.
Writings of outspoken Soviet
anti-Semites have been widely
U.S. Envoy
Reviews History
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) U.S.
Ambassador Samuel Lewis said
that it was tragic that two legi-
timate nationalist movements
had clashed in historic Palestine
instead of collaborating. There
was a general recognition, he
said, that two nations existed in
Mandatory Palestine between the
wars. The question still to be
decided is where the borders
between them run.
I aw is spoke at a dinner here
last week marking the 100th an-
niversary of Jewish settlement in
Palestine. He was one of 20 Am-
bassadors attending. They were
joined by the representatives of
45 friendship societies with Israel
Irom 25 countries.
distributed by the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization, distributed
in English throughout the Eng-
lish-speaking world.
"Jewish history is deleted from
Soviet elementary and secondary
schools," Kampelman stated.
"Indeed, the Russian pogroms of
the late 19th century against the
Jews are justified in a Soviet
publication as part of the class
struggle."
KAMPELMAN stressed that
"the Soviet Union with the
third largest Jewish population
in the world is the only coun-
try with a Jewish population in
which there is not a single ap-
proved Jewish school and no
means for teaching Jewish
history and tradition." In recent
weeks, over 80 teachers of He-
brew in Moscow alone were
threatened with prosecution and
banishment if they continued
teaching, he said.
"Invasion Without Arms," a
book by Vladimir Begun pub-
lished in 150.000 copies in 1977
and republished in 1979. charac-
terizes the Torah as "an unsur-
passed textbook (of) hypocrisy,
treachery, perfidy and moral deg-
eneracy all the basest human
qualities." Begun writes, "Jew-
ish and Christian hypocrites aiiKe
keep silent over this."
Another Book, "Judaism and
Zionism," by Trofim Kichko,
soon to be published, pretends to
"unmask the criminal activities
of various Zionist organizations
and Zionist-oriented Judaism." A
previous Kichko book written in
1964 was so virulently anti-
Semitic it provoked international
protests, including some from
major Western Communist
parties. The Soviets were forced
to withdraw it for "erroneous
statements."
KAMPELMAN also singled
out the "White Book." issued by
Soviet authorities in 1979,
subtitled. "Espionage and
Deception in the Name of De-
fense for Human Rights." This
I look is filled with preposterous
accusations and anti-Semitic at-
tacks on Soviet Jewish activities
and Western correspondents of
Jewish origin. "Even after this
despicable work received world-
wide condemnation," Kampel-
man said, "a second edition was
released in December, 1979."
Kampelman reported that car-
toons depicting Jews in ugly
stereotypes still appear
frequently, and cited paintings
and illustrations which depict
Jews as criminals and gangsters.
In an article by A. Filipenko
titled "Zionism and Crime," the
illustration states that although
"the myth has become estab-
lished that gangster bands con-
sist exclusively of Italians, the
facts prove that an active role is
played in the U.S. criminal
syndicates by persons of Jewish
origin."
"Traders of the Souls," a
prime-time television docu-
mentary viewed throughout the
Soviet Union, portrayed the Jew
as money-changer, "a trader of
souls."
Kampelman concluded his de-
tailed presentation by saying:
"The world, and certainly my
government, would welcome a
Soviet decision to mobilize its re-
sources and its people construc-
tively to help meet its internal
problems without the use of
diversionary hate tactics. This is
the only way we can ever hope to
achieve the spirit of understand-
.ng mandated by the Helsinki
Final Act that we all seek and
"hides us."
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S-.
PagelO-B
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, March 19, 1982
Event of Year'
But French Confused by Mitterrand's Trip to Israel
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
President Francois Mitter-
rand's trip to Israel is
France's "event of the
year.* Some claim it is the
most important develop-
ment .that has happened in
France since Charles de
Gaulle resigned as Presi-
dent in 1969 and the elec-
toral victory of the Socialist
Party last May.
No other presidential visit
abroad, no royal wedding, no
summit conference with an
American President or a top-level
meeting with France's European
partners has stirred such deep
interest and aroused such pas-
sionate emotions.
LAST WEEK, for the first
time, all French weekly papers
devoted their front pages to the
visit. The center-right L'Express
called it "35 years of passion."
The leftwing he Nouvel Observa-
teur printed its front page in
white and blue with the Hebrew
and Arabic words "Shalom" and
"Salam" and a banner headline
" Mitterrand on a Tightrope. "
The daily press, radio and tele-
vision devoted thousands of
words and hours of program time
to a review of Franco-Israeli rela-
tions from Israel's birth in 1948
to the Suez campaign in 1956 and
the subsequent souring of rela-
tions under de Gaulle and Presi-
dent Valery Giscard d'Estaing.
Un the official level, at the Ely-
see Palace and at the Quai
d'Orsay, rarely has a presidential
visit abroad been so carefully
prepared. Mitterrand personally
wrote the speech he delivered ir
the Knesset and also prepared his
responses to toasts, and to press
conference questions.
DOZENS OF officials, includ-
ing four Cabinet Ministers and
four presidential advisers, have
been briefed for hours on Franco-
Israeli history. Middle East
problems, Mitterrand's own
stand on the Arab-Israeli conflict
and the chances for peace.
The excitement over the trip,
which was basically a state visit,
and over what most French
people consider as the "big
Franco-Israeli reconciliation,"
show that the flames of the
Franco-Israel "love affair," by
now half forgotten in Israel, still
simmer in France.

