The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00247

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
WfaJ<
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
10 Number 9
Hollywood, Florida Friday, May 2,1980
FndShochtt
Price 35 Cents
1980 Community Mission
Price Set at $999.
Jewish Federation of
Broward has begun
ig plans for the 1980
lunity Mission to Israel,
ling to Dr. Robert Pitted,
Ions chairman.
Community Mission is set
bet. 16-26. This Mission is a
krehensive sightseeing and
of the Jewish State from
jolan Heights in the north to
Icipants visit borders, meet
[top Israel government and
Bh Agency officials, attend a
Shabbat ceremony at the
em Wall, experience home
Vitality, among other
Dr. Robert Pittell
highlights that wouldn't be part
of a private tour to the Mideast.
The price of the Mission is $999
per person, including round-trip
air transporation, meals and
accommodations at five star
deluxe hotels.
Minimum gift to the
Federation's 1981 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund is $1,500 for head of
household plus $500 woman's gift
to the Women's Division.
Individual travelers will be
expected to make a $1,500
minimum commitment, ex-
plained Pittell.
For information on the
Community Mission, contact
Diane at the Federation office.
Campaign In Critical Phase
be Jewish Federation of
th Broward 1980 Combined
sh Appeal-Israel Emergency
|d campaign has reached an
art ant and critical phase,
Irding to Dr. Philip A. Levin,
paign chairman. "As we
Foach the final aspect of our
fpaign, we must express to
elis, through our generosity,
sense of solidarity to them."
(a have started the three-
it h allocations process, when
lies committed to the cam-
in are distributed to local,
bnal and overseas agencies,
krding to R. Joel Weiss,
Cations chairman.
evin pointed out that "we
ft get by on 'business as
1' in the campaign. The
ting weeks are critical in
is of the allocations process.
Ve must collect all dollars
available in South Broward. This
process begins with the signed
pledge card. Without these
signed pledge cards, the allo-
cations committee will not have a
true account of dollars available
to allocate to our agencies
requesting monies. A signed
pledge card does not indicate
immediate payment, only the
intent to pay before the end of
1980. There are no corners to cut
for the Jewish people. This year
the needs of Israel's people are
greater than ever.
"The percentage of increased
giving to date is encouraging and
makes us confident that we can
raise more money this year than
ever in the history of South
Broward," Levin added.
The allocations process care-
fully weighs the needs of Israel
with national and local needs
such as the Jewish Community
cond Hills Dinner-Dance
The second annual Hills Dinner-Dance, held on behalf
the Jewish Federation of South Broward's Combined
iwish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, was once again a
sounding success. Koach Division Chairman, Mark
Ked, and Hills Dinner-Dance Chairman, Larry Hunter,
plcomed more than 90 young professionals and
ksinesspeople into the room where they showed their
lidarity to the people of Israel and Jews around the
>rld.
Philip A. Levin, M.D.
Centers of South Florida, Jewish
education, Jewish Family Service
and the Miami Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens, Weiss explained.
"The more money we raise, the
greater our ability is to meet
these human needs.
"We have raised $3,883,155.to
date and contributions to the
campaign are averaging 26
percent over last year at this
time," added Levin.
We cannot deny Jewish
education to our children. We
have to strengthen it.
"We cannot cut back on our
programs of guidance for young-
sters, counsel for our families,
care for our elderly. We have to
reinforce them."
Project Renewal
Nat Sedley, Project Renewal
chairman for the Jewish
Federation of South Brow-
ard, recently spent three
days in Hod Hasharon where
he was able to personally ob-
serve the needs of the people
of Hod Hasharon and bring a
first-hand report back to the
Jewish community in South
Broward. Beside him is
Ziona Kemelman, Project
Renewal director in Hod
Hasharon.
The government of Israel working in concert with the
worldwide Jewish community has embarked on a comprehensive
program for social change called Project Renewal. Project
Renewal is committed to the social rehabilitation of 45,000
immigrant families who are living in 160 distressed neigh-
borhoods which lack adequate housing and necessary com-
munity and social services in both urban and rural areas.
Project Renewal involves 300,000 people, 10 percent of the
entire Jewish population of Israel. Some 200,000 of that number
are children, or one Israeli child in every five. Most of the people
to be assisted by this ambitious new social program are im-
migrants from the Moslem countries of North Africa and Asia.
Many of these people, however, have been residents and citizens
of Israel for more than 22 years. They are a crucial part of
Israel's future, and until now a largely neglected minority.
"Project Renewal," writes theJerusalem Post, "is an attempt
to correct the mistakes of the State's early years when masses of
immigrants were crowded into tiny box-like structures that
lacked the most elementary community services." Most of these
people never left the communities in which they were re-settled.
The toll has been heavy; more dependent aged and more
dependent children than anywhere else in the country; un-
dereducation; underemployment; festering feelings of
helplessness and frustration.
Project Renewal is a program dedicated to bringing these
people into the mainstream of creative life in Israel. It involves
the renovation and construction of housing units, the creation of
recreational and educational facilities including pre-
kindergartens and day care centers, and the intensification of
social services; vocational training, tutoring and family
guidance counseling among others. "Project Renewal," said
Menachem Begin, "is a way of healing a wound in the Jewish
heart."
The program represents a partnership to be funded equally by
the people of Israel and the Jews of the free world through the
United Jewish Appeal (UJA), funded in part by the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign. It is a 1.2
billion dollar project and will take five years to complete. It is a
campaign above and beyond the regular campaign.
The Jewish Federation of South Broward has twinned with
Hod Hasharon, a city northwest of Tel Aviv. There will be more
on Hod Hasharon in the next issue of The Jewish Floridian.
Hod Hasharon
Dyer to Chair Sub-Committee
om left, are Jill and Larry Hunter, Hills Uinner chairman;
vman, Ted and Sharon Aronsky, Janie and Brian Berman.
i
led
Jm left are Mark Fried, Koach Division chairman; Dr. Larry and
eryl Levin, Dina and Sumner Kaye, Al and Marlene Finch.
See related photos Page 5.
'Mission to Washington*
Representative Harold Dyer
(D) Hollywood, has been ap-
pointed to chair a new house sub-
committee on housing. The sub-
committee will investigate the
incentives and disincentives that
effect the housing market on the
local, state and federal levels.
"We have seen the American
dream of house ownership
disintegrate rapidly in the past
several months," said
representative Dyer. "I hope thit,
sub-committee can arrive at some
solutions to eliminate the
problem and again place home
ownership or reasonable rental
apartments within the grasp of
all Floridians."
The work of the sub-committee
will center on identifying the
problems with the current
housing situation and will at-
tempt to address those problems
with legislative solutions.
"The recent rise in interest
rates, increasing cost of building
materials, the shortage of rental
units, the conversion of rentals to
condominiums, and the lack of
money for financing are all
problems which must be ad-
dressed," said Representative
Dyer.
"In addition, we must look at
new and changing types of non-
traditional housing. We plan to
take a long look at manufactured
housing and its growth as a
viable housing option. The sub-
committee will address the long
term affects of the conversion to
condo on the rental market and
the effect of this trend."
"Efficient, affordable housing
is vital to Florida's future and we
must begin to look for solutions
now," said Representative Dyer.
SWAWAW::::::;:*
Federation
m&mtfttfiH
JFSB Women to Meet Officials
_ The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division will meet with
representatives from Council of
Jewish Federations. AIPAC, the
tate Department, Middle East
experts, Sen. Richard Stone, the
Department of Energy, the B'nai
B'rith Lobbyist on Women's
Issues, Sen. Lawton Chiles and
Congressman Ed Stack, when
they participate on a "mission to
Washington," September 22 and
23, according to Elbe Katz and
Elaine Pittell, chairwomen.
The group also plans an op-
tional tour of the National
Gallery's new wing.
Minimum commitment to the
1981 Women's Division cam-
paign on behalf of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund is $700.
Space is limited, so reser-
vations should be made now
through the Federation.
| Installation
^ Albert Ratner, president of the Jewish Com-:-:-
:: munity Federation of Cleveland, will be the guest::
*: speaker and installing officer at the Jewish :
^ Federation of South Broward's annual meeting :jj
?3 and installation of 1980-81 officers and board of S
;i;.; directors. The event will be held Sunday, May 18, i
a at 10 a.m. at the Federation office. %
n 8
S S
3 The annual meeting will mark the Federation's :
Sj 37th year serving the Jewish community in South S
9 Broward. $
8 i
&:W:::::W:W:::::^^^


