The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00266

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
* ewusin iriienaijisrin
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Number 3
Hollywood, Florida Friday, February 6,1981
f ,/ snoch., Price 35 Centfi

wi and Lee Rosenberg
fonored at Emerald Hills
Cherrick to Speak at Pacesetter Brunch
150 people were pre-
inor Ben and Lee
; the annual Emerald
L held on behalf of the
iteration of South
1981 Combined
Bnl Israel Emergency
aign, according to
/in. M.D., campaign
[past six years, the
have served as co-
Khe highly successful
Jills campaign. Dr.
Ined.
Guest speaker for the event
was Major General Jacob Even,
who told the audience of the
increased needs of Israel.
Despite the fact that many
long-time Emerald Hill residents
recently moved because of the
condominium conversion of the
apartments, $150,150 was raised
at the dinner, which is an 11
percent increase over the amount
raised at last year's dinner.
The Emerald Hills total cur-
rently stands at $244,150. added
the Rosenbergs.
j arc Rabbi Bennett Greenspon, Kubbi Mel Libman, Sumner
[mi i i vc director, Jewish Federation of South Broward; Rabbi
fehter and Rabbi Morton Malavsky.

(Tt are Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Rabbi Larry Halpern, Sumner
ibbi Herbert Tobin and Rabbi Ralph Kingsley.
abbis Support
CJA-IEF
l)i Mel Libman, director,
lit- Cabinet for United
Appeal; Rabbi Larry
, Congress of Liberal
Orlando; and Rabbi
Kingsley, Temple Sinai,
I Miami Beach, met recent-
South Broward rabbis to
i their commitments to the
Federation of South
d's 1981 Combined Jew-
appeal-Israel Emergency
campaign.
local rabbis pledged
to this year's campaign,
is a 230 percent increase
I their 1980 commitment,
ned Dr. Philip A. Levin,
j campaign chairman.
lam extremely happy that
bbis had such an increase in
fear's gift. I feel it is a
ve thing for the Jewish
Btmn and area synagogues
fe a Rood working relation-
ship as we are all working for the
same goal: the improvement of
the South Broward community."
Participants in the rabbinic
solocitations included Rabbi
Robert Fra/.in, Temple Solel;
Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
temple Sinai; Rabbi Bennett
Greenspon. Temple Beth Emet;
Rabbi Robert Jacobs, Temple
Solel; Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe,
Temple Beth El; Rabbi Carl
Klein, Hallandale Jewish Center;
Rabbi Morton Malavsky, Temple
Beth Shalom; Rabbi Paul
Plotkin, Temple Israel of
Miramar; Rabbi Harold Richter,
Jewish Federation of South
Broward; Rabbi Ben Romer,
Temple Beth El; Rabbi Emeritus
David Shapiro, Temple Sinai;
Rabbi Bernard Shoter, Temple in
The Pines; and Rabbi Herbert
Tobin, Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
The South Ocean Drive Hi-
Rise Division of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward will
hold a Pacesetter Gala Brunch on
behalf of the 1981 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation campaign on
Sunday, Feb. 8 at 11 a.m. in the
Diplomat Hotel, according to
Otto Stieber. chairman.
Guest speaker for the event
will be Dr. Bernard Cherrick. vice
president of the Hebrew Univer-
sity in Jerusalem.
All of the buildings in Holly-
wood and Hallandale Beach have
been showing strong support for
this event, Stieber said.
Buildings who arc partici-
pating in the event include Avant
Garde. Aquarius, Harold Shapiro
and Bernard Goldherger, chair-
men; Allington Towers, F.li Stif-
tel, chairman; Attache Gardens.
Saul Nucian, chairman; Beach
Plaza, Lloyd Kovel. chairman:
Cambridge Towers. Joseph
lieiss. chairman; Darby Hall.
Emanuel Sills. chairman;
Galahad North. James Kofman,
chairman; Galahad South. Syd-
ney I lull /man. chairman:
Galahad III. Jules B. Gordon,
chairman; Galahad Court, David
Khrlich, chairman; Hallmark.
Dr. Bernard Cherrick
Milton Seitles, chairman; Holly-
wood Towers. Hyde Park
Towers, Israel Tannenbaum.chair-
man; Oxford Towers, Philip
Olender. chairman: Presidential
lowers, JackMandelbaum.chair-
man; Quadomain, David Sklar
and Sam Koffler, chairmen; Sea
Air Towers, Abe Mallet, chair-
man; Stratford Towers. Daniel
Pollin, chairman: Trafalgar
Towers I, Rosalie and Murray
Oremland, chairmen: Trafalgar
Towers II, Louis Ball in and
Adeline Davis, chairmen; Twelve
Pillars. Betty Krupman, chair-
man; Valiant House, Arnold
Rosenthal, chairman; Wellington
Towers, Emanuel Borenstein,
chairman.
Also Ambassador North, Is-
adore Levine, chairman:
Ambassador South. Julius Ros-
nick. chairman; Clifton, Sylvan
Solomon, chairman; Golden Bay
Manor, Jack Hoffenberg. chair-
man; Golden Bay Towers, Sam
Slept, chairman; Golden View,
Wilhelm Meister, chairman:
Hemispheres. Benjamin Klein
and Sis Altman. chairmen:
Imperial Towers, Barney I^evne.
chairman; La Mer. Lee Franklin,
chairman; Malaga, Gerl
Scisorek, chairman; Parker
Dorado, Norman Gordon, chair
man: Parker Plaza, Ralph Feld
mun, Parker Towers. Samuel II
Levy, chairman; Plaza Towers
Max Tarasa, Ruth Suss. Inna
and Joseph Deotsch, chairmen
Prince George, Riviera. San
Levinson, chairman; Sea Edge
Herman Schulman. chairman.
h Fede
It Figures
ration of So
29
Twelve solid hours of fund raising at the Jewish Federation of South Broward s Super Sunday, with more
than 300 men, women and children calling, reached 1,900 contributor* and raiaed $136.466. More than 125
Federations across the country joined the Jewish Federation of South Broward to make Super Sunday the
largest single fond raising event in U.S. history. Shown are Jacki Reichbanm and Ron Rosen, Super
Sunday chairmen.
MMMaaflMaaMMa^^
Phil Baum to Speak Feb. 11
Phil Baum, associate executive
director of American Jewish
Congress in New York, will
discuss "The 1980 Election and
U.S. Middle East Policy'' on
Wednesday, Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. at
Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson St.
His appearance will mark the
second in a series of educational
forums sponsored by the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Community Relations Com-
mittee, explained Norman Freed-
man. Middle East Task Force
chairman.
Baum, an attorney, is an
expert in constitutional law and
Israeli and Middle Eastern af-
fairs.
For the last 13 years, he has
been the coordinator of Amer-
ican-Israel Dialogue, a gathering
of Israeli and American Jewish
thinkers who discuss relevant
issues of the day.
Baum is widely published,
including a white paper report on
"The Arab Campaign against
American Jews."
He is also a member of the ad-
ministrative committee of the
World Jewish Congress.
On Sunday, March 1, The
Continued on Page 3


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Friday, February 6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Hillcrest Premier Gifts PhUBaum
Hillcrest recently held its Premier Gifts Cocktail Party on behalf
of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1981 United Jewish
Appeal-Federation campaign.
Morris Ratner was chairman of the successful evening. Guest
speaker was Ruth Gruber. Joe Raymond is Hillcrest chairman.
From left are Joe Raymond, chairman; Ruth Gruber, guest speaker;
und Morris Ratner, Big Gifts chairman.
From left are Joe Raymond, chairman; Sam Kotler, coordinator; and
Milton Winograd, Premier Gifts chairman.
Arnon to Speak Feb. 10
.Joel Arnon. the Israeli Consul
* .1 rural in Atlanta, will be
speaking to several audiences in
South Broward on Feb. 10, 11
and 12. Arnon is being brought to
South Broward under the
auspices of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward in cooperation
with the David Ben Gurion
Lodge of B"nai B'rith.
Arnon is a diplomat who was
born in Germany to parents who
later perished in the Holocaust.
He studied at the University of
Michigan.
He has been a member of the
Israeli Civil Service since the es-
tablishment of the State. He
served in various capacities with
the Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
Amon served with the Israeli
Mission to the United Nations for
four years, acted as Deputy
Director General for Adminis-
tration of the Foreign Service and
served as Minister in the Israeli
Kmbassy in Bonn.
On Tuesday, Feb. 10, Arnon
will speak to the Miami Beach
Rotary Club at 12 noon;
residents of Fairways Apart-
ments at their annual event in
support of the Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign at 3
p.m.; at a dinner with Federation
leadership and members of the
executive committee at 6 p.m.;
and to members of the
Federation's Young Adult
Division at 8 p.m.
On Wednesday, Feb. 11, he will
speak to members of Florida
International University North
Campus at 10 a.m.,; the Hillel
Foundation at 12 noon; at a
dinner with leadership of the
David Ben Gurion Lodge of B'nai
B'rith at 5:30 p.m.; and to
members of the David Ben
Gurion Lodge of B'nai B'rith at
7:30 p.m.
On Thursday, Feb. 12, Arnon
will speak to the faculty and ad-
ministration at Miami Dade
Community College North
Campus at 12 noon.
Members of the Shoshana Committee of the Women' Division of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward met recently to make further
Plans for the B'not Shalom luncheon, which is set for March 12. Seated
from left an Jo Ann Katz, Carol Morgenstein, chairwoman; and
Matilda Kunelblot. Standing from left are Brenda Greenman, cam-
paign vies president and Ana Low*.
To Speak JOIN us FOR a
Continued from Page 1
Honorable Moshe Gilboa, Consul
General of Israel to the Midwest,
will be speaking at Temple Solel.
5100 Sheridan St. at the final
forum in the series. His topic at
the 8 p.m. event will be "Israel's
Challenge in the Middle Fast."
Born in 1930, Gilboa was
educated at the Herzlia High
School in Tel Aviv and the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
He received the "Certificate of
Proficiency" from Cambridge
University.
After the War of Liberation,
Gilboa and his wife, Ayala were
founding members of Kibbutz
Krez, bordering the Gaza Strip.
After being nominated as
spokesman and Director of
Public Relations of the Israel
Labor Party, Gilboa became the
First Secretary to David Ben-
Gurion when the party split and
the newly created Rafi Party was
lormed.
He joined the Civil Service in
1959 and was nominated as Aide
and Head of Bureau of Minister
Abba Khan and later served as
Director ol Special cooperation to
Developing Countries in the
Ministry of Defence. He also
represented Israel at in-
ternational conferences and was
the last Israeli to meet with the
late President John F. Kennedy
at a conference on the developing
countries in 1963.
Ciilboa was nominated as Am-
baesador to Zambia, served as
Director of Information of the
World Zionist Organization and
Director General of Israel
Defence Fund, known as the
"Entebbe Fund."
The forum series is open free of
charge to the public. For ad-
ditional information, contact
Herb Tobin at the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward.
Western Young
Leadership
Symposia
ff*Trin w VTS
A writs gf ttjucitional Imimi
prtstMM it i public urvict
PHIL BflUM
Associate Executive Director,
American Jewish Congress
"the 1980 election and u.s. middle east policy"
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1981, 8 P.M.
TEMPLE SINAI, 1201 JOHNSON STREET, HOLLYWOOD
Tljf. HWAgLE. "OSHE ?|
Consul General o* Israe.,
Chicago
ISRAEL S CHALLENGE IN THE MIDDLE EAST"
SUNDAY, MARCH 1, 1981, 8 P.M.
TEMPLE SOLEL, 5100 SHERIDAN STRCET, HOLLYWOOD
MIDDLE EAST TASK FORCE Of THE COMMUNITY RELATIONS C0M-ITTEE
JEWISH FEDERATION OF SCUTM BROWARD
THIS SERIES IS OPEN FREE OF CHARGE TO T.if. HJBLI
<
Women who helped address envelopes for the uncoming Women's
Division Chavarut luncehon are seated from left Evelyn Stieber, Rose
Appel, Helen Rittenberg, Ruth Abrams and Nina Kaplan. Standing
from left are EBtelle Glattman, Rosemary Taxman, Corinne Kolodin,
Fay Wiland, Leonore Weber, Aniella Frumkin and Sis Altraan.
Meeting Chavarut Luncheon
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Western Young
Leadership will hold an
educational parlor meeting on
Saturday, Feb. 7 at the home of
Richard and Jan /.iff, according
to Randy and Richard Blackburn
and Debbie and Tony Lundy, co-
chairmen.
Guest speaker will be Gene
Greenzweig, executive director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Any young couples interested
in the Western Leadership
Division should contact Linda
Senk-Rice at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Invitations for the upcoming
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division
Chavarut Luncheon were mailed
on Feb. 2, according to Evelyn
Stieber, Beach chairwoman.
The Chavarut Luncheon will be
held on Monday, March 16 at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour. Chavarut
is the Hebrew word for "friend-
ship," she explained.
More than 800 women are
expected to attend the luncheon,
which has a minimum commit-
ment of $100.
At this time, we have
MARCH I3BI
representation from almost every
building on South Ocean Drive.
Three Islands Boulevard and the
Golden Isles area.
"The various buildings are
hosting parlor meetings in order
to get every woman involved,
Mrs. Stieber added.
"Our theme solidarity for
1981" stresses the idea that we
are striving to establish unity
among the women in these South
Broward areas."
Entertainment at the luncheon
will be provided by the Habimah
Players.
8
15
22
29
IUE50AY
WfllNI SDAV
IMUBSOU
6
Mark your calendars now.
16
*
23
10 jll I 12 j 13
Beach Luncheon
17 | 18 | 19 | 20
Monday* March 16
| 27
24
25
26
Sheraton Bal Harbour
30
31
10:30 a.m.
SAIUHOAV
14
21
28