They Can Buy Our
Civilian Aircraft
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTAJ The Reagan Ad-
ministration announces
that it will no longer bar
Syria and South Yemen
from buying civilian air-
craft from the U.S. even
though the two countries
are still on the list of four
nations the U.S. considers
to be supporters of interna-
tional terrorism.
However, any sale must in-
clude assurances that the planes
will not be used for military pur-
poses. State Department spokes-
man Dean Fischer said. The sale
would apply only to aircraft to be
used on "scheduled civil airlines"
in the two countries, Fischer
added. He acknowledge that the
civilian airlines in both countries
are owned by their respective
governments. At the same time,
he stressed that there are no
pending applications from either
country to purchase such planes
in the U.S.
"THIS DETERMINATION,
while it eliminates controls over
such sales based on terrorism
criteria, in no way alters existing
controls on such sales based on
(U.S.) national security criteria,"
Fischer, said, reading a prepared
statement. The State Depart-
ment, oi[ly this week, announced
that Syria and South Yemen,
along with Libya are still on the
list of countries that aid terror- %
ism. Iraq, however, was removed
from (he list and replaced by
Cuba.
The 1979 Export Administra-,
tion Act requires that the De-:
partments of Commerce and
State issue a list of countries
annually which support terrorism
and therefore cannot be sold cer-
tain material and equipment. The*
statement read by Fischer today ,
stressed that if either Syria or I
South Yemen asked to buy civil I
aircraft here, the request "would
continue to be reviewed carefully
in the light of national security ;
criteria and, if found to be con-
trary to our national security,
would be denied."
One element that would be
considered would be assurances
that thi' planes not be used for
military purposes, the statement
said. Fischer said that Syria and
South Yemen have never
diverted planes used for their
scheduled air service for military
purposes while Libya has "re-
peatedly disregarded" such as-
surances.
THE STATEMENT stressed
that the decision "does not con-
stitute either a softening of the
Administration's fight against
terrorism or a gesture toward
Syria and South Yemen. Our
concern with the support of these
two countries for international
terrorism continues unabated."
The statement added that the
decision "simply reflects" the
Administration's view that
"there is no link between interna-
tional terrorism and the sale of
civil aircraft to legitimate civil-
end users."
But the passionate interest in
Israel, and everything connected
with it, does not mean that all of
France is ardently pro-Israel.
Many French people are, but for
others Israel is a strange mixture
of love, contrition, bad conscience
and even animosity. The young
are pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian
at the same time.
FOR THE older generation,
which lived through Vichy and
often cooperated with this regime
during World War II, there is an
admiration for Israel's "Europe-
an and even Aryan" achieve-
ments. But this admiration is
tinged with a spot of anti-Semit-
ism and bad conscience, a relic of
the past.
Even within Mitterrand's
ruling Socialist Party, militants
and party leaders are torn be-
tween pro-Israel sentiments and
a sense of "justice for the Pales-
tinian people."
While international relations
are generally based on cold,
calculated pragmatic grounds,
Franco-Israeli relations are the
exception, a microcosm of human
passions and emotions. Officially,
the French stress that Mitter-
rand's trip is intended to demon-
strate his support for Israel and
to give France a more even-
handed approach in order to re-
dress the pro-Arab tilt which had
existed since the days of de
Gaulle.
Presidential aids stress
that the trip aimed at convincing
Israel that Mitterrand is "a
genuine and reliable friend."
Once this is ensured, these aides
say, France will be able to influ-
ence Israel, without provoking
any ill-founded suspicions "that
Israel's ultimate security lies in
negotiating with the PLO and
making a deal with it providing
for the creation of a Palestinian
state."
MITTERRAND "for Israel's
own sake" plans to promote, in
diplomatic terms and veiled ref-
erences, the idea of negotiations
with the Palestinians, or as the
French say in vaguer terms, "the
recognition of the other side's
rights."
Nobody in France believes that
Mitterrand will be able to con-
vince Israel of the wisdom of this
thesis and yet, most French peo-
ple, ministers, senior government
officials, and even journalists
who know Israel well and should
know better, conclude their con-
versations by stressing that "he
(Mitterrand! might succeed to
give Israel and (Premier Mena-
chem) Begin food for thought."
Mitterand needs a political
success in Israel for internal
reasons. The "paradise" pro-
mised by his party before the
election has failed to materialize.
Unemployment is on a dramatic
rise. The Franc is falling, and the
balance of payments in January
was worse than ever.
IN FOREIGN affairs, Mitter-
rand must convince the Arab
states that his support for Israel
is not contrary to their interests.
France depends more than ever
before on the Arab states for im-
ported oil and for Arab industrial
and arms contracts to maintain
employment and the stability of
the Franc.
French diplomats and Foreign
Minister Claude Cheysson have
said repeatedly during the last
few weeks, in all the Arab capi-
tals, that France's pro-Israel
policy and Mitterrand's trip can
best serve their own interests.
The gist of their message has
been that only friendly persua-
sion can convince Israel to nego-
tiate with the Arab states and the
Palestinians and no man is better
equipped than Mitterrand, who is
considered by the Israelis them-
selves as their best friend abroad.
Few of the Arabs have been
convinced. Only President Habib
Bourguiba of Tunisia and to a
lesser degree King Hassan of
Morocco have discreetly
welcomed Mitterrand's trip.
Even a partial Israeli response to
Mitterrand's overtures would
greatly enhance France's prestige
and interests in the Arab world.
But behind the hard political
realities, hopes and aspirations
there is another reality, equally
strong. The French are like the
Israelis, emotional people who
respond to symbols and words.

POSITION AVAILABLE
for
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Of the J.C.C. of South Broward
Must Have experience in:
Jewish Communal Works
Business Administration
Public Relations
Position available April 1st
Please submit curriculum vitae to:
Chairman of the Search Committee
J.C.C. of South Broward
2838 Hollywood, Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
W**tZl and
*rf*S

TroP
vca\e<*ey;,



*ftS**S.*2
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I
and***
Ships of Panamanian and Ubarian Rsgfctry


r, March 19.1982
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11-B

ael's Ariel Sharon to Address UJA National Leadership in May
EW YORK, General Ariel
on, Israel's Minister of De-
;, will address the United
sh Appeal National Leader
[Conference, May 21-23, at
Sheraton Washington Hotel
rashington, D.C., it was an
iced by National Chairman
chel Blumberg.
pneral Sharon will address
oximately 1,500 leaders of
American Jewish community
special banquet Saturday
iteration Urged
lASHlNGTON (JTA) -
louse, by a unanimous 387-0
adopted a resolution this
calling on the Soviet Union
low Jews there to emigrate
to practice their religion
I, and also called for the end
["indiscriminate arrests and
of Jewish activists" and an
the "assaults on Jewish
siiuK groups." The resolu-
urged President Reagan to
ate to the Soviet govern-
the United States* strong
Isition to the harrassment of
i in the Soviet Union.
evening. May 22, less than one
month after Israel's historic
withdrawal from the Sinai under
the terms of the Camp David Ac-
cord, Blumberg said.
The annual Conference will
launch the 1983 UJA-community
campaign to help fund the life-
sustaining and life-enhancing
humanitarian programs of the
Jewish Agency in Israel and the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee in 33 nations
worldwide, the UJA National
Chairman noted.
The event also will mark an
important transition in UJA
leadership as Blumberg, national
chairman of the organization for
the past two years, turns over
direction of the annual campaign
to Robert E. Loup of Denver,
Colo., who will be installed at a
special Shabbat service Saturday
morning.
The conference will open Fri-
day, May 21. with a review of the
human needs of the Jewish peo-
ple in Israel and around the globe
which underlie what is expected
to be a record peacetime goal for
the national campaign and a
presentation of the 1983 Cam-
Add q little natural sweetness to the
beauty of your hoildoy. Enjoy the
wholesome goodness of Sun-Maid"
Raisins, Blue Ribbon" Figs and
Sunsweef Prunes. They're the Passover
treat that no one will pass up!
DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
K CERTIFIED KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
CSON-DIAMONOGaOWEIXSOf CAHfOANI* 1982
paign plan.
Delegates to the National
Leadership Conference also will
participate in a series of intensive
workshops and study sessions on
specific campaign programs and