ragti
I'heJewtsi
in ani
ihofar of Greater Holtyntood .
'-*--..;- ?):
. Friday^May 2; iWft
Saw/ Levine Assembly Room Dedicated
Contributions made to the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Building Fund by
family and friends of the late Saul
Levine made possible the dedi-
cation of the Assembly Room in
his memory The room was re-
named The Saul Levine
Assembly Room" on Fridav
April 18.
One hundred people gathered
at the Federation office for the
room dedication and the un-
veiling of the plaque bearing the
room's new name.
Federation
Women's
Award Lunch
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division annual awards luncheon
and installation of 1980-81
Officers and Board will be held
Tuesday, May 6, according to
Nancy Atkin and Ruth
Rodensky, coordinators.
The 11:30 a.m. event is being
held at Tumberry Isle Country-
Club.
Approximately 15 office
volunteers will be the guests of
the Women's Division at the
awards luncheon. These
volunteers work throughout the
year in the Federation office,
helping to get out mailings and
handling other clerical duties.
From left are Temple Sinai Rabbi Seymour Friedman.
Mayor David Keating, Joyce Newman, Federation president; Sumner
Kaye. Federation executive director; and Temple Sinai Rabbi
Emeritus David Shapiro.
Family members seated from left include Susan Levine. daughter-in-
law; Rochelle Koenig. daughter: and Adele Levine. widow. Standing
from left are Toby Levine. granddaughter: Michael Koenig. grandson;
Andy Levine. grandson: Lawrence Levine. son; Jim Koenig. grand-
son: Paul Koenig. son-in-law: Bill Koenig. grandson: and David
Levine. grandson.
CAJE to Publish Shavuot Guide
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education through its
educational resource center will
be publishing a special guide to
the holiday of Shavuot. This
special book will include
background information about
the holiday, stories, songs, in-
teresting facts about celebrations
in other countries, fun and
games. The book will mainly be
used by the Jewish teachers and
other educators as a source book
of information and programs to
prepare for the holiday ot
Shavuot.
Mrs Lillian Ross, is coor-
dinating the publication and
acting as the editor-in-chief. Mrs
Ross has published numerous
other booklets for the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
including "Chanukah Rap-
pings;;' "The Fourth Com-
mandment. A Sabbath Manual ";
The Fall Festivals and the
School Connection"; "The
Tamin' of Haman: A Purim
Manual "; "Why is This Season
Different? A Pesach Manual":
Tzedach Not Charity but
Justice": "The Holocaust
Return to the Homeland": "The
American Jewish Experience";
The Influence of the Bible on
American Colonists." and many-
others.
All these publications are
available for purchase from the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education. For more information
please contact our publication
department in Dade or Broward.
Beth Shalom Day School Expands
Beth Shalom Day School
announces the opening of a ninth
grade to complete their new-
junior high school program.
By a decision of the Beth
Shalom School Board, the school
will be seeking to utilize its
newest science laboratory
towards a second school
program.
An innovative curriculum is
being designed to meet the needs
of youngsters who might be
interested in the school without
having a strong Hebrew
background.
Naturally, all day school
youngsters who are interested in
our program are urged to apply
for admission soon.
The new junior high school
program will also include
English, math, science, social
studies, bible, hebrew. physical
education, art. and electives.
Instructors for the Beth
Shalom Community Day School
are certified in the state of
Florida in their field of
specialization and by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education for
Judaic studies.
The newly completed
Meyerhoff Library and Media
Center will be a central focus of
the new junior high school
program.
For further information, please
do not hesitate to contact the
school.
North Dade Salutes Israel
Norman Pollack, executive
gdirector of Temple Adath
Yeshurun. and Barbara Ramsey,
executive director of Temple
Sinai of North Dade will serve as
the co-coordinators of the North
Dade Salute to Israel Parade, to
be held on Sunday morning, May
4 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
The North Dade Salute to
Israel Parade is a joint effort of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, Temple Adath
Beth El
i Brotherhood
to Meet
The Brotherhood of Tempi.
Beth El presents a speda
program on behalf of the Jewish
Chautauqua Society, Sunday,
May 11, at 9:30 a.m. in the Tobin
Auditorium of the temple.
Guest speaker will be Samuel
Z. Jaffe. A film. The Truth Will
Make Us Free," will be shown.
xThe breakfast is for Brotherhood
LI J.and temple members only. Call
vthe temple office for reservations
* as space is limited. Louis A. Sah-
m is chairman.
Yeshurun. Aventura Jewish
Center, The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
Temple Sinai of North Dade,
Shaaray Tefilia, and Young
Israel of Greater Miami The
impetus for the parade came from
the North Dade Midrasha, the
adult institute in the North Dade
community. The grand mars ha 11
for the parade will be the
honorable Ambassador Tzvi
urusn, representative ot the
Ministry of Information of Israel
to the United States.
Ambassador Brush will also
present greetings at the brief
program which will follow the
parade.
For more information please
contact Norman Pollack or
Barbara Ramsey at the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
BiscayneBlvd., Miami.
Temple Sinai Elects Board
The newly elected board of
governors will assume its duties
of directing and managing the
affairs of the Temple starting
June 1.
Elected as officers of the
Temple were: Mort Kushner,
president; Dr. Alfred Rosenthal.
1st vice president; Marcy
Kamerson, 2nd vice president;
Elliot Stein, 3rd vice president:
Stephen Platt. 4th vice
president: Sydney Burkholz.
treasurer; Irving London,
financial secretary; Rose Cohn,
recording secretary; and Paul B.
Anton, parliamentarian.
Elected to serve on the Board
for 3 years were: Louis Cantor,
Ernest Freiberger, Prof. Ms'
Golden, Joseph Kleiman. Charles
Kollin, Sidney Miller, and Sidnev
Terl.
Board members previously
elected are: Thomas Cohen,
Gerald K. Goldman, Philip
Hausfeld, Ronald Horowitz,
Hyman Jacobs, Myriam Levine,
Norman Platt, Jerald Raticoff,
Ronald Rosen, and Bertha
Widlitz.
The above will serve until 1982.
Board members whose term
will end in 1981 are: Edward
Lofkow, Jacob Mogilowitz, Dr.
Robert Pittell, Al Ponn. Dr.
Irving Rosenthal, Harry
Scheiner, Joseph Siegel. and Dr.
Saul Singer.
Families expect more
from
Riverside.
More service.
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
Jewish communities of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935, Riverside has been the standard by which
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director in Florida. They are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs,
regardless of financial circumstances.
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere else
in the world.
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up to that trust.
HOLLYWOOD:2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Call:9201010
Other chapels in North Broward.North Miami Beach,Miami Beach.
Miami and West Palm Beach
Five chaDels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
RIVERSIDE
VtT-o'tal Chapel. Inc Fure'di Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Pre-arranged Funeral.
Guirdian
kj*?
&
Carl Grossberg/ Alfred Golden / Leo Hack/ Kenneth M.Kay/
Arthur Grossberg/Joseph Rubin/Carmen Serrano/
Andrew Fier/ Charles S.Salomon
Marion Sato
Posj Hosie Shopping Center
4525 She.,don Si Hollywood. Flo
Phone 961 -o998
Personol Service Book Store
If you need it
for your home
^^ 9U at...
Housewares Hardware Paint. Locksmith
Patio/Dinette Furniture Bath /Closet Shop
Dinnerware Lighting Gifts
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily 8am 6 pm. Mon & Fr, til 9 pm. Sundays 12 5
100 E. Haltandate Beach Blvd.. Hallandat* 456-0566


I Friday. May 2, I960
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
Thousands Celebrate Israel Independence Day
More than 2,000 South Broward residents gathered
at Young Circle for the Youth Salute to Israel Indepen-
dence Day. Youth participation from Hillel, B'nai B'rith
Youth and area synagogues added to the success of the
day. From 3 to 5 p. m., a midway of booths attracted many
as they ate falafel and drank fresh squeezed lemonade. At
5 p.m., the crowd moved into the band shell where they
were entertained by area youth and the America Balalika
Company.

Brager & Co.
2301 Collins Avenue. Suite M-30
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Miami Phone: 673-8393
Out of local area call collect
jfr
Seated at table are Gail Weisberg and Wayne Weitz. Standing from
left are Bob and Sandra Lev. Larry and Jewel Smith with their
children. Heather and Wendy and Lily Lev.
From 3 to 5 p.m., folk dancing was held on the lawn at Young Circle.
Jared Levin prepares his ring at the "Masada Toss," a booth spon-
sored by the Gimmel chapter of B'nai B'rith Girls.
| Norman Freedman handed a program to Sara and Bill Rcshefaky^
Karen Kaminsky, left, of Temple Solel displays some of the youth art-
*urk to Dorothy Wilens (front) and Frieda Silverman (rear*.
FOOT FACTS
ON TAPE
Free Foot Health
Information
On Your Problems
To listen,
Request by Number
F1 Bunions
F2 Nail Problems
F3 Corns-Calluses
F4 Heel Pain
F5 Arch Pain
. F6 Skin Problems
F7 Sports Injuries
F8 Circulation Problems
6981 Tilt St.
Talt Hollywood Center
969-1786
Call
456-4933
- Cnrfiy
DR. ARTHUR B.K ORB El
lie Hemtektrei- (keen North fldg.
mOS.Ottar.Driv.
Hallandale 451-3155
Savings Stoi
with Unbeatable Rates!
WEEKLY SPECIAL
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Minimum Deposit $10,000 Simple Interest
ASK FOR THIS WEEK'S RATE
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Minimum Deposit S100 Compound Interest
ASK FOR THIS MONTH'S RATE
DAILY SPECIALS.
6 Savinqs Certificates
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Interest Compounded Dally
ANNUAL BAH rrm ANNUAL VIUD
8.00% 8 YEARS 8.33%
7.75% 6 YEARS ao6%
7.50% 4 YEARS 7.79%
6-75% 30 MONTHS 6.98%
6.50% 12 MONTHS 6.72%
6.00% 3 MONTHS 6.18%
The Handy-Dandy-ln-and-Out
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5.50% per year yields 5.65%
Earns interest from day of deposit to day of withdrawal.
Savings Certificates subiect to substantial interest penalty for early
withdrawal Renewals subject to change in annual rate and e'lective yield
ISO minimum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
SAIIATH SERVICES FROM TEMPLE ISRAEL
. FRIDAY NIGHTS AT 1:00PM on WTMI
93.1 m Dade and Broward Counties
'.* 102.3 in Palm Beach County
Brought to you by
Washington Savings
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
ASSETS EXCEED ONE BILLION DOLLARS
COMVINIINT O* FKIS MR VINO VOU IN FLORIDA
MIAMI BEACH
1701 Meridian Avenue'674-6612
1234 Washington Ave -674-6550
1133 Normandy Dnve'674 6563
1500 Bay Road/673 8306
517 Arthur Godfrey Rd 674-6710
810 Lmccm Road/674 6868
CORAL GABLES
2525 LeJeune Rd /44S 7905
KENDALL
9469 S Dme Hwy/665 8003
BAY HARBOR ISLANDS
1160 Kane Concourse/865 4344
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
633 N E 167th Street/652-9200
2221 N E 164th Street/940 3975
HOLLYWOOD
450 North Park Road/981 9192
BOCA RATON
899 E Palmetto Park Rd /391 8903
WEST PALM BEACH
4766 0keechobeeBlvd /686-7770
PLANTATION
8337 W Sunrise Blvd /472-2701
OEERFIELD
230 S Federal Hwy/428 6800
FSUC
YOUR SAVINGS INSURED TO SIOO.OOO
BY AN AGENCY Of THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
An f >]tidl Opportunity I mplovcr
JACK 0 GORDON. President ARTHUR H COURShOn. Chairman of the Board


