The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00250

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
/
eJewii3lh Flloiriidliiai in
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Number 12
Hollywood, Florida Friday, June 13, 1980
fr,d snocn,t price 35 Cents
Spaces Left on
immunity Mission
fish Federation of
irard has a limited
[spaces left for its
Mission, scheduled
I, according to Albert
[Finch, chairmen.
the intense amount
|in the community,
have been made
this year, added the
lunity Mission is a
ve sightseeing and
Jewish State from
Bights in the north to
Bsert in the south.
of the Mission is
on, including meals.
ft to the Federation's
1981 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Kmergency Fund cam-
paign is S1.500 for head of house-
hold plus a S500 woman's gift to
the Women's Division.
Individual travelers will be
expected to make a $1,500
minimum commitment.'' added
the Finches.
"We have been holding parlor
meetings in the community, to
educate people on what a mission
is and why it is beneficial to par-
ticipate on one, commented the
Finches.
For additional information and
reservations, contact the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
Missions Desk.
j left are Frieda Horwitz, Beryl Diamond, Ruth Levy and
|ick. Standing from left are Lou Diamond, Abe Horwitz,
nd Martin Harnick. Lou and Berly Diamond were hosts.
ire Gail Cohen, Herbert and Susen Grossman, hosts; and
bh, community mission chairman.

are Sumner Kaye, JFSB executive director; Dr. Saul and
Iger, Anita and Morrie Courtney.
See related photos Page 5.
wypt Welcomes U.SL Aircraft
[SHINGTON -
American aircraft
igaged in training
ses with Egyptian
at the West Air
in Cairo, the State
rtment said. The De-
tent's chief spokes-
Hodding Carter,
?d to comment as to
ler the U.S. aircraft
I reconnaissance planes,
he emphasized that
were there for training
)ses with the Egyptian
[Force.
said that "possibly" additional
U.S. aircraft will go to Egypt.
The sources said they were "not
aware" that the American planes
may have flown over Sinai or
made any use of the Israeli
facilities on the peninsula. This is
the first time American aircraft
have been engaged in such
exercises.
ASKED IF the U.S. aircraft
might use Israeli facilities as well
as Egyptian, a source said, "We
have under review use of such
facilities in a number of coun-
tries.'' He declined to comment
on "specific possibilities."
Egyptian Defense Minister
Kamal Hassan AH said the U.S.
A champagne celebration was the order of the day when the Jewish Federation of South Broward
announced that its 1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign has surpassed the
S4 million mark. From left are Sumner G. Kaye, JFSB executive director; Reva Wexler, campaign
director; Delia Rosenberg, Women's Division campaign chairman; Esther Gordon, Women's Division
president; Joyce Newman, JFSB president; Dr. Philip Levin, campaign chairman; and Susan Holtzman
Thomas, Women's Division director.
Project Renewal
Hod Hasharon
Poverty Is Rampant in
Project Renewal Areas
How would you feel if your
living space was only 15 square
feet or if your children attended
school in bomb shelters?
Those are among the problems
of the Gil Amal and Giora neigh-
borhoods of Hod Hasharon,
which has been linked to the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward by Project Renewal, a
program designed to link
American Jewish communities in
sister-city relationships with
underdeveloped areas in Israel.
According to a Project Re-
newal report, the "vast majority"
of the living quarters in Hod
Hasharon are very small and in
need of basic improvements.
"Some houses you enter."
noted Nat Sedley. Project Re-
newal chairman, "have so many
people and are so small that when
you open the door, all you see are
mattresses side to side for the
crowded family members to sleep
upon."
Twenty-five percent of the
people in Hod Hasharon live in
areas of less than 15 feet square.
Residents of Hod Hasharon slated for Project Renewal.
More than half the families there
are so poor that they have to rely
on public assistance for their
livelihood.
Initial Project Renewal efforts
are providing grocery shopping
for the near future, but there is no
bank or other commercial facility.
Project Renewal has identified
several areas that need major
renovation.
For more information on the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's role in Hod Hasharon.
contact Sumner Kaye at the Fed-
eration. 921-8810.
European Community Prepares
To Recognize Palestinians
By VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK
Yassir Arafat stands on the
verge of the greatest political and
diplomatic victory of an amazing
career in which the practice of
terrorism has become recognized
as the art of statesmanship and
blackmail and intimidation as the
exercise of diplomacy.
Within weeks, Britain, France
and West Germany, with the
but the final accolade when they
formally recognize the Palestine
Liberation Organization as the
official representative of the
Palestine Arab people and accord
it the virtual status of a
government-in-exile. They have
already recognized the right of
the Palestinian people to "self-
determination."
THE PLO had previously
achieved special status in world
politics far transcending the
recognition ever given any
national liberation movement.
The PLO has a special standing
at the United Nations, official
membership on one UN com-
mission, and there is even a UN
States pays some 25 percent of
the cost) to propagandize the
Palestine Arab cause. It has
missions in Vienna and other
capitals which enjoy all
diplomatic privileges except the
formal recognition of
representative of a sovereign
state.
PLO officials serve as
mediators in disputes between
Arab states, hold membership
and vote in the Arab League and
have a considerable say in
determining League policy.
European statesmen listen
deferentially when Arafat talks
about Middle East problems.
Good Social Democrats like Willy
Brandt of West Germany and
Bruno Kreisky of Austria vie
with a patrician like Giscard
d'Estaing of France in homage to
the PLO chieftain.
It is almost impossible to
conjure up the name of any
organization comparable to the
PLO, although a painstaking
historian like Barbara Puchman
might be able to find a parallel
he Vehme, the medieval
precursor of the Nazis, which
sought to establish its own law in
which professes to be a national
liberation movement.
IT HAS AN international
army with some elements, like es-
Saiq, either provided by or
controlled by a non-Palestinian
power. It is based on the territory
of other nations; it is well-armed
by the Soviet Union, and its
existence and presence are the
most serious military threat to
the regimes of a half dozen shaky
Arab oil dynasties. Not to be
forgotten is the war the PLO
waged (Black September) to
depose King Hussein in Jordan.
Still unresolved is the tradegy
of Lebanon where PLO forces,
supported by the Syrian Army,
destroyed the only democratic
regime in the Arab world and
reduced the country to anarchy.
Reinforcing the supra-national
character of PLO is its role as the
center of an international
terrorist web involving the major
terrorist and nihilist groups in
the non-Communist world. PLO
Continued on Page 4


(
c
V
f
8

I
r
i
i
0
(
c
r
c
t
f
i
c
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 13,
1980
Bobbie Levin
Nancy Brizel
EUie Katz
Local Leaders Named to
National Women's Cabinet
NEW YORK. N.Y. Nancy
Brizel. EUie Katz and Bobbie
Levin have been named to serve
on the Council of Jewish
Federations National Women's
Division Cabinet, it has been
announced by Mary Zorensky of
St. Louis, Women's Division
chairwoman.
The CJF Women's Division
serves as a link between local
Federation women's divisions
throughout North America,
developing collective policy and
direction. Jt functions as a
clearing house and initiator of
innovative concepts in leadership
training, Jewish enrichment, and
fund-raising skills.
CJF Quarterly Meetings and
the annual General Assembly
provide opportunities for
demonstrating model programs
that are replicated by local
communities. Council also
sponsors regional meetings
Leadership Development Council
The Jewish Federation of South Broward Leadership Development
Council held its final meeting of the year recently at the home of
Norman and Esther Freedman. From left are Sumner G. Kaye, JFSB
executive director; Dr. Robert Heller, incoming chairman of Leader-
ship Development; and Dr. David Sachs, incoming co-chairman.
throughout the year, and
specialized Women's Division
staff members are made available
for on-site consultations at in-
dividual communities.
The Council of Jewish
Federations is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds, and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective
community services; through
establishing guidelines for fund
raising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action on common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
RELGO, INC.
Haligloui t Qlll Artlclas
nrMil Aria 1 Cr.In
Hebrew Booka Judaic*
Paper Backa Racorda ft Tapea
Opan Sunday
1507 Washington Av MB 532-5912
HEBREW TUTOR
Summer tutoring by experienced
and licensed teacher All levels
and Bar Bat Mitzvah. Please call
963-7874
From left are Jessica. Norman and Esther Freedman. and Abby and
Larry Weiner.
From left are Ben and Barbara Tobias. Robert Bogdanoff. Bonnie and
Brace Benenfeld.
interior Design
school
w i I Isey institute
(305) 947-4590
Free Brochure
I
I
x
I
X
I
DECEMBER niuu
3 3 5
6
Community Day is coming.
' 8 U H) II |~J5 13
Mark your calendars nOw.
14 15 16 I? IS 19
Thursday, December 18 K
21
28
T7i

22 23 24 25
9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.
3J
26
29 | 30
Diplomat Convention Center
2()
2?
One reason why
more Jewish families
select Riverside.
More Jewish personnel.
At Riverside, we have the largest staff of
Jewish personnel in Florida. It's been that way since 1935,
and it's one of the major reasons why more Jewish families
select Riverside than any other funeral director.
At Riverside, families find total dedication to
Jewish tradition. A genuine feeling of understanding.
Economical assistance in arranging funeral services
between Florida and New York or anywhere else in the
world. And real concern for each family's needs and
wishes, regardless of financial circumstance.
Today, if Riverside service is becoming the
standard by which people are comparing all the others,
there is a reason. Riverside people. They know Jewish
tradition. And they honor it.
HOLLYWOOD:2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Call:920-1010
Other chapels in North Broward,North Miami Beach,Miami Beach.
Miami and West Palm Beach.
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
RIVERSIDE
I Memorial Chapel. Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-arranged Funeral.
3?
Carl Grossberg/ Alfred Golden/ Leo Hack/ Kenneth M.Kay
Arthur Grossberg I Joseph Rubin/ Carmen Serrano/
Andrew Fier/Charles S.Salomon
J
Manon Saltei
* .r s
Posj Haste Shopping Center
4525 Shendon St Hollywood, Fla Personal Service Book Store
Phone 961 -6996
BflDISRACK
Jhenew
Rcmx
BOND
G0PIERW
DiyPUnBondftperapistQioaaGirxrr
When you neve to copy FAST copy BIG copy RELIABLY when you
N* to copy on tn. run and can t afford to mi around w>m cnemicart or
get into a papa- (am your cope- should be the Royta. Bond Cop>ar 115
The Royta> Bond Cop*r 115 dekvers copras m a chorea of 6 was up 10
a BIG 11 1 17 You gat dry copras of contatlenl quaMy as las' as ycx,
need mem And you oat papa' pat" none safer. n.ch all but aammates paper tarns
Call
AMERICAN PHOTOCOPY
EQUIPMENT CO.
0t* 621-SMI
Only AuttwrtMd Dm tn Da*
463-3338
,cm
PUm: 632-4744
j rnarge was uuuseuoc.


