The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00253

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
uewislh IFIenctia hi
|_ Number 16
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Hollywood, Florida Friday, August 8, 1980
F ltd Shocnti
Price 35 Cents
RnW8L Hod Hasharon; Our New Partner

nags
enewal remember
/ou've been reading a
[lately, and you will be
more in the near
lharon remember
too. If Nat Sedley.
jnewal fund raising
nd Lester Grossman,
.tenewal building
chieve their aim, Hod
lot only will become
he Jewish community
Jroward, but life for
Dd Hasharon will be a
D, you ask, "What is
aewal and what about
ried Jewish Appeal-
rgency Fund?"
PROJECT Renewal is a special
people-to-people program in
which the South Broward Jewish
community joins in partnership
with a distressed area in Israel
with the mutual goal of working
to improve the quality of life for
the residents of that neigh-
borhood. It is a concerned effort
to close the social gap that en-
dangers Israel's internal security.
Project Renewal is a part of the
CJA-IEF a supplementary
campaign, if you will. But it is
somewhat different in concept
and purpose.
The CJA-IEF is an annual
fund-raising campaign to raise
money for human services in
Israel, in many countries
throughout the world and here in
South Broward. It is the primary
humanitarian campaign con-
ducted by the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. Contributions
are made annually to CJA-IEF.
They are paid annually.
There are different ground
rules for Project Renewal. First
of all, gifts to Project Renewal
are accepted only from those
contributors who already have
given to the current CJA-IEF
campaign a sum equal to or more
than the previous year's gift.
ALL MONIES will be kept
separate from CJA-IEF
proceeds, and will be used ex-
clusively for Project Renewal
programs in Hod Hasharon.
Especially important is the fact
that a gift to Project Renewal can
be paid out over a five-year
period.
The people of Hod Hasharon
are not seeking a handout no
community participating in
Project Renewal is just taking.
They are sharing responsibility;
the Israeli government is
splitting the cost; we are all
building together. Many
American Jewish communities
already have begun im-
plementing their partnerships
with their twins in Israel, Sedley
and Grossman explained.
The emphasis is on citizen
bmmunity Day Chairwomen Named
rgenstein and Joan
ive been named
kf Community Day
Phursday, Dec. 18, at
, Convention Center,
Jewish Federation
Broward Women's
sident Bobbie Levin
lity Education Vice
srence Roth.
py Day brings all the
en of South Broward
>r a day of fun,
and intellectual
Mrs. Mprgenstein
Iticoff said.
1,200 women are
attend the day-long
I luncheon.
the organization of
lity-wide event, Mrs.
Joan Raticoff
Morgenstein and Mrs. Raticoff
have eight, chairmen working
Carol Morgenstein
on various aspects of Community
Day.
Spaces Left on Mission Trip
r still a few spaces left
rish Federation of
award Community
Israel, set for Oct. 16-
to Al and Marlene
den.
The Finches explained the
difference.between a mission and
a regular tour: "As a tourist, you
would only get to see Israel with
your eyes. On a mission, you
discover it with your whole heart
and soul."
Missions build unity and a
sense of involvement among all
participants. This helps heighten
the awareness of everyone, ex-
Cnntinued on Page 14
Natalie Bluth is in charge of
the invitations, with respon-
sibilities including all printed
information.
Mary Gottlieb and Hannah
Schorr, decorations chairmen,
will coordinate and produce table
decorations for the event.
Sara Ottenstein and Gloria
Hess share the job of seating the
1,200 women who will be present
at Community Day.
Delia Rosenberg and Ruth
Rodensky, hostess chairmen, are
responsible for coordinating a
corps of hostesses who will
promote Community Day to their
friends, in order to have the
maximum number of women
present at the event.
Joan Gross, publicity chair-
man, will work with the public
relations department with her
ideas on publicity for the event.
For additional information on
Community Day, contact the
Federation office.
participation, community control
and self-help. Instead of one
group giving and. the other
taking, there will be Israel-
Diaspora fund matching with a
sharing of the responsibility in
decision making. Total ac-
countability is built into the
program.
To begin at the beginning.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
had an idea a couple of years ago.
He decided it was time to stop
making empty promises to the
45.000 families, almost 300,000
Israelis, who for decades have
been living in disgraceful cir-
cumstances, waiting for the
brighter future that had been
described but never delivered.
Begin called for a program of
renewal in which the people of
Israel and the Jews of the
Diaspora would join together to
help wipe out human misery for
these citizens of what had come
to be called "the second Israel."
Project Renewal is the
beginning of the realization of
Begin's dream.
THE SITUATION in Hod
Hasharon now is bleak, with
many social problems created by
a feeling of hopelessness
generated through the years.
There's a considerable amount
of crime and the rate of school
dropout is high the usual story
of people accepting misery as
their fate.
Until the advent of Project
Renewal, it wasn't likely that this
continuing cyle of misery ever
would be broken. Now hope has
entered the picture. The mayor of
Hod Hasharon, Simcha Moaz, is
ready and willing to cooperate,
and a committee of residents
already is helping to set
priorities.
Contributors to Project
Renewal will have the
satisfaction of seeing tangible
results of their participation.
-ard residents gathered recently at the home of Dr.
id Nancy Atkin to discuss the upcoming Jewish
1 South Broward President's Mission, set for Oct. 5-10 m
-t speaker Steve Cozen explained the itinerary, which
ps in the Negev. the Golan, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
will enjoy home hospitality by residents of East
visits to military bases, Project Renewal areas, Yad
id dinner with president Yitzhak Navon. Dr. Howard
[chairman. Seated from left are Joyce Newman, Bobbie
lident. Women's Division; Toby Greenberg, Ted Newman
, Saltzman. Standing from left are Dr. Saul and Susan
. Robert Pittell, president; Dr. Philip Levin, campaign
and David Posnack.
from left
ig from
Jo Ann
re Steve Cozen. Marge Saltzman and Nancy
left are Sumner Kaye. executive director;
Katz, treasurer and Dr. Norman Atkin
Atkin.
Allen
Some day soon, these children, residents of Hod Hasharon. will have a place to play that isn't littered
with debris. Project Renewal's partnership between ihe South Broward Jewish community and Hot


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Shojmr ofCrtmUr HoOyvood
Prida,. A0ffl-t
Holiday Cards Available
Families expect more
iji
Riverside.
*
More service.
Hibii mm:bk cards a pcayert mitarSr>M Je-r> '? of -(. y nin Relatw f in
aftfca J-- -- :>ntM ofSosta Brnward are ralibir '.hrows (he Federacioa offVe TV zr~nim*
-sro> are S far 15 5.- fc>r 20 I '' and S25 far 20w Aniwae interested laiald cafl Aaaa at tV
J*Tit** Fderauoa of Sowtfc Bn-.aard
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Technion Names
Board Members
Rher*de no* ias seven chapels to ser.*-
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han these two fine gentlemen
jam ark* as m oar efforts to
support Israel's only
tachtkokarkal iiiijhwbj said
RIVERSIDE
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TV Jewiaa Federauew of Sewta Brwward Career ttoatni C
steeriag Coaunauee Bart recently t* fiaafee plan* far the Sept 17
pobtaral program TV program w* brief career aoaaea oa political
raaidailies ash oa iaaar* reaauag la them Seated from left are
>w**a Mager. Margie Fiahmaw Naaey Ataaa. iiaaiaa and Bsfcfaie
L*^ Weans* Drtitaaa preaadeat Standang fraaa left are Elaine
Ffaieher Syrrie Afaraaa Manou Wetfena. Barbara Rothstem and
Martens HeDer____________________________________
I Temple in the Pines Events I
Fraiay evening services waa be
beid at Temple m the Pine* 9C
Stiriisg Read at < p m Aug ?
Rabbi Bernard P Sfcoter anil
officiate mnth Cantor Bernard
Eaed saaawaig Ststerbood of
Temple a tan Pines wal apooaor
taaOnegSaabbat
Heorew School regiatratra it
now taking place, and the
Sunday School program is being
expanded to mchade indivxr^a.
for fire. six. and seren-
year-olds.
High Holy Days tickew are
svaiabie and can be "*< by
morarrmg the temple office
Mark Desmao. temple
preasdeaa. hnitaa friends and
prospective members to an Open
House this Sunday High Hoh
Days Ttckau will be available at
this thna. and aaqnines may be
Program on
Current Events
in Russia
TV Sena Jewry Coanaaattae
of tV Community Reiauott:
Committee of tat Jewish
Federataon of South Broward
BJTiccs the entre community to
bear a discussion on current
events in Russia by Rabbi
Herbert Tobin.' who will be
joining tV Federation staff
according to Dr Stan Spau.
Soviet Jewry cban-man
TV event w-J be bead Sunday.
Sept U. at 6 pjn at the
Holy-wood Jewish Comnaansty
Center. 2838 Hollywood Bhd
TV program ls free of chance.
Main Sailer
?o%: Howe S^topptf^ Cf"e
4535 awawaawa St WoWy^od Flo
>961.
Pe*orto Service ooo* Skxt"
KK1MHKK I HBO
1 3 5
Community Day is coming,
9
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12
13
Mark your calendars now.
14 15 16 1? is 19 20
Thursday. December 18 ^
21 22 23 24 25 W 27
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
:
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28 29 30 31
Diplomat Convention Center
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
a a
VU R{ sPK IMISTSIN
ISUAEI sKURITHS
a
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18 East 48t* Si'eet
Nea. Vork N Y 100' ?
Securities ,212^59 1310
Corporation to*i Free 18001221 -48^e