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly u*x>d
Frida
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Hri l'. <* hi'-mi fa*r\i Aiaaoataja Aataricaa Aimj'*
taaj ixtwitf wr-iaaa*^ "* 'taoaa ar Asta< a*-ar
SutCiTo bates kacaiafaa. Oa**aa*J M 0*t a Ta>a uaaa *iaW
'.'i.. :>'.
16IYARrv.
Number 9
What is a Jew?
''
recent decision by the Small Business |
:; Administration to reject an application to designate \
:::the 100.000 to 150,000 Hasadim in the United States ;.:j
:as a socially and economically disadvantaged x
|group" on the grounds that it would bea violation of g
::;the Constitutional requirement of separation of:?
>:church and state was an example of bureaucratic nit- ?
:> picking.
The Hasidim are. of course, a definite religious
pgroup. But they were not asking for federal funds for |
;:j their yeshivas. but as special designation as a |
^minority group. The SBA readily admits that the S
:i: evidence was overwhelming that Hasadim experience I
^prejudice and discrimination in employment. The |
;:SBA did try to mitigate its decision by noting that ::
y. it is frankly anticipated that the typical Hasidic \
v. entrepreneur wUl have little difficulty in establishing fy
his or her social disadvantage |
The difficulty the Hasidim are undergoing with 1
xthe SBA is one that Hasidim and other poor Jews I
ghave t^;n experiencing in other areas where Jews \
:: have sought to be included among the disadvantaged i
xminorities entitled to federal aid. It is also part of a 1
? larger issue which will eventually have to be dealt 1
x with by the entire American Jewish community
| Benefits and Conflicts

I
Jewa have found greater freedom, equality and!
p prosperity in the United States, despite dia-|
v. crimination, partly because of the separation of 1
4 church and state. In the countries from which thev \
I came they were not considered true citizens even I
I though they had lived there for hundreds and even |
But in the U.S.. Jews have :j:
considered just another ::
| thousands of years
:: always been officially
religion.

:
::
This conflict is becoming more urgent bee-, se of
g the question of Israel, because of the problem, ,f the
Z large number of poor Jews and because many Jews
I have become part of the American trend toward :
/ ethnic pride. x
Sadat Warns He
Won't Stand For
Egypt Concession
"ink ---------- '___...____I 1
WASHINGTON (JTA -
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
was adamant against any conces-
sions to Israel on the issues of
Jerusalem, Palestinian statehood
and Jewish settlements on the
West Hank and Gaza Strip. He
also alleged that Israel is not
observing the spirit of Camp
David.
Addressing the National Presf
Club following two days of in
tensive discussions with
President Carter on th
autonomy negotiations, the
Egyptian leader, referred to those
issues. He declared that
"naturally, a final settlement" on
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
"should be based on the right to
self-determination," language
that is considered to mear
eventual statehood for the
Palestinians.
SADAT APPEARED tc
exclude Jews specifically frorr.
rights in East Jerusalem when,
later in his address, he said that
"Arab sovereignty and Islamic
and Christian rights would be
observed in East Jerusalem"
under the type of settlement he
envisaged.
Sadat contended that "self-
determination poses no threat to
Israel and its security. On the
contrary, it is the only sure way
to peaceful and harmonious co-
existence." He took issue with
the proposition that Jews have a
right to live anywhere.
"Certainly," he said, 'all
peoples must be treated equally
and without any discrimination.
However, no people has the right
to live in other poeple's territory
without thier consent and free
acceptance. To say otherwise
would not only run contrary to
the norms of international law
and legitimacy, but it would also
create a dangerous precedent
none of us could live with Sadat
said that full autonomy on the
West Bank and Gaza would be an
Israeli gesture "in response to
my historic visit to Jerusalem."
Weizman, John Wayne Part
WE WERE still children back
ia 1955. or thereabouts. Though
we had been through the Big
War the world was still shiny lor
us because our country had led
the free n a crusade of ideals
again* the Nazi forces of
Moloch, and the deals triumphed
and prevailed
In those days '.he days of
children and of ideals, isn't that
how it always happened0 It was
only in the last half-decade before
his death, when John Wayne was
still making movies in remem-
brance of these things past, that
they had grown to seem naive
and anachronistic, and he along
with them, a Don Quixote, a
courtly lover, when courts had
long since given way to com-
puterized nerve centers and love
to lust, the pure gymnastics of
passion
ANYWAY, back in 1965. or
thereabouts, the Miami publicist
Gerald Schwartz bought a
flaming red Packard convertible.
ooa>of the last of the breed of that
car. with pushbutton everything.
Leo
Mimlliii
who once
emblazoned
flew
including transmission: you
simply dialed whether you
wanted to go forward, and in
what gear ratio, or backward;
and the Packard obliged
Well, into town barnstormed a
jet-fighter cowboy named John
Wayne would surely have ad-
mired, a knight of the skies. All
chivalrous was he. filled with the
vjrtues of maidenhood and death
to the Arab enemy who denied
his new country the right to
peaceful existence.
Ezer Weizman was his name,
and he wore his wings with the
panache of the American colonists
::::::::-:-:::-:-::-::::-:-::.:-:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.:.:.:.:.:.:.:......
t***ir sink*.
bMnw with iU
firmly-threatening legend: Don'.
tread on me.
AND WEIZMAN climed into
that brand new red Packard
convertible parked outside the
offices of The Jewish Floridian
and took off around the streets of
downtown Miami as if he were
piloting his French Mirage
against the lateat Arab assault
Pressing every conceivable-
button he could find on trie'!
transmission console and
anything else automatic that
caught his eye, so that windows
and windshield-wipers and seats
suddenly took on a life of their
own. he jetted toward Flagler
Street, banked and rolled on
screeching tires to circle B.scaynt
Boulevard, shouting txiyiah
imprecations all the way.
He was a discoverer in those
days, a chalutz of the heavens at ',
those good days, the days 99
grace and awe, when youth hatf
the universe in its fist of op-
portunity, when free men were
not yet enslaved by free leaders
who are fools.
Now, Ezer Weizman is a free
leader. Men are salves, and he is a
fool. He would not step into a
flaming red Packard today He is
too busy betraying, too busy
undercutting at the very instant
that his Prime Minister ia
negotiating with a President,
with two Presidents against the
very death of his country
THERE ARE no more ideals,
not even in Israel, no sense of
honor in Weizman; and. worst of
all. there is no sense of humor as
elicited from him the boyish
shouts of imprecation in thaM
flaming red Packard a quarter of
a century ago.
Not he. no it is not he whom
age has made the Don Quixote,
but Menachem Begin whom
Weizman betrayed for a handful
of gutter politics. He has grown
older with the cancerous growth
of history, not older with the
sensitive growth of time. He has
changed, modified his soul to feed
his new appetites.
It is not that Weizman,!
challenged Begin that disturbed
Continued on Page 13
British Role in Mideast Recalled
Do you desire a reliable
refresher couse on the Holy
Land? Would you care to learn
anew which British leaders have
stood for the rebirth of a
homeland for Jews on sacred soil
and which opposed the
emergence of the modern State of
Israel? Have you wondered how
prominent and effective was the
anti-Jewish role played by Haj
Amin ai Husseini, the Mufti of
Jerusalem, a pen pal of Adolf
Hitler?
These dozens of other key
inquiries are answered brilliantly
by Nicholas Bethell, able British
historian and a member of the
European Parliament. His book,
published by Putnam, is The
Palestine Triangle: The Struggle
for the Holy Land, 1935-48."
LORD BETHELL has had the
advantage of fresh access after
30 years of secrecy to British
Cabinet documents. He has.
researched the diaries and files of
the British Foreign Office, the
British War Office, the records of
the Colonial Office, the papers of
Prime Ministers' offices, Zionist
Archives, and the National
Archives in Washington. Eight
years ago there came from his
pen a book entitled The War
Hitler Won.
Now his Palestine Triangle
might have been called "The
Wars The Jewish People Lost"
had it all been left to Arabs in
revolt. Hitler's agents. Arabists
"""""""""^.........miMamiiinnanrlnnsm..........WnMnTT ........
in the U.S. Slate Department,
and to certain British func-
tionaries who loathed the
assignment of trying to keep
Jews and Arabs from opposition
throats.
A word is in order also about
the Triangle Britain, the Jews,
and the Arabs. At times, as
Nicholas Bethell sets it down, it
could have been a rectangle,
considering the central role
played by Hitler's Reich as it
went about its bestial business
embodied by the word,
Holocaust. And towards the close
of this honest and edifying work,
one has a vision of a pentagon,
the fifth participant is the hungry
Russian bear, eager to wedge its
way into the Middle East.
FOR MOSCOW, anxious to
embarrass England, cast one of
the crucial votes when Israel was
admitted by the United Nations.
1 he Russians went on from there
in opposite course to become one
of Israels most bitter enemies.
On his wide canvas, Bethell
does justice to Winston Chur-
chill, a staunch Zionist until bJi
dear friend. Lord Walter Moyne,
was cut down" by the Stem gang,
embittered by that colonial
secretary's harsh words about
Jews clamoring to get into
Palestine and by his role in the
tragic voyage of the Struma
The writer offers us the
authentic remarks of Ernest
Bevin, who advised the Jews o
learn a better morality by reading
the Koran; Clement Attlee, who
scolded the Jews for "trying to
get to the head of the queue"; the
British minister in Egypt,
Charles Bateman, who found
both Jews and Arabs loathsome.
AND IN HIS remarkable
chapter on the Exodus, he
reminds us that Bevin, who set
out to make an example of the
ship by obliging her to return to*
French port, regarded this
dramatic and heroic effort to
reach the homeland as "this
infamous traffic." Most of the
world was shocked. Nicholas
Bethell sees in Britain's handling
of the Exodus "an act of
calculated inhumanity."
Step by step, this untiring
historian details the Peel
Commission's work, the fiery
struggle over the White Paper,
the course run by the Anglo-
American Commission and the
UN Special Commission on
Palestine.
As the British Empire went
Continued on Page 13


