The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00252

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
eJewiislti Fllondlia m
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
10 Number 14
Hollywood. Florida Friday. July 11. 1980
fnoshochti Price 35 Cents
Project Renewal
Ith Broward, Florida Hod Hasharon, Israel
1-----------Twin Communities----------'
Jicipation in the planning and execution of Project Renewal will bo broad and thorough, involving every concerned element including
irish community in South Broward. The program, supervised and monitored by a joint committee of the live Ministries and the
Agency, chaired by Deputy Prime Minister Yigael Yadin, will consult actively and continuously with officials of
[asharon, the South Broward twin community, and with grass roots neighborhood leaders through all stages of the Renewal process
er E. Grossman, Chairman
I Division of Project Renewal
ith Ocean Drive
Florida 33019
kter:
j all I want to thank you for agreeing to make the trip to Hod Hasharon in
lou will represent Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Sharon is a five-year, $8 million dollar undertaking; initiated by the State of
i, in which they are equal funding partners. The objective is to improve living
II conditions in its depressed areas.
Graphical location of Hod Hasharon is approximately 12 miles from Tel Aviv;
[time from Lod Airport is 20-25 minutes; the community is comprised of
In, Iraqi and Egyptian Jews, and the total population is 15,000.
It a led. your duties are as follows:
ID forge a relationship between Hod Hasharon and Hollywood, Florida.
j"o work with local representatives of Hod Hasharon and governmental
ncies, to plan, erect and restructure existing buildings, etc.
To recommend release of South Florida funds when projects are approved
you and all other interested parties.
to cut red tape and expedite the program.
(prepare to set forth on this mission, you go with all good wishes of the Jewish
pon of South Broward and with this message:
HOD HASHARON
You are our own
WE ARE ONE
What is Project Renewal?
Project Renewal is a bold new plan to restore 160 seriously distressed neighbor-
hoods in Israel. These slum areas are a threat to Israels strength, morale and vitality;
the deprived residents are undermined both physically and spiritually. The name
Project Renewal was given by the United Jewish Appeal and the people of Israel.
Q. Kaye
ive Director
What is our Federation's role in this massive renewal project?
Like many other Federation areas in the United States, we have adopted one of the
designated 160 neighborhoods Hod Hasharon, located northeast of Tel Aviv. We
have assumed responsibility for upgrading the standard of life and living for our
adopted family" of Hod Hasharon 16,000 men, women and children.
Who are the people involved in Project Renewal?
Ten percent of Israel's population, nearly 300.000 people. This figure includes
'200,000 children (one of every five Israeli children). These people are second and third
generation Israelis. Their parents came to the new State of Israel (1949-1951) during
its first wave of Alivah from North Africa, the Middle East. Yemen and elsewhere.
What is different about the approach of Project Renewal?
Project Renewal may be the first thoroughly integrated comprehensive program of
its kind anywhere in the world. In it it combines: Housing improvement and enlarge-
ment where possible; new construction when necessary. Communal facilities estab-
lishing and staffing schools, nurseries, day care facilities, synagogues, community
centers, pocket parks. Human Services, vocational training and employment; personal
and family counseling; facilities for physical, and mental health care; tutoring; home
management services; meals on wheels for the aged.
If you would like to donate your time and/or services to the people of Hod Hasharon,
contact Reva Wexler, Jewish Federation of South Broward.


Visit Israel Personally To
See Accomplishments
"There is only one way that
members of our community can
truly understand what has been
accomplished in Israel, and what
still has to be done." explained Al
and Marlene Finch, chairmen of
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Mission.
"That is by visiting Israel
personally, meeting with our
------------------------ fellow Jews there, and learning
r-rlor Meetings are held throughout South Broward to first hand from top government
ate the community about the Jewish Federation of South and Jewish Agency officials
card's Missions programs. From left are Arline. Ralph and Sheri about the human and social
I. Joan Greenberg and Dr. Harold Cohen. Al and Marlene Finch, problems of the country s
Bion chairmen hosted the parlor meeting. citizens, added the Finches.
The Finches will be leading the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Community Mission,
set for Oct. 16-26.
"We urge every concerned
community leader to join us on
this unique people-to-people
mission," the Finches said.
The cost of the Mission is $999
per person, including meals.
Minimum gift to the Federation's
1981 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign is SI,500 for head of
household plus a $500 woman's
gift to the Women's Division.
Individual travelers will be
expected to make a $1,500
minimum commitment, the
Finches explained.
There are only a few spaces left
for the Oct. 16 Mission. For
reservations and information,
contact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward Missions Desk.
,eated from left are Mary Lipschutz. Ethel Gould and Ada Engelman.
landing from left are Morse Engelman, Ben (Pat) Klein, Rabbi
Joseph Hurwitz. Jack Udis and Leon Oser.
Organizing the new Young Adults Division of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward are, from left,
the sister and brother team of Sandi and Dr. Robert
Lev and Adrienne Kahn. The Young Adults
Division is a group of people, predominantly single,
who are concerned with the future of the Jewish
people in South Broward, Israel and the world. The
Young Adults Division will include social, cultural
and educational programs. For additional in-
formation, contact Dr. Lev at 961-1900 or Dr. Ira J.
Sheier at 921-8810.
x<*x*x-x<-x*x-x-x-x<<*x-x*x-x-x-x-xw^
URGENTI UJA NEEDS CASH NOW
Convert Your Pledge to Dollars
Pay Your Past Due Pledges
UJA Cannot Borrow: It has
reached its debt service limit
Can you convert assets to cash to help our brethren
in Israel?
Send your cash today
Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hoilvwood Blvd.
Hollywood. Fla. 33020
r-XTXrW-XrXvXvXrX-XrXtX-XwIvX-XwX^-X-X-X-X'X-X^X-:


. --
Page 2
The JMUl FloHdiaf, and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
,
Priday.Julyiiil9J| Fr
HIAS Women Honor Glover
The Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society IHIASI Women's
Division held its annual dinner
luncheon at the St Regis Hotel in
Ne York l'it\ on June 11 HIAS
Federation of South Broward-
Ninety-two year old Minnie
Glover, a member of the HIAS
Women's Division and a HIAS
volunteer for over TO years M
rj in part by the Jewish guest of honor
1 ht .ii\nh t'omniunii> Ct< Mr-Hollywood Eathum Wttltl) held il*
annual meet ink! and installation of officer* Sen officer* are. from left.
Barbara Kubin. vice pre-idem Morton L*\ in president Philip i Bud I
Human- l'\M \ice pre-ident. and Albert Finch, treasurer Not
pictured i- Joan ^ oudelman. *crwrk.
Perfume Factory Found in
Xegev By Archeologists
.
desert ".a I'mver-
_\i a mne-
-..- rj < [
- Um rlerodim period
profcas Mordechai
M sha Fisher. ha\e
t'.evi a several year
I his perfumery
iacton. based on the hypothesis
_-\ was a source of
plantations which yielded the
main ingredients of perfumes and
medicines during that period.
K:r. Bokek was one of two
natural health springs ithe other
mma Noah' which formed part of
the natural health spa of the
ancier.: Negev
Surrounding Fin Bokek was an
-: ructure which
td date plantations.
I for their use in cos-
- r.d medicinal prepara-
\ und _-. -.Tie ancient
spnngs were balsam bushes, now
v *:-. -sed in the
- lies and per
are mentioned
in the Bib* and Talmud.
The uncovered perfumery fac-
tor} still has grinding, crushing,
pounding, and pressing machines
which, cosmetics experts say. can
be used even today for these
same purposes
ORT Card Party
B uth Ocean Chapter of
W omen s American ORT plans a
luncheon and card party July 14
at noon at Hollvwood Federal
rUr.k HaUandale Beach Blvd.
Feinberg to Join BBYO Staff
The luncheon, which was
attended by over 200 members
and invited guests of the nine
chapters comprising the
Women- Division, marked its
33rd year of existence
Minnie Glover, a pioneer of the
women s rights movement and a
humanitarian w.i- < \trwhelmed
with emotion as the audience
I lag a most wonderful
experience, one I will not forget
To my beloved family, who
are carrying on the charitable
worn which they saw in our home
to help those in need To the
dear members and friends.
H1 AS present at this luncheon in
my honor. I appreciate your
warmth and affection
Mr- Glover, as vibrant and
alert as one half her age. rv
a standing the
., Bettj EUerin.
men's
stick-pin
Betty 1
See > --. Si supreme i
.nder and
tin Kmma Lazarus
Chapter and is also a vice
lent of HIAS
HIAS lent Edwin
Shapiro discussed past HIAS
d the
membership on the
r.izaiior. s current in-
teraal Jewish rescue
and reset tiem.
The event, which was coor-
dinated by lunch chairperson.
Sarah Leffert. w ith the assistance
of Fdith Alexander, executive
director of HIAS Women's
-on. was also attended by
Gaynor I Jacobson. HIAS
executive vice president, and
Harry Fnedman. vice president,
administration and finance of
HIAS
Madeline Berger delivered the
invocation, and Cns Marden was
the featured guest artist at the
luncheon
-----RELGO.INC.-----
BsBjtam Girt Arhetes
tsraafa Arts 4 Oarts
Hobraw Books Juoatca
Paper Backs
Records ft Tapes
1VC Uathiasriua Atraiw MB
JJ2-391.'
la Region B'nai
.-.-.ua:XV. board
the ap-
- IS Feinberg
- staM Florida region
from New York
g to
ran Knoxvule. Tenn .
M a school social
-. ^kis a master of
.- :.:-..- -...
-
-ad a number of
: experience in working
.eenagvrs as a school social
worker, four years as *a:erfront
Mr a: Camp B'nai B
and he Las served as aa AZ\
chapter advisor He a.-
Sunday Schoo. M rleski Amuna
-ogue in KnoxviDe
Feinberg and ha wife. JU! -
be returning -. to set up
lenidenej id-A_^-.s: *:-.*.-
-^ ft* leaders for 40 BBYO
members on a six week tour of
Israel
interior Design
School
wilisey institute
1305) 47-4590
Free Brochure
Community Day is coming.

io
i i
12
Hi
Mark your calendars now.
14 13 1 17 Is |9 _>,>
Thursday. December 18 H
1 n n 24 23 26 27
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
2S 29 30 31
Diplomat Convention Center
Families expect more
from
Riverside.
More service*
Riverside now has seven chapels to ser.e tl
sh communities of Dade. Broward and Palm Be
cour" -ore cor. s only one of the re
why since ] ers DC ,
At Riverside
. .......
% of families
:"ces
- 'for
.lereelse
e "-' 1
Fa~ ese>rec- = .erside.