Friday, June 13, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Baers Observe 50th Anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin H. Baer of Hallandale
celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on
June 10. Melvin and his wife, I.ucile. were
married in South Bend, Ind., in 1930.
They have three sons who, with their wives,
planned an anniversary celebration to honor
their parents. They are James B. Baer of Park-
land, Allan E. Baer of Fort Lauderdale, and
Robert M. Baer of Hollywood.
Mr. and Mrs. Baer founded Baer's Home Out-
fitters in South Bend and added three more stores
in neighboring communities. They were involved
with many civic and charitable organizations in
their home town. The couple moved to Florida 10
years ago.
At present, Mr. Baer is chairman of the board
and treasurer of Baer's Furniture, and Mrs. Baer
is corporate secretary. She is also president of
Grosse Pointe Furniture.
Melvin Baer is on the board of directors of
Temple Beth El, Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Broward County, and the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. He is a
past board member of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, where he served for many years.
He is vice president of the Hollywood-Hallandale
chapter of American Friends of Hebrew
University.
He also serves on the board of Boy Scouts of
Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties and is a
member of Rotary Club of Dania and Key Club of
Nova University. He was recently inaugurated
into the 50-Year Emeritus Club of the University
of Michigan.
i .in ilc Baer is a past president of the
Hollywood Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged and is a member of
Poetry Program at Hollywood JCC
A program of original poetry in
traditional and free verse forms
was to be presented to an
audience at The Jewish Com-
munity Center, Hollywood,
beginning at 10:30 a.m. on
Thursday, June 12.
This was to be the second
invitational appearance in
Hollywood by Charles Cohen,
writer and poet of Lauderdale
Lakes. Cohen is a member of the
board of the South Florida
Poetry Institute.
In 1977, 1978 and 1979, he was
Broward poetry liaison director
for the Hollywood/South
Florida Poetry Institute prior to
its incorporation under its
present name.
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Baer
I Gold Circle of Nova University.
The Baers have eight grandchildren who
helped celebrate their anniversary; Richard and
Nancy, who are expecting the Baers' first great-
grandchild, Ronald, who recently was engaged to
Mama Bullard of South Bend; Jerome,
Catherine, Michael, Ira, and Laurance.
Temple Sinai Announces Installations
On Friday evening, June 13,
the joint installation of
Nsterhood's executive officers
and Men's Club officers will take
place.
Members of the executive
committee to be installed for
Sisterhood are:
I'resident, Marcy Kameron:
membership vice president, Rose
Cohn; CEAC vice president,
Dorothy Kushner; treasurer,
Mildred Silbovitz; secretary
(recording), Fanny Cantor;
corresponding secretary, Ida
*ftottstein; financial secretary,
Pauline Rausch; parliamen-
tarian, Rose Edelstein.
New Men's Club officers to be
installed are:
Werner Jaffe. president; Roy
Kolben, first vice president; Paul
Cohn, second vice president; Dr.
Irving Voice, recording
secretary; Charles Kollin,
treasurer and Isidore Goldberg,
financial secretary.
On Friday evening, June 20,
the following elected officers of
the temple will be installed:
Marcy Kameron
Mort Kushner, president; Dr.
Alfred Rosenthal, first vice
president; Marcy Kameron,
second vice president; Elliot
Stein, third vice president;
Stephen Platt, fourth vice
president; Sydney Burkholz,
treasurer; Irving London,
financial secretary; Rose Cohn.
recording secretary and Paul B.
Anton, parliamentarian.
Officers of the student
congregation will also be in-
stalled Friday evening, June 20.
They are: Rabbi, Glenn Platt;
Cantor, Michael Lipsitz and
Larrv Siff: Gabbai, Larry Siff:
President. Stuart Rosenthal;
Secretary, Jeffrey Fisher and
Treasurer, Greg Signer.
Planning Session
Women's American ORT will
hold its third annual Planning
Conference, Thursday, June 19,
from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Temple
Beth El, 1351 S. 14 Ave.
For further information, call
921-5891 or 432-2730.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
Pi
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.

TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.

jm A Subsidiary of
Leumi
>rp
Bank Laumi la-liraal B M
18 Easi 48th Street
New York N Y 10017
Securities ,21217591310
Corporation Ton Free isooi 221 -48i8
FOOT FACTS
ON TAPE
Free Foot Health
Information
On Your Problems
To listen,
Request by Number
D1 Bunions
D2 Nail Problems
D3 corns-Calluses
D4 Heel Pain
D5 Arcn Pain
D6 Skin Problems
D7 sports injuries
D8 Circulation Problems
Call
456-4933
- Cavrf y -
DR. ARTHUR B.K0RBEI
DPM
1m Hamipherts- Octon North Bidg.
1950S.0ceonDria
Hallondola 458-51 55
6981 Taft St.
Tatt Hollywood Center
989 1786
>
*%^
**
\*
^0*
Brager & Co.
2301 Collins Avenue. Suite M-30
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Miami Phone: 673-8393
Out of local area call collect
Savings Stotd
with Unbeatable Rates!
WEEKLY SPECIAL
182 Day Money Market Certificate
Minimum Deposit $10,000 Simple Interest
ASK FOR THIS WEEK S RATE
MOM I 111 SPECIAL
Vh Year Treasury Rate Certificate
Minimum Deposit $100 Compound Interest
ASK FOR THIS MONTH'S RATF
rDAILY SPECIALS
6 Savings Certificates
with $100 Minimum Deposit
Interest Compounded Daily
ANNUAL DAM 11 KM ANNUAl MELD
8.00% 8 YEARS 8.33%
7.75% 6 YEARS 8.06%
7.50% 4 YEARS 7.79%
6.75% 30 MONTHS 6.98%
6.50% 19 MONTHS 6.72%
6.00% 3 MONTHS 6.18%
The Handy-Dandy-ln-and-Out
PASSBOOK ACCOUNT
5.50% per year yields 5.65%
Earns interest from day of deposit to day of withdrawal
Savin9sCertiricatessubieci to substantial interest penalty for e*fl
withdrawal Renewals subject to chaise m annual rate and effective yield
ISO minimum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
SAMATH SERVICES FROM TEMPLE ISRAEL
FRIDAY NIGHTS AT S OOPM en WTMI
93.1 in Dade and Broward Counties
'." 102 3 in Palm Beach County
Brousht to you by
Washington Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSETS EXCEED ONE ilLLION DOLLARS
COHVIHIINT OFFICES SERVING VOU IN FICWIDA
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
>33NE 167th Street 652 9200
0221 N E 164th Street 940 3971.
HOLLYWOOD
150 No'lh Park Road 981 9192
BOCA RATON
399 E P.llnielto Park Rcl 3918903
WEST PALM BEACH
I7.;0 Okpwh(it>,.p Blvd 686 7 770
PLANTATION
3337 W Sunrise Hu I 472 2701
DEERFIELD
230 S la mw> 428-6800
YOUR SAVINGS INSURED TO 1100,000
BY AN AGENCY Of IHf EEDERAl GOVERNMEN1
MIAMI BEACH
1701 Meridian Avenue b .
12J4 vVa>iinqton Avc 674 6550
' '33 No.rrtdndy D'iw r:,~-i 6553
'500 Bay Road 673 B
Arthur Godt'Ov R>! I
a'OL'nroln Ro.ic 674-1
CORAL GABLES
I pJeunp R[1 44s |
KENDALL
9469 S Dime '.v, 66! G
BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse 865 4344
1 six]
APIhiiP M ( OURSMO*.


:.l r> i-
? mm 1
^~e Condemn the Violence
Tin Drum*Marches to Fearful Tune
vat .3* SHOT .
KTW .3* BK3IB SI
to a
* -> ;i^
I aa -sc,.-
t
*


MHH
1 '-.*,
1 B>
L3C
C9 .3
S *
i ra a c m
=*f a.U&3f It 3 ?)< 3K 3K RV '* -r 2
^ ^bes* t jtk! -uf-Tai a/ w ana* -*
Sn a scramst >nccuac5 a/ si*
~* ^ua* 2 tcr -ra^B 3e weans fc
1
art
i
zucm. kx:
m smc v.
2Ut
T -
x st taer
ajBBESt KSltt aBBaa* ~*a
jox. --=* -arm
~ ~~ ~
vobkbut -tr-
taaBB. IIT pBBBaB
at ska
BBBBBt uzic* ^f :n~~ + van
r n 81* s ^erj*c v. wa Buur>
3hb i same wmmwmu. a n
"** al i s =r-> seat* 3 ra-v s
ai t aac smet s annyrTTifrr w-ma v
grnmnaewn ac**
Si ^Ki' -*ti-- .. rf
eat MasL~ w*TiiTr mil.
met zt-^k- .-
Wcfory fot Arafat?
z-'z^- ;-ir Community to
R*femiz jjtt -- r^L
inunc m ne 7*ur?
^ i
-- ~r-v aaan
aaaar
k
^:
v
war-aa]
pw. ^.' |
<*
J* w
i
I
*


Friday. June 13, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
Local Woman Named Sinai Memorial Funeral Chapel Opens
For CJF Program
NEW YORK, N.Y. Lisa
Ann Morrison of Hollywood a
19H0 graduate of the University
of Florida, has been selected to
participate in., the Federation
Executive Recruitment and
Education Program (FEREP)
conducted by. the Council of
tJewish Federations.
The announcement was made
by CJF President Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland and Samuel
J. Silverman of New York,
chairman of the FEREP National
Selection Committee.
The FEREP scholarship-loan
program provides a continuing
process of recruiting, educating,
training and placing young men
anil women of exceptional ability
and commitment in professional
isitions in the Jewish
Federation field.
The two-year FEREP program
combines graduate study in
social work, community
organization, and Jewish studies
with direct field training in
Federations.
As an FEREP participant. Ms.
Morrison will take part in
lialiimore's Institute of Jewish
Communal Service Double
Master's Program at the
University of Maryland School of
Social Work and Baltimore
Hebrew College.
Ms. Morrison majored in
public relations at the University
of Florida, where she was
president of the Jewish Student
Union, Editor of Challenge, the
Jewish newspaper, and a member
of the Hillel board of directors,
she has also been a leader of the
campus UJ A campaign.
Ms. Morrison spent eight
weeks last summer in Israel,
where she participated in an
American Zionist Youth
Foundation leadership training
seminar and studied at Hebrew
University.
A total of seven young women
and men were admitted into
FEREP this year. Feme
Katleman, CJF director of
personnel services, is staff ad-
visor for the program.
The CJF is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada.
World ORT Congress
Meets in Jerusslem
The World ORT Congress,
I w hich will attract delegates and
guests from the 40 nations
throughout the world which
support the vocational and
technical education program of
ORT. will mark 100 years of
OKI's service to the Jewish
people, during which time the
organization provided more than
two million Jews with modem
skills.
Former Israeli Ambassador to
5Wie United Nations, Chaim
. Herzog, who is chairman of the
I executive committee of the World
ORT Union and president of
ORT-Israel, will welcome the
delegates to Israel. Israel's
President Yitzhak Navon, and
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin, as well as othe high Israeli
officials, will address sessions of
I the Congress in Jerusalem.
Women's American ORT
I representatives will serve on
various committees of the
Congress, including the
I Temple Relations
Chairmen Named
Meral Ehrenstein and Joan
jross have been appointed co-
hairwomen of the Jewish
federation of South Broward
Vomen's Division Temple
delations program, according to
'lorence Roth community
ducation vice president.
Right now, we are in the
ining stages of what we want
do in the upcoming year,
[explained Mrs. Ehrenstein and
|Mrs. Gross.
"Our goal is to strenghten
elations between the local
emples and the Federation. We
are planning numerous programs
[and want to work together this
year for the benefit of the South
Broward community," added
Mrs. Ehrenstein and Mrs. Gross.
nominating. resolutions and
statutes committee.
ORT (Organization for
Rehabilitation through Training)
was established in 1880 in St.
Petersburg, Russia, and has
grown to become the world's
largest non-governmental
vocational and technical
education program, with 800
installations in 24 countries on
five continents and an annual
student enrollment of 100,000.
The largest single ORT program
in the world is ORT-Israel, from
which nearly 200,000 Israelis
have graduated since the network
was established in 1949.
Women's American ORT,
founded in 1927, is the largest
member of the 40-natk>n "ORT
family."
(iutterman Musicant Kreit-
zman Jewish Funeral Directors,
in conjunction with Florida
Funeral director. Gary H. Arnold
and Sheldon J. Grundwag. have
opened the Sinai Memorial
Chapel at 5980 West Oakland
Park Boulevard, at the
I.auderhill Sunrise border,
opposite Inverrary.
In 1978, the funeral
organization also opened the first
Jewish funeral chapel on
Florida's Suncoast at 4100 16th
St., North, in St. Petersburg.
The new Sinai Memorial
Chapel has 9000 square feet of
space and has special parking
spaces, rest room areas and other
specialized facilities for the
accommodation of senior citizens
and handicapped persons.
The structure has a vaulter
sanctuary. A prominent feature
of the interior is a bronze and
copper memorial to the
Holocaust created by Lena
Broydo, internationally known
Israeli sculptor.
Gutterman Musicant Kreit-
zman also has three chapels in
New Jersey in the communities of
Union, Hackensack and Jersey
City.
In announcing the Florida
opening, the firm's Chairman of
the Hoard of Directors Irving R.
Gutterman said: This ex-
pansion of our facilities and
services in Florida is part of our
determination to provide our
kind of personal assistance to
families in the major areas we
serve. As always, care and
respect for the wishes of the
family in their time of need, and
the utmost regard for Jewish
traditions are our principal
concerns."
Coin, Stamp Show
The Juvenile Diabetes
Foundation announces the
sponsorship of a professional
Coin and Stamp Show to be held
at Hollywood Fashion Center on
Sunday, June 15, between noon
and 5 p.m. with exhibitions
throughout the entire mall. The
show helps support diabetes
research.
Gutterman, Musicant, Kreitzman, Jewish Funeral Directors, in con-
junction with Florida Directors Gary H. Arnold and Sheldon J.
Grundwag, recently opened the new Sinai Memorial Chapel at
Lauderhill <: Sunrise border opposite Inverrary. Shown (left to right)
are Allan L. Kreitzman, Gary H. Arnold, Irving R. Gutterman, Henry
M. Gutterman and Sheldon J. Grundwag. The organization also has a
Jewish Funeral Chapel in St. Petersburg.
Mission Parlor Meetings
Seated from left are Jess Gray, Eileen and Martin Senft. Standing
from left are'Iris Gray, Florence and Dr. Leon Roth, hosts.
From left are Dr. Jack Gerard, Albert Finch, Walter and Ruth
Heller, Cissie and Dr. Murray Rosenberg and Sonia Klein.
Gordon Leland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
432-7247
Light ttje candle
and remember?
Me nor ah Chapel s, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard'
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade. call 861 7301
In Palm Beach, call 8330687
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED

2
lKMfNS*U(*OS
tTMMTM*KHtaHMM>
MtMOM*lCH*MlS
MM
nun MMOMU CKWIS
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels also in Oeerf ield Beach and Margate
Tha mm Jaiiwtrt-ownad chapah in Broward County.
4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLVWOOO, FLORIDA
Temple 3etki
Wemoeial
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For Information call: 9204225 or wrKej

TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVfc HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
Pleas* send me Utersturt on the "
ADDRESS:-------------------------
_ PHONE:


i HeTreiOiYn riortdlan ana snofar of Ureater Hollywood
Friday, June
13.10
C
a
u
h
a
V
P
I
t
o
C
d
n
o
t:
a
r
o
1
r
e
f

A Retrospective View
The Jewish Emigration from Cuba
By JAMES RICE
(Editor's note: James Rice wu
executive director of HIAS from
1956 to 1966 and was executive
vice president of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Metropolitan Chicago
from 1966 to 1979.)
CHICAGO (JTA) The
story in the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency Daily News Bulletin of
May 10 by David Friedman
about the current resettlement of
Cuban refugees in which HIAS is
playing a key rolebrings to mind
the original exodus from Cuba
which took place in the early
1960s at the beginning of the
Castro regime.
At that time, during President
Kennedy's administration, re-
settlement assistance in the
United States was under the
supervision of Secretary of
Caribbean Refugee Aid
Congressman Edward J. Stack
(D-Fort Lauderdale) has in-
troduced legislation to require
the federal government to
compensate local school districts
for the costs incurred in
educating the children of
Caribbean refugees.
Stack said, "It is totally unfair
to the taxpayers of South Florida
and elsewhere to ask them to pick
up the bill for educating the
thousands of non-English
speaking students who will enroll
in Florida schools, and other
school districts throughout the
nation, as a result of the national
administration's immigration
policy. As Florida's only member
of Con Cantor Honored
At the recent convention ot tne
Cantors Assembly of America
held at Grossinger's Hotel in
New York. Cantor Maurice A.
Neu of Temple Beth Israel, Fort
Lauderdale, was honored with
receiving the
commission of
hazzan minister
and was also
elected to the
executive com-
mittee of the As-
sembly for a
period of three
years. He is cur-
rently chairman]
of the Southeast!
Region of the
Assembly.
Cantor Neu has been with
Temple Beth Israel for the past
12 years, serving in the capacity
of cantor. Bar Bat Mitzvah
teacher, and musical director.
Cantor Neu
Education and Labor, I intend to
see to it that the federal
government defrays the cost it
has imposed in local govern-
ments."
The chairman of the House
Committee on Education and
Labor, Congressman Carl
Perkins (D-Kentucky), has in-
dicated that the full committee
will expedite the Stack proposal
by promptly holding hearings in
Washington and in Florida, to
examine firsthand the impact of
the refugees on the school
systems. The Stack bill would
guarantee to Florida and other
affected school districts, the
same compensation which the
Indochina Refugee Children
Assistance Act of 1976 gave to
the various school districts
around the nation which ab-
sorbed large numbers of
Indochinese refugee children.
Stack, in his remarks to the
House at the time he introduced
the legislation, noted,
"Preliminary figures indicate
that enrollment from this source,
in Dade County, Florida, is
reaching 60 new students per
day. This represents an increase
in enrollment sufficient to require
two new classrooms each school
day, and in the cost equivalent of
adding one new school every two
weeks, which translates into $60
million per annum.
"Quite simply," Stack con-
cluded, "the taxpayers of South
Florida and other areas similarly
affected, should not have to bear
the burden of paying for costs
imposed on them by national
policy."
FOR THE
DAYTIME MAYV1N
5*2,
SWSS KNIGHT
mM3l
^
>
AND THE
NIGHTTIME NOSHER.
One of the proudest products to come from Switz-
erland, Swiss Knight cheese has long been a favor-
ite in Jewish households. Not only because of its
taste and qualitybut also because of its versatil-
ity. Balabustas continually discover new and differ-
ent ways to serve these delicious wedges. Perfect
for decorative hors d'oeuvres, garnished with
smoked salmon and olives, or speared on a tooth-
pick with a chunk of fruit. And it also provides a
high protein snack for children. On the other hand,
with the nighttime noshers, the use remains the
same. Grab one or two wedges and run!
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY
CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdale Road, White Plains, N.Y. 10605 .
Health, Education and Welfare,
Abraham Ribicoff.
HIAS, together with the non-
Jewish refugee agencies, was
requested to establish an office in
Miami. Its activity was primarily
concerned with assistance to
Cuban Jews, who along with non-
Jewish Cubans, were fleeing to
the United States, as well as to
certain Latin American coun-
tries, with some Jews also going
to Israel.
Castro Puzzled
Castro was apparently puzzled
as to why the Jews were leaving,
and one occasion, it is reliably
reported that he asked the Israeli
Ambassador why Jews felt it
necessary to emigrate, ^fince he
had nothing whatsoever against
them and would have been happy
for them to use their talents to
help develop the new Socialist
regime.
It was only after the Six-Day
War in 1967, when Castro
followpd the Soviet line of
breaking relations with Israel,
that he eventually became
violently anti-Israel and anti-
Zionist. Even so, Castro has
never interfered with the
religious practices of the re-
maining small Jewish com-
munity.
There were two basic reasons
for the Cuban Jews leaving that
country. First, it should be
remembered that a substantial
part of the Cuban Jewish
population consisted of Jews who
had fled from the Nazis, by
obtaining Cuban visas through
one means or another, but with
the primary hope of eventually
coming to the U.S. Because of the
restrictive U.S. immigration
laws, they eventually had to
settle down and adjust to the
economic and social situation in
Cuba, with help from the Joint
Distribution Committee.
Secondly, as Castro changed,
his regime to a strict Communist
society, the vast majority of
Jewish families did not wish to
live under such circumstances,
and especially did not wish their
children to be indoctrinated in
the Communist oriented edu-
cational system.
Rebuilt Sections of Miami
One final thought: as Cuban
refugees poured into Florida
during the 1960s, local govern-
ment officials and many busines*
and ethnic groups complained
bitterly that this placed an unfair
burden on southern Florida. Con-
sequently, the federal govern-
ment poured in massive aid for
public schools, job placement and
other social services.
However, within a few years
the Cuban refugees took over and
rebuilt huge run-down sections of
Miami, creating new jobs and
prosperity, and helping Miami
and Florida to become a
flourishing Latin American eco-
nomic and cultural center.
T^M."""

Constant Rabbinical
Supervision Mjchgiach
FINEST KOSHER CUISINE
RESERVE NOW FOR
HIGH HOLY DAYS
from Sept. t In 21
On the Ocean
at 67th Street
MumiBeich Fl 33141
WORLD'S FINEST
VACATION
VALUE!
DAVID ROSNER S
CHILDREN S OAY CAMP
MANY ARTS ft CRAFTS SANOV BEACH
T
FOR INFORMATION CALL
1-866-8831
IF IT IS STERLING *OU KNOW IT'S THE FINES'
Miami Beach's GlATT KOSHER
R
HOTEL I BEACH CLUB
OPEN ALL YEAR
JULY4th WEEKEND CELEBRATION
4 DAYS & 3 NIGHTS JS 5 DAYS A 4 NIGHTS
July 3 to July 6 ytTv July 2 to July 6
$f*S t*' P'on ;. f SOC P*' person
WW double occ tj^ Ow doubt* occ.
plus lai 4 Tp
INCLUDING GLATT KOSHER CUISINE
TV in All Rooms Dancing A Entertainment
_______Card Room Movies Free Parking
(i-i, -.ruwtio** fo. tmHIGH HOLY DAYS a SUCC0TH s.,.i.o,
Services Will Be Conducted by a Prominent Cantor
I______________SUCCA on premises________
GLATT KOSHER VAAD HAKASHRUT UNDER ORTHODOX
SUPERVISION OF RABBI SHELDON EVER
_Fof RgfBMOjMI Phono: 1-538-7811
SankP Decaffeinated Coffee And Friends.
What a Wonderful Combination.
Enjoy Your Coffee and Enjoy Yourself.
After running around shopping, fund-raising and taking
care of all the choresthere's nothing like sitting down
with a friend and a good cup of Some* Brand Coffee.
Why Sortp* Brand? Purely and simply, it's 100% real
coffee with all the great taste you want from your cof-
fee yet it's 97% caffein-free. So, you can enjoy all the
Some* Brand you want at breakfast, coffee klatch,
lunch, mid-day break and dinner. And
you'll always get the same satisfying fla-
vor that only 100% real coffee can give
Sonkpe Brand-100% ,, oot53
tastes it! That's what makes it such a
good friend!
K Certified Koeher
Gmil Food* Coiporilion, HBO
J L.
J charge was "nonsense.


Friday, June 13,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page?
Hollywood Hills ORT Installs Officers
The Hollywood Hills chapter of
Women's American ORT in-
stalled new officers May 28 at the
F.merald Hills Country Club.
Co-chairmen of the morning
were Beverly Baran and Bobbie
Natelson. Lois Unger,
representing the South Broward
Region executive committee, was
installing officer.
F,llen Greenspoon will lead the
group for the coming year
replacing outgoing president
Cheri Rothschild.
Other officers include Anita
Abraham, Ellen Livingston,
Marjie Simon and Linda
Weissman, vice president;
Ronnie Glace, treasurer; Donna
Breiner, Gina Saada and Dotti
Weiss secretaries.
This is ORT's centennial year,
celebrating a century of
vocational and technical training
throughout the world including
schools in Israel, France, India,
Morocco, Switzerland, South
America and the United States.
The Hollywood Hills chapter
with a membership of 230 women
in the Hollywood Hills-Emerald
Hills area meets the sencond
Wednesday morning each month.
For more information, contact
the South Broward office at 921-
5891.
The first graduating class at
Hollywood's Beth Shalom Day
School needed $2,000 for a class
trip to Washington. To raise
the money, the 10 members of the
class took part in the school's
first Torah Learn-A-Thon.
A Torah Learn-A-Thon is like a
walk-a-thon or a dance marathon,
Torah Students Stage Learn-a-Thon
Send your children!
Send your grandchildren!
to the Blue Ridge Mountains...
but in a leam-a-thon the par-
ticipants seek pledges for each
hour they can spend learning
about the Torah.
The eighth graders signed up
sponsors who agreed to pay them
a certain amount for each hour.
The event was to run from 7 p.m.
Thursday to 9 a.m. Friday.
JU
SECOND SESSION ONLY:
July24-August20 NJ86 per camper
FOR MORE INFO. WRITE OR CALL: CAMP JUDAEA/RALPH
KURLAND. DIRECTOR _J________ '
Rt. 5 Box 332 Hendereonville. North Carolina 28739 (704) 68W841
Soviet Jewry Update
NEW YORK "The Status of
Jew* in the USSR and the
Impact of Anti-Semitism" were
subjects for discussion at the
Conference on Problems of Soviet
Ethnic Policies, held here
recently. The forum, convened at
Columbia University, was
sponsored jointly by the Jacob
Hlaustein Institute for the
Advancement of Human Rights,
Columbia University and the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
The agenda covered topics on
C/.arist and Soviet anti-
Semitism, ethnic group rights,
Soviet Middle Eastern Policy,
and prospects for the future of
Jewish life in the Soviet Union.
Juest speakers included, among
others: Jerry Goodman, NCSJ;
Zvi Gitelman, University of
Michigan; Robert Belknap,
Columbia University; Jonathan
Frankel, Hebrew University; and
Ezra Mendelssohn, Hebrew
University and the University of
Michigan.
A LOOK AT
US-USSR RELATIONS
NEW YORK "The War
Called Peace" a two-part
television program focusing on
American foreign policy and the
Soviet Union will be aired by the

