<%BANNER%>

The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood ( June 27, 1980 )

~' ~*
.
M4
*!
SixtMakt m 34el
_~ -_
R A
-IT~3.
-- gems
__
"e amez < i-m :
-
ZOA Spoavirs Tor of
Alternative Energy Sites
let i
m ac
-jr ..- m*rmi* ^-^r
.4f. ^ ~r-r^ *****l
*mm *" ^ '5*.
Mr wi
mm 11 >"wr
-osstnrTwt jwt net***
_w r~*r-k. "J< nl/v-n -1M
-jMr-rjK yngw ?**
->d H w8

_-- :
""* ii-* *un a: .* aar
-
. ._ : -
uLCi
j
" .-
-1
{man
iartaTT*"
.. Bfl I
a r
C I


s* a
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
i&B RARE SCOTCH

:r
A. Sec.
_m
becaJfeda
S Dsivids
1 ^
Ian r :- r


1 t.: ~n :irr.
*^ '------.11'.
fco* jjujh
2~ i- .1- Lv^ST4a- -XT"
bbt: -va
~ ---
j
: nut 1 x v-
*^*T" 1.-
^^r1--^ K*R FVTT
p wot ncnM v. >^ .., x-
, ...
X
--
ri-


Friday, June 27,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Carter Says 'No' to Role for PLO
So Long as Destruction Of Israel is Their Goal
WASHINGTON "We
will not negotiate with the
PLO and we will not
recognize the PLO status,"
a tense President Carter
told members of the
American Jewish Press
Association meeting here
Showing visible signs of
fatigue and shortness of
temper, the President,
responding to queries by
publishers of English-
language Jewish
newspapers across the
country, declared that
U.S. policy will continue to
be negative toward the
PLO "until after the PLO
recognizes Israel's right to
exist and until the PLO
also recognizes that UN
Res. 242 is the basis for
further progress for a
comprehensive set-
tlement."
THE EDITORS and
publishers were reacting to the
June 12-18 resolution in Venice
by the nine members of the
European Economic Community,
which calls for "associating" the
PLO in the peacemaking process.
Ostensibly, the European
initiative came as a result of the
stalled talks between Israel and
Kgypt on autonomy of Arabs
living in Gaza and on the West
Bant, as '.veil as on the future of
Jerusalem, which Israel considers
indivisible and her capital city.
The EEC resolution is, in fact,
being viewed as "moderate" by
the Administration, including the
President and Secretary of State
Kdmund Muskie. Capitol HU1
observers anticipated a much
stronger EEC Palestinian stand
in Venice, and it was this that
spurred resumption of the Israel-
Kgypt talks in Washington, now
scheduled for July 2-3.
CARTER TOLD the concerned
publishers that "Whatever the
European allies might do about
this, our position is clear and as
I ve just stated to you."
The statement was an en-
dorsement of the same position
taken by Secretary of State
Muskie following announcement
of the EEC resolution in Venice.
Carter further told the
FRED JOSSI
*eicomes
voo back to
his renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lor a unique
.^rfining experience
Match your table to your
mood m one ot 5 individual
room* The Tent
Wme Cellar studio. Place
P'aalle Swiss Chalet.
Fin* Entertainment
At the Piano
Aleo violin playing
lor your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
'(private Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
'THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondays
publishers that the best way to
get "cooperation" from Europe in
the Middle East is to make
"demonstrable progress" ac-
cording to the Camp David
accords.
TO THE extent that we make
progress," Carter said, "those
European nations the
Scandinavian countries and
others I think will come back
to a more balanced approach to
the question.
"And if we can ever get the
Palestinian Arabs and the
refugees represented in the talks
through West Bank mayors, the
Gaza mayors and others, I think
this will alleviate tension con-
siderably and not only will stop
the rash of UN resolutions but
also will strengthen support for a
balanced decision on these
matters."
Carter vowed to "use all the
persuasive power that I have to
encourage" Jordan's King
Hussein in Washington this week
for talks with the President, to
join the United States. Israel and
Egypt in talks on the future of
taken "a more forceful stand"
with regard to Arab and other
foreign investments in the United
States, Carter explained:
e you cannot single out a
particular religious faith and
have a special law that puts
restraints on them on the ex-
clusion of others";
e ". if some of the $90
billion a year that the United
States pays for foreign-produced
oil was not reinvested in this
country, the drain on the U.S.
economy would be very
damaging";
e Arab investment in the U.S.
is not really that significant. "A
much larger investment by, say,
a German corporation or a
British or a Japanese corporation
is publicized not at all or, if it is
publicized, in a favorable light."
Arab investments, noted
President Carter, are highly
publicized.
Jordan's King Hussein was in
Washington this week for
talks with President Carter.
The President vowed to do
his utmost to convince the
King that he ought to join the
Israel-Egypt talks due to
resume July 2-3.
the West Bank and Gaza within
the Camp David framework.
ASKED WHY he had not
Gmmyko Rebuffs Wallenberg Query
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko has sternly rebuffed the latest Swedish
attempt to raise the isW of Raoul Wallenberg, the
wartime diplomat missingSn the Soviet Union for 35
years.
The issue was raised by Swedish Foreign Minister-
Ola Ullsten when he paid an official visit to Gromyko
late last week. Swedish official sources here say that
Gromyko replied "coldly and unmoved*' and firmly re-
lated the Soviet view that Wallenberg died in 1947
espite at least 14 alleged subsequent sightings in Soviet
i -isons or hospitals.
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
6 m "hi'. 0.619 nicotine w. pet ogawtt f TC method


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Creation Date:
June 27, 1980

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00251

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla
Creation Date:
June 27, 1980

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00251

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward

Full Text
^uems,
WUdlilgiin
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 10 Number 13
Hollywood. Florida Friday. June 27. 1980
fill Shochtt
Price 35 Cents
Anyone coming into the Jewish Federation of South Brow ard office at
2719 Hollywood Boulevard will be greeted by "Marvin", who will be
participating on the Community Mission to Israel, scheduled for Oct.
16-26. The cost of the Mission is S999, including meals. Minimum gift
to the Federation's 1981 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund campaign is SI,500 for head of household plus a $500 woman's
uifi to the Women's Division. Individual travelers will be expected to
make a 81,500 minimum commitment. Anyone interested in traveling
lo Israel with "Marvin" should contact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Mission Desk.
Herzog Heads World ORT
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Chai Ambassador to the United
Nations, was elected president of
the World ORT Union at its
100th anniversary conference
here.
He will succeed William Haber
of Ann Arbor, Mich., who has
headed the World ORT since
1955.
The conference endorsed a
long-range program which en-
visages more than 200.000
students in ORT's worldwide.
ORT Israel's operations ac-
count for some two-thirds of the
world organization's overall
vocational efforts. About 70,000
Israelis attend ORT schools in
Israel. The ORT budget for 1980
is more than S69 million.
U.S. Corps. To
Earn Big Profits
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
two American corporations
building the military airfields in
the Negev will share a sub-
stantial profit. But they are also
having their share of trouble with
the huge project that will replace
the air bases in Sinai which Israel
will have to give up in 1982.
The money picture is bright.
The Negev Airbase Construction
Co. (NACI of New York, which is
building the airfield at Ouv-
day.and the Airbase Con-
struction Co. (ABC) building the
Ramon airfield will realize ear-
nings of $55 million, about six
percent on their investment,
according to economic analysts
here. They will share the profits
on a 50-50 basis.
Barron to Chat President's Mssion
Howard Barron, M.D. has been
named Jewish Federation ol
South Broward's chairman of the
with residents of a Youth Aliyah
village; and mingling with
Israelis in supermarkets trying to
make ends meet in the face of
near-runaway inflation.
Other highlights included
meetings with former Foreign
Minister Moshe Dayan; UIA-
Israel director-general Zelig
Chinitz; and professors at Bar
Ilan University and Tel Aviv
University.
Minimum commitment for the
Oct. 5-10 President's Mission is
$10,000.
For additional information,
contact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward's Mission Desk.
Howard Barron
United Jewish Appeal's third
annual President's Mission,
according to Robert Pittell,
M.D..JFSB president.
The President's Mission, set
for Oct. 5-10, is an intensive visit
to the State of Israel, explained
Barron.
Highlights of last year's
President's Mission included
visiting the homes of young, new
pioneers in outpost settlements
in the Galilee; exchanging views
with mayors and managers
directly involved with Project
Renewal programs; joining
civilian guards on night patrols
in Tel Aviv; singing and dancing
Herzog has been chairman of
the World ORT Union Executive
Committee for the past 18
months and was president of
ORT-Israel for 12 years. He is the
first Israeli to head the World
ORT.
Other top officers elected at the
conference were Pierre Dreyfus of
France, first vice president, and
Shelley Appleton of U.S., as
chairman of the Executive
Committee.
Dreyfus is a former managing
director of the Renault motor
company. Appleton is secretary
general of the International
Ladies Garment Workers Union.
Joseph Harmatz, former
director of ORT Israel, was
elected director general of the
World ORT Union, replacing
Max Braude who is retiring.
a
8
MOREOVER, it is now
believed that the project will cost
$90 million less than the
estimated $1.04 billion budget
approved by the U.S. Congress.
The balance will be at Israel's
disposal to help pay for the
redeployment of forces after they
leave Sinai. That operation alone
is expected to cost over $3.5
billion.
Meanwhile, NAC has en-
countered problems with im-
ported laborers, mainly from
Portugal, who have been flown
back to their countries and with
its own field managers, several of
whom have been dismissed,
according to a report in Maariv.
Evelyn Richman and
Gerd of the Presidential discuss
the itinerary of the upcoming
JFSB Community Mission at a
recent parlor meeting.
Intense Interest
Shown in
Mission
Reservations are coming in at a
steady pace for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
Community Mission, set for Oct.
16-26. according to Al and
Marlene Finch, chairmen.
There is an intense amount of
interest in this mission by
community members.
"The Community Mission is a
comprehensive sightseeing and
study of the Jewish State from
the Golan Heights in the north to
the Negev Desert in the south.
"The cost of the Mission is
$999 per person, including meals.
Minimum gift to the Federation's
1981 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign is $1,500 for head of
household plus a $500 woman's
gift to the Women's Division.
Individual travelers will be
expected to make a $1,500
minimum commitment,"
remarked the Finches.
For additional information and
reservations, contact the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
Missions Desk.
Project Renewal
Questions and Answers
On Project Renewal
What is Project Renewal?
Project Renewal is a bold new plan to restore 160 seriously
distressed neighborhoods in Israel. These slum areas are a
threat to Israels strength, morale and vitality: the deprived
residents are undermined both physically and spiritually. The
name Project Renewal was given by the United Jewish Appeal
and the people of Israel.
What is our Federation's role in this massive renewal project?
Like many other Federation areas in the United States, we
have adopted one of the designated 160 neighborhoods Hod
Hasharon, located northeast of Tel Aviv. We have assumed
responsibility for upgrading the standard of life and living for
our adopted "family" in Hod Hasharon 16,000 men, women
and children.
Who are the people involved in Project Renewal?
Ten percent of Israel's population, nearly 3,000 people.
This figure includes 200,000 children (one of every five Israeli
children). These people are second and third generation
Israelis. Their parents came to the new State of Israel (1949-
1951) during its first wave of Aliyah from North Africa, the
Middle East, Yemen and elsewhere.
How did people become impoverished?
They were confronted from the moment they arrived in
Israel with a set of impossible historical circumstances. The
new State was deluged with crisis: descending itself from
hostile neighbors, struggling to house, clothe and feed
thousands of Jewish refugees from Europe and from Arab
lands; striving to integrate, educate and teach skills to new
citizens who often were culturally walls apart. The new-
comers were too many, too soon. Their needs were urgent and
the state's resources were sparse.
How well did these early immigrants adjust?
They had severe problems especially those from Arab
lands and the slums of North Africa (the majority of the
Project Renewal people). Their parents' generations provided
no model for beginning a new life in a modern society like
Israel. They lacked the experience and community support
systems necessary to help them cope with contemporary tech-
nology. A myriad of changes were required, but many new-
comers could not adapt. The result? They and their children
managed to live and grow up in Israel but OUTSIDE the
mainstream of Israeli society.
What is different about the approach of Project Renewal?
Project Renewal may be the first thoroughly integrated
comprehensive program of its kind anywhere in the world. In it
it combines: Housing improvement and enlargement where
possible; new construction when necessary. Communal
facilities establishing and staffing schools, nurseries, day care
facilities, synagogues, community centers, pocket parks.
Human Services, vocational training and employment; per-
sonal and family counseling; facilities for physical, and mental
health care; tutoring; home management services: meals on
wheels for the aged.
Hod Hasharon


Pave If)
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27
1980
CJF Executives Institute
NEW YORK. NY -
"Federation Management for the
80s" will be the theme of the
1980 Intermediate Cities
Executives Institute of the
Council of Jewish Federations
scheduled for July 6-10, at the
Del Coronado Hotel. San Diejro.
Summer G. Kaye. executive
director of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward. will represent
the community
Following an opening dinner
meeting on Sunday. July 6. a
series of workshops has been
scheduled for Julv 7-10. focusing
M& 9, f
More than MMI people attended the Jewish Federation of Soutfa
Krnward W estern Divi-ions Make Viiur Own Sundae Part) held
ih at Temple in ilie Pines. Goes) speaker. I)r Arnold Keiner
presented Sexual Awareness in the Modern Jeuish Family" and
Ste\e l.eoker. executive director of the Jewish C'ommunits (enters of
"south Honda introduced future program mini.' lor trestern Mroward
From left are Rand> Hiackhurn. Sandi Kh.ini I>r Arnold Feine .
Isruce Benefeld and Steve Leeker.
From left are Ben and Barbara Tobias, Barbara and Joel Lias and
Leah and Paul Flotkin
Participants make their own sundaes.
Sumner Kaye
on fiscal management, budgeting
and planning and campaign,
according to Murray Schneier.
executive director of the
Federation of Jewish Agencies of
Atlantic County. N J who is
sen ference chairman
Those attending the budg>
and planning on Wed-