We're trying to *e up to that trust
-: r*ood E
- ',:- 5-:* J'. '
sservngi '
RIVERSIDE
-: ge-6'a: :-s 3 jymbo :* Je/. =r 'mi ; :r
Sponsor r.g the Guarrjiar Ptar Pre-arranged Funera
G.trdiao
Car! G'ossberg Alfred Gc'Oer Leo Hack Kenneth M.Kay
----jrGrosstjerg Joseori Rut>n. Carmen Serrano
*':-e*ce' C-a- ^sS Salomon
iinisr
HAIIASSAH
-- carefo> research we offer two medical \
3t>ie separately or togetherto members :'
Hadassah -adassah Associates and their fa
EXCESS PLAN >'000 000 Ma.mum Be-
MAJOR ~ *"*'e -'"** ~s.jrarce e*x*s
MEDICAL -00e Be-e'-ts pa.ao^
oui ot ire nospitai Ava'ao*e to aoe
DAILY PLAN H --
HOSPITAL convalescent nome from t.rst oaa peyabte
INDEMNITY ,s to a uH year NO AGE LIMIT
TO BE
ELIGIBLE
i:\inmj \mv
IB* Stnrt ******* Mk^l C&-V** SM^m M *
fcm
T.Oir-rxcs eo ao* >>

kTtQM
OMOI
o---

Friday, July 11.1 WO
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
First for S. Broward Federation
During the tenure of Moses
Hornstein of blessed memory,
there was much discussion by the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Education Committee
of the advisability of moving
confirmation from ninth to tenth
grade in those temples which
were working with the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
As an incentive, Federation set
aside a sum from which the
Fstudents who fulfilled the study
requirements and were confirmed
at the end of tenth grade, would
receive a subvention for the trip.
Last year the plans were
finalized, but many of the
students had already made their
plans for the summer of 1979, and
Federation could not get the trip
off the ground. The planning for
the summer of 1980 was begun
during the spring of 1979, and
this year a South Broward Teen's
"Study Tour materialized.
All of the travel and land plans
for the tour have been made by
AZYF. Aside from the trip itself,
students will receive college
credit for a course in the Politics
of the Middle East from Miami-
Dade Community College, which
they can take with them to the
various colleges to which they
will ultimately go. Classes
started during the month of June
and will continue during the trip.
Students who were confirmed
last year and have continued
their Jewish studies are included
in this year's trip. A sad
economic fact: What had been
projected in 1979 as a $1,000
trip was affected by inflation, so
that the cost of the trip this year
is SI.700.
The young people who are part
of this tour are Rhonda Light
from Temple Beth El; Kathy
Bilkus. Jill Feldman, Robert
Friedman, Bradley Frohman,
Michael Kitover and Ilyse
Wrubel from Temple Beth
Shalom; Frank Bornstein,
Miriam Herstik, Mitchell Roth
and Lisa Weinstein from Temple
Israel of Miramar; Andrew
Cooper, Jeffrey Molin and Brett
Fleet from Temple Sinai. Michele
Hauser is from Coral Springs,
and Vicki Andron and Amy Lisa
Greenzweig are from Miami
Beach. These last three are not
recipients of the South Broward
subvention.
The Study Tour participants
boarded the El Al airplane in
Miami on July 8 and should re-
board again on Aug. 4 at the Ben-
Gurion Airport.
The leaders of the tour are Sam
Alpert, who is completing his
three-year stint as the Shaliach to
Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE) and Dr. Diana
Reisman, who represents CAJE
in the South Broward area.
There will be further reports as
the trip progresses.
Betty, Joseph Mann Wed 50 Years
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph (Betty)
Mann of Hallandale celebrated
their 50th wedding anniversary
on June 22. They were married in
Philadelphia, Pa., in 1930.
They have three children, who
with their families planned an
anniversary celebration to honor
their parents.
Their daughter, Arlene Myers,
currently residing in Chicago,
III., is manager of Wickes
Furniture Co. store there.
Daughter Marilyn and Edward
Hoffman, 20-year residents of
Hollywood, are active in many
charitable organizations. Marilyn
is the immediate past president
of Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom and has recently been
elected to the board of the Jewish
Community Center of
Hollywood.
Earl Mann, the youngest child
and only son, is a resident of
Studio City in Los Angeles, Calif.
Karl is a film director and has
Religiou
Directory
NORTH BROWARD -."
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A. Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 910*
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44-A)
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wlchelewskl. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
, TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School, 700 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterlinfl
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
J. Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONS SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (49)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 41*
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dart-
ziger. >12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shuikes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
EMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried-
man, Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Naf taly A. Linkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021 Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Fraiin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer. (52)
Betty and Joseph Mann
recently returned from Hong
Kong and London, where he
formed the new Brittish-Ca. Film
Co. He is an active member in the
Synagogue for the Performing
Arts in Los Angeles.
The Manns have six grand-
children: Joan Myers in Los
Angeles; Caren Myers, married
to Andy Jablon of Watertown,
Maine; Keith Hoffman, a senior
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill; Cathy
Hoffman, a junior at Emory
University in Atlanta, Ga.; Kim
Hoffman, an eighth grader at
Nova Middle School; Craig
Hoffman, a seventh grade
student, also at Nova Middle
School.
Betty and Joseph Mann were
longtime winter visitors to the
Miami area for more than 30
years prior to their permanent
establishment as Hallandale
residents 14 years ago. The
Manns created a custom fur-
niture company, Mann and
Mann.
As one of the highlights of
their celebration, Rabbi Chaim
Richter officiated as they
renewed their vows to each other.
Temple Israel Appoints
Program Director
Temple Israel of Miramar an-
nounces the ap-
pointment of
Mrs. Johanna
Bronsztein as di-
rector of Temple i
Israel's Early
Childhood Pro-
gram beginning |
in the fall. Mrs.
Bronsztein will
direct the ex-
panded program
which is open to
all members of
the community-
Mrs. Bronzstein is a teacher of
many years experience. She has
taught early childhood education
Bronsztein
^^ *?fo at...
Housewares^Hardware^'aint.Locksmitri.Shades^jifts
Bath/Closet Shop.Patio/Dinette Furniture^ioral Arrangements
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MORE
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FROM BALOGH
Balogh pays its highest prices ever for your precious
jewels, diamonds and antiques.
Sell where leading banks, trust officers, and attorneys
have been dealing for 70 years.
in Israel, New York and Miami.
She was recently involved with
Hillel Community Day School.
She has written and col-
laborated on various early child-
hood textbooks, and she par-
ticipated in a Miami Dade Com-
munity College workshop en-
titled "Humanizing Pre-School
Teachers." She is an artist and
teacher.
Born in London, England, she
has lived in Argentina and Israel,
as well as the United States.
Mrs. Bronsztein invites
parents to contact her through
Temple Israel.
. ........ .."'
Miami BMch: 447 Arthur Godfrey Rd 531-0087
(Broward 920-5500)
Coral Gables: 242 Miracle Mile. 445-2644 (Broward 920-1900)
Hallandale: 1115 E Hallandale Beach Blvd 456-8210
Lauderhill: 4444 Inverrary Blvd.. 742-2225______________^^
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6.00% 3 MONTHS 6.18%
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Earns interest from day of deposit to day of withdrawal
Savings Certificates subject to substantial interest penalty for early
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ISO minimum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
SABBATH SERVICES FROM TEMPLE ISRAEL
. FRIDAY NIGHTS AT MUPM on WTMI
93.1 in Dade and Broward Counties
F.* 102.3 in Palm Beach County
' Brousht to you by:
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AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSETS EXCEED ONE ilLLION DOLLARS
CONVENIENT OFFKIS SERVING VOU IN FLORIDA
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
633 N E 167th Street/652 9200
2221 N E 164th Street/940-3975
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road/981 9192
BOCA RATON
899 E Palmetto Park Rd/391 -8903
WEST PALM BEACH
4766 Okeechobee Blvd /686-7770
PLANTATION
8337 W Sunrise Blvd /472-2701
OEERFIELD
230 S Federal Hwy/428-6800
MIAMI BEACH
1701 Meridian Avenue/674-6612
1234 Washington Ave .'674-6550
1133 Normandy Drive/674 6563
1500 Bay Road/673-8306
517 Arthur Godfrey Rd /674-6710
810 Lincoln Road/674-6868
CORAL GABLES
2525 LeJeune Rd /445-7905
KENDALL
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BAV HARBOR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse/865-4344
YOUR SAVINGS INSURED TO J100.000
BY AN AGENCY Of THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
An (.goal Opportunity tmpioyer
JACK D GORDON. President .ARTHUR H COURSHON, Chairman of thf Board






Friday, July 11,1980

The Jewish Floridianand_Shqfar oj Greater Holly wood
Pag*5
==
*r-
Hollywood Woman Helps Israeli Trace Roots
By LESLIE HORN
Tracing one's roots is
becoming more and more popular
every day.
Florie Brizel, 19, of Hollywood,
was instrumental in helping one
Israeli family trace their Jewish
roots.
Because of a school project,
Brizel linked up with an in-
dependent filmmaker in New
York who needed an assistant for
a documentary she was planning
to film in Israel.
The film maker, Lilly Rivlin,
wanted to do a documentary on
her family's reunion in
Jerusalem. Rivlin, a seventh
generation Israelite, is the
granddaughter of Reb Yoshe
Rivlin, the first man to build a
settlement outside of the Old
City walls.
"There are more than 10,000
Rivlins presently living in Israel
and an equal number living in the
diaspora," explained Brizel.
More than 3,000 Rivlins at-
tended the reunion, which waa
held at Binyanai Ha'ooma, the
largest convention center in
Israel, added Brizel. The
documentary features interviews
with different family members.
Because the family immigrated
to Jerusalem from Shklov,
Russia, more than 200 years ago,
they didn't lose a lot of people to
Hitler. The family is in tact and
has almost always been in
Jerusalem since leaving Shklov.
The documentary, entitled
"The Tribe," took three and a
half weeks to film and is backed
by almost all major Jewish
organizations and has caught the
interest of people at the public
television network. The film
should be in distribution by the
end of the year, she added.
Brizel, daughter of Dr. Herbert
and Nancy Brizel, is a senior at
New York University, School of
the Arts in the department of
Film and Television.
This summer she will hold an
internship at WABC in New
York working on "Good Morning
New York."
This was her second trip to
Israel. She participated on a
United Jewish Appeal Student
Mission two years ago.
Brizel feels the documentary is
a valuable resource to show
Jewish roots, origin and history.
At this point, Brizel explained
that the film needs funding. Tax
deductible contributions can be
sent to New York Center for
Visual History, 27 Howard St.,
New York, N.Y., 10013.
Florie Brizel (right) discusses the documentary she recently completed
filming in Israel with Yossi Netz, shaliach. Jewish Federation of
Soouth Broward.
Memorial Grove Started
In Israel for Hy Sirota
Officers of the Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center, from left to right, are: Dr. Abraham S.