m
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
welcome*
you back to
h'S renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lor a unique
_i6*ining experience
Match your table to your
mood m one o* S individual
'OOms The Tent
Wme Cellar Studio Place
Piaane Swiss Chalet^
Fine Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
Mprlvala Lunchaoni arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
ft "THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Ave.
445-5371
doted Mondays
Public Broadcasting Service on
July 7 at 8:30 p.m. The first
segment, a documentary, will
include sections on Soviet Jews,
POCs and Jewish emigration
policies. It will also feature in-
terviews with Soviet Jews in
America. The second segment
will be a half-hour panel
discussion.
During the night, the
youngsters received religious
instruction from Rabbi Morton
Malavsky of Temple Beth
Shalom.
Beth Shalom Day School was
founded seven years ago by
Malavsky. Today it occupies a
new building at Arthur Street
and 46th Avenue. This year's
senior class of eighth graders is
the school's first graduating
class. Some 450 students, from
the school's Early Childhood
program through the eighth
grade, attend Beth Shalom.
Graduation of the senior class
will be held at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday June 11, at Temple
Beth Shalom.
&3bm ffewipe \
jVEoianta^in ULioLlte
On Pnvate Oiceola Lake, Hendersonville. North Carolina 7I739
300 Boys-Girls, ages 5-16
Mature, experienced stall, 1 per 3 campers
Complete activity program includes: water ski,
canoe, sail, swim, tennis, horseback riding,
all land sports, racquet ball, cralts, overnight
camping, hikes, gymnastics, drama, trips.
Sabbath Services. Friday Night
MDs and RNs in residence
VERY LIMITED OPENINGS
6/24-8/19 Full Season
7/23 2nd Session Begins
CALLTODAY
1-305-866-3045
Al and Nanette Savage
(Certified Camp Directors)
Treat your children to a fun-filled
& Meaningful camp experience

\AN12GE ULTRA LIGHTS
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
Thai Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
6 mg "in' 0.6 mg. income p*r ciemnr by FTC maihod


1 yiellewTsWtlonaian ahcTishojar of Greater Hollyu ood
Friday. J\
I
i
! i
i
T
The Jewish Federation of South Broward held its
37th Annual Meeting on May 18. The program, chaired
by Dr. Sam Meline. was filled with honors and awards.
I he culmination of the day was the installation of the
1980-81 officers and board of directors of the Federation.
The installing officer was Edgar Cadden of Chicago. The
special guest speaker was Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer of
the Jewish Agency for Israel.
37th Annual Mei
Dr. Sam Meline.
chairman of the da\
>umner Kave presents Jovce Newman with
Janie Herman, recipient of the n j "
H> and Belle Schlafer Young
Leadership Award
- '
blown glass Star of
From left are Joyce Newman. Akiva Lewinsky, treasurer of the Jewish
Agency, and Sumner Kaye.

Esther Gordon (left* presents Beverly Shapiro with the Herbert D
and Ellie Katz Leadership Development Award.
From left are Rabbi Harold Richter Dr Bob Pittell and EdgarCadden
',-,
Joyce Newman presents a medal to husband. Ted. for his tolerance
during her two-year term as Federation president.
Joyce Newman and her son. Jeffrey
VISH
Joyce Newman presents Yoaai Net*. Federation shaliach with a
plaque for his efforts on behalf of the people of Israel.
Jo\re Newman (left) presents Esih
her service as Women's Division pn
\
n
Dr. Sam Meline (left) and Haul wBmd
from Joyce Newman for their tenfl ser
directors of the Jewish Federation of| Hr<

Joyce Newman presents plaque to J
with the Federation's allocations pr
i
{g- (left. re,ve. procUmiion from State Rep
%
Fred Joyce Newman, right, presents do*


I .,,liiv. .June 13. 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywooc
ng
I
u iih a photo album for
id WHrixht) receive certificates
tenfl service to the board of
in n(H Hrnu nrcl.
to U Kosenthal for his efforts
Anti-Semitism
Under Tight Control of Soviet State
By SHARYN PERLMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Modem day Soviet anti-
Semitism is characterized by two
basic factors: anti-Semitism is in
the hands of the state and can
therefore be turned on or off at
will: it is now more racially
oriented than before, and this
prevents Soviet Jewry from
assimilating into the mainstream
of society because "according to
religious and cultural views
today there is very little dif-
ference between Russian Jews
and Russian Russians."
This analysis was presented
hereby Ezra Mendelssohn, senior
lecturer ai the Institute of
Contemporarj Jewry and
Russian Studies al the Hebrew
University and a visiting
professor ol history at the
University of Michigan.
MENDELSSOHN was one of
several guest speakers at the
Conference of Problems of Soviet
Ethnic Policies examining the
status of Jews in the USSR and
the impact of anti-Semitism. The
forum, held at New York's
Columbia University. was
sponosred jointly by the Jacob
Hlaustein Institute for the
Advancement of Human Rights,
Columbia University Program on
General Education. Columbia
University Program on Soviet
Nationality, and the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Speaking to about 160 people.
Mendelssohn presented an
historical perspective of Czarist
and Soviet anti-Semitism. Under
the Czars, although conditions
were favorable for "collective
Jewish expression," tolerance for
indi\ idual Jews was verj low as
i hey were perceived as an "alien
element in backward
society," he said.
during the late 19th and early
20th centuries, Russia was going
through great political and social
flux a condition never con-
sidered conducive for minority
advancement and or ac-
ceptance.
THE SOVIET period. Men-
delssohn continued, reflected a
reversal in C/.arist patterns. The
new Soviet regime was
dominated by forces hostile to
Judaism but friendly to Jews as
individuals. A secular culture
basi 1 on Yiddish was allowed to
floi ish, and Jews were in
positions of authority. Class
loyalty was the important factor,
and anyone, regardless of
religion, who exemplified this
loyalty was favored, he said.
According to Mendelssohn,
this favorable treatment of "loyal
Jews." which allowed them to
assume positions of influence and
stature in the community, began
to be resented and the Soviets
feared a takeover by these newly
emancipated Jews
peasant
INTRODUCING A KOSHER HOTEL FOR MATURE
ADULTS ON MIAMI BEACH < The Air Conditioned & Healed KOSHER .i
Jews also found themselves in
the middle ni Intense nationalist
competition, especially in the
Ukraine, "the hotbed of anti
Semitism in the pre-World War 1
period." which led to both social
and religious anti-Semitism.
Also. Mendelssohn observed.
WHITE JIOUSCH0^f *

P
KOSHER
PAREVE
1 wa
u) Kosher Ice Cream Sherbet
BulkNoveltiesWeddingsBar MltzvahsAll Occasions
Special Service to Institutions
3292 N.W. 38 St.. Miami
wandembergh, inc. 635 2421 / 635 2422
Here is a hotel where you won't be neglected, In tact you are
really wanted. Everything Is designed to give you the greatest
time of your Ills, whether you stay a week, month or year.
We cater to you In every way. We serve 3 not 2 KOSHER
meals dally. We are the only hotel that has a Color TV with a
Slant 7 toot screen to make your viewing easier and the only
otel on the ocean adjacent to beautiful Lummus Park.
Olympic Pool
Beauty Salon on Premises
TV t Air Conditioning
Daily Maid Service
Oceanfront Okimg Room
Foe Reservation* Phone
24 Hour Phone Service
Resident Mashgiach
Movies Crafts Trips
Daily Synagogue Services
Entertsinment
1-531-6483


ON THE OCEAN AT 15th ST MIAMI BEACH FLA 33139
Owner Mqmt Baumnnd. Ehrenteich
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
WANTS TO SEND YOU TO ISRAEL!
ateUlk-lL
I.....*. I*
ENTER THE MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
1ATE OF fltt 1H T If >\ fWEBWWJqpS
JET PAN AM TO LONDON OR ROME_________
WITH CONNECTING JET TO ISRAEL
You're always a winner with Maxwell
House* Coffee. The full aroma and
great-tasting flavor gives you all the
good things you want in coffee...
consistently cup after cup after cup.
That's why today as it has been for
over fifty yearsMaxwell House*
Coffee is good to the last drop.
ISRAEL! The land of the very old
and the brand new. Where twentieth
century technology lives side by side
with first century tradition. A trip for
two. For 14 excitement packed days
and 13 nights you'll see the sights.
The cities. You'll eat the foods and
meet the people. Anybody can win.
Just fill in the entry blank and send it
in. And if you're the "chosen one"
Maxwell House Coffee will be de-
lighted to send you.
OFFICIAL RULESNO PURCHASES NECESSARY
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
M iwu houm' Cotle rtoislervd fademarh ol G*n'a> Foods
19*) Gant'ii Food* Coipo-ai.o"
1 Each entry must Be accompanied Dy mnersaai from
,i )at ol insunt Maweii House Cottee 2" square eul
Irom Ihe plastic lid ol a can ot Ground Maxwell House"
Co"ee or lie word Maxwell House' Cottee printed m
Diock letters on a 3" x 5" carp and mail to
lisle Ot TradftKxi Sweepstakes
General Foedt Corporation
F-0 Bex 3660 band Central Station
New Vark. NY 10017
2 No purchase required
3 Entries must De postmarked no later man June 30 i960
and received Dy July 7 1960
4 Winner will De selected Dy random oundtOd drawing
undo me supervision ol an independent organization
wnose decision is trnai in the event any winner declines
me prize or it lot any other reason me pnze cannot be
awarded alter the initial drawing a supplemental draw
ing or drawings will De held to award the prize Drawing
will De held on July 14 I960 Winner will De notified Dy
mail the winner s name can De obtained Dy sending a
separate stamped sell addressed envelope to
Winners list
P 0 Sox 3990 Grand Central Station
New York. NY 10017
Prize will De awarded as soon as compliance ot win
mg entry with these rules is verified in order to De
awarded the prize, winning participant must De avail
able at the address shown on the entry Wank or must
furnish a proper torwarding address to sweepstakes
officials prior to the dale of drawing
Prize consists ot round trip economy airfare tor two via
Pan Am to London or Rome and connecting iet to Tel
Aviv Israel plus hotel accommodations tor 14 days
and 13 nights in Jerusalem or Tel Avrv
No substitution lor prize Prize is non transferable and
not redeemable tor cash The tnp must be taken in 1980
on an available Pan Am scheduled departure date
The sweepstakes is open to an U S residents except
residents ot Utah and employees iand their lamiliesioi
General Foods Corporation its advertising agencies
subsidiaries or attmates or Joseph Jacobs Orgaruza
ton inc Federal state and local regulations it any.
apply Void in any locality where taxed restricted or
prohibited by law
9 AH taxes are the sole responsibility of the winner
10 Each entry has an equal chance ol winning There is no
predetermined winner \fcur chances ol winning are
dependent on and vary according to the actual numOeV
ot entries received
NTf AS Of TIN AS YOU IKE. NO PURCHASE NECESSAHY
OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK
MAIL TO Taste 01 Tradition Sweepstakes
General Foods Corporation
P0 Box 3660
Grand Central Stalion
New York NY 10017
Nemo
Address
City
Slele z
1
I
I
I
I