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Friday. Eabru*rv. 6
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2-1 ADAS 6741
Number 3
Endav.Februarv6. 11
Volume 11
Recalling Reagan's Vow
With the speculation growing daily about just
what President Reagan s new Administration will do
so far as Israel and the Middle East are concerned,
we hope that what is especially clear in Washington
is the wide disparity between Egypt's international
image as a peace-maker and the cold reality of
Egyptian politics on a day-to-day basis.
Last week, for instance. Egypt suddenly barred
Israel from the International Book Fair which
opened in Cairo. President Sadat has apparently
since lifted the ban when he 'discovered" it.
Now comes the news that a recently-published,
official Egyptian map of the Middle East intended
for tourist use simply ignores the existence of Israel
altogether. What is shown of Israel is called
"Palestine."
Meanwhile. Israel continues to be charged with
"intransigence" and many other sins in the sanctus
sanctorum of the U.S. State Department and. of
course, in the sanctimonious parliaments of the
European Economic Community.
All of this is especially significant as Reagan
Administration officials this week made the surprise
announcement that they expect to open an exam-
ination into U.S. foreign policy toward Israel
Let the record be clear. President Reagan
minced no words when he spoke during his election
campaign about any of these subjects: Israel and
Jerusalem. Israel and the settlements in Gaza and
the West Bank. Israel and the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
" "He must be made to stick to his words.
Pope's Metamorphosis
We observe with awe the metamorphosis in the
man. He is Pope John Paul II. What he said when he
was elevated to become the Prince of the Church is
not what he is saying today about Catholic-Jewish
relations.
In fact, some of the Pope's more recent pro-
nouncements on Jews and Judaism sound like the
venomous utterances of St. John of the Cross.
All of which is particularly significant in a world
which sees the sudden recrudescence of anti-
Semitism.
It is therefore hard enough for the best-intended
Christians to preach one thing about Jews and to
practice another. But when so distinguished a
Catholic leader as the Pope, himself, makes ques-
tionable statements about Jews. Judaism and Israel,
it does seem we are in for harder times.
Saea of Sen. Warren Rudman
tad
French Anti-Semite's
Work Appears in Holland
AMSTERDAM UTA) The first issue of the
Celine Journal, established by the Celine Society to
propagate the works of the late French author. Louis Fer-
dinand Celine, an anti-Semite and Nazi collaborator, was
published in Holland this week. The society was founded
last year with the stated purpose of making Celine's
writings available in the Dutch language. The journal will
appear twice a year.
Although the society acknowledges Celine's Nazi
sympathies, it regards him as a great writer whose books
deserve to be read. Three of them have already been
translated into Dutch and more are expected to follow.
His Voyage Au Bout de La Nuit has been adapted for the
stage by Belgian playright Guido Lauwaert and will be
performed in various Dutch cities in the next few weeks.
as
r -v-
after
B> JOSEPH P0LA1OFI
WAS I
bear. Seoatw ''
Bailie l
- \meno
ccnuir
lion weather^
mnugrant
% Senator one ol
.mericans in the -'-'
has apparent!* lr-hented tr*
determination of his eiders, al-
though in other ways. U> -
war. legal competition ana na-
tional politics
Rudman. now 50 years old. has
oeen a battler since his yout
a school boy at Valley
Military Academy ana
graduation from Syracuse as an
infanirv capiain and company
commander in the Korean W ar
thai brought him a bronze star -
the I S Army's third highest
decoration for heroism under
fire
OUT OF the army as a lawyer
-.- hometown of Nashua. 40
miles north of Boston, he con-
tinued fighting for his ideas Ten
vears after being graduated from
Boston College Law School, he
*a- appointed New Hampshire s
roe) Orwral Within five
yean he a- elected presic-
the National Association of
Auoraej 'i-neral
- ". Hampshin la*
: anded the criminal
leal with
.
.... ...
-
-
Durkin
What does R

r-influena
and it- contributor
He den wr ed
rat's

lefena
In keepinj
wouidr. I lake a dime from any
out-of-stat* political action com-
mitu
I M \ ER"l national
-
the US v
-
security program M> position
on U.S. foreign policy 1- that it
must be in the interests of
America, he replied.
Israel is a stalwart friend o'
the U.S. Its the only real democ-
racy in the Middle East
The U.S. must continue to givi
strong support to Israel because
it is in our interest as well as hers
We must support and strengthen
the Camp David accords and
continue working in thai
direction This has to be a bipar-
tisan effort that crosses party
lines Some more moderate Arab
countries realized Israel ia a force
of stability and can be a stronger
force (or stability in the Middle
East."
APPOINTED to the Senate
Appropriations and fiovernmeni
Affair-- Commit trrn both of
which deal with overseas
relations. Rudman was asked
about U.S. aid to Israel and
support for Soviet Jewry. "I will
consider foreign aid point by
point.'" he said. 'Certainly we
should give economic aid to
countries in the Middle East thai
a ,n our own interest as well as
theirs That also goes for military
equipment
the Jackson-Vanik amend-
ment lhat relates IS govern-
mental credit* 10 the Soviet
I nion to its emigration policy.
Rudman said he wants to study
it more fully He noted he needs
a lot of information' to make
that decision information you
don't gel until you re in the
- ate"
Km: -eiated with
-izaiion Jewish or
- I'm not a
He did not have much
my choice "
said Religion 1- very
. : I don't talk
nned alx>ut
t-h I'm not
1
THE SEN MOR I his t
A ah!, h^
ways the

-iham
ind placed
T tO
ntwwj
the soft dnnk bottling b.-mess.
subsequently, he married an
Odessa emigrant and the) had
four sons and a daughter, all
university graduates Harvard,
I ufts and WeUesley.
Meanwhile. Abraham became a
representative of the Moxia soft
drink company, and he set up 26
agencies in Maine. New Hamp-
shire and Vermont During
World War I. all his four sons
served in the U.S. Army The
first Rudman brought his
brothers to America from Lithu-
ania and one of their sons Abe
Rudman became a Maine Su-
preme Court justice. The Sena-
tor's maternal grandparents -
the Levinsons both came from
Riga. Latvia and settled in New
York City
THE YEAR Edward Rudman.
the Senator's father was bom in
Bangor in 1897. 12 men in
Nashua founded the Temple Beth
Abraham Congregation When
Edward came to Nashua the
town had 35 Jewish families in a
general population of 30.000.
Since then, with the influx of
electronics industries the general
population has grown to 300
families, many of whose bread-
winners are engineers in the new
industries.
Being a builder and furniture
manufacturer. Edward Kudman
was named chairman ol Temple
BetB Abraham's building
committee that constructed the
new temple for the community.
\s the interview wa- ending, a
'.porter remarked to the
Si natoc wite that the Ru
saga was unbelievable irom
.in immigrant who had no knowl-
ot English to S.U.S Senator
in three generations Hearing
this, the Senator called
Only in Ameru Harry
rjolden would say I ) n *asa
general nodding oi agreement.
HI AS Notice
HI AS Hebrew Immigrant
to locate
Jews who :.%ed in or around
>k in Byelorussia (White
nal, during the period of
lit a matter of ut-
r*>st importance
Please call or write Joseph
Edelman of HI AS about this
natter. The address is: 200 Park
\\enue South. New York Ckjf
10003 Telephone: 1212)674-6800.
m


Pag* 5
New Procedures in Processing Soviet Emigrants
From left are Dr. Ira Sheier, Jewish Federation of South Broward;
I Jackie Levine, chairwoman; Zee and Hal Rudin, hosts; Israel Amitai,
guest speaker; and Dr. Joe Stein, Hollybrook chairman.
Preparing for the 1981 UJA-Federation Hollybrook Dinner are, from
lleft, co-chairman Esther Marcus and Sylvia Stein.
Hollybrook Annual Dinner
hosted the most successful "Big
Gifts Cocktail Party" ever held
at Hollybrook.
"The time and effort that Mrs.
Kudin and Mrs. Karp put into the
Cocktail Party was truly
amazing," commented Jackie
Levin, Big Gifts chairman.
"I was absolutely thrilled to
learn that we have raised nearly
$15,000 in new money as a result
of this Cocktail Party," com-
mented Rhea Krieger, Big Gifts
co-chairman.
"We are very proud of what is
going on at Hollybrook, par-
ticularly at the Big Gifts Cocktail
Party and we anxiously await the
Feb. 22 Dinner,"concluded Lester
Weil, long-time organizer and
supporter of UJA Federation
efforts at Hollybrook.
Migdal Yam
Chapter
The Migdal Yam Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 17 at
Sea Air Towers Social Hall, 3725
S. Ocean Dr.. Hollywood.
Guest speaker will be Blanche
Kaminsky, member of the
National Service Committee. .
The coffee hour begins at 12:30
p.m. and the meeting begins at 1
p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 22 at 6 p.m. at
] Kmerald Hills Country Club will
mark the annual Hollybrook
Dinner lor the 1981 Combined
UJA Federation Campaign
I Dinner.
"We are thrilled that this
year's Federation Campaign
IDinner will be held in the lovely
surroundings provided by
iF.merald Hills Country Club,"
[commented Co-Chairman Sylvia
Stein.
"In past years the dinner was
Ismail enough to hold locally,"
[added Co-Chairman Esther
| Marcus. "Happily however, we
have grown to the point of having
I to use an outside facility."
The continued growth of both
.he level of giving and the
[number of contributors is a
source of pride to all of us at
Hollybrook," added Dr. Joseph
I Stein. Hollybrook chairman.
Ilonorees for the dinner are
Kaisie and Harry Karp, formerly
[of Milwaukee, Wise.; Hollybrook
' residents since 1975.
While invitations have been
[sent to all Hollybrook residents,
additional information and res-
jervations for the Feb. 22 event
lean be made by calling Sylvia
Stein at 431-0239 or Esther
| Marcus at 431-0396.
Hal and Zee Rudin recently
NEW YORK CITY New
procedures for processing Soviet
Jewish emigrants were an-
nounced at a news conference
recently by Gaynor I. Jacobson,
executive vice-president of HI AS
(the Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society), funded in part by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. Jacobson said that
under the new procedures he
hoped two-thirds of future Soviet
Jewish refugees would choose to
settle in Israel and one-third in
the United States, Canada, Aus-
tralia and other countries. At
present the figures are exactly
the reverse.
Under the new plan the
refugees spend only two days in
Vienna instead of eight to ten
days as heretofore. Those who
opt for Israel fly there from
Vienna. Beginning in a few
weeks, the others will then go to a
hotel north of Rome, where,
during up to a week's stay, they
will receive expert counseling
from representatives of HIAS,
the Joint Distribution Committee
and the Jewish AGency for
Israel. Previously, refugees in
this category were sheltered in
scattered quarters around Rome,
and did not receive such joint
counseling.
"Those with close relatives in
the Untied States or other
countries will be helped to be re-
united with their families. For all
the other emigrants a conscien-
tious and sensitive effort will be
made to help them choose to go
to Israel," Mr. Jacobson said.
"We believe the new program
will substantially increase the
number of Soviet Jews who settle
in Israel," he declared. "Israel
has a great deal to offer, es-
pecially for people in certain pro-
fessions. Beyond this, Israel
posseses a religious and and cul-
tural environment that Jews
from the Soviet Union have never
been permitted to enjoy. We
think the joint counseling will
help many refugees make better-
informed choices than in the
recent past, when only about one-
third chose to go to Israel."
Jacobson also announced that
HIAS through local Jewish
community organizations and
Jewish federations was en-
couraging American Jews
(especially recent arrivals) with
close relatives in the Soviet
Union to send "letters of in-
vitation" to their kin desiring to
leave the USSR.
"In recent times, an average of
500 Soviet Jews a year has come
to the United States in this
manner," he reported, "and we
believe larger numbers will arrive
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here if there is an increase in in-
vitations from close relatives."
Jacobson also revealed that
1980 saw a five percent decline in
Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union as compared to
1979. Preliminary HIAS statis-
tics show that 22,000 Jews left
the USSR last year as against
51,600 in 1979. HIAS helped
15,500 Soviet Jews come to the
United States in 1980 compared
to 29,000 in the preceding year.
Commenting on the overall de-
cline, Mr. Jacobson observed:
"Because Jewish emigration
from the Soviet Union is believed
lo be closely tied to U.S.-Soviet
relations, the drop in emigration
could reflect the Soviet Union's
displeasure over the U.S. not
granting it most-favored nation
trading status.
"Indeed, the number of Jews
exiting the USSR was unusually
high in early 1979, but began to
drop as early as November of
that year. This past fall, the
number of Jewish exits dropped
again, and in the last three
months of 1980 only 3,100 Jews
left the USSR, compared with
about 13,000 for the correspond-
ing quarter in 1979.
"Despite this gloomy picture,"
he said, "sources in Washington
are confident that the emigration
of Soviet Jews will not stop alto-
gether, because it is believed the
USSR will want to keep the door
open to improving relationships
with the United States later on."
Mr. Jacobson reported also
that HIAS, at the request of the
U.S. Government (and with
Government funding), has al-
ready begun to assist non-Jewish
refugees from Ethiopia as well as
Haitians seeking asylum in this
country. The agency expects to
ud this year a minimum of 100
persons from each country, about
half of whom will settle in the
New York metropolitan area.
He predicted a "mild" upswing
in Jewish migration from France,
Argentina and other South
American and Central American
countries because of "a disturb-
ing increase in anti-Semitic in-
cidents and propaganda."
During 1980, Mr. Jacobson
said, HIAS helped reunite more
than 300 Iranian Jewish families
(about 1,200 persons) with close
relatives living in the United
States, and that in 1980 HIAS
assisted over 3,100 Cuban and
6,000 Indochinese refugees to re-
settle in communities throughout
the U.S. These programs are
funded largely by the U.S.
Government.
I It was announced at the news
conference by F.dvvin Shapiro,
HIAS president, that Mr. Jacob-
son, who has been with HIAS
since 1953. will retire effective
February 1, but wjll remain with
the agency as a consultant. He
will be succeeded as executive
vice-president by Leonard
Seidenman, who is currently
HIAS director of European and
North African operations. .
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United Jewish Appeal, the UJA-
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and Jewish federations across the
country.
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Page 6
The Jewish Flo
ridian and Shofar of GreaterHoUywood_
Friday. February 6. igg,
Gala Shomrai Dinner Dance
Seated from left are Rosalind Ratner. Joseph and Harriet Bloom and
Milton Winograd. Standing from left are Morris Ratner, Joseph and
Vicky Raymond, Bernard and Bernice Busch. Sally Winograd, Mart
and Ann Gilbert.

. -V ^->*|fj
Seated from left are Patty and Joseph Kelrick. Tobene and Stoyan
Rosen thai. Standing from left are Paul and Ruth Rodeneky. Rochelle
and Paul Koenig, Nancy and Norman Atkin.
Seated from left are Jo Ann and Sherman Katz, Sylvia Kalin and
Sadie Berger. Standing from left are Jack and Lilyan Mandel, David
and Shirley Schlossman.
Seated from left are Otto and Eveh/n Stieber. Jamee Kaasner, Mrs.
Ruby and Louis Greenberg. Standing from left are Isadore and
Dorothy Mokrin, Max and Jean Lander and Shirley Greenberg.
Seated from left are Alvin and Beverly Shap.ro and Dougte and Joan
Gross. Standing from left All Oordon. M^Zn. Esther
Gordon, Jerry and Joan Raticoff. Maralyn and Paul Anton.
Seated from left are Bonnie and Stuart Wolf, Carol and Irving Karten.
Standing from left are Howard Barron, Saul and Susan Singer, Donna
and Earl Barron. Judee Barron.
Seated from left are George and Iris Crane. James Fox Miller and
Barbara Miller. Standing from left are Bobbie Levin. Jimmy and
Margy Baer. Philip Levin. Susan Holtzman Thomas, Simon and Jacki
Keirhbaum.
wSSi nZi .'reJRobert Pon.er.nU, Merle and Joel Schneider and
*dley. Toby Greenberg and Robert Plttell.


Page
Seated from left are Rbea Posnack, Jack Salt/man M.rJi _i
and N WtcieSrn,,Ck Mma *"* ^^ ^^ Eva and *"* R<~

Seated from left are Ann and Lewis Conn, Eleanor Weiner and Gerry
Morrison. Standing from left are Moshe and Giannine Ashkenazi,
Fred and Meral Ehrenatein, Mark and Helen Cohan, Paul Weiner and
Norman Morrison.
Seated from left are Howard and Merry Liff, Stunner and Dina Kaye.
Standing from left are Marika Tolz, Reuben Schneider, Mary and
Eddie Gottlieb.

Seated from left are Camille Cammarand, Annette Deakter. Marlene
Odle and Wilma Rosenfeld. Standing from left are Selma Krupp,
Morris Deakter, Rosalind and Alvin Mishkin.
|
Seated from left are Herman and Ruth Glickman, Alex and Esther
Morningstar. Standing from left are Jules and Stella Gordon, Lucile
and Melvin Baer and Bertha Goldberg.
Receiving their awards from Campaign Chairman Philip Levin
(center) are Shomrai Division Chairmen Norman Morrison and Melvin
Baer.
From left are Philip Levin, campaign chairman; Melvin Baer, Shomrai
Division chairman; Yitzhak Rabin, guest speaker; Norman Morrison,
Shomrai Division chairman; and Robert Pittell, president.
Campaign Chairman Philip Levin congratulates Shomrai Event
I Coordinators Annette Deakter and Maralyn Anton.
Shomrai Division Chairmen Norman Morrison and Melvin Baer
announce the 1961 Shomrai Dinner total gifts at $879,304.


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, February b, lj
The Soviet Jewish Refugee Situation
** sfniwl on his job. and
Q. How many Jews have left I
the USSR in recent years and
where have they gone?
A. Since 1972, approximately
250,000 Jews have left the Soviet
Union. Approximately 150,000 of
these have resettled in Israel; 80-
90.000 have resettled in the
United States; and approxi-
mately 10.000 have resettled in
other countries, primarily
Canada and Australia.
Q. What is the current Jewish
emigration situation from the
USSR?
A. Throughout the second half
dt the I970"s, Jwish emigration
from the USSH rose consistently,
reaching ;i high-water mark ol
51,000 in I9"9 However, the
emigration figures for 1980 show
a substantial decrease.
In 1980, approximately 21.500
Soviet Jews were permitted to
exit the USSR, with over 8,000
choosing immigration to Israel
and the remaining 13,000 choos-
ing immigration to other coun-
tries, primarily the United
States. Throughout 1980 the
monthly figure of Jews exiting
the Soviet Union have declined.
In November and December of
1980. for example, only slightly
under 1,000 Jews per month have
been permitted to exit the USSR.
Q. How does one applj forexil
from the USSR?
\ I nlflce most countrii -
the free world, the Soviet Union
does not have an open emigration
policy. In order to emigrate from
the Soviet Union, the petitioner
must present a letter of invitation
from someone outside the Soviet
Union. When a Jew applies for
exit from the USSR, he is fre-
quently fired from his job or
demoted to a menial position.
Pressure is frequently applied to
relatives. He is frequently also
required to present a complicated
and extensive series oi docu-
ments attesting to his having no
outstanding debts, obtaining
permission from l"s parents, pre-
senting character references, and
practicallj anything that the
local emigration offici wishes to
n Decisions on applications
:,,,-. lake! ral month
If I
mi"-i' rse. nol rein
Meirah
Committee
The Women's Division <>t the
Jewish Federation nl South
Broward has selected us Meirah
Committee, with Nancy Atkin
and Rochelle Koenig being ap-
pointed co-chairwomen, an-
nounced Brenda Greenman,
campaign vice president.
The Meirah category was
named for (iolda Meir. Meirah is
Hebrew for "those who illumine
the land." Mrs. Greanman ex-
plained.
"The name of the category is
appropriate because the women
who are part of th- category are
leaders in our comiTtuitrt^.' sde
added.
a The Meirah ComrMttee in-
cludes Sis Altman, Judee Barron,
Wendy Benjamin, Natalie Bluth.
Frances Briefer, Nancy Brizel,
Helen Cohan. Ann Conn, (iert
Fntin. Mine Finkelstein. Edith
Frost, Vivien Goldstein, Mary
Gottlieb, Fthel (iould. Joan
dross. Mildred Meister. Khona
Miller. Susan Miller. Bee Mogi-
bwitz, Ruth Morgan. Klaine Pit-
tell. Joan Raticofl. Ruth Roden-
sky. Delia Rosenberg. Florence
Roth. Fee Schat/.berg. Bobbe
Schlesinger. Beverly Shapiro and
Jeannette Sussman.
Seated from left are Bobbie Levin, president; and Frances Briefer.
Standing from left are (iert Fntin. Edith Frost, Vivien Goldstein and
Rochelle Koenig. co-chairwoman
From left are Nancy Atkin. co-chairwoman. Jeannette Sussman, Rose
Pollen and Ethel (iould.
stated on his job. and. thereby,
the risk is great. Most Soviet
Jews obtaining exit permission
with invitations from Israel also
must renounce Soviet citizenship.
This process is quite expensive.
Q. How have the Soviets
curbed emigration?
A. In mid-1979. Soviet emigra-
tion offices, primarily in the
I kraine. began to curb Jewish
emigration by severely restrict-
ing the eligibility ol applicants
l.eiier- ill invitation were bo apt-
abli onlj ii they came from
member ol ones immediate
|j living in Israel Since that
lime, these restrictions have
id to man) othei parts ol the
i t nion. This mi thod ol re-
has been effective
majorit) ol the
-. i\ ii Ji w< a in i urn-
: -., in i he early
,,, i already im ited
. relal ives The most
applicant
! i- ol relatives ol the
Soviet Jews who
chosi ition Hi the I nited
Vusl ralia eU
emigrated
nd man) havi
..I inxiti tl itives
t'lioi
Hit) m| these
to be reunited
i in in. sl ill in the
Sll
i.) u In bit thi Sin iel I nion
I Jew i h emigrant s?
\ \ i deliniti iniormation is
.ilile on i hi Sin iel (lo> em-
nient's reasons lor imposing
new harsh restriclions Ii is
ill) agreed, however, that
,|f\v ish i migi al ion depends
lai .11) upon I nited Stales-
Sin hi relai ions. I n formed
sources within the \m rican
(iovel mm nl and in Ol her areas
tuid i hal i he consistent rise
in .lew i | ution From ibe
i I nion Irom 197 I through
1 I w.i- an utiempl b) the
i I nion in gain In i ier
trading status with the I nited
Males | iii current cutback-- in
emigration |K-rmissions are most
likel). therelore, a product ol
ciMiling relations between the
I S and l he I SSH
(J \\ hat is being done'.'
A. There is a concerted effort
under way lo increase Soviet
Jewish emigration, even under
i he current restrictions imposed
b) the Soviet authorities. It has
lone been 111 \> polic) that no
efforts should be spared in help-
ing as mans Soviet Jews as
possible to chiii.se to settle in
Israel. While lll\s as the
relugee and migration agency of
the organized Jewish communitT
is committed to the organi^
Jewish community's posjll0
that refugees should have fre
dom of choice of country of destj
nation, we have consistently
worked with the Jewish AGency
for Israel in trying to increase the
percentage of those Soviet Je*s
selecting Israel as a country 0|
destination.
We are currently working out a
plan by which joint counseling
lietween the Jewish Agency
HI AS and the American .Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
will take place with refugees
coming out of the Soviet (nion,
so that a more favorable image ol
Israel can be presented u, in,.m
Soviet Jews have been subjected
to sears ot anti-Israel |
ganda and deserve a more real-
istic view ol the possibilities
offered bj Israeli rest; I lenient.
It is sincerely hoped that ifthu
plan lor joint counseling
implemented quickly, u
percentage ol i hose J< h mm
i fining OUt of t he Siv ii | I
will choose Israel ,i^ ,i countrj ol
ik si ma) ion. and i hen b) u ill lie
able in invite their relative -nil
in the USSR. I'his plan
lore, should produce an nppor
iiinitv Im more Jew n i
leave the I SSH .
cui rent rest rictiv < polii
III \S is nol content
to allow those relal i> i nl Jews
who have settled in i he I nited
States lo remain stranded m the
I SSH We have an \nnruiin
Ifltei oi invitation program and
are encouraging all Jew- with
relatives in the I SSH lo submit
\meiican letters ol invitation In
the past. Soviet Jew- have been
discouraged by the local Soviet
officials Irom submitting invite-
lions Irom countries oihel lhan
Israel. We hope, however, that l>\
increasing the number ol \im-rt-
i .in invitations dramatically,
some po-il iv e i Heel in Ih
produced.
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- Friday, Febnary,6 1.-981
ThkJewiah >Pio.nduin arid ShofAiKof- (rrvaferWoityuvtod
\
Page 9
Project Renewal Is 'Critical tMority'
_
NEW YOKK Major Gneral
Avraham Orly, former Coor-
dinator of Administered
Territories for the Israel Defense
Forces and one of his nation's key
military leaders, described
Project Renewal as "one of
I-rail's most critical priorities"
at the United Jewish Appeal
Florida Regional Conference in
Orlando.
Speaking to more than 200
Jewish community leaders from
throughout the state, including
several representatives from the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, Orly stressed that
while world attention is focused
on continued peace negotiations
between Israel and Fgypt, the
partnership between Diaspora
and Israeli Jews to rejuvenate
Israel's distressed neighborhoods
must be the object of "intensive
concentration" in the coming
decade.
Orly, who has played a role in
negotiations with F.gypt. said
that "it is urgent for the further
development of Israel that we
solve the problems that continue
to oppress the 300.000 Jews who
Hashomer, ARMDI
Chapter Plans Luncheon
The Hashomer Chapter of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel which supports the Israeli
Red Cross Service will hold an
installation & Charter signing
Luncheon on Sunday, Feb. 15 at
the "Grist Mill" Restaurant at 12
noon, it has been announced.
All new Chapter members will
>e guests of the Chapter for the
Luncheon. They will sign the
New Chapter Charter and receive
their paid up Member-ship cards.
There will be absolutely no
iolicitationat this luncheon.
hill Hinder will be installed as
chapter President. Mr. Broder is
B"Breadth of Life" Award holder
from the American Red Magen
l)a\ id for Israel. He is a member
oi the ARMDI District Steering
Committee. Active in many
community organizations he is
a Men Brith and past President of
the David Ben Gurion Ixxlge
oi B'nai Brith. He is also active
as a Board Member of the
Hollywood llallandale Chap-
ter of Friends of Hebrew Univer-
sity. Board member of "Sports
lor Israel" and a Regional
Director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai H'rith.
Other officers include Mrs.
Betty Solondz, Exec. Vice-
President, a Life Member of
Israel Stamp
Slide Show
Petit point stilchery and
stamp collecting are two different
pastime.-. that are among
\mericas favorites. Naomi
Sloglin, a Registered Nurse from
Maple Shade. N.J.. has com-
hinedthose interests with a
passion for Israel to come up with
one of the more unique hobbies in
the country: creating petit poit
reproductions of Israeli stamps.
Ms. Sloglin will show slides of
her unusual collection of more
than 46 such creations at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center at 8 p.m. on
Feb. 10. Her narration of her
work details the history and
culture of Israel as it has been
reflected in stamps. Admission is
*l tor Center members, and $2 for
non-members.
The presentation should be of
interest to those who practice
needlepoint, collect stamps, or
who enjoy Israeli culture. Ms.
Sloglin works with the U.S.
Fublic Health Service in the Phil-
adelphia area, and is a member of
the Israeli Philatelica Society.
For more information about
the presentation, contact Cynthia
Klein, Creative Arts Supervisor
at the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center, 932-
4200.
ARMDI and an active leader in
many local Jewish Organizations,
Mrs. Gertrude Scisorek Vice-
President, Mrs. Ida Dubick Vice-
President, Morris Spiegle Vice-
President, Dorothy Wiltschek
Sec'y. and Walter Hendin,
Treasurer.
The new chapter wished to in-
vite all area residents of Holly-
wood Beach I Lilian dale Beach
to join the Hashomer Chapter. To
obtain more information, contact
Bob Schwartz, ARMDI District
Director at 16499 NE 19 Ave.,
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
or call 947-3263. You may also
call Mr. Broder at 929-6468 or
Mrs. Dorothy Wiltschek 456-
0702.
have not yet been fully absorbed
into the mainstream of Israeli
society."
Project Renewal was created
two years ago to radically up-
grade the physical and social en-
vironment of 160 neighborhoods
in Israel that are home to im-
migrant Jews, most from North
Africa and the Middle Fast,
whose economic and cultural
Isolation has been a barrier to
their successful advancement in
the society around them.
Under the program. American
communities are linked formally
with Israeli neighborhoods and
provide manpower and com-
munity development skills,
working with Israelis to identify
local problems and implement
programs to correct them.
American Jews this year will seek
to raise $54 million in addition to
the UJA Federation record
peacetime 1981 Campaign to
fund the program.
General Orly told the fourth
annual meeting leaders that the
peace process "is continuing, not
as fast as Israel would like, but
there is definite progress. This
peace is going to be firm and
lasting.
The military leader was the
keynote speaker at the three-day
conference which drew Jewish
leaders from across the state to
examine major issues faced by
the worldwide Jewish community
md to prepare for the 1981
UJA Federation hind raising
'ampaign.
Other principal conference
speakers included Jewish Agency
Chairman I .eon Dulzin who said
that sharp cuts in the Agency's
budget for humanitarian
programs and services were a
result of "sporadic transmissions
of cash" by American Jewry,
which forced the Agency to make
frequent short term loans at very
high interest rates.
He urged that American com-
munities take steps this year "to
insure a timely and even flow of
cash to fund vital programs in
Israel."
UJA National Chairman
Herschel W. Blumberg assessed
the needs of the 1981 UJA Fed-
eration fundraising campaign,
stating that "the crises, the
needs and the challenges facing
Jews throughout the world have
never been greater." Triple-digit
Israeli inflation, increasing
worldwide isolation of Israel and
the massive real costs of the
Israeli Egyptian peace treaty to
the people of Israel are con-
tributing factors in the challenge
to American Jewry to raise $635
million in 1981, a total that has
not been reached since 1974, in
response to the Yom KippurWar.
Thomas A. Dine, Executive
Director of the American Israel
Public Affairs committe,
discussed the implications of the
recent U.S. elections to American
and worldwide Jewry and told
the group: "We must work to
strengthen and support Israel
(because) many of Israel's long-
time tnends in the House and
Senate will not be returning."
Senator-elect Paula Hawkins,
who analyzed the new congress
and her projected role in that
body, hailed Israel as "America's
friend and strategic ally."
Conference presentations
ranged over current issues of
Jewish concern, including the rise
of anti-Semitism worldwide, the
values and responsibilities of the
Jewish family, and other
challenges unique to Florida and
the Sunbelt communities.
Basic elements of campaigning
were explored in an intensive
program of seminars and
workshops throughout the three
days of the conference, including
sessions on Women's Division
and Young leadership activities,
solicitation techniques, campaign
planning, worker and leadership
training, tax incentives for
giving, and approaches to
planning and implementing such
mass campaign events as the
forthcoming National "Super
Sunday," scheduled for Jan. 18.
A highlight of the conference
was the presentation of an award
to Conference Chairman Jim
Shipley by Morton Silberman,
Florida Regional Chairman,
citing Shipley for his "years of
outstanding contributions to
Jewish life."
The 1981 Florida Conference
was organized by the United
Jewish Appeal, with cooperation
from the Florida Association of
Jewish Federations and the
Council of Jewish Federations.
Will Your Lunch Today
Cause a Migraine Tomorrow?
You probably aren't
aware that what
you're eating today
could give you an
agonizing headache
tomorrow. Quite
frankly, certain foods
you eat could lead
to headaches.
Delicacies such as
ripe cheese, chocolate,
beansprouts, herring,
red wine, nuts and scotch are
known to cause headaches
in some people. In most cases,
once the food culprit is
removed from the diet, the
headache pain disappears.
Learning to understand
what causes headaches and
how to prevent them is one of
the many functions at the
Headache Treatment Center in
Ft. Lauderdale, a unit of the
Center for Neurological
Services
It is one of only a few such
Centers presently in the
United States and the only one
in Florida. Sophisticated
equipment, a highly qualified
staff of doctors, nurses and
therapists plus expertise
in diagnostic and
therapeutic technology
combine to provide
the finest in
patient care.
If you are suffering
from persistent or
recurring headaches,
we suggest you consult
with your physician.
Or call us at 491-6032.
We're here to help.
This information is brought to
you by:
The Headache Treatment
Center a unit of the
Center for Neurological
Services.
CMS
Center for Neurologlcol Services
Fort Louderdaie
NORTH RIDGE MEDICAL PLAZA 5601 N. DIXIE HIGHWAY FORT LAUDERDALE 491-4296


n
rageiu
1 he Jewish tlonduxn etna hhofar of umater tiollyi
Vanessa Again
Charge Script Inflates Fenelon's True Role
I-asker played in the orchestra,
which provided off-duty enter-
tainment for the Nazis and
played marching music to keep
the interns in step.
An Auschwitz survivor is to
ask if she can go on television to
refute the events shown in
tonight's ITV film Playing foi
Time. The part played b>
Vanessa Redgrave is, she claims,
a serious distortion of the truth.
The controversial film, written
by Arthur Miller, is based upon
the memoirs of a fellow survivor,
I' a ma Fenelon, a musician in the
camp orchestra, whose members
were spared from the gas cham-
ber to play others to their deaths.
Last week Anita Lasker, now a
cellist with the English Chamber
Orchestra, claimed that, among
other inaccuracies, the filrr
wrongly glorifies Fania Kenelor
at the expense of the orchestri
conductor, Alma Rose, who was
1 he niece of Gustav Mahler.
IN THE FILM Fania Fenelor,
emerges as the moral force wh(
bravely defied the Germans ant
held members of the orchestra to-
gether, while the conductor
Alma Rosfe, is depicted as a weal
woman who imposed a cruel dis
Cipline on the orchestra from feai
ol the Nazis and who was heavily
dependent upon gaining Fene-
lon's approval.
"It just wasn t like that,'' Miss
Lasker said last week. "Fania
was pleasant and talented but
she was not as forceful as Alma.
who helped us to survive. She
was the key figure, a woman of
immense strength and dignity
who commanded the respect ol
everyone including the SS.
"What she achieved with her
iron discipline and absurd pursuit
of musical perfection was that
our attention was focused away
from the death factory outside
the block, away from the smok-
ing chimneys and on to an F
which should have been an F
sharp. She kept us sane and we
all owe her the greatest debt of
gratitude."
MISS LASKER has already
been successful in getting
passages removed from the origi-
nal version of the Fenelon book,
"The Musicians of Auschwitz."
Now, with three other survivors
from the orchestra, who live in
France and Belgium, she is
mounting an international cam-
paign to counter the view that
:^v:::-:-:r:::r:t:::-K-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-W*:r:-:;:
THE STRUGGLE over the Fania Fenelon story, which
playwright Arthur Miller recreated in his script,
'Playing for Time,' for CBS Television last year, may
seem somewhat like old hat today. But the 'art has
nothing to do with politics' attitude that Miller took,
himself a Jew, is still galling. So was the schizo-
phrenic posturing of the star of the production,
Vanessa Redgrave, a PLO apologist. And downright
infuriating was the CBS view that Miss Fenelon's
objections to the script and to Redgrave's starring
role did not even deserve consideration. These issues
apart, 'Playing for Time' appeared on British
television Jan. 11 for the first time. Stephen Pile
reports on that event in 'The Sunday Times.'
Peres Pushes Jordan
Plan With Giscard
::... Anita Lasker, now a'%
v. cellist with the English 9
g Chamber Orchestra, |
* claimed that, among other 5
inaccuracies, the film *
wrongly glorifies Fania
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Shimon Peres, chairman of
Israel's Labor Party, has
met here with President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing
for a detailed discussion of
Middle East issues on
which France and Israel
generally disagree. During
his one-day visit here,
Peres also conferred with
Giscard's two chief rivals in
the French presidential
elections scheduled for
April, Socialist Francois
Mitterand and Gaullist
Jacques Chirac.
Peres then went on to London
where he met with Prime Minis-
,er Margaret Thatcher and
Foreign Secretary Lord
Harrington.
In talks with Giscard, the
Israeli leader reportedly ex-
plained the "Jordanian option,"
to which the Labor Party is
pledged, and stressed that a
solution for the West Bank based
in an agreement with Jordan's
King Hussein could be the way to
i comprehensive peace.
LATER, when reporters re-
minded Peres that Hussein has
ruled out any Egyptian talks
with Israel only a few months
before he flew to Jerusalem."
The French government is
skeptical about both the long-
range application of the Camp
David agreements and imple-
mentation of a Jordanian option.
Peres told reporters on leaving
the Elysee Palace, "We disagreed
on many points."
The Socialists, whom the latest
public opinion polls give a 50-50
chance to beat Giscard, have
been pledged to the Jordanian
option since the Socialist Inter-
national conference in Madrid
last year.
TV
Program
Rabbi Harold Richter, Jewish
Federation of South Broward
chaplain and co-director of the
Community Relations Committee
recently taped a cable TV pro-
gram for Selkirk Communi-
cations, which was shown
January.
in
*
Fenelon at the expense of | categorically refused to par-
the -j2~S3SIttM^llaStSrt
Alma Rose, who was the % ^ le88 pessimistic than you are.
niece of Gustav Mahler rhis is the Middle East, and
Kj today's denials carry little wort!.
->: tomorrow. Remember that
\mmmmmsaKamfmmmm President (Anwar) Sadat also
The theme was "The Jewish
Chaplaincy at the Broward
Correctional Institution." The
program included some ex-
inmates of that prison who dis-
cussed the role that religion and
the chaplaincy plays in the lives
of people in correctional
stitutions.
audiences will get from Playing
for Time.
Among the alleged in-
accuracies are:
The orchestra members
"were not like St. Trinian's girls
permanently scratching each
other's eyes out. We had to help
each other survive.
f The British did not liberate
Auschwitz. The Russians did.
0 Sex with the SS and other
women was not so prevalent as
the film suggests. One character
in the film is wrongly accused of
prostitution. "The orchestra was
not a horror story. We were privi-
leged. Auschwitz was bad enough
without having to invent
things."
TODAY Miss l.asker is a
London based cellist and house
wife with two grown-up children.
The only visible trace <>t her ex-
perience is the number tattooed
mi her left forearm. She insist
upon a dry and factual descrip-
tion ol her experiences, which
mly make-, them the more
lulling.
\i 16 she was arrested in the
nurse nt resist ance woik \tter
two years in prison she was put
en the train foi \uschwitz. I
arrived at night and only re-
member shouting and barking
and figures in black capes.'" She
walked along roads ol yellow mud
tn I lie reception centre where she
was stripped and her head
shaved.
I was asked al>out my in-
terests and I told them about the
cello. 'Then you are saved' was
the reply. The camp orchestra did
not contain a bass instrument. So
I was essential.'"
FOR ONE YEAR, the period
dealt with in the film. Miss
Give a Helping Heart
Community Hospital of South
Broward welcomes new volun-
teers to assist in areas of patient
service, the gift shop and
reception desk morning and
afternoons on both weekdays and
weekends. Come "give a helping
heart"' at a time convenient to
you!
Join us for refreshments and a
lour on Tuesday. Feb. 24 at 2
p.m. to learn more about the
many volunteer opportunities or
call Carol Bruno at 966-8100,
extension 269 for more in-
formation.
Community Hospital is located
at 5100 West Hallandale Beach
Blvd in Hollywood, one mile east
ol Slate lload 7.
Today Miss Lasker refuses to
visit Germany when the English
Chamber Orchestra plays there.
She did once revisit Auschwitz,
but hardly recognized it. "When
we were prisoners we hardly
looked around us at all. We were
too busy concentrating on our
own circumstances and sur-
vival.''
The cellist is now a chain-
smoker, an embryonic habit
which Auschwitz intensified
"Smoking was the only normal
activity that we could bring in
from the outside world. It was
the only thing that was not con-
nected with life and death.''
The sur\ ivors of the orchestra
do not blame Fania Fenelon for
her account, but feel the film.
made by CBS in America,
heightens a misrepresentation
present in the book. "We all feel
that we must defend the name nt
Alma Rose because she saved our
lives and did not survive the
i amp t" defend hei ill'
Student
Returns
From Israel
Ronnie Neemar a student at
Cooper City High School, has
returned from High School in
Israel.
Neeman, as a High School in
Israel participant, did not parti-
cipate in the usual tour. Instead,
he spend eight intensive weeks ol
study learning the history of
western civilization and visiting
the appropriate sites in Israel.
Neeman resides with his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Shaul
Neeman, in Fort Lauderdale at
20421 SW 50 Place.
American ORT
The Hollywood Hills Chapter
of Women's American ORT will
sponsor a luncheon and fashion
show on Wednesday, Feb. 11 at
Turnberry Isle Country Club in
the Garden Room.
The luncheon begins at 11 a.m.
The fashion show will be by
Sheila Natasha Friedman and
will feature exclusive couture
trappings. Cost for the luncheon
and fashion show is $16.
The event is a major fund
raiser and ol prime importance to
the Hollywood HH! Chapter of
Women's America" >RT.
CHALLENGING
Our expanding pharmaceutical phc
aggressive sales oriented people
customers over the phone. Salary plus incentive, full
time Equal Opportunity Employer.
Call 920-3111 Ext. 240 Or 221
, divisor) needs
to contact our
in
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
Konover Hotel H*C Miami Beach
* LIVELY AND YIDDISH CO. pro**, ,*.-*.
THE INTERNATIONAL 3TAGESTAR
LEO FUCHS
H it on* of MM treat comooKc acton."
V*m Canty Mm yi, Tim*
| IN A TRADITIONAL YIDDISH MUSICAL COMEDY
"ONE OF A KIND"
With an Alt-Star Cast
rSufiEErLTi MS-1500 F" VALET HUKHC
WwEMff Sift '" *** vl
"atiim win.u",u T,Mii"JL MI'O.IM0lilOa*HfVI
ft*. V... "VifcHWOS: TUIS THRU SO*.. :**
g" THE OCEAN AT ^.T mMf BEACH


Page If
-------------- i ri------^ -
Chaplaincy Volunteer Celebration
Rabbi and Mrs. Harold Richter
will host the second annual
"Chaplaincy Volunteer
Celebration" at their home on
Sunday, March 1 at 3 p.m.
The following volunteers,
several of whom have served for
the past six years will be
honored: Sarah Brackis, who
visits patients at Biscayne
Medical Center and Hollywood
Medical Center; Sam Mindlin
who visits at Doctors Hospital;
Leon Ehrlich, Max Popowitz,
Jacob Green, Marvin Carrell,
Frank Snyder, Jack Rutkin, and
Ida Klane,'services and serve at
Washington Manor; Murray
Cohen, Philip Rosenberg and
Harry Krieger who conduct
services at Hallandale Rehabi-
litation Center; Irving and
Lillian Belson, who conduct
services at the S.E. Senior Day
Care Center and assist the Chap-
lain at the State Hospital; David
Dangler and Abe Israel who
assist at the S.E. Senior Day
Care Center and at Hollywood
Hills Nursing Home; Charlotte
and Sol Cohen who display her
miniature diaramas of the Jewish
holidays in numerous institu-
tions; Edna and George Gold-
stein, Lillian and Irving Glasson,
Pauline Schweitzer, Helen Lo-
witt, Sylvia Rosier and Pearl
Welans who assist us at holiday
celebrations at the State
Hospital; Dolly Malitz who visits
the prison; Joe and Carrie
Gordon and Lou and Fanny
Cantor who help us at the State
Hospital and the Broward
Correctional Institution; and Dr.
Harry Breslaw, Louis Dunoff,
Walter Hendin, Dr. Bernard
Yanowitz who assist us at the
State Hospital's holiday
celebration and at the Passover
"Care package" program; Holly
Fraidstern, Esther Shacket and
Sylvia Rabins who provide
refreshments at the State
Hospital festival celebrations.
The Chairman of the Chaplaincy
Committee, Dr. Joel A.
Schneider, and the committee
members of the Jewish
Federation and Sumner G. Kaye,
executive director.
Rabbi Harold Richter (second from left) recently conducted a Tu
B'shevat Tree Planting Ceremony at Golfcrest Nursing Home. The
ceremony included a special tree planting dance program, which was
followed by the serving of fruits which Israel is blessed with.
lb New York and
Washington, D.C
Were big on business.
Miami, Ft. Lauderdale/ Hollywood
to New York
Leaves
Arrives
MIA 7
MIA 9
MIA 9
FLL 10
MIA 11
FLL 12
MIA
MIA
MIA
MIA
FLL
MIA
MIA
FLL
MIA
FLL
MIA
MIA 10:
:30am _
:00amt_
:05am__
:00am
:40am__
:25pm _
10pm_
00pmt_
00pm _
15pm__
30pmi
30pmt_
45pmt_
10pm_
55pm
20pm _i
45pm**
15pm__
nonstop .
nonstop.
one stop,
nonstop-
nonstop,
nonstop.
nonstop.
nonstop _
nonstop _
one stop_
nonstop _
nonstop.
nonstop _
nonstop _
nonstop _
one stop_
nonstop-
nonstop-
_ 10:03am (LGA)
-11:28am (JFK)
_ 12:32pm (EWR)
_ 12:32pm (EWR)
_2:15pm (LGA)
_2:53pm (JFK)
_3:43pm (EWR)
_4:28pm (JFK)
_5:35pm (LGA)
__7:50pm (EWR)
_6:56pm (JFK)
_8:03pm (JFK)
_8:21pm (EWR)
_8:42pm (EWR)
_ 10:30pm (LGA)
-12:43am (EWR)
-12:11am (JFK)
_ 12:43am (EWR)
Except Thursday
Except Saturday
?Wldebody
Miami, Ft. Lauderdale /Hollywood
to Washington, D.C.
Leaves
Arrives
MIA 8:00am __ nonstop_
FLL 11:55am one stqp_
MIA 12:50pm_nonstop__
FLL 5:30pm __ one stopu_
MIA 6:45pm_nonstop__
JFK (Kennedy)
LGA (LaGuardia)
EWR (Newark)
DCA (National)
MIA Miami
FLL Ft. Lauderdale
Schedule subject to
change without
notice.
10:13am (DCA)
_2:53pm(DCA*
_2:59pm(DCA)
_9:O0pm (DCA)
_9:03pm(DCA)


ij .
A
Not only do we have the first nonstop to New York, every day. But we also fly to all
three New York area airports.
And Pan Am flies you nonstop to Washington, DC. every day.
Remember, we"ve got very competitive fares. Get busy and call your Travel Agent,
Corporate Travel Department, or Pan Am. In Miami, call 874-5000. In Ft. Lauderdale/
Hollywood, call 462-6600.