Friday. May 2, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
_Page
r
Hills Dinner Dance
'From left are Jackie and Simon Reichbaum, Dr. Phil Levin, Dr. and
Mrs. Mark Forrest, Beverly and Dr. Alvin Shapiro
mw a 4flHH|HH
Hk
JB1
ifT Vj Be-*>b h as Hk ML M B| ,
t rv | HP ^^H
" V w ~Jm W'* >. OF M 1
From left are Jan Miraky, Barry and Diane Wilen. Standing from left
are Charlotte Mirsky, Sally and Joel Weiss.
From left are Bobbie and Dr. Phil Levin, Emelie and Clay Shaw.
Newman Named
to GA Post
Joyce Newman, president of
the Jewish Federation of South
Hroward, has been appointed
chairman for the intermediate
cities workshop at the 49th
General Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations.
In this capacity, .Mrs. Newman
will have the responsibility of
planning all workshops relating
to intermediate cities for the GA
which will be held in Detroit from
Nov. 12-16. Also, she will serve as
a member of the overall GA
program committee.
Seated from left are Steve Rose. Claris.- Brettler and Dolly Lerner.
Standing from left an- Ellen Rose, Merritt and Betty Epstein.
Itnsalind and William Burd.
Library Notes
There will be a lec-
ture demonstration series on
personal money management on
Tuesday evenings, May 6, 13, 20
and 27, 7-8:45 p.m.. at the
Hollywood Branch Library.
The series, presented by
Harold K. Mankamyer. director
cil Consumer Credit Counseling
Service, will deal with issues such
as: how to prevent overspending,
a review of consumer protection
laws, pros and cons of
bankruptcy, and a field trip to
ihe credit bureau.
The Hollywood friends of the
Hroward County Library will
meet on Saturday. Ma) 10, from
10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the library,
located at 26th Ave. and
I lollywood Boulevard.
This meeting is o|K-n to any
idull or young aduit who is
esl n! in participating.
Howard liirnian. county
commission chairperson; Fran
Uross, vice chairperson; Mayor
David Keating of Hallandale;
members of the Broward County
Library Advisory Boards,
Friends of the Library and
library users were invited by
branch librarian. Louise Hofer to
attend a groundbreaking
ceremony to fete the expanded
ifand renovated Hollywood
Library on April 24.
From left are Fran Knee, Mel and Kay Haas, Mike Fried and Rick
Knee.
From left are Andv and Hrenda Greenman. Joyce and Ted Newman.
TH|C UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
YOUR DOllAR ISN'T WORTH NEARtY WHAT IT USED TO BE
, *" i
You know thji because it doevi'l boy near I v what il used to buy *"<> vou tut
corners. Vou buy less. But even lew unis more, for the Irwish people, there are no
corner* let! to < ul In Israel, inflation is appro* hing 100%. here ji home, double
digit inflation has come to stay. We tan't uv no: not to Russian immigrants;
not to the peat e-loving people of Israel, not to our troubled vtHingslers. our elderlv.
our children, not to Ihe integrity ol the Irwish lamilv In a lime ol greater
need, we can!
    to keep Jewish lite growing and thriving in Israel, in thr United Males,
    I wherever there are Jews. In I ''HO. ve must sav yev We must give more
    f-i'^lrHi'n^.lr
    ilililiLK
    From left are Dr. Ira Sheier, Michelle Dunn, Mark Fried, Randee and
    Edward Lefkow.
    AlolST l!lli
    EBBUBEB
    1 2
    THE FAMILY MISSION IS COMING!!!
    >
    4
    :i 5 (> 7 8
    Augu st 5-15 ,1980 15
    m 1 1 12 13 14 16
    MARK YOUR CALENDARS NOW!!!
    IS
    l!>
    2<>
    21
    22
    CALL 921-8810 FOR DETAILS

    2 I
    25
    :il
    2(i
    2?
    28
    2<)
    23
    .'*<>
    Light the candle
    and remember?
    Menorah Chapels, to preserve
    ihe traditions of our faith,
    wishes to offer a gift of re-
    membrance. A Yahrzeit
    Calendar in the name of the
    departed and a Yearly Re-
    minder of the Yahrzeit
    observance date. A part of
    our religious life, now and
    through the ages.
    CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
    YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
    6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
    Fort Lauderdale. Florida 33313
    742-6000
    In Dade. call 861-7301
    In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
    BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
    DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
    KIICHINMlM*ltOS INC
    si MM isk v scmi (MM "<"" lOt omow
    MMOKIOl CHAHLS
    io,....-
    .SIH Mixim-i CMAHIS
    \l .l S I
    And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
    Chapels also in Deerf ield Beach and Margate
    The oldest Jewish-owned chapels in Broward County.


    Page6
    Tk* l4trish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
    Friday, Miy 2 1
    Headlines
    Carter Invites
    Peres to U.S.
    Museum Director to Talk at Beth El
    JERUSALEM President
    Carter has asked Labor Party
    Chairman Shimon Peres to talks
    at the White House. Israel
    television disclosed It said the
    telks would concentrate on the
    autonomy issue The TV added
    that such an invitation to an
    opposition leader was extremely
    rare
    It said the Carter-Peres
    meeting had been arranged by
    Ephraim Evron. Israel's
    Ambassador to the L' S
    However, a Foreign Ministry
    source said the Ministry had no
    knowledge of the Ambassador s
    efforts m this matter and no
    proof that the meeting would
    take place
    NEW YORK Jewish
    5THDI0
    Continental^ '-
    \ Cuisine
    'be: .ess
    Heritage Week, part of a series of
    public school programs designed
    to unite the various racial and
    ethnic groups in our city, was
    officially proclaimed here at a
    receptnn at City Hall The
    program, which was launched
    four years ago. is running to Apr
    27. New York State Attorney
    General Robert A brams, who is
    chairman of Jewish Heritage
    Week, stated that the program
    has grown more successful with
    each passing year, with 750.000
    students having participated in
    the spring of 1979
    According to Abrmms. who
    suggested the idea of the week
    when he was Bronx Borough
    President, the functrm of the
    series of events is to break down
    the racial barriers m many
    schools by giving students a
    greater understanding of their
    various types of peers
    The director of the B'nai B'rith
    Kluznkk Museum in Washing-
    ton. Anna R. Cohn. will discuss
    tracing Jewish family roots
    through ceremonial and folk art
    Friday evening. May 9. at
    Temple Beth El. Hollywood
    Ms Cohn s talk, which will be
    given following Sabbath sen-ices.
    in conjunction with a display of
    Judaica at the temple The items
    on exhibit are on loan from the
    B'nai B'rith Museum.
    Among Beth El congregants
    are Joseph and Olyn Horwiu.
    major benefactors of the B'nai
    B'rith Museum.
    Ms Cohn has been director of
    the museum for two years she
    joined the staff in January 1976
    as curator and has succeeded
    in
    in making it an important
    repository of Judaica in America
    She has been instrumental b.
    "discovering" hundreds of piece,
    of Jewish art and craft m jjZ
    warehouses of the Smithsonian
    Institution and acquiring both
    on temporary and permanent
    loan hundreds of others for
    display in the B'nai B'rith
    Museum.
    ="
    - V t( -s..-i
    - I ; -
    Fins Entertainment
    At the Piano
    Also noun playing
    for your pisasura
    OPENS AT 5 P.M.
    EK.: COCKTAILS s
    THE GROTTO"
    ktOH v i ; s
    :r= 3 -:isos
    Ota0.CS
    2340 SW 32 Ave.
    445-5371
    TEL AVIV Pvt Stephen
    - "fir.. 21. of Garway. Ireland,
    who died in a Haifa hospital of
    wounds he receded during a
    skirmish in south Lebanon 10
    d '-: ago. bequeathed a gift of life
    to two Israelis At the request of
    his parents, his kidneys ere
    donated for transplant
    The recipient.; IfaraUfl Khatib.
    -year-old Arab high school
    girl from a village in Galilee, and
    Mordechai Lieboviu. a 37-year-
    old Jewish salesman from Haifa,
    both suffering from kidney
    ailments, were rushed to
    iam Hospital where
    surgeons successfully performed
    transplant operations
    shortly after Gr.ff in dd
    ; -r-t- .:.-.". soldier was a
    member of the Irish contingent of
    the L'tted Nations Interia Force
    x Lecarvr VMFIL' *ruch
    -: -.:- If.j Saad Haddad s
    - Kin rr-..:.a JO Apr
    ~- -- ; _-:-: r.r as flown
    to rLarr.sarr. Hospital and piacec
    I He died
    -"'" '-' -' rtgajnjag
    -
    Planning for 1980-81 activities of Pioneer Women in Dade and Broward counties are these leaden, of the
    Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America. From left are Kalman Bachrack. editor of the Hebrew
    section of the national Pioneer Women magazine. Tamar Bachrack. national chairman of the Hebrew-
    Yiddish department of Pioneer Women: Harriet Green, president of Pioneer Women Council of South
    Florida and national building fund chairman: Frieda Leemon of Detroit, national president. Lillian
    Hantman of Miami Beach, former national vice president; Bebee Pullman of Fort Lauderdale. member of
    national board and Southeast Area organizational chairman for Pioneer Women: Mildred Weiss of Deer-
    field Beach, national board member and Southeast area coordinator: and Sylvia Snyder of Boca Raton,
    past national vice president and southeast area Na'amai chairman.
    IT'S THE COFFEE THAT'LL
    MAKE EVERYONE THINK YOU DID
    WHEN YOU DIDN'T!