Page 10
" "fnk JVwisH rionatah dan xienm- ^t u-~~ -'
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 13,1980
Jewish Education & You
By RABBI
MENACHEM RAAB
In an article published in Mid-
Stream (May 1980), Arthur
Hertzberg states, the
future of American Jewish
education is in the day school."
From, its small beginnings in
1944 with 39 schools in the
United States, the movement has
grown to a total of over 500
schools today.
Why this phenomenal growth?
Why is the day school the only
Jewish educational institute that
is expanding when all others are
decreasing?
The answer is Jewish parents
are facing up to the reality that if
their children get a good Jewish
education, they have a fighting
chance to remain Jewish.
Without this knowledgeable
understanding of their heritage
*F<
I
they reach their maturity not
knowing what it is that they are
to preserve, much less why they
must preserve it.
The South Broward com-
munity is fortunate in that it has
a Day School in its midst that
started in 1973 and now is filled
to capacity. The Beth Shalom
Day School, founded by Rabbi
Morton Malavsky, has classes
Synagogue to be Restored
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The 200-
year-old former synagogue at
Ichenhausen. destroyed during
the infamous "Kristallnacht" in
November 1938, will be restored
during the next four years at a
cost of 1 million marks to be
provided partly by the state and
local authorities and partly
through a fund-raising campaign,
it was announced.
The baroque style building,
which dates from 1781, was used
until recently to store hay. Before
World War II. about 1.300 Jews
lived in Ichenhausen, comprising
one-third of the population of
that south German community.
The restored synagogue will
house a museum devoted to the
history of the Jewish community
in Schwaben.
Meanwhile, the public radio in
the state of Hessen is broad-
casting a call to former Jewish
residents of the town of Khina to
make their whereabouts known.
The radio station is preparing a
documentary on Khina which is
believed to have been the only
town in Germany where Jews
outnumbered the non-Jewish
population before the war.
Furniture Refinishing and Reupholsterer
Experienced
Must know Doth
454-1117 Mr. B
Why
The Big
Tzimmes
Over
Tetley's
Tiny
Little Tea
Leaves?
TINY IS TASTIER. THAT'S WHY!
Gourmets have always known that! That's why
they buy tiny peas. Tiny baby lamb chops. And
the same goes for tea leaves. The most flavorful
are the tiny young leaves. The kind of leaves
Tetley packs into every tea bag. That's why hot
or iced, Tetley Tea gives you rich, refreshing
flavor. Tetleythe favorite tea in Jewish homes
since 1875.
K Certified Kosher
A CENTURY OLD TRADITION
from first and eighth grades. In
the early part of this year, the
school opened a new wing to help
accommodate its ever growing
enrollment.
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward recognizes the
importance of Day Schools. It
funds three schools where South
Broward children are currently
studying. Besides the Beth
Shalom Day School, there are
South Broward students at the
Hillel Community Day School in
North Miami Beach and at the
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami and Miami Beach. The
Federation's financial support
consists of a subsidy for those
children who cannot pay the full
tuition and need financial
assistance. Part of the
scholarship is assumed by
Federation funds.
A Jewish Day School is a
unique institution. Children
attend one school for their
general education and also for
their Jewish education. Under
one roof, the children are exposed
to two cultures and are shown
how the two can be integrated
into a meaningful lifestyle. The
supplementary afternoon Hebrewi
school has not been successful in
the last few decades. Its students
have not been able to capture the
feel for their heritage in this
supplementary form of
education.
In the Day School, Jewish
heritage becomes a natural,
normal and meaningful part of
the students life. Starting in the
tender years of nursery, kin-
dergarten and early grades, the
student is imbued with love and
respect for his Jewish past. When
he reaches the upper grades, he is
well on his way to gaining a rich
and deep knowledge of Jewish
literature and texts that will
solidify his ties with his people.
When entering the junior high
and high school level, the student
is exposed to the full weight of
Jewish knowledge, un-
derstanding, philosophy and
literature.
The Jewish heritage cannot be
picked up by well meaning adults
simply through reading a book or]
two. Even attending a few adult
education lectures cannot do the
trick. In order to truly un-
derstand the meaning of our rich
Jewish background, students
must study and devote time and
effort to the teachings of our
people. It is for this reason that
traditionally Judaism has always
emphasized learning. An
ignoramous cannot be a pious
individual, our sages teach us.
And to paraphrase it, an
unknowledgeable Jew cannot be
expected to adhere to his
heritage.
The Day School movement has
attempted in the last few decades
to give Jewish students the
opportunity to become
knowledgeable in their own
historic context and to learn what
Judaism is all about. With this
kind of an education, Judaism
becomes meaningful and worth
fighting for.
I'yrts.jirc^^
f 0 ajri^v
air cowcmtioneo
STRICTLY
KOSHER
AIR CONDIIFONtl
Cftoum
GLATT KOSHER
OUMFKONT
HOTEL 4oth to
41st Street*
Reserve Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS & SUKKOTH
Tennis Facilities-Sauna-Hand Balt-Volteybalr-uh/mpic Swimming
Pool-full Block of Private Beach-nlertamment-TV in Rooms-Daily
Synagogue Services-Therapeutic Whirlpool
Under the Supervision of HASHGACHAH
of Rabbi Schmuel Rubin
Tour Hosts. Michael Letkowitz 1 Alex Smilow
For Reservations Phone
1-538-9045
SUPERB CATERED AFFAIRS WITH AN ELEGANT FLAIR.
BILL GOLDRING The "Dean of Florida Caterers and our Vice President, brings his
unmistakable touch and unmatched experience to the Konover's unparalleled facilities.
Superlative service, unexcelled cuisine, unequaled counsel and supervision-and sensible
prices Catered affairs that are treasured events
Please call BILL GOLDRING at (305) 865 1500
Kosher
Catering
Available
Konover(J4c)Hotel
ON IM[ OCEAN AT Mth SI X-------------' MIAMI BCACM
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who was the first American
scientist to win a Nobel Prize?
A: Albert Abraham Michelson.
Born in Prussia in 1852. Michelson
came to America as a youngster with
his parents. After graduating from
the U.S. Naval Academy in 1873.
and serving several years as an of-
ficer, he changed careers and began
teaching and experimenting. His
work in helping to measure the
speed of light won him the Nobel
Prize in 1907the first American
scientist to be so honored!
A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and
affection is to 'open the house' when
mishpocha. guests or friends drop
in. Out comes the fine food and,
invariably. J&B Rare Scotch. And
why not?-J&B is a clean, light
scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving
the best. And because of its great
taste. J&B commands a high level
of elegance... at home or at your
most important simchas.
And that's a fact!
J'B
RARE
SCOTCH
/

*


M13,1960
[Golden Age For French Jews
Chronicle Syndicate
IS Rabbi Jacob
the Chief Rabbi of
is 80, and will be
ig within a few
yet he remains such
/us and free-minded
that many French
^ve suggested that he
remain in charge "at
the next 10 years."
125 years since he was
head of the Central
r, the Jewish religious
stive body established
Dleon in 1808, Rabbi
[has presided over a
I change in the character
Jewry and unexpected
its size.
IE 1950s, the French
t community numbered
J.OOO and was the sixth
Jewish community in the
lay, it numbers 700,000
iks fourth behind
I Israel and Russia.
lay, one Frenchman in
is a Jew, and one Jew
[every 20 is a French
lflux of "newcomers"
French Jewry in the
'60s consisted predom-
of Sephardi Jews from
former North African
possessions Algeria,
and Morocco. Others
)m Egypt, where French
influence had been
result, France has
along with Israel, as a
Sephardi country
t>e Jewish world. Some 60
:>f the Jewish population
lardim, and so are 70
F the rabbinate.
IRTHELESS, the
character of French
not a modern phe-
It was very Sephardi in
until the end of the 19th
with the Jews of
having the legacy of a
fculturul and spiritual
ship with Spain.
were easily dis-
able from the Jews of the
Ashkenaz (Northern
d the Rhineland), who
as a community
the Talmud, under the
of Rashi of Troyes,
Tarn and the
Its.
when formal citizen-
ml equal rights were
to "French nationals of
| persuasion," there were
iin centers of Jewish
|nt: the Sephardi "Por-
in Bayonne and Bor-
I the remnant of the old
community of
and the Ashkenazim of
the poorest and most
[all.
'AS Napoleon who
as the ideologist and
er of modem "assimil-
ench Jewry.
about 1870, the leader-
French Jewry remained in
is of the scions of such
families as Pereire,
remieux and Salvador.
so, the pendulum began
, and the Aahkenazi
>f the Rothschilds
fame and titles. In the
i of the Franco-Prussian
1870, the Ashkenazim
achieve numerical and
jpremacy.
i eve of the Second World
percent of French Jews
ental France were either
or German "Wester-
Russian, Polish and Ro-
" Easterners." The
"Southerners" had all
ippeared, or had remained
in the sun-blessed but
iyilized" colonies of
elderly French Jews of
suggest that the dif-
i which exist between the
i of French Jewry are
' mild, compared with the dispute
between the Juifs and Israelites
which prevailed prior to 1939.
The native-born Jews had
somehow taken the word Juif to
be pejorative, so they discarded
the French word for "Jew" and
adopted Israelite instead.
The Napoleonic Central Con-
sistory had already led the way,
and the more assimilated French
Jews were delighted to describe
themselves as Francois Israelite
(Israelite Frenchmen).
On the other hand, the East
European Jews who settled in
France after leaving Russia in the
wake of the widespread pogroms
of 1881, retained a "national"
if not always a national-religious
philosophy of Judaism.
THEY SUSTAINED Yiddish
and Hebrew, and were only too
pleased to be des Juif de France
(Jews of France).
Gradual assimilation was, of
course, inevitable, even for the
most nationalistic of Jewish
families. However, the divisions
remained.
It was the Nazi-Vichy oc-
cupation that resolved the dif-
ferences. Between 1940 and 1944,
some 120.000 French Jews,
native-bom and immigrant, were
deported to* Hitler's concen-
tration camps, where the
majority perished.
However, an estimated 200,000
French Jews were able to escape
deportation, thanks to the help or
benevolent neutrality of large
segments of the Gentile
population.
religious and ethnic con-
notations, while the latter is
generally restricted to cultural
and administrative matters.
SINCE THE early '608,
French Jewry's two groups have
gradually fused. Some differences
remain, but they are less related
to communal origin than to com-
munal commitment.
A revealing aspect of this is the
appeal that Ashkenazifc
Chasidism, in the form of the
Lubavitch movement, has for
young Sephardim. The same isl
true for other religious and|
Zionist organizations.
Rabbi Kaplan's heir-apparent I
is Rabbi Max Warschawski, the]
Chief Rabbi of Strasbourg, butj
the influence of the Sephardi rab-|
binate is profound.
Rabbi Meir Jais, who wasl
Chief Rabbi of Paris until his
resignation in 1979 at the age of
71, and Rabbi Chouc henna, head
of the rabbinical seminary near
the Sorbonne, are bothl
Sephardim.
THE CONSISTORY, which
still has the allegiance of most
French Jews, is becoming more
Sephardi in character and, thus,
more traditional The use of |
organs and microphones in syna-
gogues has been banned, and
kashrut has been made much I
stricter.
Younger rabbis now generally
have a yeshiva background and'
are firm in matters of halacha
(rabbinic law).
However, some observant
Jaws feel this is not enough, and
have set up alternative kehillot
(congregations). And while 10
percent of French Jews belong to
'.he Orthodox stream, 50 percent
of practicing Jews can be
described as Orthodox.
Religion has become once
again a central factor in the life of
French Jewry. Intensive Torah
^tudy is a commonplace, and
yeshivot and plain Talmud
shiurim are well attended.
EVEN non-believing and non-
practicing intellectuals like
Bemard-Henry Levy and Ber-
lard Chouraqui use Torah ter-
minology and concepts.
By the year 2000, France, the
country of Rashi, will no longer
be the land of the assimilated
Israelite, but the land of a new
golden age.
Hue
Out AT HOME
DINNERS DELIVERED TO
YOUR HOME FOR
LESS THAN COOKING
Let Mastei Hosl Florida s largest and finest dinner
si vie edehvi i ..iipert> fresh lull course dinners t>>
your home daiiy lor less than cooking your sell IryH
i me day or as ollen as you likr lor one person or
a houselull USDA choice meats garden Iresh
vegetables and only the finest ingredients
"used Delivered m sparkling clean,
\ disposable heat in containers
Mem, changes daily and
_ /*.-klv C.i'i belixe 10 AM
" v,i II have din.v at yo M
door belore b CM
KOSHfcH
SALT FREE *
LOW FAT
DINNERS
IN DADE: 633-8066 IN SOUTH BR0WARD: 927-3266
LATIN PHONE 635-5201
N. BR0WARD 462-8466
For the survivors the words
Juif and Israelite took on new
meanings. In contemporary
usage, the former has communal,
Youth Advisors with some ex-
perience for a large Synagogue
.Youth Group in the Broward area.
Experience helpful. For infor-
mation, please call 949-0501 or
981-6111.
master
.c, host
>BBB' HarKhtiQ Lew.
V..^' Pr*tnt
dinner
service
r4001 N.W. 31 $t Avenue
Miomi, Florida 33142
WE ILS9 MTR MULL HimiS I H.ISMT WQUETS. MUMS ESMML
CALL FOR FREE MENU
: :'???*'?'-??
Now
you can
have
your bran
and like it,
ii
That's what hundreds of people
discovered when they tried Bran
Chex* cereal for the very first time. In a
comparison taste test against other high
fiber bran cereals, Bran Chex proved to
a lot of hard-to-convince men and
women that high fiber and great flavor
can go together. They'd always assumed
you had to give up one to get the other,
till Bran Chex cereal came along. Now
they know better. And better is Bran
Chex. Use the coupon to help us prove
you can have your bran and like it, too
.. .the way they do.. with Bran Chex.
H
FUtWOrt F*Uftf* Ctt**nv. W*
K Certified Kosher
SAVE13* 13<
on your next OFF
purchase of ^^
Bran Chex?..the light
crisp, high fiber cereal.
io t mggm sggsm ^cs^'^m^T, S
sSv- cr. tangigBsasgsa
MM. a, 1 m li 11 l. j^rajj X2J1Z
E-^S35S?1i2?22i57sw,:=
^ *********** 'A t**\
13*^00^9 STCWECOUfON A 1&