Lay, August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Sondra Re iffNamed Hollywood JCC Director
I Sondra Reiff ha* been named
jcutive director of the Jewish
Immunity Centers of South
orida Hollywood Extension,
cording to Hollywood JCC
esident, Mort Levin.
[Mrs. Reiff came to Miami in
I76 as the program director of
L JCC South Dade Center.
fmr to that, she had been affil-
_J with the Pittsburgh JCC as
Participator, committee mem-
I, part-time and full-time staff
Unber for 38 years.
She was directly involved with
and supervised all facets of pro-
gramming with the exception of
physical education (although she
was part of the swim staff for
several years).
As part of her assignment for
the Pittsburgh Center, she was
program director of Emma Kauf-
mann camp, a children's resident
camp located in West Virginia.
She was also program director for
the South Hills outreach
program.
For several years, she owned
and operated "The Opened Door
Nursery School'' in New York
State. She was also an owner and
creator of a children's theater
group, "Kidelot Production."
This group wrote and presented
original children's theater
throughout the Pittsburgh area.
The theater group became
Gimbels Bros. Department
Stores home theater group pre-
senting special holiday and back
to school shows in all branches.
Shalom Committee Announces Events
|The Jewish Federation of
luth Broward Women's
(vision Shalom Committee met
fcently to discuss plans for the
rev upcoming Shalom events,
tording to Audrey Klein,
jrman.
I The Shalom program is held
jinually in order to welcome new
[wish residents to South
toward and help them establish
heir roots here.
The first Shalom event will be
held Saturday, Sept. 6, at the
home of Jackie and Simon Reich-
baum; the second event is set for
Saturday, Oct. 4, at the home of
Dr. Norman and Natalie Bluth;
and the third event will be held
Saturday, Oct. 11, at the home of
Debbie and Tony Lundy.
The Shalom Committee in-
cludes Randy Blackburn, Natalie
Bluth, Wendy Benjamin, Hedia
Cantor, Lila Demet. Nancy
Ehrlich, Freyda Fellows, Terry
Greenberg, Kayla Herscovitch
and Edna Jacobs.
Also, Leah Kurtz, Barbara
Liss, Debbie Lundy, Florence
Pasternack, Jackie Reichbaum,
Mimi Sabra, Avis Sachs, Joanne
Schoenbaum, Diane Snyder,
Susan Snyder, Susan Singer,
Valerie Sussman, Sylvia Sperber,
Elayne Topolski, Margaretta
Terkiel and Gail Weisberg.
four to six times per year.
In 1977, she became the project
director of the South Dade JCC
and became the director in 1978.
A resident of North Miami
Beach, wife of Donald Reiff,
mother of four children and step-
mother of four children, she is a
grandmother of one.
JCC and Jewish education
have been a major part of her life
both personally and pro-
fessionally. She was confirmed
from Beth Shalom Synagogue in
Pittsburg, and taught Sunday
School for Temple Emanuel in
the South Hills area for five
years.
Sondra Reiff
JFSB Women on Washington Mission
The Jewish Federation of
louth Broward Women's
pivision will meet with represen-
Itives from Council of Jewish
federations, American Israel
hiblic Affairs Committee, the
Itate Department, Middle East
iperts, Sen. Richard Stone, the
department of Energy, the B'nai
nth Lobbyist on Women's
ssues, Sen. Lawton Chiles and
pontfressman Ed Stack, when
ey participate on a "mission to
Washington," Sept. 22 and 23,
ccording to Elbe Katz and
Elaine Pittell, chairwomen.
The group also plans an op-
tional tour of the National
iallery's new wing.
Minimum commitment to the
1981 Women's Division cam-
paign on behalf of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund is $700.
Space is limited, so reser-
vations should be made now
through the Federation.
Women's Division Beach Leadership
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division will meet with its Beach
leadership on Thursday, Aug. 14,
at the home of Brenda Green man,
Campaign vice president, to
discuss plans for the 1981
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign.
Mrs. Greenman said the
women will discuss ideas for the
upcoming year. She added that a
new concept for the Women's
Division Beach campaign will be
gone over at that time.
Interested residents of the
beach area should contact Helen
at the Federation office.
Arthur A. Selevan, past deputy commander of the State of Florida
Jewish War Veterans and chairman of the essay contest of Poet 177,
presents $50 United States Government Bond to first prize winner
Melinda Faith Stein. Also shown are principal Roz Sidel, runner-up
Larry Siff, Jamera Overstein, commander of JWV Poet 177; and
Rabbi Seymour Friedman, Temple Sinai of Hollywood.
f
Leadership
nstitute Set
The Women's Leadership
nstitute Committee, which
solved from the Jewish
federation of South Broward
v'omen's Division President's
touncil met recently to make
|l;inv for an Institute, to be held
Wednesday, Sept. 17, at Temple
Beth El, 1351 S. 14 Ave., ac-
cording to Elaine Pittell,
President's Council liaison.
The committee will provide
lorkshops for local Jewish
imen's organizations. The goal
the committee is to establish
Dhesiveness within the
Jrtfranizations.
Organizational presidents and
their executive committees are
ivited to attend the 9:30 a.m. -
:30 p.m. event.
Committee responsibilities are
held by Randee Lefkow, fund-
raising workshop moderator;
f'lorence Siegel, publicity; Betty
Jomans, program ideas;
Suzanne Gunzburger, com-
munity resources; Mamie Gates
and Roz Klein, membership; Ann.
iGorin, Bobbie Levin and
Florence Roth, education.
IF YOUR OBJECTIVES ARE
GETTING THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF MONEY
IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME
WITH THE LEAST AMOUNT OF INCONVENIENCE
THEN CALL
YOUR
NEIGHBORHOOD PROFESSIONAL
FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS
OF YOUR HOME
EVERYTHING TO GAIN-NOTHING TO LOSE.
ALL-RITE REAL ESTATE, INC.
#^^-----X. mmmM REALTOR
I ZTllL VW 618 ATLANTIC SHORES BL'
^ j/21. 458-3336
RELGO.INC,-----
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts ft Crafts
Hebrew Books Judalca
Paper Backs
Records ft Tapes
Opmn Sunday
1507 Washington Avenue M.B.
532-5912
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
Seated from left are Florence Siegel, president, Temple Beth Shalom
Sisterhood; Ann Gorin, president, Unity Council and member of
B'nai B'rith Women; and Mamie Gates, chairman, executive com-
mittee, South Broward Region Women's American ORT. Standing
from left are Bobbie Levin, president, Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division; Suzanne Gunzburger, president, Hills
Section of National Council of Jewish Women; Elaine Pittell,
President's Council Liaison, JFSB Women's Division; Roz Klein,
president, South Broward Region of Women's American ORT; and
Randee Lefkow, program vice president, Twin County Council, B'nai
B'rith. Not pictured is Betty Humans, president, Twin County
Council B'nai B'rith and Florence Roth, community education vice
president, JFSB Women's Division.

Temple Administrator
Wanted
Large Reform Congregation in S.E. Florida
Requires Accounting Background, Office
Administrative Experience. Salary Open and
Commensurate with Ability. Fringe Benefits.
Mail Resumes to: Box TAW, 120 N.E. 6th Street,
Miami, Florida 33132.
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Z.p




Friday, August 8,1980
The Jgwish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Alfred Golden Re-elected CAJE President
Alfred Golden, synagogue and
community figure and long active
in the top echelon Federation
leadership, has been re-elected as
president of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education (CAJE) for
1980-81.
Officers who will serve with
Golden on the Executive
Committee of CAJE include
/David M. Dobin, Arlene
Rosenthal and Roberta Shevin,
vice presidents; Judge Steven
Robinson, secretary; Richard
Levy, treasurer; Nancy Gold-
stein, nominating committee
chairperson; David Mesnekoff,
Tamara Nixon and Gwen
Weinberger, directors at large;
and Helene Berger, immediate
past president.
GOLDEN said, "I accept the
(re-election to the presidency of
I CAJE with a profound sense of
I renewed responsibility, together
I with a willingness that is shared
I by the entire Executive Com-
I mittee and board of directors, to
I meet the formidable challenges
I that face Jewish education in the
South Florida community in the
months and years ahead."
Golden added, "We are
especially fortunate in having a
highly capable and committed
professional staff under the
direction of Gene Greenzweig,
CAJE executive director, and a
solid history of achievement,
growth and development under
the guidance of our past
presidents. We will seek to
continually meet the Jewish
I educational needs of an ever
growing community."
Golden, recently re-elected to a
fourth term as a national com-
missioner of ADL of B'nai B'rith,
has been a longtime community
leader. He serves on the board of
directors of the Jewish Fed-
eration Greater Fort Lauderdale
and its Chaplaincy Commission.
He is national vice chairman of
the Council on College Youth and
Faculty of the Council of Jewish
Welfare Federations.
He has compiled a dis-
tinguished record of service in
H'nai B'rith. chairman of its
Southeastern area ADL com-
mittee; former national commis-
sioner of the Hillel Foundation,
and both founder and first presi-
dent of the Dade Community
Hoard for Hillel and the Florida
Foundation for Hillel. He has
served as an officer and is on the
boards of a number of syna-
gogues in both Dade and
Hroward counties.
IN THE general community,
he is a former member of the
Dade County Personnel Board
and of the Miami Beach Public
Relations Committee.
Professionally, he is the
executive vice president of
Riverside Memorial Chapels of
Florida.
In reviewing some of the major
[achievements of CAJE during
I the past year, Golden highlighted
the establishment of a Day
[School Department that already
has had major impact on the
jeducational and financial
joperations of the community's
day schools; the inauguration,
I through special grants from the
I Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the
I Jewish Federation of South
Hroward, of a Department of
Special Education that has
Houses for Sale
North Miami Beach
Spacious 4/6 bedroom, POOL, eat-
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walk to Orthodox TEMPLE,
* 125.000.661-3453. -
Alfred Golden
conducted a series of pilot
projects; the expansion of Jewish
educational programming for lay
and professional community
leaders, the formation of
cooperative adult education
programs in the North Dade and
Hollywood communities with
CAJE serving as the melding
instrument for the synagogues
and the Jewish Community
Center; and the holding of
community-wide Israel Dance
Festivals on Miami Beach and in
Hollywood; all of this in addition
to the on-going programming of
the agency.
In looking to the future,
Golden declared, "The con-
striction of available funding for
Jewish education in the com-
munity, combined with the ever-
increasing needs of overseas
Jewry, will make this year one in
which prioritization of projects
for maximum fulfillment of
community needs will be the
major theme.
"ACCORDINGLY," he
continued, "there will be very
focused goals for which to strive.
Chief among them will be the
establishment of the Community
Day High School, for which a
new director is presently being
sought; the strengthening of
inter-agency planning and
programming in all phases of
Jewish education; the full cer-
tification of day school general
and Judaic faculties; the
examination of approaches to
graduate Judaic studies in the
community; the coordination of
educational services throughout
all of Dade and Broward counties
and the expedition of cooperative
planning for Jewish education on
a state-wide basis; the increased
services to day schools; the
inclusion of the Department of
Special Education as an on-going
program of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education; and the
special pilot program entitled
"Home Start."
"Above all else," Golden
concluded, "perhaps the most
dynamic factor in the entire
community is the supportive
attitude for Jewish education of
the lay and professional
1 leadership of Federation, which
recognizes that the continuation
and enhancement of Jewish life in
our community depends to a
large degree on how this agency
formulates, implements and
reaches the goals of life-long,
community wide Jewish
education."
Be Sure to Vote ...
Absentee Ballot if Necessary!
Registered voters who will be out-of-town on
Primary Day, Sept. 9, or on Runoff Day, Oct. 2,
should follow the procedures listed here to make
sure that their vote counts:
Broward County residents at home now should
call the Superintendent of Elections at 765-5580 or
81 and ask for an absentee ballot. They will be
required to give their full name as it appears on
their Voter Registration Card, date of birth, local
address and telephone number, and a forwarding
address.
Broward County residents who are already out-
of-town may write to Jane Carroll, Broward County
Courthouse, Fort Lauderdale, 33301, and ask that
an absentee ballot be sent them. Inquiries should
include the information listed above.

Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health



a*. lu//^- v. -,_ v < -
to;'
-Ml
.