Fischler. treasurer; Sister Trinita Flood, president; Dr. Willie C. Robinson, vice president; Mrs. Ooldie
H. Goldstein, executive vice president, and Abraham B. Halpern, secretary.
A memorial grove has been
established at Lahav, Israel, to
honor Herman (Hy) Sirota, who
was long active in religious and
civic organizations throughout
Broward County.
Sirota had retired to South
Florida several years ago. but he
began a new career as public
relations director for Menorah
Chapels of Sunrise, Margate and
Deerfield, He worked in the
capacity until his death in May.
The memorial grove has been
established by Menorah Chapesl
within the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America Memorial
Forest at Lahav, located near
Beersheba in Israel's Negev
Desert.
Friends of Sirota who wish to
add trees to the grove in his name
can do so by calling Menorah
Chapels in Sunrise.
Sirota was a past president of
the Sunrise Lakes Condominium
Association, was Broward
County chairman for Israel
Bonds and was a member of the
United Jewish Appeal's
speakers' bureau.
He was also past president of
the South Broward Council of
B'nai B'rith Lodges, charter
president of Sunrise B'nai B'rith
and a member of the Inverrary
B'nai B'rith. He was
parliamentarian at the Tamarac
Jewish Center and a member of
the Sunrise Jewish Center.
On FIU Campus
Holocaust Memorial Center Opens
Paris Elects Chief Rabbi
Sister Trinita Flood, president
of the recently created
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Abe Halpern
Abe Halpern
Named Ad
Supervisor
Abraham B. Halpern has been
appointed by Fred K. Shochet,
editor and publisher of The
Jewish Floridian. as advertising
supervisor for The Jewish
Floridian and Shofar of Greater
Hollywood.
Mr. Halpern will be based in
the new offices in Broward
County at 2500 Eaat Hallandale
Beach Blvd., Suite 707G, phone
454-0466.
Memorial Center, describes it as
"a truly unusual effort to prevent
mankind from repeating the
greatest crime ever committed by
a sovereign nation against
millions of helpless people."
The Center is unique because
presidents of the eight colleges
and universities in southeast
Florida have joined community
leaders in religion, government
and business to educate the
area's population on what the
Holocaust meant; how it seared
the conscience of the world and
why it must never happen again,
she said.
With these goals in mind, the
Southeast Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, opened its
offices on the Bay Vista Campus
of Florida International
University. The Center was
organized in 1979 and is in
operation to memorialize the
victims of the Holocaust through
oral history and education.
THE CENTER will collect,
gather and record oral, visual and
written testimony of survivors,
liberators and protectors of the
Holocaust.
Rev. D. Wayne Martin, a
Southern Baptist minister added,
We expect to stimulate public
awareness of and sensitivity to
the Holocasut through education,
remembrance days, special
events, a library, media coverage
and any other means which serve
the above purpose."
Eventually, the Center plans to
U8e audio and video tapes to
package" programs for use n
the school system, thus
providing a part of the
educational tools needed to teach
the Holocaust at all grade levels.
These courses will be available to
all school systems.
The board of directors of the
.Southeastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, Inc., includes:
Dr. Hugh Adams, president of
Broward Community College;
Maurice Ferre, mayor of the City
of Miami; Dr. Abraham S.
Fischler, president of Nova
University; Sister Trinita Flood,
president of Barry College; Mrs.
Goldie R. Goldstein; Abraham B.
Halpern; Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe,
senior rabbi of Temple Beth-El
(Hollywood); Prof. Valerie G.
Kanouse; Rev. D. Wayne Martin,
pastor of the First Baptist
Church of Hollywood.
Also, Dr. Robert McCabe,
president of Miami-Dade
Community College; Rev.
Patrick H. O'Neill, president of
Biscayne College; Arnold M.
Picker; Dr. Willie C. Robinson,
president of Florida Memorial
College; Dr. Henry King
Stanford, president of the
University of Miami; Dr.
Gregory B. Wolfe, president of
Florida International University
and Ms. Susan R. Weitz, execu-
tive director, ex-officio.
Mrs. Goldstein, executive vice
president of the Center, urges
anyone having information about
survivors, liberators or
protectors living in southeast
Florida to contact her or Ms.
Susan R. Weitz, executive
director, at their offices located at
Florida International University,
Bay Vista Campus.
PARIS (JTA) Rabbi
Alain Goldmann was elected
chief rabbi of Paris for a seven-
year term recently.
The 49-year-old rabbi, who
holds a degree in German
language and civilization, was
born in Strasbourg and began his
career as an Army chaplain in the
southwest military district in
1959.
He became a Navy chaplain in
1967 and chief Jewish chaplain of
France's armed forces in 1978.
Like the new chief rabbi of
France, Rene Sirat, Rabbi Gold-
mann has played a major role in
the field of education. He said
after his election that he would
work closely with Sirat to
promote Jewish education and
tradition in France. He said he
would also strive to keep the
French Jewish community
united, observing that there was
no difference between Ashkenazic
and Sephardic Jews.
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Friday. July} MSP
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
i. >i 111> .; i !,>________'"'"- "- ------------------------
Page?
New AJC Leaders Outline Views on Presidents Confab
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Howard M. Squadron, a New
York lawyer and president of the
American Jewish Congress, has
been elected chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, a group that is
largely accepted as the
spokesman of American Jewry's
consensus on issues relating to
Israel and U.S. Mideast policy.
The 53-year-old Squadron, who
succeeds another lawyer,
Theodore R. Mann, for a one year
term beginning July 1, ia
assuming office in an election
year here and at a time when the
prospects for further progress
toward peace in the Mideast are
at a stalemate.
IN A SPECIAL interview with
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
at his law firm office, Squadron
outlined his views on the
Presidents Conference and its
goals, its dealings with the
Administration and Israel and
other related issues. Following
are excerpts from the 50-minute
interview.
Question: What is the role of
the Presidents Conference?
Answer: I think that the
Conference of Presidents is the
one instance in the American
Jewish community where unity is
attempted to be reached on one
subject: the subject of Israel and
i he relations between Israel and
the United States.
It is a very diverse group,
representing all shades of
(ipinions, different constituencies
Hid different concerns. It is
therefore rather remarkable that
the group agrees on what the
U.S. policy toward Israel should
be.
Question: Can you be more
specific as to the role of the
Conference in dealing with the
Administration?
Answer: The Presidents
Conference has two principal
functions. One, to express to the
Administration the concern of
the American Jewish community
on the subject of U.S.-Israel
relations and two, to express the
unified view of the Presidents
Conference how the best interests
of the U.S. can be served in the
Mideast or anywhere else in the
world where there is a Jewish
community.
Question: How would you
describe the present relations
between American Jewry and the
Administration?
Answer: I think they are
cordial. In the last two years
there has been a remarkable
access (to Jewish leaders) to the
White House, the State
Department and other branches
of the Administration. When the
announcement was made that I
was elected as chairman of the
Presidents Conference, I im-
mediately received an invitation
to meet with Vice President
(Walter) Mondale. I hope to meet
with him when I am in
Washington next week.
Question: You describe the
Conference's relations with the
Administration as "cordial" but
do you agree with the
Administration's Mideast policy?
Answer: The tradition has
been in an election year to
suspend differences. This year, I
think, it is not going to be
possible. The differences are
going to be confronted. It is
absolutely vital, if the Camp
David process is to survive, to
reach an agreement on autonomy
(for the Palestinians), even if it's
a compromise agreement, before
the November election. It is in
"* the interest of Israel, Egypt and
the U.S. to do so for different
reasons. But the common reason
is that an autonomy agreement
now is the only defense against
the West Curopeans' efierts to
impose a PI.O dominated
Palestinian State in the West
Administration here is going to
find common ground with our
Western European allies.
Question: Is the Presidents
Conference an independent
organization? Is it in any way
receiving instructions from the
Government of Israel?
Answer: In my view it has
been independent and should be
independent. The member
organizations in the Presidents
Conference are American Jewish
organizations and they should be
making decisions of what is in the
best interest of the U.S. as well as
the security of Israel. If they (the
Presidents Conference) appear to
be taking instructions from the
government of Israel, they
cannot be effective.
Question: A few months ago
(Israeli) Agriculture Minister
Ariel Sharon urged American
Jewry, during an address to the
Presidents Conference, to stage a
mass demonstration in
Washington against the Carter
Administration's Mideast policy.
What do you think of such ad-
vice?
Answer: Mr. Sharon was
making a mistake. He does not
understand the American
political process and it was not
appropriate for him to give such
advice. Such statements can only
create the mistaken impression
that the Presidents Conference
gets instructions from Israel.
Question: How should
disagreements with the gover-
nment of Israel be handled?
Answer: The communications
to the Israeli government from
the Presidents Conference should
be private and not in the media.
Exchanges through the media do
not help Israel and do not in-
crease the effectiveness of the
Presidents Conference.
Question: The issue of Israeli
settlements in the West Bank is a
constant source of friction
between Israel and the
Administration, which claims
that the settlements are an
obstacle to peace and illegal.
What are your views?
Answer: I do not think the
settlements are illegal and I think
that even if you would like a
different approach from Israel, it
is a mistake to call them an
obstacle to peace. The real ob-
stacle (to peace) is the PLO's
commitment to exterminate
Israel. How do you make peace
with somebody who wants to kill
you?
Question: Don't you think
that the PLO is gaining in
American public opinion?
Answer: There should be a
distinction between the PLO and
Palestinians in general. In my
view the American people are
prepared to continue to support
opposition to the PLO because it
is a terrorist organization
committed to the extermination
of Israel. On this subject, the
subject of not dealing with the
PLO, I think the American
people wiill support the U.S. view
and not the European approach
(which advocates bringing the
PLO to the Mideasl peace
process).
Question: How would you
characterize your relationship
with Prime Minister Menachem
Begin?
Answer: Good, quite good. We
agree on most things. We
disagree on some things.
Question: Did you ever meet
with Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat? What is your impression
of him?
Answer: I met with him twice.
I found him to be charming and
intelligent.
Forum on 'Coping with Stress'
wood; Martin Segall, director of
Chai Lodge in Hollywood and hypnotist at the Consultation
the Jewish Community Center and Training Center, Inc. and a
Hollywood Extension are paSt president of the Florida
sponsoring a Community Forum, Association of Hypnotists; and
Vivi Dearmas, of Nova Univer-
sity Bio-Feedback.
Thursday, July 24, at 8 p.m. at
the Jewish Community Center,
2838 Hollywood Blvd.
The subject of the Community
Forum will be "Coping with
Stress" featuring panelists
Sherwin H. Rosenstein, executive
director of Jewish Family Service
of Broward County; Dr. Arnold
Rosenthal, an internist in Holly
The program is being co-
ordinated by Norman Freedman
of Chai Lodge and Judy Glazer of
the Hollywood JCC.