i*m- is
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of GreateiJiollywood_
Frkluy. February <;.
981
January 18 Truly a Super Sund i
Thank You, South Broward!
You Made It Happen!
More than -UK) men. women and children strengthened the
Jewish lifeline to survival in 12 straight hours of calling
friends and neighbors for pledges to the Jewish Fed-
eration of South Broward's 1981 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Kmergency Fund campaign.
- ?
The Jewish Federation of South Broward wishes to thank the
following organizations and synagogues who helped make Super
Sunday the huge success it was:
Fairways Hadassah
Presidential Hadassah
Galilee Hadassah
Women'8 American OUT, Colony Point Chapter
Women's American OKT. The Estates Chapter
Women's American OKT. Hillcrest Hills Chapter
Women's American ORT, Hollywood Hills Chapter
National Council of Jewish Women. Holly wood Section
Mizrachi Women, Tamara Chapter
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Women's Division Board of Directors
llollybrook
Temple Solel
Hemispheres B'nai B'rith Women
Hollywood Jewish Community Center
I emple I n Tin- Pines
Temple Belli Emet
Temple Beth Emet Confirmation Clam
I umple Israel of Miramar
High Sch> ml in Israel Alumni
Jewish Federation ol South Broward Chaplaincy Committee
Tikvah BBC
Ciimmel BBG
B'nai Israel \ZA
I lallandale Jewish Center
Temple Beth El
Brandeis Women's Committee
B'nai B'rith Harry S. Truman Lodge
('lifton (Condominium
Temple Sinai
Jewish Family Serviceoi Broward County
I loll)-wiMid Jew ish Community Center
\merii an Red \1agen David Association
ol Israel, (ialilee Chapter
Temple Sinai Sisterhood
Temple Sinai Men's Club
Einstein A/.A
Fighl lor Sight
American Jewish Congress- Entebbe Chapter
Women's \mcrican ORT South Broward Region
B'nai B'rith Women. Unity Council
B'nai B'rith Women. Quadomain Chapter
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Hoard ol Directors
Jewish Federation of South Broward
Young Adult Division
thanks to the folk**
We also wish to express our sincere
businesses who donated food and drinks to Super Sunday
Charles Chips
Coca Cola
Corky s Restaurant
Diamond Caterers
Pantry Pride
West Hollywood Kosher Meat Market


Kricluy, l-VI>ruury H. 1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
.
(here were representatives from every synagogue,
n'Ufini/Htion and agency plus fun and excitement and
prizes for all. But the real winners were the Jewish people.
Fne increased funds mean increased services, a stronger
pewish community and a life with dignity for Jews in
heed.
H

I".*V* I 'Jff. V: ''.'.IlitQ'WT'Vi^y **??"? I


Brafllovsky Seriously 111
MOSCOW Irina Brailovsky
reports that her husband's health
has deteriorated since his arrest
on Nov. 13. Viktor, who is being
held in Moscow's Butyrka Prison
while his case is under investiga-
tion, is suffering from a liver ail-
ment. According to Irina, the in-
terrogation has been suspended
temporarily because of Viktor's
serious medical condition. This
latest news is in sharp contrast
with the information Irina had
previously received from prison
authorities. In three letters, the
last dated Dec. 31, the officials
assured her that her husband had
been provided with appropriate
medicine and was well.
PERM POC Iosif Mendele-
vich has been on a hunger strike
for almost two months. He is de-
manding that his religious books
and ritual articles, confiscated by
camp authorities, be restored and
he be allowed to observe the
Sabbath. Moscow activists
report that Mendelevich was
force-fed after fasting for two
weeks and that camp officials
plan to repeat the action every
ten days. Iosif is the only Jew
sentenced at the notorious First
Leningrad Trial who still remains
in a labor camp.
TULA Aleksandr
Magidovich, long-term refusenik,
was sentenced on Jan. 10 to two-
and-a-half years in a labor camp
on alleged charges of "circulating
of fabrications known to be false
19
i tin
siimr no noil
I,
ion I
which
social
defame Soviet state and
system." The 40-year-old
radio technician was arrested in
May 1980. His place of detention
is as yet unknown.
MOSCOW Jewish religious
self-study groups, which have
functioned in the Soviet capital
for years, have been comnelleH tn
cease their activities. Following
harassment and break-ins by
Soviet authorities these private
religious study groups have sus-
pended their informal classes.
However, some Ulpanim
(Hebrew language study groups!
continue to meet.
KLINTSY We have just
learned the location of the camp
to which Dmitri Shchiglik was
sent. It is in Bryanskaya oblast
in the Western part of the
Russian Republic. His address is:
P Ya B-21 6A, Klintsy,
Bryanskaya obi.. RSFSR. USSR.
Dmitri is serving a one-year sen-
tence for alleged "parasitism"
and "evasion of payment for
support of child."
^l
Beach residents recently participated .n a Bus Tour 8P?^ b* the
Jewish Federation of South Browards Women. DM**, flyBm
Tour visited Federation-supported agenc.es Miami Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens, the Hollywood Jewish Com
munity Center and Temple Beth Shalom Day School.
JCC Presents
"Songs of Broadway," a pre-
sentation of 45 songs from a
dozen of the most memorable
Broadway shows of the past 40
years, will be presented by the
Hollywood Jewish Community
Center on Saturday, Feb. 14 at
Temple in the Pines, 9730
Stirling Road, Hollywood.
The performance will begin at 8
p.m. Tickets are $3 each for
general admission, and $2.50 for
students and senior adults. They
may be purchased at the
Hollywood Jewish Community
Center, 2838 Hollywood Blvd.
Bus transportation for seniors
HOLLVWOOO.PLA J3QI1
will be available for 50-cents.
Pick-up will be at Young Circle at
7 p.m., and at the Hollywood
JCC at 7:15 p.m.
"Songs of Broadway" has been
a popular show in South Florida
since 1972. It is a professionally
produced presentation that is
both romantic and heart-
warming.
For detailed information about
tickets or transportation contact
Judv (ilazer at the Hollywood
JCC. 921-6511.
Residents of Golden View gathered recently at a cocktail party, hosted
by Dr. Solomon and Gizela Rinkoff, to give their support to the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1981 United Jewish Appeal-
Federation campaign. From left are Wilhelm Meister, chairman;
Shirley Weber, Rose Orloff, Rose Edelstein, Gizela and Dr. Solomon
Rinkoff, Julia Fried, Trudy Meister and Rose Friedman.
iS^UpE
TRAVEL SERVICE, inc.
PRESENTS
ISRAEL ALL INCLUSIVE
MODIFIED AMERICAN PUN
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Tke Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater tiolly wood
Pagelft
[outfc Qhowakd
tSpotftgto h
^iiocheUe Koenip
boda Marcus and
[omen of the Sabra
' of Hadassah held
lealing" luncheon
Country Club. A
ition of $160 was
/ent supports the
lical Organization.
(Fay Plum and
planned a beau-
and a delicious
June Meinstt'in.
and 1 agreed we
the fabulous
sc pie for dessert.
resist! I enjoyed
|V.P. Ann Levy,
ferg, Judi White,
Dsenblatt. Shirley
^dassah burlesque
ler on April 4.
ling...I Judi White
K'arihbean cruise
Gene went on over
|ng with Newt and
Joyce Roaman
us an adorable
lew baby grand-
i Koaman, horn to
daughter-in-law
involvement in
&s back several
leek, N.Y., when
hum belonged to
r. founder and
i told of how the
|th 36 members.
Br has grown to
ible officers are
Be Miller, Nancy
Jimbel. Among
is ladies enjoy-
were Miriam
Heiden, past
[Salter, Maxine
Frost, Ruth
Jso very active
atom). Some of
iv winners were
| Leila Shapiro,
[Ann Krovetz.
Selma Burn-
Players per-
g the spirit of
ent "Jews
talented group
a KoKenfield,
I. Evie Hlumen-
, Sylvia Ber-
with Deeva
1st.
isah members
lor raising funds
cause.
|ion is the best
Kar Mitzvahis
Few families
Ing a father and
Ws later, cele-
brating Bar Mitzvahs in our
community. The Fred Greenes
and Martin Smiths are two of
Hollywood's pioneer Jewish
families the wives are sisters.
These families will be partici-
pating with the other members of
their clan at the Bar Mitzvah of
Randy Greene, son of Mel and
Arlene Greene at Temple Solel.
Helping Randy celebrate will
be brother Michael, grandparents
Fred and Lorraine Greene, uncle
and aunt Attorney Joel and
Abby Klaits with their three chil-
dren. Also on hand to extend
good wishes will be great uncle
and aunt Martin and Shirley
Smith with more family Dr. Alan
and Dara Berger and Andrew
(Drews! Smith. Former Holly-
wood resident, cousin Susie
Joseph will be here from New
York. Great grandmother and
matriarch of the family (Lorraine
and Shirley's mother) Lillian
Kirschbaum will also share the
festivities at elegant Turnberry
Isle Country Club.
Through the years the Greene
and Smith families have been in-
volved as leaders in our com-
munity. Fred Greene is now serv-
ing as president of the Broward
Jewish Family Service. Mazel
Tov to a beautiful family.
South Broward residents de-
lighted in an evening of nostalgia
at the recent Yiddish Film Festi-
val presented by the Hollywood
Community Center. Judy Glazer,
supervisor of cultural arts, has
arranged the series held at
Temple Israel of Miramar. The
fun began with a sing-a-long as
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski led
the audience in a rendition of the
old favorite Yid'l Mitn Fid'l.
More than 150 spectators
watched and listened to Molly
Picon, then in her twenties, now a
legend in Yiddish theatre.
English sub-titles helped some of
us understand the dialogue.
Among those'enjoying the enter-
tainment were Nat and Phyllis
Kramer, Dr. Lou Novak, Sidney
and Bea Goldsmith, and Larry
Friend. It was a fun evening for
all!
According to Judy, the next
presentation of the JCC will be a
musical production "Songs of
Broadway" at the Temple in the
l'ines on Feb. 14. A professional
New York Company will sing
Broadway favorites in a gala
show.
thering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors
June 10 23,1981 in Israel
Direct Flights from Miami
In Cooperation with
reater Miami Jewish Federation
kage tour includes airfare, hotel accom
transfers, sightseeing, entrance fees, por -
ifers to and from all "Gathering" events
In in the World Gathering require* a
fee of $100 per person.
NATIONS OR FURTHER INFORMATION, CALL
2500 E. Haliandal* Boaoh Blvd.
Hallandala, Florida 33009
I !| The South Broward Federa-
tion's elegant Shomrai Dinner
was held at the Diplomat
Country Club with Norman
Morrison and Mel Baer serving
as chairmen. The room was a
spectacular scene of orchids and
majestic white plumes. Kudos to
Maralyn Anton and Annette
Deakter for the beautiful
arrangements of the evening.
Yitzak Rabin addressed the
gathering giving everyone an
update on the urgent situation in
Israel. The room was hushed as
Dr. Phil Levin spoke eloquently
and cogently for support of our
"Jewish family." Phil's remarks
were impressive. Highlighting
the evening was announcement of
the women who will now wear the
gorgeous gold $5,000 Shomrai
Lion pin. Esther Gordon named
the excited recipients Ann Conn,
Maralyn Anton, Jean Landers
and Margie Baer.
Among the handsome couples
doinining and dancing were Dr.
George and Iris Crane, the Henry
Roses, Jack Mandels, Dr. Fred
and Meral Ehrenstein, Al and
Marilyn Ponn, Joe and Harriet
Bloom, Dr. Saul and Susan
Singer. The gowns were magnifi-
cent and the evening was elegant.
Seated with us were the Dr. Paul
Rodenskys, Dr. Norman Atkins.
Joe Kelricks, and Dr. Stoyan
Kosenthals. Tobene Rosenlhal
had recently returned from a trip
oul west to visit colleges with
daughter Liselle. Arizona Slate
was a favorite school that offered
a special communication pro-
gram. Dr. Paul and Ruth
Rodensky just had a visit at their
home from Ilene Kones (daughter
of Hy and Marilyn Konesl now
an ambitious student at Suffolk
Law School in Boston.
The Hollywood Lakes Country
Club was the setting for a sur-
prise birthday party for Buddy
Galvin. At least it was a surprise
until 6:30 that evening when
Buddy's uncle called to wish him
"Happy Birthday" and to ask
him for directions to the club!
Charming wife Ruth planned the
celebration for 100 close firends
and family. Among the notables
offering a humorous tribute to
Buddy were Bobbe Schkainger,
BUI Horovitz, Sonny FinkeJstein,
'Grace Finkel, Andy Green man,
Judy Schiff, daughter Joyce
Kent, grandson David War-
shefaky, and M.C. Jerry Seigei
topping the evening's fun. In
addition, the Galvins were cele-
brating their wedding anniver-
sary. Buddy is a successful area
businessman and former Mayor
of Hallandale.
Maury Terkel was guest of
honor at a cocktails and dinner
celebration for his birthday at the
Emerald Hills Country Club.
Wife, Ruth, sons Larry and
Marc, daughter and son-in-law
Nessa and Chuck Cianciolo
joined the family and friends
from Cleveland and South
Broward to extend greetings.
Lilyan and Jack Mandel, Adele
I a- vine, Jerry and Shirley Pascal,
David and Shirley Schlossman,
Fred and Irma Stein and Dr.
Jack and Susan Miller shared the
beautiful evening.
Mazel tov to the Robert
Gaffins on the Bat Mitzvah of
their granddaughter. Their chil-
dren and grandchildren from the
east and west coasts (California
and Boston) were reunited for the
happy event in Miami.
Hollywood boasts of many
parents with children in the
public eye. Mark Goldstein,
Mayor of Gainesville, is the son
of Ned and Vivien Goldstein.
Congratulations to Marshall
and Mira Platt on the birth of
their first child, a daughter.
Happy grandparents are Norman
and Pauline Platt.
Camille and Harriet Sultan are
Kept busy entertaining their large
family. A recent and very wel-
come guest was their sister and
irother-in-law Rachel and
tCduardo from Caracas,
Venezuela.
Insiders are talking about the
newest Jewish dynamic tennis
duo the Natalies Bluth and
Joblove. The girls won the Hill-
crest Tennis Championship from
long time top seeded Myra Good-
man and Pauline Sarkin. What
an upset!
Beautiful Parker Playhouse is
having a near sell-out season.
Enjoying the recent Neil Simon
comedy were Dr. Lou and Ruth
Sands with adorable daughter
Allison. Also in the audience were
David and Lillian Popover
Rosen, Dr. Joseph and Selma
Hopen, Mel and Gloria Fried-
man, Dr. Joe and Sue Badat,
Herb and Elbe Katz (on crutches
from her skiing accident).
SUPERB CATERED AFFAIRS WITH AN ELEGANT FLAIR.
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unmistakable touch and unmatched experience to the Konover's unparalleled facilities.
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prices Catered attairs that are treasured events.
Please call BILL COLORING at (305) 865 1500
Kosher
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Available
Konove
ON THE OCEAN AI S4lh ST
Hotel
MIAMI BEACH

<&
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ALL NEW 1981
Manischewitz
PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE
-:Mr.*sa*

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plus 60cworth of coupons
for your favorite Passover f 001
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Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE, RO. BOX 484A, JERSEY^JITY. N.J. 07303
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Only One Recipe Guide Per Request
. State_
Up.
PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY


a. m
Page 16
77ie Jewish Elandiqn and Shofaraf\Greater Hollywood
Friday. February
1981
A staff member at the Acre Regional Home for the Aged assists a resident with a weaving
project. Recreational therapy is an important part of the daily program. (UJA photo by
Marty Gallanter).
Headlines
Gift Won't Influence Washington U.
The American Jewish Committee has been
assured by University of Washington officials;
that their recently authorized exchange program
with Saudi Arabia's King Abdulaziz University
includes a viable, non-discriminatory clause that,
if not adhered to, would nullify the agreement be-
tween the two universities.
According to Arthur Abramson, AJC Seattle
area director, "In discussions with University of
Washington officials, a clause was included that
prohibits the Saudis from discrimination on the.
basis of race, sex. age, religion, and/ or national
origin. An 'oversight committee' has been set upi
to insure that all clauses of the contract are
adhered to, although we would have preferred
lhat individuals from outside the University's
medical school structure were included as mem-
lers of this committee.''
In a television interview in New York, Leon
Dulzin, chairman of the Executives of the Jewish
Agency and the World Zionist Organization, has
emphasized that the number of Yordim in the
Mnited States, when viewed in the proper ^per-
pective, was neither abnormal nor frightening.
.)ulzin said there are some 270,000 Yordim in the
United States.
"Wherever there is a great deal of immigration.
I here is emigration," Dulzin pointed out. He cited
the experience of the United States during the
years 1906-1928 which marked the period of the
great wave of immigration to America. During
ihese years, Dulzin said, "approximately 28
percent left the United States for other nations.
In contrast to this percentage of emigration from
\mcrica. less than 10 percent of its population of
1,250,000 left Israel during the 33 years of Israeli
Statehood."
The American Jewish Congress has hailed a
lecision by a New Jersey court allowing schools
. lo schedule extra-curricular activities so they do
not conflict with students' religious practices.
Morton Runis, president of the New Jersey
Region of the AJCongress, said that the decision,
by the Appellate Division of New Jersey Superior
a Court in a case involving the Tea neck, N>J.,
Hoard of Education, was "important because it
reaffirms the authority of school boards, as a
matter of educational policy, to schedule school
activities to as not to exclude any group of
students."
The court, in reversing a ruling by a lower
court, said that Tea neck's policy of restricting
school events on Friday nights, Saturday and
Sunday mornings "represents an effort by the
iard to enable its students to participate as fully
is possible in extra-curricular activities without
if ringing on the religious liberties of these
students."
An off-beat connection ties cold, windswept
Mars, the Earth's nearest planetary neighbor,
vith Israel's desert university, Ben-Gurion
niversity of the Negev. That link is Dr. Haim
soar, resident sand dune expert.
Yes, the frigid Mars has sand dunes, located,
radoxically, near its northern polar cap.
fsoar, whose specialty is aeolin geomorphology
the effect of wind action on the earth's surface
used the knowledge he gained while closely
observing dunes in the Sinai to determine the
wind direction on Mars by studying its sand
dunes.
The tall, salt n pepper-haired sabra's fascina-
tion with dunes began during the Six-day War
when, stationed in the Sinai, he caught himself
wondering what processes create dunes and cause
them to migrate.
The Jewish community has generally failed to
provide support services to help working mothers
cope with the daily pressures of family and jobs,
according to a report on a pilot study issued by
the American Jewish Committee.
In a foreword to Working and Mothering, a
study of Jewish working women with large
families, in the Washington. DC. metropolitan
ana. Yehuda Kosenman. director of the AJC'a
National Jewish Family Center, writes that "The
feeling of isolation, of not being able to depend on
community resources, disappointing as it was for
women who took parenthood for granted, is even
more serious today, when well educated women
are weighing whether to have children at all. "
Most of the women studied were between the
ages of 40 and 60, less than 10 percent had been
divorced, and all of them, while having "demand-
ing" professional or managerial positions, raised
at least three children.
A major revision of the Israeli welfare system's
aid to young adults completing army service,
which would extend a II, 1 million loan to eligible
recipients, was one of many proposals put fortrrat
an international conference on "Social Policy
Evaluation: Health. Education and Welfare,"
organized by Tel Aviv University's Pinhas Sapir
Center for Development.
The revision plan, submitted by experts at Tel
Aviv University's Sapir Center for Development,
is designed to replace existing forms of aid to
such young adults, including current loans to
young couples seeking to buy apartments, or aid
to university students.
Traditional intelligence tests fail to evaluate I
millions of the world's children fairly because'
they are based on what a child knows and are not
a measure of how much a child is capable of
learning.
There is no greater handicap that children must
overcome than to be written off as "uneducable,"
"retarded," or as "slow learners." In this Inter-
national Year for the Disabled Person, three of
the world's largest organizations devoted to pro-
tecting the rights and advancing the well-being of
children have joined to sponsor a day-long
seminar of educators and developmental psy-
chologists devoted to the theories and techniques
of Dr. Reuven Feuerstein whose work Dr.
Nicholas Hobbs, professor of preventive medicine
and of psychology at Vanderbilt University,
describes as "teaching intelligence."
The Seminar will take place Feb. 18 at Ford-
ham University in New York.
Israel's New Minister
Unfolds Economic Plan
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Israel's newly appointed
Finance Minister, Yoram
Aridor, is expected to in-
troduce an economic pro-
gram to slow the steady de-
valuation of the Shekel,
improve labor relations, en-
courage long-term invest-
ments and savings by the
public and. hopefully,
reduce the annual inflation
rate, now at a record 130
percent-plus to a more
manageable double digit
figure.
Much of Aridor's program was
recommended to his predecessor,
Yigal Hurwitz, in an economic-
plan paper submitted a month
ago, close associates of the new
Finance Minister told reporters.
Me is expected to continue
Hurwitz'fl policy of slashing gov-
ernment spending which he con-
siders absolutely essential if in-
flation Ls to be contained. That
proved to be Hurwitz's most
formidable obstacle. He achieved
only limited success and resigned
over the issue Jan. 11.
ARIDOR INTENDS to prop
up the Shekel by offering the
public foreign currency saving
schemes. A stronger Shekel
would have adverse effects on
exports which rose substantially
during llurwit/.s regime, his
most notable achievement.
\iulor is said to be ready to
recommend additional incentives
and compensation to exporters
who line] it hard to market their
goods abroad without a cheap
Shekel.
Aridor will make wage and
salary increases dependent
entirely on Increased produc-
tivity.'He believes this formula,,
would lead to labor peace by
cushioning wage-earners against
inflation and offering them a
tangible inducement to improve
productivity and at the same
time, would peg cost-of-living in-
crements to 100 percent of the
price index and pay them
monthly instead of quarterly. At
present, the increments do not
cover the full rise of the price
index.
ARIDOR IS said to favor a
reduced tax on fuel and does not
believe the tax should go up
every time the price of fuel rises.
Thus, he believes, the economy
would be less subject to periodic
jolts. He would offset the fuel tax
reduction by a one-time large in-
crease in the value-added tax
(VAT). The new Finance Minis-
ter also wants to make govern-
ment saving schemes more at-
tractive to investors as a means
ol absorbing the excess money
supply.
Failure to Punish Iran
Sets 'Dangerous Precedent'
'
By HUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV UTAI An
Israeli expert on international
terroism said that the deal en-
tered into to free the 52 American
hostages and the failure to
punish Iran for seizing them
more than a year ago may have
set "a dangerous precedent" Dr.
Ariel Merari. a researcher at Tel
\\n I niversity "s Institute lor
Strategic Studies, nevertheless
welcomed the release ol the
Americans
I CAN FULLY understand
the rcjofring ol the families of the
hostage he said. Rut from the
national and international |ioint
ol view, it may serve as a danger-
ous preeedent lor other would-be
kidnappers or hijackers, either
individuals. organizations or
governments."
Merari said that I here has been
a decline in hijacking and
hostage-taking in the last five to
si\ years mainly because
countries have refused to grant
BS) luin to the hijackers lor fear of
international sanctions. Rut the
Iranian government was itself
involved in the seizure and hold-
ing ol the Americans and it
succeeded in its objectives.
Education and Exercise *
Classes in Lung Disease
A series ol free education and
exercise classes for patients with
lung disorders will begin
Monday. Feb. 16, 1981 from 6 to
H p.m.. in the cafeteria of Comm-
unity Hospital of South Hroward
5100 West llallandale Reach
Blvd., Hollywood, FLA. The
Series will continue on Wed-
nesday. Feb. 18. Monday the
23rd,and Wednesday the 25th.
Each participant will be given
individual attention. The classes
are based on a comprehensive
team approach with physicians,
respiratory and physical
therapists, a nurse, dietician, and
social worker, the classes are
open to 20 participants and their
families and friends. Participants
are expected to attend all foui
sessions.
For lurther information and
registration, call Mary Rucker at
the American Lung Association,
524-4657.
Jewish Heritage Series
The Art and Culture Center of
Hollywood, 1301 So. Ocean Dr.
will present the second in its 1981
Jewish Heritage Series on
Tuesday Feb. 10 at 8 p.m.
Guest speaker will be Dr.
Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual leader
of Temple Beth El. His subject
will be "Martin Buber "one of the
great philosophers and theo-
logians of our time who died in
Israel in 1965. Among his out-
standing achievements is a
collection of chassidic tales.
When Dag Hammarskjold
crashed to his death he was in the
process of proposing the nomi-
nation of Buber for the Nobel
Prize of Literature.
The series is coordinated by
Leo Balkin of Hollywood, former
B'nai B'rith Natioal Corp-.
missioner of Adult Jewish**
Education and a member of the
Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of So.
Broward in cooperation with Dr.
Moses Coleman, Chairman of the
Board of Governors of the Art
and Culture Center.
Admission is $1.50 for
members of the Center and $2 for
non-members. Refreshments will
beserved.


bbruary6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 17-
Legacy and Endowment Fund Tax Seminar
Schwartiexpliuiid "M">t Fund to area profeaaionaU.
rtt
74
k RUesI speaker. Hrure H. Bokor. Johnson. Blukcly. Pope,
[Huppell. PA., Qaarwater; Chairman Joseph Schwartz,
IrhwarlZ, P.A.i and guesi speaker. Mortimer Berl. Tourhe
< Vrlified Public Arrounlants. New York.
Gars Qcmoll, Atlantic Bank; Joyce Buyer. Plagahlp
kail P. Krupnick. PA.; Dirk Marks and Harry Levin.
I. Associates.
m -M n
.t| K i *^c !m <^^
7 ^^ |Bh"
>M
WE BaW' .-**
Lawrence Wiener. Pension Investors. Inc.; Harry B.
1.: Irving Pallk, Touche Ross K Co.; C. Russell Greene.
lorlinter Berl.
pen Tobias and Gary Arenson, Arenson and Tobias; Mel
Zoller, Koross and Reiss; and Dan A. Brna. vice
krust officer. City National Bank of Hallandale.
1 PASSOVER PACKAGE FOR
SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
'S-l 0 NIGHTS (April 17 to April 27)
80
Per Person, Double occupancy .
Room at Adjoining Atlantic
Towers Hotel meals at Waldman
II BEACH'S FINEST CLATT KOSHER
CUISINE INCLUDED
at Waldman-11 Nights Minimum Stay
WALDMAN hotil
from Facility
V Services
Pis
jiment Program
Holiday IgrvtCM
or Gelb
OCEAN AT 43 ST
MIAMI BEACH
Phone: 538-5731
ajg 8P/^ere -"eluded Bruce H. Bokor, of Johnson, Blakely,
r*% koru& ^"P^1- PA. inClearwater, who discussed "Tax Plan-
S v T8h.Ehn8 : Mortimer Berl, of Touche Ross & Co. in
kwl u' ,w.hofussed "Use of Trusts in Making Gifts"; and
and Wo!?' pTff; ofMGreenber- Tmurig. Hoffman, Lipoff, Quentel
PhilaS *' '" '' WhOSe topic W" "Tax Advn^ of
Delta to the
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ing a Buy 'N Fly Fare.
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*DELTA
Winter schedules from Ft.Lauderdale:
To Chicago Four nonstops a day: at 9:20am.
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To Detroit Fly nonstop any afternoon at
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To Cincinnati Take our one-stop thru-jet at
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IlttMlltlHIHfHIIIIIIItmttfMiniHtttltlltMimttWIfMMMIHMIHUHHttllflMllfltltltlttlll.....UllinilBIIIUU
Beth Shalom Concert
Edith Cornfield, well known
New York pianist, will appear at
Temple Beth Shalom, in concert,
Sunday evening, Feb. 8, at 8 p.m.
Mrs. Cornfield, lecturer-recitalist,
graduated from the Juilliard
School, where she was a scholar-
ship student of Joseph Bloch.
She has concertized widely in the
New York metropolitan area, the
South, New England, the
Midwest, and abroad.
Her appearances in New York
include a concert on radio and bi-
lingual lecture for "Voice of
America." She is presently on the
staff of the College of Mount St.
Vincent and Concordia College.
Tickets to the piano concert are
$4 per person and may be picked
up al the Temple office. For more
information, please call 981-6111,
Members and non-members may
intend.
Edith Cornfield
Temple Beth El Event
Shabbal Services will be held
Friday. 8:15 p.m. Dr. Samuel '/..
Jaffa, spiritual leader of the
congregation, will speak on
"Now, I Know."
I'ulpit honors will be accorded
Mrs. Charles Wolfe in memory of
her husband. Mrs. Wolfe will
bless the Sabbath tapers and
sponsor the flowers.
Intermediate Hebrew.
Monday. 9:15 a.m.
Dr. William Korey, Director of
International Policy Research for
B'nai B'rith International will
appear at the Annual Charles
Doppelt Memorial lecture on
Sunday. Feb. 1, at Temple Beth
El, 1351 S. 14 Ave.. Hollywood,
at 8 p.m.
Dr. Korey is a leading national
and international authority in
Soviet Jewish affairs and on
global human rights. He received
his HA from the University of
Chicago and his MA and PhD
from Columbia University where
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he specialized in history and
international relations and
graduated from its famed
Russian Institute. Among the
numerous academic honors
accored hin, are the Carnegie Re-
search (Irani and the Ford
Foundation Fellowship.
Dr. Korey is a prolific writer of
both popular and scholarly ar-
ticles. His essays have appeared
in such diverse journals as
Foreign Affairs. Tin- New York
Time*. Saturday Review,
Midstream. Problems o\ Com-
munism. The Progressive. The
New Republic. Survey. Journal of
Soviet and Hast European
Studies, Annals of the American
Academy <>l Political Science.
Commentary. Commonweal. The
Wall Street Journal and The
Washington Post.
The Annual Charles Doppelt
lecture series was established by
Mrs. Charles Doppelt and her
daughter and son-in-law. Shirley
and Jim Brenner, as a living
memorial to Mr. Doppelt, a
founder and benefactor of Temple
Beth Kl. Its purpose is to bring
annually to Temple Beth Fl out-
standing scholars, historians and
writers for a cultural evening
which is open to the community
at no charge admission by
ticket only available through the
Temple office.
Peppercorn
Retires
After 34 Years
NEW YORK Martin
Peppercorn. Associate Executive
Vice Chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal, has retired after
34 years of service in fundraising
for the humanitarian needs of the
Jewish people.
As Associate Executive Vice
Chairman for the past six years.
Peppercorn coordinated UJA's
program to increase and upgrade
major campaign gifts. He was
executive liaison for the $100,000
minimum "Hineni Committee.'
played a leading role in the
planning and implementation of
yearly Prime Minister's
Missions, and helped to organize
the annual International Meeting
nl the Jewish world's foremost
leader and contributors.
"Martin Peppercorn "a personal
contribution to the development
of this organization is beyoYld
calculation." Bald Irving Ber-
nstein. UJA executive Vice
Chairman, in announcing the
retirement. "He has rightfully
become 0 national and in-
ternational symbol of
professional leadership in Jewish
fundraising, and he has set
standards in campaigning that
will challenge us all in the years
ahead.
His achievements through
the years have been an essential
element in the success of our
nationwide campaigns. Lay and
professional leaders throughout
the country, as well as his friends
and colleagues on the UJA staff,
will surely miss his advice and
counsel. We wish him a most
satisfying and rewarding
retirement experience."
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Pearl Goldenberg
Hadassah Coordinator
Bather Cannon, president of
the Florida Mid-Coast Region of
Hadassah has appointed Pearl
Goldenberg as region co-
ordinator for the area's showing
of the worldwide premiere of
"the Chosen" from the best seller
by Chaim Potek.
The film will be shown si-
multanenously in 1.000 theatres
around the world on Monday,
May 11, 19H1 in celebration of
Israel's 33rd anniversary. At
$100 a seat, it promises to be the
largest theatre party ever, all for
the benefit of educational in-
stallations based in Israel.
Mrs. (ioldenberK is a past
president of the West Broward
Chapter of Hadassah, and is
currently vice-president of the
Florida Mid-Coast Region. She
has been selected for the all-
important "Celebration 33"
promotion for this area because
of her Hadassah experience and
her background in show business.
Both Mrs. Goldenberg and
Mrs. Cannon will attend a
national planning meeting to be
held at the Sherator Center Hotel A-
in New York, on Monday. Feb. 2.
and upon their return will be able
to supply all information to the
public, in cofnnection with this
unprecedented event.
Residents of Clifton gathered recently at a cocktail party to pledge
their support to the Jewish Federation of South Bro ward's 1981 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Seated from
left are Sylvan and Roslyn Solomon and Bertha Harris. Standing from
left are Walter Baron. Abe Melter, Karl Freedman and Nat Harris.
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jary6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 19-

M
^re Phyllis PriU-her. Ellie Rickel, Tony Santamauro. Fran
i Spillcr and Sharon Lallouz.
r
Mildred and David Brades. Judi White, Judy Hecker,
fchel, Iris Schwartz, Ruth Burns, David A'micoand Mike
o Women's Division
lo women will be winning production of "Together
ting, laughing and We Grow," will be working on
Is thev prepare for ln' script of the Musical
deration of South Production.
i (imcii's Division
Musical I'roduc- _^^^^^^
lo Susan Singer,
airwoman.
Tabatchnik
Retires After
28 Years
Nl \\ YORK- Man- Tabatch-
nik. Executive Director of the
I nited Jewish Appeal, has
ret ired alter 2H years of service in
kej administrative posts on
UJAs national staff. He was
Executive Director since 197^.
overseeing the organization's
personnel operations and
directing research and
development programs aimed at
strengthening the effectiveness
of annual campaigns.
In announcing the retirement,
UJA Executive Vice Chairman
Irving Bernstein indicated that
Tabatchnik will be serving in a
consultative capacity on selected
future planning and program-
matic issues.
"Marc Tabatchnik. in many
ways, has been the heart and soul
ol UJA for almost three
decades.'' Bernstein said at a
staff reception marking the
retirement. "I know that his
countless friends and colleagues
throughout the country join with
mi' and the entire UJA staff in
wishing him a happy and healthy
retirement. We are delighted that
we will continue to have the
benfefit of his advice and
guidance from time to time.'"
Members of Golden Surf Towers Women's Division held their annual
brunch recently on behalf of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign. Event coordinators were Gert Lazier and Freda Rosen. Seated
from left are Ruth Arohen, Annabelle Weissberg and Minna Wittner.
Standing from left are Lillian Brasch, Beatrice Kassin, Ethel Cohn,
Martha Prenner and Bobbie Levin, Women's Division president.
Seated from left are Mary Stander, Cele Levine and Gert Lazier.
KvHv^, T 'a1 2 Lum.anuel "N N" R-zinovsky, guest speaker;
nr/JiH S^tei86!* chairwoman: Bnda Greenman. campaign vice
ordin t 8nd Lm Schatlber- Beh building co-
said the tryouts
bil Production were
ll she is extremely
] the show, which is
day. April 2 at
D.
nauro will direct
pph this musical
howstoppen from
Ira up to present
m will also have
Iwisli women as
the strength ol
11 he community as
Singer explained.
Ian. who was a
I In- production of
II 'i\ ision's awanl-
ns Organization
executive direc-
ustrative, mem-
community
\lus expertise in
Sing. Please send
0. Box 6132,
[33021
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4 rw / twu"


News in Brief
Israel Disappears on Egypt's Latest Tourist Map
NEW YORK "Egypt wel-
comes the world," a map dis-
'-ributed by the Egyptian Tourist
Office in midtown Manhattar
proclaims. But Israel is not
recognized as part of that world,
at least not on that map.
An introductory note on the
reverse side of the map, which
lists tourism information in
Egypt, proudly declares: "You
have only to look at a map to
realize what an important pan
Egypt plays in the travel world
for in order to reach most of th I
Middle East, African and Asia I
countries it is necessary to pf1
through this wonderful country.
But when you turn to the othi'
side for a look at the map, th
southern part of Israel is shovu
but the word "Israel" does no
appear. The map lists Gaza Strij
towns and West Bank cities such
as Bethlehem and Ramallah.
They are labeled as being in
"Palestine." The only Israeli city
listed is Jerusalem which the
Egyptians obviously consider
part of "Palestine."
Foreifin Minister Yitzhak Samir
JERUSALEM Israel would
like to see the United States par-
ticipate in a multinational force
to be set up in Sinai after the final the Red Cross regularly visits
withdrawal to police sensitive, Israeli prisons, and two Euro-
gate the prison system and the
respect of human rights. The vote
was overwhelmingly against the
resolution submitted by Karl
Lindbom. a Swedish Socialist.
The two Israeli observers,
Likud Knesset Member Avidor
and Labor MK Shlomo Hillel,
stressed before the various
parliamentary committees that
ment agency that seeks to deport
former Nazis. In his letter,
Kussek said that he believed that
the decision not to retry Frank
Walus was "mistaken and too
hastily taken." Russek added:
"Your decision has left me in a
state of shock. I respect it but
cannot understand or accept it."
strategic spots. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir said this week
that this issue would be high on
the agenda of priorities that
Israel seeks to raise with the new
Reagan Administration.
The final withdrawal date
under Israel's peace accord with
Egypt is April, 1982. Under the
peace treaty package, a multi-
national force must be set up if
the United Nations is not pre
pared to play the peacekeeping
role. This force would be present
at Sharm El Sheikh, guaran-
teeing free passage through tht
Straits of Tiran and along the
northeastern coast of the
peninsula.
STRASBOURG The
Council of Europe has voted
down a Swedish Socialist reso-
lution asking for the dispatch to
Israel of a commission to investi-
pean parliamentary commissions
had visited Israel last week and
had had ample opportunity to
study these issues.
The council is an advisory
body on which practically all
West European parliaments are
represented.
NEW YORK "Israels chief
investigator of Nazi war crimes
has sharply criticized the Depart-
ment of Justice for its decision
not to retry a Chicago resident
accused of committing acts of
persecution as a member of the
Gestapo in World War II," The
New York Times reported from
Washington.
The paper said it obtained a
copy of a letter from Lt. Col.
Menachem Kussek of the Israeli
National Police to Allan A. Ryan
Jr., director of the Office of
Special Investigations, a Depart -
BONN -
ney's Office
OUTSTANDING
Teaching Opportunity
In all departments of the new South Florida Jewish
High School for exceptional applicants with superior
qualifications that should include post-graduate degrees,
noteworthy experience in college or high school and creative
teaching credentials Commencing August 81, Rewarding
salary. Send application with curriculum vitaw to:
Rabbi Louis Herring, Principal
South Florida Jewish High School
located at the
Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33180
members were still talking of
May or even the end of April, but
eventually they would com-
promise, the observers predicted,
for a date towards the end of
June.
Large Florida Croup
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SPORTS.. .NATURE .. .SCIENCE .. ARTS
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basketball courts, 3 rifle ranges, 8 athletic fields, 3 craft shops
2 photo labs, 2 theaters, 3 dining rooms, 320 acres of beautiful mountain
forest with trails and streams. Mature, well qualified staff.
Staff Inquiries Invited
WASHINGTON The ITT
Grinnell Corp. of Providence,
R.I., has agreed to pay a civil
penalty of $50,500 for alleged
violations of the reporting
requirements of the U.S. Anti-
Arab Boycott Law. the Depart-
ment of Commerce has disclosed.
The company "voluntarily
advised" the Commerce Depart-
ment of a total of 101 instances of
late filing of boycott requests at
three of its 185 facilities "after
the matter came to the attention
of company officials," the De-
partment said in a press
statement.
The State Attor-
in Frankfurt has
issued a new warrant for the
arrest of Josef Mengele, the chief
doctor at Auschwitz who is
presently reported to be living in
Uruguay. The warrant, which
includes new evidence against the
man who was called the "angel of
death" by Auschwitz inmates,
replaces a warrant issued in 1959.
Mengele is accused of having
selected concentration camp in-
mates lor the gas chamber and of
performing brutal medical ex-
periments upon them. Attorney
General Hans-Eberhard Klein
said his office felt it necessary to
update the charges. The number
of Jews and other prisoners sent
to gas chambers by Mengele
"cannot even be approximated."
Klein said.
According to a recent report by
Jacobo Timerman in the Israeli
newspaper. Muuriv, Mengele is
now working for the Government
of Uruguay as an adviser on how
to torture inmates, especially
Jewish inmates, in the notorious
"Freedom Prions," the main de-
tention center for political
prisoners in Uruguay.
JERUSALEM The likeliest
date for the election is thought to
be June 30. or alternatively June
23, according to well-placed
Knesset observers Monday. They
made the prediction following the
first session of the Knesset law
committee, considering the
government bill passed through
first readings last week to hold
the polls on July 7.
The observers said majority
opinion in the committee favored
an earlier date. The opposition
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress has asked the
federal government to release all
its unclassified documents on the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion and its personnel and sup- <*
porters in this country.
In a sweeping Freedom of
Information Act request made to
more than 100 agencies of five
Cabinet departments and the
Central Intelligence Agency, the
A J Congress stated that the
release of the information was in
the public interest because tht
PLO is an "avowed terrorist
organization, and the nature and
extent of its infiltration into
American institutions are
relevant to important issues of
domestic and foreign policy." ^
In legal papers filed in support
of the request, lawyers for
A J Congress point out that the
PLO "engages in terrorist ac-
tivities which are contrary to the
interests and policies" of the
U.S., and that its "chief purpose
is to destroy the State of Israel."
Fedorenko Citizenship Revoked
The U.S. citizenship of Nazi
death camp guard Feodor
Fedorenko was ordered revoked
last Wednesday, Jan. 21, by the
U.S. Supreme Court.
By a 7-2 vote, the justices ruled
the Ukrainian who had served as
a guard at Treblinka, Poland,
during 1942 and 1943. had "il-
legally procured" his American
citizenship by concealing his past
when he immigrated to the U.S.
in 1949.
The Court upheld the Fifth
Circuit Court of Appeals which
had overruled Fort Laucierdale's
U.S. Distrk-t Court Judge
Norman Roettger who ruled in
Fedorenko s favor following a
trial at which six Jewish sur-
vivors of the Treblinka death
camp had testified that they had
Technion
The South Hroward Chapter of
the American Society for
technion. Women's division will
hold its next meeting on Monday.
Feb. 9 at 12 noon, at Galahad
North. 3001 South Ocean Dr.,
Hollywood.
Habbi Seymour Friedman of
Temple Sinai. Hollywood, will
speak on The Klephant and the
Jewish Problem."
Refreshments will be served.
All are welcome.
seen Fedorenko beat, shoot and
whip Jews held captive by the
Nazis.
Deportation proceedings are
expected to begin soon to send
Fedorenko to the Soviet Union.
since he was born in the Ukraine,
or to Germany.
More than 200 denaturaliza-
tion cases are now pending in the
Justice Department. The Su-
preme Court decision is expected
to lead the way to early trials for
other accused Nazis living in the
U.S.
Cancer Society
The Hollywood Branch of the *'
American Cancer Society needs
volunteers to work in the office
located at 2338 Hollywood Blvd.
(next to Cox's drugstore. We are
presently in need of typists,
telephone workers, envelope
stuffers and drivers to help
transport patients to doctor
appoiyments and treatments.
Volunteers can schedule their
own time. If you can help or you
need further information, please
call I.ynne or Janet at 925-2314,
Monday thru Friday between the
hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
SEXTON FOR
CONSERVATIVE TEMPLE
CALL TEMPLE SINAI OF
HOLLYWOOD, 920-1577
FOOT FACTS:Warts are virusus and tend
to spread if left untreated
Dr. Barry R. Block
Dr. Ellis L. Jacobs
Podiatric Physicians & Surgeons
1011S. Federal Highway
Hollywood, Florida 33020
920-1700
MEDICARE ACCEPTED


f. February6, 1981
Tfte Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
'.' ,-..
LANE
DISCOUNT
KOSHER MARKETS
UNDER THE STRICT SUPERVISION OF RABBI TIBOR H. STERN
163rd. Street
Shopping Center
Store Hours
Monday thru Wednesday 8:30 to 6
Thursday-9:30 to 7 Fridav 8:30 to 4
Sunday 9 to 6 Closed Saturday
1845 Alton Road
Miami Beach
Store Hours
Monday thru Wednesday 8:30 to 6
Thursday 8:30 to 7 Friday 8:30 to 3
Closed Saturdays & Sundays
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THURSDAY, FEB. 12 ONLY AT THE ABOVE STORES.
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i li


*r/n.rx-"
Page 22
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday, February 6, 1981
Raticoffs Receive Bond Award
Joan and Jerald Raticoff have
been named to receive Israel's
City of Peace Award at a State of
Israel Tribute Dinner, to be held
in their honor, at Temple Sinai In
Hollywood, under the auspices of
the Israel Bonds Organization.
The event is slated for Sunday.
Feb. 15. at 6 p.m., according to
Ronald and Lynn Rosen,
chairmen of the event.
The Raticoffs have long been
active in Jewish communal af-
fairs. Raticoff is former Temple
Sinai vice-president and serves as
a member of the Temples
Trustees. Active with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward, he
is a member of the Hoard of
Trustees, Chairman of the Public
Relations Committee and Co-
chairman of the Metropolitan
Campaign.
Mrs Raticoff is active with the
Federation Women's Division
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEAAPlE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative RabDi
Philhp A Labowitz Cantor Maurice
A. Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive Reform i44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER 9106
57ti-. St Conservative RaDbi Israel
Zimmerman. 144 Al
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL 6920 SW 35th St
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski (481
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School 200 NW Douglas Rd Liberal
Reform Rabbi Bennet Greenspon
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd., Hollywood Conservative Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S Nob Hill Rd Rabbi Sheon
J. Harr 164)
RECQNSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob
Danziger. (12)
NORTHMIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kingsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
LEVI YITZHOK CHABAD SYNA
GOGUE 1504 Wiley St.
TEMPLE SINAI. 1201 Johnson St. Con
servative. Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Robert Ungar
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Mosbe
Bomzer. (52)
Joan and Jerald Raticoff
and is a board member. She
served as the Chairman of the
Federation's successful Women's
Community Day.
Special guest at the dinner will
be Israel Amitai, noted Israeli
television producer, author and
journalist. Amitai has served in
various positions within Israel's
communications industry and is
a noted authority on middle-
eastern affairs.
Co-chairmen of the event are
Rabbi and Mrs. David Shapiro
md Jacob and Bea Mogilowitz.
Seven Named For
New Life Awards
Seven South Floridians have
been named t<> receive the State
of Israel New Life Award at an
area-wide gathering of Jewish
communal leaders on March 1 at
the Konover Hotel on Miami
Beach.
The recipients were chosen by
,i special committee headed by
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, from
nominations submitted by area
rabbis and Jewish organization
presidents
The award recipients are:
l.udwik Brodzki, Ricki Igra,
James Kassner, Leo Martin. Bins
Ockman and Carl Rosenkopf, a
reisdent ol Hallandale.
A special award for a contribu-
tion to the Yad Vashem
Memorial in Israel will be
presented to Miami resident Lilly
Meier. In addition. Israel's
. Righteous Christian Award, for
extraordinary help to the Jewish
people during the Holocaust, will
lx' presented to Ft. Lauderdale
American ORT
Sandpiper chapter of Women s
American Ort of Pembroke
Lakes. South Broward Region,
will hold its regular monthly
meeting at the Holiday Inn of the
Hollywood Lakes Country Club,
14800 Hollywood Blvd., Holly-
wood, Monday, Feb. 2 at noon.
The program will include in-
stallation of officers. Husbands
of members and prospective
members are cordially invited to
attend.
For further information call
431-4530 or 431-5141.
Rummage Sale
A rummage and white elephant
sale sponsored by the Sisterhood
of Temple Beth Fl will be held
Thursday. Feb. 12 from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. in the Tobin Auditorium of
the Temple. 1351 S. 14th Ave..
Hollywood at the rear entrance.
Proceeds will go toward the
religious school of the temple.
resident. Carola Mueller.
The criteria for receiving the
award is that the person must
have been a survivor ol the
Holocaust who was reborn into a
new life in the United States and
who has distinguished himself or
herself in the community.
4800 Griffin Road
South Fort Lauderdale, Florida
(3 blocks west of 441)
TEMPLE BETH EL
Wemotuit(jatdtiu
The most beautiful Jewish cemetery
In Broward County
Close in location
Administered and operated on a non-profit
basis by Temple Beth-El of
Hollywood, Fla.
Perpetual care Included
Reasonable prices
For further information please call
Broward 920-8226
Dade 944-7773
No Obligation
No Sales Person Will Call
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33020
Please send me literature on the above.
NAME ___________________________________
ADDRESS_______------------------------------------
CITY_______________
(JF.)
STATE.
ZIP_
Residents of Olympus will gather
to support the growth of Israel's
economy at a "Night for Israel"
scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 19,
at 8 p.m.. in the Olympus Social
Hall. At the same time, Leo and
Betty Hilzenrath will be
presented with Israel's Scroll of
Honor, in recognition of their
many years of devoted and dedi-
cated service to the Israel Bonds
Organizatk>n.7Hil/.enrath has
been active in synagogue work
and is president of Olympus
B'nai B'rith. Mrs. Hilzenrath is
vice-president of Olympus B'nai
B'rith Women!Chairman of the
event is David Berlin; co-chair-
men are Jules Brenner and Frank
Friedman. Special guest will be
Eddie Schaffer, noted American-
Jewish humorist.
AFTER
MASTECTOMY
totally new and different breast!
orosttiesis1" 15 advantages over fluid orl
pnicon prostnesis completely naturail
n/itn nipple areoia. even weignt nol
Hipping duraDle. wear regular ora orf
fcwimsuit fda approved EiigiDle for!
Insurance you truly forget your rel
Iwearing it' New 6 Dra styles availaoie |
[For color brochure can Mianfl
667-0332
For The
.NurseYou Need
fcj MM
N4 (Had
3jtAtTiMs
Services Ihc
Call 963-3320
Ms. LPNs, Aides
Carefull. stated tor h.rh
standard of proieonal
MI ad itnuint human
ewetmler the patient
* single call arranges jour
exact needs for care
ON CALL 24 HOURS
Harold anc
and Raie Caster received Israel's City of Peace Award,
recognizing their many years of support for the State of Israel Bonds
Organization and for the economy of Israel. The award was presented
bv Nat Sedley (left) at a tribute held in their honor at Quadomain.
Kdward II Kahn (right) received Israel's Solidarity Award, rerog-1
nizing his many years of faithful service to the Jewish community I
to the State of Israel. Kahn is president of the Hollybrook Condo-
minium Association and has been active on behalf of numerous
philanthropic and civic groups. The award was presented by AlCohrn,
the condominium vice-president.
a
liFVITT -\ Fl
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
HOiirwooo i' P""h"> Horn
NOP.TH MIAMI I3WS W D >* Mwy
WEST palm BEACH M<' OM
'J
BJ17M0
AtAJ'i
eM700
,
___Mjffl@!fildl&l
GRATCH MANDEL
HARTMAN MILLER
Our new insignia symbolically expresses
the kinship between PISER of Chicago and
MENORAH CHAPELS in Florida. You will
find the same trustworthy service and
respect for Jewish traditions here that
generations of Chicagoans have come to
rely upon. In Chicago or Florida, you can
call on us at any time with complete
confidence.
m
Executive Offices:
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale
(Sunrise), Fla. 33313
305/742-6000
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441
Margate, Fla. 33063
305/427-4700
2305 W. HilUboro Blvd.
Deerfleld Beach, Fla. 33441
305/427-4700
Dade County
305/861-7301
Palm Beach County
305/83*0887


February 6, 1981
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Pajre23-
LOEHMANN'S
PLAZA
ON BISCAYNE BLVD.
(US-1) and 187 Street
NOW AT WHITE
SALE PRICES.
MM L ANOALE BEACH BLVD-
IVES OIABV ROAD
MIAMI OABDtUB DMVF
Linn Chl
fift.c*
E
* *
tri&
**

*t r
#

V
j
DESIGNER SHEETS
by YVES ST. LAURENT
* Grace Kelly
* Gear at

. *
jz^r
SEE OUR 1981 COLLECTION
OVER 3000 DIFFERENT PATTERNS
Reg. SALE
TWIN............12.00........5.99
DOUBLE.....15.00........7.49
Reg. SALE
QUEEN.......19.00........9.50
KING............23.00......11.50
NOW
FROM
20% to 50%
OFF
"Let our Decorators help you choose from our
fine selection of designer home fashions."
EXTRAORDINARY BUYDESIGNER SETS by
Reg SALE
TWIN 2 SHEETS & CASES...........25.00 12" set
DOUBLE 2 SHEETS 4 CASES......40.00 ...19" set
QUEEN 2 SHEETS & CASES........50.00 24" set
OFF KING 2 SHEETS & CASES 60 00 ... 29"
* CALVIN KLEIN
* JAY YANG
* MANY OTHER DESIGNERS
set
"K-cSW
,'
MATCHING
SHOWER
CURTAINS
EMBROIDERED
TOWELS
ACCESSORIES
MIX 'N' MATCH
OVER 20 DIFFERENT
PATTERNS TO
CHOOSE FROM
ALSO: ACCESSORIES
IN LUCITE BRASS
SILVER GOLD
WOOD WICKER
SOLID TOWELS BY:
MARTEX -
FIELDCREST
- CANNON
/?M6/?Ja*>^
1
*-.-*
HOURS:
MON., TUES., SAT. 10-6
WED., THURS., FRI. 10-9
SUN. 12-5
THE LINEN CHEST
at Loehmann's Plaza on Biscayne Blvd. (U.S. 1)
and 187 Street North Miami Beach
DADE 931-8530
PROWARD 52? '
TABLE CLOpS
Reg. SALE
53x53........i5.oo. ::.7.50
53x71........20.00. 9.95
63x90........30.00..14.95
63x106......40.00 19.95
70 RD........30.00.... 14.95
NAPKINS... 3.00.......1.50
AVAILABLE IN
6 PATTERNS
Let our decorators
help you choose
from our fine selec-
tion of designer
home fashion.
be HaOia tspanoi

I


YOUR BEST HOME FURNISHINGS VALUE
NOW EVEN BETTER!
\

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\
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22
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Cil
save s; wo
SWWEL ROCAEt
BTMOEHLB
na .*
v>>t
- RECllNER
J50 OFF
* aaaai ve .. fa* fcraw 1
ia*
SAVE $1:1 CLASS* TRADI7lONAi DINING
ROOM m ANTIQUE WHITE
Tie aaaaj na* ; aiinrta*! hasMf tjt wMt
4* atuja ir* parr acr**?-. *Bk 01* too MM
CHMA REG $319 Salt 13
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bedroom i sroc
20% OFF
ii acar nHf: aa* tiats- li*s
can rot> aacan Wi :
SAVE SI5C MtOEHiER
^ASSIC TRADITIONAL
SOFA W CORDUROY
440 te| t9
Maaani toaataa* |in tM' In >ir .
rajnaaac* *mtt Htnaajr laarr :oVh
i.msa'c: js**v<>f
SAVE JSC SOFA FLOOR
SAM*\E CLEARANCE
NOW 50% OFF
BKEtMSWtYTWnCATHl
FOR FLORIDA
BEDDING SETS
$/*Q "ttTK!
** IT I
i jJ':1 Soar liC w
tan am Sf or nw t*|
SAVE $320 ON OUR
LUXURIOUS 8 PIECE
MODULAR SECTIONAL
YOU* "hOlCE m,
ARM.ESS OR *
CORNER CHAIR
-: r sj*l uawft '-'* :-'
-.,. *& rri*til netart prtpMrMf
I I IrXtKMl 0 i UMVtlUtioa $A fNJ
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SAVE $150
QUEEN SIZE CONTEMPORARY
SLEEP SOFA
$dyy n
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JS49
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pa* sob t tn > im'as urror' t> aajkt Qatar, un
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coaaorl *r tcntrs *n>Ktn oKoctln ;or jtrj'
alar oa* Rm- s SmSIM
FREE DELIVERY
WITHIN 60 MILES
OF OUR FURNITURE SHOWROOMS
OPtt FtlDAY fcM to 9 PM. SATMIiAT *M KM. to 5:30 P.M.
fljaS:737
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