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, June 13.1980

National Press Club Catering to Arabs
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The world-fa-
mous National Press Club,
whose historic reputation
as an ethical forum is
based on journalistic
purity, stands revealed as
having guaranteed the
anti-Israel Arab League
two opportunities for "po-
litical" speeches to the club
in return for spending
$40,000 for an "Arab
Night" gala to entertain
the club's membership.
The resignation of Richard
Maloy, chief of the Washington
Bureau of the Thomson news-
papers which serves 67 U.S.
dailies with a circulation of one
million, as chairman of the Club's
speakers committee when he dis-
covered the guarantee blew the
cover off the package of three
events agreed between the
League and some of the Club's
leaders.
AFTER THE Club had an-
nounced the gala, the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency reported
May 5 that the Club's publicity
attendant to it had listed the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion among the League's 22
member "countries" but that
Charles Williams, the Clubs
entertainment chairman, and
Drew von Bergen, its president,
said they would not act to bar the
terrorist organization from
participation.
In response to a JTA question,
ilodding Carter, the State
Department's chief spokesman,
later ridiculed the Club's desig-
nation of the PLO as a "coun-
try." Von Bergen said the listing
in the Club's publication.
"Record," was "unfortunate."
In a letter to Von Bergen May
23, Maloy said he was "obliged"
to resign "on principle since you
overruled my decision to cancel
the luncheon set for May 27
featuring Clovis Maksoud,
resident spokesman for the Arab
League."
MALOY'S letter said "my
cancellation decision, cleared in
advance with Club Vice President
Joseph Slevin and Chairman of
the Board Seth Payne, was made
on the customary grounds our
members had shown insufficient
interest in the luncheon. We had
sold only 61 tickets to our 3,000
resident members and require
twice that number to put on a
lunch.
"The Arab League pledged to
buy a bloc of 100 tickets so the
luncheon could go forward, but
presumably Press Club speakers
luncheons are for the benefit of
our members and not for special
interest groups who desire access
to our platform and the coverage
provided by national public radio
and C-SPAN," Maloy wrote. (C-
SPAN is the television cable
satellite public affairs network
that serves some 700 cable tele-
vision systems.)
"You have explained to me,"
Maloy's letter to Von Bergen
said, "that you overruled my
decision and reinstated the Mak-
soud lunch after the Arab League
said they would pull out of the
'Arab Night' party being held the
same week in the Press Club
unless the luncheon was also
held.
"ACCORDING to James
Abourezk, attorney for the Arab
League, the League had been
given a 'guarantee' by the Press
Club that if they agreed to under-
write the Arab Night party, they
could in return use the Press Club
to make two 'political' state-
ments at a newsmakers breakfast
and a speakers luncheon. He said
further that his clients had bud-
geted $40,000 for this 'package'
and $20,000 had already been
spent. I, of course, knew nothing
of such a guarantee and if I had,
would never have agreed to a
lunch in the first place."
In his concluding sentence,
Maloy said: "It pains me to find
the Press Club crawling to the
Arabs, or any other special in-
terest."
Abourezk, a former Demo-
cratic Senator from South
Dakota, said that Arab League
members were concerned about
the cancellation of the luncheon.
Confirming $40,000 was in-
volved, Abourezk said, "They
were coming under pressure from
their constituencies back home
for spending so much money"
and that "if the Press Club can-
celled the noon luncheon, we
wouldn't have anything to show
for it."
PAYNE, of McGraw-Hill
World News, told JTA that "The
PLO is a member of the Arab
League" and "we have no right
to set up ourselves as judge ot it?
membership. I am sorry about
the listing, but it's done." Bergen
told JTA that when he became
president of the Press Club, it
had a deficit of $224,000, but the
funding for "Arab Night" had
"nothing to do" with the Club's
finances. He said he had "first
heard" of the $40,000 in Maloy's
letter.
"I don't know if it's right or
wrong, but it wouldn't surprise
me," he said. Maloy told JTA
that Arab representatives told
him that Williams had written
them if they put on the party
they could make speeches.
Maksoud made his represen-
tation here, boosting the PLO
and Palestinian statehood and
terrorism and condemning Israel,
the U.S. and the Camp David
accords. As customary for the
Club's president. Von Bergen,
who works for United Press
International, chaired the lunch.
Only three others of the Club's
board members and officers
attended. They were Payne. Lee
Egerstrom of the Knight-Bidder
newspaper chain, and H. Perez,
of FA Impartial.
^^ It* at... f
,i. i
HousewaresHardwarePainMocksmitrShadesGins
Bath/Closet ShopPatio/Dinette Furniturefloral Arrangements
DinnervareLightingElectncalPlumbingGarden
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DEUVER
Summer Hours: Daily 8 am 6 pm, Sundays 12 J
100 E. Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Tel 456-0566 (Broward). 949-1682 (Dade)
Member Hal I an dale Chamber of Commerce. Better Business Division
Fi
>
INTRODUCING
NEW PRITIKIN
ST0NEGR0UND
WHQLEWHEATBREAD.
THEBREAD
F0RALLREAS0NS.
PRITIKIN STONE
GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD truly is the
bread for all reasons.
Because you know what
you want and what you
don't want in your daily diet
Developed for use at the
Santa Monica Longevity
NOSUGAR
NO SHORTENING
NO ANIMAL FATS
NO MILK OR MILK PRODUCTS
NO CHOLESTEROL
NO ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS
NO ARTIFICIAL COLORS
NO ARTIFICIAL PRESERVATIVES
LOW IN SALT
ALL NATURAL FIBERS
ALL NATURAL CARBOHYDRATES
ALL CEREAL PROTEIN
Center. PRITIKIN STONE
GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD is made
from a special formula using
only the most wholesome
ingredients. PRITIKIN
STONE GROUND WHOLE
WHEAT BREAD truly the
bread for all reasons.
L
K
'


ne 13, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
O MilMllill
'Tin Drum' Marches to Fearful Tune
itinued from Page 4
i stellar genealogy, this is
Trinity of his arrival
earth. Since mythology
i that all messiahs suffer
equisite to their divine
It is Oskar's martyrdom,
ttrec, to fall down a flight
at age three that
ily leaves him a dwarf.
THIS act that purifies
nd prepares him to accept
[as savior. Aware of the
titening noises the Nazis
ting in Danzig, par-
the attack on the toy
the Jewish shopkeeper,
Markus, who suffers
love for Oskar's
and who even vainly
through baptism and
an for the sake of this
)skar makes a bold
ses to grow up. He acts
nbolically the negligible
nedically unexplainable
[>f the fall on him. Now
Ily imperfect like all other
(Moses' stammering,
chauvinism, Lenin's in-
Ince to cruelty, Che
(rra's obesity), Oskar
the world which is about
; its Armaggedon.
[is especially confirmed in
cision by the action of his
father, the man who
ily accepts the dubious role,
he sees on the morning
ring the infamous
illsnacht at the
elisweg Synagogue now
taking, as Grass says in
jvel. "advantage of the
^unity to warm his feelings
i fingers ."
CAR'S REJECTION of a
indifferent to cruelty is
[substance by the Jewish
eper Sigismund Markus'
him of a tin drum, which
now beats incessantly in
pf human communication
a means of gathering the
hi to his divine cause. Of
i use are words in the season
discontent'.'
en Oskar does bypass the
on occasion to let his
is be known, he engages in
Ints of rageful shouting,
are so piercing that they
by glass and windowpanes
iristallsnacht all their own,
wrathful voice warning us
lumanity's impending
book and the film are tbo
In image, myth and symbol
Irsue here. The film version
i Drum goes partly off track
irking Oskar's puberty at
rioment when he divests
blf of the role of messiah.
[dwarf's sexual encounter
|Maria, the sister of a friend,
name Grass chooses as no
ent (there are no accidents
sort in his superb artistry),
rise to a pregnancy and
itely to a son.
IEN FOR the first time
\r speaks significantly in
I and distinct language, it is
bounce that he has a son; it
"this point that we know that
ft'a end as messiah is at
He passes from the in-
Ite to the carnal. The book
no such special emphasis,
the film's departure in this is
queaky note in what is
vise a symphony of mythic
I and romance. '.._
bt the film, x. Tin Drum,
vs the book admirably in its
ogy. The "Trinity" is
plicable mystery. Grass'
lie trinitarians are each
ol8 of evil in their own way:
pr's "father," who is a Nazi-
ftathizer; Oskar's mother,
becomes pregnant again
fly. a metaphor for im-
ilately. and this time refuses
per son or messiah by
nitting suicide she eats
elf to death with a
voluminous quantity of fish, the
food of the disciples.
And then there is Oskar
himself, the son-messiah, who
rejects the evil world, finding his
solace in the inchoate warnings of
a drumbeat; in Grass' favorite
haunt, the circus, perhaps the
best home for messiahs after all,
where the only reality is illusion;
even in a mental institution.
ONLY THE Jew, Sigismund
Markus, is charitable and
humanitarian in his love and
understanding of Oskar and of
Oskar's sexually prolific mother,
who dies of the overdose of fish.
(Sex and the divine, warns Grass
cynically, are incapable of union.
Is that not the lesson of the
Trinity after all?) But even
Markus, in his baptism and
conversion, has shown weakness
of faith and succumbed to the
bestial. In this sense, he is ap-
parently no better than his Nazi
tormentors, who ultimately
murder him as he sits at his desk
in his toy shop.
Still, Grass writes, "There was
once a toy merchant, his name
was Markus and he sold tin
drums There was once a
drummer, his name was Oskar,
and he needed the toy merchant
. There was once a drummer,
his name was Oskar, and they
took away his toy merchant .
There was once a toy merchant,
his name was Markus, and he
took away all the toys in the
world in his act of this world."
In the end, of course Markus,
though inconsistent in his faith,
has not fallen from it. Between
his Judaism and his adopted
Christianity, suggests Grass,
may be a stupid gulf, but a gulf is
not a fall. And why did Markus
convert anyway? Was it not for
love?
BUT BETWEEN Judaism and
Christianity on the one hand, and
Nazism on the other, is more than
a gulf. Between Judaism and
Christianity on the one hand, and
Nazism on the other, is the fall.
Hence, Markus is of a certainty
better than his tormentors. And
hence Grass writes, repudiating
Christian and Nazi, whom he sees
as the root of the evil that tore
Europe (and humanity) asunder,
with the Jewish shopkeeper as a
symbol of the victim of their evil:
". there is no Paul, the man's
name was Saul, and it was Saul
who told the people of Corinth
something about that he
called faith, hope and love, which
he advertized as easily
digestible."
Only Markus as Jew digests
well. The others merely eat well
and fornicate well, which both the
novel and the film depict almost
too graphically.
THERE IS.no Paul. He is
Christianity as an institutional
myth that fails repeatedly to
prevent evil this time,
mankind's latest fall in the
Hitlerian madness. There is only
Saul, whom Grass depicts as
Markus, the eternal Jew, the
divine impulse in man that the
Christian illusion forever betrays.
Oskar is his disciple, a new
gospel to the world which the
world refuses to heed; Danzig,
Europe, the very universe are the
victims of their own evil, their
senseless baptism of Saul as Paul
whose cunning words again
mistranslate the true testament.
Markus, crucified by
mankind's wickedness, leaves
Oskar silenced a drummer
without a drum, a disciple
without a message.
If, like all human gods,
Sigismund Markus is carnal in
the end, so is Oskar who.
silenced, succumbs to another
drumstick, his outsized penis (de
rigueur in a Grass novel), a sign
now not of his divinity but of his
absolute humanity. It has
already served him with Maria,
and now he rejects his role,
precisely as other messiahs have
attempted to do in the past.
OSKAR GROWS up. He joins
the world with the end of the war,
the end of Nazism. But he places
the drum into the hands of his
illegitimate son, conceived not by
a ghost but frank carnality,
hoping that he will become the
new messiah, the messenger of
the true testament to carry his
father's ministry forward. The
war may be over, but the danger
of another fall is always im-
minent.
The son refuses the drum.
Grass knows: mankind has not
yet risen from the last fall or,
indeed, from the first. The Bible,
the Third Reich man's
wickedness is endless in its
variety.
Volker Schlondorff's
production of Tin Drum shows all
this quite admirably. To boot, the
photography is exquisite, oc-
casionally bordering in its beauty
on the still life scenes of the great
French cinematographer, Jean
Renoir. And David Bennent as
Oskar is a gothic treasure.