Friday, August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Decade of Women
How Copenhagen Became Another Mexico City
NEW YORK The
United Nations Decade for
Women conference is over
in Copenhagen, but the re-
verberations continue to
come back from the Danish
capital city in shock upon
shock.
The Conference of Presidents
(of Major American Jewish Or-
Iganizations and B'nai B'rith in
Ithe last week of the women's
Imeeting urged the Carter
Administration to take the lead
in forcefully blocking efforts by
the Palestine Liberation
[organization and its allies in the
I Soviet bloc and Third World
| countries to subvert the United
Nations Decade for Women by
f transforming it into a forum for
; anti-Israel and anti-Zionist
propaganda.
AT THE same time, Bemice
Tannenbaum, president of
lladassah, sent a letter to
President Carter from Copen-
hagen in which she observed,
"We have seen our hope of sister-
hood profoundly shaken by a
divisive political circus." Mrs.
Tannenbaum attended the
Copenhagen conference as a
delegate representing the World
Jewish Congress which has non-
governmental organization
status.
Howard Squadron, chairman
ol the Presidents Conference,
sent a telegram to Secretary of
State Kdmund Muskie saying
[that his organization's 34 con-
stituent members were "pro-
loundly concerned at efforts by
the enemies of Israel and peace in
the Middle East to politicize" the
Decade for Women conference.
He had urged that the U.S.
delegation "take the lead in pub-
licly opposing and in actively
lobbying against" attempts by
the Soviet-Arab bloc to condemn
Israel and to channel UN funds
lor Palestinian women through
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
"THE PLO and its Soviet-
Arab supporters seek to win
United Nations' financial support
allegedly to meet the needs of
Palestinian women. They would
also have the conference condemn
Zionism, along with imperialism,
apartheid, neo-colonialism and
racism."
JCC Singles
Set Events
Squadron added: "We urge
that our country's delegation to
the conference take the lead in
publicly opposing and actively
lobbying against the inflam-
matory polemics of the PLO and
its o> conspirators in the Arab
League, the Soviet bloc and the
so-called Third World. Free and
democratic nations everywhere
look to the United States to play
the key role in resisting the anti-
Israel cabal in Copenhagen .
"We believe it is imperative
that our country's delegation in
Copenhagen undertake a major
campaign to avert a serious blow
to the American national in-
terest, to the Arab-Israel peace
process and to the security of our
friend and ally Israel."
JACK SPITZER. president of
B'nai B'rith International, also
asked in contacts with the White
House that the U.S. instruct its
delegation to take the lead in
resisting proposals that equate
Zionism with racism, provide UN
subsidies to the PLO under the
guise of helping Palestinian
women and other PLO attempts
to politicize the Copenhagen
conference.
"The PLO and its allies" were
trying to subvert the meeting
and turn it into a propaganda
show "to further the PLO's anti-
peace aims," Spitzer said. "B'nai
B'rith is deeply concerned about
the PLO's cynical exploitation of
the conference."
Tannenbaum noted, in her
letter to Carter, that on "issues
relating to the problems of
women refugees, Palestinian
women are singled out over
Afghan, Vietnamese, Ethiopian,
Kampuchean and countless other
women refugees, thus distorting
a tragedy of staggering
proportions."
SHE ALSO stated that once
again, at the Copenhagen con-
ference, "the slander originating
in 1975 at Mexico City is being
revived by Cuba which has intro-
duced an amendment to the Plan
of Action calling Zionism an evil
to be eradicated along with
colonialism, racism, etc."
Tannenbaum praised "the
strong efforts of our outstanding
United States delegation led by
Sarah Weddington," but despite
this, the conference "has
degenerated into an anti-
American, anti-Jewish and anti-
Israel diatribe where any ill \in
any part of the world is
blamed on the United States
and/ or Israel."
She called on the President "to
speak out now before the con-
ference ends to affirm that the
policy of the United States is to
reject any Plan of Action con-
taining such proposals and
slanders."
IN A RELATED develop-
ment, a group of internationally
eminent women, including
several political figures, artists,
authors and actresses, signed a
statement that appealed to the
participants at the international
women's conference in Copen-
hagen to end politic ization of the
conference and to "preserve its
universal character."
Among those who signed the
statement were Simone de Beau-
voir, Ixwise Nevelson, Madeleine
Kenaud, Beverly Sills and Bella
Abzug. Other women, from the
United States, included Colleen
Dewhurst, Betty Friedan,
Shelley Winters, Ann Jackson,
Ann Meara, Jacqueline Grennan
Wexler, Bess Meyerson, Eugenie
Anderson and Reps. Beverly
Byron (D., Md.), Marjorie Holt
(R., Md.) and Margaret Heckler
(R.,Mass.)
The statement, which was
released to the media on an inter-
national basis, was initiated in
Vranee by a group of women
aware that certain agenda items
would overshadow the original
intent of the conference and turn
the event into an explosive
political forum. Among the
countries represented in the list
of signatories were Australia,
Austria, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada,
Costa Rica, Denmark, Federal
Republic of Germany, Ecuador,
Finland, Great Britain, Italy,
Japan. Mexico, Norway,
Panama, Portugal, Uruguay,
U.S. and Venezuela.
THE APPEAL "to all par
ticipants," stated: "This con-
ference provides us with the
opportunity to make known our
views on questions which pre-
occupy women: social life,
equality, education, health and
employment. We know that
actions are envisaged to use this
conference for partisan ends thus
diverting it from its initial aims.
Politicizations have no place in
this encounter. It is to be hoped
that this conference, which rallies
women from all countries,
preserves its universal charac-
ter."
In addition, the National
Coalition of American Nunsi
(NCAN) also issued an appeal
"to women of all faiths to join
hands as sisters in an effort to
make the International Women's
Conference in Copenhagen what
it is supposed to be an op-
portunity for women to dialogue
about the women's agenda."
The appeal, signed by Sister
Margaret Traxler and Sister Ann
Gillen, members of the
Coalition's executive board and
delegates to the conference,
added, in part: "NCAN deplores
the efforts of the PLO to
politicize this women's con-
ference in Copenhagen, 1980, as
they did in the International
Women's Conference in Mexico
City in 1975.
"NCAN DENOUNCES the
PLO terrorists, who presume to
speak for the largely silent Pales-
tinian people. The PLO do not
even dialogue with all their
brothers to say nothing of
their sisters ... So far, the PLO
has not shown any signs of
joining the human family, as they
are still pledged to liquidate' the
State of Israel .
"Palestinian women are hos-
tages to the perverse national
istic haired of the PLO, who
demonstrate by their plant, for
Copenhagen that they dominate
their own sisters, using them as
pawns in the game of politics,
even as they keep them in the
bondage of Arab male
supremacy. Finally. NCAN urges
Palestinian women to share the
concerns of all women and to join
in efforts to build peace for their
people."
Tanks to Jordan on Agenda
WASHINGTON (JTA) The proposed sale of
100 M-60 tanks to Jordan advanced when the Defense
Department announced that the $160 million deal will be
presented to Congress for approval. The tanks, equipped
with night vision devices, are part of a 200-tank package
President Carter promised King Hussein of Jordan
during his Washington visit last month to modernize
Jordan's armed forces.
ISRAEL HAS vigorously opposed the tank sale,
although Pentagon officials insist it will not affect the
military balance in the Middle East because Jordan has
promised to phase out its older M-48 tanks. The
Administration has claimed that the sale will improve
U.S. ties with Jordan and help persuade Hussein to join
in the current Middle East peace process based on the
Camp David accords.
141 New Settlements Established
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Jewish Agency and
the World Zionist Organization have established 141 new
settlements in the last three years, Matityahu Drobless,
co-chairman of the WZO's Settlement Department,
reported at a meeting of the WZO Executive. According
to Drobless, it is "the greatest settlement drive in
Zionist history." Only 22 of the 141 settlements are
immigrant settlements, he said.
Drobless reported that the settlement plans of seven
groups of new immigrants have been delayed by financial
difficulties. He also contended that the IL 2 billion
allocated by the Housing and Construction Ministry this
year for the new settlements is insufficient to cover their
needs. The Executive deferred further discussion of
settlement problems to a later session.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
North Miami Beach, has a
variety of events scheduled in the
month of August for the JCC
Singles "Social Cluster" Groups
. and other interested single
adults.
On Sunday, Aug. 10, a
champagne brunch and swim
party will be held at a JCC
member's home beginning at 11
a.m. Guests are limited. Call
early for reservations.
On Saturday, Aug. 16 the
singles will attend the Great
Laser Fusion show at the
Planetarium at 8 pm. The 20-35
and 30-45 JCC Social Cluster
Groups will join forces for this
event. They will meet at the JCC
parking lot and car pool together.
On Sunday, Aug. 17, poetry
will be recited in the Pub at
Livingston's Landing in Fort
Lauderdale. Food and drinks
available. All singles will meet at
JCC parking lot (near ballfield) at
1:15 p.m. and car pool together.
Come have WMffj^
dinner at our house...
HflRBOUR HOUSE
We have dozens of delicious entrees, veal, beef,
duckling, seafood, liver, chicken and lamb all
cooked to order and served in a charming
garden-like setting in beautiful Bal Harbour. We have
luscious rolls and pastries, fine wines and spirits
all at sensible prices
DINNERS FROM $8.95
includes entree, salad, potato, vegetable and
home-baked rolls
We serve luncheon from 11 to 3 and dinner from
5:30 Complimentary parking Closed Mondays
Call 866-5559 for reservations or help
planning a private party of 20 to 200 persons
You are always welcome at our house

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Summer Hours. Daily 8 am 6 pm, Sundays 12 5
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Tel 456-0566 (Broward). 949-1682 (Dade)
Member HallandaM Chamber ot Commerce. Better Business Division
SUPERB CATERED AFFAIRS WITH AN ELEGANT FLAIR.
BILL GOLDRING-The Dean of Florida Caterers, and our Vice President, brings his
unmistakable touch and unmatched experience to the Konovei's unparalleled facilities.
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prices. Catered affairs that are treasured events.
Kosher
Catering
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Please call BILL GOL0RING at (305) 865 1500
Konover(Mcr)Hotel
ON THE OCEAN At S4th SI--------------^ MIAMI BEACH