    na ana f,es' perked ta t<
    a;, z ce D'oud IC serve zizez a "
    me y me Hone) cake 0< 1 -:- : -
    z-zr:. > whenever friends and ?
    Suddenly ;:: Maxim*the -eze
    ; ed coffee -at make everyc e thinl .
    - "t ~e k ~-=-e I 'fee
    . i y
    963-4080
    JOHNSON ST. AT 44 1


    Friday. May 2, 1980
    *?
    The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly u-od
    Page 7
    B'nai B'rith Women Set Regional Event
    Jacobson
    Sen. Scott
    Hadassah Mid-Coast
    Region Slates Conclave
    A star-studded cast will I
    headline the three-day annual
    conference of the Florida Mid-
    Coast Region of Hadassah,
    scheduled May 4-6, at the
    Sheraton Yankee Trader Hotel,
    Fort Lauderdale. '
    Charlotte Jacobson, world
    Zionist leader, past National
    Hadassah president, currently
    chairman of the American
    Section of the World Zionist
    Organization, and national
    advisor to the region conference,
    will discuss the world scene at the
    American-Zionist Affairs plenary
    session Sunday night, May 4,
    sharing the platform with Florida
    State Sen. James Scott who will
    speak on "The Jewish Con-
    tribution."
    Monday morning the male
    Hadassah Associates will gather
    lor breakfast to hear Dr. Ezra
    Sharon of Israel whose subject
    will be "Wonders of the
    Hadassah Medical Complexes of
    Jerusalem."
    Following a cocktail party at 6
    p.m. that evening, conference
    delegates and guests will attend
    the Installation Dinner at which
    Port Lauderdale Mayor E. Clay
    Shaw. Jr. will bring greetings
    from the city, and Broward
    Commissioner Jack Moss will be
    the installing officer.
    Incumbent president Esther
    Cannon will be re-installed for a
    third year. Other officers are vice
    presidents Pearl Goldenberg,
    Helen Kamer. Mollie Lewis.
    Josephine Newman. Mary
    I'avony. Ann Salkin, Leona
    Brauaer, Rita Sherman, and Lee
    Rich; treasurer, Dory Tarlow:
    recording secretary Sarah
    Solomon; corresponding
    secretary Adeline Moll.
    At the closing luncheon on
    Tuesday, May 6, the "Chapter of
    the Year" and the "Group of the
    Year" first, second, and third
    places, will be announced and
    awards presented.
    Adeline Moll, region con-
    ference chairman, who has had
    the conference on the drawing
    board for the past year, has
    announced that in addition to the
    special events, there will be nine
    workshops: Program Fund-
    raising, Tourism, Youth, Wills
    & Bequests, Bulletin, Mem-
    bership, Education and
    Leadership.
    An "Artistic Interpretation of
    Hadassah" will be presented in
    an original program of music and
    drama produced and directed by
    Irving Friedman whose drama
    background dates back to his
    days with the New Jersey stock
    company.
    Region arrangements chair-
    man for the conference is Sylvia
    Beckman, and the host chapter,
    Anna Silman, president, is the
    West Broward Chapter of
    Hadassah. Sixty members are
    assigned to the tasks of various
    preparations.
    Reservations can be made with
    Gloria Hirsch, for complete
    participation or for individual
    meal functions. The Sunday
    night plenary and workshops are
    free to the public.
    B'nai B'rith Women, South
    Coastal Region, will hold its Fifth
    Annual Conference at the
    Konover Hotel, Miami Beach,
    May 3, 4, and 5. Special guests
    will include Murray Meyerson,
    mayor of Miami Beach.
    With his wife, he will attend
    the banquet on May 4, and will be
    one of the judges for the "SI.97
    Talent Show" in which the
    representatives will participate.
    Among the features of the
    conference will be seminars,
    workshops, and awards
    presentations with such titles as
    "Prime Time," "Face the
    Region," "Let's Make a Deal,"
    "Issues and Answers," and
    "M.A.S.H."
    The 250 representatives
    coming from 67 chapters and
    eight councils throughout Florida
    and as far away as Savannah, Ga.
    will hear speakers discussing
    timely issues.
    Among the guest speakers will
    be Lillian Holstein, B'nai B'rith
    Women past international
    president from Pittsburgh, Pa.^
    who will speak about the various'
    programs and projects of B'nai
    B'rith Women; Jean B. Wilson,
    national program coordinator for
    the March of Dimes Birth
    Defects Foundation, coming from
    New York to participate in the
    coherence; J.C. Collier, Jr., energy situation and Sylvia
    director of marketing and energy Lewish, director of the Anti-
    conservation, Florida Power and Defamation League for Palm
    Light Corporation, to discuss the Beach County.
    Starship Fan Federation Meeting
    15, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The
    program will consist of films of
    Star Trek "Bloopers" and two
    The Starship Fan Federation is
    a group of dedicated fans of the
    TV series "Star Trek" who meet
    monthly at the Hollywood
    Branch of the Broward County
    Library system.
    Young adults and adults are
    invited to the next meeting which
    will take place on Thursday, May
    Star Trek episodes, followed by a
    discussion.
    All "Trekkies" are invited to
    attend this program free of
    charge at the library.