PimlO
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday. June 13,1960
Headlines
in
Begin Takes Defense Minister's Post
TEL AVIV Prime Minister
Begin plunged into his new tasks
as Defense Minister and pledged
that he would fulfill all the
functions of that office in ad-
dition to his other respon-
sibilities.
He held his first conference
with members of the General
Staff at the Defense Ministry
offices here and, prior to that,
met with Deputy Defense
Minister Mordechai Zipori, Chief
of Staff Gen. Raphael Eitan, and
Yossel Ma'ayan, Director
General of the Defense Ministry.
After his two-hour meeting
with General Staff officers, which
he described as "the most
pleasant hours I had for a long
time," Begin admitted that the
controversial question of cuts in
the defense budget were raised.
He said that no doubt there
will be cuts. The only question is
to what extent. He noted that the
Chief of Staff has already met
with Finance Minister Yigal
Hurwitz on this matter and
further meetings will be held in
which he would participate.
WASHINGTON The Carter
Administration called on the
Israeli Government to bring swift
justice to the perpetrators of the
explosions in four West Bank
towns that injured two Arab
mayors sympathetic to the
Palestine Liberation
(As we approach the Shloshim)
The heavens are still darkened as if covered
with sackcloth with the untimely and tragic demise of
Renee Gottlieb
beloved wife of Irwin and dear mother of
Michael, Alan.Melissa and Laurie.
Her blessed memory will be cherished and
FOREVER remembered by all of us always
ALL-WAYS.
To the entire family heartfelt condolence and
solace on your bereavement.
Organization and seven others,
and urged "everyone to exercise
maximum restraint."
The administration also in-
dicated it has asked the Israeli
Government to rescind its ban on
the circulation in occupied
territories of two East Jerusalem
Arab newspapers that Israeli
officials believe incite the Arab
populace there against Israelis.
Regarding Al Fata's demand
for the PLO to reject any mideast
formula offered by governments
of Western Europe to resolve the
Arab-Israeli conflict, but urging
the PLO to increase military
action against Israel and destroy
the "Zionist entity," the
Administration reiterated that
the Camp David agreements
form the "proper framework" for
reaching "a negotiated set-
tlement."
PARIS Pope John Paul met
the French Chief Rabbi who
blessed him for his actions
favor of human rights.
The 20-minute meeting be-
tween the Pontiff and Rabbi
Jacob Kaplan took place in a
seminary here in the presence of
representatives of the French
Church and the Jewish com-
munity.
Rabbi Kaplan said he was
much pleased to see the pope and
praised the church for its new
favorable attitude towards
Judaism.
The Catholic Church
recognizes the permanent
vocation of Judaism, and there is
a new effort on its part to look at
Judaism with different eyes,"
Rabbi Kaplan said after
meeting.
the
He added that relations
between Catholics and Jews were
"excellent" and that the Pope
had assured him that the church
firmly condemned anti-Semitism
and Nazism.
CHICAGO Alexander
Slepak, a Soviet Jew whose
parents are exiled in Siberia, ,
urged continued pressure on the
USSR for free Jewish emigration
in order to "atop the next
Holocaust."
Speaking before a group of 600
at a Solidarity Day rally for
Soviet Jews held at the Daley
Center Plaza, Slepak said his
parents and other refusniks will
never tire of fighting for their
right to be free.
"Soviet Jews are tired only of
discrimination," Slepak said. "'
"We have seen enough of death
and slavery." He noted that since
his parents first applied for exit
visas in 1970, they were subject
to interrogation, imprisonment,
and harrassment.
Sister Ann Gillen, executive
director, National Religious task
force on Soviet Jewry, who met
the Slepaks in 1974, noted that
Soviet capriciousness in ad-,
ministering emigration
procedures has "destroyed
families."
Begin Book Is Bonds Gift
Mrs. and Mrs. Joseph Harcsztark
New York City
Israel Prime Minister
Menachem Begin*s new book,
The Revolt, will be presented to
all new members of the Israel
Prime Minister's Club of the
State of Israel Bonds
Organization.
The book will be especially
inscribed. "In appreciation for
the response to Israel's im-
mediate cash needs," declared
Gary R. Gerson. Israel Bonds
general Campaign chairman.
The book will be presented
only to those members of the
PMC who make their payment
for Israel Bonds pledge bv June
30. The Prime Minister's Club
consists of all those who purchase
$25,000or more in Israel Bonds.
The Revolt describes Begin's
experience as a young man and
his involvement with the un-
derground during Israel's War of
Independence and in prior years.
All those who are interested in
receiving a copy of the book are
asked to call the Israel Bond
office in Hollywood.
For The
Nurse You Need
at- NOW!
hjA ct>ic**l
Services Imc
Call 963-3320
RNs, LPNs, Aides
Carefully selected foi high
standard of professional
skill and genuine human
concern for the patient.
A single call arranges your
exact needs for care.
ON CALL 24 HOURS
DO YOU
LIVE ALONE
AND NEED
HELP?
Cresthaven East may have the answer.
Newly opened Cresthaven East may have the answer for you. Located
in beautiful West Palm Beach, Cresthaven East is an innovative kind of
apartment living for ambulatory adults with support services.
Cresthaven East is not a nursing home.
Monthly fees include the following:
A tastefully decorated one bed-
room or efficiency apartment
with all electric kitchenette.
Two delicious meals daily.
Brunch and dinner.
Weekly maid and linen service.
Activities, social and entertain-
ment programs daily.
Resident nurse for general
health maintenance & health
emergencies.
Daily transportation service.
Emergency medical system. 24 hour security staff.
Cresthaven East does not require cash contributions or endowments.
You only pay a monthly fee, starting at $735. (Single occupancy
furnished apartment.)
cresthaven east
* iNNOV* 'IVt RlS'OfNTlAL CONrl'T
Cresthaven East will
provide free transportation
and lunch by reservation
Coll 309/964-2626
For further information
and free brochure, clip this
coupon and mail today
Cresthaven East H
5100 Cresthaven Boulevard, West Palm Beach. Florida 33406
Yes, I would like your Cresthaven East Brochure.
Name
Address.
City____
State__
Zip Code.
Obesity & Risk Factor Program
For the Medical Treatment
of Obesity
Announces the Opening
of its Office:
1636 N.W. 7th Court Suite 4
Miami, Florida 33136
By Appointment Only:
Phone: 305/545-5673
For $7.50,
You ,
Wrong! c^f
Many .
pool "
'
. i .' iri pal

NGta
XX
.w
aeiv
ifU**
e^ent
\N\t\v.
,sr
w
otrr***
than
|W
^rr>>s
uooo
**
rev
,ove*1
^3&*r35< tor
*toc
iY>o*
corf*1
,tvon*
50/0
discount
cm
O.R-*
XocW
Rolt**
Srt

.',
; \ :.
.. II
IPI
I ,

' pro
li
No* loi the in si lime i .
'the concept ^.imine the appropriate"
indprovidi 'tor-nation on more than 1 000 p,
with dividend reinvestment plans lor stockholders
Order your copy of this important investment tool today by sending a
'or 57 50 (plus S1 50 tor postage and handlmgi to
Dividend Reinvestment Services Inc >r h
760' W Flagler Street Suite 211
Miami Florida 33144
(305) PR4-177?
\udVtf*
,rc
tese*