The Jewish Ftondiar amd Skofar of Greater HoUyuxxtd
Frife
Students, Parents Join
In Discussion of Cults
Soviet Jewry Update
Community heiauon<
Committee of tn InM
leoerauoi o- Soutr browarc
101ns witr. tnt Jewisn Community
lente* or Hobywooc anc arei
s-vnapopue? u inviunr eieventi
anc twetttr. praae stuaent- anc.
cohept stuaer.t: topetne- witr
tnei- parent: u discus? tnt
tnrea: posec r>> cult.1 anc
missionan proups u nipr. scnoo
anci cohepe stuaents
Tnt meeunf wil taKt piact
Tnursaa\ Aim -. a: "3( u.n.
a. TeniDit faeu Snajon. I4(X N
4bU. -wt
Sana> Andror. ct-chrecto- o'
tn- -luaai: Hapr Scnoo oropran
io- tne Centra. Agency to- jewisr
Laucatior (CAJfiJ wil nt tnt
irues sneaKe- anc riiscussior
ieaae-
ANDRON na? puDiisnec
severa article? ir various
periodical? or tm tactic? anc
tnrea cv tnt cult: H- na? aia
iosterec i courst or cult- u
souu rionafc t Juaai: Hipr
scnooi h- i JF I reeourct
pw io- tnt cult? anc
missionaries
h- i? ais< a: aavise- u tnt
C oncernec '-arent? -\ssociatwx.
comDosec o" parent? mo*
cniiarer navt rjeei invoivet witr
cults
lanon u in- meeting art
oeint sen: u vouu promo? anc
otne- orpanization- bj tnt
'.ommuni'.' Relations L ommitu*
anc itr suDcommittet or cults
.airec rr< Eleano- Bar-
oeirnai anc Mera Enrensteu.
-vssisunj: tnen an tnt .jewisr
'< ommunit> Oente' c Holm-yooc
anc tnt are*, svnapopue:
-vccoraini- u tnt cnairDersom
in- cur sui-committe*
handiemar anc Enrensteu. tn-
ain o :n- mwiaj 1 M convent
oiae- mpr scnoo stuaenf anc
coiiep anc universir stuaent?
ms" t>etor- in- nepinninp o; tn
nev semeste- u acauain: iner
wiu metnoa? usec n- cult' anc
missionara?? u acquin toliower;
Aisc u maK- tnen mon awar-
of wn> cult? lounc t measure o-'
success amonp tooa> s vouu.
COMMENTING or tnt cults
Mrs Enrensteu anc Mr*
Hanoetmai aaic ult? an
cnaractenzec r> systematr.
utiiizauor of mine contro.
tecnniaue? anc aeceu Tne>
naiTT u Dt reiipiou' ye: ir
reaiiu an ia- mon pohtica o-
even para-muitary in naturt
-\ Jew; wt of al peopK
snouic rememoe- wna: t smal
prouj o lanau: oeueverv cai a<
:: i countn mad' ^uineraDH n^
spiniua disiliusionmen: anc
spiraluu: mfiatioi.
Cult? pan adnerent; oecaus*
tne\ teaa now t< iivt Tne> i*i
DeooK wna. u at anc wna:
oenavio- 1? imoortani ano ofie-1
suosutuu iamin anc suppor.
systen. Cul: leaaer? navt tounc
tna: man' Deooit wil enaun
paintu COBMqmtM
numuiatioi. anc ever aeati
rememoe- jonestowr.' as Jonj.
a- tnei lee ooisterec r>> mena?
structur- anc mwanin;
Enrensteu anc Hanneimai
aaaec V. iea- tna: tat
Amencar Jeisr '.-01110^'..* 1?
no: aoequauei> impanin*: tbt
richness o- ou- iradiuor. At a
consequent* mam Jewisr yuu'.r
an Depinnin*-' u ioo eHwwner*
io- puioanct anc suppur. 'Jfu^i
wner tne> ox ioo eisewuert
Ue> an- oeceivec anc trappec u>
various cult? tna: ofler ar uisum:
soiuttor u tm dilemma* o' hit-
immediate irieriosnii. ui
conditions. au'.fni-r.B'iar
oeciston? anc aouv. al vw
wneimmg sunpit mapi'.a
meaning Tm cull? prumm u 0.1
tor tnt vounf aauit? wna
communn> na? d> anc iarp no:
neipec nur. ne- u itjan 11 oi 11
a cntica. meaninptu wa>
Mrs. Enrensten anc Mrt
Kanaennai conciuo* "W nopt
tna; our meetuu- or ^up 2] wil
neu. maJB tnt communit> awar*
o- tn* prooien o- tin iuiu anc o;
tm oeep unaausiiec neeo; -tia
cui: mvotvemen: represent? V\<
nopt tna: ou* youti wil uecon>
mon sensiuzec u tnt su anc
tna: tm community wil ueiom-
mon- sensitive u tm neeas ir ou-
stuaent?
Home Eye Test Program Offered
"I< neit tine tm om u. H pn-
scnooier? wn< navt- eye disoroer?
- oeion 1: 1? uk iatt tm
Nationa faoaet^ u r*reven:
Bimanes? na? 1 us. issuec a Homt
Eyt les: ^Topran Gukh
Tnt Ciuiot 1? DacKec win sup
pestiom 01 nov communin
proup? car ormp tm Societ1 ?
homt Eyt Tes: io- Weecnoo*ers
u 1 lamiiajs ui tnei- aret
Tnt homt Evt les ii < m-ii
yoursel' wbn lor parents to cneci
tner younpsters 101 dossidh
\1s101 proDiem.' sunuK sel;
containec Kit tnt 1 es: include?
ar ev. cnar anc mst ruction? io-
screen mr visiax. 1: na? Deei
enaorsed n^ eyt sneciaiist? anc
neaitr Droiessionai?
"A homt Eyt Tes- propran
cai maict ; vita contriPutior u
tn- live? o' ou- cnuarei. says
: nvmrc V\ McGumnesb Dres-
oen: o: tm Nationa boae:> U
Freveni Blinanes? Fio-iQt
Affiiiau
fo' mosi cniiarer reacnec bj
tn< Homt Eyt les; 1: than
nrs; \iskw tes: V^'nei cniiarer
tai. tner parent? an aiertec u
tm iac: tna: t proiessiona.
cnecKup is callec tor 11 treaimen:
mdicatec 1: car mant in-
lerenct oetweer pooc eyesurt 1
a iiJetimf proDien.
Tm Homt Eyt lest rTop-ar:
Guiat is avauaoit a: S: i
iron tnt- Nationa Socier> : Pre
veal Bimanes: Floridi -.ffiiiau
Nentum St. Tampt Ph
3360V
M1LH AKY CONtsCRllTION
a ottei uaed a* meant of
preventing >oung Kuasiac Jewt
inm emigraiii* Cat* 11. point
C-K1WPY CE1SHJS
A i-L ->fca? ciC eiectroBice
s.uoer: O'jgw^i wat expebec
Iron l>eningrac I niveraitv on
tat cuty (it appijec lof ar. exit via*
tc larael Ht is now umaiuec
win t iria Iik evading coo
y.'ipuor.
On Lw < l^fc Onwr>
suomitiwc nit document* u>
'.n IB itn* emigrauor. officei On
-.ii. Mimt da> at wat caUed u tnt
new t ofiict anc expelac fnm:
im univeniity for "behavior
unsuiiao* for a boviet student
It lour lour montnt for OVIR u>
senc Or*or> a repiy Your
appUcauor rejectee oecaua*
your mother it considered a
secuT.> ris*. 1c Aprii the wboit
ianin> appiiec anc al received a
refusa. Su montnt later Origor>
apau. appiiec anc or. Dec 10.
1979 ir was apau reiusec
I iivi Grigory hat
rv.eivec nis arai: papert die he
reiusec u accep. men. '-miminf
itia sinit the BUtfionuet oeniec
run t dtaW I 'pn'. tt be
eouca:^ hi OOUU w* nt reaaor.
now Cbej come appi> u him the
-uit of '.'jnacnptior.
On J u 4 ht w a? 'jibec oeion-
t specie, military committee for
ar. bou- nt was roupnn anusec at
t tn&ot Ht rer.eraiec that if
tfaej I insiae-ec nis rooine- s
v art MM anc prounas 10-
rjeryiru: run t visa arm> serva*
must surei> expose nur tt secret*
anc nt rrupn: neve* ot aDit ic
it-Kvt Anywa* nt aaaec
' now cm t lnilM ser\t m tnt
rag"
1 v i.-t u CM ias: tew monin?
<-y nas wniier U 4ttOMMj
-a i.oniar Kuaenac. teliinp
tun nil exnuisinr iron int
univemtv anc asmru: w-betner
ueinp unsuitaoit io- eductuon
maaet hnr suiiaon io- it tray.
Ke hat hac no rep)-
At MM word nt wat cine to
mx tm proaecuior s offict
=* o: evading
conecnptaoT,' ma> m ibsc
1
OLYMPICS
Foitowmp the leac 0:' OVIR
officet a. man) major cam.
aeveral more OVIP. officet hnt
announced tna: tne> wiL sot be
consioennp apphcanont for
erruprauot visas unii snail
weekt after the enc of the
Otyinpic garnet
HOT UM
\'iadimiT Kialb. 1 -efusaaik
5met 19T72. wat arresyjc for 15
deyt for "hooupanisn. Laten
word tt that he has :>: piaced in
b menuL instituiior and a
aw aiimp a aanit> nearmg If
Kisbi. it committee Cht sentence
1? open-enoed Tnt sr.uation is
urpent
Pteaet senc pnnes: MMn to:
Dr Anaio!\ I>eT..sovitxk
Pevenot
Psvehc NeuruHtpiia ri:ispiul
N< B
Frunze 10S
Kiev Ufo SSR
USSR
AJRi-MS TICKFTINC
CRU! ^m\
RESERVATION?
>ESO*A^iZ. KM
P^ANWINC
' HOTE_S-REN-^.-r^A:
NC SERVICE CHARGE
New 60-DUib ai- lart
Cnnore- tiv tree at- tare
iwim restnctiont.
tjf
921K9002
KumunMaoitvi
c
t 0
OFF
&ENJOY!
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q. \KJho picked up the telephone
before Alexander Graham Bell did?
A: Johann Philipp Reis.
.. .

B
: 5
Bel. :
gams i> g
the
' MM
- neper eMai -. :v

nu:r' .
hon. Betiei h 1
"
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT.
Ufl-mt> arw MMctton
shpocha
i> B Ran
BtBh
an- -
ngrv ir u
best W beca
Mti .-omman
a: honx a ^oui rr
sim.-tiav
VfV"
RARE
L
RARE
900TCH


rtday, August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Overwhelmingly Approved
United Jerusalem Voted Israeli Capital
From Wire Service*
JERUSALEM Israel's
larliament overwhelmingly
-proved legislation last week
taring united Jerusalem to be
ie nation's capital, defying
iternational protests that the
w threatens to derail the
ideast peace process.
The bill was adopted 69-15,
ith three abstentions, after
rime Minister Menachem
legin's coalition and the Labor
arty, the largest opposition
oup, combined to defeat two
izen amendments.
ISRAEL has considered
Jerusalem its capital since the
foundation of the Jewish state in
|948, and it annexed the Arab-
opulated eastern sector to the
^jst of Jerusalem after seizing it
Com Jordan in the 1967 Mideast
Var.
No country has recognized
Israel's claim, however, and all
lit 13 nations maintain their
Imbassies in Tel Aviv.
Venezuela, one of those 13,
inounced last week it was
noving its embassy from
Jerusalem to Tel Aviv in order to
emain neutral.
The United States says the
jlure of Jerusalem must be
ecided in Middle East peace
Negotiations, not by Israel alone,
id most nations follow that line.
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat called the vote an act
{against the spirit and workings
it Camp David," but refused to
[av whether Egypt would
Prime Minister Begin
suspend negotiations with Israel
on Palestinian self-rule. Egypt
had said earlier it was con-
sidering such a move.
ISRAEL has rejected any
suggestion that the city not be
under its complete control, and
has gradually tightened its grip
on East Jerusalem by moving
government offices there and
building Jewish housing projects.
With the new law, Israel has
pulled provisions of various
statutes together under one title.
The first clause states that
"complete and united Jerusalem
is the capital of Israel."
The second clause makes the
city the seat of the government,
the parliament (or Knesset), the
president and the Supreme
Court.
The third clause repeats earlier
laws in guaranteeing freedom to
all religious groups with holy
sites in the city and protecting
the holy places "from desecration
or any other offense, and from
anything which is likely to
prejudice the freedom of access."
The final clause gives
Jerusalem economic preference.
THE BILL amounted to a
rejection of a United Nations
General Assembly resolution
adopted July 29 in New York
demanding that Israel withdraw
from the occupied West Bank of
the Jordan River, the Gaza Strip
,ind East Jerusalem, and for
those territories to be used for
establishment of a Palestinian
state.
The measure also snubs an
Arab call that Jerusalem become
the capital of such a Palestinian
state, and rejects Sadat's
suggestion that the city be ruled
alternately by Jewish and Arab
mayors. By guaranteeing
freedom to all religious groups
with holy sites, it acknowledges a
Vatican proposal that such sites
be placed under international
protection.
THE BILL'S author, Geula
Cohen, said that she introduced it
"to disrupt" the Egyptian plan
to deal with Jerusalem as the
final item in the peace talks.
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Flavia of Italian Registry
50% SAVINGS
Sept. 8 to Nov. 3,1980
Book a cabin with 2
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pays only 50%. 3rd
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available at 50% of
minimum rate.

:;S*irsi-:


COSTA CRUISES
It an Italian hstr
One BiscayneTower, Miami, Florida#33131 3 7330
In the Knesset debate, David
Glass, chairman of the Law
Committee, which prepared the
bill, admitted there were "doubts
about the political wisdom" of
the law.
"But when the wheels began to
turn, there was no choice but to
stand behind the bill," said
Glass. "Any hesitation, any
retreat, could have been in-
terpreted as a question mark on
our part. On Jerusalem, there
should be no question."
AFTER its introduction in
May, the measure became known
as "the bill with the least support
and the most votes."
Few Knesset speakers
disputed Jerusalem's status as
Israel's capital. Opponents of the
bill, and some reluctant sup-
porters, centered their objections
on its negative political impact.
The Laborites and Begin's
Likud coalition had reached
agreement in negotiations to
broaden the bill to include
protections for religious shrines
in the ancient city.
Opponents of the legislation
included the Israeli Communist
Party, which suggested the bill
be titled "Law of Annexation of
the Arab Sector of Jerusalem,"
Anwar Sadat
and the tiny left-wing Sheli
Party, led by Uri Avnery.
CAUGHT between in-
ternational protests against the
bill and the fear of appearing
weak on the issue of Israel's rule
of Jerusalem, the Begin
government had taken no official
position on the bill.
Begin is known to have said
that he didn't need the bill but he
could not afford to oppose it.
It was adopted as a "basic
law," meaning that it will become
part of Israel's constitution. The
32-year-old state of Israel does
not have a constitution, but basic
laws are regarded as the cor-
nerstones of a national charter.
Maxwell House* Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of America's favorite pas-
times. It's always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
pi ng day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
K Certificd Kosher
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House? Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't 'shop'
for Maxwell House* They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House* you pour
relaxation. At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
Sf