Vice
C'Ji and
toi
Th on

conducted
i
rlea Ztbbell.
The campaign workshop on
Wednesday afternoon will be
conducted jointly by Darrell
Friedman, associate executive
vice president of the CJF. and
Mel Bloom. UJA assistant
executive vice chairman.
Don Cooper, executive director
of the Hartford Jewish
Federation. and Norman
Schimeiman. executive director
of the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County, have announced
plans for a Thursday, July 10,
morning meeting on "Financial
Resources" at which the subjects
of federal funding, campaign and
endowment programs will be
discussed by Frank Newman,
executive vice president of the
Indianapolis Federation.
A summary and evaluation
session will conclude the con-
ference at noon. Thursday, July
10.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
and embrace over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
United States and Canada
RELGO, INC.
aifi Artie*.
>*< Art. 4 on
HNnwIwliJudMca
'c Back* >nH 4 <
Open Sunday
1507 Washington A MB 532-5912
IMCIMIIKII 198 0

x
*
M-1-
AT WtLiniSO.y THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
2
3
6
Community Day is coming,
!
I"
1 1
12
13
Mark your calendars now.
14 15 tie 17 is [g 20
Thursday, December 18 ^
2] 22 23 34 25 26 27
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
28 29 3() 31
Diplomat Convention Center
The Inter-Faith Council of Greater Hollywood met recently to install
its new officers for 1980-81 and to honor Father John Madigan of St
Stephens Church. Father Madigan will be leaving for a neu
assignment in Lowell. Mass. Seated from left are Eleanor Han
dleman. at large board member; Sister Maria Danielle, Madonna
Acedemy. second vice president; Elaine Pittell, Jewish Federation of
South Broward. first vice president. Standing from left are Dr. Ira
Sheier. JFSB. executive secretary; Rev. Steward Austin, First
I'nited Methodist Church, president: Father Madigan. Sal Oliveri.
immediate past president and Sandi Khani. Temple Solel. treasurer.
Savings Sto&
with Unbeatable Rates!
WEEKLY SPECIAL
182 Day Money Market Certificate
Minimum Deposit $10,000 Simple Interest
ASK FOR THIS WEEK'S RATE
BI-WEEKLY SPECIAL
2Y* Year Treasury Rate Certificate
Minimum Deposit $100. Compound Interest.
ASK FOR CURRENT RATE
r-DAILY SPECIALS -
6 Savings Certificates
with $100 Minimum Deposit
Interest Compounded Dairy
ANNUAL RAT
8.00%
7.75%
7.SO%
?%
>%
6.00%
TEtM
I YEARS
6 YEARS
4 YEARS
30 MONTHS
It MONTHS
3 MONTHS
ANNUAL YtLD
7.78%
6.18%
The Handy-Dandy-In-and-Out
PASSBOOK ACCOUNT
5.50% per year yields 5.65%
Savings Certificates subject to substantial penalty for ttty
withdrew* Renewals sublet to change m annual rate and effective yield
$50 rrwwnum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
SAMATH SIRVKES FROM TEMPLE ISRAEL
FRIDAY NIGHTS AT 1:00PM en WTMI
93 1 m Dade and Broward Counties
102 3 in Palm Beach County
Brought to you by:
Washington Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSETS EXCEED ONE IILLION DOLLARS
COMVINIf NT OFFKf S SHYING YOU IN FLOMOA
AMI BEACH NORTH Ml AIM BEACH
\W5Z ?a" **?" '674*612 633 N E 167m Street. 6S2-92O0
? ^l,OI0^Ave '6'-65S0 222' N E 164m Street W0 3975
i NOf"2*rSy r>,ve 674-6563 HOLLYWOOD -------------------
I^aSJ* ??i/673-8306 450 NorhPa* Road '961-9192
17 Artnur Godfrey Rd/674-6710 BOCA RATON
810..ncc-n Road7674*868 aSSFpSSL
CORAL GABLES
ggSjfJjun. Rd 445-7905
BA^H^BoWSliNDS8003
1132 Kane Concourse '865 4344
899 E Paimetlo Par* Rd /391-8903
WEST PALM BEACH
*J66 0*eecnc*ee Bivd 686-7770
PLANTATION
833' W Sunrise BJvd .'472-2701
OEERFIELD
230 S Federal Hwy 428-6800
YOUR SAVINGS INSURED TO IWO 000
B> AN AGENCY Of THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
A" q-* OoOOrt.no Ernpioyc' 'lKnoIS
,ACltD SOtOON, Presoem. AtThur h COURSHOn, Chairman of the Board
FSL
\


Friday, June 27,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
d
Leadership Development Chairmen Named Local k*"1**8 National Meeting
Dr. Robert Heller and Dr. I
David Sachs have been named I
chairman and co-chairman,
respectively, of the Leadership!
Development Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South I
Broward, according to Dr. Robert |
Pittell, president.
"The Leadership Development!
Committee is programmed for
potential Federation leadership.
Programs fully explore all
aspects of the Federation and its
impact on the Jewish com-
munity, explained Pittell.
'' Past members of the two-year I
Leadership Development!
Committee have been active,
young leaders who have taken on I
positions of responsibility with'
the Federation and other con- Dr- David Sachs Dr. Robert HelleT
situtent organizations in South The first, to be held in the fall, tUe leadership Development
Broward, he added. wm feature guest speaker Dr. Committee, contact Sumner G.
Heller and Sachs said they Bernard Reisman of Brandeis Kaye, executive director, at the
have nine programs planned for University. Jewish Federation of South
the coming year. For additional information on Broward.
Hostages: New Breed of Martyr
Herb and Ellie Katz and Dr.
Saul and Susan Singer
represented the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
recently at a National Campaign
Advisory Board meeting held in
Washington, according to Dr.
Robert Pittell, JFSB president.
Herschel Blumberg, United
Jewish Appeal national Cam-
paign chairman and UJA officers
met with top leadership from
around the country to discuss the
campaign strategy for 1980-81.
Coffee Hour Set at Temple Israel
On Sunday, June 29, Temple
Israel of Miramar will host a
coffee for prospective members.
Those interested in learning
about the temple, school and
facilities should come in during
the morning and meet with Mark
Young, membership vice
president and his committee.
For those interested in
membership who cannot attend
Sunday morning, the temple
office will be open during the
entire summer to answer
inquiries.
Registration is now being
taken for the fall term of Sunday,
Hebrew, pre-confirmation and
confirmation classes. Pre
registration through June 30
requires no registration fee. The
Religious School is open to
members only.
Registrations are now being
taken for the pre-school fall term.
This program is open to the
general public with pre-school
children aged 2'/> to 5.
Rabb* Paul Plotkin will be
leading a tour to Israel on July 1
for a two week pilgrimage.
During the month of July,
Sabbath Service will continue at
8 p.m. on Friday evening and 9
a.m. on Saturday morning,
conducted by lay leaders of
temple.
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Humiliated by the unending
Iranian stranglehold on Ameri-
can hostages, our great army of
second guessers has been playing
hard ball with their criticisms of
every person and every bit of
machinery connected with the
abortive rescue attempt. This is
the high season of recrimination.
The pundits who take to their
typewriters when a mission fails
theorize on reasons for the
disaster. King of the scapegoats
in this election year, Jimmy
Carter, catches most of the
piercing darts. He has been,
variously, too patient, too
inexperienced, too hesitant, too
political, too trustful of the
military as well as too suspicious
of the military. The overriding
cause of failure, seasoned
journalist, Joseph Kraft, has
concluded, is "the sanctimonious
moralism of Jimmy Carter."
YALE'S STAR graduate, Bill
Buckley always three steps
ahead of the pack of Monday
morning quarterbacks is
intrigued by his own thought
that a secret Soviet agent, having
generated the highest echelons of
our Washington strategic ap-
paratus, may have telegraphed
our rescue punches to the
Kremlin. Furthermore, Cy Vance
must have been bothered with
that possibility himself hence
his departure from the office of
Secretary of State.
For a brief moment in the sun,
the finger of suspicion pointed to
Col. Charlie A. Beckwith, Army
commander of the ground forces
participating in the rescue effort.
Was he so hell-bent for churning
up out of the desert sand and into
the embassy-prison that he
ordered the go-ahead despite
dismal odds? No, a million times,
no, he told US.
As brave a soldier as the most
valiant, a rescue officer as ex-
perienced as the most seasoned,
he proposed cancelling the daring
mission when failure and great
loss of hie struck him as
inevitable.
ONCE THE dispute over the
advisability or quixotic nature of
the great rescue attempt began to
subside, a new hostage episode
burst upon the front pages of our
newspapers. Half a year after the
seizure of the American embassy
in Teheran by radical Iranians
with the Ayatollah Khomeini's
blessing, Iranian Arabs confused
the world by seizing the Iranian
embassy in London.
Now the game plan was not
Khomeini terrorists vs. American
innocents but a minority band
from the southwest province of
Khuzistan vs. representatives of
the Iranian circle that
Washington has been plagued
by. In this instance, ethnic anc
national complexities baffle the
unsuspecting bystander.
For there are Iranian Arabs up
from Khuzistan determined to
blow up the Iranian embassy in
London and kill themselves with
20 hostages unless Iran released
91 Arab political prisoners.
WE THOUGHT we had seen
one of the most astounding
examples of man's inhumanity to
man demonstrated when the
Ayatollah Sedegh Khalkhali, not
the Ayatollah Khomeini, insisted
on ghoulish expositions
characterizing the desecration of
the bodies of the American
victims of the ill-starred effort at
rescue in Iran. But this more
recent internecine maneuver
pitting Iranian religious fanatics
against Iranian Arab terrorists
outpaces the radar screening zone
of our understanding.
Students of Iranian history
and culture have warned us that
we shall continue to fail to un-
derstand developments in Iran if
we persist in viewing these
disasters with American blinkers
attached to our eyes.
Hailing Abraham our own
Abraham, so we thought as
the "Father of the Faithful,"
Islam once had a reputation of
tolerating both Judaism and
Christianity. In these days we are
told that the fiercely nationalistic
Ayatollah Khomeini is so
determined to restore the Islamic
^^ *)fo at...
Hou$ewresHrdwarerf>int.Locksmith.ShdesGirts
Bath/Closet ShopPt.o/Dinette Furnituref (oral Arrangements
Dinnerware*Lightinglectrical*P FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Summer Hours: Daily 8 am 6 pm, Sundays 12 !
100 E. Hallndal Beach Blvd.
Tel. 456-0566 (Broward). 949-1682 (Dade)
Membt* Haliandale Clumber of Commerce. Setter Business Division
world to the role it occupied
before the two modern-day Shahs
secularized Teheran with oil
wealth that the religious leader
will use any means, spill any
amount of blood, unleash any
kind of havoc to achieve his goal.
CAUGHT IN the crossfire oi
the modem Teheran created by
the Shahs and the culture, frozen
in time, characterized by all that
is holy in Qum, our American
hostages constitute a new breed
of martyrs.
Maiion Saliei
Post Haste Shopping Center
4525 Shendan Si. Hollywood. Fla
Phone 96) 6998
You probably have a will.
But there's another step to
consider.
It's called The Guardian
Plan"'. And it may be the most con-
siderate thing people can do for
each other.
Today, more and more
people are including it in their
plans for family protection. These
independent-minded people look
at life without flinching. They
believe that in the event of death,
loved ones should be protected
from having to make funeral
decisions at the worst possible .
time alone.
It's the reason they turn to
The Guardian Plan. The Guardian
Plan enables people to make
funeral plans in advance, at a price
they believe is right. And with
The Guardian Plan, the price won't
increase in the future, regardless
of inflation. If desired, payment
for the services selected may be
made in convenient interest-free
monthly installments. And all the
money is fully refundable in the
event of cancellation.
The Guardian Plan is a com-
mon sense, thoughtful approach
to a difficult problem. It avoids
last minute decisions. It offers
peace of mind. It protects loved
One of our experienced,
authorized representatives will
explain all of the ways The
Guardian Plan can meet your
needs. There's no obligation. Call
us to arrange a conven- ^f2*flfl
ient appointment. Or ^l >aJ
mail this coupon today.(: p^n1,?n
Guardian Plan Manager
Riverside Memorial Chapels, Inc.
2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Or call: 920-1010.
I want full details on The Guardian Plan.
Name________________
Address
City
State
Zip
Telephone No.
Oiher Riverside Chapels servinf South Florid*:
NORTH MIAMI BEACH: 16480 N.E. 19th Ave/947-8691
MIAMI BEACH: 1920 Alton Road (19th St.)/531-1151
NORMANDY ISLE: 1250 Normandy Drive/5811151
MIAMI: 1717 S.W.37th Ave. (Doulas Rd.)/443-2221
SUNRISE: 1171 N.W.61st Ave. (Sunset Strip)/584-6060
WES I I'Al.M BEACH: 4714 Okeeehobee Blvd.,683-8676
Five chapels scrvinK the New York Metro area.
RIVERSIDE
nori*l Chapels, Inc./Funeral Director!
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.


