The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00286

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
?Jewish Floridlain
e
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Number 24
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 27, 1981
r"" snoch,, price 35 Cents
ir Florida President And Dolphin Star Among Those Honored
Joseph Bhom Appointed At Federation Celebration
Chairman of Legacy and
Endowment Committee
ire extremely fortunate to
Ls.'ph Bloom as chairman
lear's Legacy and Endow-
pmmittee," said Dr. Saul
i chairman of the 1982
^deration Campaign. "His
I in the field of account-
his devotion to Jewish
[make him the optimum
-Bloom is the senior partner
Bloom Hochberg and Co.,
Accounting Firm. He now
exclusively with estates
lists. To ensure that he re-
fup to the minute" in hie
pf specialization, he is
tly enrolled in the Miami
stitute for a review course
1981 Revenue Act as it
k to Estates and Gifts.
[ave big expectations for
nmittee," said Mr. Bloom.
i they can be very produc-
|am. and have been a mem-
the Jewish Communal
[in the Metropolitan New
krea. Their assets are over
llion."
lieve that it is an over-
have a will and not have
kse for a charitable be-
f Mr. Bloom explains. "If
stablish a philanthropic
during your lifetime, you
Rouble tax advantage. The
hat you can save money,
kill benefit your favorite
should be of interest to
le."
Bloom stresses that estab-
Joseph Bloom
lishing a family philanthropic
fund need not be a complex mat-
ter. As chairman of the legacy
and Endowment committee, he
will be available to discuss estate
tax planning at no fee.
Mr. Bloom is a recipient of the
David Ben Gurion Award.
Created by the Government of
Israel, the Award is conferred
upon outstanding individuals
whose unswerving commitment
to the growth and security of
Israel is evident. He is a long
time supporter of Israel Bonds,
and is a member of its Prime
Minister's Club. Mr. Bloom has
served as chairman for various
UJA committees in New York,
and is currently on the Board of
Directors of the Jewish Federa-
tion of South Broward.
YAD Shahhat Dinner Dec. 4
)ay. Dec. 4 at 7 p.m., the
Adult Division of Jewish
Btion of South Broward will
biding its first traditional
bat dinner and services at
le Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.
rat for the complete dinner
brv ices is $13.50.
ibi Herb Tobin of the
ation staff along with YAD
for, Dr. Ira Sheier are work-
pi h YAD members to create
pw D service.
fa '-ihabbat dinner and serv-
lis part of the complete
am of social, cultural and
Dus activities of the Young
Division," commented
Co-Chairman Sheldon
Iwitz.
"We have had successful social
events, and this past fall the
YAD had a 'Learn-In' and Suc-
coth Party. This is just continu-
ing our outstanding programs,"
added Bonnie Geier, YAD co-
chairman.
The program for Dec. 4 in-
cludes a complete, tradi t onal and
kosher Shabbat dinner. This will
be followed by services in the
Zinn Chapel and an Oneg Shab-
bat after services.
The cost is $13.50 and payment
must be received at the Federa-
tion by Dec. 1. For additional in-
formation, call Dr. Ira Sheier or
Anita Lorenz at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
"We are pleased that Eli
Timoner and Ed Newman will be
honored at our Federation Cele-
bration," announced Rochelle
and Paul Koenig, chairmen of the
evening. The celebration has been
planned as a gala campaign kick-
off for the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. It will be held
Dec. 14 at the Hallandale Jewish
Center.
Eli Timoner, Chairman and
President of Air Florida, founded
the airline in July 1971, and has
served continuously as either
Chairman or President since its
inception.
From 1963 to 1970, Mr.
Timoner was President and
Chairman of the Board of Giffen
Industries. Prior to joining Gif-
fen Industries, Mr. Timoner co-
founded Laura Lee Candy Com-
pany in 1950.
Mr. Timoner is an active mem-
ber of the South Florida com-
munity. Among his other affilia-
tions, he is a member of the
Board of Directors for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Ed Newman is a guard with
the Miami Dolphins, and a
powerful part of the Dolphins' of-
fensive line. He became a full-
time starter in his sixth season
(1978), and has logged 33 conse-
cutive starts over the past two
seasons. He has acquired the title
of all-time strongest Dolphin
with 485 pounds in bench press.
Mr. Newman's obsession for
superb conditioning sprang from
Big Gifts Dinner
Scheduled
Marge Saltzman and Dr.
Howard Barron, chairmen of the
Big Gifts Committee of the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward,
announced that this year's Big
Gifts Dinner has been scheduled
for Saturday, Dec. 19, at the
home of Marge and Jack Saltz-
man. Rabbi Herbert Friedman,
eminent authority on Jewish
overseas needs and Israel's birth,
growth and development will be
the special guest speaker.
Both Mrs. Saltzman and Dr.
Barron stress that heightened
commitment to the 1982 UJA-
Federation Campaign is a must if
local needs, and those of Israel,
are to be met.
Passover in Israel
Passover In Israel trip for
1-15 is being planned by the
Federation of South
. according, to Nat Sed-
airman
i participating will attend
ming ceremony at a Youth
i Village, celebrate Seder in
alem's historic and modern
I feel its universal spiritual
N?. share the Kabbalat
)bat Service with
s.meet with high-level
government officials; and
openly with political
will also enjoy Home
l>tv with Israeli families,
visit new mini-settlements in the
Galilee, lunch at a Kibbutz, ex-
perience the impact of Yad
Vashem, visit military installa-
tions, explore, shop, relax or par-
ticipate in our optional tours.
The package includes round
trip airfare, 6-star hotels, aU
meals, renowned UJA guides and
flight from Eilat to Lod Airport.
This is the Federation's most
unique and exciting trip to our
homeland, Mr. Sedley com-
mented.
For additional information,
contact Susan Marx at the Jew-
ish Federation of South Broward.
Ed Newman
his courageous victory over con-
cer when a malignant tumor on
his thyroid gland required two
throat operations in January
1975. A tough regimen of weight-
lifting, bicycling and swimming
restored his strength.
Eli Timoner
Mr. Newman is active in com-
munity affairs. He has done
promotional work for United
Way in 1980, and is currently
promoting a blood drive for the
John Elliot Community Blood
Bank.
Pay NOWPay LESS
A Tax Saving Year
Dr Robert S. Pittell, president
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, has recently appointed
Mrs. Jo Ann Katz to chair the
Federation's Cash Collections
Committee.
Mrs. Katz, upon assuming the
chairmanship stressed, "The
time to pay is now! "
"With the 1982 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation campaign al-
ready underway, it is increasing-
ly important that any unpaid
amounts from prior campaigns be
paid. The needs of Israel and the
other worthy agencies supported
by pledges to the Federation de-
pend on receipt of cash. Without
your payments, these needs can-
not be adequately met," Mrs.
Katz stated.
"The Economic Recovery Tax
Act of 1981 makes it more advan-
tageous to take tax deductions
this year, however, in order to
qualify, payments must be made
Jo Ann Katz
prior to Dec. 31, 1981," she
added.
Mrs. Katz urges that pay-
ments be made now. "Let Uncle
Sam help you pay your pledge!"
:::*:*:*:::*W:::^^
Community Day
Reservations Available
A limited number of reserva-
tions are still available for Com-
munity Day, sponsored by the
Women's Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, ac-
cording to Delia Rosenberg,
chairwoman.
The event, which is set for
Wednesday, Dec. 2, will feature
guest speakers Virginian Graham
and Susan Dworkin.
"The Community Day hostes-
ses have been keeping very busy
getting their table reservations
for the big day.
"There is an enormous amount
of excitement within the com-
munity for this popular annual
event," Mrs. Rosenberg added.
Community Day will be held
from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the
Diplomat Convention Center,
3616 S. Ocean Dr. The cost of the
luncheon is $22.60
For information concerning
reservations, contact Mary Anne
at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian andShofiwofOrMterffoUyt^t
Hillcrest Campaign
Leadership Meets
Hillcrest recently held ita first campaign leadership meeting
on behalf of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1982
United Jewish Appeal-Federation campaign.
Guest speaker was Jerome Gleekel, noted Mid-East authority
H
Seated from left are Harvey Fell, Loo Broolu and Paul Kleiman
Standing from left are Joe Block, Ben Miahler and Bert Mock.
H&CHFST*
Seated from left are Julius Licht, Joe Bloom and Alex SchniU.
Standing from left are Julius Remlieb, Al Philips, Godfrey Augustus,
Milton Rudick and Hy Gorin.
From left are Nat
Harry Smallberg.
PrHcher, Joe Raymond, Milton Winograd and
Seated from left are Al Izenson, Hy Orlansky and Isadore Rabinowitz.
Standing from left are Leo Balkin. Lou Batzar, Dr. Milton Landon and
Irving Noble.
From left are Sam Kotler, coordinator; Vicki Raymond, Women's
Division Pacesetter chairwoman; Milton Winograd, Big Gifts
chairman; and Joe Raymond, chairman.
Fun and
On Super
Excitement ia to,
Jewish Federation I 1
BrowardsSupersJJ
oSr17 at f
"Super Sunday ,j
telephone effort by il
federations. Jewish '
across the country d
phoned in an effort M
money and contact sai
in a single day thanZl
We wUl reach out 3
Amencan Jewish comaiaT
pledge maximum supZfl
tow Jews at home, fff
around the world,"
Brenda Greenman a
Golden, Super Sunday M
Saras Kosher rZI
Miami will partially a;
Super Sunday by provA
and paper product) ,]
falafel, schmoppere, |
kosher whoppera.landp
restaurant will also pro.
ovens and two cooks ~k\
event. J
Sara's Kosher Kitdaj
been located in Miami M
years. Owned by Sari all
my Tamir, the restaaaj
previously housed in Ni|
for 13 years, the ch
plained.
Super Sunday partidj
be able to enjoy Israeli a
dancing in front of the 1
tion.
For information on S
day. contact Susan Mini j
Jewish Federation of |
Broward.
The most respected
in Jewish funerals
In the world
Seated from left are Abner Friedman, Dan Scalanger and Sam
Hofman. Standing from left are Harry Studner, Sam Kotler, Jack
Lichtenatein and Ed Shandell.
Seated from left are Charlea Knopf, David Green and Leon
Standing from left are Morris Simon, Sam Silberberg, Bill
a, Morris Herts and Sam Werbach.
Zim
Not surprising,if s River-
side, and there are many
reasons.
If you've ever worked with
any of our people on com-
munity projects ranging from
fund-raising drives for Israel
to enhancing Jewish education,
you'd understand. If you've
ever experienced the compas-
sion and kindness of Riverside
counselors.you'd have an even
deeper appreciation of the
reasons for Riverside
leadership.
At Riverside, we have
the largest Jewish staff
available from any funeral
director in Florida. More
important, they are people who
understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
They carry on a tradition
that for over three generations
has been a priceless assurance
to Jewish families.
Our people. They make
Riverside the most respected
name in Jewish funeral service
in the world.
Seated from left are Dr. Charles OrarHngW en* D\ i
Standing from left are David Mpyre and Jake Mogilowit i.
The Largest Jewish Staff
In The World.
Carl Grossberg, President
Andrew Fier, Vice President,
New York and Past
President of the Jewish
Funeral Directors of
America.
Charles Salomon, Vice
President, New York.
In Florida:
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice
President.
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious
Advisor.
Sam Rosenthal
Kenneth Kay, V.P.
Keith Kronish, F.D.
Mark Ginsberg, F.D.
Harvey Pincus, F.D.
Douglas Lazarus, F.D.
Carmen Serrano, F.D.
Robert Burstein
Arthur Zweigenthal
Isaac Nahmias
Samuel Gotland
Jules Fischbein
Elaine Gardner
Lena Rothfeld
Sonia Gale
Bernard Eilen
Sol Silver
Charlie Blumkin
Ida Rosenberg
Barney Selby
Edward Dobin
Ralph Rubell
Guardian Plan Counselors:
ira taoidberg. Manager
Steve Fischman
Joel Kay
Syd Kronish
DickSorkin
Henry Bofman
Joseph Bass
ADDRESSES:
MIAMI BEACH: 1920AJ
Road (19th St.)/ 53HT
NORMANDY ISLE: 12SJ
Normandy Drive/53H
MIAMI: 1717 S.W.17J8LL
(Douglas Rd.)/**g
NORTH MIAMI BEACH:""
NE. 19thAve./947W
HOLLYWOOD: 2230 HdlJ
Blvd./920-lOlO
FT.LAUDERDALEtTa..
6701 West Comment,
Blvd. (E. of University^
587-8400 ^ul71l|
WEST PALM BEACH:471
Okeechobee Blvd./
683-8676 -
Five chapels serving WJ,
York Metropolitan an
RIVERSH*
Tradition. It's *
-akes*1
pre-Affang^"^*