A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


amd Skojar of Greater Hollyuood
*+>-**
180
Work and Mental Health:
Occupational Stress
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a alert for emeigenciM at
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and pr'y:--:* are
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hosaehold is usually headed by a
woman, who re.s 88 centa to
r-.er> 13 earned by a aaaa Thai
aknauoa almost jnevitabiy leads
-xal health profeaakmab
talk abr^i*. helping people
cope wkh stress As the
namber of peopie entenag
---: "
^jcreast* profes?y.rA^ are
reccapuzmg that stress related to
- aa occupational beakh
haaa- s* *nous and
aaag laBrmg as exposure to
- -*;-.; .---
-.-1- :-_-:ri .-:-
i^ lj- -. > r*. It
H -racuon tane on
Dg acodents or poor
peri ~ anc*. Job stress can
ngfa i-cohoiisc:. drug abuse
ar.tal probiems. k has been
. ad to coronary heart
en bjfh haaaal
lea. a raaoacaas aa
The farat
laajia
P v.-Brd tat
- wress i,
ep a ic e-umme (
e as given to work.*
Pask a: homt
or pursmng
laoroues
Per^ie seed assure, play,
*r*aaacatta. we. edocation. as
we as w*rt to fi-f_ sj their
The thani atop is to talk about
--pataaaasl -:--. %lth
eoleagves aad aopenors. Job
stress a aoc aaacfy the prrduct of
the sadrraaaaTs age. health, oi1-.
to hand* the job:
jab atractvre work at-
aad mechanisms for
support feedback play t
per*. curuilini
a profess ic-al social
worker or leaiail.i can be' in-
vaaaabae as aoruat out stress
retated aaaes and providing
BBppo-l for reeded changes
If yxaj feet aay of the above
appbes U> too. why not give
sh Faauly Service of
Broward rnaaas a call and let us
Mi
Jewish Faaawy Sen ice
of Brosiaxd Coc.'
O North State Road 7
Fort I^aderdate. Florida 33319
or
Jewish FaaaaSr Service of
- _--.-.
;*Harrawa Street
Holhwood- Florida 33020
iniiiiiiilaffi
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mn was rrt tacnr ii "aww-t ha nnae. tr*
a aa^anuBTi a ia Mobxb Scaajas
TAPfS
CARTOKS
HASGCRS
pcxrrrwYLEf
BUSINESS FOf
TAGS-LABEL
BAGS BOXE!
\m Wi-ES
7766272
Rowano
a>It a
aCKAGlNC
FOB' LAWOfwOMl
BEFORE YOU SELL YOUR
DIAMONDS
AND
PRECIOUS JEWELS
YOU REALLY SHOULD SEE
________BALOGH.
mantart casa
aAU>&H aaaa .^ r^fea*.- .-.%.-
8aaaajoaaal
^.. *rr. f .-.-- feaj aaa traat
:>e* -
iTora. Satva
SB*

okVlr-at "lAiaviaw ^aa.i
-^ 81


Friday. August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian arid Shofar of Greater Hollywood
m t
Family 'Adopted' by Hadassah 3$SAM!$ XAP-STS?!
"* ** ______________________SL_ ...... ?v. t^=k Lmtinn of South Division, said "We were
Dr. Grigory Rozenstein of
Moscow, USSR. his w^e nd two
I sons have been "adopted" by the
Florida Mid-Coast Region of
Hadassah which means that the
region's 16,000 members will be
responsible for a letter-writing
campaign urging that exit visas
be granted this family to leave
Russia for Israel.
In addition to letters of
support and sympathy to the
[family, letters will also be ad-
I dressed to the Soviet Ambas-
Isador Oleg Troyanovsky at the
United Nations, Ambassador
Anatoly Dobrynin in Washing-
lion, also to Soviet Premier
Leonid Brezhnev, as well as to
U.S. Senators Lawton Chiles and
Richard Stone, and to Secretary
of State Edmund Muskie.
In a joint statement issued by
Esther Cannon of Pompano
Tleach, president of the region,
and Fanny Katz of Hallandale.
Iladassah's Soviet Jewry chair-
man for the region, it was stated
lhat "Dr. Rozenstein, who has
done considerable research on the
structure of the human brain,
was fired from his position at the
Medical Research Institute in
1972 when he first applied for the
exit visa, and has been
threatened with continuous
Card Party Set
The Hillcrest B'nai B'rith
Women's Auxiliary is sponsoring
a card party and luncheon at the
Hillcrest Playdium in Hollywood,
Monday, Aug. 18, at noon.
Proceeds will be used to benefit
the Children's Home in Israel.
(luests are invited. For reser-
vations, call Kit Sheldon in the
morning.
Klein on TV
Dr. Carl Klein, rabbi of the
Hallandale Jewish Center, will
host the "Still Small Voice"
program on Aug. 17 at 8:30 a.m.
This program is sponsored by the
Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, in conjunction
with Channel 7. Joining Rabbi
Klein will be Rabbi Sam Jaffeeof
Temple Beth El of Hollywood
and Rabbi Sol Landau of Beth
David Congregation, Coral
Gables,
CAJE Completes
\Shavuoth Manual
Mrs. Lillian Ross, head of the
Community Relations Depart-
ment of the Educational
Resource Center of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
has just announced the
publication of a new manual on
[the teaching of the Holiday of
Shavuoth, entitled Whither Thou
lioeat.
The manual contains over 275
pages of lesson plans,
background information, songs,
arts and crafts projects, short
stories, holiday lore, and many
more topics of interest on the
holiday of Shavuoth.
This publication is one of many
jthat have been put out by the
CAJE to he'p enhance teacher
preparedness in the classroom.
For more information about
this publication, as well as other
books published by CAJE,
contact Marilyn Bloom.
Dr. Rozenstein
refusals because the Russian
officials claim Dr. Rozenstein
saw' a classified document 14
years ago. He asserts he does not
even remember seeing such a
document and even if he had, how
secret and important could this
document be after so many
years."
Continuing in their statement,
Mrs. Cannon and Mrs. Katz
deplored the harassments the
Rozensteins suffer at the hands
of the KGB and their neighbors.
Early replies from Sen. Chiles
to Fanny Katz reveal that he is
contacting Leonid Brezhnev per-
sonally and a response is eagerly
awaited. From Rep. William Leh-
man, it was learned that he too
has written to both Brezhnev and
Amb. Dobrynin outlining the
entire story of the family's hor-
rendous existence.
Mrs. Cannon, representing
16,000 area Hadassah members,
has appealed to President Jimmy
Carter, who has stressed human
rights, to render assistance to
this desperate family.
It is expected that a first
report of this entire effort on the
part of the Hadassah Region will
be made at the first fall meeting
of the Region Board, to be held
on Sept. 3.
The Young Adults Division of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward recently held its
inaugural event at the home of
Dr. Andrew Fleischer. The event
drew more than 200 people from
the South Broward area.
"Many young Jews in our
area are looking for ways to
express their Jewishness and to
meet other people of similar
interests. Through a series of
educational, cultural and social
events, we hope to provide this
opportunity," commented Dr.
Robert J. Lev, chairman.
Anyone interested in
discussing the YAD's first
educational event is invited to
attend the meeting on Wed-
nesday, Aug. 27, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Federation.
Holli Harwin; one of the
organizers ot the Young Adults
Division, said "We were ab-
solutely thrilled at the response
to our first event. We hope that
interest and attendance con-
tinues to grow."
Adrienne Kahn, another YAD
organizer, added that the first
social event was a hugh success.
"I only hope that this continues
and that many of the people
become more interested in
Federation and ultimately make
a commtment to the Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund campaign," she
added.
Dr. Sheier, JFSB director of
planning, has staff responsibility
for the Young Adults Division.
For additional information, call
Dr. Lev, Ms. Harwin. or Dr.
Sheier.
Raab Announces Day School Institute
Rabbi Menachem Raab,
director of the Day School De-
partment of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, has just
announced plans for the fifth
annual Day School Teachers
Institute to be held on Thursday,
Aug. 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at the Rabbi Alexander S.
Gross Hebrew Academy of
Greater Miami, Miami Beach.
The Institute is co-sponsored
by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the Day School
Principals and Administrators
Council (PAC).
The theme for the Institute is
"Education for the 80's."
Included in the activities for the
day will be workshops and
seminars on various educational
and administrative subjects.
Some of the topics usually
covered are: Teacher-Child Com-
munication, Methodology in
various disciplines, Problems of
Learning Disabled, Early Child-
hood Education, and other
relevant subjects. The workshops
are geared to teachers both in the
Judaic and the General Studies
Departments as well as the prin-
cipals and administrators.
For more information, contact
the Day School Department.
Learn
Interior
Decorating
Willsey institute
(305)947-4580
Free Brochure
LIGHTS: I mj. -W. 0.8 ng. mcoun., UGH! WOY11 "m". 0.9 mQ.nienuni. W oV*nc "I0tC '79


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 8.1980
General Media Silent on GOP Pro-Israel Plank
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Although Arab-
Israeli affairs was high-
lighted in the news and in
commentaries during the
winter and through the
spring, usually marked by
denunciations of Israel, the
general media was silent on
the strong pro-Israel plank
in the Republican Party
platform that was adopted
at its convention in De-
troit. Neither was attention
given to the pro-Israeli
statements by Presidential
candidate Ronald Reagan
in his first news conference
as nominee and in his
acceptance speech at the
GOP convention.
At the GOP conclave, literally
thousands of reporters from
around the world hung on every
nuance, but they did virtually no
reporting that the Republicans
warned the Arabs against re-
imposing an oil embargo and
asserted opposition to the Arab
boycott of American companies
doing business with Israel
strong medicine for the oil-pro-
ducing Arab nations despite their
big contracts with American oil
companies and construction
firms.
THE MEDIA also was
strangely quiet about the in-
fighting between the adherents of
President Carter and Sen.
Edward Kennedy ID., Mass.)
when the Democratic Party's
platform was being written in
Washington a month earlier.
That fight was over whether the
platform should say, as it did in
1976, that the U.S. Embassy
should be moved from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem.
The Carterites wanted to
qualify that plank, the Kennedy-
it es balked; and in the end the
qualification was moved to
another place in the plank. While
other Carter-Kennedy squabbles
were extensively reported at the
platform writing, the difference
on support for Israel was vir-
tually ignored.
A general attitude seemed to
be that platforms are meaning-
less because Presidential can-
didates don't feel bound by them.
Some reporters felt support for
Israel in platforms was the usual
stance for electioneering pur-
poses. "No news in that," one
said. "Wait until next winter,"
another remarked. "It will be
news if the President, new or old,
backs up the platform." But the
major question remains: If the
public is told when Israel is
attacked should it not be in-
formed when Israel is defended?
THE 93 JEWISH delegates
among the 1,994 delegates at the
Republican convention were
divided like the others over Vice
Presidential candidates. For
example, in the Connecticut
delegation, Robert Katz, of
Bridgeport, favored New York
Representative Jack Kemp, while
George Lewson of Danbury,
backed George Bush. A sig-
nificant fact about the size of the
Jewish number of delegates is
that it formed about 4.5 percent
of the total, about double
America's Jewish population.
The right and liberal wings of
the Republican leadership were
both represented at the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee's
reception for Jewish delegates
and others at the Detroit Plaza
Hotel. Of the approximately 350
that attended there were at least
a dozen Senators and a score of
Representatives. The chief at-
traction included Elizabeth
Taylor, accompanied by her
husband, Virginia Senator John
Warner, and Mrs. Strom Thur-
mond, wife of the conservative
South Carolina Senator who
could not attend.
Another guest was Philadel-
phia's Arlen Spector, who may
make it this time to the U.S.
Senate. In his previous state-
wide Pennsylvania races he lost
in 1978 for Governor to incum-
bent Richard Thorburgh, and in
1976 for Senator to John Heinz.
This time, pollsters say, Spec-
tor's chances against former
Pittsburgh Mayor Peter
Flaherty, a Democrat, are ex-
cellent. They are campaigning for
the seat being vacated by Repub-
lican Richard Schweiker, a friend
of Israel. David Garth, a master
at political strategy, is helping
Spector's campaign.
Spector, a district attorney in
Philadelphia for eight years and a
counsel for the Warren Commis-
sion that probed President Ken-
nedy's assassination, will be
Pennsylvania's first Jewish
Senator if he wins. He is on the
board of Orthodox Mikvah Israel
Synagogue in Philadelphia's
Independence Square and of the
American Museum of Jewish
History. His wife, Joan, an
activist for Jewish causes, is a
member of Philadelphia's City
Council.
FRED GOTTFURCHT, a Los
Angeles investment banker who
lAl
fcFVITT \ Ft
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
HOLLYWOOD '9?' P> -*Me Boat) 92' '200
NORTH MIAMI 133(1 A Din* Mwy 9*96315
WES' PALM BEACm Mi' Oneecnooe* Bivfl 689-8700
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
^Temple 3etk
tttemoeial
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
for information call: 9204225 or writes
TEMPLE BETHEL" /SffitSH
1351 S. 14th AVE.-HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
fleas* send ma literature on tha above.
NAME.- -_-____--__-_-__-______-__________
ADDRESS:
PHONE:
is a founder of the National
Coalition for Reagan and has
been backing Reagan since 1966,
is the father-in-law of Rabbi
Richard Hertz of Detroit's oldest
congregation, Temple Beth El.
Max Fisher, "Mr. Republican,"
is a member of it. Gottfurcht was
a member of the California
delegation at the GOP con-
vention.
During the GOP convention,
"Mr. Republican" was not
Governor William Milliken or
Henry Ford II or even Reagan.
Since the Republicans have never
before held their national con-
clave in Detroit, and since
Reagan was their unquestioned
leader, one suspected that the top
honor would go to one of three
mentioned. But no, indeed.
The Monthly Detroit, a slick
200-page magazine selling for
SI .50 a copy, devoted the cover of
its July issue to "Max Fisher
Power Broker." It showed him
smiling, spectacled, thinning
gray hair and wearing a white
shirt, blue tie and white handker-
chief in the breast pocket of his
dark suit befitting the con-
servative style of the globally
known benefactor who achieved
riches in gas and oil in a typical
"made in America" story that
Detroit's Junior Leaguers, like
Bev Curtis of Detroit's plush
Grosse Point suburb, proudly
told visitors, including the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency's
reporter.
INSIDE, under a two-page
spread entitled "The Power
Broker," by Kirk Cheyfits, the
magazine reported in big type
beneath another head photo of
Fisher backgrounded by the
American flag: "Max Fisher was
a poor kid from Ohio. Now his
wealth is in nine figures. He
advises Presidents and Prime
Ministers, directs corporations.
raises millions for charities and
politicians. He's a member of the
permanent government."
The magazine describes "the
permanent government" as "that
elite band of wealthy men and
academics whose steady in-
fluence on national affairs
continues virtually undisturbed
by the temporary changes in
leadership occasioned by elec-
tions or shifts in political power.
In Fisher's case, Detroit's
mayors, Michigan's governors
and America's Presidents come
and go but Max Fisher remains a
constant force in the affairs of the
city, the state, the nation and, to
some extent, the planet."
HOW IMPORTANT is Fisher
to the Republicans? Stephen
Bull, President Nixon's Appoint-
ments Secretary, used to watch
the power brokers come and go
through the Oval Office. "Of
course, I know Mr. Fisher," Bull
said. "And it's always Mister
Fisher. I think he is probably the
most prominent Republican in
the country."
Mel Larsen, Michigan's
Republican Party chairman,
speaking of Fisher's role in the
past 18 years, said: "We've been
very fortunate to have him in-
volved in the Republican Party
because if you look at the most
prominent, influential individuals
across this country. Max Fisher
has to be right in the top."
Incidentally, and to some
incomprehensibly, titles on the
Detroit magazine's cover also
had a guideline to "Bishop Trifa:
Prelate or Persecutor?" He is
covered in eight pages in which
the "lonely, persistent effort" by
a now 83-year-old New York
Jewish dentist, Charles Kremer,
is basically credited for the
federal case to strip U.S. citizen-
ship from Trifa. who has been
accused as having been a key
leader of the viciously anti-
Semitic Rumanian Iron Guard
that massacred hundreds of Jews
in Rumania during World War
II. Ironically, the magazine
prominently noted that Richard
Nixon, when Vice President,
invited Trifa to deliver the
opening prayer to the U.S.
SenateMayll.1955.
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Lay. August 8.1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Arabs Changing French Economic Scene
Champs Elusees Takes on the Flavor of a Middle East Bazaar
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
There are probably more
Arabs living in France
today than in all of Israel,
deluding the occupied
erritories. One-and-a-half
Jiillion are registered as
Lermanent residents in
france, and an additional
lillion are believed to be
iving in France either as
Jlegal immigrants or under
the guise of temporary
Visitors.
During the last 10 years,
France's Arab community with
fcs 43 mosques, 22 newspapers,
lozens of schools, hospitals and
|>snks has become a vital
onomic force and an important
olitical factor. French
oliticians and businessmen take
Into account its political
Aspirations and its economic
nte rests.
, ONE ROLLS ROYCE out of
bvery two registered in France
>elongs to a Middle Eastern
\rab visitor, and one industrial
worker out of every 20 is a North
African immigrant. Lebanese
-.efugees float some of France's
[major banking loans, others own
large blocs of shares in major
lindustri .1 enterprises.
Many of these relative
ewcomers now represent large
rench corporations in Saudi
rabia and the Persian Gulf
tates handling huge sums and
ndirectly controlling a heavy
hare of France's exports to the
rab world. Since January, 1977,
slightly over three years, 29
ew Arab-owned banks have
petted in France to handle the
uge amount of cash passing
hrough the country.
All along the Champs Elysees,
Paris' main avenue, Lebanese
restaurants have opened to cater
this new clientele. The former
Regine's," once the center of the
I Paris jet set society, has passed
into new hands and renamed
The Beirut." Lebanese Tyre
wine is flown in by special plane
and Arab bakeries throughout
I'aris now prepare fresh pita like
in the suks of Cairo or Damascus.
ONE OF Paris' landmarks, the
I world famous Ritz Hotel, has
been bought by an Egyptian
I resident; the Cafe de la Paix,
where generations of tourists
traditionally sat, is owned by a
Kuwaiti company. The elegant
Prince de Galles Hotel, where
many senior Israeli government
and Jewish Agency officials stay,
' is now owned by an Egyptian. On
the hotel's seventh floor,
l^ebanese leader Raymond Edde
has his private apartment and a
22-room office suite which many
ADNAN KHASHOGGI: power broker
describe as a Lebanese govern-
ment in exile. i
France's naval pride, the
"France," the world's largest
liner, was originally bought by
Arab businessman Akram Ojjeh.
Another Saudi entrepreneur,
Ghaith Pharaon, is the owner of a
XV Century castle, the Chateau
de Montfort, which he uses as an
occasional weekend home.
France's Arab population is
basically divided into two
communities: the North Africans
who started off as poor, unskilled
workers; and the Middle Eastern
investors attracted not only by
the pleasant West European
living standards but also by their
desire to closely control their
business interests and financial
investments.
THE MASSIVE North
African immigration to France
started at the end of the Algerian
war. Most of the arrivals at the
time, in 1961, were Algerians who
had collaborated with the French
Administration and feared
possible reprisals. France, at the
start of a large-scale economic
expansion, was keen for cheap,
undemanding and unskilled
labor.
The North African influx
continued over the years. Today,
according to official statistics,
there are close to one million
Algerians in France, half a
million Moroccans and a quarter
of a million Tunisians. They still
remain the core of the
country's low paid labor
force the men who sweep the
streets, build the roads, and work
at menial tasks in the Renault
and Peugeot automobile plants.
By their very penetration into
French economic life, the North
Africans have become an im-
portant factor both in the con-
sumer and in the distribution
process. "Should the North
African merchants or consumers
decide to boycott a certain
product, its producers would be
out of business within less than a
fortnight," a member of the Paris
Chamber of Commerce admitted
recently.
THE NORTH African
population is politically highly
motivated and well organized
within a multitude of
associations and unions where
political indoctrination is the
rule. In most Algerian cultural
centers there are regular weekly
lectures on such delicate subjects
as Jerusalem, the Palestinians
and the "Israeli aggression
against our Arab brothers."
For the time being, most of
this population is still too busy to
assimilate; it is still fighting too
hard for basic economic well-
being to find time for political
involvement in France. In less
than a generation, however,
many of them will have opted for
French nationality, will vote, will
bring pressure to bear and will
openly make their voices and
political views heard.
Their natural leaders are
already on the spot. Two
generations of Arab-born
lawyers, doctors and intellectuals
who have studied in France and
have remained are generally
opting for French citizenship.
THEIR ECONOMIC
framework is also being rapidly
established. Over 20 Arab-owned
banks have opened in the Paris
region alone since January 1977.
Among them are such giants as
the Union of Arab and French
Hanks with a turnover of over 13
billion Francs in 1977; the Arab
Investment Bank with a turnover
of five billion Francs; the Franco-
Arab Investment Bank with a
four billion Francs turnover; and
the Arab Intercontinental Bank,
with a turnover of three-and-a-
half billion Francs in 1977.
The arrival in France in 1977 of
some 20,000 Lebanese refugees
gave a new impetus to the Arab
business community. Most of
these refugees came with money,
with considerable business ex-
perience and with a practical
knowhow of Western economic
practices.
They took over hundreds of
business companies and now
work as French representatives
in the Persian Gulf states and
Saudi Arabia and operate smaller
but highly active banks in Paris,
I. ich ten stein and Geneva.
FRENCH REAL estate agents
say that half of the apartments
they sell in the 10.000-20,000
Francs per square meter range
are bought by Arabs and mainly
Lebanese refugees. These
refugees also reportedly now own
10 percent of the Dumez in-
dustrial empire, 44 percent of
various airline companies and 39
percent of the Dunkerque
chemical concern.
Many of them have joined
older Arab established firms or
businessmen such as the groups
led by Akram Ojjeh, a Syrian-
born multi-billionaire; Adnan
Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian
business wizard; Ghaith
Pharaon, a 38-year-old Saudi
Arabian who is an electronic
engineer and a graduate of
Harvard; and the new owner of
the Intra-Investment Arab Bank
and the First Arab Corporation
(FAC), which several years ago
tried to buy 25 percent of the
Lockheed Corporation (a bid
turned down by the Washington
Administration) and is now
eyeing the Dassault Works.
Tamraz's FAC is also openly
bidding for half a dozen giant
refineries in Western Europe.
Canada and Puerto Rico.
This Arab strength is so ob-
vious that Khashoggi declared
recently in Paris: "Whether you
like it or not, we are henceforth
bound together."
The Arab economic
penetration in France is less
spectacular than in Britain,
where they concentrate on
prestige real estate, and more in
depth where Arab money flows
into industrial projects and long-
range economic enterprises.
Ojjeh recently explained to the
French weekly, Le Point:
"French enterprises need money
and we need technology and
growth companies. We are bound
to link our destinies together."
THE PERMANENCY of the
Arab implantation in France is
symbolized by the new Arab
press. Among the 30-plus Arab
publications are such renowned
newspapers and periodicals as An
Nahar; Al Mstakhal. with a self-
proclaimed regular circulation of
90.000; Al Watan Al Arabi; Al
Hawadess"; Al Riyad, Al
Iktissad we Almal Al Arabi. and
l)ar Assayad, and at least 30 or
40 other lesser known
publications.
In chic Paris areas, or on the
Cote d-Azur, an affluent Arab
resident leaves his elegant eight
or nine-room apartment, drives
his Bentley or Lincoln Con-
tinental car to his office when he
does not yet have a chaufeur and
bodyguard, has lunch at a
Lebanese restaurant, goes out ir
the evening to an Arab casinc
and meets friends over drinks
, later at one of the chic clubs.
On the way, he stops at a
newspaper kiosk to pick up some
Arab dailies or weeklies
published in France.
AT THE same time, a poor
Arab worker, generally from
North Africa, sweeps the streets
or weighs fruits and vegetables in
a small dingy shop, but
i nonetheless feels part of the same
"Moslem and Arab community"
in spite of his one-room flat with
practically no heating and just
one tap of running water.
Both worlds, the multi-
billionaires and the poor, are and
feel part of the same family and
Arab community. Many French
Jews feel and fear that in less
than a generation from now
France's Arabs will become a
main force in French political and
economic life.
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p.ikI Fin By Fred Lippman Campaign Fund Victoria Semora, Treasurer