'< in
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27,1980
"Jewish Floridian
ltd SHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
American Savings 3600 Building
2800 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard. Room 707O
Hallandale. Florida S300S Telephone: 4B4-04M
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT -1 NE 6th St.. Miami. Fla. SS1S2 Phone 37S-4S08
FRED SCHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and PubUaher Executive Editor
The Jewish Floridian Doei Not Guarantee The Kashruth
of The Merchandise Advertised in its Columns
FORM 3579 returns to The Jewish Floridian
P. O. Box 012B73. Miami. Fla. M101
Published Bl-Weekly
Second Class Postage Pending at Hallandale. Fla 86*600
Fred Shochet
Federation officers: President. Robert Plttell. M.D Vice Presidents Paul
Koenig. Philip A. Levin. M.D.; Secretary. R. Joel Weiss; Treasurer. Jo Ann Kati;
Executive Director. Sumner G. Kaye, Submit material for publication to Marcy
Schackne. Public Relations Director; or Leslie Horn. Assistant Public Relations
Director
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish Weekly
Member of me Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate, Worlo
wide News Service, National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) 1 Year minimum subscription I7.H
13 TAMUZ 6740
Number 13
(Annual U.JO). Out ol Town Upon Request
Friday, June 27, 1980
Volume 10
::
Jerusalem at the Heart
The problem is that PLO disavowals will be |
$ mere window dressing to disguise an ultimate
1 Moscow -led takeover of the entire region. Anyone 8
who believes otherwise, including President Carter, |
:: is merely fooling himself in the same way that the |
S United States was fooled in toto into believing in >;
;S the revolution of Fidel Castro in Cuba as a step |
% toward Cuban democratization.
What occurred in Venice last week was;*
| predictable, Europe being what Europe has been :
g since time immemorial self-centered and im- ?
* moral. But what is as disguised as PLO disavowals :
S would be, should the PLO ever disavow the g
g. destruction of Israel, is that the autonomy talks *::
$: themselves are a code word I for East Jerusalem. The !
:: President lays his hopes on the talks as an absolute 5
S predicate for peace in the Middle East. i?
In the end, the talks, as they have evolved, are fe
a codeword for Jerusalem as a whole. |
For those who refuse to see, let them note the !:
S increasing reference to "the status of Jerusalem" as
San item to be negotiated'* as part of the peace-:?
v': making process.
Just how does President Carter feel about tha\
I Members of the AJPA aren't as certain of that as :
Sour report of the proceedings of the Association's 3
S meeting with the President shows him to be on :':
x': related matters. :
I Warring Jewish Factions
American Jews are constanly being admonished :j:
S not to interfere in Israel's internal disputes. Yet we :':
S should not sit quietly in the face of the growing j:j
bitterness between the various factions in Israel. ':'
:: The name-calling has gotten so bad that a group of ;
:: Knesset members from all parties have gotten I
|: together in an effort to end the vituperation that
S has marked recent Knesset debates.
But even more ominous is the threat of violence %
between the various sides within Israel. The I
S outrageous Palestine Liberation Organization S
: terrorist attack in Hebron May 2 in which six 1
S yeshiva students were murdered has increased the |
I demand by some Jewish militants for retaliation |
| against the Arabs. This may have been the motive :
S behind the equally heinous attack against West S
| Bank mayors which left two of them maimed. I No
| one yet knows who were the perpetrators of the i
attack on the mayors, but several hitherto unkown :
:| ultra-nationalist Jewish groups have claimed i
g "credit" for the attacks.
The Israeli government should act now. The :j:
Jews of the diaspora are expected to display their I
unity for the benefit of the survival of the Jewish ?
I State. The Jews of Israel can do no less.
Ex-SS Officers Go on Trial
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Two
former SS officers accused of the
wanton murders of concentration
camp inmates went on trial in
Hannover after a four-year delay.
The indictments against Alfred
Grams, 74 and Friedrich-Wilhelm
Rex, 67, were presented by the
State Prosecutor in 1976.
They are charged with crimes
committeed in April, 1945,
shortly before British troops
occupied northern Germany.
According to the indictments,
Grams and Rex were in charge of
the evacuation of the Hamburg
Neuengamme concentration
camp whose 5,000 inmate* were
ordered on April 7-8, 1945 to
march some 60 kilometers to the
Bergen- Belsen concentration
camp.
REX IS accused specifically of
shooting one inmate, Moses
Soedermann, because he
allegedly stole a piece of bread
from an SS guard. He is also
accused of shooting five other
inmates in a fit of anger because
he could not find his knapsack.
Two more inmates were
murdered by Rex in a dispute
over scarce food. In a number of
other cases, he killed inmates
who could not march fast enough.
He is charged with ordering 7 to 9
inmates to dig their own graves
and then shooting them.
Brazilian Jewish Community
Has Strong Ties With Israel
By BEN FRANK
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
To the visitor to the Jewish
community of Brazil, sights paint
the landscape of his mind and
experiences inspire him. Picture
this moving scene aboard a Varig
Brasilian jetliner approaching
Rio de Janeiro: an elderly
Brazilian Jew rises, dons his
prayer shawl and tefillin and
recites the morning prayer. It is
an appropriate introduction to
Jewish life in this fast-growing,
fifth largest nation in the world of
about 120 million people, in-
cluding about 160,000 Jews.
This is a dynamic Jewish
community not without its
problems of assimilation and
intermarriage but one, which
like Brazil itself, is hardly known
by North Americans living an
overnight flight away. Yet there
are about a half-dozen Jewish day
schools in Rio attended by a
substantial proportion of this
city's children. Frequently,
Jewish boys and girls can be seen
walking proudly to school with
emblems in Hebrew announcing
their colegio.
THE CITY of Sao Paulo,
which is one of the largest in the
world with over eight million
people, has about 75,000 Jews,
several kosher restaurants, the
huge Hebraica community center
and club; more than a dozen
synagogues and 60 Jewish
organizations.
In Sao Paulo, there is even a
(habad located on a street in
vhich the municipality changed
:.v name to read '"Rua Chabad."
And Sao Paulo, too. has its
Lubavitch "Mitzvah Tank." just
as does New York City and
Brooklyn.
Jews have reached high
positions in the life of this nation.
The present mayor of Rio. Israel
Klabin. is Jewish. Born in Brazil,
he is well-liked, a businessman
who is an intellectual, proud of
his heritage, and who with
dignity stood up to foreign Arab
officials who had refused to meet
with him. The result was that the
press supported and acclaimed
their mayor.
ONE OF the most outstanding
Jews of Brazil is Adolpho Bloch,
president of Bloch Editores, the
largest publishing and printing
company in Brazil. Bloch likes to
relate how his family on their
way to the U.S. intended to
stay here for only a year, and
remained for nearly 60. And there
is another tale, in a way symbolic
of the stature of Jews here.
"When Bloch calls the
President of the Republic," it is
said, "the President picks up the
telephone" in his office in
Brasilia, new capital of Brazil.
This city, "where the future is
the present,*' was hewn out of the
forest in central Brazil in 1960
and today it has about a million
people, including nearly 200
Jewish families. Bloch is proud of
his Jewishness. He fights
discrimination wherever it rears
its ugly head. He often is host to
outstanding world citizens,
including Henry Kissinger, and
the beautiful dining room in his
headquarters frequently is the
scene of exchanges of ideas on a
governmental and journalistic
level between the United States
and Brazil.
ANOTHER distinguished
Brazilian Jew is Hans Stern,
president of H. Stern Jewelers,
who came to Brazil with a penni-
less family fleeing from Nazi
Germany, but built an inter-
national jewelry concern. Stem
feels at home in Brazil. He recalls
traveling, even by horeback at
times, to the far north, staying
overnight in isolated towns,
seeking precious stones which he
received on consignment and
later sold as a broker back in the
cities.
As Stern noted in an interview,
there are Jews everywhere in this
country, for Brazil is a 21st
Century nation, larger than
continental U.S. Jews move
freely in all walks of life, in all
professions, in culture as well as
commerce, industry and
government, in real estate and
construction, tourism and the
military.
THEY ARE middle-class,
educated and professional, and
many of their families have been
here for centuries (the first Jew to
land in the U.S. came from
Brazil). They are fourth and fifth
generation Jews of Sephardic
descent who manage factories
and hydro-electric dams to power
industry in Manaus, capital of
the state of Amazonas and
located 1500 miles up the
Amazon in the heart of the
jungle.
In Salvador, the exotic capital
of the State of Bahia, one of the
continent's oldest cities, there is
also a synagogue and community
center.
It is spectacular Rio de
Janeiro, however, with 60,000
Jews, where one really finds a
Jewish presence in the
synagogues, the clubs, the
streets named after Herzl and
Ben Gurion, and a school called
"Escola Municipal Ana Frank."
MANY SPEAK Hebrew here,
as a large percentage of the Jews
of Brazil have visited Israel.
Their ties to Israel are strong and
on Yom Hatzmaut (Israel
Independence Day), for example,
it was a moving sight to be at a
holiday reception at the home of
the Israel government officials
where, hour after hour, all day
long, the Jewish community
greeted the Israeli represen-
tatives on the receiving line and
one could hear the Hebrew words
Hag Sameach being uttered with
much pride.

Envoy Denies Carter
Disavowed UN
Resolution of Mar. 1
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YOKK (JTA) Donald F. McHenry. the*
United States Ambassador to the United Nations,
maintains that President Carter did not "disavow'' the
United Nations Security Council resolution Mar. 1
criticizing Israel's settlement policy, only the references
to Jerusalem, according to an interview in the biweekly
journal The New Leader.
IN THE INTERVIEW with Gertrude Samuels, a
UN correspondent, McHenry said Carter did not
disavow the vote. "He (Carter) explicitly said it was with
regard to references to Jerusalem," the Ambassador
said. "He went on to reiterate the policy with regard to
settlements." McHenry asserted that the Mar. 1
resolution "did not condemn Israel" and "was not an
anti-Israel vote. It was an anti-settlement vote. I think
it's important to get that clear."
The U.S. envoy rejected claims that he personally
supported the resolution despite the Administration's
views. "I work for the government and, when I speak, I
speak for the government," he said. "No one has ever
heard me express my personal views."
tfi&r
OF\SKfi . hoirc
,


Friday. June 27,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
. Soviet Jewry Update
Leningrad Trials 10 Years Later
By STANLEY SPATZ. M.D.
Chairman,
Soviet Jewry Committee
It is 10 years since the
Leningrad trials. It has been a
very eventful decade. Much has
shaken our nation and our world
in the past 10 years. Most of us, if
we ever heard of the Leningrad
trials in the first place, have long
since forgotten the mass arrests
on June 15, 1970, and the trials
that followed.
Yosif Mendelevich remembers;
Alexei Murzhenko remembers;
Yuri Fedorov remembers. These
three young men remember well:
thev are still in prison near
Moscow. Their crime was
wanting to leave the Soviet
Union.
It is ironic that the mass
immigration of Cubans the past
few weeks has included prisoners
set free from Cuban jails and
allowed (forced?) to sail to the
even greater freedom of
American soil. How different it is
in the USSR, where so many men
and women have been sent to
prison as punishment for merely
asking to leave their country!
And so, while we in America
struggle with the problems
created by the sudden and huge
influx of Cuban refugees, it is all
the more appropriate to pause for
a moment and consider the
'Insufficient Kinship'
Affects Refuseniks
MOSCOW Yuli
Kosharovsky, refused an exit
permit for eight years because a
previous job categorized him as a
"security risk," recently received
1 another refusal. Although he was
informed that his "security"
classification was lifted, he was
iold that he would not be per-
mitted to leave because his in-
flation from Israel was not from
a relative of the "first degree."
The reaction on the part of
long-term refuseniks and acti-
vists in this city is one of outrage
and disbelief. Like other Jews
wishing to emigrate, they
thought that the new emigration
regulations were devised to stem
the flood of new applications for
exit visas. The fact that they are
being applied retroactively to
families whose applications were
handed in as early as 1970 has
caused great concern.
In a similar development, Lev
F.lbert, a prominent Kiev
refusenik and Hebrew teacher,
was told several months ago that
although his army service
classification had expired, he still
could not emigrate because his
relatives in Israel did not meet
the "first degree" criterion. His
wife's brother is living in Israel.
Plead For Dying Boy
MOSCOW The plight of
Sasha Landsman was publicized
in an appeal sent to Soveit
('resident Leonid Brezhnev on
Sasha's behalf. The appeal,
signed by more than 30 Moscow
refuseniks, asked that for
humanitarian reasons, the 16-
year-old boy, dying of leukemia,
be allowed to leave the country
for treatment in the West.
Sasha's parents, Emma and
Boris Landsman, have been
unable to emigrate because
Emma's former job made her a
security risk. For the sake of
Sasha's health, the parents are
prepared to split the family,
asking Soviet officials to allow
the father and son to leave. The
authorities' response to this
request has been a resounding
"no".
would-be refugees from Russia.
THE THREE young men in a
Soviet prison were part of a small
group of 11 Russians whose
peaceful, patient attempts to
leave the USSR were continually
thwarted by an inflexible Soviet
government a bureaucracy
that refuses to recognize the
possibility that a Russian could
really want "to live elsewhere.
That the mostly Jewish group
included two non-Jews reflected a
more widespread dissatisfaction
with Soviet life.
In an act of dazzling courage
and sacrifice, this group staged a
futile attempt to fly a plane to
freedom. This was not a hi-
jacking, mind you, for the plane
had no innocent passengers or
crew aboard; no innocent lives
were in jeopardy. They were
going to fly the plane themselves.
Most startling of all, however,
was that the dissidents knew that
the KGB, the Russian secret
police, was aware of their plan,
that it was already doomed to
fail! Yet they went ahead any-
way, with no hope of success,
simply to call attention to their
plight. And attention they got!
The Leningrad trials that
followed their arrest opened the
eyes of all nations and awakened
the consciences of all men. Those
of us in this country who valued
human rights and personal
dignity, who were already
fighting for equality and justice
in this nation, came to recognize,
and join, the struggle for
similarly inclined people in the
Soviet Union who asked only for
simple religious freedoms and an
end to harassment and per-
secution or that they be
allowed to leave.
WORLD reaction was strong,
and under the pressure of publi<"
opinion to which even tnt.
implacable Soviet leadership is
occasionally sensitive two
death sentences were commuted
to 15-year prison terms. Much
support came from the West
letters, demonstrations, protests
from sympathetic government
officials.
The Jackson -Vanik amend-
ment to the 1974 trade bill linked
Soviet-American trade to Jewish
emigration. The Helsinki agree-
ment of 1975 promised protection
of minority cultures in Russia
and a relaxed emigration policy;
although its promises remain un-
fulfilled, the document remains
an affirmation of simple rights
which we in the United States too
often take for granted and for
which brave men and women in
other lands risk and give their
lives.
Eight of the original Leningrad
prisoners recently have been
released, replaced, of course, by
others who have had the courage
to speak openly of freedom. To
Yosif Mendelevich, Alexei
Murzhenko, and Yri Fedorov,
completing their tenth year of
harsh imprisonment, the Lenin-
grad trials are a continuing living
nightmare. But to us, Leningrad
1970 must remain a call to action
in the struggle against tyranny
and an inspiration to those who
have joined that struggle.
AS AMERICA remains the
symbol of hope for the oppressed
around the world, Leningrad
remains the symbol of the human
spirit that nurtures that hope.
We cannot forget Leningrad,
lest we abandon the very ideals
that blessed our nation with
greatness. We cannot forget
Mendelevich, Murzhenko, and
Fedorov, lest we forsake those
who depend on us for survival.
We must mark this tenth an-
niversary of the Leningrad trials
with solemn rededication and
commitment lest we forget.
Write to the prisoners at:
Perm. Uchr. 8410/1 V.S.
Moscow, USSR.
Write to: Leonid Brezhnev,
The Kremlin, Moscow, USSR.
Three Soviet Jews Get Jail Sentences
V Jewish Exodus Reaches Low Level
,
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish emigration from the
USSR fell to the lowest level of
1980 in May when only 1976 Jews
reached Vienna.
According to the Student
Godunovto
I Perform in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Alexander Godunov, the former
member of the Bolshoi Ballet who
defected to the U.S. last year, is
expected to visit Israel in August
for a series of performances with
the Israel ballet crps.
Oodunov has relatives by
marriage in Israel. His wife, a
hallerina with the Bolshoi com-
pany, is of Jewish origin. She also
defected but chose later to return
to the USSR.
New Orleans Tour
Women's American ORT,
' South Ocean Chapter, announces
an escorted motorcoach tour of
New Orleans from Nov. 10-16.
Contact Ruth Zimmer of 3161 S.
Ocean Dr., Hallandale, for more
information.
Struggle for Soviet Jewry and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, this was 52 percent below
last year's monthly average exit.
Sixty-two percent of the May
exitees did not go to Israel.
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
As part of the continuing
crackdown on Soviet Jewish
activists over the past few
months, Soviet authorities
sentenced Moshe Zats, Shmuel
Rosenberg and a Mr. Hi let sky to
prison terms ranging from three
to eight years on trumped up
charges of bribery
Zats, a construction engineer
from Cherrovtsy, received a
three-year sentence. Zats. his
wife, two children and mother-in-
law received exit visas to Israel
at the end of 1979.
At the last moment, Zats' visa
was confiscated and old charges,
which were officially dropped in
October 1977, were brought up
again. At that time, the local
procurator, after a lengthy nine-
month investigation, had decided
that there was no case against
Zats and all charges against him
were dropped. The authorities re-
opened the case when he applied
to go to Israel in October 1979.
Rosenberg, from Tashkent,
charged with bribing a Soviet
official to obtain an exit visa to
Israel, was given five years
imprisonment and confiscation of
property. Rosenberg and his wife
applied to emigrate to Israel in
1979 to reunite with their two
daughters there.
Rosenberg was charged with
Article 153-2 of the Uzbeck
Criminal Code on Dec. 31, 1979,
at which time all the family's
property was confiscated. The
trial in May 1980 was held behind
closed doors.
The third Jew, Biletsky, was
sentenced to eight years in prison
on similar charges of bribery.
liEVITT \ Wl
Israeli
Academic Institution
Requires
Fund Raising
Executive
for
The State of Florida
EXCELLENT TERMS
DISCRETION ASSURED
Send Resume to:
Box IA I, TIm Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 01-2973
MJaaBi.Ffe.SU01
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
Menorah Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade. call 861 7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
irkmnmummm
STAMTtlto. KHtOOM MC'KKOMON
MtMOMM CHAHIS
Mfia MfMOMMU CHAMl!
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels alto in Deerfield Beach and Margate
Tht Oldest Jewish owned chapels in Broward County.
t
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
HOLLVWOOO 1921 PiintcMt Road 921-7200
NORTH MIAMI 11MS W D Hwy 94*6315
WEST PALM BEACH y Hit OkMChoMt Blvd 680-8700
TREES OF LIFE
For Dignified Fund-raising
Over 52 years experience in furnishing all
kinds of Bronze and Aluminum Tablets,
Memorials, Donor Rales, Trees of Life Awards
Portrait Tablets, Letters. Testimonials.
Dedicatory Tablets, Original Sculpture, Etc.
Send for free catalog or call.
UNITED STATES BRONZE
& ALUMINUM CORP.
1065 E. 28th St. Hialeah, Fla. 33013
836-2880 or 836-2908:
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
Temple 3etk 1
Wlemoelol
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful aurroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or write
TEMPLE BETH EL r..V>.-<
13S1 S. I44H AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 23020
fleam eaad me Hteratere w the abeve.
ADORES* _________-----------------------------H*ONC_
*