June 13. 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
!eth Shalom Students Observe 'Week of Ocean'
Shalom Day School
competed in four com-
is and submitted a total of
fcects in the recent "Week
ot the Ocean" observance in Fort
Lauderdale. One competition was
limited to teachers.
More than 400 students from
Broward County public and
private schools exhibited arts
and crafts, food and science
projects during the first "Week
of the Ocean" countywide
competition.
Solel Welcomes Assistant Rabbi
N. Roaman, president of
Solel, announced that
nbert A. Jacobs will be
the staff as assistant
jmmencing in July.
Jacobs and his wife,
are former residents of
bw, Tex., where the rabbi
as spiritual leader of
i Emanu-El.
a graduate of Ohio State
attended Hebrew
allege-Jewish Institute of
in Los Angeles, and was
at Hebrew Union
-Jewish Institute of
i in Cincinnati, in 1977.
Temple Solel's Annual Picnic,
sponsored by the Brotherhood,
was held on Sunday, June 1, at
T.Y. Park.
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
conducted the worship service
and installed the 1980-81
Sisterhood officers and board of
directors on Friday, June 6.
The following were installed:
Delly Weinberg, president; Irene
Masel, executive vice president;
Pam Goldberg, Penny Frazin,
Jackie Wheeler, Adrienne Fiske,
Edye Rubenstein and Judy
Grossman, vice president;
icyclopedia Judaica Donated
Hills Section of National
of Jewish Women
ly donated the
opedia Judaica to the
jn Street Branch of
rd County Libraries to be
reference books for the
inity, according to
'he Savages
Mountain
,ake Camp
er the guidance of owners
Operators Al and Nanette
?. The Savages Mountain
Camp in Hendersonville,
features a staff of teachers,
en and experienced college
tits with one counselor for
four campers.
long the special camp
res are Friday Sabbath
fes; an arts and crafts
im; ski boating on a private
re Osceola Lake and canoes,
[tats, playaks and water-jet
boats.
eligiou.
i rectory
NORTHBROWARD
fLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
lip A. LabowiU. Cantor Maurice
leu
LE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Relorm ,44)
kRAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Imerman i44 A)
MIRAMAR
>LE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
ervative Rabbi Pa',1 Plotkin
>' Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
LE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
Dol, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
l. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon
LE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
lard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
JITATION JEWISH CONGREGA
IN 400 S. NobHill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
|arr. ,64)
JNSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
JUE 7473 NW 4th St. 169)
HALLANDALE
LANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
18th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
r ,12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
NE 22nd Ave. Retorm. Rabbi
P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
s. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
LE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Conservative. Rabbi Max
kclman (47B)
LE BETH EL. 1351 S 14th Ave.
form. Rabbi Samuel Jatte.
lant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
>LE BETH SHALOM 4601 Arthur
Conservative. Rabbi Morton
avtky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
LE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
ervative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
k> Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Nattaly A. Linkovsky (65)
LE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
lywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
prm. Rabbi Robert P. Fraiin
tor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
G ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
*T LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Id Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
izer. (52)
Dorothy Goldstein, library
chairman.
Mrs. Goldstein said NCJW has
donated other reference books for
children's use, but this is the first
set pertaining to Judaism that
they have donated.
Leanora Anchell, treasurer;
Lynne Emmer, financial
secretary; Lillian Mandel,
recording secretary; and Carole
Edwards, corresponding
secretary.
Family Night Shabbat
Worhsip Service will begin at
8:15 p.m., Friday, June 13.
The following will become
B'nai Mitzvah during the month
of June: Rick Bruce, Neil
Pomerantz, Beth Pomerantz,
Judith Grossman, Ruth Winick,
Joy Freeman, Steve Koerner and
Beth Lennitt.
Temple Solel's tenth annual
congregation meeting was held in
May. The following officers were
elected for the year 1980-81: Alan
N. Roman, president; Fredrik S.
Lippman, executive vice
president. Dr. Joel Wilentz, vice
president; James Kronengold,
vice president; Alan Fiske,
treasurer; William Wallace,
financial secretary; and Linda
Patraka, recording secretary.
The purpose of the "Week of
the Ocean" was to call attention
to the influence of the ocean on
our lives its historic and
recreational significance and its
resources of food, water, energy
and preventitive medicine.
In the poster contest for grades
3-5, Jodie Thorz and Melissa
Diamond each received a second
place. In the 6-8 grade section,
Yael Simon placed second and
Lisa Eichler and Josiane Machat
each received honorable mention.
A science project submitted by
Gideon Baig, Grade 1, entitled
"Can We Grow Plants with
Ocean Water?" was first and
Best in Show in its age group.
The second grade class project,
entitled "A Comparative Study
of Ocean Water and Tap Water,"
placed second in the K-2 section.
This project also received a
special award from the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration.
In the 3-5 grade section, a
project by Karen Homans
received an honorable mention.
Class project by K-l and K-2
were submitted to the arts and
crafts contest. Susan Cook's
second grade placed first and
Best in Show with their project
Stuffed Fish." The kindergarten
project, "Ocean Art," placed
seond. and the first grade project
"Serendipity" received an
honorable mention.
Project submitted to the 3-5
grade arts and crafts contest by
Jennifer Rhodes and Sherry
Rubin each placed second.
Honorable mention was awarded
to Jason Buchwald.
Geniene Buschel entered the 6-
8 grade arts and crafts contest
and placed second.
In the Cook-off for grades K-2,
Gideon Baig placed first and Best
in Show with his recipe for
"Tu(na)lips." Alan Cook, Grade
4, placed first and Best in Show
in the 3-5 grade contest with his
receipe for "Fish Creole." Dara
Hill, fifth grade, received a first;
Sherry Rubin, fifth grade,
received a second and Debora
Rosenbaum, third grade, received
an honorable mention.
For the teacher's competition,
Arlene Laudon's third grade
lesson plans received an
honorable mention. Lesson plans
for "A Team Approach
Introduction to the Ocean" were
submitted by the kindergarten
team of Ellen Fell Baig. Carole
Slonin, Donna Kahn and Delina
Carmelli. The kindergarten
lesson plans were awarded first
prize and Best in Show.
LIGHTS Hmg. "in".08mg nicotine.LIGHT 10(Ts:nmg "ir".0 9rngmcoiiM.i Mt cigwwu. FTCRtport OfC.79


p*

The Jeu ish Floridian and Sh, -eater H
Friday. Juni-
13.
1980
with our Blue
Register Tapes
First Quality
Cannon Towels
and washcloths
Save your
Blue Register Tapes
tor FREE* Cannon oath linens
A cxautiful selection o(
washcloths, hand towels,
bath towels and large bath
sheets in 3 lovely colors.
SEE DETAILS
IN THE STORE'
Mimosa Yellow'Mocha Brown-Dynasty Blue
* PLUS SALES TAX OFFER GOOD THRU
AUGUST 20 -0
DUBUQUE-U S CHOICE
Item -': A T.** .'.A
Ah Cloth 13.13 25.44. -:-..: M 4"
MiC Tol Bali Tc Bil* Sht (SB 1147
US CHOC* ftfSM VAUIT M(f SlADf
CHUCK $139
STEAK
LB
LB
lB
'.-i .- maiC lliiHt
Perch Fillets
K oa mi niwiw tiw
Fryer Parts
immm MiMisnait tMAtis
N.Ar UA4ANC I'.HcG LAM. OVIN |AO*
MM $| 39
t
89'
89*
Legs o. Lamb
MMH t :.i 'ic;is wnCHI ihl i r. 11 <
Chicken Legs x. 59*
Save With...
"GENERICS"
I ri M*ut4t ml, M MM *< '*
M tkt IhfMf pncrt NiMH* Brwtfs
Corned Beef Brisket
U.S. GRADE A FROZEN SELF BASTING FARMER GRAY
Turkey Breast
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Shoulder Roast
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Shoulder Steak
U.S. CHOICE FRESH VALLEY-BONELESS WHOLE OR POINT HAlr
Beef Brisket .*169 =
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH FLAT CUT Jl t LB
Lots of Chicken 49*
$p|59
$*|99
$229
cPnde
Prices 1 Offers good Thurs. June 12
thru Wed.. June It in Dodo. Broword
i Monroe Counties.
YOUR FOOD STAMPS CO j1"*^
FURTHER AT PANTRY PRIDE :..
HJTONI
41 > >
Of ONI
FREE'
14 OZ CAN
Salad _oc
Dresssing 79
Sweet
Peas 3
Spaghetti?"
Sauce
89*
i 79*
2.7T
BATH TISSUE
Whala -m*
Beets 3 89c
Evaporated billed
tafl
39<
LB.
3 CIBLET PKGS 3 BREAST QTtS. W BACKS 3 LEG OTtS. W.BACKS
Sweet
BING CHERRIES
Most of our
produce is
disployed
loose so you
con pick
your own!
AJAX
CLEANSER S
iwm om 'Mi can with ims coupon and am SJSS]
AOCMTlONAl 17 OK*. O. MOM OT OIHtt I400WCTI
iiuuomc cicaiirnt ano >mi coupon hum SSSS)
COUPON OOOO thuH AWN I Hv WID AMI 14
om coupon mi MnoN
COUPON GOOD in DADI MONtO AMO MOMOI COUNT
RICH AND FLAVORFUL
Cantaloupes its 89
U'ONI
Al MCwiA. MiC
CH ONI
24 OZ CAN POWDERED
FREE~
iN powdered
PANTRY PRIDE
DRINK MIXES =
ASSORTED FLAVORS
LIMIT ONI I Ml CAN WITH THtl COUPON A NO AN
AOCHTIONAI 17 OtOII O. MOM Ol OTHtl PIOOUCTl __
IICLUOING CCAM"tl ANO >MI COUPON HUM
COUPON C.OOO THUtS JUNI If WfO A*N4 l| pjj
oni coupon mi riMON BssB
|COU*ON GOOD in DADI ttONAID ANOMON.OI COUNTim
FIRM SALAD SIZE
Ripe Tomatoes 6,^49* s
SU'ONt
Oil ONI
FREE a
16 OZ JAR
10*
79<
HIRES ROOT BEER REG. OR DIET
DR. PEPPER pack
or 7UP 6
12-OZ.f
CANS
OCIAM IMAT (IIHMH' JU*CI COC.IAM. OS
4442 SIN
SUMSMAM4
Cheez-its 'to0.' 69'
SavllT I A* HO CUTS OML I
Watermelon u
V-...'S0 1Af| *tliM
Pineapples *',
. SO AH BUflBOM BWMtTI
Potatoes 5 14% 79*
p-C 'Out OWN Wltxil!
Florida Limes 10o.79e
mi.ii Ul AMO GOOO G.IIN
Zucchini Squash
ADOJ 7J5I IO 1AIADS
Endive Escarole
STOKELY CUT
139BES 3?.89C
MCA lOUt OWN ftOAI A lOOM 0'PlA
Yellow Onions
KU.I UNSWIITINIO
MM SI 39
GAl .< |
A5SO.TI0 VA.I ! o:
JA.
Orange Juice
A**oe>iie .*i c is maioin
Salad Dressing
23e
SIM
89<
35*
49
Cranapple Drink
7-oz. Cold Cups rTssb 99<
OlAMONO ALUMINUM
Foil 2 '.Si." 89*
MIIIIIM 4A1TH) fS WMSAirtO MISPT
Crackers_____tt 7?i
BN'IT RUM
Tea Bags a!
PANTRY PRIDE
SWIITMIAIt IMAGt INCH
Paper Plates
*0 LAUMOAf FV*KH
Detergent ____
MIMI
Keg O Ketchup
PIT RITZ FROZEN
CREAM
JIOI
I
99*
oi Si 19
40.
KRAFT
MAYONNAISE -
.* ONI >MI JA. WITH TNTI COUOON ANO AN /
ADO-'iONAl 17 O.OU Of MOM Of O'-U NOOuCTI
UCLUONC OCAMTTIS AND nil COUAON ITUA1 f|M
COUOON GOOD THUM ,UNI II Him WHO ;UNI I.
ONI COUfON M. MMON
jAO^OOO^ OAOI^^.to .-..... fl
PMH-AOflPMIA
CREAM CNEESE UV
SAVf IS-
YWTH NRWrSPAPtM COUPON
i PIES
ASSTD
VARIETIES
U-OZ
BOX
69
ASST'D GRINDS
COFFEE
MO. HO HAVO.J Till
Ice Cream _
4MT0SITI HO JIN
Corn on the Cob
SAIUIO 'IIMH 444A0 I.OZIN
Cheese Pizza___!
Mil"
Al
!
me
. oi
40.
S2'
99*
69*
4AT CCHO.I0 AM..KAN SMMKIS
Cheese Food JZ?. ,1
SAVI K-> WtTM PWt>.Pll COUS*ON
Bli i'ONI
Sour Cream coT,' 79*
ANT.' ..IM .A.IT > ASSO4TI0
Meat Slices Vi *1**
NI" RUM
All Beef Franks 3S 99*
KM S UKIO CHKIIN
Breast_________*. $1"
FREE COUPON
U'ONI iSSSSJ ,SSSSSv iSSSJ p
citoni ImBE
1-LB. BOX
S MUELLERS =
! Elbow Macaronis
.iL!"" OW '*" *" ""H ,H COUfON ANO AN SJffJ
AOomONAl 7 OlMI O. MOM 0 OTHtl MrOOUCTS
m IICLUOINC CICAMTTIt ANO >.|| COUPON ITUM ffJB
COUPON COOO TNOB AMI II Hi.. WIO AMI II
ONI COUPON .1. MMON
^jjo^co; NOAM ion "J5T.nl
Stivitt-'Diti VtfMttmtMt
ONl Al 1IOM1 WITH ll.VKI Mil COUNII.
LUNCH MtAI I (.mi UKIO TC
LEAN COOKED
CORNED
REEF
QT*.
IB.
4119
1
'p'UtA "SeJUd $ MEYErS
ENGLISH
MUFFINS 3
All Till M4AT 04 I
Knocks___
I.AAMMO.
CLAUIMN WHO.I O. 1AIA.
Pickles_______
MSB.
Mf, SI J9
P4>. I_
OUA.T SI 19
LAC. lO.liT .! CI.MAN
Bologna M:i' 99<
'IIIMtT MAM
Potato Salad .. 69*
0O.MANtAUII.ilN
Swiss Cheese T.* *!**
PKGS
Of
HEBREW NATIONAL
Mf "42 RfOULAR OR SMOKEY
IAMEQVE
14-OZ
Tl
59"
Rye Bread a mm
A UNI > ANWT SI NC1N 04 ItltM
Ring
2
Ar
2
,95^
o, 144
MIDGET
BOLOGNA or SALAMI
Wf SUttYl THE
fmiB.-wis*i
1- -55


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EKHW1UKLA_CEC8AT INGEST_TIME 2013-05-24T22:32:31Z PACKAGE AA00014307_00250
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES