The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00279

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
vmsl
Wildii&in 1
andShofar of Greater Hollywood
11 Number 17
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 21,1981
Tr,
** Price 36 Cente
#otf Hasharon Awarded Prize For Tehila Center
-c. for outstanding Amniuttw<,<.niiui:..L. ^W'WW X>"X^# +/\s M
m*
Hze for outstanding
pent was awarded to the
enter in Hod Hasharon,
sh Federation of South
s Project Renewal City.
1 is the program to eradi-
l illiteracy in Israel.
L-ly July, 6,000 women
fcing more than 14,000
gathered in Kiryat
Stadium to celebrate
hievement. Hod Hasha
I two other centers were
Minister of Education
i Hammer for special rec-
| runs classes for adults
enters throughout the
nd is an important part
social rehabilitation
I in most Project Renewal
Ihoods.
, approximately 12 per-
he population of Israel is
prate, and an additional
pt have had leas than five
years of schooling.
Among those enrolled in the pro-
gram. ,40 percent have never
studied at all.
90 percent of the students are
women, long-time residents of
Israel who came in the early
years of statehood primarily from
the Afro-Asian countries. They
married young, raised large fami-
lies, and had little or no opportu-
nity to study.
"Few countries in the world
have been as successful as Israel
in developing such a systematic
course in basic levels of literacy,"
according to psychologist Rachel
Tokatli. "In the past it was im-
possible to get illiterate women
out of their homes for regular
organized study. Tehila has suc-
ceeded in helping them overcome
their embarrassment, hesitations
and fears."
The integration of Tehila into
Project Renewal has helped the
program to expand much more
rapidly. Project Renewal has
financed the renovation of
abandoned buildings, creating
modern school structures to
house Tehila and other social and
educational programs. Many new
centers are accommodating up to
300 students every week.
Through Project Renewal, it is
expected that the total Tehila
student population will double
during the coming academic year.
"The fight to eradicate adult
illiteracy is an integral part of
bridging the gap between Israel's
disadvantaged and our more es-
tablished sector," according to
Eliezer Schmueli, Director-
General of the Ministry of Edu-
cation. "There is a definite corre-
lation between school failure in
Soungsters and their parents' il-
teracy. To improve the level of
our children's performance in
school, we must also work with
their parents and bring both into
the mainstream of society."
I
derstanding Project Renewal
i social programs born
nership between Diaa-
and the Jaws of
one has generated more
at and controversy than
enewal.
been called "the single
ortant program in Israel
because of its attempt to
ym of the last barriers to
nd equitable society in
nd it has been identified
tical priority" by politi-
bholars, military leaders
i Israeli citizens.
critics agree that the
success or failure of Project Re-
newal will have lasting impact on
generations of Israeli society.
For the involved, Project Re-
newal is full of idealism and is a
means for world Jewry to play a
direct and personal role in help-
ing 300,000 Jewish people make
places for themselves in Israeli
society.
Project Renewal is a compre-
hensive rehabilitation program
aimed at upgrading radically the
quality of life in 160 immigrant
neighborhoods throughout
Israel. It is supported and funded
by Diaspora Jewry and the
Tacki Reichbaum Appointed
To UJA Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet
kwin, president of the
I Division of the Jewish
In of South Broward,
M that Jacki Reichbaum
appointed to the United
ppeal's Young Women's
n Cabinet. In this ap-
Mrs. Reichbaum will
other women from
be U.S. who have dedi-
fcmselves to improving
ly of Jewish life.
btember 10 through 13,
I attend a Young Worn-
pership Cabinet Retreat
She will be par-
m the following work-
Jjper Sunday, which will
longing this campaign
^" communities and to
established Super
ommunities; Training,
velops programming to
"*ers and trainersTpro-
'al. and; Business and
been an active mem-
South Broward com-
a's a board member of
ens Division of the
federation of South
]ww co-chairman of the
^ Super Sunday,
1
1
Israeli government. Among its
unique features is the require-
ment that neighborhood resi-
dents determine the needs of
their communities and how
money will be spent to meet those
needs.
On paper, the process is rela-
tively straightforward. Residents
of a distressed neighborhood
organize themselves, and form a
comprehensive plan for physical,
economic and social rehabilita-
tion of their neighborhood. This
plan must be approved by all
three partners, who also set
priorities for implementation.
Some projects in the plan are
the traditional responsibility of
the government housing,
schools, parks and are funded
and implemented by the appro-
priate government ministry.
Others day care centers, com-
munity centers, meals for the
elderly, youth clubs, libraries
have been accepted by Diaspora
Jewry as its responsibilities and
are implemented by the Jewish
Continued on Page 12
Family Mission Participants
Reflect On Their Visit to
Hod Hasharon
Participants of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Family Mission to Israel had the
opportunity to visit Hod Hasha-
ron, South Broward's Project Re-
newal City, on their recent visit
to Israel. They returned to South
Broward with very positive im-
pressions about the people they
found there.
"The 'self-help' concept is
really at work there," commented
Herb Grossman. "The people of
Hod Hasharon do not want hand-
outs. They want the tools neces-
sary to do the work themselves."
"I've been going abroad for 16
years to various countries, and
I've never seen such pro-
American sentiment," Mrs. Mara
Giulianti said. "It was good to
feel appreciated for a change."
"The people of Hod Hasharon
gave of themselves without
limit," remarked Herb Gross-
man. "We were all impressed
with their incredible spirit."
Course Charted For Hod Hasharon In The Coming Year
w
Jack! Reichbaum
chairman of the Women's Divi-
sion Phon-A-Thon, and is cur-
rently serving on the Allocations
Committee. Jacki participated in
the 1961 Community Mission to
Israel
In May of this year, Jacki was
the recipient of the Hy and Belle
Schlafer Young Leadership
Award, which is presented to an
outstanding man or woman who
has shown deep involvement in
the community by active leader-
ship.
Nat Sedley, chairman of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Project Renewal Com-
mittee, has recently returned
from intensive meetings in Israel.
The outcome of these meetings
will determine the course of the
Project Renewal program in Hod
Hasharon (South Broward's
Project Renewal City) in the
coming year.
Mr. Sedley and Sumner Kaye,
Executive Director of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
met with Yehiel Admoni,
Director-General of Project Re-
newal for the Jewish Agency,
Simcha Maoz, the mayor of Hod
Hasharon, and Ziona Kimmel-
man, Hod Hasharon's Project
Renewal social worker, to plan
next year's program for Hod
Hasharon.
The group examined the needs
of the area, and chose the follow-
ing programs as the most criti-
cal:
1) Renovating the Community
Center in Giora. (The section of
Giora was established in 1962 as
Continued on Page 12
Community Mission
Will Focus on
Israeli-Arab Relations
"The upcoming Community Mission will offer
participants an indepth view into the problem of
Israeli-Arab relations," said Jerry and Joan Rati-
coff, chairmen of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Mission to Israel (October 26
-Novembers).
"The visits to the Wast Bank area and the
Golan Heights will add a different perspective to eur
understanding of this most complicated problem,"
add Dr. Herb and Nancy Brizel, mission co-
chairmen. "Only a few spaces remain for this unique
learning experience. To secure a place, you must sign
up now."
For further information, contact the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, 921-8810.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridianand Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Frida
Know Your Legislators
Senator Lawton Chiles
(This is the second in a series on
our Florida Legislators. This in-
formation published as a service
of the Legislative Liaison Joan
Gross, chairman of the
Community Relations Com-
mittee)
Senator Lawton Chiles baa
been a distinguished member of
the U.S. Senate since his election
in 1971.
His current committee assign-
ments include the Appropriations
Committee, Special Committee
on Aging, Governmental Affairs
Committee, Budget Committee,
and the Democratic Steering
Committee.
Senator Chiles was born in
Lakeland, Florida in 1930. He
and his wife, Rhea, now reside in
Holmes Beach, Fla. The Chiles'
have four children.
Chiles has devoted his life to
public service. After a two year
stint in Korea as an Artillery
officer in the U.S. Army (1953-
1954), Chiles completed his law
degree at the University of
Florida. From 1959-1966, he
served in the Florida House of
Representatives. He/was a mem-
ber of the Florida Senate from
1966 until his election to the U.S.
Senate.
Senator Chiles has shown him-
self to be a strong supporter of
Israel. A check of his voting
record Li 1980 alone proves this
point:
6-80 Voted in favor of tabling
an amendment which proposed
$150 million be withheld from
economic aid for Israel.
6-80 Voted in favor of the
Foreign Assistance Authori-
zation Act for the fiscal year
1981. This bill authorized world-
wide military and economic
assistance including $1.4 billion
in military aid and $785 million in
economic aid for Israel.
7-80 Signed a letter to Presi-
dent Carter urging his denial of
Saudi Arabian request for ad-
ditio is! offensive equipment for
F-15*.
12-80 Voted in favor of the
Foreign Assistance Authori-
zation Act Conference Report
FY81. This report authorized
$1.4 billion in military aid an $785 million in economic aid foi
Israel.
He also signed the Packwood-
Jackaon letter of June 17, 1961
which asked the President not U
send the sale of the F-15 enhance-
ments and AW ACS to Congress.
Commenting on the possibility
of the sale to the Saudis, he said,
"If the U.S. sells the enhance-
ment package to Saudi Arabia, I
believe it would amount to break-
ing a solemn promise, not only to
the U.S. Senate, but more im-
portantly, to the government and
the people of Israel. Our friends
deserve better treatment than
that."
CAJE Courses Offered
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education is conducting courses
in their In-Service Summer
Semester for the teachers of the
Jewish schools of South Florida.
Dr. Howard Messinger. ad-
junct instructor at the Florida
International University, wilL
conduct a program highlighting
the concepts of Creation, Reve-
lation, Chosen People, Israel and
the climatic events of the
wanderings in the wilderness on
Thursday evenings from August
27 through September 24 from 7-
10 p.m.
The course is part of an on-
going program of the Institute
for Jewish Studies which pro-
vides pre and in-service pro-
fessional growth course for the
teachers in the Early Childhood,
Sunday, Weekend and Day
Schools of South Florida. For
further information about the
course, call 925-6244.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood
Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
have its opening luncheon meet-
ing of the season on Tuesday,
September 8, in the Tobin Audi-
torium of the Temple, 1351 S. 14
Ave. Hollywood.