H)
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27, i9gn
Spotlight on Mel and Lutile Baer
By MARCY GROSS
SCHACKNE
Hallandale Beach abounds
with men and women who have
chosen to supplement their
everyday lives with activities and
events geared to the im-
provement of Jewish life world
over.
Mel and Lucile Baer of Parker
Plaza are two such exemplary
people. By their choice, they
chose a philanthropic lifestyle
which they have been living for
nearly all of their 50 years of
marriage.
Their recent golden wedding
anniversary celebration could
also be seen as a golden giving
celebration for Israeli youngsters
in Ramat Hasharon, Israel. This
year, the Baers established an
Israeli Tennis Center there for
the underprivileged children of
the area.
ANOTHER golden milestone
in the life of Mel Baer was when
he and Lucile recently visited
Ann Arbor, Mich. Mel was
awarded his 50-year emeritus pin
from the University of Michigan.
Jewish philanthropy began in
the Baer home back in the early
40s. The Baers were living in
South Bend, Ind. Jewish
Federations were still called
Welfare Funds" and Israel was
still Palestine.
In 1968, Mel and Lucile Baer
became permanent residents of
South Broward, and the Jewish
community has been much better
for it.
Having been active with the
Jewish Federation in their
hometown, Mel and Lucile felt
very much at home with the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward (then the Jewish
Welfare Fund of Greater
Hollywood).
WHILE Lucile was active with
the Women's Division, serving
on their board of directors, and
Douglas Gardens' Auxiliary,
serving as their president, Mel
was busy building a reputation
and list of honors that has
become a permanent part of the
Jewish history of South Broward.
As Beach Campaign chairman
in 1973, Mel organized and
structured what has developed
into the viable and ever im-
portant, hi-rise division of the
Federation's Combined Jewish
Appeal campaign. It was also in
that year that Mel visited a
community call Hillcrest. He met
with the president of their
President's Club and spurred
their interests with the United
Jewish Appeal.
The result of his efforts has
become an enourmous part of the
current day campaign. In 1974,
he accepted the entire chair-
manship of the Federation's
annual CJA-IEF campaign. In
1975, he served as co-chairman of
the campaign. In 1976, he served
as secretary of the Federation,
led the Federation's annual
Community Mission to Israel,
and wound up a three-year term
on the Federation's executive
board.
He brought his campaign
involvements home with him,
serving as chairman of the Parker
Plaza Campaign and later as
honoree for their building.
Mel continued to serve on the
ZOA Sponsors Tour of
Alternative Energy Sites
Lucile and Mel Baer
Federation's board of directors
but did not assume another
chairmanship until 1979, when he
became Cash Collection Com-
mittee chairman for the 1980
CJA-IEF campaign.
WHEN questioned about the
Baers' Federation involvement,
Mel replied, "Federation is a
means by which we can do the
most good for the people of
Israel. We can help Israel to
develop into a stronger state. The
Federation is also a facility to
reach the Jews of South Broward,
including the elderly and the
youth whose local needs are so
great.
"Lucile's and my combined
desires are to help our fellow
Jews who have been less for-
tunate than we."
An average person would at
best carry on a normal business
life with minimal volunteerism
with their favorite organization.
The "above average" Baer family
was not satisfied with "just"
Federation involvement.
Mel and Lucile are both
members of the Prime Minister's
Club and Guardians of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens.
MEL is a founder of the
Hebrew University, a recipient of
the "Man of the Year" award
from the American Jewish
Committee, vice president of the
Holly wood- Hallandale Chapter of
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, a recent recipient of
the Diamond Founders Pin from
Hebrew University, and an
honoree at Temple Beth El for
their Bond Drive.
Mel is on the board of Key
Club at Nova University, while
Lucile serves as a member of
their Gold Circle.
The Baers have three sons,
eight grandchildren and are
expecting their first great-
grandchild in December.
NEW YORK, NY. The
Zionist Organization of America
(ZOAI recently sponsored a five-
day tour of alternative energy
facilities for 20 American Jewish
leaders representing 4,000,000
U.S. citizens. This was the first
time a group of concerned
citizens has undertaken such a
"hands-on" venture.
"The American Jewish leaders
had the opportunity to observe
and evaluate, first-hand, our
country's energy options," Ivan
J. Novick, ZOA president, stated
upon returning from the tour.
"This reinforced their beliefs in
the crucial need to inform the
American people of the true
status of our country's current
methods of large scale energy
production, mainly coal and
nuclear. In addition, valuble
insight was gained in the area of
research and development of
alternative sources of energy,
including the actual availability
of wind, solar-electric and
synthetic fuel, as well as a wide
range of potential long-term
solutions.
"The leaders acknowledged the
need for a balanced view
regarding immediate and
cumulative social and en-
viromental effects, and also
became aware of the necessary
tradeoffs that are part of the use
of each alternative energy
source." Novick said.
The first stop on the tour was
the Bruce Mansfield Coal Plant
in Pittsburgh, Pa. ZOA President
Ivan J. Novick and Dr. Zalman
Shapiro, ZOA Energy Committee
chairman (left), the plant, which
is equipped with an advanced air
pollution control package.
The group's five-city tour also
took them to the Loss of Fluid
Test (LOFT) Facility in Idaho
Falls. Idaho. Here, a scale model
of a commercial nuclear reactor is
subjected to procedures
simulating a major loss of coolant
accident. Results are analyzed
and solutions to problems
developed.
In Albuquerque, N.M. the
visitors inspected the Sandia
National Laboratories. The day
included a briefing on the lab's
solar program, and tours of the
many solar and wind testing
facilities.
Major organizations including
the National Council of Jewish
Women, B'nai B'rith, American
Jewish Congress, United
Synagogue of America, Anti-
Defamation League of the B'nai
B'rith, Hadassah, Jewish War
Veterans of America, National
Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs, American Jewish Press
Association, North American
Jewish Students Network,
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRAC). American Zionist
Federation. American Technion
Society and the Synagogue
Council of America were
represented in the leadership
group touring U.S. energy
facilities.
The itinerary for the five-day
tour included, in addition to
those points cited above, visits to
a synfuel facility in Pittsburgh;
the National Aeronautic Space
Agency in Cleveland, Ohio: and
nuclear power plant and operator
training center in Zion, 111.; and
the National Reactor Testing
Station in Idaho Falls, Idaho,
which includes LOFT.
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247

RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Why should the Zeppelin
really be called a "Schwartz*?
A: Because "The Zeppelin" was
invented by David Schwartz.
David Schwartz was ar. Austrian-born
engineer who, in 1890, came up with the
idea of an airship with a gas-filled metal
container to make it rise. Because of finan-
cial reasons, the Austrian minister of war
turned down the idea. However, in 1892,
after Schwartz built a prototype in Russia,
the German government urged him to
So ahead with production for them.
Infortunately, Schwartz died before the
project could get off the ground. Shortly
thereafter, Count von Zeppelin bought the
patents from Schwartz's widow.
ANOTHER RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affec-
tion is to quickly become completely
open and informal with people and
things they particularly like. Samuel is
called "Sammy!' a snack is a "nosh"
and the famed Chicken Soup has
become known as "Jewish Penicillin'.'
And nght in keeping with this inherent
warmth, J&B Rare Scotch has come to
be regarded as a favorite part of the
'mishpocha'. Because along with its
elegance at formal affairsJ&B is
also the kind of 'relative' one can
take his shoes off with, loosen the tie
and relax with friends at home.
Madpocho The *u.ufc extended /om./v including rthmm
for. near remote and numerout
n
RARE
8COTCH
liauga


Friday, June27.1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 7
Carter Says 'No' to Role for PLO
So Long as Destruction Of Israel is Their Goal
WASHINGTON "We
will not negotiate with the
PLO and we will not
recognize the PLO status,"
a tense President Carter
told members of the
American Jewish Press
Association meeting here
Showing visible signs of
fatigue and shortness of
temper, the President,
responding to queries by
publishers of English-
language Jewish
newspapers across the
country, declared that
U.S. policy will continue to
be negative toward the
PLO "until after the PLO
recognizes Israel's right to
exist and until the PLO
also recognizes that UN
Res. 242 is the basis for
further progress for a
comprehensive set-
tlement."
THE EDITORS and
publishers were reacting to the
.June 12-13 resolution in Venice
by the nine members of the
European Economic Community,
which calls for "associating" the
IM.O in the peacemaking process.
Ostensibly, the European
initiative came as a result of the
stalled talks between Israel and
Egypt on autonomy of Arabs
living in Gaza and on the West
Bam. as '*ell as on the future of
Jeru.saU.nn. which Israel considers
indivisible and her capital city.
The EEC resolution is, in fact,
being viewed as "moderate" by
the Administration, including the
President and Secretary of State
Edmund Muskie. Capitol Hill
observers anticipated a much
stronger EEC Palestinian stand
in Venice, and it was this that
spurred resumption of the Israel-
''K>|it talks in Washington, now
scheduled for July 2-3.
CARTER TOLD the concerned
publishers that "Whatever the
European allies might do about
this, our position is clear and as
I ve just stated to you."
The statement was an en-
dorsement of the same position
taken by Secretary of State
Muskie following announcement
of the EEC resolution in Venice.
Carter further told the
-gtefrM1^
*

Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
*eicomes
you back to
his renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
tor a unique
Owning experience
Match your table to your
mood m one of 5 individual
rooms The Tent
Wme Cellar Studio. Place
P'oaiie Swiss Chalet.
Fine Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleature
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
[Iprivtw Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340SW32Ave.
445-5371
closed Mondays
MliMtiitta
publishers that the best way to
get "cooperation" from Europe in
the Middle East is to make
"demonstrable progress" ac-
cording to the Camp David
accords.
TO THE extent that we make
progress," Carter said, "those
European nations the
Scandinavian countries and
others I think will come back
to a more balanced approach to
the question.
"And if we can ever get the
Palestinian Arabs and the
refugees represented in the talks
through West Bank mayors, the
Gaza mayors and others, I think
this will alleviate tension con-
siderably and not only will stop
the rash of UN resolutions but
also will strengthen support for a
balanced decision on these
matters."
Carter vowed to "use all the
persuasive power that I have to
encourage" Jordan's King
Hussein in Washington this week
for talks with the President, to
join the United States. Israel and
Egypt in talks on the future of
taken "a more forceful stand"
with regard to Arab and other
foreign investments in the United
States, Carter explained:
you cannot single out a
particular religious faith and
have a special law that puts
restraints on them on the ex-
clusion of others";
". if some of the $90
billion a year that the United
States pays for foreign-produced
oil was not reinvested in this
country, the drain on the U.S.
economy would be very
damaging";
# Arab investment in the U.S.
is not really that significant. "A
much larger investment by, say,
a German corporation or a
British or a Japanese corporation
is publicized not at all or, if it is
publicized, in a favorable light."
Arab investments, noted
President Carter, are highly
publicized.
Jordan's King Hussein was in
Washington this week for
talks with President Carter.
The President vowed to do
his utmost to convince the
King that he ought to join the
Israel-Egypt talks due to
resume July 2-3.
the West Bank and Gaza within
the Camp David framework.
ASKED WHY he had not
Gwmyho Rebuffs Wafleriberg Query
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko has starnly rebuffed the latest Swedish
attempt to raise the MU of Raoul Wallenberg, the
wartime diplomat missingNn the Soviet Union for 35
years.
The issue was raised by Swedish Foreign Minister.
Ola Ullsten when he paid an official visit to Gromyko
late last week. Swedish official sources here say that
Gromyko replied "coldly and unmoved" and firmly re-
tated the Soviet view that Wallenberg died in 1947
espite at least 14 alleged subsequent sightings in Soviet
, "isons or hospitals.
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
6 mq "i*i". Q.6 mg Aicoint l pet cigwie fcy FTC mtiborf


Pairefi
PageS
The
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27,1980
Jewish Education & You
School in Israel
High
An increasing number of South
Breward high school juniors and ._ wj -s
seniors are participating in the "" J^ .
High School in Israel program. ^-*" 1
The local youngsters study for
eight weeks in an intensive
academic atmosphere in Hod
Hasharon, near Tel Aviv.
Living on the campus of
Mosensen High School, an Israeli
facility, the Broward teenagers
learn the history of Western
Civilization using Israel as a
textbook. Far from just another
tour, the High School in Israel
program teaches its students the
history, archaeology, the
religious significance and current
importance of each site visited
before the visit.
One student explained, "1 was
in Israel before the program and
saw Masada. But during the
Droeram, we went back to
At:
\
>
r
Masada. and it was lots more. It
wasn't just a mountain, it was
where people died for their faith."
BROWARD County schools
grant students participating in
the HSI quinmester full local
high school credit for their
studies in Israel. Students have
also found that colleges are
pleased to find HSI listed on
applications.
Temple Beth El Sisterhood
Announces Special Events
A luncheon and open meeting
for the women of Temple Beth El
will be held Tuesday, July 8, in
the Tobin Auditorium of the
temple, Hollywood.
The program features a beauty
class of skin care and glamor.
Reservations will be accepted
from Sisterhood and temple
members only no later than July
3. For reservations, call Anna
Wolfe, or Dorothy Sahm.
Service to the Blind Program
of Temple Beth El sisterhood will
benefit by Sisterhood's Petite
Luncheon Card Party to be held
in the Tobin Auditorium of the
temple, on Tuesday, Aug. 26, at
noon. The public is invited.
Sisterhood's Braille Services
provide study and test materials
for students at Nova Elementary
and Middle Schools, as well as for
students throughout the state of
Florida. Blind adults benefit by
the transcription of career and
technical manuals.
This group also provides
librarv books to the Jewish
Braille Institute of America. The
Braille Bindery group works
under the chairmanship of Mrs.
Milton Forman, with Mrs.
Abraham Halpem in charge of
the tape recording books for the
Nova schools.
For tickets and reservations
call Mrs. Sylvia Cohn, Mrs. Raya
Finn or the temple office.
High School in Israel holds five
academic sessions each year, with
about 80 students in each session
(more in the summer). Broward
students apply in >va? "ft
calling Dr. Ira Sheier, at 921-8810
for interviews for the program.
High School in Israel is an
independent institution. Director
of Admissions, Felice Traktman,
explains. "We try very hard to
work with students to arrange all
the logistics."
The students spend two
months on the campus of Mosen-
son, where they share a library
and dining facility with Israeli
teenagers. The HSI classrooms
and dormitory are separate, and
students live with counselors in
their dormitory.
The academic staff at High
School in Israel is directed by
Rabbi Lee Diamond, and all
faculty members are either or-
dained rabbis or have graduate
degrees. The faculty is composed
of Americans who have made
Aliyah to Israel.
HIGH SCHOOL in Israel was
founded seven years ago by
Miami Rabbi Morris Kipper, who
was then congregational rabbi at
Temple Judea in Coral Gables.
Rabbi Kipper is now director of
the program. He visits Israel on a
regular basis and, during his trip
this June, scheduled a meeting
with President Yitzhak Navon.
Navon, an educator as well as
president of the country, has fre-
quently visited the HSI campus
and has praised the school as one
of the rare programs that is
effective in building a Jewish
identity and commitment among
young American Jews.
In Broward. high school
students have also been
responding to reports from their
peers that although the High
School in Israel is a lot of
academic work, it is also
meaningful and fun.
Students have found that they
enjoy being treated as serious
and independent people who can
absorb a lot of knowledge in a
short time and who can personal-
ize their relationship with their
religion by learning more about it
and its home.
High School in Israel's student
body also includes non-Jewish
students who share the feeling
that their closeness to their own
heritage is strengthened by the
HSI experience.
South Broward teenagers who
have participated in the program
include:
Audrey Alterman. Jeffrey Babchirk
Carl Marie Harstow. Av. j. BernW
Debbie Blulh. Sherrl Bluth rESj
Bodne. Debbie Brudno. Ann Bullork
Ann CaaUllo. Jeffrey Comfeld. jlf
Desky. Faith Elchner, June Elchnlr
Lee Michael Flrpo, Randl Fern Fimn
Trlna Flelaher. Karen Frank likl.
Freedman. Brad Frohman, Gary Fmh
man. Arl Gelfant. Zobln Hellman
Also, Keith Javery. Robert J.v
Joaeph, Susan Khanl. Madelene Klein
Susan Joy Koplo. Keith Krlegler David
LlfkowlU. Eric Mandel. Debbie Melm.
Carrie Miles. Laura Sue Mulchav
Keyna Fran Nlad, Franclne Sue Pearl'
Jeffrey Plttell. Jeffrey Rabin, Henry
Rose. Jason Saver. Martin Shapiro
Gillian Silver. Harry Stem, WeWv
SpauldlnK. Randy Steckel, Bonnie
Topfer. Suianne Treusch, Robin
Wasserman, Debbie Welnstock, Dara
Ann Wolf, Mark Yeslow. Karen Zedeik
and Kin lii-lle Zwlck.
Miami teach s MATT KOtMIII
HOTEl 1 MACM ClIM
OPEN ALL YEAR
JULY4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
4 DAYS & 3 NIGHTS j^S 5 DAYS & 4 NIGHTS
July 3 to July 6 V?Bt July 2 to July 6
*65 SffiS" Hi $85
P'person
double occ
INCLUDING GLATT "KOSHER CUISINE
TV In All Rooms Dancing Enttrtainmant
Card Room Mo via* Fraa Parking
i,*, >. h. iksHIGM HOLY DAYS t SUCCOTN i
ServiosBwOl be conducted by SUCCAMpD
CANTOR JACOB JEROSOLOMSKI
GLATT KOSHER VAAO HAKASHBUT UNDER ORTHODOX
SUPERVISION OF RAW SHELDON EVER
For R*e*va4iofta Phone: i-538-7811_
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
WANTS TO SEND YOU TO ISRAEL!
r
interior Design
School
willsey institute
(305) 947-4590
Free Brochure
ENTER THE MAXWELL HOUSE" COFFEE
*a$ti oi fl\M>iri()\s>vnpsivK!S
JET PAN AM* TO LONDON OR ROME ^V ^^
WITH CONNECTING JET TO ISRAEL
GEPETTO
HAS WHITTLED
HIS PRICES
Sampler Sized
Complete Dinner
from
$6.95
Served fn*n 5p.m to
those *. 11 itl by 6 30p.ni
( >. Ulrica "l"l I
Mt-iiiri rruni-ii'i Ui'uihi
Spicvd -nh iMAflinaft
r'il f llh pride, and Sftml with lov
Wi coaiforlablv prMvd
Fl I iiiil.rd.lr 252S N I rrirtal Hwy
561 4227 Brent. 940 2334 Dad*
You're always a winner with Maxwell
House* Coffee. The full aroma and
great-tasting flavor gives you all the
good things you want in coffee...
consistently cup after cup after cup.
That's why today as it has been for
over fifty yearsMaxwell House*
Coffee is good to the last drop.
ISRAEL! The land of the very old
and the brand new. Where twentieth
century technology lives side by side
with first century tradition. A trip for
two. For 14 excitement packed days
and 13 nights you'll see the sights
The cities. You'll eat the foods and
meet the people. Anybody can win
Just fill in the entry blank and send it
in. And if you're the "chosen one"
Maxwell House* Coffee will be de-
lighted to send you.
1 Each entry must be accompanied Dy mnerseai trom
a iar of insiani Maxwell House* Cotlee ?" square cut
Irom the plastic lid oi a can ol Ground Maxwell House*
Cotlee or Itie word Maxwell House* Cotlee printed in
olocx letters on a 3" x 5 card and mail lo
Taile 01 Traextien Sweepstakes
Garter a Feeds Cur per (tori
0 lex MO. Grind Centra Sutan
New ftrk. NY 10017
I. No purchase required
3. Entries must be postmarked no later man June 30 I960
and received by July 7 1980
4 Winner will be selected by random Hmdloid drawing
under the supervision ol an independent organization,
whose decision is Ima in me evem any winner declines
me pnze or il tor any other reason me prize cannot be
awarded alter the initial drawing, a supplemental draw
Sor*awings wane held lo award the pnze Driving
be held on Jury 14 I960 Winner will be notified by
mM The winner s name can be obtained by sending a
separate stamped sefl addressed envelope to
OFFICIAL RULES-NO PURCHASES NECESSARY
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
"*i2fr Ho"**Coll < i|(,aM IrioWnnk ol dwii Food!.
tao Gn..ji f oodt Cotpotalion
Winners List
P0 Be. 3990. band Centra Suaen
Near Yrt. NY 10017
Prize win be awarded as soon as compliance ol win
mg entry with these rules is venhed in order to be
awarded the prize winning participant must be avail
able a the address shown on the entry txank or must
lurntsh a proper forwarding address to sweepstakes
officials prior to the date ot drawing
Prize consists ol round trip economy *rlare lor two via
Pan Am to London or Rome and connecting to Tel
Am Israel plus hotel accommodaKins lor 14 days
and 13 nights in Jerusalem or Tel Am
No substitution lor prize Prize is nontranslerabie and
not redeemable lor cash The trip must be taken m 1980
on an available Pan Am scheduled departure date
The sweepstakes is open to an u S residents except
residents ol Utah and employees land their tamrkesiof
General Foods Corporation ns advertising agencies
subsidiaries or attikates or Joseph Jacobs Organza-
lion tnc Federal state and local regulations rl any
apply V*d in any locality where taxed, restricted. Or
pronbrted by law
taxes ae the sole responsibaty ol the winner
10 Eachentry has an equa chance otwinning Theresno
pre-detennmed winner <*ur chances of winning arc
Oependent on and vary according lo the actual number
ol entries received
OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK
MAIL TO: Taste 01 Tradition Sweepstakes
General Foods Corporation
P0 Box 3660
Grand Central Station
NewYdrk. NY 10017
ENTER AS OFItN AS VOU LIKE. NO *UCHASE NtCtSSAKr
I
I Nam.
| *!'!'..
| City
Stilt
Zip
L .__________"I____|


Friday. June 27,1980
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Jewish Family Service Offers Aid to Community
By LESLIE HORN
"Our move from Ohio was all
try well for him. He simply
plugged himself into his new job
as you transfer a phone from one
room to another. But for me, it
wasn't easy at all leaving
family and friends.
All of a sudden I find myself
stranded in Hollywood in mid-
July with two restless pre-
schoolers in a new development
where I never see anyone outside.
Do you think it's easy just to go
up to someone at the pool and
make friends when you're feeling
depressed and unsure of yourself?
The days are so empty. I feel
withdrawn from the children, and
they begin arguing more and
more to get my attention. It
works I become irritated and
, 'fh out at them.
By the time my husband gets
home in the evening, not only
have I had a rotten day, but our
evening is ruined as well. He
wonders what has happened to
the rather adequate wife and
mother he seemingly left behind
in Ohio. When I try to tell him
about what has upset me, he gets
defensive and feels I'm over-
absorbed in my little daily
mishaps and that I don't un-
derstand the real strain he's
under on his new job, trying to re-
establish himself as the com-
petent worker he was back in
Ohio.
At night we go to bed ex-
hausted, feeling that the gulf be-
tween us is surely widening ."
Does this sound like a familiar
"story? It may seem like there is
no answer to your problems; no
help for you.
But Jewish Family Service of
Broward County has a solution.
"Jewish Family Service of
Broward County is a non-profit
social service organization,
established in 1963, whose
primary function is to promote
Duplicate Bridge
at Hollywood JCC
Duplicate bridge games,
usually held each Monday at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, North Miami
Beach, will be held for the
summer months at the
Hollywood Jewish Community
Center through Monday, Aug. 11
from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The community is invited to
join the duplicate bridge games
" .aid earn master points. For
further information, contact
either the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC or the Hollywood JCC.
JFS counselor Victoria Eichner
session. All counseling is kept con
may be subpoened by courts.
and strengthen sound family life
in the community and to prevent
personal and family breakdown,
according to Sherwin H. Rosen-
stein, ACSW, executive director.
"The program for carrying out
these objectives is administered
by professionally trained social
workers and psychologists,
providing casework counseling
services for a wide range of
personal, family and child care
problems, including marital dif-
ficulties, parent-child relation-
ships, individual emotional prob-
lems and mental illness," he
explained.
JFS provides planning to
persons experiencing difficulties
in adjusting to old age.
The agency offers bereavement
counseling, as well as group
experience for recently widowed
people. They help with adjust-
ment for those experiencing dif-
ficulty in retirement, and will also
act as an advocate and referral
source to those needing home
health care, Rosenstein said.
There are programs for
adoption and foster care.
"JFS helps families wishing to
adopt a child and aids women
who are interested in having their
child adopted to obtain proper
medical care and arrange the
adoption procedure."
Foster care is arranged for
those children who must tem-
porarily leave their homes, he
added.
JFS offers educational pro-
grams for community groups and
organizations to strengthen
Jewish family life. Programs are
also designed to prevent personal
and family problems, explained
Rosenstein.
"One of our newest additions is
the Refugee Resettlement Pro-
deft), leads a group counseling
Tidential; however, clients records
gram. Our agency assumes
responsibility for the resettle-
ment and readjustment of Jewish
and non-Jewish new American
families coming to Broward
County who are referred by the
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
(HI AS). These families are
assisted in obtaining housing and
employment so that they are
integrated into the economic and
cultural life of the community,"
Rosenstein remarked.
Emergency financial
assistance is also provided by
JFS.
"We evaluate and cooperate
with other agencies and
organizations in the securing of
temporary financial assistance to
individuals or families in finan-
cial stress, and we grant limited
financial assistance as agency
funds allow," added Rosenstein.
JFS bases the charges for their
services on a sliding scale. It is
the policy of JFS to serve
families and individuals at all
economic levels. The fee is in-
Come have W^Wf1
dinner at our house... Jfutpi
HARBOUR HOUSE
We have dozens of delicious entrees, veal, beef,
duckling, seafood, liver, chicken and lamb.. all
cooked to order and served in a charming
garden-like setting in beautiful Bal Harbour. We have
luscious rolls and pastries, fine wines and spirits...
all at sensible prices
$7.95 SUMMER SPECIALS
include entree, salad, potato, vegetable, beverage
^."N and home-baked rolls
We serve luncheon from 11 to 3 and dinner from
5:30. Complimentary parking. Closed Mondays.
Call S66-5559 for reservations or help
planning a private party of 20 to 200 persons.
You are always wekome at our house
;*^-'&w HARBOUR HOUSE RESTAURANT
Tip"i- i 10275 Collins Avenue in beautiful Bal Harbour
The Frimershtein family, from Odessa in the Soviet Union, resettled
in Hollywood, with the aid of Jewish Family Service and Hebrew
Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) both constituent agencies of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward. Seated from left are Lidya,
Aleksandr and Zinovy Frimershtein. Standing from left are Dr.
Albert Martin and Abe Halpern.
tended to be administrered with
flexibility so that no one is denied
service because of inability to
pay.
The fee is based on current
income and is adjusted if income
changes. Clients who are below
the fee charge level may con-
tribute voluntarily in line with
what they can pay, Rosenstein
remarked.
"The board of directors of
Jewish Family Service is the
governing body of the agency.
The board establishes policies
which outline the agency's scope
of activities, define eligibility for
service, sets the annual budget
and prescribes the salaries and
working conditions of the em-
ployees.
"The agency is a financial re-
cipient of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward, the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale and the United Way
of Broward County," Rosenstein
explained.
You do not have to be Jewish
to take advantage of the services
provided by Jewish Family
Service. Rosenstein explained
that the agency's responsibility
is to the social welfare of the
community as a whole.
You can make ah appointment
with Jewish Family Service by
contacting either the Hollywood
or Fort Lauderdale office between
9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday. The offices are
open until 9 p.m. on Thursdays.
The Hollywood office is located
at 1909 Harrison St., Suite 109,
Hollywood. The phone number is
927-9288. The Fort Lauderdale
office is located at 3500 N. State
Road 7, Suite 399. Fort Lauder-
dale. They can be reached at 763-
6340.
IS THE
K
KRACKER!
Oyster
Krunchier!
100% KOSHERTASTES 100% DELICIOUS
BAKED WITH 100% VEGETABLE SHORTENING. NOT LARD!



Page lu

The Jewish Floridian and Shptar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27
1980
Nothing Will Remain'
Begin Calls Venice Resolution 'Munich Surrender'
JERUSALEM "A
Munich surrender" is what
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin called the
European Common Mar-
ket's joint resolution last
Friday in Venice, which
demands that the Palestine
Liberation Organization be
"associated" with the Mid-
dle East peace process in-
volving the West Bank and
Gaza.
In a statement following
a Cabinet meeting here
Sunday, Begin warned
that Israel will ignore the
"Venice resolution" and
stick strictly to the Camp
David accords of 1978 as
the basis on which to
achieve peace in the Middle
East.
"NOTHING WILL remain
from the Venice resolution but its
bitter memory." he declared,
calling the PLO an "Arab SS"
and comparing it to Hitler's Mein
News in
Brief
SAN FRANCISCO Mayor
Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem said
here that Prime Minister
Menachem Begin was in a way
"philosophically responsible for
the June 2 bomb attacks which
crippled the mayors of Nablus
and K a mullah. Kollek made his
remarks in an interview with
reporter Phil Bronstein, taped for
broadcast June 12 on KQED, the
Public Broadcasting Service
(PBS) television station.
He was asked whether Begin s
insistence on Jewish Biblical
rights to the West Bank en-
couraged the violence against the
mayors. Kollek replied, according
to a transcript provided by
telephone to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. "I am sure
that he doesn't do it in an or-
ganizations sense, but philo-
sophically he does. You have a
situation where the government
believes in this; then you will
always have young people who
will interpret it in their own way.
Although the government is very
much opposed to this, you have
their philosophical support,
therefore you cannot divorce it
from the actions."
TEL AVIV Police and
troops, aided by helicopters,
began a massive search for eight-
year-old Oron Yarden who was
kidnapped but not released after
his parents paid the II. 2 million
demanded by the kidnappers.
The crime is said to be the first of
its kind in Israel.
CONDEMNATION
OF ISRAELI **f*/s| ,
f,_ TERRORISTS iU\ II
sTppdm
A
sfr-r.
3BB
0
c
S* v/\m&A_ t-ivao
Kampf because Al Fatah, a
branch of the PLO, issued a
statement in Syria last month
which urged the .launching of a
jihad (holy war) for the destruc-
tion of Israel.
Timerman Accuses Knesset Of
Yielding to 'Political Blackmail'
JERUSALEM (JTA) Jacobo Timerman, the
former editor and publisher of the Buenos Aires daily. La
Opinion, accused the Knesset this week of surrender "to
political blackmail" by the Argentine government.
Timerman, who was detained as a political prisoner
in Argentine for two years before he came to Israel last
year, made the charge publicly at the Opening session of
the 33rd Congress of the International Federation of
Newspaper Publishers which presented him with its
"Golden Pen for Freedom" award in recognition of his
suffering in the cause of a free press.
THE AWARD ceremonies were to have been held in
the Knesset building but were transferred to the nearby
Hebrew University. A Knesset spokesman said this was
done "due to requests by Argentine Jewry."
Timerman told the 450 delegates from 19 countries
attending the five-day conference that the Knesset
treated him "not as an Israeli citizen but as an Argen-
tinian prisoner."
He thanked the Congress for the award "in the
name of the Israeli people, not the Israeli Parliament
which yields to political blackmail." He implied that
pressure was brought to bear by the Argentine govern-
ment. Since coming to Israel, Timerman has been writing
a column for the daily Maariv.
The Strictly
GIATT KOSHER
HOTEt
On The Ocean
40th lo 41st SI
Miami 8each
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUCCOTH
Services Conducted by Cantor JACOB FRIEDMAN
BEAUTIFUL OCEANFRONT SUCCAH
Private Beach Olympic Swimming Pool
Poolside Therapeutic Whirlpool Solarium Health Spa
TV In All Rooms Appropriate Nightly Entertainment
SPACIOUS OCEANFRONT SYNAGOGUE
TMr Holts
Michael lilkowtr
i Alii Snilew
Resident Mashgiach,
Rabbi Schmuel Rubin
For Reservations
I
1-538-9045
0c See Your Travel Agent
In its June 12-13 resolution,
'the nine European nations called
on Israel to grant self-deter-
mination for Arabs living on the
West Bank and in the Gaza Strip
and to reverse Israel's policy of
establishing settlements in these
lands.
The EEC resolution also
rejected Israel's 1967 unification
of Jerusalem.
WITH OBVIOUS reference to
EEC petrodiplomacy. Begin de-
clared that "The heart of anyone
with a memory will shudder,
knowing the consequences of the
guarantee given to Czecho-
slovakia in 1938, after the
Sudetenland was torn from it,
also for the sake of self-
determination.''
Said Begin: "Any man of
goodwill and any free person in
Europe who would examine this
document (the Venice resolution)
would see in it a Munich
surrender."
He added that, seen in these
historic terms, he had no con-
fidence in proposed European
guarantees for Israel's security
following u negotiated peace
settlement in which the Palestine
Liberation Organization would
participate.
LAST WEEK. Ik-gin called
Europe "morally unfit" to join
the mediation process following
the breakdown of autonomy talks
between Israel and Egypt.
The Opposition Labor Party,
led by Shimon Peres, while not
going quite as far as Begin in his
sharp rhetoric, nevertheless
noted that Europe itself would be
"the chief victim" of its Venice
resolution.
The Israeli newspaper
Haaretz, noted, "The Europeans'
should be condemned for seeing
in a terrorist group a partner in
the peace process, but these are
the ways of the 1980's. Begin is
wasting his time by trying to
revive the memory of the
Holocaust. The PLO has won
effective recognition from
Western Europe And this, for
us, is not a favorable develop-
ment."
MEANWHILE, a PLO com
munique declared that the Venice
resolution was an attempt "to
rescue the U.S.-sponsored Camp
David process from its current
impasse and isolation." It called
the plan an "attempt to drag
other Arab countries into the
(amp David process."
In Cairo, officials said Egvpt
would like to see an African Mid-
east peace initiative aimed at
Palestinian self-determination,
but they emphasized that the
initiative would have to fall in
line with the Camp David ac-
cords.
In Syria, a statement in Da-
mascus framed by the PLO called
the Venice resolution "weak and
blind."
H3B
Summer Special Wt'rsSs&
ROOM RATE INCLUDES:3supervued meals daily...)
A.D.A. dietician...Free massages...Tennis (day and
night)...Million dollar health spas for men & women..J
k.M.& P.M. snacks... Yoga and water exercise classes
...Nightly en tertainment...Dancing...Shows...Bingo
...Movies and More!
AS LOW AS
. Larry Paskou s ^-a
ARBOR ISLAND SPA
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
*
*
olside Lanals and
169
10 ot 65 looim
Daily p p.dbl.occ
Special Rates for
Kiolside Lanals ana -^
aterfront Tower Suites -ft
Dode:751-7561 c^a BrowQrd:764-5777*
IPIHW*
IomT^
"sfTc^v
tit*** *
is<
Constant Rabbinical
Supervision Machg,ach
FINEST KOSHER CUISINE
RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
from Sept. u In 21
On the Ocean
al 67th Street
Miami Beach fr 33141
WORLD'S FINEST
VACATION
VALUE!
DAVID ROSNER S
CHILOREN S OAV CAMP
MANY ARTS 6 CRAFTS SANDY BEACH
FOR INFORMATION CALL
1-866-8831
IF IT IS S TEHLING YOU KNOW IT S THE FINES '
The youngster, son of Fenina
and Amos Yarden of Tel Aviv,
was last seen entering a car in the
wealthy Savyon section. Wit-
nesses said the child was sum-
moned to the car by a khaki-clad
man but were not certain whether
he entered it freely or was forced.
A telephone call to his parents
that night said the boy was safe
and demanded the money. The
police were informed by then but
the kidnapping was kept secret to
protect the boy's safety. The kid-
nappers called again last
Tuesday with instructions.
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin has appealed to the kid-
nappers to return the eight-year-
old child, and "prove that in spite
3f the crime you committed you
still have a conscience. Do not
x>rture the family." he said.
SUPERB CATERED AFFAIRS WITH AN ELEGANT FLAIR
BILL GOLDMNG-The 'Dean of Florida Caterers, and our Vice President brings his
unmistakable touch and unmatched experience to the Konover's unparalleled facilities
Superlative service, unexcelled cuisine, unequaled counsel and supervision-and sensible
puces Catered affairs that are treasured events.
Plea* call BILL GOLDRING at (305) 865 1500
Kosher
Catering
Available
Konovet ON THC OCtAN AT S4th ST N------------/ MIAMI
INTRODUCING A KOSHER HOTEL FOR MATURE
ADULTS ON MIAMI BEACH t ^
Th.. A.r .Conditioned r. Heated K()S'l -
WHIT XOUSCHOU -
ZflU??*ZV- *" 3 "0* 2 KOSHER
Sg* hotel ih.t ha. a Color TV wtm a
Cm 7oXrrr.te "WH! -! lliT and ft..only
hoM on tho ocoan adiacont to ooaulHul
Olympic Pool
1 aaaty
TV | (t
MPtawtteaa
Lummui Park.
Sorvtoa
Conditioning
OaHy Mate Service
Ocaantront Dining Room
Rf* at Ions Phoo.
24
Resident Mashgiach
Movtea Crafts Trips
*, Synagogue
ntertatement
lanrtcai
For
1-531-6483
Idlll.ii.'IFl'.il
Owner Mqml Baumrind EhrenrP.rh


ay, June 27,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page II
Srandfather of Vitas Gerulaitis
Israelis on Trail of Alleged War Criminal Living in Queens, N. Y.
,JEW YORK (JTA) The daily
ess here has not yet run a story on a
pward Beach, Queens resident whom
raeli intelligence has called "one of the
,ost important Nazi war criminals in
br files," although local newspapers
fere informed of his background over
vo years ago.
Stasys Cenkus, now a permanent
bsident alien (No. 8100124/ 601481 Jl),
las Lithuanian Chief of the Secret
folice, collaborating with the Nazi
:ret police in Lithuania, headed by
M'.stapo chief Karl Jaeger. In copy-
lighted material from his forthcoming
|ook on the subject, author-journalist
Charles Allen, Jr. calls Cenkus one of
Lhe top five alleged Nazi war criminals
|iving in America today.
IN HIS collaborative role, Cenkus has
^een implicated in various Einsatz-
ruppen actions against Lithuanian
?ws in 1941-43 including appropriation
Jewish money and property,
lumerous witnesses and documents in
le Soviet Union testify to his role in
Ratings, transports to death camps,
Id murders.
His secret police unit was on a direct
porting line to Ampt IV of the
t-stapo. The Soviet Union has con-
demned him to death in absentia for his
war crimes.
Before World War II, Cenkus was
chief of the Lithuanian State Security
Police in the Marijampole district of
Lithuania. He fled to Germany in 1940,
after being charged with subversive
activity against the Lithuanian state. In
Germany, he was trained by the
Gestapo and returned to Lithuania after
the Nazi victory there, Allen said.
AFTER THE war, Cenkus hid out in
American-occupied Germany and
became involved with the International
Refugee Organization, which functioned
as an escape mechanism for some Nazis.
Although the group knew of the charges
against him, they gave him DP status
and helped him get into the United
States, according to Allen. From 1946 to
1948, he was a member of the U.S.
Army Intelligence Corps, and he entered
the U.S. in 1951. Allen testified before
Congress in 1978 that Cenkus was
employed by the FBI and CIA.
Although Cenkus' background and
locale were reported in the former
Chicago Daily News in the fall of 1977
by William Clements and Charles Nico-
demus, and this information was given
to New York daily newspapers by Allen,
jthe story has never appeared in the
|press here.
Allen said he believes the news-
papers have omitted the story because
Cenkus is the grandfather of Vitas
Gerulaitis, third-ranking pro tennis
player in the world.
ALTHOUGH the New York dailies
have claimed that the city resident's
Nazi background and his link with
Gerulaitis are not "a local story," Allen,
a foremost expert on Nazi war criminals
in America, attributes the omission to
"selective hypocrisy," to protect the
money market of professional tennis.
Gerulaitis, himself, made a virulently
anti-Semitic remark last month, which
was buried on the sports pages of The
New York Times and The New York
Post on May 10. In criticizing Jewish
linesman Lee Gould, Gerulaitis said to
news reporters: "That guy should be
put into a crematorium and burned to
death."
He made the remark on May 5, after
his victory John Sadri at the West Side
Tennis Club in Forest Hills made him
eligible for the semi-finals of the
$500,000 Tournament of Champions.
Gerulaitis subsequently won the
championship and $100,000.
HH
.,.,. .
OKlAWMA
^\\
STAWNG
"A" Ronald Reagan (cowboy^
$ Ommy CARTCR. (/a* mm)
I Shortly?
The Argus
STATE OF
SRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES;

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
n A Subsidiary <>< I
Leumi
I Bank Ltumi W-larMi B M
18 Ed3' 48th Street
New York N Y 1Q017
Securities (212) 759-1310
Corporation Toll Free (800) 221 -4838
IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
WHEN YOU DIDN'T!
The rich ground aroma and fresh perked taste
makes Maxim*the coffee any busy balbusta
would be proud to serve. Especially with the
strudel. Or, the Honey cake. Or the lox n
bagels. Or whenever friends and 'mishpocheh'
suddenly drop in. Maxim* the 100% freeze
dried coffee that'll make everyone think you
took the time to make fresh perked coffee
when you didn't!


10
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27, I960
P
Beg
nap|
old.
Df tl
Itill
X)ltl
City Council of New York congratulates HIAS Centennial. Left to right are Councilman
Abraham G. Gerges; William Males, director of HIAS Post-Migration Department; Carol
Bellamy, president of the City Council; and Councilman Theodore Silverman.
Headlines
New York Salutes HIAS Centennial

The City Council of New York at a full session
meeting, adopted a resolution officially con-
gratulating III AS on its 1980 centennial.
The resolution, introduced to the legislative
body by Councilman Abraham G. Gerges, was
praised by City Council President Carol Bellamy
and passed with "unanimous consent."
In presenting the resolution, Councilman
Gerges stated: "Over the past one hundred
years, HIAS has been responsible for the world-
wide rescue and resettlement of over four million
Jews ... As evidenced today, with a commit-
ment to the U.S. Government for providing
assistance to Indochinese 'boat people,' HIAS
has and continues to reach out to all people,
wherever religious, racial or political persecution
prevail."
Sam Rothberg, one of the biggest individual
foreign investors in Israel, is planning to pull his
investments out of the country, according to
rumors reported by Yoram Kessel in Jerusalem
for the London Jewish Chronicle. The rumors are
being denied by Shimon Horn, who is Rothberg's
representative in Tel Aviv. "We never divulge
any of our company's activities to the press,"
declared Horn.
But the rumors persist, according to Kessel. A
business acquaintance of Rothberg's said that
Rothberg has hinted privately that he no longer
feels able to keep abreast of all his business
affairs and is thinking of shifting some of his
capital away from Israel.
In 1960, Rothberg established the New York-
based Israel Investors Corp., which includes
mainly small American investors. He is
president of the corporation, which has a capital
of some $30 million invested in 36 factories and
other Israeli enterprises.
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
has revealed that a major national academic
society the Organization of American His-
torians was deceived into giving its mailing
list to an anti-Semitic front group set up to
prove that six million Jews were not killed
during the Nazi years and that the Holocaust
was a hoax perpetrated by Jews themselves.
The group, the Institute for Historical Review,
was established last fall by Willis A. Carto,
whose Washington-based, far right Liberty
Lobby, according to ADL, is "the largest and
best-financed anti-Semitic apparatus in the
country today."
The new institute, Justin J. Finger, director of
ADL's Civil Rights Division, said, is using the
American Historians' mailing list of history
teachers to promote subscriptions to its "Journal
of Historical Review."
Mr. Finger said ADL has given documen-
tation of the Institute's true nature to Dr.
Richard Kirkendall, executive secretary of the
Organization of Historians, which is head-
quartered on the campus of Indiana University.
I
Los Angeles attorney Burton S. Levinson has
been reelected chairman of the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry at a meeting of the
organization's Board of Governors. Levinson,
who was first elected NCSJ chairman in 1979,
had been chairman of the Commission on Soviet1
Jewry of the Jewish Federation Council of
Greater Los Angeles, and is also chairman of the'
National Development Committee of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
Levinson pledged to the NCSJ leadership that
he will continue to seek new options which would
reflect the fact that "the struggle of Jews who
wish to emigrate, or to live in the Soviet Union
as Jews with full rights accorded to other
national and religious groups, is still a
paramount issue. It should transcend other
political considerations." ,
Pianist and comedian, Victor Borge of Green-
wich, Conn., has been appointed by President
Carter to serve on the United States Holocaust
Memorial Council.
The Council will carry out the recom-
mendations of its predecessor, the President's
Commission on the Holocaust, by establishing a
memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., an
educational and research foundation, and a
Citizen's Committee on Conscience. Funding will
be principally from private contributions. The
Council will submit its report to the President in
December of this year.
Borge was established as one of the leading
stage and screen personalities in Scandinavia
when the Nazi invasion took place. As a
humorist, Borge was noted for his biting satire
of Hitler, and thus he became a target of the
Nazis. He escaped to America on the last ship to
leave Finland.
An honorary Doctorate has been conferred by
Tel Aviv University upon Prof. Hussein Fawzi,
Egyptian scholar and intellect, and ardent
supporter of the Middle East peace process, who
became the first Egyptian to receive an
Honorary Doctorate from an Israeli university.
Prof. Fawzi, former Rector of Alexandria
University and former Minister for Cultural
Affairs in the Egyptian Government, is today
Vice President of the Institut d'Egypte, and was
recently awarded an Honorary Doctorate of the
Egyptian Academy, conferred upon him by
President Anwar Sadat. Prof. Fawzi has been
constant in his call for conciliation in the Middle
East.
In testimony before the Republican Platform
Committee in New York City, Ivan J. Novick,
president of the Zionist Organization of America,
characterized the question of Israeli settlement
policy as a "misleading and false issue."
Said Novick, "The settlements are not an
impediment to a Middle East peace except as the
Arab world prefers to construe them as such.
They present no roadblock to harmonious co-
existence between Palestinian Arabs and Jews
except as the PLO wishes to construe them as
such."
Novick pointed out that West Bank settle-
ments helped to anchor the defense of Jerusalem,
and added that "settlement" had become a code
word for East Jerusalem, which includes the Old
City.
"The phony settlements issue strikes with
coldly calculated intention at Jerusalem the
Jewish heart. The object is to deny Jerusalem to
Israel, thereby attacking the legitimacy of Israel
as a Jewish State. Thus, the Jewish people
would have no past, present or future."
JFDA Elects LeVine
Robert W. LeVine, a partner in
Menorah Chapels of South
Florida, has been elected
president of the Jewish Funeral
Directors of America (JFDA).
The organization includes
nearly 100 firms nationwide and
in Canada, representing about 90
percent of the Jewish funeral
home industry. A member in the
association for 18 years, LeVine
had formerly served as editor of
its quarterly journal and as an
active member of the Education
and Public Information Com-
mittee.
Elected first vice president of
the association was Joseph Roth,
also a partner in Menorah
Chapels, Broward County's
oldest Jewish owned-and-
operated funeral firm.
Menorah Chapels was doubly
honored by the elections," noted
Mark Weissman, managing
partner, at his office in Menorah
Chapels' Sunrise facility. "Both
Bob and Joe have stressed their
concern for progressive thinking
in view of the changing directions
in funeral service nationwide. At
the same time, they are dedicated
to preserving the traditions that
distinguish the Jewish funeral
chapel." Other Menorah Chapels
are located in Margate and
Deerfield Beach.
LeVine, 42, is vice president
Robert Le Vine
and director of Stanetsky-
Schlossberg-Solomon Memorial
Chapels of Brookline, Mass. and
resides in Wellesley Hills, Mass.
Roth, 55, is a partner in Piser
Memorial Chapels, Skokie, 111.
Also elected to office in the
JFDA were: Richard Stein of St.
Louis, Mo., second vice
president; Sonny Levitt of
Hollywood, third vice president;
Herman Goldberg of Rockville,
Md., secretary, Gordon Weil, Jr.
of Cincinnati, Ohio, treasurer;
Manual Golov of Salem, Mass.,
editor-in-chief.
Jewish Feminists Fear
What Will Happen
NEW YORK Jewish
feminists have voiced "deep
resentment and profound
dismay" that next month's
World Conference of the United
Nations Decade for Women, to be
held in Copenhagen, has been
"subverted by the intrusion of
political issue the alleged
plight of Palestinian women.''
Chiae Herzig, co-president af
the national Women's Division of
the American Jewish Congress,
spoke on behalf of her
organization and the Leadership
Conference of National Jewish
Women's Organizations at a
planning meeting in Washington
"WE are gratified by
assurances from the
Administration that the United
States delegates to Copenhagen
have been instructed to devote
their efforts to the urgent agenda
of the Conference: to improve
health services, to expand
education and to increase em-
ployment opportunities for
women around the world," Mrs.
Herzig said.
"Together with all concerned
women, we express our deep
resentment and profound dismay
that the Conference has already
been subverted by the intrusion
of a political issue the alleged
plight of Palestinian women.
"Part of the documentation
developed for Copenhagen
consists of unabashed PLO
propaganda prepared by the
Economie and Social Council that
has admitted the PLO into full
membership and excluded Israel.
"GIVEN THE composition
and organization of the Con-
ference, it appears clear to our
groups that the debate in
Copenhagen will suffer from the
same defects as other recent UN
forums.
"Representation will be
heavily skewed. Delegates
subject to Arab-Soviet influence
will come carefully instructed.
There will be no way for Israel
to escape condemnation and no
way to prevent the subversion of
the Conference from its true
purpose to one that serves the
propaganda needs and purposes
of the PLO.
For The
Nurse You Need
^ T g NOW
N4 cMcaI
Services Imc
Call 9633320
RNs, LPNs, Aides
# -___i^ -- -*- j a__ fcj A
UrfTHIf MtOM m Mffl
A single call arranges your
exact needs lor care:
OH CALL 24 HOURS
FOOT FACTS
ON TAPE
Free Foot Health
Information
On Your Problems
To listen,
Request by Number
D1 Bunions
D2 Nail Problems
D3 corns-Calluses
04 Heel Pain
D5 Arch Pain
D6 Skin problems
D7 sports injuries
D8 Circulation problems
Call
t 456-4933
DR. ARTHUR B.K0RB El
DPM
ntntiwrit (H##e) M#fftn *
IW4 S. 0 Hollon eeeiTaftst
TaftHoNywood Center
1-1716


iday, June 27,1960
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
Announces
IA trio of personalities in
ewish life will compose the
kculty of the Institute of
Judaism, sponsored by District
five of B'nai B'rith, to be held at
he Wildacres Retreat, in Little
Switzerland, N.C., fronxThura-
ay, Aug. 21 through Sunday
Ifternoon, Aug. 24.
Although sponsored by B'nai
S'rith, the Institute will be open
the general Jewish public in
the six states: Florida, Georgia,
[.South Carolina, North Carolina,
Maryland and Virginia and the
District of Columbia, which make
[up the district.
The faculty includes Dr. Dov
Iperetz Elkins, who combines his
Itraining as a rabbi with advanced
[studies in counseling and
[humanistic education; Dr.
Mervin Verbit, associate
professor of sociology at
Brooklyn College and currently
visiting professor at Tel Aviv
University; and Dr. Jonathan
Woodier, assistant professor in
the Hornstein Proeram in Jewish
Communal Service at Brandeis
University, where he teaches
courses in Jewish community,
identity, and contemporary
Jewish life.
Dr. Elkins was ordained as a
rabbi by the Jewish Thelogical
Seminary and received his
doctorate in counseling and
humanistic education at the
Colgate, Rochester (N.Y.)
Divinity School.
Dr. Verbit has a Ph.D. degree
from Columbia University. Dr.
Woocher has a Ph.D. in religious
studies, with a concentration on
the history of Judaism, from
Temple University and also
attended the Reconstructionist
Rabbinical College.
Each member of the faculty
will deliver three lectures,
followed by discussion, on the
over-all theme: "Strengthening
Jewish Identity: A challenge for
the '80's." The limitation of 90
persons for the Institute assures
the opportunity for all attending
to participate in discussion.
The setting of Wildacres, a
mountain top retreat of 1,400
acres in the heart of the Blue
Collective Punishment
Finger of Blame Pointed at Weizman
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Deputy Defense Minister
Mordechai Zipori claimed
that his former chief, De-
fense Minister Ezer Weiz-
man, was solely respon-
sible for the collective
punishment of two West
Hank Arab families last
month because one mem-
ber of each family allegedly
was involved in the stoning
of cars in which Israeli
officials were riding. Weiz-
man resigned on May 26
over basic differences with
the Likud-led government.
The families were removed
from their homes and relocated
in a deserted refugee camp near
Jericho where minimal facilities
were lacking. The incident raised
strong protests in Israel and
abroad, and the families were
subsequently returned to their
homes on Weizman's orders.
ZIPORI, who was reappointed
to his post after Weizman quit,
testified before the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee on the issue of collec-
tive punishment. He said that
normally an expulsion order
required the Prime Minister's
approval before it was carried
out, but in the case of the two
families, the Defense Minister
acted on his own because they
were not being deported from
Israel controlled territory.
Zipori conceded that collective
I punishment, such as the im-
I position of curfews, was not the
1 ideal way to keep order in the
[territories but there were in-
stances when it was the only
neans available short of force.
IKs Amnon Rubinstein of the
Shai faction and Yossi Sarid of
the Labor Party maintained that
collective punishment was un-
just and ineffective.
They referred to the 24-hour
purfew imposed on the West
lank Arab town of Hebron after
ambush killings of six
yeshiva students there on May
p. The curfew lasted 12 days and
s still in force during the- night-
jme hours.
MAIM DRUCKMAN, a Na-
lonal Religious Party MK,
psisted on the other hand that
ollective punishment was neces-
in Hebron. He claimed that
et of the Arab population
knew in advance that an ambush
was-planned and stocked up with
food before the attack
preparation for the curfew.
in
Dr Mervin Verbit
Ridge Mountains, is conducive to
the type of cultural experience
which has been characteristic of
the Institutes of Judaism at
Religious services will be
conducted daily. Opportunities
for informal recreation will be
provided during the afternoon,
with lectures and discussion
scheduled for mornings and
evenings.
The Wildacres Retreat was
established in 1946 bv the late
! Dr. Jonathan Woocher
Mr. and Mrs. I.D. Blumenthal,
dedicated to the betterment of
human relations and inter-faith
amity. The facilities are operated
on a non-profit basis.
Further information and
applications for enrollment in the
Institute may be secured from
Dr. A.J. Kravtin, chairman of the
Institute, who may be contacted
at 1715 Preston Drive, Colum-
bus, Ga., 31906. Dr. Kravtin is
co-chairman of the Adult Jewish
Education Committee of District
Five of B'nai B'rith.


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27,1980
i
i
i
1
i
t
i
I
t
F
D
1
B
m
ol
Oi
St
X
Gotham Memorial
For Jewish Businessman
Executed by Iranians
Fear for Afghanistan's Jewish Community
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA)
More than 300 people,
among them Jewish
leaders, Israeli officials and
members of the Iranian
Jewish community in New
York attended a memorial
service here for Albert
Danielpour, an Iranian
Jew executed in
Hamadan, Iran on June 5.
The service was held at
the Fifth Avenue
Synagogue and was
sponsored by all maior
>ewish organizations in the
metropolitan area. It was
coordinated by the Jewish
Community Relations
Council of New York.
THE 52-year-old Danielpour
was accused of cooperating with
the CIA and with Israeli in-
telligence and was also charged
with helping to establish the
"Zionist government in Israel.''
Although he denied all charges,
he was sentenced to death Apr.
10 by the Islamic Revolutionary
Court in Teheran.
His sentence was commuted to
three years' imprisonment after
many interventions on his behalf.
But last Thursday, upon a direct
order from Ayatollah Kalkali, he
was executed in Hamadan.
The memorial service here,
which was also attended by
Danielpour's two brothers and a
sister, was also to express protest
and anger as well as concern for
other Iranian Jews now im-
prisoned in Iran and who may
become subject to the same fate.
DANIEL SHAPIRO, vice
president of the JCRC who
chaired the program, said that
Jews all over "and all men of
conscience" should not sit idly by
in the face of the harsh times
confronting Iranian Jews. Rabbi
Nisson Shulman of the Fifth
Avenue Synagogue, said that
Danielpour was a Kadosh
(martyr) who was "blameless and
innocent of any crime."
He was murdered, Shulman
charged, "not because of what he
did but because of what he was
a Jew." He added that
Danielpour has become a symbol
of the hatred of our enemies, who
wanted to "Attack Israel and the
Jewish people" through him. He
called for a campaign "to touch
the conscience of the world," as
to the fate of Iranian Jews.
The 46-minute memorial
gathering was also addressed by
Ambassador Jerome Shestack,
U.S. representative to the United
Nations Commission on Human
Rights and former president of
the International League for
Human Rights. He declared:
"The execution of Danielpour
and others by summary
proceedings is a symbol of
lawlessness. The holding of the
hostages by the militants is a
symbol of inhumanity. These are
the symbols of the failure of the
revolution that so many wanted
and looked upon with hope."
THE SERVICE concluded
with the reading of Li Moleh
Rachamim, the traditional
Jewish memorial prayer, by
Cantor Sherwood Coffin, of the
Lincoln Square Synagogue.
Consul General Yosef Kedar of
Israel, represented the Israel
government.
Memorial services for
Danielpour were held in other
major cities across the United
States. More than 1,000 persons
attended a service at Temple
Sinai in Los Angeles, sponsored
by the Jewish Federation Council
in conjunction with the Temple.
t-.ariier. two American Jewish
leaders denounced the Iranian
government's action. Bertram
Gold, executive vice president of
the American Jewish Committee,
said his organization "notes with
revulsion and renewed concern"
the report of Danielpour's
execution.
EDGAR M. BRONFMAN,
acting president of the World
Jewish Congress, in a statement
issued in Paris, where he was en
route to Israel, called the
execution of Danielpour "a cruel
and ominous disregard of
civilized standards of justice and
decency. It makes one tremble for
those now behind prison walls
whose fate lies in the hands of
men who have such contempt for
international opinion and the
dictates of ordinary humanity."
Bronfman's statement was made
available by the New York office
oftheWJC.
By The Institute of Jewish
Jewish Affaire
London Chronical Syndicate
Russia's invasion of
Afghanistan last December has
raised concern over the fate of the
country's small Jewish com-
munity-
While information about
Afghanistan's Jews has always
been scarce and not very reliable,
the moat recent estimates speak
of a community of about 100
souls, most of them whom live in
Kabul, the capital.
To place its history and
prospects into perspective, the
Institute of Jewish Affairs has
published a report which it
described "almost as an epitaph"
for a community that is rapidly
dying out.
THE EXACT origins of the
community are disputed, but it
was flourishing by the early
thirteenth century, when the
Mongol invasion killed many
Jews in the destruction of Firoz
Koh in Ghuristan.
Reports by Jewish travelers in
the last century spoke of a
community of 40,000 living in 60
identifiable communities, all of
which were in existence as
recently as 1927.
Repression and outbursts of
anti-Semitism caused the
population to fluctuate, and a
large-scale exodus took place in
the late 1870s with the in-
troduction of punitive taxation
and other harsh measures.
As a result of their long
sojourn in Afghanistan, Jews
were influenced by Moslem
customs, but never assimilated
into Moslem society. Until 1918,
they lived in ghettos when a more
tolerant regime allowed an im-
provement in their social and
economic status.
TIL1PST
H.UMSSAII
After careful research we offer two medical plans-
available separately or togetherto members of
Hadassah, Hadassah Associates and their families.
EXCESS PLAN l: $'000,000 Maximum Benefit
y. jP Picks up where other insurance ends
MEDICAL l$15' deductible) Benefits payable in or
out of the hospital Available to age 75.
DAILY PLAN II: Provides income in hospital and
HOSPITAL convalescent home from first day, payable
INDEMNITY for up to a full year MO AGE LIMIT
TO BE
ELIGIBLE
Underwritten by Santry Insurance A Mutual Company Stevens Point Wisconsin
TAHLOV-TILLES P O Box One South Norwalk. Conn 06854
FOR
INFORMATION Name________________________Date ol Birth ___________
on either of
both plans Address_____________________________________________
and Hadassah
membership City. State. Zip_____________'.___________________________
write:
HOWEVER, fresh repression
followed the assassination of
King Nadir Shah in 1933. The
anti-Semitic campaign led to the
impoverishment of Jewish life, as
Jews were obliged to pay a heavy
poll tax that diminished the
community's wealth.
Jews were confined to Herat,
Kabul and Balkh; they were
forbidden to enter government
service or enter specific oc-
cupations; they were liable for
military service, but could not
bear arms or wear uniforms; and
they were forbidden to buy food
in the markets or communicate
with people abroad.
Throughout a thousand years
of settlement Afghanistan's
Jews maintained Judaism, but
with their own particular
religious customs steeped
mysticism and symbolism.
in
Shoes are removed before
entering a synagogue where men
sit cross-legged on the floor;
there is the ritual slaughtering of
sheep on the Ninth of Av; the
observance of Yom Kippur is
replete with symbolic acts like
expiatory beating administered
to adult males; and pieces of
candles are taken away by
worshippers at the end of services
as amulets to ward off the "evil
eye."
The last eight families in Kabul
applied for exit visas for Israel in
January, even though they have
no passports, in an act that will
end a millennium of Jewish
settlement.
IF YOUR OBJECTIVES ARE
GETTING THE GREATEST AMOUNT OF MONEY
IN THE SHORTEST POSSIBLE TIME
WITH THE LEAST AMOUNT OF INCONVENIENCE
THEN CALL
YOUR
NEIGHBORHOOD PROFESSIONAL
FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS
OF YOUR HOME
EVERYTHING TO GAIN-NOTHING TO LOSE.
ALL-RITE REAL ESTATE, INC.
a^^^aBBJaaaW IBal REALTOR
V Zl 111 XW 618 ATLANTIC SHORES BLVD
Sz/21 458-3336
GRAND OPENING HOLLYWOOD SHOP
IS YOUR GAS GAUGE
The Fastest Moving Part On Your Car?
WANT BETTER GAS MILEAGE?
Gel It From Ou' Fully Computerized Tune-Up And Diagnostic Center
3mg lo U S Dent ol Energy Savi 11
No Tricks No Gimmicks
Let Our Computer Diagnose Your Engine Honestly & Elticienily
Telephone
Senior Cituens
Discount
WHEN THE COMPUTER SAYS
...ITS FIXED
IPS FIXED!
GAS SAVING SPECIALS
r-~ COUPON,
I Oil Change Special |
lT^O95'.
a PKft*MyCtMck^>F
> toavaa iu ti aa
95
I
--.COUPON ---.
Computerized
Tune-Up^Specials
I
I
WtotLa*** I
aMMCYiaajwevt.
19" I FREE HE i
I
I
I
Tune-Up St
26
AIR CONDITIONING-TUNE UP SPECIAL
evacuate entire AC system
vo
FrA.C. Check
19*
reg. J24.9S
The ONLY Fully Computerized Engine/Electrical Test System
Prints Out Detailed Test Report
Helps Increase Gas Mileage SAVES YOU TIME AND MONEY
Helps Reduce Operating Costs EXPERT MECHANIC ON DUTY
TUNEX
COMPUTER CAR CARE
MARGATE
2053 N. St. Rd. 7
374-5360
Visit Either
Location
2009 Pembroke Rd
Opp. Dog Track
Hollywood
920-9700


ly, June 27, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
'trife at 'State'
iew of Settlements Not All One Way
}y JOSEPH POLAKOFF
ASHINGTON -
[A) The State De-
tment's "bureaucracy"
"ing with the United
tes position towards
aeli settlement policy is
ven with strife and con-
t." a State Department
pkesman said after
ving asserted opposition
"any unilateral steps"
Israel on the West
nk and the Gaza Strip.
fl'he spokesman, Tom Keston,
- asked to provide an answer
whether the U.S. opposes the
mber of settlers in existing
dements. Declining to take
question lor a response later,
-ion said, "I don't know if
\ are in a mood to answer at
point," referring to the De-
ent's Mideast policy-
rs that provide information
pokesmen.
en he was pressed "you are
ed in it.' Reston replied,
only the bureaucracy is
with strife and conflict.
i'ii\ the presa corps is
at

2V

a
Robert Strauss
(the bureaucracy) in a mood to
do so at this point."
In defense of his settlement
program. Begin was reported as
having quoted President Carter's
statement of Sept. 27, 1978 of
agreeing to additional Israelis
sen ling on the West Bank
Reston invited reporters to read
the Carter remarks that followed
ilu ("amp David agreements,
THE PRESIDENT said then,
in response i" a reportei -
question "on no limits on ex-
pansion," that Israelis "were not
talking about an enormous
expansion of tens of thousands
of people, but just tiny settle-
ments being expanded."
Carter also said, "If we put in
an absolute freeze on all expan-
sion the families couldn't be re-
united. The President said the
Israelis "emphasize how tiny the
total population was. I thought
k was a good trade-off that in
dropping the expansion language
(in the Camp David accords) we
added on the language that the
status of future settlements
would be decided during the
negotiations."
The difference in views be-
tween the Carter statement and
the Israeli version of Begin's
understanding with Carter of
expansion of settlements has
plagued American-1 sraeli
relations ever since. But it was
understood in other remarks by
the Carter administration that
an influx ni some settlers was
not beyond the understanding.
AN INDICATION of serious
differences within the Carter Ad-
ministration in handling the
settlements policy and other
Israeli matters came from
Robert Strauss, the President's
former special negotiator in the
autonomy talks. Irritated over
the foul-up in the U.S. vote for
an anti-Israeli United Nations
Security Council resolution Mar.
1. Strauss, who is chairman of
the President's reelection cam-
paign, spoke of the "damn
Arabists" in the State Depart-
ment.
Personnel in the State Depart-
ment's Middle East Bureau and
in other sectors of the Adminis-
tration are known to be at odds
on how far to try to pressure
Israel and also how far to go
toward appeasing the Arabs.
Egyptian analysts appear to
see Secretary of State Edmund
Muskie's address as leaning
towards U.S. recognition of a
Palestinian state. But Reston
denied any U.S. policy changes.
President Carter previously said
he "preferred" that the West
Bank federate with Jordan.
Kahbi Morton Malavskv. spiritual leader of Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood (light), met with Dr. Meir Kosenne. Israel's Ambassador
to Kranee (center! at a recent meeting sponsored by the Israel Bonds
Organization. They discussed the latest Middle East negotiations
and new peace overtures towards Egypt and Jordan At left is Rabbi
Max A Lipschitz, of North Dade's Beth Torah Congregation, chair
man of the event.
IE COLLOQUY arose overt"
Minister Mennchem
announcement that
would set up 10 more
tnents on the West Bank
hen slop building after
lliat. We oppose any unilateral
lleps on settlements which
Jnitlercut the negotiations now
Inderway to achieve agreement
1 these territories (West Bank
{ Gaza) that all parties can
pipport," Reston said.
Asked if an increase in
npulation is a unilateral action,
Reston said, "Yes, if not in con-
sultation with other parties."
|lut when asked if that would
undercut negotiations, he replied
he was trying to obtain ad-
Jit ional information "if they are
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARO -
EMPLE BETH ISRASL. 7100 W. Oak
ind Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
fillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
Neu.
WPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
3nve. Reform (44)
XRAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
S'tn St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
.immerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
fMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (at)
PEMBROKE PINES
*PLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
nooi, 200 NW Dougias Rd Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bannet Greenspon.
APLE IN THE PINES. 9730Sterling
fa Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shotel
PLANTATION
|ANTATlON JEWISH CONGREGA
ion 400S. Nob (fill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
Harr. (64)
[cONSTRUCT$ONIST SYNA-
GOGUE. 7473 NWath St. (69)
HALLA^DALE
rLf.NDALE JE#"SH CENTER. 416
1 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
"i Klein, Ph D.Xantor Jacob Dan
it .12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
I TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
|B0i NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ij'ipn P Kongsley Cantor Irving
Jtulkes (37)
HOLLYWOOD
APLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
ye Conservative Rabbi Max
r-ndman. (47B)
APLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
e'orm. Rabbi Samuel Jaffa.
aslant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
APLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
Conservative. Rabbi Morton
piavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
JPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
n^rvative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
>n, Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro,
p'or Naftaly A Linkovsky (65)
"PLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St
lywood, Fla. 33021 Liberal
form RabDi Robert p Fra2|n
Intor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
VfH ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD-
PRT LAUDERDALE 3291 Stirling
lad Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
nier. (52)
LIGHTS; 11 mg. "itf". 0.8 mg nicotine. LIGHT lOOY 11 mg "ur". 0.9 mg nicotine, iv. pet cigarette. FTC Repoft DEC. '79


fVe lti
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 27
Cannon Towels
and washcloths
These towels are truly top quality...
no seconds or irregulars. They're large
ft heavy weight and come in 3 lovely
colors. See and fed these towels, you'll
offe good thru aucust 2. iio recognize the value! put) IAMI iu
BATH TOWEL... FREE with
275 in blue register tapes or
a great buy at U.77 without tapat.
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VAILIY UEF ROUND BOTTOM
FLA OR SMIPPD PREMIUM FRESH
IEG I BREAST
FRYER
QUARTERS
*199
1
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY
BEEF
BRISKET
WHOIE OR
POINT HALF, .IB.
M69
Round Roast
I Veal Breast JV9
FRESH GROUND (WITH SOY PROTEIN ADDED) -_. -.
'Great Ground'B.ef .99
FARMER CRAY SELF BASTING GRADE 'A' 10 16 LBS.
"Ttefe
Prices ft offers good Thun., Juno 26
thru Wod.. July 2 In Dado. Broward
ft Monroo Counties
BUY ONI, GIT ONI
J;H
REDEEM ONI OR All 'REE COUPONS WLH
A $; ORDER OR OTHER ITEMS EXCLUDING
CIGARETTES AND FREE COUPON ITEMS.
SWIIIMIIHI 7 oz _______.
Cold Cups oTS 99*
SWIITMIAII IMAOI _
Paper Plates oTS M29
$459
IS llll.
OTILI
J3 07
onus
Real Sangria
Canada my
Tonic Waters" 2
Save With
GENERICS
A wry stnsibl* way to hold down food
costs. No fancy packafiRi,.. just rood
quality products at io, low prices.
"t
II
BATH TISSUE
wet cm
SWEET PEAS
UOl IM ISSOtTIO
SPAG. SAUCE
WHOLE BEETS 3/89*
uai <* ,,.
COFFEE CREAMER
ft m. _
CATSUP 75'
69*
3/89*
79*
89
T
1.19
2/79'
'1.49
39*
'1.99
99c
OK *1
..or IM
$129
PANT.T PIIM
Tea Bags..
Sweet Relish 3S 79*
MMU NATIMAl
Apple Juice .S^f M29
OCIAN SPIAY C.ANAPPU MINK
OR UANU.RT JUKI -
Cocktail OSt M29
i
69
SUNSHINI
Cheez-its............................'iSi
DIAMOND ,).,,
Aluminum Foil 2 89*
ASSORTED GRINDS
Pantry Pride
COFFEE gi&'rZ39
vi a sic pa oci ssio-------------
Dill Pickles USS 99*
IIISMNC P..
Schaefer Beer 6 V^M69
SHASTA ASSOITIO FLAVORS
Low Cal Sodas 6 c.n, M19
PANT.TP.IOt a _-
Charcoal 20 m. $2"
REFRESHING
MILLER
HEINZ REGULAR OR SMOKEY
BARBEQUE
14-OZ.
OTTU
FAItMEK OKAY SUMASIINO ORAUl A IUI11BJ j. -
Hen Turkeys"?, 69 =
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH -_ ^Bk j^
Lots of Chicken ,59
3 BREAST QTRS. W BACKS *3 LEG QTRS. W BACKS O GIBLET PKGS.
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VAllEY KEF ROUND BOTTOM
$039
B*faai
IU ONI
Al II'. > I
GET ONE
FREE
2-LITER NO RETURN PLASTIC BOTTLE
REG
DIET
PEPSI-COLA
or Mountain Dew
LIMIT ONI fll HI WITH THH COUPON AND AN
ADDITIONAL SI OtOII OI MOM OF OIMI PIOOUCU
IICLUOING CICAHITIS ANO llll COUPON ITIM1
COUPON GOOD THUtS JUM M *f WIO.. JUT t
oni coupon Pt. PinoN
Round Steak
Most of our
producs is
displayed
loose so you
can pick
your own I
PoufON C,OO0_IN_0ADI WOS I^MONlOl COUNT i^JJ
nir^tEcoLTpoN mil
gjjB^Bkapj^pg
oitoni AY RWrngeBges
4V-OZ. BOX
TIDE
DETERGENT
IIMIT ONI Fill tO WITH THB COUPON ANO AN
ADDITIONAL |7 OIOII O. MOM 0 0INB1 P.O0UCTS
KCLUOING CIOAIITTIS ANO llll COUPON IT1MS I
COUPON GOOO THUM JUM M Mm WIO., JUL v 1 I
ONI COUPON PH f ItSON I
STIMULATING TASTE-FRESH
Pineapples
LA1CI
TOO Sill
i. 59*
79*
79*
it
AO
IINIST IATINC APPLI A VAIL Alll
CAPt OIO* GIANNV SMITH
Apples........RawTeaeeww
U.I. I All PU.POM WHITI
Potatoes....................5
IOP OUALITT SIIDLISS
Fla. Limes 10
OA.MN >II5H C.ISP .10
Radishes 2 tfo',29*
PU.I IJNSWIITINID HAH
Orange Juice "ii?"*!39
ASSOIIID COIO.S FIISM CUT .
Floral Bouquets iunch 14
DILICIOUS I AST llll 71 1(1 I Al 5
Otter Pops .nV\o 89*
OA.MN iiism PICK
roul OWN
Cucumbers 3 fo. 39*
XCIUINT OUAIITT
Yellow Squash............i. 35*
U I All PU.POM PICK TOUR OWN
Yellow Onions.........-.. 25*
32-OZ. BOTTLE
LIBBY'S
KETCHUP
IIMIT OM 'III OIL WITH THH COUPON ANO AN
ADDITIONAL II OIOII Ol MOM OP OINf I PRODUCTS
IICIUOINC CIOAIITTIS AND FM COUPON ITIMI
COUPON OOOO THUM. JUM M Km. WIO. JWT I
OM COUPON PMFMION
ICsS"
cjaoi.NjAjajjojj
S
CJHJNTin
FREE COUPON
ASSORTED FLAVORS SEALTEST
ICE CREAM
$179
HALF
GALLON
FREE
FROZEN FAMILY MEAL
MORTON
DINNERS 2 box
TURKEY 1EEF PATTIES SALISBURY
STEAK IN GRAVY
t"J49
LIGHT N LIVELY
StTTABE $119
CREESE W
IKSHT N IIVIIT ASSOIIIO
ILAVOPIO
OI
CUPI
69*
PANI.T P.IM IIGULAI
OR PINK IIO JIN
Lemonade.....................5 tSS% 1
CHOC. FUll O NUTS F.OUN __ ,
Pound Cake 'JOS. SSi 79*
PANT.T P.IM F.OZIN
Corn on iM Cob..................o. BJ V
MEYERS FIBRE OR
RAISIN
MUFFINS 2
PKGS. 4
OF 6
#109
Yogurt......_...........L.
ur.Mi N LIWIlT
Low Fat Milk caixon1 $105
M..UM. AStOITID IL Avon
Cheese'nut BallsJ5&W*"
..AFT COIO.I0
Amer. Singles S3 99*
PANT.T P.IM PA.TT PACK tllCIO
Assorted Meats VY. $1*9
ICM S 51 KID
Chicken Breast iSt $109
AMERICAN KOSKER
OUT ONI
AT IIOUIAI PIICI
GIT ONI
22-OZ. BOTTLE FOR DISHES
PALMOLIVE
LIQUID
LIMIT OM FMI III WITH TMt COUPON ANO AN
AOCMTIONA! IJ OIOII O. MOM OF OTM. PKXXJCTS
IICIUOINC CIGAtlTTIS ANO HM COUPON ITIMS
COUPON GOOD THUM JUM H Win. WtO. JUIT I
ONI COUPON PM PIMON
COUPON GOOD IN DADI IIOWAIO i MONIOI COUNTIlJ
ILUI IONNIT OUA.TI.S **
Margarine.......................HI 61
Sliced' Swiss tSl 99*
Source TkU TkpvitmeHt
OMY AT ITOMS WITH U*VICI DILI COUNTII
LUNCH MIAT I CHMU UKW TO CHtOH.
READY TO SERVE
BBQ Chickens,. M29
99*
HAIF
............._.........I..
HANMl A OIITli
Olive Loaf
LIAN COO.I0
Corned Beef ..........3 $1 "
AMI.KAN KOSHII LONG
SALAMI O.
Wide Bologna 3K $1
69
WISCONSJN WHITI OI COIO.ID Mfc^tl
Amer. Cheese M?.' 99*
PANT.T P.IOI
Raisin Bread
VIIVII C.IMI PIAM OI
Sugar Donuts
I. OI.
.....Kt:
PKG.
Of 4
89*
65*
LONG SALAMI or
WIDE BOLOGNA
> BJ 'juTf
m RESERVE TM RIGHT TO LIMIT QUAN7ITH1 NONE SO10 TO DEALERS NOT RS*HmE K)R TYPOCntAIHWCAl