November 27,1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
bed from left are Marge Mom, Fay Slororoff and Flora Barron
Ung from left are Jeanette Zuckeman, Ethel PoUack, Selma
Am an and Lillian Koppel.
fcted from left are Rae Zwicker, Blanche Bookbinder and Rose Kroll.
Lnding from left are Clara Greenberg, Hilda Cohn, Mildred
jedman, Rosalie Williams and Helen Cohan, guest speaker.
M
.
Women's Division
Plans Beach
Campaign
am left are Pearl Sable, Lillian Newman, Rose Karlin, Betty Ger-
nunn. Lilyan Liese and Bella Gray.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward is currently in the pro-
cess of planning its 1982 Beach
Campaign.
Evelyn Stieber, Beach chair-
woman, said the campaign is
broken down into two areas:
Golden Isles and Three Islands.
Fredda Schwartz, Selma Kaye
and Mildred Friedman have been
appointed Golden Isles coordina-
tors; Selma Gersten and Edna
Barron will serve as Three
Islands coordinators.
Educational programs were
recently held in both areas.
Fredda Schwartz was the hostess
of the Golden Isles meeting and
Selma Gerstein hosted the Three
Islands meeting.
'The purpose of these edu-
cational programs was to explain
what the Federation is and why it
is such an important part of our
community."
"We are extremely grateful to
Fredda Schwartz and Selma Ger-
sten for opening up their homes
to us for such important events,"
Mrs. Stieber said.
The Three Islands chairwomen
have formed a committee in-
cluding Pearl Sabel, Ann
Schapiro, Dorthea Levy, Ida
Schneider, Lillian Newman, Rose
Karlin, Ann Firestone, Rozia
Stolzenberg, Bella Gray, Lil
Liese, Gina Seidler and Joan
Klein.
Seated from left are Lenore Caen, Fredda Schwartz, area coordinator;
and Hilda Meyeraon. Standing from left are Ethel Leve, Evelyn
Stieber, beach chairwoman, Belle Shapiro and Rose Benjamim.
' i i
V
From left are Joan Klein, Gina Seidler, Selma Gersten, area coor-
dinator; Ida Schneider, Claire Bern hang and Edna Barron, area
coordinator.
If you need it
for your home
HousewaresHardwarePaintLocksmithShadesGifts
Bath/Closet ShopPatio/Omette FurmtureFloral Arrangements
DinnerwareLighting.ElectricaUPIumbingGarden
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily & Sunday
100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Tel. 456-0566 (Broward). 949-1682 (Dade)
Member Hallandale Chamber ol Commerce. Better Business Division
>
FLORIDA DIVISION,
AMERICAN COMMITTEE FOR THE
WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
cordially invites you to attend its gala
Annual Dinner-Dance
celebrating Israel's primary Scientific Research Center,
and Bridge to the 21st Century
Sunday Evening, December 6, 1981
Fontainebleau Hilton, Miami Beach
\
*!
Reception 6:00 P.M.
Fleur-de-Lis Room
Dinner 7:00 P.M.
Fontaine Room
PROGRAM
Guest Speaker:
ALLAN CERSON
Special Assistant to the
ILS. Permanent Representative
to the United Nations
Film Presentation:
"Interface"
Film Report from Rehovot
Highlighting Weizmann High Technology Research
and Health Advances with
DAVID FROST
Television's Noted World Affairs Analyst
Music Jerry Marshall Orchestra
Subscription $500 per person Dietary Laws Observed Black Tie
The
Institute is
the fulfillment of a
vision and the transla-
tion of a dream into reality It
can achieve much for the good of
Israel and when peace comes to the
Middle East for the good of our
neighbors and the good of mankind
Or. Chaim Weizmann'

Honorary President
Shepard Broad
General Chairman
lay Wen*
Co-Chairmen
Irwin Levy
Norman Rosunan
joe Suzyn
Members ol the Board
Sam I. Adler
Slanley Brenner
Morns N Broad
Arthur H. Courshon
Martin Fridovkh
Joseph Handleman
Or Sidney S Hertz
Joseph Kanter
Herbert D Katz
Jay I. Kislak
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Hyman Lake
Dr. Irvine. Lehrman
Louis Levine
Harry A. Levy
Robert Levy
Harvey B. Nachman
Sheldon M. Neuman
Roselee Pollack
Harold Rosen
Robert Russell
Dr. M. Murray Schechler
J. Skip Shepard
Harry B. Smith
Nathan Tanen
Arthur T. Wasserman
Harold X Weinstein
Director
Col Moshel Diskm
FLORIDA DIVISION.
AMERICAN COMMITTEE FOR THE
WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE
Suite 309 / 420 Lincoln Road /
Miami Beach 33139 / Phone 538-3090
J


Page 4
The Jewish Ploridian and Shofarof Ortqter Hollywood
Jewish-Hispanic Rift
Net Emigration of 20,000 in Last 2 Years
In cities across America where there is signifi-
cant Jewish and Hispanic representation, the public
relations impulse is to suggest that both com-
munities are finding newer and stronger ties between
: them every day.
But the truth is, as some American Jewish
Committee research shows, that the ties are few and
far between. For one thing, there is the upcoming
phenomenon in the '80s of what AJC's research pin-
points as group identity vs. individual merit.
Translated, this means the increasing struggle,
on the one hand, between groups in the UnitedStates
that regard themselves as minorities and that de-
mand special handicap points to help them make it in
the general culture; and, on the other, individual
Americans who prefer not to be offered such handi-
cap points in the form of. say. equal access-equal
opportunity legislation but rather to compete on the
basis of their individual talents.
Paradoxically, Jews are themselves a minority,
a fact which too many non-Jews seem inclined these
days to forget; and, against a backdrop of their
minority experience in America at the end of the 19th
and beginning of the 20th Century, they see their
achievement in the national fabric in individual
terms. In short, nobody helped them because they
were Jews and to the disadvantage of others as a
result. Quite the contrary, they made it in the face of
enormous religious prejudice against them.
The AJCommittee's research shows that ancil-
lary to the phenomenon of individual merit vs. group
identification is the growing Hispanic demand for
quotas to assure the mobility upward of the Hispanic
community as a group. As longtime victims of
American discrimination against them, Jews are
opposed to quotas.
Seen in these terms, Jews must view with in-
creasing alarm both demands of the Hispanic com-
munity as central to their well-being: a) quotas; and
b| acceptance via supportive discriminatory
legislation against the majority of Hispanic group
identity as if it were an individual social force.
None of which helps the public relations view
that things between both communities are all sweet-
ness and light.
Sharon Has Tough Job
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon will be in Wash-
ington on Nov. 30 to speak with the Administration
about the details of the projected strategic relation-
ship between Israel and the United States. In a
sense, those talks are already dead.
Operation Bright Star, the military exercises in-
volving United States and Egyptian forces in
Egypt's desert, does not include Israel as a third
partner to the maneuvers.
In Miami this week, two members of a six-mem-
ber delegation from Israel, Likud MK Sarah Doron
and Labor MK Shlomo Hillel, told us that the Rea-
gan Administration apparently regards their country
as a "stepchild" in the new world of American for-
eign policy in the Middle East.
Doron and Hillel, and the other members of the
delegation headed by Moshe Ahrens, chairman of Is-
rael's Foreign Affairs Committee, are crisscrossing
the United States this week to meet with major Jew-
ish community leaders in order to voice these and
other concerns over the growing tilt by U.S. policy
planners toward Saudi Arabia to the clear disad-
vantage of Israel.
What Doron and Hillel reported to us is what we
have been suspecting all along: Capitol Hill moguls
say the right things about Israel, but they im-
plement few of them. In the clutch, the palm goes to
the Saudis.
Jewish Floridian
By SHLOMO MAOZ
Jerusalem Port
Economic Reporter
For the first time in the history
of Israel, emigrants have out-
numbered immigrants during the
ast two years, government
itatistician Moshe Sicron dis-
posed presenting journalists
vith the 1981 Statistical
Abstract.
Other established trends which
ontinued during the period
xtvered were lower marriage and
birth rates, more divorces and
fewer immigrants.
During each of the last two
years, emigrants outnumbered
newcomers by approximately
10.000. Projections for this year
point to a total of some 11.000
immigrants, with about 20,000
persons expected to leave. The
immigration figure is the lowest
in Israel's history with the
possible exception of 1953. when
about that number arrived. Esti-
mates peg the total number of
\ emigrants since 1948 at 300.000.
Israels population is expected
to reach four million in April or
May of next year, and if recent
demographic trends continue,
there will be 5.5 million citizens in
2000. Of these 4.3 million will be
Jews, an increase of 30 percent,
and 1.2 million non-Jews, a 90
percent rise. During the last de-
cade, the population has in-
creased by 900.000. including
700.000 Jews.
Only 94,300 babies were born
in 1980, down from 96,600 in
1975. The birth rate for Jewish
women dropped from 3.4 per per-
son in 1970 to 2.8 per person last
year, with the gap between
various ethnic groups dropping
in recent years. Among non-Jew-
ish women, the drop for the
decade was from 8.9 to 6.0.
The number of Jewish mar-
riages fell from 28,000 in 1975 to
24,700 last year. The sharp drop
is partly explained by the ageing
of the country's population, but
lower figures were registered for
all age groups. In addition,
divorces were up, affecting 6 per-
cent of all couples during the first
five years of marriage and 10 per-
cent during the first 15 years.
The number of women working
outside the home has steadily in-
creased from 31.6 percent in 1975
to 37 percent in 1980. The
country's total labour force grew
during the same perkwik ,
cent reaching iJBftf
number actually J?!
'accounting for hi^eruZ1
ment) rising by n p,^
Especially ^ J
crease in employment j,,,*1
services 39 perct'
public services 22rw~*T
industrial labour fJJ^
only 7 percent. **
Workers from th,
ministrered territories
tuted 5.4 percent of the
labour force. Numbering
last year, they were 34 pat-.
the territories' total work^1
While families shrank bJ
the standard of living aho-3
steady increase. Real net Z,
of workers is expected 3
between 8 and 10 percentT
year. In 1980 the ftpu,,
already 21 percent higher,
five years previously.
Western Young
Leadership
The Western Young Leader-
ship Development Committee
will present a panel of local Jew-
ish agency represent aUves on
Saturday. Dec. 12 at 8 p.m. at the
home of Doris and Steve Mazel.
The panel will include Sondra
Reiff. executive director of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Hroward; Dr. Diana Keis-
man. educational consultant for
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation: and Sherwin Rosenstein,
executive director
Family Service.
for
The Western Young M
ship Development ComnuUaJ
eludes Richard and Randy I
bum. Rabbi Bennett Greeo-
Alan and Jackie Kan. Marki
Renee Kaplan, Tony and wL
l.undy. Steve and Dons uj
Joel and Marcy Schacbe. I
and Barbara Tobias, Richanla
Jan Ziff
FLY EL AL NOW
AND SAVE 20*
ON YOUR
NEXT TRIP
TO ISRAEL!
rMaan
4
9 Fredlhocne
FREO SMOCMCT SUZANNE SMOCHET
Edrtor and Pubiiaher t.ecuti.* Editor
uMianed jMWaatat som ci *oi*o* po i Heiienoaie. fi us*s miaou
HOLL/WOOO FOWT IAUOCMOALE OFFICE Am Sennga MOO Sidy 2900 E H.n.noai, teach
Bt0 SulM 70TO. HarlanOele Fie UOOS Phone 4S44MM
Hwiomcttrm iMNF*hS< i*ami n U1J2 Pnon. i jrvejos
i n )wihwij..w>...... p.p. iBnanaw ru mi
Jewish Federation oi South Browerd Ottloera Preeident. Robert Pitteli M 0 Vice -rtoenti
Philip A Lena. M.O. Nat Sodloy. Secretary Jo Ann Kati. Treaturer Theodore lawman
Eiaculiva Director. Sunn* O Kara Submit malarial tor publication to Elaina Peeeaotf. Public
Raiationt Director, or Laaho SMaa. Aaaociala Public fteietione Director
M.mo.r jta. Baan Ana wns NEA. ajpa ana Fpa
Jewien Florldutn doe* not guarantee Kaehrvth of taercnendiee Adwjnieed
auaaCaawriOW NATES Local Aroa OSO Annual 12 Taai Mimmum in or by memoeretMp Jew.eh
Federation of South Browerd TTit Hollywood Btvd Hollywood Pel MOW Phone K.eaio
II. 'own Upon Nequaet
Friday, November 27,1981
Volume 11
1KISLEV5742
Number 24
rjmfmfmffmYm^^^^:
20
M
Wfl
20*
tor acr. l*116' mmK _^ Sjje-Tft# m^
MlanSPOrt |
mMM^^
m,.rh H Pa^iRcrs love Israel so
much, they just can t wait to come back
which is why were giving two
very special vouchers' to every EL AI
to Israel before December 14.1981
xvi rThc fin* vouch"r 's good for a
,1 a f(H,n! n "* <***' EL AL round
The second voucher is good for
a free AVIS car rental in Israel for one
day (gas and mileage not included).''
For information and reservations,
contact your travel agent.
And insist on EL AL
The Chosen Airline
Vhduim., i-, ,.*,,

n mi


"November 27,1981 .
.......I' '"II1")1!
ThfJ.wishFlorJdian and Shofar of Grtat.r Hollywood
Pagao-
Perceiving Time Relation Jewish Defense League
By ELAINE PA8EKOPF PINES
j of the things I cannot grasp U -time relation.' At an
in Jews were Ml done to death at Trtblinha extermination
, overwhelming plurality of human beings, two miles away on
urns, five thousand miles away in New York, were sleeping or
* .. worrying about the dentist ... The two orders of
Jieous experience are so different their coexistence is so
[a paradox ...thatl puzzle over time." From Sophje^Choke
lamStyron. ~ "------V^VMT'
statement issued during
r week of October, the
khibiting again its ugliest
i, has decided that it will
J against Americans if the
Etradites a Palestinian to
lor alleged participation in
t acts. By their announce-
jie PLO has brought to
bfront the significance of
delation." They have dis-
Ithe fallacious belief that
j the fact that deplorable
I aggressiod and terrorism
ried out in other lands, life
jitinue normally here. If
\jQ lives up to its word,
ans can expect to be
for events they neither
ated in, nor had direct
lover.
[threat followed a refusal
I U.S. Supreme Court to in-
tin a decision by a Chicago
I recommending the ex-
bn of Ziad Abi Ain to la-
kin has been accused of
a bomb that killed two
and injured 36 in
i in May. 1979.
| has been held in Chicago
nee August. 1979. when
J appeals courts affirmed a
[court's decision that there
ufficient evidence for ex-
Is).
Abu Situ, a senior
of the PLO's executive
tttee, said that Secretary of
Alexander Haig can over-
Ihis decision and warned
Washington did not in-
the PLO's "revo-
iry courts would try all
American citizens that
the Israeli army, or con-
I towards the enemy's war
b, accomplices in all ugly
against the Palestinian
(added, "Those (Americans)
ave helped the enemy (Is-
t known to us, and we can
I them."
I DAVID FRIEDMAN
.SHINGTON (JTA) -
eentative Benjamin
hthal (D., N.Y.) said that
| and other American ethnic
s. by taking stands on for-
ohcy issues that concern
, create a national debate on
issues, many of them like
tics
ec^i^^^
"ontinenfof
'uisffie
Ireo JOSSI
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k>u bjcK to
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for a unique
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patch your table to you'
rooa m one ot 5 individual
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imp Cellar studio Place
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Fine Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
lor your pleaaure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheons BSSRSJSS)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREOIT CARDS
HONORID
2340 SW M Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondayi
MAP..I.L'
'the recent sale of AW ACS and
other military equipment to
Saudi Arabia harmful to this
country.
If the ethnic groups did not in-
volve themselves in the issues, it
would leave foreign policy to the
arms industry, oil companies, toe
New York banks, which lend
money to countries to buy arms
and the foreign policy establish-
ment within and outside the
government, Rosenthal said.
"To do that would be a disaster
for this country and the demo-
cratic institutions we all believe
in," he told the monthly public
affairs forum of B'nai B'rith
International.
Rosenthal's talk was an attack
on the article by Sen. Charles
Mathias (R., Md.) in Foreign Af-
fairs Quarterly last summer in
which Mathias said, ethnic
groups like Jews, Greeks and
Irish Americans should not seek
to influence foreign affairs.
Instead, Mathias argued, only
the President has the national
constituency needed to take the
national interest into considera-
tion in developing foreign affairs.
"One does not have to be a part
of the Greek or the Jewish, or the
Irish lobbies, as some would call
them, to take serious issue with
any argument that deprives
groups of Americans of a com-
petency and natural right to de-
bate and seek to influence their
govemment," said Rosenthal, an
18 year veteran of the House For-
cing Affairs Committee.
Jews Unfairly Accused of Dual
Loyalty

advertisements mention it was
the purchasing agent for the
Saudis.
Kennedy Stressed Issue in
Earlier Speech
Also not mentioned he said,
was the role of such companies as
Bechtel, the San Francisco
engineering corporation, which
does millions of dollars of con-
struction work in Saudi Arabia
and for whom Caspar Wein-
berger was s Vice President
before becoming Secretary of De-
fense.
Meanwhile in Boston on
October 31, Sen. Edward Ken-
nedy (D., Mass.) made some of
the same points in a speech there.
"I reject absolutely the unworthy
appeals which in effect question
the patriotism of Jewish Ameri-
cans," he told the New England
Chapter of the American Asso-
ciates of the Ben Gurion Uni-
versity of the Negev.
"The Administration com-
plains that Jewish Americans
were vigorously expressing their
views. But where were the Ad-
ministration's complaints about
the corporations that lobbied
hard for AW ACS because of the
business it would bring? Now
why were there no complaints
about Saudi Princes gliding
through the halls of Congress?"
Kennedy stressed that "sup-
port for Israel is not an act of
charity: it is a matter of national
security." He said "Israel has no
need of fairweather friends," a
reference to Senators who at the
last moment switched their vote
to support the AW ACS sale.
"Neither Israel nor the United
States will be served by poli-
ticians who profess one thing and
do another," Kennedy said. "And
none of us can rely on con-
servatives proclaiming a biblical
allegiance to Israel who can then
be turned around in a single
White House meeting."
Denies Role in Attack
He said that Jews were
charged with "dual loyalty" in
the recent AW ACS debate yet
they were only supporting the
policy they expected from Presi-
dent Reagan as a result of the
stand he took during last year's
Presidential campaign. Rosen-
thal said that in his nearly 20
years in Congress every Presi-
dent from Kennedy to Reagan
had said during their campaign
"what we want to hear about Is-
rael." But he said that once they
get into office they become
"Presidential" and become a
"captive" of the "national secur-
ity apparatus" which he desribed
as the State Department, the De-
fense Department and the intelli-
gence community.
He said the AWACS deal was
proposed because the Air Force
wanted to cut the cost ratio of the
plane and the Saudis are the only
ones with the money to buy
them. But he said, once the pro-
posal was supported by the
President, it became a test of the
President's ability to conduct
foreign affairs.
Rosenthal said the same thing
happened to Greek Americsns
who saw Jimmy Carter as a
candidate support their stand
against arms to Turkey and then
reverse himself when he became
President. But Rosenthal said
that the Greek Americans wer-
not subject to the same kind of
'vitriolic attack" as were Jews
during the last few weeks.
Rosenthal said that Mathias,
while ruling out a role for ethnics
in foreign policy did not say any-
thing about the major cor-
porations who lobby for then
views. He said the role of Mobil
in the AWACS sale was not
mentioned nor did the oil com-
pany in its numerous newspaper
NEW YORK 4JTA) The
Jewish Defense League says that
while it was not responsible for
the attack on a house used by the
Soviet Ambassador to the United
Nations, it "applauded all such
actions aimed at freedom for So-
viet Jewry."
In a statement to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, the JDL at-
tributed the attack as part of "an
escalating campaign by Jewish
activists against ths growing at-
mosphere of pogrom in the Soviet
Union." Attacks on Soviet per-
sonnel and installations will con-
tinue as long as Soviet Jews are
imprisoned or refused permission
to emigrate, the statement said.
According to police reports,
about a dozen shots were fired in-
to a glass enrlosed sitting room
of a building in the Glen Cove,
Long Island compound housing
Soviet Ambassador Oleg
Troyanovsky. No one was in the
house at the time of the attack.
A man saying he represented
the JDL telephoned United Press
International and claimed re-
sponsibility for ths attack. The
JDL has staged several protests
at the compound used by Soviet
envoys to the United Nations.
Banker Charges U.S.
Policy 'Mortgaged9 to Oil
NEW YORK The head of
Lehman Brothers Kuhn Loeb
Inc. has charged that American
foreign policy is "mortgaged" to
oil and the government's "gro-
tesque" energy policy has failed
to lessen the nation's vulnerabili-
ty to an import cutoff.
Peter G. Peterson, chairman of
the board of the major invest-
ment banking firm and Secretary
of Commerce in the Nixon Ad-
ministration, recalled that in
1973-74. the cutoff of only
600,000 barrels of oil a day
created turmoil and long lines at
gas stations.
"That was a mere 'vascular in-
cident' compared to the economic
and political struggle that would
affect this country if such a thing
were to happen today when we
are importing 2.6 million barrels
a day from the Mideast," he told
an American Jewish Congress
audience at the organization's
annual Stephen S. Wise Awards
dinner here.
PETERSON, who was on hand
to receive an award for "commit-
ment to social justice." claimed
that American energy problems,
which he attributed to the fact
that "we have or have had the
world's most grotesque energy
policy," have been compounded
by a gasoline tax that is only one-
tenth of that in most countries
abroad.
If we were to have a gasoline
tax equivalent to other in-
dustrialized countries," he noted,
"it is estimated by moat experts
that we would reduce our imports
by 2 million barrels a day." Such
a reduction, he added, would
equal the total amount of
petroleum imported from Saudi
Arabia, Libya and Alaeria.
Peterson was also sharply cri-
tical of the government's failure
to set up a sat of procedures in
case of an emergency. Citing a
report just issued by the General
Accounting Office, he said that
not only has the government
failed to develop a plan to reduce
demand, but it has not even
established allocation guidelines
to follow in case of s cutoff.
You're Always A Winner When You Serve
CHEX PARTY MIX
A Family Favorite For 25 Years
PARTY MIX RECIPE
1.. cup butter or margarine
1'. teaspoons seasoned salt
*'; teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
2 cups Corn Chex* cereal
2 cups Rice Chex* cereal
2 cups Bran Chex cereal
2 cups Wheat Chex* cereal
1 cup salted mixed nuts
Preheat oven to 250 Heat butter in large shal-
low roasting pan (about 15 x 10 x 2 inches) in
oven until melted Remove Stir in seasoned salt
and Worcestershire sauce Add Chex and nuts.
Mix until all pieces are coated Heat in oven 1
hour Stir every 15 minutes Spread on absorbent
paper to cool Make* about 9 cup*
K Certified Kosher
1981



The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
^Nqv*
Standing Room Only At
Human Rights Plea
Two Floridians Thought ABb
In Voting 4No* on AWAC8
E-tsr ^
Mora thin 1300 .
IV the standing room onlj
crowd at Temple Beth El for tin
Human Rurhu Plea for Soviet
Jewry on Nov. 16, wi by
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Due to unforaeen
circum


^j**
1 u
K 7 ^as aa
<^H
&? M
***3W
ffl^j
:
=

Standing left to right Randee Lefkow. Dr. Joel Sandberg. and Betty
Humans
Rick Barnett, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Committee, stands right
with members of the Soviet Jewry Committee
Dr. JoelSandberg with Bill Markham
you've
got
willpower!
rrS THE PCI TO Ml THE FUTURE BV
LEAVING A LEGACY TO HAOASSAH TCOAV
BUILD A BRIDGE BETWEEN 7 DECADES
OF PAST ACHCVEMENT IN ISRAEL
AND A TOMORROW OF OUTSTANDING
MADASSAH SERVICE IN
MEDICINE. YOUTH RESCUE AND
CAREER EDUCATION
MAN. TO
HADASSAH WILLS t BEOUESTS
DEPT
SO Wot) son Svwt
NwrYorti NY 10019
nimi i ttmmaw
br0Chur**Thy StW( B
nmmtmbmO nPrM*
lOmn (?'?, too
etancea, the originally achedoied
guest speaker. Sen. Lowell
Wacker, was unable to attend
the Plea. Sen. Wekker was de-
bating a bill which reads "No
Funds appropriated may be used
to prevent programs of voluntary
school prayer and meditation."
This bill would effectively
make it impossible for the Justice
Department or the courts to stop
any attempt, although unconsti-
tutional, to force all children to
recite school prayers, Sen.
Weicker reported from Washing-
ton
He said he is determined to
make every effort to defeat this
bill, including the use of fili-
bustering.
Replacing Sen. Weicker at the
Plea was Dr. Joel Sandberg. na-
tional vice president of the Union
of Councils of Soviet Jewry, an
organization designed to promote
grass roots involvement.
Dr. Sandberg is past chairman
of South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry in Miami, the area's
largest committee for the free-
dom of Soviet Jews.
By
'Jr.
WASHINGTON Lawton
Chiles and Paula Hawkins.
Florida's two U.S. Senators, cant
identical reasons for opposing the
Reagan Administrations sale of
Airborne Warning and Control
System pianos to Saudi Arabia.
In floor speeches before the
vote, both termed Saudi Arabia a
self-interested friend not an
ally of the United States and
warned that sophisticated
AW ACS radar technology might
fall into hostile hands in the vola-
tile Middle East.
Hawkins, who was lobbied by
President Reagan at the White
House on the morning of the
vote, was one of just 12 Republi-
cans to split with the administra-
tion. Chiles joined 36 other
Democrats in opposing the sale.
The Senate voted 52-48 to allow
the $8.5-billion arms deal.
Hawkins was the more outspo-
ken of the two senators. Terming
Saudi Arabia "a politically un-
stable nation that has thwarted
our vital foreign policy interests
many times while helping us only
rarely.'' she produced a list of
coup attempts, assassination and
other political turmoil in the
yaar.
"Given the insui*^
Jbi. and Cgftl
g *o our It^Zl
^*thpowrfK*
that could be 2
van turned
said.
gtinM
Hawkins sUo WBM
the event of renewdTl
ttoMHdfeEsaUalS.
compiled to atUck J
AWACS to mainua^
superiority. "This wk hi
clash between Saudi ArH
5?-LS* the Uniuds '
the middle." she argued.
Chiles, who had oppoj
aale of F15 fighters t?Hj
during the Administra^
emphasized politici|'
Middle East, but hi L
heavily on the sophin^
the AWACS planes.^
"I do not want that u^
to fall into the hands ofsJ
tion unfriendly to the?
States," Chiles said. "lai,
do not believe that we aj
to allow any nation, eveoa
disposed toward ui. to I
unilateral control of tail
craft."
Maxwell House Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox n bagels n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomicaJ innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House"
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century Andwh> not'
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food.without great coffee!
So. nomatterwhat your preference-
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House? you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
K < 1-rlil.iti K.. ,ii. .
(.-F
/A*1
, ft U I
viufj tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century^


l,, November 27,1981
1
T^e Jgwiaft Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
!*-
Page 7
tickets by Dec. 8 for low winter fares
This winter, enjoy
the warmth of New\fork
WonTWA.
There's no lower fare to New\brk.
Smell chestnuts roasting on an open fire.
Stroll down bustling city sidewalks. Hear
the warm applause at a Broadway musical.
See couples skating along the ice at Rocke-
feller Center It's all a part of the warmth of
New York City immMmt
And you can warm up to TWAs $114
midweek fare Monday through Thursday
Friday through Sunday the fare is $124 one
way There's no lower fare from Miami to
New York. With the money you save you
can bring the whole family to share the
warmth of New York this winter. This fare
is good now throuc^i January 31,1982*
Just buy your tickets by December 8,1981.
You can land at any of New York's three
airportsJFK, La Guardia, or Newark. And
starting in early December, we're adding wide-
body service to Newark Airport Ifyou're flying
to Newark or Kennedy you can fly on an
L-1011, the world's most advanced wklebody.
So this winter feel a different kind of
warmth. The warmth of New York. And the
warmth of an airline that cares about saving
you moneyTWA. Call your travel
agent or TWA at 800-325-410Q
You're going to like us

Far. *S175on.^.oNw York r^enj^u^ 1-5 Ate $175 horn Ne*-York o M*mi between December 19-25
T&SSiiLTlKraTSn completely unused tlctat.submitted for refund


Page8
The Jewish Ploridim and Shofar <
}r*aten


_!!^^<*nfcrfr|
CUtll I II II I
i > 11in 1111 ii
The Bat Mitzvah festivities
honoring Amy Rose Schwartz.
daughter of Joe and Benita Sch-
wartz was a gala event. A
beautiful Bat Mitzvah service, a
gourmet Oneg Shabbat, a
spectacular dinner dance and
charming warm, and wonderful
people. Amy was outstanding at
the Friday evening services at
Temple Beth Shalom. Her poise
and sparkling personality were
remarkable. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Shirley Cohen,
Reuben Schneider, and Allan
C'oplin offered congratulatory
wishes to the Schwartz family.
For many years Joe and Benita
have been active at their Temple
and in the community, so each
speaker claimed to know Amy
and her parents the longest.
Following services a Shabbat
reception was held at the home of
Joe's law partner and his wife,
Jim and Barbara Miller. It was
more like a feast. The sumptuous
buffet of homemade desserts
tempted even the most con-
scientous dieter. Bonnie Kowitt,
Dr. David and Shelly Stone,
Merle Schneider. Barbara Peretz,
Dr. Joe and Selma Hopen were a
mong the nearly 200 guests who
not only looked, but also tasted.
The mouth watering selection of
pastries were baked by the
Miller's teenagers, Charles,
Steven, and Beth. Everyone
enjoyed the gracious hospitality
of the Miller family.
On Saturday evening the social
hall at Temple Beth Shalom was
Israel Scores Well In
'Quality of Life' Measurement
Israel has sometimes been cri-
ticized for spending an inordinate
amount of its budget on defense,
at the expense of its other
programs.
Yet, according to a new rating
by the Environmental Fund,
a non-profit group studying
worldwide environmental and
population issues. Israel fared
quite well, and significantly
higher than any of its neighbors.
The Physical Quality of Life
Index was developed by the
Washington-based Overseas De-
velopment Council and rates
countries on a scale of 1 to 100.
Three factors were used to deter-
mine the rating infant mortali-
ty, life expectancy at age one,
and literacy.
Listed below is a partial list of
the ratings:
97 rating, Sweden; 96 rating.
Denmark, Iceland, Japan, Hol-
land, Norway; 94 rating, United
States, Finland, France, New
Zealand, U.K.; 89 rating, Israel.
Greece; 79 rating, Lebanon; 74
rating, Kuwait; 61 rating, Bah-
rain; 54 rating, Syria; 47 rating.
Jordan; 45 rating, Iraq, Libya;
43 rating, Egypt, Iran; 34 rating,
United Arab Emirates; 29 rating,
Saudi Arabia.
transformed into an elegant ball-
room. Tall silver holders were
brimming full with bouquets of
roses, cascading over each table.
Every floral arrangement dis-
played a different shade of roses,
llu'minated by the glow of
candles and twinkling lights.
Joe and Benita were
surrounded by dear friends
Matt and Andy Miller; the Baer
family, Bobby, Aviva, their chil-
dren Michael, Ira, Larry, and
parents Mel and Lucille Baer; the
Schneiders, Reuben, Walfy,
Andrea; and Dede, Elaine and
Allan Coplin. On hand were Hal
and Myra Simon, Dr. Alan and
Ann Lane, Dr. Steve and Judy
Greenberg, Howard and Merry
I.iff. Also Jack and Marge Saltz-
man, Dr. Mark and Helen Cohan,
Al and Evelyn Wilpon and loads
of popular Amy's friends.
Mazel Tov to loving relatives,
Amy's grandparents, Nate and
Ethel Machtey and Eddie and
Annie Schwartz. Brother Jonny
Schwartz arrived a little late for
his sister's Bat Mitzvah party.
Jonny was playing the leading
role in the Fort Lauderdale
Children's Theatre production of
Noah's Animals held at the
Parker Playhouse. (Hollywood
friends Gregg Wilentz, Howard
Spector, Jeff Newman and Beth
Greene also took part in the
show.) When Jonny arrived at
the Bat Mitzvah he was still
wearing some of his stage
clothes.
Everyone had a great time as
they shared the happiness with
Joe and Benita and their lovely
family.
Nova University is offering an
informative luncheon and lecture
forum. First of four provocative
speakers was journalist,
playwright, Congresswoman,
Ambassador Clare Booth Luce.
An overflow audience including
Nova President Abraham
Fischler and wife Shirley
gathered at the Fort Lauderdale
Stouffer's Anacapri Inn. The
Hollywood luncheon goers in-
cluded Dorothy Fine, Nancy
Atkin, Lila Demet, Selma Hopen,
Rosemarie Goodman and daugh-
5 such great fun shanng the excitement of your latest
trip with specal fronds There's noth.no hke K2
EZJ?rw! 9d ',mes and a 0d *> o> sS
Brand Decaffeinated Coffee Why So^ BrarxP
Purely and amply. s ,00% real coXZm aiMhe great
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. flavor that only 100% real coffee can q.ve ferMR,a h
100% real coee and fastes ^TZSSZtF'
such a welcome guest1
K CERTIFIED
KOSHER
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andEniorv^irc^
I ragaMrad trademark of Qanaral Foods
and Enjoy Ybursett
IB1 On** WSKCSf&XiZi 7g5i

ter Nancy Ehrlich. Also Bobbe
Schleainoer, Janet Gable, JoAnn
Katz, Camille Sultan. Betty
Finkeistein, Ruth Galvin.
The audience enjoyed the ener-
getic speaker who is nee ring her
80th birthday. Mrs. Luce con-
tinues to be noted for her wit and
intelligence as well as her charm
and beauty. She is concerned
with the status of American
women. She began her career as
an associate editor for Vogue
magazine, followed by editor of
Vanity Fair and foreign corres-
pondent for Life Magazine. When
Mrs. Luce served in Congress,
there were 17 Congreaswomen.
Four decades later there are only
18 Congress women, although
women comprise 51 percent of the
electorate. Mrs. Luce is a very
inspiring woman.
Next lecturer will be Margaret
Truman Daniel. The series is a
complete sellout which reflects
the enthusiastic response of our
community when something
worthwhile is offered.
December will be an exciting
month for Dr. Fred and Sandi
Khani. They will long remember
the weekend of December 18 and
two beautiful simchas they will
enjoy with their family. Daughter
Khila will become a Bat Mitzvah
at Temple Sold at a meaningful
service. Fred's grandmother who
recently arrived from W ^
ve the Pleasure tobT?,?1
fo*mt.ea. More of S>
cUn from Us AxSlTJ*
be with their FlonStuui"-
The following evening!,.
marriage of son HowardI, ,*'
Retreat. Presently rwT*
Joni attend school F
IB**"- < &ss!
The family will top off A.
festive celebration at a Sun
brunch. These wonfcrW fi
reunions are heartwarming
sums. ** j
The Alumni of DeWittClita'
High continue to support th* ;
New York Alma Mater. AniZ
South Florida Chapter is u2
President Harold Newman, CU
of "24. (Busy Harold is also Pn
dent of his B'nai B'rith Lodai
Jesse Goldberg planned thTp*
gram and get together at Vffl
Restaurant on November 17. |i
was the Installation of Of&sj
complete with musical ent*ru&
ment, and a luncheon. Mettu
and greeting old friends aad
classmates highlighted the fa
filled afternoon.
Marion Sato
Post Hast* Shopping Cantar
4525 Sheridan St., Hollywood, Fla
Phone 961-6998
EMBASSY NORTfT=
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mar
181 White House Conference on Aging Community Calendar
By RABBI
EYMOUR FRIEDMAN
mole Sinai Congressional
?legate to the WACOA
Ling the 20th Century there
Ibeen about 35 national con-
Ves carrying the aegis of the
House. This increasingly
fcr mechanism has allowed
[the President and the Con-
1 to draw national attention
[wide range of subjects
L being one. The 1981 White
L Conference on Aging will
[he fourth conference on
since the initial one in
L upcoming White House
tence provides the op-
uiity to confront both short
[and long range issues of
Irn to an aging society and
Main recommendations and
lions for positive responsible
: actions.
uniqueness of the 1981
House Conference should
bted.as a number of signifi-
|factors have triggered the
^ing for this important
he increase in the total num-
M older people in America
[he growing proportion they
(sent in the population as a
he phenomena of longer life
|the projected continued in-
in the size of the older
llation.
("he increased pool of know-
available about why and
eople age.
The growth in private and
|c services for older Ameri-
The increased awareness on
Ipart of the public policy
irs that the older population
Bet with a multitude of prob-
but also, an important na-
I resourse.
evious White House Con-
jees on Aging have been
productive in identifying
in stimulating public and
^te effective programs and
initiators. This has re-
in a steady expansion in
| the number and complexity
rial organizations concerned
| aging in a rapidly changing
py, with the presently pro-
1 demographic changes. It is
I to consider the adequacy of
Jocial institutions in terms of
effectiveness, in assessing
responding to the implica-
for our country of a much
Rabbi Seymour Friedman
larger, older population and
longer life. Thus, while the 1981
White House Conference on
Aging must address the many
problems that confront the
present and future older Ameri-
cans, there is also a great need for
fresh thinking about ways to
utilize older Americans as current
and future resources for this na-
tion.
When Congress authorized the
1981 White House of Aging in
1978, it noted that dramatic
demographic and societal
changes had made it necessary
for a new, national policy to be
developed. Congress also called
for emphasis to be placed on
"right and obligation of older in-
dividuals to free choice and self-
help In planning their own
futures." Older Americans have
become the fastest growing seg-
ment of our population because of
lower death rates and longer life
spans. The number of people
aged 60 and over has increased
four times as fast as the number
under 60 since the year 1900. At
the tum of the century, there
were only 4.9 million Americans
aged 60 and over and the life
average expectancy at birth was
47. Today there are 34 million
older Americans and the average
life expectancy is 73.
The trend towards a graying
America will continue in the
future. In 1981 one out of every
seven Americans is 60 or over but
when today'8 pre-schoolers turn
60, one out of every 4 will be that
age or older. These changes will
have profound implications for
the economic and social affairs of
our country. For example, many
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ISRAEL BONDS
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ration Toll Free (800) 221-4838
older Americans want or need to
work and the nation will in-
creasingly need their productive
capacity, as the number of older
people continues to increase rela-
tive to the numbers of younger
people. But negative stereotypes
of the abilities of older people still
push many of them out of the
working force prematurely.
Among the major questions
facing the conference are:
How will the graying American
affect our social institutions?
How will it affect our families'
economy, educational system and
government programs? How can
we enhance the extra years of life
bestowed upon us. How can we
tap the skills or experiences of
the growing elderly population so
that it can truly serve as a con-
tributing and productive force
within our society? How can we
address the needs of those older
people who because of limited
fraility require the assistance of
one kind or another?
What role should governments
and the taxpayers who are re-
quired to support them play in
dealing with these vital issues?
And in those areas where govern-
ment role is appropriate, should
it be at the local, state or federal
level? What role can be played by
such private sector institutions
as business, labor unions and
professional associations, volun-
tary charitable organizations, re-
ligious groups and others? What
are the areas in which the public
and private sectors can work to-
gether?
Participating in the conference
in Washington will be approx-
imately 1,000 voting delegates
and 1,500 official observers.
Rabbi Friedman has been ap-
pointed to the Committee on Re-
search which will deal with new
knowledge needs, behavior, social
and economic areas and improved
information for policy making.
NOVEMBER 30
Temple Sinai Sisterhood, Paid
Up Sisterhood Membership
Luncheon. 12 noon, Haber Karp
Auditorium, Temple Sinai, 1201
Johnson St., for information, call
Rose Cohn, 922-1433 or Temple
Sinai, 920-1577.
DECEMBER 2
Community Day, Sponsored by
the Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.,
Diplomat Convention Center,
3515 S. Ocean Dr., guest
speakers, Virginia Graham and
Susan Dworkin, for information,
call Mary Anne at 921-8810.
DECEMBER 4
Young Adult Division Shabbat
Dinner. 7 p.m. at Temple Sinai,
1201 Johnson St., for informa-
tion, call Anita at 921-8810.
Temple Solel Shabbat Worship
Service. 8 p.m.. Temple Solel,
5100 Sheridan St., guest speaker,
Robert Clary, for information,
call Sylvia Greenberg at 989-
0205.
DECEMBER 6
Temple Beth Shalom Sisterhood
Holiday Gift Pair, 10 a.m. 1:30
p.m. in the temple ballroom.
Books, records, games, jewelry,
wrapping paper, activity books,
stickers, etc. will be sold. Pro-
ceeds will benefit the temple
youth. The fair will also be open
on Tuesday, Dec. 8 and Wednes-
day, Dec. 9 from 4:30 p.m. to
6:30 p.m. For information, call
Gail Cohen, 961-9787.
DECEMBER 7
Temple Israel of Miramar Sister-
hood semi-annual Rummage
Sale, 9 a in. I p.m. at the temple,
6920 S.W. 35th St., Miramar.
Clothing, small appliances, toys,
costume jewelry and furniture
will be sold. The Rummage Sale
will also be open on Tuesday,
Dec. 8 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. For in-
formation, call Fran Kravetz,
961-1700.
H oil wood Section, National
Council of Jewish Women,
general meeting. 12:30 p.m. at
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.
Entertainment will be provided
by international singing star
Eddie Klein. Refreshments will
be served and guests are
welcome. For information, call
923-4286.
DECEMBER 14
Jewish Federation of South
Broward 'Federation Celebra-
tion, 7:30 p.m. at the Hallandale
Jewish Center, 416 Northeast 8
Ave. Musical entertainment will
be provided by The American
Balalaika Company.
DECEMBER 16
11 illrrest Women's Division
Pacesetter Cocktail Party, 4 p.m.
at the home of Gertrude Falk,
guest speaker Mathilda Brailove.
DECEMBER 19
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Big Gifts Dinner, 7 p.m.
at the home of Marge and Jack
Saltzman, special guest speaker.
Rabbi Herbert Friedman.
Hollybrook Big Gifts Dinner, 6
p.m. at Hollybrook.
DECEMBER 21
Hollydale Chapter of American
Jewish Congress, Observance of
Chanukah with lighting of can-
dles and concert by the
Choraleers directed by Ben
Weinstein, 12 noon at Galahad
South, 3801 S. Ocean Dr. For in-
formation, call 454-7254.
RELGO, INC.
Religious & Gilt Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books-Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
Open Sunday
1570 Washington Avenm. MB.
"" 532-5912 ^^^
MyjSon,
The Knip-Kt!
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted, and justifi-
ably so, about their children's professional achievements. But in how many
parts of the world can a Jewish parent proudly proclaim: "Meet my son, THE
KNIGHT!"
Certainly Scotland must stand in the forefront. In recent
years Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
bers of Parliament, a Lord Provost (mayor), and the only Jewish
pipe-band in the entire world!
Of course Scotland's most famous product is scotch whisky.
And America's favorite scotch is J&B. We carefully select the fin-
est scotches and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The
result is why we say that J&B whispers.
Incidentally, you don't have to wait until your son becomes
a Knight or your daughter a Dame in order to enjoy J&B. Any
'simcha' will do!
86 Proof Blandad Scoter. Whisky. 019B0 Tr ParioTr^ Corp.. NV
J&R It whispers.


Page 10
The Jewish Foridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
i
Community Mission
Returns
patience, reactions to what the
group saw and felt were striking-
nilar
ult to trj
make people who haven't been to
Poland understand our re-
actions," said Nancv and Herb
I^i^-^27
Participants in the .Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Community Mission have re-
turned trom their remarkable
journey. Although the Mission
was an intensely personal ex-
!. chairmen of the Poland
thi Mission "Pol
sh civilization iting
and productive lor over 1.000
Now leas than f>.000 Jews
live in 1'oland. from a community
that had once numbered 3 mil-
lion."
"Our group was very fortunate
to have Gene Greenzweig. the
director of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, as our scholar
in residence," Nancy Brizel said.
"His knowledge and sensitivity
added an unique perspective to
our trip, and made the Mission a
tremendous learning experience."
"We became, an extended
family. Poland was so grim,"
Hi rl> Brizel recounted, "we found
we had to grasp one another."
"Israel provided a striking
very essence of life SWni^
. "A highlight of the kJ
8on was a chance v?C**
another The HenJfe'N
plane that was u&7 I
our resolve to'sTa'dSfflj


*
4*
.V_^ i
-4
Philip and Jessica Feibush talk with an United Nations border soldier.
Mission participants at Masada.
J
"jfachS1' P,and MiMi0n Chairman' D8es electronic, class at an Israeli
Eve Sterkel with Hod Haaharon children
wait into
Jessica Feibush talks with a resident of a new mini-settlement
Virginia Hyde meets one of the children who lives


November 27,1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
i participants on the Mount of Olives.
JBarron and Audrey Meline play with Israeli children.

i Hyde participates in a Masada torch-lighting ceremony.

lorrUon viaits Golda Meirs grave.


Saul Singer, campaign chairman, is greeted by Yidal Yadin.
^
N
Howard and Judee Barron aboard the CI30 Hercules transport, which flew par-
ticipants down into the Sinai. _____
n Morrison on a banker overlooking the Kinneret.
Al Golden tf"" with a resident of Mai Ban, which is a Home for the Aged


Robert Ciary To Speak At Temple Solel
Shabbat Worship Service will
begin at 8 p.m., Friday evening,
Dec. 4. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
will conduct the Worship Service.
Cantor Michael Kvrr will chant
the liturgical portion of the Wor-
ship Service.
Robert Clary, internationally
renown entertainer and holocaust
Vicki Raymond
thilda Brailove
Hillcrest Women's Division
Plans Pacesetter Event
For the first time in its history,
Hillcrest Women's Division is
planning a Pacesetter Cocktail
Party on behalf of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
1982 United Jewish Appeal-Fed-
eration campaign.
"This exciting event will be
held on Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 4
p.m. at the home of Gertrude
Falk, according to Vicki
Raymond, chairwoman.
"The women at Hillcrest are
extremely excited about this
$1,000 minimum commitment e-
vent, which 60 people are ex-
pected to attend," she added.
Guest speaker will be Mathilda
Brailove, past chairwoman of
United Jewish Appears Wom-
en's Division.
Hannah Adel, Dorothy Cher-
nuchin and Eleanor Lerner are
Hillcrest chairwomen.
The Pacesetter committee in-
cludes Harriet Bloom, Lillian
Ehrlich, Gert Entin, Birdie Fell,
Anne Gilbert, Hilda Gradinger,
Toby Greenberg, Sylvia Hagler,
Lillian Kramer, Shirley Kravitz,
Sue Mock. Bea Mogilowitz, Roz
Ratner. Daisy Rubin. Ruth Ser-
Nelson Dembs
Appointed Emerald
Hills Chairman
Nelson Dembs
Dr. Saul Singer, chairman of
the 1982 UJ A-Federation
campaign, has appointed Nelson
Dembs as chairman of the
Emerald Hilla Townhouses,
Apts. and Villas campaign.
"The needa of Israel, and our
local agencies are much increased
this year," said Dr. Singer. "We
are looking forward to greater
participation and commitment
from Emerald Hilla in our
campaign. I am rare that Nelson
Dembs will provide outstanding
Idrehip to this portion of our
campaign."
witz, Nellie Shanler, Sara Small-
berg and Sally Winograd.
survivor, will address the congre-
gation.
Devoted to education and sen-
sitizing young people who rep-
resent the 60 percent of the
world's population who were not
bom or were too young to be ex-
posed to Nazism during World
War II to the contemporary
significance of the Holocaust, the
Wiesenthal Center's nationally
acclaimed Outreach Program af-
fords students an opportunity to
leam first hand from a Holocaust
survivor, about the test of the
human spirit in the shadow of the
Third Reich. Pictured is
Robert Clary, survivor, actor and
volunteer for the Center's Out-
reach Program, sharing his camp
experiences during the Holo-
caust.
Robert Clary was born in
Paris, Franee, the youngest of 16
children and at 12 years old he
was singing professionally
throughout Paris. When the
Nazis invaded France, in 1940
Robert was 16 years old. Thirteen
members of his immediate family
were deported from Paris to Nazi
concentration camps Robert
was the only one to survive. (He
was liberated from Buchenwald
in 1945 by the American Army.)
After the war, Robert went
back to Paris to pick up the
pieces and start his life again.
Discovered singing in a Paris
nightclub in 1947, he recorded a
song tha' became an American
hit. The success of this brought
Robert to the United State* in
1941, where he eventually gained
recognition in all fields of enter-
tainment.
^needtoSkZ
during tk?l
hem with^ ,
nationally *?*>*(
Program* ifiN
SESfcg
Pictured is Robert Clary, survivor, actor. (Homo1, ft
volunteer for the Center's Outreach Program, gharins hkJ
periences during the Holocaust.
NOW YOU CAN KIBITZ
WITH A KIBBUTZ IN HAIFA
FORONLY$3.75.
operator ^Son^o^^e^ ** 'Srel' nOW ** nly $375'dided ** *"
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did c^>oXS**S!SSSSf **>*x<^ mm Sjmm*n**i
rr^oCa^?vSSa3^ ******** taepo.^efih.oou^onddVodBlouu.ond*
ccco fo\ pwnqbv are w 6(va (972)
AAjlO
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Southern Bel


r.iwi------r~
No More
\Soviet Jewry Update
TKeJewikh^loridian andShofarof Gretaer Uotiywgd_
glasses Continue
re Threats
The recent up-
hreats initiated by
Soviet authorities against refuse-
nik Hebrew teachers from
Moscow Odessa, Leningrad and
Vilnius has plagued the victims
with impromptu and destructive
iunity Relations Co mm it t
$h Federation of South Biaward
CU]pdat
ea organizations
presenting William
jrional Director of
I Jewish Committee,
J Anti-Semitism: "Is
IWorse?" at Temple
Vsday, Nov. 12.
Organize It ions
Jewish Community
DUth Broward, the
on the Holocaust
amunity Relations
f the Jewish Fed-
outh Broward and
kerican ORT.
Mi of the Jewish
Centers of South
kaired the evening.
bating was Rabbi
spiritual leader of
El who spoke on
It."
ig commemorated
anniversary of
it," the night of the
when the Nazis
it 200 Synagogues in
Austria and Germany.
Leaders of the sponsoring or-
ganizations graced the dais:
Ronald Rothschild, president of
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Broward, Elaine Pittell,
chairman of the Community Re-
lations Committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
Carl Rosenkopf, chairman of the
Subcommittee on the Holocaust
of the Community Relations
Committee and Ros Klein,
Regional president of Women's
American ORT.
CULT HOTLINE
If you are concerned or
troubled that your son, daughter
or friend has become involved
with cults or missionaries, please
call the Jewish Federation of
South Broward. Rabbi Harold
Richter, Chaplain and co-director
of the Community Relations
Committee will refer callers to
cult counselors and other re-
source people.
Temple Solel Notes
of officers was in-
[ii' Breakfast meeting
kherhood on Sunday,
Louis Pleeter; Vice
|st, Mark Fried, Vice
Second, Stephen
Treasurer, Leo Maltz-
ary, Gerald Wein-
ant Secretary, Alvin
ting was concluded
i Jamaica on film.
Party is scheduled
t her hood for Sunday,
Dec. 6 from 1 to 5 p.m. at the
Sunrise Skating Rink, Pine
Island Road. Admission is $4
per person will include skates
rental.
Plans are in progress for the
Israeli Band Drive Dinner to
honor Joan and Doug Gross on
Sunday, Dec. 13 at the Temple.
Barry Farber, host of a New York
Talk Show will be the guest
speaker. Reservation may be
made by calling the Temple
office, 989-0206.
An
HOTEL
nelll
TEL I
Strict!, Inker
13 Fill Cmtk Meals Daily
Italtfxa art Spam" <
i I.I.-UN Sktw-lkiits
Hfe Cfr to // Needs Saecul Diets
700EUCUD AVE
, MAM BEACH 1.531-1191* '% *' trnMrnai
139.
Weekly Per. Pers.
Ooub. Occ.
To Dec. 13
REGARDS FROM MEL AND
EUNICE SAFRA AND YOUR
FRIENDS, FORMERLY OF
THE WHITE HOUSE.
REGARDS FROM CAMTOR
FRIEDMAN. GLORIA. ELKIN.
AND OEOROINA.___________
ipeit Catered Affair
rtth Heart and Flair!
Unexcelled cuisine.
Magnificent public
rooms combine for
perfect ambiance,
supplemented by the
renowned experience
of Bill Goldring,
Vice President
For Further Information Please call 865-1500
konover ** Hotel
I 5445 Collins Avenue. Miami Bwchl
accu-
violations of their homes during
which essential teaching
materials are seized and threats
of exile, arrest and false
sations are issued.
Fulmahkt, Eiddshtein, Litvak,
Surakin, Kholmelnitsky, Ku-
ravsky, Abramovich, Kosharov-
sky, Khasina, Tesemenetsky, and
Finkelstein all have been
designated as objects of KGB
taunting and rigid surveillance in
three short weeks.
Abramovich and Koaharovsky
were linked to Sverdlovsk acti-
vist Lev Shefer, currently under
indictment, and threatened with
arrest by KGB interro-
gators.Abramovich outwardly
denied any knowldge of Shefer.
Koaharovsky claimed Shefer as
merely a casual acquaintance
from several years ago and
denied any other connection with
him.
Shefer, an engineer who has
applied for a visa to emigrate, is
under investigation by the
Sverdlovsk KGB, along with
others, for alleged anti-Soviet
activities.
Despite the KGB's heightened
harassment and interrogations,
its falsified accusations and
attempts at marring the charac-
ters of many Hebrew teachers
and invoking fear in the teaching
communities of several cities,
Hebrew classes continue and the
spirit of learning remains intact.
Paritsky Hires Legal Aid
KHARKOV Polina Pa-
ritsky has secured a lawyer for
her refusenik-husband,
Aleksandr, who awaits his trial in
a Kharkov prison. He was
arrested in August for allegedly
"defaming the Soviet State." The
charge carried a maximum
sentence of three years.
Abe Stolar: An American
Hostage In Moscow
MOSCOW American Abe
Stolar entered the Soviet Union
in 1931 at the age of 19 and was
unwittingly made a Soviet cit-
izen, falling prey to the rigid
Soviet doctrine and lifestyle
ordained Jews in the USSR.
In 1975, Stolar and his Rus-
sian-born wife and son received
visas to emigrate to Israel. Steps
away from the plane to freedom,
their exit rights were rescinded
and they were turned away.
Now Stolar and his family, for-
bidden to work or study, are
united and vocal in their battle to
leave the USSR and end their
"captivity." Stolar wrote in a
June, 1981 letter:
The Soviets refuse to say at
least orally, let alone in writing,
why they are violating our hu-
man rights and their own Consti-
tution. Why are they holding us
captive? ... My family demands
to be released immediately from
this heartless, unnatural de-
tention in an unfriendly country.
We demand that the authorities
comply with our exit visas of
1975. .
A Decade Has Passed ... The
Goldshteins Remembered
TBILISI This month marks
the 10th anniversary of Isai and
Elizaveta Goldshteins struggle
to emigrate to Israel. For the
past decade, the Goldshteins
have battled Soviet bureaucracy,
tolerated harassment and the
pilaging of their home, and
fought to assuage the un-
productivity forced upon them as
their livelihoods were destroyed.
In a desperate attempt to receive
visas for herself and her son,
Elizaveta divorced Isai in 1980.
Her efforts, thus far, are futile.
NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SOVtET JEWRY
10 Beet 40*. km, Suite tV Nn York, N.Y. 1001*
And
(NATIONAL AGENCY/COMMUNITY)
PETITION TO
LEONID BREZHNEV, PRESIDENT, SUPREME SOVIET
a. people ol different religious racial, naiional and political perauaaiem. dhara a
belief ei tvt naad to a Intamalional paacc and mutual truet. e akte believe
that 0* obaervinco ol elementary human rajtm a fundamental prereouttlte to eurti
peace and truat. We are deeply datreued diet at preeant your government virtually
denial Jew wieti to depart die eaerciee of dveir Right to Leave and at family reuni-
fication, aa guaranteed by international agreementa. e, therefere, call upen dve Soviet
Unen aa a ugnetor, to the HeUntti Final Act and to dve Orenant on Oril and Political
Pjghatei
I.
Permit dtoee men, women and children who lor yean have eeught to leave
the USSR the Rajnt to Leave, and to be united with reletivee.
Caaae all heraatment of and preeaure en Jean amo eapreei the i la emig-
rate and to unite with the. f amiiiei and thee- people in thee notional home-
land.
Pre* all lev/Oh Prusnert of Cenecience earn to labor campa, prlaona and
eile tolely beceuae of thee deaire to leave for braeL
NAME
ADDRESS
SJH
a mess
Are your closets
garage full m^DL to the
topO do us both a favor
call O^theThrift Shop

old new small ^ large
we'll come get it gj|g and
there's no charge
Everything you give to the Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is tax deductible,
and is sold to pay for medical supplies and medication for the indigent elderly of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Call 751-3988
In Miami 5713 NW 27 Avenue.Miami. Tel:635-6753
In Miami 500 NE 79 Street. Miami.Tel: 751-3988
n Hallandale 3149 Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale.
In Hallandale JMJ^ 981.8245 (ln rjade) 625-0620
In Carol City 2800 NW 183 Street. Carol City. Tel: 624-8252
Irvine Cvrjen Chairman of the Board Harold Beck. President.
JSSRchm I hrifl Shop Committee Fred D. Hirt. Executive D.rector.


Page 14


The Jewish Floridion and Shofar of OrtaUr Hollywood
nr
Prtfcy.No
Jewish Education in South Broward
Recognizing that the future of
the Jewish Community lies in the
hands of our young people, as
well as an educated community,
in Judaism, on all levels, our
Federation joined hands with the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation.CAJE, in 1976. A commit-
tee on Education became one of
the standing committees of
Federation, and under the watch-
ful eye of Moses Hornstein. of
blessed memory, became an
active and watchful observer of
what is being done educationally,
in our community.
CAJE provides speakers for
Federation as the need arises,
and when they are requested.
Thus when the Community Mis-
sion of this fall was projected.
Gene Greenzweig, the Executive
Director of CAJE gave a series of
five lessons to that group of the
Mission which would start its
trip with a visit to Poland before
joining the rest of the Mission in
Israel. This was not a new role for
Mr. Greenzweig who has given a
series of classes to the Women's
Division. When Federation re-
quested an Ulpanist to give a few
lessons to those who were going
to Israel. CAJE sent in an Ulpan
teacher.
There are many problems
which are of concern to the Jew-
ish Community. Thus when a
speaker is needed for a meeting
with students and parents on the
troublesome subject of "Cults.''
Dr. Sandy Andron. the Youth
Program Director at CAJE is of-
ten the speaker.
Dr. Menachem Kaab. the Day
School Department Director at
CAJE works with the Day
Schools. On Nov. 11. 1981. there
was a very successful all Day
School Workshop which was at-
tended by all teachers of Jewish
Day Schools from Miami to West
Palm Beach.
Dr. Deborah Lerer. the Jewish
Special Education Director has
set up classes for these children
in need of special education in re-
ligious schools and day schools in
South Broward and Dade Coun-
ties.
The Judaica High School is a
program which has been set up
for eigth. ninth and tenth grades.
The thinking was that this would
act as an outreach program for
students who are just Dast Bar-
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
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432-7247
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Box OD The Jewish Fioridian
P.O. Box 012973. Miami 33101
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(305)531-2223
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MEMBER: NASD. S SIPC
Bat Mitzvah age, and would help
hold them for these crucial years.
The courses are chosen by the
Educational Director and-or the
Rabbi of the institution together
with Rabbi Shimon Azulay. the
High School Administrator, Dr.
Andron, the Youth Program
Director and Dr. Diana J. Reis-
man. the South Broward Educa-
tional Consultant who is part of
the CAJE Organization. Books
for these classes are provided by
CAJE, as are materials and cur-
ricula which are produced by
CAJE.
Workshops for the Judaica
High School teachers, and for
teachers of the Religious Schools
are arranged by CAJE from time
to time. Special classes in subject
areas are held for all teachers in
the area, generally during the
mid-winter period when there are
no classes, and in the summer
time.
One of the very happy experi-
ences which would have been a
source of great pleasure for
Moses Horenstein, was the tact
that Federation has allocated
funds to be uaed Si a aubvention
for students who study through
their tenth grade, and are then
confirmed. This last summer we
sent our second Teen Tour Group
to Israel, and at our last monthly
meeting of the Council of Rabbis
and Educational Directors we
initiated conversation about our
third trip.
Another source of satisfaction
to the Education Committee are
College Credit Courses which are
open to tenth grade students.
These courses allow a student
who completes them successfully
to go on to college with credit,
which is much cheaper, and
which can also shorten the time
that the student must spend in
his undergraduate program.
CAJE.which is housed in the
building of the Greater Miami
Federation at 4200 Biscayne
Blvd. has a fine library which is
open to all residents of South
Broward who come to register.
Further information about
Jewish Educi,
Lomar Rental Apartments
3501 Tyler Street, Hollywood, R
Broward 966-7600
Dade 6244777
No
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YOUR 1981 TAXES AND RETIRE
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BUT YOU MUST ACT BEFORE APRIL
Did you know that you can still save hundreds of dollars
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Federal laws permit any person, either employed
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And If you act before April 15. those tax-deferred
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I If you art younger, final benefit! are
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Tax Bracket.................................32%
Inot uncommon during these
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First year IRA Contribution.............. SI.500.00
Tax deferment on si.500.00.................40000
Interest' on SI.500.00 at end of first year ....22020
SI.500.00 + 220.20 = S1.720.20
Totalfirst years tax deferment on S1.72O20 S550.47
tMHoma
1111m
: 11 **
C0M.MILII
M'MC
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wauriM
SCUM
'SI ssst
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inlHt UXB
mmmmtn
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umjua
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tawmtot
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awMvaw*
COUMMW
NOW LOOK HOW YOUR MONEY
WILL HAVE GROWN BY AGE 65
si.500.00 annual tax-deferred
contributions Invested for I year
and S2.0O0.00 for 24years..............S4%50000
S4%500.00principal plus
Interest after 25yean..................S448.J21.B0
*>tal tax-deferred savings
nd Interest If you begin withdrawing
pension of S5.908.5l per month at
age 65 for IS years (Average life
expectancy at age 651 S1.063.531M
MSJMil
Aimmtoamm
SJI-W"
imwumu*,
atomaaum
SSl-HK
umtmmu
aurufljw
11S-H*
aai
UMXUW*
inaiHi'
ISM*
mnsemi-r
moumxw**
axm
mum
FLAGLER FEDERAL
S*ving* 4 Loan Association
JudeRabldeau
101 N.E. 1st Avenue
Miami. FL 33132
**e send me further Information on Flagler
Federal's IRA retirement program.
Address
OtyKtate/Zlp
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
**tomMw\yowtaxm)h\edt4*S80M.p*m Interest,
'amount to MORC THAN ONEMILLION DOLLARS.
^SSlft** "* **-** current 2V> yam cortmcatm paying O.K%
ntmt marc ft no guarantee that thm percentage m* continue throughout
your contributing years. Of course. It could go higher
FLAGLER
uua
ijwiiua-W"
LASOOV
MW*"-a-
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oxomnam
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xa <
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-.UIIL.J & LEAH AS5ELIAIII I'
uuamxm
tat****


rfcf-*^""
nV.-:V1
JTfir /eg** Ffortdtdn and Shofur ofGreater Hollywood
Page 16
Temple Sinai In Winner's Circle
RON
SYM
PSON
3/TS WOTS: The AUoiv-
,tfcfe imu printed in the Oct.
tut of the Port Lauderdale
it a difference day
[Long before Albert Poan
to Hollywood 11 yean
the retired Boston in-
list placed -the laws of his
? stive Jewish faith above
rsona 1 opportunities for fi-
gain. That made his en-
er with Yom Kippur three
ago a particularly trying
Hence.
tin now owns race horses, six
are stabled at Calder
Racetrack for the summer sea
on- Two days before Yom
Kippur. he learned his 4-year-old
FrstV.Bey bad been scheduled
lor the second race on the high
Jewish holiday, when working is
forbidden. Ponn went to his
teener. Harry Benson. "I'm very
disturbed," Ponn said he told
Benson.
Calder racing secretary Terry
Meyocka pleaded with Ponn to
reconsider. The field already was
too small, Meyocka said, and
without First Valley it wouldn't
be much of a race. "I was in s
quandary." Ponn said.
Ponn found his solution in
Leslie Benson, the wife of his
trainer. "He's Jewish, but she's
Colony Point To Hold
Campaign Skill Seminar
ony Point residents will
pipatc in a Campaign Skill
Bar Training program, Mon-
|Nov 30 at 8:45 p.m. in the
and Crafts Room.
event is sponsored by the
kh Federation of South
lard.
Colony Point Committee
des Hilda and Jules Beme.
lie and Murray Bornestein,
Nancy and Ben Goldstein, Mimi
and Manny Mandel, Gloria
Perry, Toby and Jack Pitchman,
Arlene Saxe, Cele and Harry
Schwartz, Yetta and Murray Sel-
by, and Ceil and Alton Zucker.
The committee is also looking
forward to the upcoming
Chanukah Celebration, set for
Sunday, Dec. 20 at 11 a.m. More
than 250 residents are expected
to attend.
Disabled Veterans Event
National Department of
[Disabled Veterans of the
States of America will
itf their mobile field unit
on December 15. from 9 a.m.
t-m. at the DAV Post No. 41.
Scott St., Hollywood (one
: west of Dixie Hwv.l.
fv purpose of this project is
ovide the disabled as well as
bterans with information and
tance concerning any aspect
ntitlement to federal bene-
JCC
pme join in the fun at the
Ish Community Centers of
pi Broward and participate in
I Israeli Dance class every
Way evening at 7:30 p.m.
[class is open to beginners,
hnediates and advanced
lers. The Jewish Community
ler is located at 2838
lywood Boulevard. The
fssion fee is SI for members
i Jewish Community Center
12 for non-members.
Professionally skilled AV
service officers are on board the
unit to provide free assistance in
the filing of claims for VA
benefits, as well as aiding to clear
up problems with present claims.
Included are not only claims for
disability compensation and pen-
sions, but also for benefits in
such areas as education, home
loans, hospital and outpatient
medical treatment, insurance and
correction of military and naval
records.
In addition the DAV National
Service Officers are prepared to
offer general information and
assistance concerning federal
employment and other benefit
programs administered by Civil
Service and the Social Security
Administration. They also are
fully qualified to counsel on
employment matters and state
veteran benefits.
Veterans should bring
discharge papers, social security
and-or medicare I.D.
South Broward DAV Chapter
No. 41 looks forward to helping
all veterans whenver possible. .
by
Judi Sheppard Miuett
jazzercise
JP A FUN WAY TO FITNESS
PALM BEACH INFORMATION
736-1625 & 585-9190
BROWARD INFORMATION
475-4787
DADE INFORMATION
9480292
not." Ponn said, "ao I leased the
horse to Mrs. Benson for the
day" The temporary switch was
Mk bscauM Mrs. Benson
heady was a registered hone
owner at Calder.
"The horse won, believe it or
not, by 14 tenths," Ponn said.
First Valley had picked up a
4.000 purse for running the
track at just under 1 minute 13
seconds and paid S3.40 to win.
Ponn took his problem to the
congregation at hia synagogue,
Temple Sinai hi HoUyood. "I got
up before the congregation and
told than I was very unhappy,
but moat of them thought I had
dona nothing wrong," Ponn said.
Ten percent of the winnings
had gone to the jockey and
another 10 percent to Benson,
leaving Ponn with about $3,200.
"I didn't want that money under
any circumstances," Ponn said,
"ao I decided to give it to my
synagogue and the chaplaincy at
Calder." Benson concurred and
gave up his MOO as well.
The chaplaincy fund, explained
Calder president Kenny Nee Jr..
benefits track employees such aa
grooms and Stable hands. "I
thought it was a hell of e
gesture," Noe said.
Ponn said he still feels guilty.
But Rabbi Seymour Friedman of
Temple Sinai disagrees. "There's
no reason for feeling guilty at all"
Friedman said. "I just think it
waa the greatest thing."
For the first time in its history, the Women's Division of the Jewish Federation of South Broward reached
hill capacity on its Bus Tour. The Bus Tour visits various Federation-supported agencies such as the
Jewish Community Centers of South Broward. the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged at
Douglas Gardens and Beth Shalom Day School
ITS THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxiffrthe coffee any busy balbusta
would be proud to serve. Especially with the
strudel. Or. the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bagels. Or whenever friends and 'mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim* the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to make fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!


T-T-7*
-
Open an EARN MORESM Checking Account at
American Savings, and save. You save on monthly
service charges, because there are none. And you earn
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So make the most of your checking as well as your
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In
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Your
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rln*. inurd by an Aeancy <* tf F*dml OownmM *J*2 fL-**
ASSETS EXCEED $2 BILLION.


(ovember 27.1961
_
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofbr ofGreater Hollywood
-Tigel7
PRE-DEVELOPMENT SPECIAL!
On theJbeach
DISPLAY CENTER & SALES OFFICE IS
OPEN DAILY FROM 9:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M.
^asi
f
MARCO ISLAND
at tropical Marco Island
Only Twenty Eight Condominium apartments are available
at the Special Pre-Development down payment of
10% on the unit of your choice.
Financing is available to qualified buyers.
All apartments will be completed by the Fall of 1982.
Apartments on the beach vary in price from $ 139,000
depending on size and appointments specified.
Drive over to Marco Island (only 90
miles) and visit the sales and recep-
tion center Take a golf cart ride to
the fabulous beach, and examine the
site from our observation tower. Then
.select the unit of your choice at
special, once-in-a-lifetime pre-
development price opportunity.
We are not able to visit you at this time
but would like more information.
I
I
I NAME___________________________________________
ADDRESS
I
I
I
I
I CITY & STATE.
I
ZIP.
PHONE
BUSINESS
FOII O IT AILS Oil FMHTHBW WPOW"iiw
CALL JEAN KAPLAN
Gulfside Club 600 South Collier Boulevard
Marco Island. FL 33937 (813) 394-8848
_. ..,. ,.u.ntatinm of tt* develop*' for correct representations. maKe reference to this
Orai reprwentafons cannot be rel.ed upon as "^^TSSjiii | ........| tMlMI
tjrocnure and to>ffe,j3pc JF-IH8I
m


Page 18



xMmmmmm
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Fridt
iy.No
W
Hollybrook Awards
Temple SolelE^J
. Independent Singles of hour with
Temple Solel (ages 30-66) 6100 fallow. CdMH"*V
NhM-irlan are nlannhu. r\__i ~"=id.
Dr. Joseph Stein, immediate
past-chairman of the Hollybrook
Division, UJA Federation
Campaign was honored at the re-
cent Hollywood Oneg Shabbat
and Awards presentation. This
annual event marks the begin-
ning of the Hollybrook UJA-
Federation Campaign.
In accepting his award from
Dr. Howard Barron, chairman of
the Physician's Division, Dr.
Stein used the oft quoted Jack
Benny line used when he received
a similiar award, "I really don't
deserve this, but then again I
have arthritis and I don't really
deserve that either."
Dr. Stein then thanked all of
the 1980-81 campaign workers
and presented their awards.
The program started with 1982
Campaign Chairman Harry
Goldstein introducing the leaders
of this year's campaign. They
include Dr. Harold Goldberg, co-
chairman: Rhea Krieger and
Jackie Levine, co-chairman Big
Gifts CockUfl Party; Esther
Marcus and Sylvia Stein, co-
chairman. Dinner.
Jackie Levine announced
Saturday, December 19, as the
date of the Big Gifts Cocktail
Party at her home. Guest speaker
will be Rev. John Stanley Grauel,
a member of the crew of the ill-
fated ship. Exodus.
The highlight of the evening
was a report from recent Mission
participants, Susan Singer and
Dr. Howard Barron. Susan re-
ported on the Poland portion of
the mission and Dr. Barron re-
ported on the Israel portion.
This annual Oneg Shabbat is a
tradition that started with Joe
Stein. It gives the Hollybrook
workers a chance to renew old
acquaintances and prepare for
the forthcoming campaign. We
look forward to pushing well past
the hundred thousand dollar
mark for Hollybrook this year,"
Harry Goldstein commented.
The next official Hollybrook
campaign event is the Big Gifts
Cocktail Party Saturday,
December 19 at the home of
Nathan and Jackie Levine. The
minimum commitment is $650.
Further information can be
obtained by calling Jackie Levine
431-0257. Rhea Krieger 431-7051
or Ira Sheier at Federation. 921-
8810.
The
empl
Sheridan are planning a Dec. 10
7:30 p.m. program with Dr Frank
Curley, psychologist aa guest
speaker. The topic is "Kramer vs.
Kramer or The Role of the Father
in a Divorced Family." A social
S"PPer at Trafril
C<*t $7.50. Fonfy
details call M.2r
477 or aLjS
0l2n oar Jib.
LEON ROTH. M.D. PA
DIPLOMATE INTERNAL MEDl(
is pleasedloQ^^
the relocation of his offj
tor the practice!
Internal Medicine and Cardiolc
m association
Stanley H.Bernstein, I
3800 South Ocean Dn3
Hallmark Building, Suite 2J
Hollywood. Florida
Tel 458-
Past Hollybrook Chairman Lester Wefl (center) and immediate past
r.' ,am,!*5. G*ore Finneman (right) greet Jack Wessler at the
Hollybrook Oneg Shabbat.

i
5^''^ L H"M Goldberg, Hollybrook 1982 co-chairman; .
Kuth Goldberg. Dr. Howard Barron; Physiciane' Division chairman
nxA^ u "' inM,ediate P" chairman. Susan Singer, Evelyn
Goldstein, Harry Goldstein, Hollybrook 1982 chairmanTand Dr Ira
Sheier.campaign associate. Dr. Stein received campaign award from -
Mrs. Singer.
:
4900 Griffin Road
South Fort Lauderdsle. Florida
(3 blocks west ol441)
TEMPLE BETH EL
Crypts and Niches
The moat beautiful Jawl.h cemetery
In Broward County
Close In location
***> operated on a non-profit
basis by Temple Beth-El of
Hollywood, Fla
Perpetual care Included
Reasonable prices
' for further errdrmaf/OAp/ease call
-

,-Whole life
insurance at
"Saw prices.
on w.th flexible nrl you wh0,e Me protec-
PeoPte who though tr?iUmS-,rs a bargain or
"* insurance N^ yo7clnT} affo'd e
ca" your Liberty ^iS. T f'nd out how-
y Nat,onal agent today.
i

ALABAMA
No Obligation
No Sales Person WiU Call
HA*|WJoiii7;3;*V
raoMn
HmSHX
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33020
Pleaae send me lltersture on the above.
NAME _______.________
ADDRESS
CITY______
STATE
."';' *:;:*.'!<-'>*


iy, November 27,1981

The Jewish



Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19
>ward Adults Go
To SchoolIn Israel
Christians Mobilizing For Israel
ah Reiter of Margate; Mary
of Hallandale; Dora and
t Simon of Pompano Beach
f imi Solomon of Plantation,
ned Nov. 25 from an Adult
Water of High School
Is and seniors across the
I five were part of a group of
fults on the special program;
_e-a-year chance for adults
perience the High School in
intensive learning and
program. Students at HSI
history where it happened
[twice a year so do their
Its, and other adults.
gh School in Israel, which
tors eight annual student
B, as well as two three-week
_ sessions is non-sectarian
non-profit. Students learn
Speakers Bureau
Update
By MARJORIE HYER
Washington Port Service
WASHINGTON A new
effort to mobilize American
Christians in support of Israel
and to form Christian Zionist
pressure groups in congressional
districts throughout the country
got off the ground here recently
at a diverse gathering of
Christian groups.
The representatives of more
than a score of Christian organi-
zations were able to momentarily
gloss over their deep ideological
differences and concentrate on
more practical subjects, such as
the issue of selling AWACS radar
planes to Saudi Arabia. Partici-
pants ranged from representa-
tives of the National Conference
of Catholic Bishops and the Na-
tional Council of Churches to
fundamentalist broadcast
evangelists.
the history of western civilization
m ""a" classes and in seminars
at the sites of historical events. A
maximum 18:1 student: teacher
ratio, an immersion educational
atmosphere, college level
academics and residency ir Hod
Hasharon, South Browards
Project Renewal City
combine to make this a unique
opportunity. 4
For further information on the
programs, call (305) 576-3286
For further informaiton on the
people, call Mary Dunetz.
Workshop
On Stress
The Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Broward is
sponsoring a workshop on
"Coping ... The Challenge of the
80's," on Wednesday, Dec. 16, at
8 p.m. The session will be held at /~n. i j _
msHXwSTouTevard0^ of Aging ParentsWorkshop
In a statement, the Christians
pledged renewed efforts "to work
for the security and well-being of
Israel and for the strengthening
of ties between Jews and
Christians." It also called on the
U.S. government to "take steps
to strengthen Israel's position,
not to weaken it."
The statement condemned an-
ti-Semitism and "reckless state-
ments that cast aspersions on the
Jewish people."
The meeting was organized by
the New York-based National
Christian Leadership Conference
for Israel, an umbrella organiza-
tion that seeks to bring together
Christian groups that support
Israel.
The meeting was the latest ef-
fort in a continuing tug-of-war
'between pro-Zionist forces and
pro-Arabs to capture the sym-
pathies and support of American
Christians on the Middle East is-
sue. But the 30 groups that now
are included in the organization,
according to the Rev. Isaac Rot-
tenberg, director of the confer-
ence, have widely divergent
reasons for their allegiance to
Israel and even more conflicting
views on how Christians should
relate to Jews.
<
pph Kleiman
iv JOSEPH KLEIMAN
Chairman
e Jewish Federation of
Ih Broward s Speakers
|au currently has 27 speakers
10 topics available for the
r-f community members.
date, 25 speaking engage-
ts have been booked by the
Deer's Bureau and 300 tele-
is (political telegrams which
| sent to Washington) have
i filled out.
pr additional information on
Speaker's Bureau, contact
n Marx at the Jewish Fed-
lion of South Broward.
JATIONAL HEBREW-
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
|ynagogue Gift Shop Supplies
Bar Mitzvah Sets
krge Selection ot Chanukah Gilts
949 Washington Ave., M.B.
Sherwin Rosenstein, ACSW,
Director of Jewish Family Serv-
ices of Broward County, will lead
the workshop which will focus on
coping with the stress and
tension of everyday living and
particularly, the difficult mo-
ments in your life. Channelling
your energies in positive ways
and adjusting to situations that
might at first appear in-
surmountable, will also be dis-
cussed.
The program is open to the en-
tire community. The fee for the
workshop is $5 for Jewish Com-
munity Center members and
$7.50 for non-members.
For further information and
to register contact Sherri Kling-
hoffer at the JCC of South
Broward. 921-6511.
,532-2210*
STUDENT FORUM
Tuesday. December 29,
7:30 p.m.
Jewish Community Center
of South Broward
Topic: "How Does
Campus Life Affect You As
A Jew?"
Participants: College
Students
Sponsored by the Sub-
committee on Cults of the
Community Relations Com-
mittee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
and the Jewish Community
Centers of South Broward.
For further information,
call Rabbi Harold Richter,
921-8810 or Sherri Kling-
hoffer, 921-6511.
XCELLENT ORE
EGINS WITH
LY LICENSED FOR MEDICARE. VX & PRIVATE PATIENTS
HALLANDALE
(REHABILITATION CENTER
THE PLEASANT NURSING HOME"
(305) 457-9717 OR 944-6340
2M EAST HUIAMMII BEACH BOULfVARO. HAUAR0ALL FLORIDA 33009
A Workshop for Children of
Aging Parents will be held on
Wednesday evening, Dec. 3, from
7:30 to 10 p.m. sponsored by the
Southeast Focal Point Senior
Center, to be held at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
2719 Hollywood Boulevard.
There will be a panel discussion
and a question and answer period
conducted by the professional
staff members of the Senior
Program.
This workshop will deal with
the kinds of help which are avail-
able, where to go to receive
assistance, and the support sys-
tems to which the family mem-
bers can turn in their concern for
the care of and relating with their
aging parent. Most important
this will provide those with simi-
lar problems the opportunity to
share their concerns and feelings.
Please contact Doris Friedman
for further information at 921-
6518.
Fundamentalist Christians in-
terpret Israel's resurgence as the
fulfillment of Biblical prophecies,
a prerequisite to the second com-
ing of Christ. They also believe
the New Testament commands
them to work to convert Jews to
Christianity.
Mainline Christians in the
coalition reject this interpreta-
tion of the Bible. They support
the existence of Israel as a home-
land for the Jews after centuries
of persecution, much of it, as the
Rev. Robert Drinan outlined to
the gathering here, at the hands
of Christians. Such Christians
view Judaism as a religion on a
par with Christianity and reject
efforts to convert Jews.
LEVITT-WEINSTEIN
"mortal Chapato
mm mm.....
JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Local and Out of Slate Arrangamanti
PRE PAID FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH
OUR GUARANTEED "SECURITY PLAN"
Hoayoood
'9?1 P,mfHn. RoH
21.7200
Mkvia KttnA
arM pm bk i.
Mil OfeMchoM. W.d
M.I 100
** G'uthow
North Mi.ml lm
18040 W On* Mwy
M*-tl1S
Hen., Klain
VIC KWM
"We've discovered j I
THEMENQRAH
PRE NEED PLAN.
And all the satisfaction,
thoughtfulness
and financial value
of pre need planning"
"Preneed arrangements have given us peace of mind, the right to make
our own choices and a cost set at today 's prices. And at Menorah, the
traditions of our faith will be upheld. "
The Menorah Pre-Need Plan offers these guarantees:
ALL PAYMENTS are held in trust and are TOTALLY REFUNDABLE
ALL CONTRACT FORMS are APPROVED BY the office of the
FLORIDA INSURANCE COMMISSIONER
Interest free payments for up to five years
Funds may be used toward funeral expenses both locally and
out of -state
Only the purchaser can cancel for reasons other than non-payment
To learn more about the Menorah Pre-Need Plan, just fill out and
J return this coupon to:
I Menorah Chapels. 6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard.
| Fort Lauderdale, FL 33313. Attn: Pre-Need Director.
I I WOULD LIKE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN. I UNDERSTAND IT IS AT ABSOLUTELY NO
COST OR OBLIGATION TO ME.
NAME___________,--------------------
I
I
| ADDRESS.
I CITY.
JF
STATE.
ZIP.
I TELEPHONE.
AGE.
[wjj The Menorah
3- Pre-Need Plan.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
In Broward, 742-6000. In Dade, 945-3939.
In Palm Beach, 833-0887.
And coming soon to North Miami Beach..
Menorah Chapels Cemetery Counseling Service is available at no charge.


Pmre20
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar ofGnater Hollywood
Friday, No
NORTON
SINCE 19S*J-
TIRE CO.
SAFETY
CENTER
ec_
XCA LIGHT
TRUCK TIRES
SIZE
700x15
I 6 ply tubeless
750x16
|8 ply lube-type
875x16.5
I 8 ply tubeless
1950x16.5
lor 10ply t less
10x16.5
8 ply tubeless
PRICE
77.66
96.30
104.81
125.58
124.64
F.E.T.
304
4.14
4.27!
---------^S---------i PRICF
IP155/80R13
4 881
5.06!
4 880
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
155x12
145x13
155x13
165x13
165x14
185x14
165x15
175/70x13
185/70x13
185/70x14
PRICE
41.76
38.60
44.06
49.43
51.52
62.07
54.68
57.85
64.02
68.31
F.E.T.
1.39
1.32
1.48
1.61
1.73
2.28
1.81
1.73
1.90
P195/75-14
ER78-14
FR78-14
P205/75-14
k205x14
P205/75-1;
GR78-15
GR70-15
71.37
7
73,06
146
.22
60
07
19
2.68
2.51
12.51
2.55
95
206
LIWW1M

12.91
2.751
SkR
SPECIAL PERFORMANCE
PACKAGE
TRX RADIAL
& MAG WHEEL
Check our stores
to see II these will
lit your car
P225/75-15
l.rn.tedquannt.es
SjQ 2.95 j
2.91
190/65R390 Black
220/65R390 White
SPECIAL
PRICE

1^*n*uSL
M
*\V
lJy*r~-
pfr
205/70X
918
THERE'S MORE TO BUYING
TIRES THAN JUST PRICE
SINCE 1924 NORTON TIRE CO. HAS OFFERED QUALITY BRANDS
COMPETITIVE PRICING, FAST & EFFICIENT SERVICE, T/A HIGH
TECH SPECIALIST STORE MANAGERS, CERTIFIED MECHANICS
PERSONAL INTEGRITY PLUS GUARANTEED SATISFACTON
SPECIAL PURCHASE
RADIALS
FIBERGLASS BELTS
POLYESTER PLIES
WHITEWALLS
NOT ALL SIZES AVAILABLE
AT ALL STORES
_SJZE_
BR78-13
also tits
P185/75R13
ER78-14
also ills
P195/75R14
FR78-14
also fits
P205/75R14
GR78-14
also fits
P215/75R14
HR78-14
also fits
P225/75R14
GR78-15
also tils
P215/75R15
HR78-15
also tits
P225/75R15
LR78-15
also fits
P235/7SR15
PRICE
37.05
41.34
42.39
44.46
46.78
44.53
47.28
51.00
218
229
2 43
2.59
241
2.75
2 92
PREMIUM 4 PLY POLYESTER
CORD WHITEWALLS
A78x13
*C78x13
* C78x14
E78x14
F78x14
G78x14
H78x14
G78x15
H78x15
L78x15
25.44
28.38
29.03
30.24
31.69
33.40
34.96
33.50
35.24
37.20
F.E.T.
1 58
1 84
1 87
204
2 14
2 28
2 52
236
257
284
Available in 2 Ply only
IMPORTED RADIALS
FOR FOREIGN ft MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL ft WTER ME MATE
CARS
155SR12
155SR13
165SR13
175SR13
165SR14
175SR14
185SR14
155SR15
165SR15
29.01
31.50
34.47
36.15
37.02
38.27
41.48
34.88
1.53
1 61
SWfS
NORTON...FOR A LITTLE MORE PEACE OF MIND1
NORTON
SiNCe '9?>l -
TIRE C
SAffTY
ami
f? Honor MASTERCARD- VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS.
OMEN'S CLUB
CORAL OAH.U HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MIL!
Blfd & DSUflMB Road 446-8101 1275 40th St 822-2500
* NOrtTH MIAMI MIAMI AJRPOHT
13360 N.W. 7th Av. 601-8541 N W 25 81 & Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
t* N. MIAMI IEACH WEtT Mui,,,
1700 N E 3fd St 045-7454 Bird & OMoway Mi 552-6056
* KENDALL OR /HIOATE SOU ARE
13872 SW 68th St 387-0128
HOMESTEAD
30W0 S Federal Hwy 247-1822
W. hollywooo
497 S Slate Rd 7 987-0450
* *FT. LAUDEROALE
1740 E SunneeBtvd 463-7588
a PLANTATION
381 N Slat* Rd 7 S67-2W6
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Anon Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDOE
20390 8 Dixie Hwy 233-5241
4' & W Commercial Btvd 735-2772
'TAMARAC
N Untveratty Dr. M McNao Rd 721-4700
OMW(OMACH
3151 N Federal Hwy. 043-4200
WEST PALM NACH
515 South Dixie 832-3044
LAKB PANK/N. PALM BEACH
532 N Lake Btvd 848-2844
f DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W mueborn Biwn 427-8BO0
'. FT. P48RCE
2604 South 4th St 464-8020
t.VBBO BEACH
755 2let Street 567-TT74
? OHLAHDO
3620 E. Cotontsl Or 606-1141
99 S Orlando Aye. 645-5305
WBTTOMA BACH
907 Wotoata Ave 255-7487
teajAPLBB
2065 E Tmlaml. 774-4443


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