Page M
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, August 8, I960
The Jewish Federation of South Broward recently held a parlor
meetinK at the home of Jake and Bea Mogilowitz in order to explain
the benefits to Hillcrest residents of participating on the Oct. 16-26
Community Mission. Seated from left are Bea Mogilowitz, Naomi
Needier and Martha Werbach. Standing from left are Jake
Mogilowitz, Michael and Lynn Sossin, Tony Needier and Sam
Werbach.
Seated from left are Esther Kahn, Sonia Podell and Edith Rodman.
Standing from left are Ginny and George Hyde, Sigmund Rodman,
Trudy and Al Ginsberg.
Few Spaces Left on Mission Trip
Continued from Page 1
plained the Finches.
"The biggest thrill when you
arrive in Israel is the feeling that
you are part of the majority. The
people are Jewish, the signs are
Jewish, the streets are Jewish.
You are given special insight into
Israel, the Finches added.
"The mission gives you
comprehensive exposure to the
current political, economical and
social problems of Israel. You will
have the kind of experience you
could never get as a tourist- It is
truly an enlighting experience."
The cost of this year's mission
is $999 per person, including
meals. Minimum gift to the
Federation's 1981 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign is $1,500 for head
of household plus a $500 woman's
gift to the Women's Division.
Individual travelers will be
expected to make a $1,500
minimum commitment.
For reservations and in-
formation, contact the Jewish
federation of South Broward
Missions Desk.
Council of Adult
Congregations to Meet
The special concerns of adult
congregations will be the main
focus of attention at the Council
of Adult Congregations meeting
at Tamarac Jewish Center on
Monday, Aug. 11.
The Southeast Region of the
United Synagogue of America
has called this Council into
session to bring together in-
dividuals and congregations that
are specifically interested in
planning for the adult
population.
Rabbi Benjamin Z. Kreitman.
executive vice president of the
United Synagogue of America,
will be coming from New York to
take an active part in helping set
the direction for this planning
meeting.
Beginning at 11:30 and
continuing through lunch, this
council meeting will begin to
develop an agenda of concern, so
that others will be aware of the
opportunities that await them as
part of the organized Jewish
community, said Rabbi Kreit-
man.
Recognizing that there are
many people who are searching
for a renewed commitment to
Judaism, this Council will honor
congregations which have begun
to meet the needs of the older
population, he said.
Aventura Jewish Center,
North Miami Beach; Temple
Beth Israel, Deerfield Beach, and
Temple Emeth, Delray Beach,
have recently affiliated with the
United Synagogue as adult
congregations.
Henry Sender of Nashville,
Tenn., regional president who has
been appointed by the United
Synagogue to be the national
chairman of the Commission on
Adult Congregations, will be
attending this meeting. Rabbi
Seymour Friedman, spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai, Holly-
wood, has accepted the special
appointment as chairman of the
Council of Adult Congregations.
A steering committee of
leaders of concerned con-
gregations will be meeting to
develop the plans and agenda of
future get-togethers.
In order to register for the
Aug. 11 meeting, contact Rabbi
David B. Saltzman, executive
director of the Southeast Region,
United Synagogue, at 1110 NE
163rd St., Suite 216, North
Miami Beach.
Cite Halacha
?-~H
Orthodox Worry over Draft Law
NEW YORK (JTA)
A coalition of Orthodox
Jewish groups has ex-
pressed concern over a
federal court decision
declaring the draft
registration law un-
constitutional because it
was limited to men.
Although a temporary stay
of the decision was issued
by Supreme Court
Associate Justice William
Brennan, the full court will
consider the question in its
upcoming term, which
begins in October.
Meanwhile, registration for
men officially ended
According to Rabbi Herman
Neuberger, coordinator of the
Orthodox Jewish Coalitoin on
Registration of Women for the
Selective Service System, rulings
of halachic authorities state that
Jewish reliirious law prohibit*
Jewish girls from participating in
the Selective Service System,
whether in military or alternative
service.
SHOULD THE lower court
ruling be upheld by the Supreme
Court, and if registration is then
to be reactivated, Congress will
have to pass a new registration
law providing for the registration
of women as well as men, he
noted. Since the current draft law
provides for random selection for
induction from the pool of regis-
trants not exempted or deferred,
the problems are obvious and
ominous, Neuberger said.
The Coalition consists of
Agudath Israel of America,
Central Congress of Orthodox
Rabbis, National Council of
Young Israel, National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA), National
Society for Hebrew Day Schools
(Torah Umesorah), Rabbinical
Alliance of America, Rabbinical
Council of America, Union of
Orthodox Jewish Congregations
of America, Union of Orthodox
Rabbis of the United States and
Canada, United Lubavitch
Organization and United Satmar
_,Community.
Neuberger stressed that while
the position of the Coalition is
based on religion, it is in accord
with the conclusions of a report of
the Subcommittee on Manpower
and Personnel of the U.S. House
of Representatives.
THAT REPORT, prepared in
connection with the new regis-
tration law, concluded that the
judgment of military leaders and
Congress was that a men-only
system best serves national
security.
Pointing to studies that show
that women volunteer in suf-
ficient numbers to fill the
positions open to them, the
report stated it was thus not
necessary to draft women. The
report said that since a draft
would be based on a random
selection from the pool of
registrants, in time of national
emergency when men would be
needed quickly for combat, an
equal number of men and women
would have to be called up.
Moreover, sexually integrated
units would create great dif-
ficulty for military planners with
respect to combat deployment,
according to the report.
THE REPORT also referred to
the impact registering and draft-
ing women would have on the
family unit and maintained that a
decision on this question is
properly within the purview of
Congress.
Dennis Rapps, executive
director of COLPA, who is
serving as an attorney for the
Coalition, said that the Coalition
would continue to work
politically to avoid the regis-
tration of women. He said that
the Coalition would also file a
friend-of-the-court brief with the
Supreme Court when it considers
the issue in the fall.
#,
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A


Lugust8, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

lack Jewish Boxer
Gained in Bronx, He Won't Perform to Please Miami
[HASKELL COHEN
I writing this interview on
of Tisha B'av. My
lion is a Black Jewish
[by the name of Saoul
who is the reigning super
|ight champion of the
/e have just concluded a
on pertaining to the
fion of both temples and
J who attended cheder, is
' familiar with the various
which befell the Jewish
Ion Tisha B'av. He's a
young man, and asked me
liim what happened to the
people on this particular
plained to him that there
Dme eight or nine major
es which, for reasons
jn, have occurred on this
fthe Jewish calendar. He's
rested listener and is very
[concerned over the fact
the Jewish people have
so much throughout the
les.
|HY," he asked, "have the
lied chosen people had so
trouble and tragedy
Ighout history?" Of course,
Answers 1 gave him were
ers he received from a
ly of rabbis he has talked
lover the years. Despite the
bus answers which we have
J taught by tradition, Mamby
It satisfied and just can't get
lough his head as to why the
in people have been chosen
ffer.
just can't believe that the
blr whom the Almighty
kted as his very own should
er so much at the hands of
Father in heaven," Mamby
|ore brilliant theologians than
elf have tussled with this
problem over the years so that
anything I may have told
Mamby isn't new. At the con-
clusion of our lengthy interview I
felt that Mamby still wasn't
reconciled to the fact that the
chosen people could endure so
much and still survive as an
entity.
Young Mamby he's 32 years
old has become the super light-
weight of the world rather late in
his boxing career. Although he is
strong and feels like a kid of 19,
for a fighter, 32 is considered
passe. Nevertheless, Mamby in
his recent defense of his title,
fighting on the under card to the
Holmes-LeDoux heavyweight
championship held in Min-
neapolis, wallopped the daylights
out of his opponent. At this
writing he has a record of 29
wins, 12 losses and five draws.
MAMBY HAS been fighting
16 years, two as an amateur and
the other 14 in the pro ranks. He
said that he'll continue to pursue
his career so long as "God
permits me." He is a firm believer
in the Almighty and feels that his
destiny is wrapped up in what the
man upstairs wants him to do.
Religious
Directory
A veteran of the Vietnam War,
where he served one year and six
days, he can give you the exact
minutes and seconds, Mamby is a
believer in fate. I pointed out to
him that a heavyweight
champion was slated to fight an
exhibition match in Israel in the
not too distant past, and he
cancelled out at the last minute
because of a flare-up <*Wthe
Lebanese border. Mamby said:
"I can see where he would be
frightened off by that sort of
thing, but after surviving
Vietname for over a year, I'm
willing and ready to go to Israel
to defend my title. Just get me a
nice Jewish competitor over
there, or bring in a fighter who is
ranked highly in my weight, and
I 11 be glad to perform my duties
in the ring before my co-
religionists."
The young fighter explained
that he is a Jew by tt^CSftion.
First my mother converted, and
then my father converted, and
subsequently I was brought into
the faith. I attended" Hebrew
school in The Bronx, on Boston
Road. All my classmates were
Black, and we were taught by a.n
Flder who was attached to the
late Rabbi Matthew's synagogue.
I learned how to read Hebrew,
and I started the studying of the
Bible in Hebrew," the pugilist
explained.
HE ATTENDED, as a youth,
the synagogue every Sabbath
and was brought up in, what he
terms, a kosher home. To this
very day, he does not mix meat
and dairy food at any given meal.
He remembers very well that his
mother observed this tradition
very cautiously, and he 3till
maintains the belief, to an extent,
in kashruth. He does not eat any
pig products or shell fish.
"I don't attend services with
any regularity, mainly because
I'm not located near a synagogue
where I live uptown," Mamby
explained. "I once walked quite a
distance to attend High Holy
Day services, but 1 was turned
off by the fact that the gentleman
at the door wanted me to pay to
enter.
"I felt and feel now that people
should be free to attend any
denomination without having to
pay to enter. If I want to make a
contribution to a synagogue
and or a chuch. I would do it out
of faith and desire, not out of
pressure."
I TRIED to explain to Mamby
that since attendances at
synagogue are heavy only on the
High Holidays, the temples have
to adhere to the practice of
charging for tickets to the ser-
vices. Mamby just wouldn't buy
this type of thinking.
Why did Mamby's success
come along so late in his career?
He believes that had he per-
mitted himself to be exploited as
a Jewish fighter he might have
made it much sooner. He
definitely refused to be shown off
as a Jewish pugilist, particularly
in Miami where there is a
plethora of Jewish boxing fans. It
was suggested that he wear chai
necklaces and a Magen David on
his trunks, and he refused to do
so.
Consequently, it is his belief
that he was held back by his
refusal to exploit his Judaism,
something several fighters, white
and Black, have done, albeit they
are not anywhere near the Jewish
individual that our current super
lightweight champion is. He's a
pleasure and a delight to talk to,
and it is my fervent hope that he
shall continue to reign for several
years.
NORTH BROWARD
|MPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak-
jjnd Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
. Neu.
iMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Jnve. Reform (441
kMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
P7th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
.EMPLE ISRAEL. 4920 SW 35th St.
Iconservative. Rabbi Pa'jl Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
' TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
Reform. Rabbi BennetGreenspon.
EMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
|Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
I Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
lLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
1 I ion 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
J. Harr. (64)
(ECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
, GOGUE.7473NW4thSt. (69)
HALLANDALE
VLLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
LCarl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
|ziger. 12)
NORTHMIAMI BEACH
INAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
| Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
lEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. '47B)
Temple beth el. 1351 s. uth Avt.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jafft.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
EMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
EMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
nan, Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naftaly A. Linkovsky (65)
JMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021 Liberal
iReform. Rabbi Robert P Frazin.
ICantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
fOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer. (52)