techniques designed to
strengthen their skills as cam-
paigners at the community, re-
gional and national levels.
The conference program also
includes announcement of the
Pinchas Sapir Awards to com-
munities for outstanding
achievement in the 1982 cam-
I paign.
The leadership meeting, which
closes Sunday morning. May 23,
will be preceded by the annual
meeting of UJA's National Cam-
paign Policy Board, selected lay
leaders from throughout the na-
tion who are responsible for
formulating the annual UJA-
community campaigns.
"SHALOM,
\MATA,\?\IATA,
VATATAAATATA,
\MATA,\ATATA,
\MATA,\ATA1A,
\MATA,Y?OAlA,
\MATAA5*IATA,
YMATAAMATA,
VMATA,\ATATA,
\ATATA,\MATA,
VMATA,\MATA,
\MA1A,\MATA,
Y^ATA,\MATA,
\2UftIA,\ftIAlA,
VVDVIAAATATA,
SHALOM"
MAKE A 3-MINUTE CALL
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If you died direct on the weekend without operator assistance, a 3 minute call to
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DIAL DIRECT
Dialing direct is not only the easiest and fastest way to call long
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CODES FOR PRINCIPAL CITIES IN ISRAEL (972)
Alula 65 Dimona 57 Nazareth 65
Ako 4 Hadera 63 Nerania 53
AshWon 51 Haifa 4 Rehovot 54
Bat lam 3 Hokm 3 TelAvtv 3
BeerShvo 57 Jerusalem 2 Tiber!** 67
Southern Bell


-
iz-tt
The Jewish Flondian and Shofar'o'f Greate^Hollywood
Friday, March 19,1 Mg

The festival of
"They baked unleavened
cakes of the dough which
they had brought forth
out of Egypt, for it was
not leavened, because
they were thrust out of
Egypt, and could not
tarry, neither had they
made any provision for
themselves."
MATZOS
Manischewitz
-LB. BOX
$118
Goodman's
-LB. BOX

Horseradish
Fresh ?159

$
White 2/
SILVER SPRINGS
Red or
128
5-OZ. JAR
MOTHERS
Gefilte Fish
24-OZ.
JAR
MOTHERS OLD WORLD
White and Pike Fish
24-OZ.
JAR
$231
ROKEACH
Borscht
32-OZ.
JAR
81
10-OZ. CAN
Messing
Macaroons
ns &
34
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURS., MAR. 18 THRU WED., MAR. 24 AT STORES LISTED.
* Skylake Mall Diplomat Mall
Miami Gardens Dr ft NE 19 Ave. Hallandale Beach Boulevard
* Alton Road at 18th St. 1510 South Federal Highway
* Biscayne Shopping Plaza
Biscayne Blvd. ft NE 79th St
* Collins Avenue at 5th Street
* Collins Avenue at 74th Street
* 79th Street Causeway
North Bay Village
* Alton Road at 10th Street
* Arthur Godfrey Rd& Prairie Av
Normandy Dr &Rue Versailles
# Harding Avenue at 94th Street
(Surfstda)
Hollywood
* 2700 Hollywood Boulevard
* Briar Bay Shopping Center
SW 136 St w of So Dixie Hwy
* Plaza West
N Kendall Dr & S.W 127th Ave.
* C3useway Plaza
NE 123rd St. b Biscayne Blvd
# 163rd Street Shopping Canter
Crandon Blvd.CrWestwood Dr.
# Coral Way
3rd Avenue & SW 15th Road
* 3100 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables
* South Miami Shopping Center
6200 South Dixie Highway
* Miami Gardens Drive
ft NW 7th Avenue
* Coral Park Shopping Center
Temiami Trail ft SW 97th Avenue
''Pride


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