The program is open to the
public and free of charge.
U8HTS, *$. "*. 0.8 mg nicotim. LIGHT 100's, Tl mg tat". 0.9 mg nicotine.av. per cigarette. fTTHSpon DEC. '79


7Tk Jeuuk Flohdum mmd Skofvmf Grtaitr Hoiiyuood
Fl*f Juiy n.ijjj
Another Dig
Biblical Expedition Probes City of David
->-- .-
Jr,R(,SALEM Ta* ar- TW ea-.ar*e a
-.--a*.ofprai expedxaor. to the City carried oat by tae Ca? -~
of Lwvid Btbbeai Jeraaaa Soaety. wtoee imaatiiM sac^a*
'-*stan uur-i aewavc on Jaae the Ineuuoe 04 Arcfcaecaogy *
M It ii vjx.*<; v. iaat oatl the Hebrew ','nrveracv the I met
' -? Exploration Society. the
Oops! Sorr
/ifi/ifir Never Meant
Attacks Would End
By JOSEPH POi.AKOFT
WASHINGTON 'JTAi -
A widely puoimred assertion by
Stats f>eoartment enjor of
fiaaJ '.hat Jordan i King Huaiein
rj,-: p*r>oaDy aaaajeaa President
Cartar he would not permit the
P aIt i a Li barat i o
Orjrar./a'.ior. y, launch *nke
*/*..-.>s. lira*l from Jordanian
pfli *u acknowledged ',y the
I*^artm*nt a* having been
BKaRCft
1 .-.- official made the
tatMMBt to *eU*:t*d reporters ir.
a rjeckfrround briefing at the
Blast iJepartment after the King
and the President had completed
their talk* but while the King
waa u.ill m VYaahintrton It was
prominently reported a* an in-
if the King opposition
to PI/J terror againat larael
HOWKVER. four daya later,
on NBC a nationally tekrvised
\fr*r the Prts% program, the
King aajd that the subject did not
anse in his taJka wan the
Preaafaat. Later the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency asked the
State DapartaMBt, who is nght
and who is wrong'*
The State Department replied
'n. Kf^i. the Pnw the King
aaid there is no change in Jot-
dan position We knew that
found it acceptable and saw no
reason to raise the queetaon in our
talks It did anse when the King
was meeting with the Congress
The King restated his posatnn.
and it was to that statement that
the senior official referred.
The JTA aaked a competent
source at the State Department
to whom in the Congress the
King made the statement, since
he had met with Senators and
Representatives in separate
sessions. The source replied be
did not know
Anthem Change Urged
MONTREAL 'JTA) The
Canadian Jewish Congress has
urged the Canadian government
'/, remove the words la iron (the
cross) from the French version of
U anadc tba '^juntry's un-
rjffil rial anthem
Tba House of Common*, in
Ottawa ia debating this aaal
bar '/, make the song, in use
for many yeart by Canada at.
national and international
Official national
em
IN A TELEORAM sent today
to anadian Secretary of Stau-
Prancia Pos, CJC Executive Vice
dent Alan Koae said that the
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Continental ]
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STUDIO
RESTAURANT
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Hn\f I alls' i'ud'O P i
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Fins Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(pAvHf I unchK>ntavrangd;
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO" I
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
?340SW3?Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondayi
a a a awaawawwa^baa
CJC applauds the government
of r anada's action to make rj
f ana/la our national anthem. We
believe that the words should be
such that it may be sung proudly
by all Canadians
Therefore, we respectfully
draw your attention to the
French version which contains
the words lu croix which creates
aarioua probianu for Jews and
those of non-Christian faiths We
hope that you will take not* of
our deep concern which is
prompted only by the desire that
' > < 'i mil in should be a proud
national anthem, which can be
sung by all Canadians irrespec-
tive of origin or religious belief."
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THE EXCAVATIONS are
earned oat on state lands, most
of which were purchased at the
hegwinwic of the century by
Baron Edmiaid de Rothscrskj for
the purpose of archaeological
excavationa in the City of David
The expedition works n close
conjunction with the
MuniapaUty of Jerusalem, in
removing mounds of earth left by
earlier expeditions which con-
stitute safety h*zanis and un-
dergoing salvage excavations in
order to make available areas for
the sewage and road-paving-
works now in progress by the
Jerusalem Municipality.
At the head of the expedition is
In Yigal Shik>h of the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem The
architect of the expedition is
Oiora Solar. A large staff of
approximately 25 graduates and
students of the Insrtute of
Arehaeology of the Hebrew
University will conduct the
excavations in five areas.
The work is being carried out
with the help of groups and
individual volunteers from Israel
and abroad, many of whom
return ytar after year to uncover
Jerusalem through the ages
There are still places for add-
itional volunteers
THE EXPEDITION is ex
cavating this year in five areas
The excavation of the Israelite
building on terraces of the
eastern slope of the City of David
will continue, with the purpose of
uncovering additional elements
of the design of the Israelite city
and its town planning in the
period of the monarchy The
archaeokigists are looking for-
ward to the discovery of ad-
ditional segments of the for-
tification ayatan and residential
area of Israelite Jerusalem, which
were destroyed by the
Babylonian army.
The expedition also plans to go
deeper in some places, in order to
uncover remains of Jerusalem at
the time of David and Solomon,
which began to be revealed in the
last season, and hoDefullv to
Large fragment of pottery vessel, probably a square caltic stand
from the 10th-9th century BCE. On the body of the stand, a head of
a male figure is attached ia relief The bead has a pointed beard and
either a feathered hat or a particularly long hair style. Similar rultk
stands were found in other Israelite cities, for example. Megiddo and
Ta'anakh Thia relief fragment was found in the level of the city of
David and Solomon, whose remains the expedition Dopes to unrover
this summer.
reach the level of the Jebusite
city
With the assistance of the
Municipality of Jerusalem which
a repavuig the road in the Kidron
Valley, the expedition wfll finish
this season the uncovering of a
section of the system of walls and
dam which sealed the mouth of
the central valley between the
Cky of David and Mount Zion at
the time of the Hellenistic-Roman
Byzantine period.
WARRENS SHAFT, the
early underground water system
in the City of David, will this
year be a special focus of in-
vestigation for the expedition. In
the upper portion of this un-
derground water system is a wide
tunnel hewn through the bedrock
from the top of the slope until a
point above the Gichon spring.
There the tunnel ends with a
deep shaft descending ap-
proximately 14 meters to the
level of the spring. With the help
of the sponsors from South
Africa, two mining engineers
from Cape Town will help the
expedition open a new tunnel
through the debris and enter
Warren's shaft.
If these preparatory activities
will succeed. Warren's shaft will
be incorporated into the planned
archaeological park in the City of
David and will serve as one of the
most interesting points to visit in
Jerusalem from the time of the
monarchy.
THE CITY of David Society is
now negotiating with an ad-
ditional body in the United
States which is mainly interested
in the development and in-
vestigation of the early un-
derground water systems, the
Gichon spring, and the Shiloah
pool.
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Lay, July 11.1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Jama Elinsow
}ortraitofa Courageous Lady
Costa Rica May Cut Ties to Israel
MOSCOW Hanna Elinson,
,,3, a Jewish refusenik and ac-
tivist from this city, received a
formal request from Soviet
tuthorities to leave this city
during the Olympic Games. Her
fcnswer: a resounding "nyet."
Police officials said that if she
J>es not comply, she will be
[forced" to leave.
Despite several chronic
Lilments, including heart disease,
duodenal ulcer and pancreatitis,
^anna has maintained her active
ole in the Moscow Women's
group movement.
Hanna and her husband, Saul
borelik, 67, are living alone in
this city. They applied for exit
pisas for themselves and their
two sons in June 1975. Although
they were denied permission
because of their alleged access to
(classified information, their sons,
IXlexander and Moisey, were
permitted to leave.
A Message From
Evgeny Tsyrlin
MEVASERRET TSION,
IIsrael Evgeny Tsyrlin, a
I recent Soviet Jewish emigre
[living in this city, sent the
[following message to a friend in
|the United States:
We are absorbing much
(better than expected. I can say
I that everything depends on one's
state of mind. We don't take our
problems seriously and,
therefore, we don't have a nara
life. I must mention that
everything is possible.
Everybody knows how hard it is
to be a new immigrant, and
everybody does his best to help.
Everybody is very patient, and
listens to our Hebrew, always
explaining things to us. Because
of this we are very glad to have
come here we did not think
that in such a short period of time
we would meet so many good
people."
Soviet Writer Receives
Israeli Award
TEL AVIV Moshe Altman
of Chernovtsy was one of six
international Yiddish writers who
received the 12th Itzik Manger
Award for Yiddish literature. An
elderly man, Altman received the
award in absentia for his short
stories and novels. The awards,
presented at ceremonies in this
city was attended by Israeli
President Yitzhak Navon, among
other dignitaries.
NEW YORK Costa
Rica may be on the verge
of abandoning its close
friendship with Israel for
the sake of Arab votes in
the United Nations, the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith warns.
According to two ADL
officials who have just
returned from a fact find-
ing trip to Central
America, reliable sources
say that high ranking
Costa Rican officials
received an Arab
delegation which arrived in
Costa Rica June 28. The
delegation included
representatives of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization.
A NEW PLO threat in
Venezuela was also reported by
the two Abraham H. Foxman,
associate national director and
head of ADL's international
affairs division, and Rabbi
Morton M. Rosen thai, director of
the agency's Latin American
affairs department.
Thev noted that the an-
Pioneer Women Elect Officers
Two Broward chapters of
Pioneer Women have elected new
officers for the coming year. Fay
I'oliner is president of the
Miramar chapter. Sadie
Friedland is vice president; Doris
Davidson, treasurer; Rose
Wellman, financial secretary;
and Trudi Piper, recording
secretary.
Shirley Partner is the new
president of the Shalom chapter
and Dvorah Ickow, Thelma
Freeman, Fay Taylor and Pauline
Reese will serve as her vice
presidents. Judith Polishuk is
recording secretaiy; Goldie
Kramer, corresponding secretary
and Gertrude Weinberg is
treasurer and financial secretary.
Wken youre ready
for dunltin
instead of munckin
Swiss Knight Fondue has made "dunkin" very
glamorous because there's nothing so elegantly
informal, beautifully entertaining or as teasmgly
delicious as when serving Swiss Knight Fondue.
The special blend of Emmenthaler and natural
Swiss Gruyere gives this treat a special ta'am that
makes it "just right" to enjoy no matter what else
you're serving. Made bubbling hot and served with
bread cubes and fruit, Swiss Knight Fondue is as
easy to prepare as it is to eat!
v- r-k
ticipated visit to Costa Rica by
the Arab delegation comes on the
heels of a Mideast tour by
Rodrigo Alberto Carazo. son of
the president of the country, who
was accompanied by a
presidential adviser.
He reportedly was promised
Arab support in getting the
United Nations to finance a U.N.-
sponsored University for Peace in
Costa Rica a project in which
President Rodrigo Carazo Odio
has a personal interest.
FOXMAN SAID that ac-
cording to stories circulating in
Costa Rica, the quid pro quo for
Arab support of the university
project is a pledge by the
government of Costa Rica more
actively to support the Arab
cause and, specifically, the PLO.
"A PLO presence in Costa
Rica," he said, "would threaten
the stability of this politically
volatile region, in view of PLO
contacts with the revolutionary
left in Guatemala and El
Salvador." Foxman added that
"it would also be a great setback
for Israel, because Israel has not
had a more constant friend and
ally than Costa Rica. Costa Rica
has consistently supported Israel
at the UN and at other in-
ternational forums."
Foxman noted that Costa Rica
has already veered slightly away
from Israel. Since the 1979
election of President Carazo
Odio, Costa Rica has altered its
traditional voting pattern in
support of Israel and on issues
important to Israel.
DECLARING THAT ADL is
worried about the situation in
Venezuela, Rabbi Rosenthal
quoted informed sources as
saying that the country's
Ministry of Mines has forwarded
to the Foreign Ministry a
recommendation that Venezuela
authorize the opening of a PLO
office in Caracas.
The Venezuelan Jewish
community, he said, has ex-
pressed its concern in meetings
with government officials and in
full page newspaper ad-
vertisements.
In a June 19 ad, the Jewish
community warned that opening
of a PLO office would have
"lamentable results."
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Page 10
The Jewish,Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
_____________________________ '. 11 i
Friday, July 11.1980
Ex-Secy, of State Says
Negotiations Won't Key Mideast Outcome
By HENRY KISSINGER
The Middle East issue seems
to me to have three aspects: the
Kast West relationship; the
relationship between moderates
and radicals in the area; and the
Arab-Israeli problem. Those
three issues are partly
overlapping but partly
autonomous, and I do not believe
one can solve the whole complex
of issues by addressing one
particular narrow part of it. And
therefore, while I strongly favor
the negotiations on the West
Hank that are now going on, and
strongly support the Camp
David Agreement, I do not
believe the outcome of those
negotiations will be the key to all
the other issues in the Middle
East.
Let me first begin with the
East-West relationship. A strong
America is essential for any
effective foreign policy; without
such strength there can be no
security for anybody, and
without our dedication there can
be no progress. And it is a source
of profound concern that the
relative balance of power is not
nearly so favorable to the United
States as it has been.
INDEED, if current trends
continue, we will be in an in-
creasingly difficult position.
Through most of the post-war
period, the United States could
substitute or balance Soviet
conventional superiority with our
strategic nuclear superiority. As
late as I97:i. when we went on
alert at the end of the Midde East
war, we had something like 8,000
warheads and the Soviet Union
had something like MM) to 1 . We had then an enormous
superiority, which made it very
dangerous for the Soviets to
drive matters beyond a certain
point. From now on, the nuclear
balance will be about equal; and
as a result, the Soviet con-
ventional strength is bound to
increase, to count for more.
If one looks around the Soviet
periphery, almost all the changes
in recent years have occurred as
the result of Soviet arms, Soviet
friendship treaties, Soviet proxy
troops, Soviet bases which
creates a massive sense of in-
security around the world.
WE HAVE announced the so-
called Carter Doctrine for the
defense of the Persian Gulf, but
there is an enormous gap between
our commitment and our
capability. And if that gap is not
closed, the radicalization is
bound to continue. The danger
inherent in the fact that countries
prefer impotent neutrality to a
military relationship with the
United States is a warning sign
that must be dealt with.
There can be no good policy for
us in the Middle East until we
restore the actuality and the
perception of American strength.
The second problem has to do
with the balance between
moderates and radicals in the
Middle Fast and in the world.
This has, in turn, two aspects:
the first has to do with the
perception by leaders around the
world of what the likely trends
and their chances for survival
and progress are.
AS THEY see the growth of
Soviet power and of radical
strength, more and more
countries are going to make
accommodations, even before a
test of strength occurs. More and
more countries are attempting to
avoid economic pressures by
preempting them with con-
cessions, and this balance be-
tween moderation and radicalism
must be restored.
I have always believed that the
United States must stand by its
friends. As an individual, I have
attempted to defend my con-
ception of American honor
towards foreign allies because it
Henry Kissinger is awarded the Anti-Defamation League's 1980 America's Democratic Legacy Award
at a recent dinner at the Plaza Hotel in New York. Left to right are Maxwell E. Greenberg, ADL
national chairman; Dr. Kissinger; Edgar M. Bronfman, who made the presentation; and Irving D. Lip
kowitz, guest of honor.
has been my belief that a country
that does not stand by its friends
will not be taken seriously by its
adversaries. And if we once start
getting into the business of
putting price tags on our friends,
there will be no end to it.
One of the most fundamental
challenges for the United States
is to make it clear that there is a
benefit in being our friend and a
penalty in being our adversary.
And until this balance is
restored, we can be certain to be
challenged more and more.
Without an understanding of
these matters, the situation in
the Middle Hast is not com-
prehensive.
THE ARAB Israeli
negotiation is but one aspect of
that overall situation. The
balance between moderates and
radicals will not be restored by
negotiating procedures in West
Bank negotiations; our fun-
damental problem and challenge
as Americans is to make clear
that whatever concessions may
be made and whatever mutual
adjustments result emerge from
countries that have a choice.
Moderation is a virtue only in
those who are believed to have an
alternative. It is not a virtue if
extorted by constant pressures.
For this reason, I hope very much
that the negotiations succeeds
and that some solution will be
found for the autonomy talks.
But I must also tell you
frankly that even if the
negotiations succeed and some
solution emerges for autonomy,
we will only be at the besrinnini
and not at the end of the problem.
The question of the jurisdiction
of whatever that administrative
council is called will be forever
contentious; there is a fun-
damental disagreement as to its
nature between those who believe
it is the first step toward
sovereignty and those who
believe it is merely a technical
administrative device, and that
problem will not go away, even
after successful negotiations.
I WOULD therefore like to
state a few principles.
I signed the Memorandum of
Understanding as Secretary of
State that we would not
negotiate with the PLO. and it is
often cited as an obstacle to what
might be done had not the
previous administration made
this rather rash promise.
That promise was not made as
a favor to Israel; it did not result
from an attempt to placate any
group in this country. That
statement arose from our con-
viction that the settlement on the
West Bank must be one that
includes Arabs who want to work
for peace and not the most in-
transigent group that cannot
possibly be satisfied no matter
what its proclamations with
what is achieveable.
And. therefore. I believe that
as these negotiations develop, the
most important challenge for the
United States, for Israel, and for
all who are concerned, must be to
find some way to involve Jordan
in the negotiation and to see
km torn*-

Wr mhm
6oii\Q ro do ?
I

whether that country can assume
some responsibility for the ad-
ministration of whatever it is
that is finally negotiated, thereby
turning the PLO into an Arab
problem rather than into a West
European, American, or any
other far-away country's
problem.
I WANT to stress again that
no negotiation gimmick can
possibly work until we restore the
balance between moderation and
radicalism in the area and until
we make clear that we are not
forever in retreat. I think it is in
the American interest to separate
the oil problem as much as
possible from any political
negotiation. I think it is in the
American interest to separate the
oil problem as much as possible
from any political negotiation. I
think the more we involve the oil
issue, or the more we talk our-
selves into involving the oil issue
into these negotiations, the more
paradoxically we undermine the
position of the moderate
elements, even in the Arab world;
if we affirm the connection, they
cannot resist the linkage. And
they will not be able to oppose
those radical elements who have
always advocated an explicit
linkage between oil and set-
tlements. Nor is there any ter-
minal point if that process starts.
I believe we must all hope for
the negotiations between Egypt
and Israel to make further
:.x-k-x-s-:v>x-x-x-:-x->x-x-x-:
THIS article by Dr |
Kissinger appeared in
the June, 1980 issue of
the ADL Bulletin and
is reproduced with per-
mission of the Anti-
Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
x<*x*x*x<*xc*x-x<*x-x*x*x
progress; we must supplement
them as rapidly as possible with
some Jordanian role on the West
Bank. And we must avoid the
illusion that the world crisis
sketched here can possibly be
solved by dealing with one group
using terrorist methods
associated with all our opponents
in that area. That is nostalgia,
evasion, potential disaster.
HAVING SAID all of this, I
would like to stress that while the
current trends in the world are
ominous and while one
sometimes has the feeling of
various crises running out of'
control, we should keep in mind
that the fundamental assets are
on the Western side. We
produced moderation finally in
the Middle East when it became
clear that the military option
would bring no progress.
We will produce moderation in
the world at large when we make
the same demonstration. We
have twice the gross national
product of the Soviet Union. We
have a creative people. We have
strong allies.
Fven in the Middle East we
have the nucleus, in Israel and in
the peace agreement with Egypt,
of the fundamental strengths,
and therefore there is no reason
for us to be timid. There is no
reason for us to curry the favor of
any one group that is attempting
to blackmail us.
IT IS RATHER an op
portunity for confidence. and
imagination and for the
realization that we are in a very
fortunate position and that,
contrary to most people in the
world, we can still say to our-
selves that the solution of our
problems is up to us. And Israel,
a state which was an idea before
it became a reality, testifies to
the power of faith; it can show us
that all great achievements were
ideas before they became a
reality.
The most important task
before America today is to get
the idea of the kind of world we
want, the strength to vindicate it,
and the confidence to stand by
our friends.
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The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
k Stage
lie for U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem
Israel."
Rep. James Scheuer (D.. N.Y.I,
while opposing the Crane
amendment, agreed with Dor-
nan's criticism of two U.S.
consulates in Jerusalem.
fH POLAKOFF
INGTON -
Although the
[Representatives
[is attempts to
the Carter
Ition move the
jissy from Tel
; Jerusalem by
i a 3-1 vote. Rep.
ine (R.. Ill)
tice in a floor
it he will con-
ffort at a time of
B
.indicated earlier
kuld seek further
this week to
the Ad-
in to abide by
locratic Party
i Jerusalem.
irho had sought the
' nomination for
rid is now backing
an, brought about a
that found strong
|rael arguing against
at included the point
osal would cause the
tment to close the
ssy in Tel Aviv
opening one in
legislation for the
tment operational
amendment that
[use of more than
expenses of the
Smbassy in Israel
Jerusalem. In effect,
insufliccnt funds
bailable to maintain
in Tel Aviv. The
it 252-80.
Jewish members,
lor the amendment:
lev Yates ID.. 111.I and
^publicans Benjamin
id William Green.
fKM Congressmen not
Iteps. Martin Kraal
ll-.li/abctli Iloli/man
Ken Kramer IR..
IVVeiss(l) N.Y.I, and
II). N.V.I. The
Jewish Congressmen
I amendment.
[h VOTING marked
^edings. Millicent
. N.J.I, an ardent
Israel, and Rep. Paul
III), an advocate of
liition of the Palestine
Organization, both
ICrane's amendment.
House leader John
Arizona favored it,
nocratic leader Jim
[Texas did not vote.
jert Lagomarsino (K..
/ith Sen. John Warner
is co-chairman of the
policy unit of
for Reagan, also
the amendment. A
)f the 80 proponents
slican.
amendment was of-
i the Democratic Party
trriters wrangled over
on the status of
which they finally
after the House had
I the Crane amendment.
le opponents of his
ent argued it was
ly inspired, Crane
that it harmonized
Democratic Party's
of 1976. The
in's platform plank on
for 1980 has not yet
nulated.
PE, who was aided in the
..ainly by Gilman and
Ibert Dornan (R-. Cat).
|to the Democratic pledge
jsalem. He said that
[not in the habit of en-
couraging compliance with the
Democratic platform," he was
"emphatically" urging both
Democrats and Republicans "to
heed this succinct and persuasive
policy statement."
Gilman said, "It makes no
sense to continue thi- double
standard of support for Israel
with its capital in Jerusalem
while our Ambassador remains in
Tel Aviv."
Observing that the U.S. has
consulates in "Jerusalem" and
"East Jerusalem." Dornan said
this situation is "unique in all the
world for U.S. consulates" and
that inside Jerusalem"
Americans are working at cross-
purposes." The Kast Jerusalem
consulate. Dornan said, "does
not answer to our Kmbassy in Tel
Aviv." That is "a dangerous
situation." he said, and
"Upsetting the Israeli govern-
ment a lot."
ADDRESSING opponents of
the Crane amendment as facing
"a brutal decision" on whether a
"vote either way would endanger
Israel." Dornan said. "As a non-
Jew, you do not speak for most
Israelis. They want our Embassy
in their capital city. Period.
However, they are afrid they are
going to be Formosaized,
Nicaragua-ized, Vietnamized
and unceremoniously dumped for
oil."
Rep. Stephen Solarz ID., N.Y.I,
who led the opposition, said that
the Crane amendment "really has
to be one of the most incredibly
irresponsible approaches to an
extraordinarily complex pro-
blem which has ever been put
before this House."
He noted, "no effort was
made" by Crane "to consult with
ihose members of the House who
have been most closely and
deeply involved in this issue."
SOLARZ ADDED: Many of
the members may think the
American Embassy should be in
Jerusalem, but we all know that
the Administration is not about
lo go in and move the Embassy
to Jerusalem. So what would be
the consequence of this amend
ment? It would not be to move
the American Embassy to
Jerusalem. It would be to close
down the American Embassy in
Tel Aviv, and the last thing any
of us want to do is to close down
the American Embassy in
Chess-Player Brzezinski
Moves Pieces of Universe
On Board of Cynicism
WASHINGTON (ZINS) In an interview with
mwsman Moshe Zhak of the afternoon daily. Ma'arir.
Zbigniew Brzezinski. President Carter's adviser on
national security, expressed some noteworthy views on
America's relationship to Israel.
In response to a question from the journalist as to
whether Israel is regarded as an ally of the United States
or merely as one of its "clients.'' Brzezinski's answer
was: "In the case of a major power such as the Unite. 1
Stales oven a country like Belgium which is a memhr
of NATO cannot be considered as an "ally. The
difference in power between nations determines the lev- I
of the relationship."'
Kesponding to a second question as to whether
Israel is an asset to the United States or a liability.
Brzezinski answered. "With respect to Kgypt. Israel is
an asset, because it helped the United States to influence
Kgypt lo take a pro-American course. The same is not
true, however, with regards to Saudi Arabia. With
respect to the Saudis. Israel is a liability because a
Moslem Saudi Arabia is opposed to any ties between
Israel and the United States."
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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, July 11,1980
Proposed Arms Deals Distinct Damage to Israel
By VICTOR BIENSTOCK
How much trust can Is-
rael and its American sup-
porters, Jewish and non-
Jewish, place in the good
faith of President Jimmy
Carter with regard to the
security of the Jewish
State in view of the two
pending arms deals with
Arab states hostile to
Israel?
Two years ago, in a
package deal which was
approved by Congress only
after the Administration
insisted the planes were
equipped for defensive
fighter action within a 450-
mile range, we sold Saudi
Arabia 60 of our F-15
combat planes, the fastest
and most powerful military
aircraft in the skies.
BEFORE Congress approved
the sale, the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee received
written assurances from Defense
Secretary Harold Brown that
"Saudi Arabia has not requested
or do we intend any other system
of armaments that would in-
crease the range or enhance the
ground-attack capability of the
F-15."
Congress and the concerned
public were assured that, as
delivered to Saudi Arabia, the
planes would have a limited
range and no bomb-carrying
capacity. Thus equipped, they
would be purely defensive craft
designed to intercept and fight
off any invasion of Saudi Arabian
air space.
But now, the Saudi Arabians
have asked for conformal fuel
pods that would extend the F-
15"s range to 1,000 miles and
back sufficient to enable them
to range over every foot of Israeli
territory and for bomb racks
that would convert the fighters
into lethal bombers.
THE STATE Department has
lost no time in opening a cam-
paign to put the deal through.
Spokesman Tom Reston. with
deadpan gravity, commented
that the Saudi application was
justified by "the increased threat
which was posed by the invasion
of Afghanistan by the Soviet
Army."
Reston is neither so obtuse nor
credulous as to believe for a
single moment that the Saudi
Arabians could or would employ
these aircraft against the
Russians. Even bureaucrats with
short memories must remember
the Saudi hysteria when the
Communist-controlled South
Yemeni threatened to overrun
North Yemen and solidify a Com-
munist presence right on the
Saudi border.
To reassure them, we had to
dispatch an aircraft carrier to the
Indian Ocean to loiter offshore
and we loaded up North Yemen
with all kinds of equipment
which is now mainly in pro-Com-
munist hands.
SAUDI ARABIA'S military
capacities were sharply defined
recently by William Tuohy, the
well-informed Middle East cor-
respondent of the Los Angeles
Times. "For a country with
enormous wealth," he reported,
"a country whose Bedouin
natives are renowned as fighters.
Saudi Arabia has surprisingly
weak military forces. The
Bedouin chieftains have not
taken easily to modem military
techniques and the royal family
has purposely kept the military
services divided to ensure against
any attempt at a military coup."
And Touhy adds: "For years
the Saudis have relied on the
Americans to come to their aid in
the event of a military calamity.
And that same reliance continues
although the government likes to
refer to its military in-
dependence."
There is no evidence that this
condition has changed, that the
Saudis are able to or have the
will to participate in their own
defense. Senate Majority Leader
Robert C. Byrd tartly observed
the other day that "when all is
said and done, this country is
extremely important to the
security of Saudi Arabia." The
West Virginian said there was
"no rationale to justify the
supply of the offensive equipe-
ment Saudi Arabia seeks."
THE STATE Department lost
no time in letting it be known
that the Saudis had accompanied
their demand with the warning
that America's failure to comply
would damage relations between
the two countries. One official
told the New York Times that
"they've thrown down the gaunt-
let," while another insisted that
"there's not much we can do but
to grant the request." Our thirst
for oil is too great.
Zbigniew Brzezinski, President
Carter's national security ad-
viser, who dreams of forging a
solid Middle Eastern anti-Soviet
front, is described as a powerful
advocate of acceptance of the
Saudi demands. But Chairman
Frank Church, of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee,
asserted that the provision of the
offensive equipment would
contravene the terms of the 1978
deal and pointed out that the
committee had agreed to supply
the F-15s to Saudi Arabia in the
first place "on the understanding
that the F-15s would not be so
equipped and would have only
defensive capability." Sen.
Henry Jackson angrily dismissed
the Saudi demand as "black-
mail."
It is hard to believe that
anyone in Washington really
believes that Saudi Arabia needs
powerful offensive weapons
because of the Afghanistan
situation or would use them
against the Soviets. It is difficult
not to agree that Saudi Arabia,
which is as recalcitrant on the
Palestine issue as any of the re-
jectionist states, has anything in
mind except possible use of the
aircraft against Israel or a
remote possibility against its
powerfully-armed and hostile
neighbor, Iraq.
AT LEAST, should the Saudi
deal go through, the Saudis
would pay in good coin of the
realm for the expensive hardware
they want and some of the dollars
extorted from us by OPEC would
come back to these shores. But
what about President Carter's
agreement to give King Hussein
of Jordan 100 of our best tanks
the M-60 equipped, pre-
sumably, as Jordan wants, with
night-vision scopes and laser
range-finders?
The M-60 is probably the most
powerful land assault weapon we
have in our arsenal. Hussein
asked for 200 of them, but Carter
agreed to supply 100 now with
the possibility of another hun-
dred in the future.
Why should Carter have bowed
to Hussein's demand for
weapons? What, if anything, has
Hussein done for the cause of
peace in the Middle East? He
flatly rejected the President's
plea that he join the Camp David
peace process and then had the
effrontery to denounce that
process, American policy and
American motives in the Middle
East, using American media for
that purpose.
In so many words, he implied
that Carter, with elections
coming in November, was the
political prisoner of American
Jews. The President not only has
accepted this meekly but has
rewarded Hussein with the
promise of weapons. How far
does humility have to go?
IT IS NOT that we have to
bribe Hussein because of his
influence among the Arab
leaders; he has none, but is a
virtual pariah. He manages to
hang on to his throne only
because the Bedouin tribesmen
around whom his army is built
remain loyal to him; he is not
overly popular with the Pales-
tinians who constitute the
majority in his country's
population.
He is not a leader among the
Arabs but a puppet of the Arab
leaders who keep Jordan
financially afloat. For decades, a
British subsidy was the biggest
item of revenue in his national
budget, and it wasn't so long ago
that it was disclosed our own
Central Intelligence Agency had
been slipping him millions for
'' walking money.''
But Hussein had a weapon
effective only in Washington,
particularly in the White House
and the State Department, the
threat that if we do not give him
what he wants, he will apply to
the Kremlin. And, as we know,
the Kremlin would be only too
happy to ship tanks and Soviet
advisers to Amman and establish
another beachhead in the Arab
world.
TO GIVE added weight to this
threat, Amman has been leaking
reports for weeks that Hussein
has schedule a visit to Moscow.
Apparently the ploy worked with
Carter and Braezinski. Congress
may not be so gullible.
There might be some jus-
tification for providing Hussein
with arms if you knew from one
minute to another just what side
he was going to take in any
situation. Hussein, as a fledgling
monarch who had seen his grand-
father, Abdullah, assassinated by
Arab foes, quickly developed and
elevated to a high level the art of
self-preservation that has kept
him on the throne for nearly three
decades. There was for long a
smouldering enmity between his
family and the House of Saud
which had expelled the Husseinis
from their Hedjaz kingdom. But
now, the Saudis subsidize the
Jordanian king.
AT ONE TIME or another in
the past decade, his throne and
his life have been threatened by
his neighbors, Syria and Iraq.
Arafat's Palestine Liberation
Organization almost toppled him
in a bloody uprising and would
have succeeded with Syria's help
if the Israelis had not let it be
known they would resist a Syrian
intrusion into Jordan.
For the moment, Hussein is
guardedly on good terms with all
three, but there is no telling who
will be allies tomorrow and who
will be enemies. The Arab rulers
play a dizzying game of King of
the Hill.
By virtue of geography, Jor-
dan could be an important factor
in resolving the future of the
West Bank a role Hussein dare
not accept. And for the same geo-
graphical reason, the tanks he
has been promised in Washing-
ton constitute a very definite
threat to Israel's security.
Washington officials may shrug
their shoulders and reply that
Israel is so strong militarily it
needn't fear the re-equipment of
Jordan's army.
But these American tanks plus
the Soviet tanks Iraq and Syria
deploy and those the PLO has
hidden in Lebanon plus, also, the
equipment the Saudi Arabians
would "lend" to any force aP
tacking Israel, would create over-
whelming odds. No one would
object if Jordan's legitimate
needs were met by supplying
them with anti-tank guns and
missiles and other purely
defensive arms.
BOTH THE proposed deals
now under scrutiny in Washing-
ton represent a distinct danger to
Israel and must be recognized as
such. If Mr. Carter thinks it good
policy to make Hussein strong
enough so that he might be
tempted to repeat his 1967 folly
and attack Israel again, then Mr.
Carter and his advisers display
either an astounding ignorance of
the Middle East or an appalling
callousness about the security of
Israel which all the protestations *
of friendship they can utter be-
tween now and November will
not be able to conceal.
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July 11.1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Cm reateHToUywooi
Jew Executed for Importing Honey
)R. GEORGE GRUEN
tor, Middle East Affairs
in Jewish Committee
The sudden and ar-
execution of Albert
lpour, 52, by a local
in Hamadan on June
trumped-up charges
in violation of
lished judicial
lures has aroused
(nation throughout the
sh community and
for the fate of an
lated 70 other Iranian
is believed to be in
ious prisons.
iielpour, a prominent
iber of the Teheran
irish community, leaves
,idow and three young
lldren.
Janielpour, a partner in
Jortant agricultural and
istrial enterprises, had
finally been picked up in
Iruary, 1979 and held for
|stioning by authorities in the
n prison in Teheran. No
rial charges were brought
linst him, and he was released
pr five months. Meanwhile,
I business had been taken over
workers' committees
\mites). In mid-January, 1980,
litants from Hamadan seized
Inielpour and took him to
|son in Hamadan, where he and
brothers, Parvis and Daniel,
itly owned a textile factory
it had been taken over by the
lal workers' komite.
UmONG THE wild charges
jninst Danielpour were support
ir the creation of the Israel
Innist Government," working
|th Israel "to suppress the
lestinian revolution," im-
iiiting honey from Israel, and
jying for the CIA and Israel.
In Apr. 16, the Hamadan court
lunvicted the Danielpour
bothers and sentenced them to
lealh.
Under Iranian law, no death
Sentence can be carried out
without ratification by the
jupreme Court in Teheran.
"Allowing appeals to Ayatollah
Ihomeini, an order was given to
fansfer the case to Teheran. On
ine 4, an international
imanitarian organization was
(formed by Iranian authorities
it the death sentence had been
Smmuted to three years' im-
risonment and that Danielpour
las to be transferred to a prison
i Teheran.
Khalkhali's independence and
ke fact that the Hamadan
ithorities could so blatantly
My an order from the central
ithorities in Teheran add to the
kars within the Jewish com-
munity that the central
ithorities are unwilling or un-
jle to insure that the full rights
he Jewish minority, formally
claimed in the Constitution of
Islamic Republic, will be
Maintained in practice. Principle
GEPETTO
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13 defines Zoroastrians, Jews and
Christians as "recognized
minorities" who are "free to
perform their religious rites and
ceremonies"
Principle 14 states:
"According to the Koran, the
Islamic Republican Government
of Iran and the Muslims as well
are bound to treat non-Muslims
with good moral conduct and
Islamic justice, and to observe
their fundamental rights. This
principle will be applicable to
those who do not get involved in
anti- Islamic activities and in
conspiracies against the Islamic
Republic of Iran."
IT IS the potential misuse of
the last sentence that has
aroused great concern. More
than a year ago, in May, 1979,
the first prominent Jew, Habib
Elghanian, was executed on'
charges of being a "Zionist spy."
Now, in addition to Albert
Danielpour, it was announced on
June 10 that Yousef Sohbani, the
former director of the Pepsi Cola
company in Iran, was executed
for "aiding Zionism," among
other charges. Sobhani was a
Bahal, whose fathers had been of
Jewish origin.
Two members of the
Beroukhim family, owners of a
chain of hotels in Iran, were
arrested on Apr. 22 and an
being charged, inter alia, with
"aiding Zionism" and allowing
their hotels to be spy centers for
Americans and Israelis. Among
the "evidence" presented was
that Israeli coins were sold in the
gift shop and that regular
meetings of Iranian Jewish
committee and of prominent
Zionists, such as Elghanian,
took place at the hotels.
The outcome of the Beroukhim
case is not yet known, but such
exaggerated accusations and the
use of "Zionism" as a capital
offense has provoked a public
protest by a group of young
Iranian Jewish intellectuals, who
have in the past supported the
Islamic Revolution and the
Government's pro-Palestinian
policies.
IN AN unusual admission,
Ayatollah Khomeini publicly
declared in a broadcast to
provincial governors on June 10
that Iran was in "chaos" and
that internal disputes among
various factions supporting the
revolution posed a greater threat
even than U.S.or Soviet op-
position. In what may have been
intended as a criticism of the
multiplicity of workers' komites
and other local vigilante groups
taking matters into their own
hands, Khomeini declared that
the Iranian revolution and
progressed to the point where
"the masses cannot any longer
govern the nation" He said it
was now up to the elected and
appointed officials to govern the
country and solve its problems.
In addition to disputes be-
tween President Bani-Sadr and
the fundamentalist Islamic Re-
publican Party, the government
also faces opposition from
Marxist and other secularist
elements, and growing dis-
affection among regional and
non-Persian ethnic groups, such
as the Kurds, the Baluchis, the
Azerbaijanis, and the Arabs of
the oil-producing region of
Khuzistan.
The continually-unsettled situ-
ation since the revolution has had
a negative impact on the
economy, compounded recently
by the sanctions imposed by the
United States and Western
Europe.
THE IRANIAN Jewish
population in 1978 was variously
estimated at between 70,000 and
80,000. It is believed that some
30,000 have since left the
country. Except for a couple of
thousand in Europe, the others
are about evenly divided be-
tweenthose who have come to the
United States and those who
went to Israel, joining the 65,000
Iranian Jews who had im-
migrated since the establishment
of the Jewish State in 1948. Of
those remaining in Iran, the
overwhelming majority (25,000
to 40,0001 are in Teheran, some
7,000 to 9,000 in Shiraz, between
1,600 and 2,000 in Isfahan, and
about 3.500 scattered in 22 other
towns.
The former upper class have
generally left the country, their
substantial holdings have been
either officially confiscated,
occupied or brought to ruin
through exorbitant demands by
' workers' komites. Sharp declines
in property values and the
economic chaos have hurt the
middle class and professionals.
University professors have been
dismissed, and some other Jews
have experienced discrimination.
The majority of the Jews
remaining are from the poorer
groups.
Synagogues and Jewish
: schools still function. Parents
increasingly send their children
to Jewish schools, since
government schools require
Koran studies. The Anjoman
Kalimian, the central Jewish
body, still meets, and there is a
designated Jewish deputy in the
Majlis (Parliament). Foreign
travel has generally been per-
mitted.


Page 14
Tht Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Fridy,Jalyilil980
Ofira Navon, wife of Israel a President, with Jane Stern (right) at Bar-Han University's Silver Jubilee
Dinner, where Mrs. Navon presented the Lapid Award of the Israel Association for Adult Education to
the BrooKdale Foundation for a program at Bar-Han at which several hundred senior citizens are
enrolled in undergraduate classes working toward degrees and opening new vistas for themselves and
their mates.
Jules Love, right, receives the Brandeis University Annual
Distinguished Achievement Award in Athletics from Roger Morgan..
Brandeis Award to Love
Headlines
Agudath Israel Battles Against ERA
The regional Commission on Legislation and
Civic Action of Agudath Israel is spearheading
efforts to defeat the Equal Rights Amendment.
Under the leadership of its chairman, Rabbi
Chaim Dov Keller, the commission is working
with other opponents of the amendment, in-
cluding Phyllis Schlafley, the leader of the
national "Stop ERA Movement." The combined
efforts "resulted in a 102-71 vote in the Illinois
House of Representatives in favor of the ERA,
but fell five votes short of the majority of 107
needed for approval," according to Agudath
Israel.
Rabbi A. Stanley Dreyfus, of Brooklyn, N.Y.,
was installed as director of placement for the
Reform movement of Judaism and will serve as
successor lo Rabbi Malcolm Stern, who recently
retired from the position after 16 years of service.
The ceremony was the concluding item of
business at the convention in Pittsburgh of the
Central Conference of American Rabbis, which
met last week for its 91st annual convention at
the William Penn Hotel.
The 68th annual convention of the National
Council of Young Israel, which ended in Ellen
ville, N.Y., commended Israeli Prime Minister
Menachem Begin for his "courage" in moving the
Prime Minister's offices to the Old City of
Jerusalem.
The Young Israel delegates, representing over
160 branches and over a quarter of a million
members across the United States, reaffirmed
that "Jerusalem is and shall remain the eternal,
undivided capital of Israel," and called upon the
Carter Administration to recognize that fact by
relocating the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem.
Congressman Dante Fascell (D.,Fla.) has
joined in signing a letter to Soviet Chairman
Leonid Brezhnev urging the Russian leader to re-
examine the cases of Jewish dissidents Iosif
Mendelevich, Yuri Federov, and Aleksie Mur-
zhenko.
The three are the last of the so-called Leningrad
Group who attempted to seize a plan 10 years
ago to escape the USSR by air after repeatedly
being refused exit visas for Israel. Seven others
have already been released.
Mendelevich is an Orthodox Jew. He refuses to
eat any non-kosher foods. His daily diet is
inadequate, and his health is rapidly
deteriorating. Federov and Murzhenko are
suffering from a variety of illnesses including
chronic bronchitis and tuberculosis.
"The review of these cases and the release of
the prisoners would signal to the nations of the
world that the Soviet Union has reaffirmed its
commitment to the Helsinki Final Act," Fascell
said.
The world's first true digital camera, integrated
with a powerful digital computer to be used in
nuclear medicine for the detection of malfunction
and abnormalities of human organs, was in-
troduced by Elscint, Inc. at the opening of the
27th annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear
Medicine Detroit.
As a result of its revolutionary "architecture,"
the new imaging processor system, named
APEX, will enable physicians to carry out
studies, particularly in cardiology, which were not
practicable before, and obtain better and more
precise diagnosis. Delivery of the new APEX
system will start in the fall of 1980, a company
official stated.
Special $500 individual scholarships, to assist
in the academic training of deserving Jewish
students four in Israel and four Jewish
refugees in the United States have been
established as an enduring memorial to the late
Judge Murray I. Gurfein, it was disclosed by
Gaynor I. Jacobson, executive vice president of
the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS).
Judge Gurfein, who died December 16, 1979 at
the age of 72, was president of HIAS, the
worldwide Jewish migration agency, now
celebrating its Centennial anniversary, in 1956-
1957 and 1960 through 1967.
Judge Gurfein was a prominent jurist.
Publicly, he is best remembered for his decision,
made while he was serving as Judge of the United
States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, to
reject the Nixon Administration's attempt to bar
the New York Times from publishing the famed
"Pentagon Papers" in 1971.
Emunah Women of America has lodged an
official protest with the government and the
General Services Administration for its sudden
action in dissolving the "Diamond Agreement"
between Israel and the United States without
"justification or cause."
In issuing the protest, Emunah National Vice
President for Public Affairs Toby Willig noted
that the abrupt termination of the "Diamond
Agreement," which enabled Israel to purchase
industrial diamonds at preferential prices, would
almost certainly create great economic upheaval
in a country where diamonds are the greatest
export industry. '.
"This inexplicable action by the General
Services Administration," charged Mrs. Willig,
"will cripple Israel economically and increase her
budget deficit. No reason has been offered for the
premature dissolution of the agreement, which
makes the action all the more incomprehensible."
Barbara K. Wiener, of Milwaukee, Wis., has
been elected 1981 national chairwoman of the
United Jewish Appeal Young Women's Leader-
ship Cabinet.
The results of the recent election were an-
nounced by Paula Dubrow of New York City,
chairwoman of the Nominating Committee and a
member of the Cabinet Executive Committee.
Ms. Wiener, a current vice chairwoman and
member of the Executive Committee of the
Young Women's Leadership Cabinet, is
president of a Milwaukee packaging firm and a
long-time activist in the Jewish community.

Hollywood resident, Jules
Love, has received the Brandeis
University Annual Distinguished
Achievement Award in Athletics.
The presentation was made at the
recent "Friends of the Brandeis
University" Awards ceremonies
in Waltham, Mass.
The Distinguished
Achievement Award is bestowed
upon former Brandeis student
athletes who have distinguished
themselves in business and
volunteer service.
Love is national associate
director of labor for the
Development Corporation for
Israel. He has been active in
fundraising for B'nai B'rith
Youth and the National Jewish
Federation
Clubs.
of Jewish Men's
He is national vice president of
the U.S. Committee Sports for
Israel and represented Israel as
assistant basketball coach in the
Brazilian Pan American Mac-
cabiah Games. Love was ap-
pointed to the first Manpower
Training Development Program
for the Laborers' International
Union of North America.
He has received numerous
awards from the National Kidney
Disease Foundation, the
International Laborer's Union,
Association for Jewish Children
of Philadelphia and the
Federation of Jewish Agencies of
Greater Philadelphia.
Flo. House Salutes Israel
TALLAHASSEE The
House of Representatives, in
Resolution 1617, has put itself on
record as joining with the free
people of the world in
congratulating the State of Israel
on the occasion of its 32nd an-
niversary."
The resolution was introduced
into the House by Represen-
tatives Fred Lippman, of
Hollywood, and Dick Batchelor,
of Orlando.
The resolution observes that
j LU"ited States of America
and the State of Israel (was) each
born in the fire of revolution" and
that both "still struggle con-
stantly for mans basic freedoms
of speech, petition, religion and
representation."
IT ALSO observes that "both
nations share a common heritage
as a refuge for fugitives from
distress and still maintain that
oppressed humanity will have an
asylum on this globe."
In addition. Resolution 1617
notes that "both nations con-
tinue to demonstrate to the world
that thriving democracies can
exist in the midst of turmoil and
dictatorship both nations
have resisted the call of the oil
blackmail and are again seeking
to establish a lasting peace in an
area so devastated by war ..."
The resolution is signed by J.
Hyatt Brown, Speaker of the
Florida House of Represen-
tatives.
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Friday, JUly ll.'l80
' The Jewish Florididn arid Shdflir-bfXJreaieY Hhltyiiood
fPagel5
Begin Has 'Small' Heart Attack;
Body of Kidnapped Kid Dug Up
JERUSALEM "A small
h-art attack" is how Prime
Minister BegirTs condition was
described early this week by his
physician. Martin Gottesman.
The Prime Minister was
tl moved from the Knesset Mon-
daj 0n a stretcher and brought to
Hadassah Hospital's intensive
^cardiac care unit.
11 is understood that Begin felt
chest pains early in the morning,
but he insisted upon going to the
Knesset debate, which ended in a
6 1 vote to reject a motion
(ailing for dissolution of the
Knesset and early general
, nnns. The vote came after
Begin had been taken away.
The chest pains grew pro-
ivelv worse. Deputy Prime
Minister Yigael Yadin noticed
lhal Begin was sweating heavily.
He came swiftly to his side to
.....sen bis shirt collar. When
Yadin asked Begin how he was
:.- ling. I he Prime Minister failed
ply, Yadin promptly called
[or help.
TEL AVIV Oron Yarden.
the eight-year-old boy who was
ili. Iirsi person slain in a kidnap-
ping tor ransom in Israel's
:., lory lias been "found.''
His liody was dug up near a
beach about 20 miles north of Tel
\v i\ Authorities were tipped off
as to the burial site by a man
whom they now judge to be the
prime suspect.
Oron was kidnapped on June 8
mar his home in Savyon. a
wealthy suburb of Tel Aviv. Two
days after his disappearance, his
family paid a $40,000 ransom for
his return. A national police hunt
has been carried on ever since.
UNITED NATIONS The
Security Council Monday
demanded that Israel withdraw
from all Arab territories it
conquered in the 1967 Six-Day
War and criticized Israel's stance
on Jerusalem.
The vote was 14-0. The 15th
member of the Council, the
United States, abstained. U.S.
Ambassador Donald McHenry
said that Israel has "a right to
secure and recognized boundaries
in a just and lasting peace."
Since the Security Council
resolution did not mention this,
and centered exclusively on
ilt nianding Israel's withdrawal.
Mrllenry declared that the U.S.
ould not go along with the rest
ol 1 he Council.'
"We do not intend to be
diverted from our course of nego-
tiation by a series of actions and
, reactions resulting in resolutions
in this Council which do not con-
tribute to a negotiated peace," he
declared.
AMSTERDAM The defense
gained a point in the second trial
ol accused Nazi war criminal
Pieter Menten in a Rotterdam
district court. But the
prosecution is sticking to its
^ demand for a conviction and a
stiff sentence for the 81-year-old
millionaire Dutch art dealer who
served with the Nazi SS during
World War II.
Menten is charged with
participation in the mass mur-
ders of Jews and others in the
village of Podhorodz in the
eastern Galicia district of Poland
under German occupation in
1941. At the insistence of his
defense lawyer, the court sent an
expert, Willem Veder, professor
of Slavonic languages at the Uni-
versity of Nijmegen, to Moscow
to study the archives of the
Soviet War Crimes Commission.
Veder reported that he was
unable to find any reference in
the archives to the slaughter in
Podhorodz or any mention of
Prime Minister Begin
The verdict is expected on July
10.
TEL AVIV A south Leba-
nese youth in custody in Israel
claimed that two members of the
Norwegian contingent of the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UN I FID were in-
volved in the preliminary
preparations of the Arab
terrorists who attacked Kibbutz
Misgav Am in April.
Ibrahim al Tawil.^1. who says
he was a cook employed by the
Norwegian battalion, made the
charge in a television interview.
He claimed that two Norwegian
soldiers met with representatives
of the Arab Liberation Front at
his home in Ilirhet el-Salm
village to discuss the possibility
of obtaining permits from the
Norwegian force for the terrorists
to pass through the area it
controls to the I sraeli border.
PARIS About 40 French
Jewish intellectuals and com-
munity leaders have signed a
petition condemning terrorism
"from wherever it may come."
and urged Israel to ban violent
methods which "risk destroying
the peace effort."
The appeal, addressed to
Israeli public opinion, was signed
among others by writers Elie
Wiesel. Albert Mem mi and
Bernard Henri-Levy; by the
president of the French Zionist
Federation. Albert Najman; and
the president of the International
League Against Anti-Semitism
and Racism (LICAl. Jean Pierre*
Bloch.
The petition is clearly, if not
openly directed at Jewish
terrorist acts. According to some
of the signatories, it was
prompted by the June 2 bomb
attacks against West Bank
mayors. Although the per-
petrators have not been appre-
hended or identified, it is widely
suspected in Israel and abroad
that the outrage was the work of
Jewish extremists.
The petition stated that
"Certain declarations made in
Israel suggest that a minimal
fraction of the population accepts
or even justifies a Jewish
terrorism." It warned that
'"I Trorism once started, knows
no limits and none can escape its
blind madness."
BONN A 75-year-old law-
yer was lined 1,500 Marks by a
Nuremberg court for threatening
to bring legal- action against a
German Jewish journalist who
1 said on a television program that
members of her family died in the
Holocaust. The lawyer. Kberhard
Engelhardt, was found guilty of
exercising duress.
The journalist. Renate Har-
pecht. of Hamburg, appearing on
a panel discussion following
screening of the American TV
scries. Holocaust, in West
Germany last year, said that
several members of her family
died in Nazi gas chambers. A
former SS official on the panel
demanded to know precisely
where and when the murders took
place and whether she could
prove it beyond doubt.
Kngelhardt, who represented
the ex SS man, warned Har-
precht that unless she provided a
satisfactory reply within a fixed
period he would take her to court
for insulting the German people.
Ilarprecht informed the police,
and the State Prosecutor brought
charges against the lawyer.
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