Page 16
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The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
^y-Augu^.tJ
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OFFER GOOD THRU AUGUST 20 IfM
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SALAD Si/* titM RIPI
Tomatoes 6 Si 49*
PK TOUR OWN US 1 All PUIPOSI
Yellow Onions .. 21*
CARD!N PRISM CRISP RIO
Radishes 2 t 29*
CRISPT IRISH CA.IICMfNlA
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PICK TOul OWN JIWIL GtilN
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FILES


August 8,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
rabs Changing French Economic Scene
Champs Elusees Takes on the Flavor of a Middle East Bazaar
P EDWIN EYTAN
IRIS (JTA) -
are probably more
living in France
than in all of Israel,
ling the occupied
jries. One-and-a-half
\n are registered as
anent residents in
le, and an additional
In are believed to be
in France either as
fl immigrants or under
[guise of temporary
brs.
Hng the last 10 years,
e's Arab community with
mosques, 22 newspapers.
of schools, hospitals and
has become a vital
nic force and an important
j;al factor. French
lians and businessmen take
account its political
It ions and its economic
it*.
-. ROLLS ROYCE out of
two registered in France
n to a Middle Eastern
. visitor, and one industrial
pr out of every 20 is a North
n immigrant. Lebanese
es float some of France's
banking loans, others own
blocs of shares in major
kri .1 enterprises.
kny of these relative
bmers now represent large
|h corporations in Saudi
and the Persian Gulf
handling huge sums and
ctly controlling a heavy
of France's exports to the
[world. Since January, 1977,
|ghtly over three years, 29
Arab-owned banks have
bd in France to handle the
amount of cash passing
^gh the country.
along the Champs Elysees,
k' main avenue, Lebanese
lurants have opened to cater
lis new clientele. The former
line's," once the center of the
jet set society, has passed
new hands and renamed
Beirut." Lebanese Tyre
is flown in by special plane
Arab bakeries throughout
now prepare fresh pita like
I suks of Cairo or Damascus.
IE OF Paris' landmarks, the
famous Ritz Hotel, has
bought by an Egyptian
[lent; the Cafe de la Paix,
re generations of tourists
litionally sat, is owned by a
pvaiti company. The elegant
Ice de Galles Hotel, where
By senior Israeli government
I Jewish Agency officials stay,
ow owned by an Egyptian. On
hotel's seventh floor,
panese leader Raymond Edde
his private apartment and a
3 m office suite which many
ADNAN KHASHOGGI: power broker
describe as a Lebanese govern-
ment in exile.
France's naval pride, the
"France," the world's largest
liner, was originally bought by
Arab businessman Akram Ojjeh.
Another Saudi entrepreneur,
Ghaith Pharaon, is the owner of a
XV Century castle, the Chateau
de Montfort, which he uses as an
occasional weekend home.
France's Arab population is
basically divided into two
communities: the North Africans
who started off as poor, unskilled
workers; and the Middle Eastern
investors attracted not only by
the pleasant West European
living standards but also by their
desire to closely control their
business interests and financial
investments.
THE MASSIVE North
African immigration to France
started at the end of the Algerian
war. Most of the arrivals at the
time, in 1961, were Algerians who
had collaborated with the French
Administration and feared
possible reprisals. France, at the
start of a large-scale economic
expansion, was keen for cheap,
undemanding and unskilled
labor.
The North African influx
continued over the years. Today,
according to official statistics,
there are close to one million
Algerians in France, half a
million Moroccans and a quarter
of a million Tunisians. They still
remain the core of the
country's low paid labor
force the men who sweep the
streets, build the roads, and work
at menial tasks in the Renault
and Peugeot automobile plants.
By their very penetration into
French economic life, the North
Africans have become an im-
portant factor both in the con-
sumer and in the distribution
process. "Should the North
African merchants or consumers
decide to boycott a certain
product, its producers would be
out of business within less than a
fortnight," a member of the Paris
Chamber of Commerce admitted
recently.
THE NORTH African
population is politically highly
motivated and well organized
within a multitude of
associations and unions where
political indoctrination is the
rule. In most Algerian cultural
centers there are regular weekly
lectures on such delicate subjects
as Jerusalem, the Palestinians
and the "Israeli aggression
against our Arab brothers."
For the time being, most of
this population is still too busy to
assimilate; it is still fighting too
hard for basic economic well-
being to find time for political
involvement in France. In less
than a generation, however,
many of them will have opted for
French nationality, will vote, will
bring pressure to bear and will
openly make their voices and
political views heard.
Their natural leaders are
already on the spot. Two
generations of Arab-born
lawyers, doctors and intellectuals
who have studied in France and
have remained are generally
opting for French citizenship.
THEIR ECONOMIC
framework is also being rapidly
established. Over 20 Arab-owned
banks have opened in the Paris
region alone since January 1977.
Among them are such giants as
the Union of Arab and French
Banks with a turnover of over 13
billion Francs in 1977; the Arab
Investment Bank with a turnover
of five billion Francs; the Franco-
Arab Investment Bank with a
four billion Francs turnover; and
the Arab Intercontinental Bank,
with a turnover of three-and-a-
half billion Francs in 1977.
The arrival in France in 1977 of
some 20,000 Lebanese refugees
gave a new impetus to the Arab
business community. Most of
these refugees came with money,
with considerable business ex-
perience and with a practical
knowhow of Western economic
practices.
They took over hundreds of
business companies and now
work as French representatives
in the Persian Gulf states and
Saudi Arabia and operate smaller
but highly active banks in Paris,
I, ich ten stein and Geneva.
FRENCH REAL estate agents
say that half of the apartments
they sell in the 10,000-20,000
Francs per square meter range
are bought by Arabs and mainly
Lebanese refugees. These
refugees also reportedly now own
10 percent of the Dumez in-
dustrial empire, 44 percent of
various airline companies and 39
percent of the Dunkerque
chemical concern.
Many of them have joined
older Arab established firms or
businessmen such as the groups
led by Akram Ojjeh, a Syrian-
born multi-billionaire; Adnan
Khashoggi, a Saudi Arabian
business wizard; Ghaith
Pharaon, a 38-year-old Saudi
Arabian who is an electronic
engineer and a graduate of
Harvard; and the new owner of
the Intra-Investment Arab Bank
and the First Arab Corporation
(FAC), which several years ago
tried to buy 25 percent of the
Lockheed Corporation (a bid
turned down by the Washington
Administration) and is now
eyeing the Dassault Works.
Tamraz's FAC is also openly
bidding for half a dozen giant
refineries in Western Europe,
Canada and Puerto Rico.
This Arab strength is so ob-
vious that Khashoggi declared
recently in Paris: 'Whether you
like it or not, we are henceforth
bound together."
The Arab economic
penetration in France is less
spectacular than in Britain,
where they concentrate on
prestige real estate, and more in
depth where Arab money flows
into industrial projects and long-
range economic enterprises.
Ojjeh recently explained to the
French weekly, Le Point:
"French enterprises need money
and we need technology and
growth companies. We are bound
to link our destinies together."
THE PERMANENCY of the
Arab implantation in France is
symbolized by the new Arab
press. Among the 30-plus Arab
publications are such renowned
newspapers and periodicals as An
Nahar; Al Mstakbal. with a self-
proclaimed regular circulation of
90,000; Al Watan Al Arabi; Al
Hairadess"; Al Riyad, Al
Iktissad we Almal Al Arabi, and
l)ar Assayad, and at least 30 or
40 other lesser known
publications.
In chic Paris areas, or on the
Cote d-Azur, an affluent Arab
resident leaves his elegant eight
or nine-room apartment, drives
his Bentley or Lincoln Con-
tinental car to his office when he
does not yet have a chaufeur and
bodyguard, has lunch at a
Lebanese restaurant, goes out ir
the evening to an Arab casini
and meets friends over drinks
i later at one of the chic clubs.
On the way, he stops at a
newspaper kiosk to pick up some
Arab dailies or weeklies
published in France.
AT THE same time, a poor
Arab worker, generally from
North Africa, sweeps the streets
or weighs fruits and vegetables in
a small dingy shop, but
, nonetheless feels part of the same
"Moslem and Arab community"
in spite of his one-room flat with
practically no heating and just
one tap of running water.
Both worlds, the multi-
billionaires and the poor, are and
feel part of the same family and
Arab community. Many French
Jews feel and fear that in less
than a generation from now
France's Arabs will become a
main force in French political and
economic life.
For The
Nurse You Heed
T NOW!
YjA cbic a 1
Jcrviccs Ihc
Call 963-3320
RNs, LPNs, Aides
Carefully selected foe high
standard of professional
skill and ptmint human
concern fof the patient.
A single call arranges your
exact needs for care.
ON CALL 24 HOURS
Fred
DEMOCRAT
STATE LEGISLATURE
District 94
for furthei information or to
make a campaign contribution, contact
4315 Buchanan Street, Hollywood, 961 3990 '
P...cl For By Fred Lippman Campaign Fund Victoria Semora, Treasurer


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9"I V* Siaarnr ta Joaa Haan.
Taa taaa. pcxiaMri ta
v.- -xjiztTj!* aaya..-
- -tbsra^i May.r P*r
^"^iiarty. a Democrat, are ex-
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.rx teat oeaag vacated by ftxpub-
jr_an Rjcn*rt Sefrmreaaer. a frary:
>-/ laraei David Garth, a maatn
at pr>taaeai ttrataajy. a betpcaa;
Se^rxw a daatnet attorney m
r" ..^;*- v.-* :-.r i aj9M aaajaj aja] i
fwaani. ?'>r tc* Warren C<4aaa*-
-.hat proted Preaklent Kij
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'orthodox MJr.ar. Israel
.ipjp m Phiaadeipf.ia %
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ncaa Maanaaj of Jeamh
Hattory Hia wife. Joan, an
Mtaria] fa Jewah cauaea. a a
member of PhUaddphai'a Cay
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FRED WJTTFURCHT. a Loa
.r./eaaj iajaaatajajajt bjaabal aha
a A
Let/rat
Leaaraer*
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Broaar
Teaearapaat
WSIDE. aadar a
thread estatiad "TVe
by Kark Caeyfica. tax
reported aa biaj type
ther head photo of
Faaar baca^rocaded by the
Max Faher wax
a poor itai froas Ohao Sam has
weaath a ax aane fararea. He
ad-.aea Preaadrou aad Pnaaa
Maaaatert daracta
aaaa me mdu
Lx Faher*
-rmy.rt- Xrsri.T r.'*r3r.r
aaat Asarxa a Preaadesta tntca
aac an sat Max F after reaeassa a
-,-ttsracx i-^rx 11 tae aga.rt -^ tax
sc? 9bb1 ataca. thx aaocc aac to
KB&eexzxst- the paacat.
BOfW IMPORT AST a Fafaer
to tax latH in iim" Scepaes
&i PreaidxEt job AppoaaV
saecta Secretary laeC to watch
taa ^er troaer* taane ace: gc
.zr-x^p. taa O**- 0cx. 'Of
eaarax I kaaw Mr Faaar Baal
aaaot .Aad at 1 aaaaya Mater
F'aaer 1 taaBa aa a procaoty the
-j--- proaBaxaaaxl BBafaaaxaBBal
tat cnaauy
Mel Larsaa, Michiaa 1
HiaJiiiaa Party raaMnran
paaa^axf of Faaher roae a the
paax 1* year*, aand: '' been
very fertsaxsx to have ham av
vcrsed a thx Baparar ir Party
af y.>. /..< as taa aacat
jt.. ^7 1 a *
k4ax Fa
haatobc right aa the top
I-rvtarfaJy
|bjbbj ^iprt^cc^ ^^7
Detroat aaaaszaa
federai
ad to
tatiaa oa the
9 cover also
BashopTrifa
He a
wbach
effort by
-old New York
i, Charles Kretner.
cradxed for the
to atrip U-S extaen-
FOOT FACTS
ON TAPE
Frtxai Foot Hoalth
On Your Probtwm
To listen,
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afclFVITT -1 fE
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rde fcafarmeHaa call: M0422S or write,
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