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    FageB
    The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
    Friday, May 2, 1980
    Poland Stop on UJA Mission Enlightening
    The following is the second of a
    two-part series on United Jewish
    Appeal staff member Judith
    Manelis' visit to Poland as part
    of a UJA-sponsored American
    Jewish Press Association mission
    to Eastern Europe and Israel.
    The article appears by per-
    mission of "The Jewish News of
    Metropolitan New Jersey."
    By JUDITH MANELIS
    Part Two
    The visit to Auschwitz was
    over. It was time now to travel
    the few miles to Birkenau, the
    camp down the road where most
    of the death and destruction took
    place.
    The snow had not let up .
    the bus labored on. We passed
    the railroad depot where Jews
    were selected by the infamous Dr.
    Mengele. You, Jew, to the right
    and labor. You, Jew, to the left
    and death. Neat words. No
    emotion necessary. You. mother
    and child, to the left, You, Jew,
    sickly and weak, to the left. You,
    Jew, look healthy enough to last
    a few more weeks, to the right
    and a small chance to live. "Work
    makes men free."
    Snow, snow everywhere. It
    whirled around the bus and beat
    against the windows making
    visibility difficult. The bus came
    to a stop. We had arrived at
    Birkenau. Here there was no
    parking lot to be seen. Either it
    was beneath the snow or perhaps
    few came to the real scene of
    death. The gate was locked. A
    lone guard sat in an office in the
    camp's main entrance building.
    Our guide told us it was impos-
    sible to walk the half mile to the
    memorial to lay the wreath and
    say our prayers. The snow, he
    said, was too high. Perhaps we
    would be satisfied simply
    climbing to the top of the watch-
    tower and viewing the camp from
    above ... not attempting the
    long walk to the memorial.
    We said no. NO! We would not
    be satisfied. We had come too far.
    NO! We would not return to the
    bus. We would not accept the
    verdict. We would not turn our
    heads. We would not let the bliz-
    zard deter us. We would walk if
    necessary ... in the snow which
    was now up to our knees.
    Our guide finally agreed to ask
    the guard for permission to drive
    into the grounds of the camp so
    we might take the circuitious
    path that led around the camp to
    the memorial. The road, he said,
    was open.
    But first we climbed the steps
    to the tower. Stretching before
    us, barely visible in swirling
    snowflakes, were the barracks
    that housed the inmates. Some
    were intact. But many had been
    destroyed and only their chim-
    neys remained standing in eerie
    silence, each alone in a mount of
    snow like disembodied
    buildings like monuments to
    the dead like a child's first
    attempts at building brick
    piled on brick, with no distinctive
    shape. Only these chimneys were
    not made by children. And they
    had been surrounded by real
    buildings made of wood, too
    fragile to keep out the winter
    winds, the freezing temperatures,
    the harsh realities of death next
    door.
    We walked to a nearby
    barracks to look inside. Again the
    horrible feeling of deja uu. There
    stood row upon row of three-tier
    wooden bunk beds, primitive by
    any standards. And suddenly a
    picture of emaciated inmates
    hanging over the sides of these
    beds came into focus. Was I
    really here? I sensed a distance
    between myself and what I was
    seeing ... a distance caused by a
    terrible fear spreading through
    my body like a fever. The beds
    were empty, but in my mind's eye
    I filled them up with emaciated
    Jewish bodies filled them up
    with the hopeless and the
    doomed-for-death.
    We examined the chimney and
    heating system. A crude Nazi
    joke. The heat would rise quickly
    through the chimney and leave
    the barracks, providing little if
    any heat. Even sitting on the
    long cement platform encasing
    the pipes or huddling next to it
    would not warm the body in the
    ferociousness of a Polish winter.
    A Nazi mockery. Gas cham-
    bers that looked like showers.
    Chimneys that provided no heat.
    We left the barracks and got on
    the bus. The driver drove inside
    the gate. The bus moved slowly
    through the heavy snow along
    the roadway toward the memorial
    which could not be seen. The
    snow seemed to be getting higher
    and higher forming a natural
    barrier, keeping us from seeing
    the railroad tracks, the memorial,
    the camp itself. Finally, the bus
    stopped, unable to move further.
    We would indeed have to walk
    the rest of the way to the
    monument. Ironically, the bus
    had stopped next to one of the
    crematoria ... its walls broken,
    its machinery stilled forever, no
    longer able to do its hideous
    work.
    A dream? A nightmare?
    Eighteen Jews, symbol of Chai
    life sitting in that desolate
    place, our bus stuck next to one
    of four crematoria which burned
    the bodies of over one and a half
    million Jews.
    We took our flowers and began
    walking slowly through the snow
    in mostly single file trying to
    walk in the footsteps of those
    who walked in front of us, like
    children at play. Only we were
    not at play. We were adults
    walking the snow covered, blood
    soaked soil of Birkenau to lay
    flowers on two of the 19 plaques
    which describe the horrors of that
    place. Two plaques in Hebrew
    and Yiddish.
    As we walked toward the
    memorial, a young woman about
    the age of 18 or 20 passed us. She
    was on her way home and took a
    short cut through the concen-
    tration camp, walking by empty
    barracks, across the railroad
    tracks and close to the
    crematorium. What thoughts, if
    any, ever came to her mind as she
    took that solitary walk? Who
    would choose to pass through the
    desolation and nightmare of
    Birkenau on any errand save
    ours?
    The 19 plaques were covered
    with snow. Only Sam Abramson,
    our Polish expert from UJA who
    had been to Birkenau before,
    knew where to find the Yiddish
    and Hebrew plaques. We wiped
    away the snow, placed our
    flowers on the ground and
    proceeded with the brief service I
    had prepared.
    I had chosen the simple words
    of Gerda Klein, Holocaust
    survivor and author, to begin.
    "You are going to Auschwitz.
    The thought chills my being .
    My mother was only 42 years old
    . My father was kind, wise and
    strong My friends were gay,
    chattering, bubbly girls That
    was my world ... It perished
    there."
    The wind howled. The snow
    continued unabatedly. The cold
    bit and chaffed our faces and
    froze our tears.
    "I want to remember them as I
    knew them. They would have
    been glad that you came, that
    you cared, that you wept for what
    weal) lost there ."
    After Gerda's words, a poem
    and then kaddish. We had come.
    We had seen. And we wept.
    We turned to walk back to the
    bus, our arms entwined seeking
    comfort together. We tried to
    follow that same path of lonely
    footsteps in the midst of virgin
    snow covering everything at
    Birkenau even the crime of
    genocide.
    We climbed on the bus. It
    would not move stubbornly
    holding fast, resisting departure.
    The hour was 3:30 in the after-
    noon. Darkness was not too far
    off; it would come by 4:30. The
    18 Jews sat uncomfortably in
    side. Stuck in Birkenau, next to
    A conversation in the Remo Synagogue. Samuel Abramson, at
    lest, UJA Polish expert, speaks with Matje Jakubowicz,
    President of the Jewish Community of Cracow, in the famous
    Remo Synagogue, house of worship of Rabbi Moses Isserlis,
    19th century philosopher and scholar. Mr. Jakubowicz died
    several months after this picture was taken.
    the broken remains of the cre-
    matorium. Eighteen Jews alone
    and tormented by what had hap-
    pened in this place on this very
    spot.
    Though we wanted to leave
    this camp of death, leave the
    snow and the desolation, the
    barracks and the chimneys, the
    watchtower and the railroad
    tracks, we knew we would never
    be able to tear it out of ourselves.
    A part of it would remain with us
    all our lives.
    But it was growing late. And
    no one wanted to spend the night
    in Birkenau. We would have to
    push the bus. Of the 18, five men
    were not allowed to help. One was
    retired, three had recent histories
    of illness, strokes, heart problems
    and one with a high fever. That
    left 13 including seven women
    and six men. And our guide.
    We left the bus then and
    gathered at its sides. My beige
    gloves would soon be black. I
    grasped the arch of metal above
    the left front wheel with several
    members of the group. Others
    took their place on the right side
    of the bus. We pushed and
    pushed until finally the bus
    began to move.
    We were proud of ourselves
    and climbed on to the bus ready
    for departure. But the bus had
    stopped several yards away and
    stubbornly refused to budge a
    second time. Once again, this
    time at the rear of the bus, we
    took our places and began to
    push. The bus rolled forward and
    backward, forward and back-
    ward, forward and backward
    again.
    We looked to our right and saw
    the crematorium. We looked to
    the sky and saw darkness falling.
    We pushed harder. I thought of
    the Nazis and their Jewish
    victims, the horror of that place
    and the six million who never had
    a chance to escape their des-
    tination of death, and I yelled,
    "Jew power. Let's show those
    Nazis Jew power." We pushed
    again and again. The bus moved.
    It was free. So were we.
    Totally relieved, the group of
    18, of chai, piled on to the bus.
    And this time, the bus moved,
    away from the crematorium,
    away from the desolation, away
    from the horror into the falling
    shadows of the night.
    Birkenau Concentration Camp. A view of the death camp of
    Birkenau surrounded by barbed wire. Many of the buildings
    *ere destroyed and the chimneys | stand in eerie silence, like
    nonuments to the four million who died in the camp.
    RARE JEWISH FACTS
    from
    J&B RARE SCOTCH
    Q: Who picked up the telephone
    before Alexander Graham Bell did?
    A: Johann Philipp Reis.
    Reis is listed in THE BOOK OF FIRSTS as
    number one to publicly demonstrate the
    telephone. He did this in front of a group of
    scientists in 1861-fifteen years before Bell got
    a patent. Because of illness and a lack of funds.
    Reis was unable to capitalize on his invention.
    Bell knew of his work as did Edison who even
    toyed with Reis' ideas. On March 22. 1876
    twelve days after Bell's first intelligible speech
    transmission, the NEW YORK TIMES ran an
    editorial entitled The Telephone'. The editorial
    was all about Philipp Reis. Not one word about
    Bell. Even the U.S. Government brought suit
    against Bell for: "claiming the invention of
    something already widely known to exist in the
    form of the Reis 'telephone' and also with
    somehow concealing the latter from the Patent
    Office s expert examiner in that field" Bell of
    course, survived the lawsuits and the challenges
    but physicists built a monument to Reis as the
    inventor of the telephone. (Better he should
    have won the lawsuits.)
    A NOT-SO-RARE FACT...
    A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
    is to 'open the house' when mishpocha
    guests or friends drop in. Out comes the
    fine food and, invariably. J&B Rare
    Scotch. And why not'-J&B is a clean
    light scotch with the superb taste that fits
    right in with the tradition of serving the
    best. And because of its great taste
    J&B commands a high level of elegance
    at home or at your most important
    simchas.
    And that's a fact!
    Jfi
    RARE
    SCOTCH
    *

    i
    >^-
    ,-r


    Friday. May 2, I960
    The Jewish Floridianand S ho far of Greater Hollywood
    Page 9
    Community Calendar
    May 4
    TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR, Sisterhood Donor Luncheon.
    May 5
    HILLCREST CHAPTER OF HADASSAH, general meeting and instal-
    lation of officers, with Maxme Heichen officiating. Program by
    Naomi Needier and group of Hadassah members. Refresh-
    ments, noon, Hillcrest Playdium contact Betsy Malkus, 963-
    0566.
    May 6
    JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD WOMEN'S DIVISION,
    annual Awards Luncheon and installation of 1980-81 officers
    and board, 11:30 a.m. Turnberry Isle Country Club.
    TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR, Blood Drive, sponsored by the
    Men'sClub.
    MayS
    MIRAMAR CHAPTER OF PIONEER WOMEN, regular meeting,
    noon, Miramar Recreation Center, 6700 Miramar Blvd., Mira-
    mar, call Nellie 989-7870.
    May 14
    SISTERHOOD TEMPLE BETH SHALOM, Annual Donor Luncheon,
    theme, "An International Festival," noon, Temple Beth Shalom
    Ballroom, 1400 N. 46th Ave., Hollywood, contact Lois Kobert,
    983-0628 or Elayne Topolski, 989-8744.
    May It
    JEWISH FEDERATION OF SOUTH BROWARD, 37th Annual
    Meeting, 10 a.m. at the Federation office, 2719 Hollywood
    Blvd., Hollywood.
    TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR, Temple Installation.
    May 19
    HOLLYDALE CHAPTER, AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS, Spring
    Luncheon & Card Party, noon, Galahad South, 3801 South Ocean
    Drive. Call 456-1454 for tickets.
    TEMPLE ISRAEL OF MIRAMAR, Israel Bond Reception honoring
    Irving and Rose Seidel.
    May 20
    PLAZA TOWERS HADASSAH, Installation of Officers by Mrs.
    Diana Issenberg, regional Hadassah vice president, Musical
    program, noon, Recreation Hall, Plaza Towers. Call Dorothy
    Prouse, 456-5898.
    401 N. Fadaral Hwy., Hollywood
    920-4151
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    A Jewish Summer for Children
    When this country was young we were largely
    an agricultural society, and children were very
    much part of the family's work force. As a result,
    it made good sense for the school year to be set up
    on a 9-10 month basis. This made it possible for
    youngsters to be free to help with chores assoc-
    iated with the harvest, etc. Since this was a school
    calendar that was set up in response to a very real
    need, the fact that continuity is a powerful aid in
    the learning process of individuals had to be set
    aside. This need is no longer operative in our
    contemporary society, so the need for continuity
    in education has become more and more a
    priority. As a result we hear more and more voices
    being raised about the fallacy of a 2 to 2 '/i -month
    summer vacation in the lives of our children
    today, and suggestions for an 11-month school
    year.
    If this long hiatus is detrimental to the edu-
    cational growth of our children on a secular level,
    consider how much more of a problem it is in the
    Jewish life of a child. Aside from July 4th which is
    celebrated in every community across the land,
    dates of national importance do not fall during
    the summer months. In our Jewish year, however,
    this is not so. Tisha B'Av (the date of the
    destruction of the first Temple in 586 BCE, and
    the second Temple in 70 BCE) falls in either July
    or August. Historically, the 9th of Av is preceded
    by a 3-week period which marked the siege of
    Jerusalem. The last 9 days which led up to the 9th
    of Av were dreadful days when the Temple was
    under siege. These dates are largely a blank to
    most of our children. The month of Elul which
    generally coincides with the month of August, is a
    month when traditionally, Jews begin to prepare
    for Rosh Hashanah: the Shofar begins to be
    heard, families visit the graves of their departed.
    All of this is lost to our children because of the
    long summer vacation.
    What can we do to avoid this long gap in the
    lives of our children? Why should the Jewish child
    think of his / her Jewish heritage and life as being
    limited to the months of September
    May June? One way of avoiding this is through
    Jewish camps which can and do make Judaism an
    on-going, year 'round way of life. Whether the
    camp is a camp of the Orthodox movement, such
    as the Lubavitsch camps, of the Conservative
    group, such as the Ramah camps, or of the
    Reform movement, such as Camp Coleman, or a
    camp with a Zionist orientation, the Jewish
    element is an important component. The sports
    program is strong, but there is more than just fun
    and games. Jewish history becomes an important
    part of the program. There are experiences
    relating to Israel, and certainly Tisha B'Av will
    be dealt with in a meaningful and dramatic
    fashion.
    So, if you have not yet made plans for your
    child's summer look into the possibility of a
    Jewish camp experience. And if the summer is
    already bespoken, start making plans for a
    Jewish summer camp for next summer.
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    Page 10
    The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
    Friday. May 2, 1980
    South QtoxiwA
    Qpotkqkt n
    fcy RocheUe Koenig-
    A fantastic brunch, a beautiful
    garden room, and glorious
    Florida weather were all part of
    the scene making the Bat Mit-
    zvah celebration of Karen Sue
    Schneider, a fabulous event. The
    happiness shown by Dr. Joel and
    Merle Schneider and Karen's
    brother Alan was felt by every-
    one present. Grandparents Henry
    and Etta Dickoff and Joseph and
    Belle Millman shared the
    meaningful services at Temple
    Beth Shalom as well as brunch on
    Sunday at the magnificent Turn-
    berry Isle Country Club.
    Among the guests enjoying the
    party were close friends Dr. Bob
    and Sheila Grenitz, Dr. Jerry and
    Diane Bergheim, Dr. Mort and
    I-ouise Diamond, Dr. Rubin and
    Abby Klein, Morris and
    Stephanie Engelberg. Also, Dr.
    Mark and Helen Cohan, and
    partners Dr. Bob Pomerantz and
    wife Ellen, and Dr. Don Mendel
    baum and wife Shelly. The room
    was filled with interesting
    friends, loving relatives, and a
    warmth enhanced by the Jewish
    feeling of "nachas" radiated by
    the Schneiders who are pillars of
    the Jewish community.
    Gene and Judi White have had
    happy and exciting news.
    Daughter Shari is engaged to
    Gregg Harris, son of Bruce and
    Norma Harris of Plantation
    (formerly of Kmerald Hills). The
    Whif- enjoyed a wonderful
    famiU reunion during Passover
    Son (Jury visited from Jerusalem.
    Israel and son Michael, a
    Brandeis U. student was also
    home tor the holidays. It was a
    great celebration!
    Ma/el tov to grandparents
    F.rnie und Janet Mirhaelson on
    the birth ot their grandson Jay-
    Howard. Son Marc and daughter
    m-law Lynn live in Nashville.
    Tenn where Mare is an engineer.
    Janet and Ernie are Hollywood
    pioneers and have been active
    community and Temple Sinai
    leaders Robert and Sophie
    Gavin from Galahad North
    planned a wonderful trip to
    California to visit their children
    and grandchildren Irving and
    Lillian Belson are hack from San
    Francisco and a reunion with
    their family. The Belsons are
    looking forward to returning to
    the Golden State in August lor
    the Bal Mitzvah of their grand-
    daughter Karen Robbing
    daughter of attorney Leonard
    and Sally Robbins elected to Phi
    Beta Kappa at the U. of Miami
    Law School. Jared Anton, son of
    Paul and Maralyn Anton, a first
    year U. of Miami Law School
    student. Michael Abrams. son of
    Maynard and Gertrude Abrams.
    has also followed in his dad's
    footsteps and is an attorney.
    Could be another Abrams. Anton
    and Robbins law firm in the
    future?
    Temple Beth Shalom Day
    School observed Art
    Appreciation Day with Ann
    Fineman, mother of third grader
    Lisa, as chairperson. On her com-
    mittee was Regina Rosenbaum,
    mother of Aaron, Tammy, and
    Debbie. Jewel Smith, mother of
    Wendy and Heather, coordinated
    the many talented artists among
    whom were Billie De La Penha.
    working with oils, sculptor Susan
    Miller, Harriet Lapidus, draw-
    ings, and Michael Gabsi,
    designing a collage. The young-
    sters loved the event Cecilia
    Malavsky is off to Chicago to
    happily babysit for her five
    grandchildren Con-
    gratulations to new parents Dr.
    Myles and Regine Krieger who
    became parents of a son And
    to Mark and Donna Sabra who
    are parents of a daughter. Mazel
    tov to grandparents, our neigh-
    bors, Hal and Dorothy Sabra .
    Burning the land lease of the
    Emerald Hills Townhouses Rec-
    reation Building was cause to
    celebrate with a barbeque and
    dance. Over 100 residents joined
    the festivities led by President
    Harold Shapiro, assisted by
    Treasurer Aaron Kline and Art
    Levine. Nat Braverman and
    Jerry Feiler. Hope no one burned
    the hot dogs!
    If you couldn't find your
    doctor during a certain day in
    April, it was National Doctor's
    Day. In case some ol you were
    not aware and missed it. on
    Doctor's Day throughout the
    nation our dear friends, the
    doctors, are honored. Locally.
    cocktail parties were held at
    various homes of members of the
    Broward County Medical
    Auxiliary. Hostesses were Sue
    Martin, Meral Khrenstein,
    Barbara Feldman. Kathy
    Sokolick. Judie Richman, Mara
    Giulanti and Barbara Hartley.
    Alter cocktails, nearly 200
    doctors and wives enjoyed
    gracious hospitality at the home
    and tented yard of Dr. Stoyan
    and Tobene Rosenlhal. A mag-
    nificent, mouth-watering sweet
    table lured even the most ardent
    dieters. The auxiliary members
    had prepared all of the delicious
    food and pastries Doctor's Day
    was B social and gastronomic
    success
    Attention: The next column
    will focus on our young people
    who are graduating from high
    school, college and graduate
    schools. Please send names.
    details and future plans of our
    young men and women so that v.i-
    can share the happiness with
    their families. Mail this and all
    other birthday. anniversary,
    wedding and vacation plans to
    Hochelle Koenig. Spotlight On
    You, c o The Jewish Floridian,
    2719 Hollywood Blvd.. Holly-
    wood. Fla. 33020.
    SUPERB CATERED AFFAIRS WITH AN ELEGANT FLAIR.
    BILL GOLDRING- The "Dean of Florida Caterers, %nd our Vice President, brings his