The program will feature Sal-
vatore Cavallaro, romantic tenor,
who has recorded for MGM
Records and has performed ex-
tensively in major Concert Halls
of the U.S. and Europe. He has
.ppeared at the Fontainebleau
Hotel, Diplomat Hotel, Eden
Roc, Palm Beach Spa. Boca
Raton Country Club, etc. Reser-
vations accepted from members
and their house-guests only. The
deadline is Friday, Sept. 4.
A rummage and white elephant
sale sponsored by the Sisterhood
of Temple Beth El will be held
Thursday, Sept. 10, from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. in the Tobin Audi-
torium, 1351 S. 14 Ave. Holly-
wood, at the rear entrance. Pro-
ceeds go toward the religious
school of the temple.
Soviet Jewry New Years Cards Offered By JFSB
Soviet Jewry New Years Cards are once again being offered to the public by the
Soviet Jewry Committee of the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
The cards are available in English and are for distribution to friends and relatives.
They come in packages of:
15 cards for $8
25 cards for $15
50 cards for $25
Packages may be ordered either mixed or all of one specific card.
To order your Soviet Jewry New Years Cards, fill out the form below and return it to
the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Return form and check to:
would like to order.
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
---------packages of Soviet Jewry New Years Cards.
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE NUMBER
I would like mixed package of cards.
I would like only Card A B C D (circle one)
ly.Aug,*,
One reason why
more Jewish family
select Riverside.
More Jewish
At Riverside, we have the largest staff of
Jewish personnel in Florida. It's been that way since 1935,
and it's one of the major reasons why more Jewish families
select Riverside than any other funeral director.
At Riverside, families find total dedication to
Jewish tradition. A genuine feeling of understanding.
Economical assistance in arranging funeral services
between Florida and New York or anywhere else in the
world. And real concern for each family's needs and
wishes, regardless of financial circumstance.
Today, if Riverside service is becoming the
standard by whic eople are comparing all the others,
there is a reason /erside people. They know Jewish
tradition. And they honor it.
HOLLYWOOD:2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Call:92O-1010
Other chapels in North Broward.North Miami Beach.Miami Beach.
Miami and West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
RIVERSIDE
I Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Oirectors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-arranged Funeral.
Ouftrdlia
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CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
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TAGS LABELS
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ACKAGING
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Man Who Helped 100,000 Jews
JFlee Holocaust Named U.S. Citizen
IJER FRIEDENBERG
Uipps-Howard staff
JINCTON A 16-year-
leanan .lew named Tom
Escaped the Nazi Holo-
Ith the help of the young
Tdiplomat Raoul Wallen-
wasn't the only one
\x% nelped. At the re-
the US. government.
Teat personal risk, Wal-
saved an estimated
lews.
n Lantos. a first-term
it if 'ongressman from
Ceo. Calif., will be the
| speaker at the Jewish
U of South Broward's
kip Institute Weekend,
E8. 29 and 30 at the Boca
otel.
said he is "delighted"
|e Senate's unanimous
granting Wallenberg
American citizenship,
jlution also calls upon
It Reagan to "take all
Isteps'' to ascertain from
|iet Union Wallenberg's
outs and secure his free-
Isome 280 cosponsors in
Ise. Lantos expects pas-
|eptember.
once before has the
States named an
citizen: Sir Winston
I in 1963.
said he hopes Wallen-
|U.S. status will give
ton leverage in pursuing
with the Soviet leader-
bpokm but suggested is
I Reagan-to-Brezhnev ap-
dozen years after the
larmy chased the Nazi
but of Budapest in early
ne Soviet government
Swedish inquiries by
|they knew nothing of
erg.
ELGO, INC.-----
ligious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Cralts
brew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
| Records 4 Tapes
Opmn Sunday
hington Avenue MB.
532-5813 '
Tom Lantos
In 1957, however, then Deputy
Foreign Minister Andrei Gro-
myko said that a "Wallenberg''
had died of a heart attack in his
Moscow prison cell in 1947. The
presumption among Wallen-
berg's friends and beneficiaries
was that he had been arrested in
Hungary as an American spy and
executed.
The scion of a banking family
dubbed "the Rockefellers of
Sweden," young Wallenberg was
sent to Budapest in July 1944 as
a neutral Swedish diplomat at the
request of the U.S. War Refugee
Board.
Though "a mild-mannered,
physically unimpressive" man,
as Lantos recalls him, Wallen-
berg threw himself into the work
of rescuing Jews from Nazi
round-up operations.
Lantos, who worked for Wal-
lenberg for four months as a
courier, said the young Swede
distributed 20,000 official-looking
Swedish "passports" and
operated a network of "safe
houses" for Jewish escapees. At
times Wallenberg would pull
Jews out of lines and from trains
headed for extermination camps.
"He showed total disregard for
his own health and safety," Lan-
tos recalls, And he became a
model for other neutrals there
Portugal. Spain. Switzerland, the
Vatican -- who helped many
others escape. My own wife, An-
nette, was saved by the Portu-
guese. "
Through the years,- former
Soviet prisoners brought out
word they had seen Wallenberg,
even shared a cell. The latest re-
port came last January.
"Perhaps there may be a mis-
taken identification," Lantos
suggests hopefully. And perhaps
the present negative U.S.-Soviet
climate might work in our favor.
The Soviets could make a no-
cost, generous, humanitarian
gesture."
If Raoul Wallenberg is not
alive, Lantos, 52, concedes "then
at least the United States will
have honored his heroic acts,"
and in the words of the resolu-
tion, hailed "this symbol of
man's concern for his fellow
man."
If still alive, Wallenberg would
be 69.
Notice for Leadership Weekend
rdon Leland
Br Piano Craftsman
Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr member
|>o Technicians Guild
432-7247
Registration for the Leader-
ship Institute Retreat Weekend
will begin at 12 noon at the Beach
Club of the Boca Raton Hotel on
Aug. 28 and continue until 6:30
p.m. The Shabbat dinner will
take place at the Coral Room at
the Beach Club.
Family Mission
Reunion
A reunion has been planned for
all participants of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
recent Family Mission to Israel.
It is scheduled for Sunday,
August 23 at 2 p.m. at the home
of Lila and Murray Zedeck.
Participants are encouraged to
bring pictures and memorabilia
of the recent trip to share with
others.
For further information,
contact the Jewish Federation
921-8810.
|Hsta Shopping Cantar
fldan St., Hollywood, Fla.
_Phont961-6Ma
H you need rt
for your home
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zkvutetfo
house wares.Hardwro.Pint.Lochsmith.Shades^ifts
I'Closet Shop.Patio/Dinette Furniture-Floral Arrangements
#DinnerwareH.ightingElectrk:lPlumbint^Garden
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily & Sunday
100 E Hallandala Boach Mvd.
Tl 456-OSf* (Broward). 949-1M2 (Dad*)
""** Hrtlandtf. Ch*t* of Comn-rc* BuWMM DMwon
Mark Talisman to Speak
At Leadership Institute
Mark Talisman, Director of the
Washington Office of the Council
of Jewish Federations, will be a
principal speaker at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Leadership Institute Weekend at
the Boca Raton Hotel, August
28-30.
Talisman, a Harvard graduate,
was the youngest person ever ap-
pointed Administrative
Assistant in the House of Repre-
sentatives, when he joined Con-
gressman Charles Vanik's staff.
He served in that position for al-
most 14 years.
Mr. Talisman was the founder
and continues to be an instructor
in the John F. Kennedy Insti-
tute's Politics Program for New
Congressmen," which instructs
newly elected members of the
House of Representatives in the
operations of the House, office
structure, and issues. This
seminar is conducted every two
years at Harvard immediately
following the November elec-
tions.
"Mr. Talisman's talk will be of
great interest to us," said Dr.
Mark Talisman
Robert S. Pittell, president of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. "I truly believe that it
is imperative for all leaders in the
community to attend this Insti-
tute."
For further information, con-
tact the Jewish Federation 921-
'8810.
Saturday Breakfast, and all
work sessions will be at the
Granada Room at the Convention
Center. Saturday evening cock-
tails and dinner will be at the
Beach Club.
Sunday breakfast and wrap-up
session will be at the Beach Club,
Coral Room.
For further information,
contact Elaine, 921-8810.
Poland
Study Group
Participants in the Poland por-
tion of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's upcoming Com-
munity Mission to Israel met for
their first study group on August
10. The group was led by Gene
Greenzweig of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
The evening's discussion focused
on the Jewish migration to Po-
land at the end of the 11th
century, Jewish lifestyles over
the following years, and the dif-
ferences that arose in the com-
munity. A film was shown.
The group will meet again on
September 14, September 21, and
October 5 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Federation building.
News
Briefs
SOUTH ORGANGE, N.J.
(WNS) Shlomo Glickstein, Is-
rael's top ranking tennis player,
defeated Dick Stockton to cap-
ture the final of the $125,000
Mutual Life Benefit Open, 6-3, 5-
7, 6-4, it was reported here Aug.
3. The victory gave Glickstein,
23, the richest prize of his career,
a check for $15,000. Stockton
took home $7,500.
NEW YORK (WNS) The
number of Jews who arrived in
Vienna from the Soviet Union in
July was/79, the lowest figure in
nearly a year, it was reported
Aug. 3. The prior low point was
770 arrivals in August of last
year.
pe&eRation moimns
The officers and board of directors of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward deeply mourn the loss
of Herbert Kravitz, a leader of the Jewish com-
munity of South Broward.
Mr. Kravitz worked tirelessly for the Federation
as a member of the Big Gifts, Project Renewal,
Allocations, Planning, and Governance Committees.
The loss of Mr. Kravitz's leadership and friend-
ship will be deeply felt by the professional and lay
leadership of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, and the entire Jewish community.
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'


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Frida
9,
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Volume 11
21 AB574I
Number 1"
A Difference In Perspective
The signing of the accord on the Sinai does two things
in the process of the implementation of the Camp David
agreement. Most obviously, it establishes a peace-keeping
force according to the terms of the agreement, which the
Soviets have done everything in their power to frustrate.
While the force will not be a genuinely United Nations or-
ganization, with international representation to maintain
the provisions of the historic Israel-Egypt accord, this
may in itself be a positive outcome of the Soviet maneu-
vering and a more certain guarantee of its success. In
retrospect, the Soviets have merely assured their isolation
from the peace-keeping process, a result which both signa-
tories and the United States are likely to applaud.
The second thing that the signing of the accord does
is to set up the machinery that will have Israel cede the
last part of the Sinai in April. 1982. thus returning the
entire peninsula to the Egyptians, which the Israelis cap-
tured in the 1967 war and have occupied since then, piece-
meal most recently.
Now that the signing itself has occurred, the Middle
East comes into an even more dangerous period vis-a-vis
peace between Israel and Egypt than existed before. The
reason is rooted in the different perspectives held by the
signatory parties on the meaning of the ceding of the Sinai
in the first place
Egypt makes no bones about its view of this final
step in the agreement. Ambassador Ashraf Ghorbal. for
example, sees ne*xt April. 1982 as the final step in the
return of Eg to the Sinai in its entirety, a procedure
that began witn ihe signing of the Camp David agreement
in March. 1979. He sees it as the culminating achievement
of Egypt's purposes with respect to Israel which it has
wrested from its aborted Yam Kippur War. In this sense.
Egypt is playing the role of belated victor and Israel the
role of the vanquished.
On the other hand, the Israelis see the ceding of the
Sinai as a quid pro quo on the road toward normalization
of relations with Cairo, a process that the Egyptians have
been avoiding like the plague in their effort to walk the
treacherous fence of peace with Israel and all the benefits
peace has brought them at the same time that they hope
to mend their ties to the rest of the Arab world.
It is for this very difference in perspective that in-
creasing resistance is being noted in Israel against the
final step of withdrawal from the Sinai come next April. In
short. Israel does not see the normalization quid pro quo
as having come to pass, or indeed as coming at all in the
months ahead.
While the signing of the peace-keeping agreement is a
welcome move in the direction toward the final implemen-
tation of the Camp David process, we would not be sur-
prised to see a stalling in the process itself come next
April. Israelis are not likely to want to bear the whole
blunt of the burden. They don't want to wake up and dis-
cover that they have given up the Sinai and won nothing
in return for that dear concession. Not normalization and.
therefore, not peace.
Hebrew University
Archaeologists Hope To Reach]
Level of Canaanite Jerusalem
JERUSALEM The
Hebrew University arch-
aeological team digging at
the City of David. Jeru-
salem's Biblical nucleus,
aims this summer to reach
the level of the Canaanite
Jerusalem that existed
before King David's con-
quest around 1000 BCE.
The season got underway mid-
Jul> and will las', until Sept. 4.
I'la. excavations are carried out
by ihe City of David Society,
lounded in 1978, whose members
include Ihe Institute of Archaeo-
logy >l the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, ihe Israel Exploration
Ninety, ihe Jerusalem Founda-
tion, a group of sponsors from
Siuili Africa headed by Mendel
Kdpljn. diid the Ambassador In
lurnaliunal Cultural Foundation.
California. Additional assistance
lid-. Ihvii granted by the Jeru-
salem Municipality and the
Kotlischild Foundation
THE EXCAVATIONS are
lieudid lij Dr. >. i^ai Shilo of the
Ik-brew Univeraly, and con-
duilcd by the permanent staff
Irum that institution, whose
in* nilkis include Donald T Ariel.
A Ion UcUraul, David Tarler.
^ dii -Slioluni. Jane t'ahill and
^ i*.dl Val The architect of the
t \|*dition is Ciiora Solar A con-
tinent of archaeology students
Irum the Hebrew University, as
well as other American and Euro-
pean universities, complement
tin staff Ihe project has stimu-
lated much interest among arch-
auluKiata and archaeology stu-
denta abroad Some 400 volun-
teer! from Israel and the world
ovef have applied to participate
this >ear.
During the course of this
summer, its fourth season, the
expedition will continue to in-
vestigate that set of problems
winch it began in 1978. The ex-
cav ations are being carried out on
slate lands along the eastern
slope of the City of David, above
tin-(Jihm Spring
Segments of the Israelite city
wall from the lime of the mon-
arch) will lie uncovered in addi-
tion tu the li mcteis ihus far
.. ......il lii ..ioiiii.il buildings
. I hi icane |H-riod. built atop
stuia.', slipped Lemon descend-
ing the eastern slope, will be ex-
laivuUxJ as well. In the past three
M-aMtna such structures de-
sttoyivi by I In- Kahylomans in
?-',|U"i: have yielded a wealth
ol liljils
THE LOWER portion of an
111| -si\e construction g
:!<. -l<|i|>ed slrucluie ex-
." d lieigiu ol lb' meters
i .u- I.ii. will be revealed. This
iiioiiunii nidi strucluic was built.
.i|i|mh nl iy in tile Until century
l>l I., dining the reign of David
oi Sutuimm, and served as d com
I".in nl o| 11 builduig loinplt-K in
llie Up| i City, .site >A llie royal
aiiojiolis ol Jerusalem ipossibly
tin (Iphcll duiing Its apogee in
l lie I ii si Ft inpie period.
Duiing llie last three seasons,
s|iidl emphasis has been placed
on uncovering the city s remains
llMO the Israelite period. This
year, ihe excavators are reaching
Canaanite Jerusalem (U,
of Jebus from the UtfcJ
and Early Iron Ages. wkS
ceded David s conquest [a!
Unt structural remains fn!
period were discovatd
Investigation continue,
the Meant undergnaaaj.
systems hewn out of rocki
the slope. these .jaJ
lluzukiah s Tunnel, u*
tuniK-l channel, excavji*)
lJ7K-7y. and Warren s Skdl
rxcnvalul and paniallj
dumig IWO. The *-_
bu|K Liu* x-.i-Mii UiciirnpfcS
liydiolo-i,j| >urxe> j j|
sysu-nis In-uig undiTUkal
Dan (ill <>| ii,. Ueulupj
siuule.
Al llie si.utlnrnendiifiliefl
'il David, lIn evpidilionl
i vi.ivaU .in au.i in nhnhl
wall n mains luvi Ihvii(ms,
iL.unt; io tin \\ nan anil
i in 4h |m i mds mhIi Snii
>< IM Kl Fea nsaaau
I in ^. |. ,i.,|. nav. U, n kl-
x..ti m .iv.ilioii. ill JenuU
.....' r^" '< i|hm laiHv has I
.n i.hIh>I in i lieu disniii iti||
' > ol I l.i, ,.| ||,||, Mhaliaaj
.i.o:. i in. i ,>| ,|i i nvi in Im
... |Mi"ii inn ii ihr I|j>b
TrfWWJTTHECUlIS!
PtaM fu *m: a)9M>Sao nwrelanarCaWMh
(Pi nawt f*a jowovs reitartial
ue OnsaJrtTy aVsvonrcs maa M M
yOu9amtB"'3L I *Jf (MatV
SaneClorHaiaiTbTal
'Authority of a* Malt]
IH'S. BnevutWWP
My3or%
Jewish mothers (and fathers) have traditionally boasted,- and jusnh-
^} About *f,r ^'loWs professional achievements. But in how many
BSSrn- ""a Jewish psucnt proud,y Prodaim: "Mc mvson- E
^ J^T1* ^ot4n, must stan^'" the forerVont. In recent
yean^Scotland produced three Jewish Knights, two Jewish Mem-
ptpe-band in the entire world!
And ArSL"?^ Scodan(fs V^ ^mous rxokiatt^jcch whisky.
^ches and blend them for srnoothness and subdety. TTve
result ttwhywe say thatJ&B whispers '


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Perceiving Time Relation
By ELAINE PASEKOFF
|0ne of the things I cannot grasp u 'time relation At an
\hen Jews wen being done to death at Tnblinka extermination
the overwhelming plurality of human beings, two miles away on
\ farms, five thousand miles away in New Yorh, were sleeping or
l0r... worrying about the dentist ...The two orders of si-
neous experience an so diffennt their coexistence is so
a paradox^ that I puzzle over time." From Sophie's
.by
William Styron.
1980, the CIA released a
fon international terrorism.
lunting violence within na-
[ borders. 642 people were
1980 by terrorists, 1,078
tjured. Experts on interna-
fviolence agree that these
rs will be greater in the
[years,
following developments
obable in the very near
violent incidents become
onplace, terrorists may re-
i more savage acts to grab
adlines on which they de-
rorists will be better
land trained.
[Washington, the Reagan
pstration, calling terrorism
sault on civilization itself,"
ade the problem one of its
foreign policy concerns.
ary of State Alexander
(aid. "The Soviet I nion has
d. funded and equipped a
|rsi\e army directed against
fest "
erican author, Claire Ster-
Las recently written a book,
I'error S'etuork. Ir it, she
nes the links between
|s subversive groups and
pport they receive from the
Union, East Europe,
North Vietnam, and the
inians.
lere is massive proof that
lw and its surrogates,
; the last decade, have pro-
Ithe weapons, training and
kary for a network aimed at
bihzing Western democratic
r,' Ms. Sterling writes.
terrorism is not just an
Vest conflict. It has be-
[a global phenomenon be-
lof modern means of trans-
pd the ability to flash news
the world in a matter of
s.
itow-backed "urban gueril-
re not the only terrorists.
Icfinition includes the Ku
lKlan Mr:uccans in Hol-
!tf
defirutior terrorism can
(hreaten aemocrtciM. This
carried nut by under-
the tvuj of civilized
^ to delend itself.
rnational ei perts on ter-
: nni a i iak forecast for
RBO's I'ntc rtunatelv. the
tea nee of time relation" in-
h in relation to the growth
"number of people killed by
?si activttiM
Israeli diplomatic
posu bombed
Bj L'PI
nbs were thrown on August
[Israel's embassy in Vienna
Iplomatic mission in Athens
fpate of attacks on Jewish
diplomatic residences in
A woman was injured in
enna attack
ice said they had no clue as
o threw the bombs and no
| has claimed responsibility,
fienna, Yaaov Hess, deputy
V ambassador said. There
In damage on our building,
nobody was hurt from our
^sy staff."
[ice said a 75 year-old wom-
fing next door to the Em-
*as slightly injured when
lent out into her garden to
Jigate the noise from the ex-
In.
.Athens, two home made ex-
p devices went off after
Kht outside the Israeli Dip-
p Mission, causing slight
^ to the compound's back
olice said.
The damage was slight and
no one was injured," said Arik
bhoket, counselor at the mission.
The explosive materials I
wouldn't call them real bombs -
went off about 10 minutes
apart."
Greece has never recognized
Israel, but maintains "de facto"
relations, and the Israeli
diplomatic mission in Athens has
embassy status.
The Israeli diplomatic delega-
tion building in Athens was
slightly damaged Saturday by
time bomb blasts, but there were
no injuries.
The offices of Israel's airline El
Al at Rome airport were also at-
tacked Saturday, injuring two
people. A Palestinian group in
Beirut claimed responsibility.
The Vienna attack came one
day after Austrian authorities
expelled two alleged PLO mem-
bers who were arrested July 29 at
the Vienna airport after trying to
smuggle weapons into Austria.
Manhunt for terrorists
Jerusalem Post Reporter
A manhunt is still under way
for two terrorists armed with
automatic weapons who fired at
an Egged bus Jury 29 near Kib-
butz Ma'aleh Hahamisha, about
10 kilometres west of Jerusalem,
wounding four persons.
A passenger in her seventh
month of pregnancy is in critical
condition in Jerusalem's Sha'are
Zedek Hospital after a bullet
passed through her stomach and
out her back. The woman, Mrs.
Dvora Arend, lost her child.
A boy was shot in the elbow
and a man and a woman sus-
tained light wounds, a hospital
spokesman said.
The No. 65 bus from Jerusalem
was ambushed at 9 p.m. as it ne-
gotiated an uphill turn near the
kibbutz, which is two kilometres
from the "Green Line," the pre-
1967 border.
A passenger said the terrorists
unleashed about 15 rounds of sin-
gleshot fire which brought the
bus to an almost immediate halt.
The 15 passengers, he said,
threw themselves on the floor
when the shots hit and then left
the bus and hid along the road-
side after the driver failed to re-
start the engine.
In Beirut, the PLO claimed
responsibility for the attack on
what it called "the military
Zionist bus."
Army colonel killed
JERUSALEM An army
colonel was killed and other mili-
tary personnel travelling with
him injured on July 14 when a
terrorist explosive device went
off under their vehicle at Rafiah,
south of Gaza. The dead man was
the military commander of the
Rafiah area. Eli Shahak.
Former Judge Fined for Denying
The Existence of the Holocaust
BONN (JTA) A former
judge from Hamburg was fined
6,000 Marks by a court in Kiel for
claiming that there were no gas
chambers during Hitler's regime
and no Jews were murdered by
the Nazis. The man, Wilhelm
S tag lie h. the author of a recent
pamphlet called The Auschwitz
Myth," made both claims in a
letter to a federal court judge.
After he was found guilty,
Staglich, who was in trouble re-
cently for making disparaging re-
marks about German police, was
quoted by a German weekly as
saying: It cost me 450 Marks to
insult policemen, while insulting
Jews drew a fine of 6,000 Marks.
That's typical of the German
judicial system."
Meanwhile, the federal depart-
ment in Bonn which is em-
powered to take action against
hate literature has not moved
against Staglich for his pamph-
let. In addition, the department
lost a case it initiated against
Gerhard Frey, the publisher and
editor of the neo-Nazi National
Zeitung. This | publication is the
most widely circulated neo-Nazi
newspaper in Germany and one
of the most popular weeklies in
the country.
r
9
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. .


Pge6
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater HoUy wood
Frida
>***
MFO Accord Signed In Ceremony
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The development of an agree-
ment for a multinational force
and observers (MFO) to patrol
the Sinai after Israel's final with-
drawal in April 1982 was seen as
evidence of U.S. commitment to
work for peace in the Middle
East. But the commitment was
viewed differently by the parties
involved the United States,
Egypt and Israel.
This was evident at a State
Department ceremony when Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig
witnessed the signing of the
MFO agreement by Israel's Am-
bassador Ephraim Evron and
Egyptian Ambassador Ashraf
Ghorbal. Haig also signed identi-
cal letters to the Foreign Minis-
ters of Israel and Egypt outlining
U.S. commitments to the agree-
ment, including providing more
than 1.000 troops for the MFO
and getting other nations to
make up the rest of the 2.500
member force.
Haig. noting the "pleasure"
the agreement has given both
President Reagan and himself,
said the agreement was a "reflec-
tion of a new confidence in the
Middle East in America's leader-
ship, its willingness to meet its
commitments and obligations to
the peace process." He said a
first step in the peace process
would be moving toward the
autonomy talks, a step which he
said will begin with the visits of
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
and Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin in September.
Ghorbal. in his remarks, also
called for progress toward a Pal-
estinian autonomy. He noted the
Reagan Administration's first
efforts in the Middle East, as
evidenced by the Sinai agreement
and the "cease-fire" across the
Israel-Lebanon border, "augurs
well for the future."
Evron stressed that the agree-
ment was the "implementation of
President Carter's commitment
on this issue. We should all re-
member that the credibility of an
American commitment, on any
issue, is essential to keeping the
momentum of the Camp David
accords" The Israeli envoy
stressed that the Israeli-
Egyptian peace agreement does
not mean Israeli withdrawals
only" but also "full normaliza-
tion and friendly relations and
cooperation between our coun-
tries and peoples '
Meanwhile, onlv Fiji has an-
nounced that it is willing to send
troops to the MFO. State De-
partment spokesman Dean
Fischer said that the U.S. ex-
pects to have the "components
of the MFO ready soon, but he
said it will not announce individ-
ual acceptance by countries until
the entire force is complete.
The US. has agreed to allocate
$125 million for the fiscal year
beginning Oct 1. to pay for the
Sinai forces and the construction
costs involved in creating the
MFO bv next March. Starting in
the 1983 fiscal year. Israel. Egypt
and the U.S. will each pay one
third of the costs of MFO or $35
million annually.
Five Medicare
Denials Appealed
The Medicare Information
Service (MISi formally appealed
the denial of Medicare coverage
for five Broward County resi-
dents. The appeals, if successful,
will result in additional Medicare
payments to these residents The
appeals could also result in in-
creased Medicare coverage for
Broward Countv's approximately
250.000 Medicare recipients.
Peter Deutsch, Director of the
Medicare Information Service,
stated. "The present Medicare
system is a disservice and a dis-
grace to the elderly. People
should not have to appeal for
these sorts of things. these things
should be given without ques-
tion."
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Sherwin Rosenstein. Executive
Director of the Jewish Family
Service, the parent agency of
MIS. stated. "These five appeals
should move the Medicare
System in the right direction. I
expect at least four of these ap-
peals to be successful."
Two of the appeals involve
denials of Medicare payments for
Nursing Home stays. Medicare
claims that no skilled care was
provided even though a trained
physical therapist worked with
the patients and a skill was in-
volved in the management of the
patients' daily routines.
Two of the appeals involve
unreasonably" low Medicare re
imbursements One Medicare re-
imbursement is for $36 for each of
four SI00 doctor bills. The other
is for $25 for a $175 wheelchair
repair The former reimburse
ment appears to be coded wrong,
and tne latter it due to Medicare
uing an arbitrary amount tor
medical supply repairs
The final appeal involv
Medicare denial for a doctors
consultation during surger\
Medicare claims that duplicate
consultations occured even
though the doctors had different
specialties and performed dif-
ferent tasks
Mrs Lucille Paladino. a quad-
raplegic whose wheelchair repair
was appealed, said. "You can't
imagine how much people are
suffering from Medicare These
appeals barely scratch the sur-
face, but they will help."
Research Being Conducted To
Combat Disorder That Strikes
One in 2,500 Ashkenazi Jews
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Re-
search efforts are underway to
combat Gaucher's disease, a little
known progressive and as yet in-
curable inherited genetic disorder
that strikes approximately one in
every 2.500 Ashkenazi Jews, ac-
cording to Marilyn Baumel, press
manager at the department of
public affairs for Mount Sinai
Medical Center.
An estimated one in every 25
Jewish people are otherwise
healthy carriers of the recessive
disease-causing gene. When two
carriers have children, there is a
one in four chance that a child
will receive the recessive gene
from each parent required to
cause the disease. In the New
York metropolitan area alone,
more than 1.000 Ashkenazi Jews
suffer from Gaucher's, and over
120.000 are carriers of the
Gauchergene.
Patients with Gaucher's dis-
ease lack sufficient amounts of
glucocerebroside. an enzyme
needed to break down and eli-
minate a particular fatty sub-
stance in cells. The result is a
rapid proliferation of abnormal
blood cells containing the fatty
substance, which accumulate
within the spleen, liver, bone
marrow and lung causing symp-
toms which include anemia, in-
creased susceptibility to in-
fection, abnormal blood clotting
and bone pain and
Baumel said
Developing Strati*,.,..
Disease
Research iS cum
conducted to develop i
identify carriers and su,
treat the disease One:
now seeks to inject i
mental amount of the
glucocerebrosidase, m
from human placenta J
body to replace the mijZj
zume, according to n, """
Desnick, director of
Sinai's Center for Jewijh(
Diseases.
Desnick explained,
that the isolation andi
of this enzvme is a
highly techni al problem]
date, the preliminary trials^
zyme replacement hi*]
proved convincingly effeai
number of hu.-Jles need I
overcome.
Baumel described the,
types of Gaucher's disetst]
tients with Type I. the "J
genetic disease, may da-
wide variety of symptom
symptom severity Some of I
patients may live fairly ml
lives, while others die of tM
ease in their teen* orduriagtl
adulthood. The infantile forai
Gaucher's. or Type 2, isi
strikes at four to six a__,
age and causes death withal
years, according to Baumel
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Put a new bright taste into y&nr brisket
i Vegetable Maatart Inn
ft cup green beans. I" pieces,
fresh or froten
ft cup diced celeiy
ft cup chopped onions
ft cup cauliflower florets, fresh or frcgen.
6 tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
2 tablespoons Pineapple juice
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S
Fraltj MasUrt Saacc
Blanch all the "Vegetables in boiling wale/ for 7
minutes; drain. Combine with Gulden's Mustard
aad pineapple juice Store in refrigerator. Serve
with cold or hot meats such as brisket, pas-
trami, corned beef salami and bologna.
Makes approxirra'-K 1 cups. f
The Mustard good enough to cook with
ft cup chopped apple
ft cup chopped pear
ft cup chopped canned
chug peaches
ft cup raisins
i tablespoons Gulden's Mustard
I tablespoon cling peach syrup
Blanch apples and pears in boiling water for 5
minutes, dram Add peaches. Zu. Gulden*
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fngeraior. Serve wuh cold or hot meats such as
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H0TII

GLATT


I, August 21,1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
forth
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Page 8
Thr r-,..fc FLtridinnamdShofmrofQrimUrHoUywood
Frida
y.i
Sadat Fails To Convince
Reagan on PLO Issue
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA| -
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
ended his two days of talks with
President Reagan, having estab-
lished a friendly relationship with
the new American President but
apparently failing to convince
Reagan to drop United States
opposition to negotiations with
the Palestine Liberation
Organizatpion
Reagan in his farewell remarks
stressed that "we are both
anxious to ensure that the nego-
tiating process stemming from
the Camp David agreements will
resume and succeed." Reagan
said he will continue this process
when he meets later this year
with other Middle East leaders.
The President noted that a
"great deal" of the time of his
discussions with Sadat was
devoted to the Middle East peace
process. "To be completely
candid. I was a willing listener,"
Reagan said.
Although neither mentioned
the PLO in their departure re-
marks or during the welcoming
ceremony. Sadat did make a
personal appeal to Reagan for
U.S. recognition of the PLO in
his toast at a dinner given him
and his wife, Jihan, by President
and Mrs. Reagan.
Noting that the establishment
of peace between Israel and
Egypt would be a "model" for
peace between Israel and the Pal-
estinians. Sadat declared: You
can help this process of re
conciliation, Mr. President. b\
holding a dialogue with the Pal-
estinians through their rep-
resentatives." an apparent refer-
ence to the PLO. "This isxertain
to strengthen the forces of
moderation among them. It
would also undermine the designs
of those who exploit the present
state of affairs for their own self
ends. It would be an act of
statesmanship and vision."
Sadat repeated his statement of
the last several days that the
willingness of the Palestinians to
assent to the ceasefire in Lebanon
and to uphold it. "is a turning
point that should not escape our
notice. In effect, it means that for
the first time the Palestinians
have come close to endorsing the
peaceful solution."
Sadat said that if "tangible
progress" can be achieved on the
Palestinian problem than Egypt
and the United States can "con-
front the real challenges we face.
They are challenges which in-
volve the survival of many na-
tions and the protection of the
vital interests of the West.
Reagain did not deal with any
specifics in his toaot at the din-
ner. He praised Sadat as a "rare
exception," a foreign leader who
Ins "truly captured the hearts of
the American people." He said
that both Egyptians and Ameri-
cans share a "love of freedom and
independence."
Reagan again called Sadat "a
fuD partner in achieving our
mutual goals" as he did in a de-
parture ceremony held at the
north portico of the White House.
It was held there because of a
driving rain, a marked contrast
to the welcoming ceremony in
bright sunlight and 94 degree
heat after which Sadat's daugh-
ter. Sana, had to be hospitalized
with jet lag and heat exhaustion.
Reagain said that the
"respect" he had for Sadat before
he met him "vastly increased"
during their two days of talks
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t31, 1981
TheJewish Ploridton and Shofar of Oretaer Hollywood
Pwt
atement On Jerusalem Of
Grave Concern to IJCIC
Greenberg Elected Director
Of Early Childhood Development
\m0 (JTA) -
ernational Jewish
for Inter-
Consultations (IJ-
kpresenting Jewish
ities throughout
Id, has expressed
knd grave concern"
Statement on Jeru-
lopted here by the
juncil of Churches'
Committee (WCC).
pC, at its meeting here
adopted a statement
"the Israeli unilateral
annexing East
Tand uniting tie city aa
capital' under its ex-
^ereignty. This decision
to all pertinent UN
It most dangerously
s all efforts towards
jlution on the Middle
i and thus jeopar-
Inal and world Deace."
ICC statement called on
[churches "to exert
heir respective govern-
pressure on Israel to
all actions on
, the future of which
[included in the agenda
1 negotiations involving
the Palestinian people
ermination and on the
lof the Middle East
:hc:
^AfaWW1*

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ciotea Monday*
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Jerusalem."
The text of the IJCIC state-
ment was presented and
discussed at a joint consultation
of the WCC and the IJCIC here.
The IJCIC statement with a
covering letter was simul-
taneously sent to Dr. Philip
Potter. WCC Secretary General,
requesting that the text be sub-
mitted to the WCC's Central
Committee.
Administration Offers
Rationale For AWACS
Sales to Saudi Arabia
ICIC. in a statement,
Ized the WCC's state-
wholly "political in
[ and flagrantly par-
charged that "it can
Ire to encourage ex-
whose rejectionist
vc most dangerously
all efforts towards a
Bon of the Middle East
IIC. in its statement,
\he WCC "to reconsider
fe-sided and biased
and to contribute to
jugh genuine recon-
lin the spirit of the
for a Jerusalem that is
united city.' "
I STATEMENT noted
holy city of Jerusalem
deep spiritual attach-
nd emotional ties for
ristians and Moslems.
only, however, has
been the eternal city,
r ot their spiritual world
focus of hope fol
For the past 3,000
ere has always been a
lewi.sh community in
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration
appears to be basing its argu-
ment for the proposed sale of
AWACS reconnaissance planes
to Saudi Arabia on assurances to
Congress that the intelligence
information forwarded from the
planes to the ground will be con-
trolled by the United States.
This was indicated by Senate
Majority leader Howard Baker
(R., Term.) and Defense Secre-
tary Caspar Weinberger in
separate television appearances
in which they also indicated
Israel would also benefit from the
intelligence information.
"The actual crewing of the
planes is not nearly as important
as the staffing on the ground,"
Baker said. He said that the crew
on the plane does not really know
what information is being sent
back to the base. He said what is
important is "what access does
the U.S. have or do the Israelis
have."
Weinberger said that the Ad-
ministration is working out de-
tails on the use of intelligence
picked up by the AWACS. How-
ever, he. stressed that the five
AWACS are being sold outright
to the Saudis. But he said this is
being done not only to help the
Saudis to prevent attacks on
their oilwells, but also in the
overall interests of the Middle
East, "specifically including the
United States, specifically in-
cluding Israel."
Still Several
Months Away
Both Weinberger and Baker
said the Administration would
begin the informal notification to
Congress on the proposed sale
after Congress returns from its
summer recess in September.
This would mean, according to
Baker, that the final 30 day
formal notification period would
end in October or November. The
proposed sale would also include
enhancement material for the 62
F-16s previously bought by the
Saudis and other sophisticated
military hardware would go
through automatically unless
both houses of Congress adopt
resolutions to reject it.
Baker, who convinced the Ad-
ministration last spring to post-
pone the notification because of
strong opposition in Congress to
the sale, predicted today that it
still will be "a difficult fight." He
noted that Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat supports the
AWACS sale and "urges it
should be done and done
promptly," with safeguards to
ensure Israel.
Arlene Greenberg, Director of
the Early Childhood Develop-
ment Program at the Jewish
Community Center of Southwest
Miami, has been elected aa
President of the Jewish Council
of Early Childhood Educators of
South Florida for 1981-82.
The JCECE is the professional
organization of Nursery and
Kindergarten teachers in the
synagogue and day schools from
Miami through West Palm
Beach, and now numbers over
260 members in its ranks.
Mrs. Greenberg, who succeeds
Shirley Cohen, ECE Director of
Temple Beth Shalom as the or-
ganization president, is a native
of Chicago and received her BA
in Education from the University
of Miami where she has also
taken graduate courses. She
served as teacher in the JCC pro-
gram from 1970-78 when she was
appointed as director of the ECE
program.
Serving with her will be area
vice-presidents: Martha Moses of
Temple Judea, South Dade;
Arlene Liebowite of Hebrew
Academy, North Dade; Robin
Eisenberg of Beth El of Boca
Raton, North and South
Broward. Shirley Schiff of He-
brew Academy, Treasurer; Gilda
Ashbal of Hebrew Academy,
Recording and Corresponding
Secretary. Shirley Cohen,
Immediate Past President and
Shulamith Gittelson of Tores
Ernes, Chairman, Council of
Directors.
In cooperation with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
JCECE conducts a variety of in-
service professional growth pro-
grams. The two major events
during the year are all-day in-
situtes held in August and
January. This year the Institute
will be held on Wednesday,
August 26 at Temple Judea,
Coral Gables, with more than 20
seminars and workshops, special
film on "Science and the Early
Childhood Program" and dis-
plays by exhibitors and school
equipment firms.
Waldman
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Page 10
^gjew^FloridianandSm
Frifr,
Doctoral Student Discovers New Method in Detecting "AT
JERUSALEM A doctorml
student at the Hebrew Uni-
versity faculty of medicine in
Jerusalem has discovered a new
and quick method for diagnosing
the hereditary disease ataxia
telangiectasia (AT) prenatally.
Mrs. Meira Shaham, while
doing her doctoral research in the
Department of Human Genetics
at the Hadassah University Hoe
pital. found and partially isolated
a factor in the amniotic fluid
which is a sure indicator that the
disease is present.
BABIES WITH AT appear
normal at birth. Only when they
start walking do the symptoms
begin: progressive lack of co-
ordination, dilation of blood
vessels, and immunological de-
fects causing very high sus-
ceptibility to infections, espe-
cially respiratory ones. The co-
ordination problem comes from
degeneration in the brain.
While these children are not
necessarily retarded, they are
sometimes placed in institutions
for the retarded. They usually die
before the age of 20 as a result of
recurrent pulmonary infections or
certain malignancies, after years
of burdensome, agonizing, ex-
pensive and hopeless care.
When the cells of an AT
patient are examined under a
microscope, they are found to
have a great many broken
chromosomes. This high degree
of chromosome breakage is what
typifies AT. What Mrs. Shaham
discovered was a chemical ex-
creted from AT cells which
causes the chromosomes to
break: the "clastogenic"
(chromosome-breakingl factor
WHEN SHE mixed plasma
and blood cells from AT patients
with those from normal in-
dividuals, the lector caused the
chromosomes in the healthy
sample to break.
The factor has been found in
the amniotic fluid at an early
state, when the pregnancy can be
aborted easilv.
This discovery is a boon to
pregnant mothers who have
already borne one AT child and
therefore stand a 25 percent
chance of having another While
the disease has a general inci-
dence of only one in 40.000. it is
found with much greater
frequency among Moroccan Jews
and among Arabs. There are at
least 45 known AT families in Is-
rael.
Until now. diagnosis of an AT
fetus was dependent on waiting
for sample cells from the amniotic
fluid to grow in the laboratory
until they were numerous enough
to have their chromosomes
examined. This took a longtime,
because the cells with this dis-
order are particularly slow-
growing and problematic.
ORT Sponsors
Rummage Sale
The (>ceanview Park chapter of
ORT a holding a rummage sale
on Sep:ember 3 and 4 from 8 a.m.
to 5 p :n. at the West Hollywood
Citizer.- League, 805 Glen Park-
way. Hollywood. For more in-
formal], n. contact Tili Seiko,
458-1!; .
Rabbi Richter to
Appear on
\* orship Service
Rab i iarold Richter, Director
of the aplaincy of the Jewish
Feder: D of South Brnward.
will at ar on the "Jewi'-'i Wor-
ship i ice" Channel .0. on
Sunda \ugust 23, at 8 a.m. Also
appear.../ with the Rabbi in the
show w ill be two of his children.
Miriam and Saul, who will sing.
Davi I.abovitz will be the
guit& i for the show.
BUT THE new discovery does
away with the need to grow a cell
sample at all. A sample of the
amniotic fluid itself, added to a
culture of healthy blood cells, can
reveal the presence of the
clastogenic factor within one
week.
Mrs. Shaham's findings were
supported when the one-week
results were compared with the
longtime cell-growing results
from the same patient. But
dramatic confirmation came only
recently, when cells from the
aborted AT fetus of the saw
mother were tested[ "" *?^
that the baby would indeed have
been an AT victim.
There is another potentially
important application of the new
discovery. Scientists know that
the same kind of cell aberration,
chromosome breakage, is often
associated with cancer. In fact.
AT patients do have a higfc
susceptibility to cancer of the
lymphatic system. Future re-
search on the clastogenic factor
may shed light on cancer.
OUT OF about 2,000 known
hereditary diseases, about 200
can be diagnosed prenatally
today by biochemical or chromo-
somal testa. AT can now be
added to that hot, which includes
Mongolism and Tay-Sachs
disease.
Mrs. Shaham is working
towards a PhD from the Hebrew
University faculty of medicine
under the guidance of Prof.
Yechiel Becker of the Molecular
Virology Department.
uThe Hadai^
Hospital's 522LJ1'
yr lead to the $
ntnj
genetics Uboi
Shaham made K
"WbyDr.Rutfcy,
Families with
genetic disease fa.
dually i toudl
counseling center
families can be
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tist 21,1981

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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00N. -63.0SI *4S7454 B" "" M%?Srt BOUARl POMPANO BEACH WINTER PARK
MIAMIBEACH !TvMISl Ml W 3W N F.OW.I H*v 943-4200 999 S OrHrxlO Av. 64b 5J0-J
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BOOTH OAO vmSfMMllw 247-1622 SIS Sootn On.* 83-> n44 907 VDUM Av. 255-7487
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OCERFIELO BEACH
k ( -S68 226S W HrtlSCorO BlvrJ 42 7 8800


fgSgS Shofir QfOreater Hollywood
^~12 The Jewish FlonOtan ana vnv, <*,------------ -
Understanding ProjectRehewal
Fridi.
Continued from Page 1
Agency, with funding from Jew-
ish communities throughout the
world. The neighborhood steering
committee is at the center of each
phase of the program and noth-
ing happens unless residents
approve.
The day-to-day reality of Proj-
ect Renewal is that self-deter-
mination and democratic process
are concepts often alien to the
cultural background and prac-
tical experience of residents in
these neighborhoods. Project Re-
newal is based firmly on the prin-
cipal of grassroots participatory
democracy. Involvement of resi-
dents is not an ideal to aim for,
but rather a basic "must" of th(
program.
The benefits of Project Re-
newal do not flow in only one
direction. The Jewish com-
munities around the world who
participate in Project Renewal
derive satisfaction from helping
neighborhood leadership acquire
the skills they need to effect
social change, and from seeing
such changes become realiites.
_-____-___
fr 1
Yehiel Admoni Makes U.S. To
Course Charted For
Hod Hasharon In
The Coming Year
Yehiel Admoni, Director-Gen-
eral of Project Renewal for the
Jewish Agency, recently com-
pleted an eight state, 10-day tour,
meeting with more than a dozen
communities. Admoni began his
visit with an address to the of-
ficers of the United Jewish
Appeal in Washington. D.C., on
May 17,1981.
"It took a long time to con-
vince the neighborhood residents
in Israel that Project Renewal
was a reality.' he said. But they
have been convinced and
they have seen the beginnings of
rehabilitation. They believe in
Project Renewal because the
Jewish community of the United
States has told them to believe
and has told them that we are all
partners in this venture together.
"It is the condition of that par-
tnership that concerns me today.
The collective American Jewish
communities have approved allo-
cations totaling almost S50 mil-
lion, yet the UJA, has received
only $16 million.
"We were told that, in order to
raise money in America, we muit
spend money in Israel .. w
must show progress. This is what
we have done and today we only
have a couple of weeks worth of
cash remaining in Jerusalem.''
Admoni concluded by telling
the officers that the credibility of
the American Jewish community
in Israel would be endangered if
Project Renewal were forced to
slow the pace of rehabilitation.
"Together, we have made a
promise that we cannot afford to
break."
After meeting with several
community groups in Washing-
ton, Admoni began his eight
state tour with a visit to New
York City, New Jersey, Ohio,
Florida, Massachusetts. Upstate
New York, Texas, Colorado and
Louisiana followed in rapid sue
cession. While in North America.
Admoni also spent time in
Canada discussing Renewal with
Montreal and Toronto.
Continued from Pane 1
permanent housing for immi-
grant who arrived and resided in
transit camp;- in 1950-54 from
Morocco. Iraq, Tripoli. Iran and
Rumania. Approximately 250
familiM live in Giora. Giora's in-
come level is well below the na-
tional a\tragt Most men are
blue collar workers. Many resi-
dents feel alienated and isolated.)
It is felt that the community
center will foster a sense of com-
munity ana pride in the resi-
dents, as well as serving to coor-
dinate cultural, social and educa-
tional projects
2) Building a Community Center
in Gil Amal. (The Gil Amal
neighborhood was built in 1949-
50. Its population today is 2,700
people, or 560 families. 84 fami-
lies in this area are considered in
need of intensive care by the
Social Service Office. 86 percent
of the population is of Iraqi
origin. 10 percent of Yemenite
origin The basic education level
of the adult population is very
low. as much as 42 percent of the
population lack basic educational
skills.)
3) Study Center Program in Gil
Amal. This program will offer in-
novative opportunities for the
youth of the area in education,
sports, and even music.
"The need in Hod Hasharon is
great, said Mr. Sedley. "We, in
South B reward, have I committed
$1 million for Project Renewal in
the coming campaign year. These
people are depending on us. I am
confident that we can reach our
goal"
r
St
/
H
Hi f V
WF Hp
Mi [K J
>r 9
W


t 21,1981
The Jewish Floridianand Shpfar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
alian Jews Disturbed Over Capucci's Activities
By
MIERI BILLIG
Jewish community
disturbed by the
Ability or unwilling-
sin Msgr. Hilarion
former Melchite
karch of Jerusalem,
prgi'd of late as the
jpagandist for the
Deration Organiza-
f not all of Western
Vatican's pledge
Id not be allowed to
tivities "detrimental
>f Israel," Capucci is
currently touring Italian cities
championing the Palestinian
cause and condemning Israel.
His flair for self-dramatization
has gained him immense ex-
posure in the press, radio and tel-
evision. The media regularly
refers to him as "The Vatican's
ambassador for Mideast affairs."
Capucci was convicted in Israel
on Dec. 9, 1974 of gun-running
for Palestinian terrorists and
sentenced to 12 years' imprison-
ment. But he was released in 1977
by President Ephraim Katzir in
response to an appeal by Pope
Paul VI. The Papal intervention
Plans Educational
Ld Social Events
g Adult Division of
I Federation of South
sponsoring a Learn -
iene Greenzweig, Ex-
ctor of the Central
Jewish Education,
:>ur Friedman, spir-
| of Temple Sinai, and
Bud Jaffe, spiritual
temple Beth El, will
fcussions.
Dns will deal with the
\Rosh Hashana, Yom
ccoth, Shemini Att-
tchat Torah.
starts Wednesday,
and continues Sep-
nd September 23 at
at the Federation
ri9 Hollywood Blvd.
$10 registration fee.
efreshments will be
ad a social hour will
ag Adult Division is
bring a social gather
pmi-rald Hills Country
nday, August 23, at 8
lar event in June was
over 200 members of
Adult Division. Ad-
[the August 23 social
i $5. Music, munchies
oar will be available.
ig Adult Division of
Federation of South
i group of singles who
ked with the future of
people in South Brow-
fnited States and the
foung Adult Division
bial, cultural and edu-
terwan
?r Society
|th Broward Branch of
in Cancer Society is
[announce that we have
i of August 3.
address is: 2042
St., Hollywood, FL
text to Hollywood
Jmpany East of Dixie
Washington St.)
ae number will remain
1305) 925-2314
rill remain 9 a.m. to 5
iay through Thursday,
|:30 p.m., Friday
for the new office is
bn the West side of the
knd along the railroad
JixieHwy.
| of increasing demands
11 to Cancer patients in
[Broward area, we will
ng all of our programs.
pore, will need to fill
I volunteer position
These positions in-
Dllowing:
ation Coordinator,
I Training Coordinator,
Special Events Chair-
Information Chair
it Chairman.
[her information about
l>?g, contact Lynne or
^5-2314.
cational programs.
For more information, contact
Dr. Ira Sheier or Anita Lorenz at
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward, 921-8810.
was accompanied by written as-
surance from the Vatican that
Capucci would be restricted
thereafter to pastoral duties
away from Middle East.
Violated Vatican's
Undertaking
But after a brief stint in South
America, Capucci brazenly
violated the Vatican's solemn un-
dertaking by attending PLO
meetings in Syria and Lebanon
and resuming his .propaganda
activities on behalf of the
terrorist organization. Protests
from Jewish community leaders
have been to no avail.
His Palestinian connections
apparently convinced church au-
thorities that Capucci could be
"useful" in Vatican attempts to
mediate the Iranian hostage
crisis last year. He "intervened"
on behalf of the American
hostages without sucess but with
considerable publicity for him-
self. Later, he played a role m ar-
ranging an audience for Farouk
Kaddoumi, the PLO's foreign
affairs spokesman, with the Vati-
can Secretary of State, Cardinal
Agostino Casaroli.
The Jewish community pro-
tested vigorously. Last April 1,
the vice president and the secre-
tary of the Union of Italian
Jewish Communities, Tullia Zevi
and Alberto Levy, respectively,
were received by the Vatican Sec-
retary for Public Affairs, Msgr.
Achille Silvestrini who acknowl-
edged their protest. But the Vati-
can never denied Capucci's in-
volvement in gaining an audience
for the PLO's No. 2 man a
clear violation of its promise that
he would not be allowed to
engage in political activities.
Major Publicity
In The Media
Jewish community leaders
have been trailing Capucci on his
propaganda tour. But their let-
ters to the editors are a weak res-
ponse to the lengthy interviews
with Capucci published in the
newspapers of Leghorn, Genoa
and Padua.
His most recent stopover was
in Venice at the end of June. He
was received there by a commit-
tee of local political leaders
headed by Carlo Bernini, presi-
dent of the Venetian regional
government. Two days of din-
ners, speeches and press confer-
ences, attended by representa-
tives of the region and the
province, were arranged for Ca-
pucci by Walid Chazal, head of
the PLO office in Rome and
Gianfranco Lai, leader of the left-
ist Partito Democratico di Unita
Populare.
But his propaganda line is
identical to the most extreme po-
sitions of the PLO. In an inter-
view published in the Leghorn
daily, II Tirreno, on May 24, Ca-
pucci contended that Europe
must concentrate on "recogniz-
ing the inalienable national rights
of Palestinians, that is, the right
to national self-determination, to
the return of the refugees to Pal-
estine, to the building of an inde-
pendent Palestinian state and the
recognition of the PLO as the
only legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people."
Capucci states that his objec-
tive is to "inform" public opinion
on the plight of the Palestinian
people and the "PLO program."
He insists that his motivation is
"religious, not political."
HOW TO______ ______
KIBITZ WITH A KIBBUTZ IN HAIFA
DIAL DIRECT
Does your area have International Dialing? Then you can call around rhe world
in almosr no rime. How? Dy dialing yourself. Wirhour Operaror assisronce. And
wirhour wairing. Here's how ro dial Haifa:
____ fn.u>nmn nTV rCW
INTEHNAllONAl ACCESiCOOC
COUMTRYCOOE OTYCOOC
011 + 972 + 4 +LOCAL numder
Dialinq direct saves more than time it saves you a lot of money $4 50, more
than 47% on a 3-minute call to Haifa placed any day during the week.
ALMOST DIRECT
This is the next best way ro save time if your area doesn't have International
Dialina vet. Dial 0 and be ready ro give the Operaror rhe countty city and local
releohone number you wanr. Specify Station or Person. The fewer questions the
Ooeraror must ash rhe faster you'll connect. On Station calls nor requiring special
ooeraror assisronce, you can ger rhe same low ratesas International Dialing.
0pe pif Everyone can dial direct to Conodo, rhe Caribbean. Alaska. Hawaii,
nnd oarts of Mexico-iust as you dial direa ro cities inside the continental U.S.
^Ordering oranges or finding a friend, keep a record of rhe country ond
r-iiy rndes vou use and use rhem to coll rhe world-fasti___________________
cooefOftPWNOPAianESw (aVsUWD
AMo
Aho
6ai lam
SMfShtvo
05 Omona
4 Hodera
51 Ho*)
3 Moton
57 MruHlam
57 Hobi **
63 NtMrto 53
3 WAvw 3
2 Tftwflcs 67
Southern Bel


Movie "The Big Red One" Photographed In Israel
By HERBERT G. LUFT
/Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
HO!
Fuller
One"
ad on
ompi'
assign
i
ragic
he v
reiui
'lack
eWlST
urtia
in.
JflOUt
oe filn
-nent ..
->on.
Jon )avison. the 30-year-old
lO-producer of the box office
ame capacity in "White Dog.'
with Edgar J. Scherick and Nick
Vanoff as executive producers.
Burl Ives. Paul W'infield. Kristy
McNichol and Jameson Parker
LYWOOD Samue
director of "The Big Reo
-\ its entirety photograph-
rations in Israel) now has
ed another challenging
ent. "White Dog." from
1 of novelist-diplomat
Gary who died so
y in Paris last December
te dog symbolizes racial
es by attacking only
leople in the ironic
y the Lithuanian-born,
"rench author. Fuller and
lanson adapted the novel
-creen. an action drama
young wnter-and wouid-
director whose involve-
ads to a climactic explo-
portray the leads of the forth-
coming Paramount picture.
"Victory." The new Para-
mount film now showing
throughout the countrv. is a
WWII varn set behind the
barbed wire of a POW ramp and
focusing on a soccer match be-
tween Allied prisoner* and Ger-
many s national football team.
Mlededly the game is staged for
Nazi propaganda purpose to
prove the Aryan superiority be-
fore tens ot thousands .it French-
men in an immense staaium of
xrupied Paris. It is a sports-
manlike event that becomes a
ferocious match between the
combined forces of democracy
and the might of totalitarianism.
Pele. Brazil's Black football star,
portraying a native from Trini-
dad in addition to staging the
contest, personifies the Western
superiority over the so-called
"supermen. "
Produced by Freddie Fields on
locations in Hungary and direct-
BUILD WITH
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FOR
CAREFREE BEAUTY]
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<-dn lake it! Ndtu'dl stone
.. f .^**-aft?i^3P' tlagg.ng lor pat.ov 'oyers or
- L ?~2^^4^ Ui^r-' walkways will outlast any
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^* -.Ik'
the way. Come choose a
flagging stone and see now
easy it is to install yourself
JIMCO STONE CENTER
5511 N.W. 37 Ave.. Miami, Florida
STORE HOURS
Mon. thru Fn. 7:30 to 4:00
Sat. 8 00 to 12.00
TEMPLE SINAI Or HOLLYWOOD
0
I Conservative I
attain nrouillij nreient.
at tlie
DIPLOMAT HOTEL
5742 High Houdrv Seruices 1981
conducted by
RABBI DAVID SHAPIRO
of Temple Sinai
CANTOR MURRAY LIND
Internationally renowned Cantor, formerly with
Congregation Shaarei Tikvah
ol Chicago lor over 25 years
DAVID RENZER
Baal Shachrit, Baal Koreh, Baal Takiah
- i
ROSH HASHANAH
SeplemtMf 28th, 29th & 30th
YOM KIPPUR
Octobw 7th 8th
$
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Prayer Books, Taleisim & Skull Caps Provided
Tickets May Be Purchased At Temple Sinai Ollice
1201 JOHNSON STREET HOLLYWOOD 920-1577
O
ed by John Huston. "Victory
boasts a superb cast headed by
Michael Caine and Sylvester
Stallone. The participants behave
like proper gentlemen The
picture leaves the false impres-
sion that Nazi prisoners received
a chivalrou.-- .reatment which
holds only true tor POWs from
Knt'land. France and the U.S.
vnile Eastern bloc prisoners,
even those protected by -he
Geneva ton.ention were treated
_-arbae.
Max E. Youngstein. veteran
Hollywood movie executive, has
been appointed to the Board of
[rectors of the South California
chapter of the American Society
for Technion Israel Institute
of Technology-
Youngstein s long and prolific
association with the film industry
began in 1942 when he became
director of advertising, publicity
and exploitation for 20th Cen-
tury-Fox studios. Since then, he
has held similar positions with
such major studios as Paramount
and United Artists.
During his 40 years in the
movie industry, he has partici-
pated in every aspect of the busi-
ness, including distribution and
legal matters. He supervised the
production, distribution, adver-
tising and promotion of over
1.000 films. In various capacities,
he was involved with "Exodus,"
"The Red Shoes." "Marty."
"Around the World in Eighty
Day." "West Side Story." "Billy
Jack." and "Island in the
Stream."
In 1980. the National Associa-
tion of Theatre Owners honored
Youngstein with a special award
of recognition for distinguished
achievements in motion picture
exhibition, distribution and pro-
duction, and hailed him as a
major innovator in film
marketing.
Frank Yablans (past president
of Paramount) announced the
production of "Monsignore, to
be directed by Frank Perry with
Christopher Reeve portraying the
central role. Based on a novel by
Jack Alain Leger, with a screen-
play bv Abraham Polonsky,
"Monsignore" deals with a priest
who becomes a Cardinal and Sec-
retary General for the Vatican
but must somehow reconcile this
with his former involvement with
the Mafia. The picture goes be-
fore the cameras in Rome Oct. 15
and will be released by Twentieth
Century-Fox.
The drama marks the second
collaboration between Yablans
and Perry who recently com-
pleted "Mommie Dearest," star-
ring Faye Dunaway as the late
Joan Crawford. Reeve has just
finished filming "Death Trap"
for director Sidney Lumet.
Edie and Ely Landau (produc-
ers of "CeUbntion 33 The
Chosen") completed "BeatW-
mania," the film version of the
unique documentary-musical
stage hit featuring news clips of
the 1960s and four young artists,
Mitche Weissman, Ralph Castel-
li, David Leon and Tom Teeley
whose talent seems to be a match
for the Beatles of 20 years ago.
Martin Ritt's contemporary
romantic drama, "No Small Af-
fair," with Sally Field who had
starred in two of his previous
pictures, began principal
photography in New York last
spring. It had to be shelved after
three and a half weeks of
shooting due to Ritt's serious ill
ness which waa diagnosed as
extreme exhaustion.
Ross Martin, who died last
month at the age of 61, was on
the screen a man of many faces'
and foreign accents. Often por-
traying Hispanic characters, he
became well known as agent Gor-
don in the long-running television
series. Wild. WUd West." When
I first met Martin 20 years ago. I
was quite surprised to learn that
the rugged Western hero and
gunfighter was born Martin Ros-
enolatt in Grodek. Poland who
came with his family to New
York City as an infant. Growing
up in the tough, multilingual
Lower East Side, he early became
acquainted with the plight of the
poor immigrants.
Holding a BA from City Col-
lege in NY., he studied law at
George Washington University
but never became a practicing at-
torney staring his professional
life modestly as a law clerk. Sub-
sequently, he earned his living as
a teacher, psychologist and
public relations representative.
He started as an actor in radio
and later live television. In the
1950s, he was on Broadway in
"Hazel Flag" and "Shinebone
Alley," and in the road company
of "Guys and Dolla" portraying
Nathan Detroit. He co-starred in
the television series of "Mr.
Lucky" and became host of
"Stump the Stare."
On the theatrical t^J
portrayed a *** of**M
Experiment iB }
roguish villain ii, .
*<* nd Uur *
nemesis in ;ne -
epic. "Th. r,rt a,Hi
appeared i ,uch *t
Conquest of SPiw .^*l
York. an In recent vears. Mm,]
confined his filmic
guest shots on (v
Angela." "Love Bo"
"Fantaay Island."
I knew Koss Martin aji
mired him most for his to
in behalf of the Jewiik-
His devotion to the Stattrf!
el was unlimited. After ta!
day-War he appeared u
speaker at a huge rally attaS
Angeles Shrine Auditorial
contributed much time and i
to the cause of justice, hi
who introduced Anas
publisher Jacobo Timerma^
had been tortured and L
prisoned in his home couadjj
a Jewish National Fund da '
Beverly Hills Heserved<
unteer entertainer both atl.
raising activities for Jewuj
nizations and the State of k
throughout the years. Ati
time, he appeared as 1
Herzl in a one-man show.
MICH AIL I. M ARQOLIS, D.0.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
ANNOUNCES THE OPENING
OF HIS OFFICE FOR j
THE GENERAL PRACTICE OF MEDICINE
AT
4065 S.W. 40th AVENUE
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33023
OFFICE HOURS TELEPHOtfl
BY APPOINTMENT
(305)!
VICTOR M. GLAZEH. M.D.. P-A.
ffl DLOMATC, AMimCAN BoOO Of 0TTIC -0 OYNKOUOW
Fillow. amih.can Coliibc or Bohocon.
ANNOUNCES TM[ HtLOCATlON Or HIB OrFlCI
ram thi practice or
OYNECOLOBY AND OBSTETRICS
TO
HOLLYWOOD MEDICAL CENTER F-LA2A
SUITE 203
3700 WAtHINDTON TEET
HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33D31
TELEPHONE I30S) *l-364
JOSEPH B. ESTERSON, M.D, FAC.C.
Diplomat*, American Board of Internal
Medicine and Cardiovascular Diseass
takes pleasure in announcing the association or
BRUCE L.BOROS, M.D.
Dipiomate, American Board of Internal Meo*""
In the practice of
Cardiology
at
2500 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard-Suite 211
Hallandale, Florida 33009 .c*.5ltf
By Appointment Telephone (305)45*9'


121,1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page IB

OtS
merican and British Style
3BERT E. SEGAL
even Arts Feature
onald Keagan met with
ime Minister Margaret
'not long after Inaugu-
|our President spoke of
relationship binding
Jreat Powers.
.rologists would wonder
j accuracy of such assur-
bnsanguinity; but it was
tioned. Despite 1776,
of Americans have
| imagined themselves
\i the British. This de-
orge Bernard Shaw's
omment that America
and are two countries
by the same language.
story is beginning to
more realistic com-
. the British are under-
rave of rioting, looting,
tig, and petrol-bomb-
I threatens to surpass in
le upheavals that shook
ountry in the 1960s.
luses of the British tur-
will be researched and
kver for years. At this
[Margaret Thatcher, a
brder matron, sticks to
lusion that the riots are
[consequence of naked
he underclass is clawing
i share of the upperclass
Irely bugged by the sear-
i troubles and giving
her time to her anti-
| crusade, she pays little
to the Loyal Oppo-
[ contention that unem-
is to blame in part for
plosions in Toxteth,
I Liverpool, Manchester,
r areas.
|, the fact that Britain's
ate has passed the 11
.aark and is twice that in
the battle areas must un-
tie of her associates.
Nor can the heavy inflow of
thousands of non-white immi-
granta possibly be minimi^ as a
strong factor in the rioting. For
within a generation, Great
Britain has changed from a near-
ly all-white nation to a multi-
racial one. As the sun's rays so
long ominipresent on the British
Empire dwindled, the British
colonials came in ever greater
numbers. From Pakistan, Cey-
lon, Hong Kong, the West Indies,
the caravan moved into the mul-
tiplying ghettos of color. Added
to these lists more recently have
been hosts of Arabs whose wealth
breeds envy in poverty-burdened
new arrivals.
In the course of the current
season of rioting, pressure to
pass new anti-immigration legis-
lation has mounted. A year ago, a
Gallop poll revealed that 46 per-
cent of those questioned favored
an immediate halt to immigration
and 30 percent, if they had their
way, would "send the coloreds
not Britain-born back whence
they came." The proposed new
nationality law is flirting with a
clause declaring that children of
immigrants may not be citizens
even if born in the tight little
island averaging 953 crowded
people to the square mile.
But can't the British, now so
frightened by the riots, learn
from the American experience?
Did not such valuable studies as
the Kerner Report of 1967-68 -
the survey made by the National
Advisory Committee on Civil
Disorders and the fact-
jammed review, "The History of
Violence in America," the report
of the National Commission On
The Causes and Prevention of
Violence, tell us just about all we
needed to learn about our own
history of throbbing unrest?
"he Jewish
Community
las A Right
b Know:
There are several funeral chapels in South
Florida that serve those of the
Jewish faith.
SOME OF THESE CHAPELS ARE NOT
OWNED BY JEWS.
Even more disturbing, they do not make this
fact apparent to the Jewish community.
MENORAH CHAPELS ARE THE ONLY
JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS BETWEEN
HOLLYWOOD AND WEST PALM BEACH
AND THE OLDEST IN BROWARD COUNTY.
At Menorah Chapels, unlike the others,
serving the Jewish community is more than
a business it's a way of life.
[traditions of our faith and the concerns of our
pie should be genuine. It's your right, and we are
pd of our religion.
742-6000
Dade, 945-3939.
Palm Beach, 833-0887.
In9 chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
1 locations in Sunrise, Deerf ield Beach and Margate.
"^joonto North Miami Beach. _________
fcno&h
CljapelS
3 0 O 6 0 O 0
Beginning with Jack Kenne-
dy s assassination in 1963,
aggravated by dissent over in-
volvement in Vietnam later, and
rubbed sore by the 1968 assassi-
nations of Martin Luther King
and Bob Kennedy in rapid suc-
cession, the degree of outbreaks
in this country stunned us. From
Watts to Detroit to Newark and
along the way, riots broke out in
77 American cities. We examined
the causes, evaluated the
suggested cures, and tried not
with complete success to
detonate the unexploded piles of
social dynamite.
Basically we absorbed what
the Kemer Commission ham-
mered into our heads: "Our na-
tion is moving toward two
societies, one black, one white
separate and unequal."
Torahs Recovered
CENTEREACH, L.I. Two
Torahs stolen from the Temple
Beth Shalom in Smithtown, L.I.
last June have been recovered
and three Centereach teenagers
have been charged with the bur-
glary, the Suffolk County police
said.
The Torahs, valued at $16,000,
were found buried in a dump in a
heavily wooded area, the police
said. Still missing are the Torah
crowns and breast plates and of-
fice equipment that was taken in
the June 15 robbery. The total
loss was estimated at $50,000.
A spokesman for the conserva-
tive Synagogue said that the
value of the missing items were
"overstated" and said he prefer-
red not to speak about the case.
He said however that "the entire
(Police) Department has done a
beautiful job" in helping to re-
cover the lost items.
Religious Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 7100 W. Oak-
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowltz. Cantor Maurice
ANeu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform.
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
57th St. Conservative Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman.
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski.
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School. 200 NW Douglas Rd.,
Liberal Reform. Rabbi Bennet
Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rab-
bi Bernard P. Shot or
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA-
TION. 400 S. Nob. Hill Rd. Rabbi
Sheon J. Harr.
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St.
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob
Danziger
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Klngsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes.
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Land man
TEMPLE BETH EL 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jafte
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold.
CONG. LEVI YITZCHOK OR-
thodox. Rabbi Raphael Ten-
nenhaus. 1504 Wiley St.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson St. Con-
servative. Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Robert Ungar.
TEMPLE SOLEL 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr.
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-
, FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Edward
Davis.
Kiryat Shemona Receives
$250,000 Grant
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Jewish
Agency Executive chairman
Leon Dulzin told the Kiryat She-
mona town council that the
Agency would give a special
grant of $260,000 to the township
to help it recover from the shell-
ing and rocketing across the
border last month by Palestinian
terrorists.
Dulzin and the Jewish Agency
Executive held a special meeting
in Kiryat Shemona after touring
the border region and holding
special meetings with the Galilee
regional council and the Kiryat
Shemona council.
Dulzin and Agency treasurer
Akiva Levinsky said the special
grant would be in addition to
funds already budgeted for spe-
cial projects in the Galilee in gen-
eral and Kiryat Shemona in par-
ticular. Agency members said
after the tour that the main
problem appeared to be not so
much economic and financial aa
social.
Only about 10 percent of the
Kiryat Shemona population had
stayed in the township through-
out the two weeks of shelling.
Observers say the residents had
not been sufficiently prepared in
advance for the possible effects of
Israel air raids against terrorist
installations in Lebanon.
Soviet Jew Sentenced To
Two Years In Exile
NEW YORK (JTA) The
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry has learned that another
Jewish emigration activist, the
second in two weeks, has been
convicted in the Soviet Union.
Evgeny Lein, a 42-year-old
doctor of engineering, was
sentenced in a Leningrad court to
two years of exile at hard labor
for allegedly "resisting a repre-
sentative of authority."
Lein was held in prison since
his arrest on May 17. On that day
he had attended a seminar on
Jewish history in a private apart-
ment, when uniformed policemen
and KGB agents burst in and ar-
rested several participants,
including Lein. He was accused
of "beating a policeman."
Lein defended himself at his
one-day trial yesterday, attended
by about 50 people. According to
activists, the procurator's wit-
nesses did not succeed in
> proving the charge. It was
shown that an injury to the po-
liceman's leg could not have been
inflicted inside an apartment.
Furthermore, a medical state-
ment produced by the procurator
was written 20 days after the
incident was to have occurred.
Three men who wished to testify
on Lein's behalf were not permit-
ted to do so by the judge because
of their friendship for the
defendant.
KRAVITZ, HERBERT
The American ORT Federation and the Florida
region of Men's ORT deeply mourn the sudden
and untimely passing of our officer and good
friend, Herbert Kravitz. We extend heartfelt
condolences to his family.
Levitt -1 li
EINSTEIN
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hollvwooo NORTH MIAMI IJM W O^i* Hoy
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13 blocks west of 441)
TEMPLE BETH EL
mmm
fjtUuttoJeuni
Crypts and Niches
The moat beautiful Jewish cemetery
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Administered and operated on a non-profit
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