    unmistakable touch and unmatched experience to the Konover's unparalleled facilities.
    Superlative service, unexcelled cuisine, unequaled counsePand supervision and sensible
    prides Catered affairs that are treasured events
    Please call BILL GOLDRING at (305) 865 1500
    Kosher
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    Konover(MCoHotel
    Rabbi Narrowe of Sweden Will Speak
    Mr. Hyman Jacobs, adult
    education chairman of Temple
    Sinai, Hollywood, announces
    that Rabbi Morton H. Narrowe,
    Chief Rabbi of Stockholm.
    Sweden, will be guest speaker at
    a special adult education evening
    on Monday, May 5 at 8 p.m. at
    Temple Sinai.
    Rabbi Narrowe will also appear
    as guest speaker at Beth Torah
    Congregation in North Miami
    Beach on Friday evening, May 2
    and on Saturday morning May 3
    in the Beth David Congregation
    of Miami.
    Rabbi Narrowe
    Temple Israel Elects Board
    Temple Israel of Miramar
    elected officers for the year, 1980-
    Hadassah Lunch
    The Shalom group of
    Hollywood Hadassah will hold
    their installation meeting on
    Wednesday, May 7, at noon, at
    the Sweden House.
    Following the luncheon,
    Maxine Heicken, executive
    director of the Hollywood chapter
    will perform the installation of
    new officers.
    Entertainment will follow.
    Chairwomen of the day is Sadie
    Nabel.
    81. They are as follows: Michael
    Koenig, president; Jack Shurack,
    executive vice president; Mark
    Young, membership vice
    president; Arnie Feiner, religious
    vice president; Allan Futterman,
    fundraising vice president; Cecile
    Gorelick, education vice
    president; David Morris,
    treasurer; Peter Bernstein,
    recording secretary; and Sandra
    Ruttner, corresponding
    secretary.
    The following are to serve as
    directors for 1980-82: Alice
    Abrams, Harold Chick, Sonia
    Podell, Morris Koltunovsky and
    Sonny Levitt.
    Rabbi Narrowe was born in
    Philadelphia, Pa. and ordained at
    the Jewish Theological Seminary
    in New York. He moved to
    Sweden in 1965 and has been
    Chief Rabbi in Stockholm since
    that time.
    In Sweden, he is chairman of
    the Rabbinic Court dealing with
    questions of conversion, marriage
    and divorce. He is an instructor
    in Jewish studies at the
    University of Stockholm dealing
    with Biblical religion, Biblical
    history and Jewish religion in
    general.
    Because of the dearth of
    spiritual leaders, he has been in
    contact with the small scattered
    Jewish communities in Norway,
    Finland and Sweden thus, is very
    knowledgeable on European
    Jewry and his lecture will deal
    with the Jews on Nordic Europe.
    Currently he is on Sabbatical
    leave, studying at the University
    of Judaism in Los Angeles in the
    doctoral program in modern
    Jewish history. He is also
    preparing work on the history of
    Zionism in Sweden.
    The lecture at Temple Sinai is
    open to the general public.
    After
    shopping,
    relax with a
    great cup of
    coffee.
    Maxwell
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    L May 2,1980
    The Jewish Flaridian and Shofar ofGreater Hollywood
    Page 11^
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    Fr
    Page 12
    The Jewish Floridian and Shotar of Ureater Hollywood
    Friday, May 2, 1980
    Something for Everyone at the JCC
    By LESLIE HORN
    Whether you are three or 93
    years old, there is something for
    you at the Hollywood Jewish
    Community Center.
    "The Jewish Community
    Center offers a wide variety of
    services ranging from a program
    for children of working mothers
    and single parents to a day care
    center for the frail adult," ac-
    cording to Steve Lecker,
    executive director of the Jewish
    Community Centers of South
    Florida.
    By participating in the JCC's
    programs, you will meet new
    people in your community, while
    sharing in interesting and ex-
    citing programs and special
    events, Lecker added.
    The after school program is
    developed to allow each par-
    ticipant an opportunity to gain
    new and varied experiences anc
    skills. Programs include New
    Games, a new style of play,
    encouraging participation, trust.
    creativity, and making tun
    possible; Culinary Crafts, where
    children learn elementary
    cooking and enjoy "noshing" on
    the final results; Soccer, where
    teams are formed, colored shirts
    and socks are given to each child.
    These are juat a few of the many
    programs offered.
    The parent-tot program is for
    children from 18 months to VA
    years. Parents and tots par-
    ticipate in a program geared to
    help them share experiences.
    Teen activities include rap
    sessions, an SAT preparatory
    course and a Spanish enrichment
    program.
    Tweens (sixth eighth grade
    students) meet once a month for
    fun and relaxation and the op-
    portunity to meet others their
    own age.
    The Hollywood Senior Adult
    Program, known in Broward
    County as the Southeast
    Multipurpose Senior Center, is a
    comprehensive program
    established to Fill the needs of the
    senior adult population of South
    Broward. All services are
    available to individuals. 60 years
    and older. The program, staffed
    by professionals, operates out of
    the Hollywood JCC, 2838
    Hollywood Blvd., and is open
    Monday through Friday from 9
    a.m. to 5 p.m.
    former director of the South Dade
    JCC, explained Lecker.
    "Future directions for the
    Hollywood JCC include services
    for pre-schoolers, an after school
    day care program for elementary
    age children, an expanded league
    program, and increased activities
    for teens and adults," he added.
    If you want to strengthen the
    cultural and social links between
    you and your Jewish heritage,
    the JCC has something to offer.
    Free transportation is
    available to the center on a daily
    basis. One-way transportation is
    available to doctor appointments,
    if requested 24 hours in advance.
    Grocery shopping transporation
    is available once a week.
    A hot, kosher meal is provided
    to seniors Monday through
    Friday at the center. Those
    persons on special diets who
    bring their own lunches receive a
    hot beverage.
    Legal counseling, recreation,
    such as arts and crafts, movies
    and trips, continuing education
    and all types of counseling are
    offered through the center.
    The Outreach Department
    visits home-bound individuals to
    assess their needs and make
    appropriate referral to social
    service agencies within Broward
    County. They also provide
    limited shopping service, friendly
    visiting, telephone reassurance
    and emergency meal sen'ice.
    The Southeast Multipurpose
    Senior Day Care Center, located
    at Temple Sinai, 1201 Johnson
    St.. is designed to serve those
    seniors 60 years and over,
    residing in Broward County, who
    require an organized and
    sheltered atmosphere during the
    day. The center is staffed with
    trained professionals to supervise
    this frail elderly population.
    The Day Care Center operates
    Monday through Friday from 8
    a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily activities
    include health screening.
    ceramics, painting. crafts,
    current events, meditation, music-
    therapy, dance-exercise, movies.
    Bible class, among others. A hot.
    kosher meal is provided daily.
    For adults, the .ICC oilers arts,
    theater and personal enrichment,
    including such subjects as in-
    vestments, photography and
    Spanish.
    Personal growth classes are
    offered in cooperation with
    Jewish r'amily Service of
    Broward County, including
    Psychology of Stress and Parent
    r^ffectiveness Training.
    Jewish holiday celebrations
    and classes in Jewish education
    are offered in cooperation with
    North Dade Midrasha. Lectures
    and forums featuring outside
    authorities on Jewish affairs,
    special events, such as Holocaust
    commemoration and Jewish
    Book Month are available.
    Summer camp, held at
    Michael-Ann Russell JCC in
    North Miami Beach, gives boys
    and girls in North Dade and
    South Broward a chance to make
    decisions, meet challenges, enrich
    their Jewish heritage, enjoy the
    outdoors, develop relationships
    and have fun. The structure
    includes preschool camp, junior
    and senior Shelanu camp,
    creative arts camp, sports camp,
    emphasizing tennis and gym-
    nastics along with other athletics
    and a new teen summer program.
    Fifty-five families currently
    hold membership at the
    Hollywood JCC. This is in ad-
    dition to the more than 650
    Hollywood memberships at
    Michael-Ann Russell Branch,
    whose memberships are accepted
    at both facilities, remarked
    Lecker.
    "Sondra Reiff has recently
    been employed as director of the
    Hollywood JCC. She is the
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    Friday. May 2. 1980
    The Jewish Floridian anc
    Robert Segal
    Weizman, John Wayne British Mideast
    Have Parted Company
    Continued from Page 4
    me, but when he challenged
    Hegin. Gunfighters who face
    John Wayne to the death earn
    our admiration even when we
    know that they are so foolish as
    to defy the ineluctable. It is only
    i." Si* the dry-gulchere who earn our
    ' "i contempt, those who shoot the
    hero in his back.
    .
    NO, John Wayne wouldn't like
    Ezer Weizman very much these
    days. Neither do I. Not as much
    as when he was a jet pilot of
    flaming red Packards, a man of
    many parts. He is not the tilter at
    windmills as once he was in his
    youth. In the onset of his age, he
    is the windmill itself, twisting in
    the currents of what is, not what
    ought to be.
    Negotiator Burg Sees Autonomy
    Breakthrough Before May 26
    By YITZHAK SHARGIL
    TEL AVIV (JTA) -
    Interior Minister Yosef
    Burg, Israel's chief nego-
    tiator in the autonomy
    talks, has predicted that a
    breakthrough will be
    achieved by the target date
    of May 26, at least on some
    of the substantive issues
    that have been unresolved
    until now.
    Appearing on the Israeli
    Broadcasting Service's Arab
    Hour program, Burg said that
    the momentum of the autonomy
    talks will pick up after Passover
    when four separate working
    groups will apply themselves to
    the task of finding a common
    ground.
    ACCORDING to Burg, an
    achievement of significant im-
    |x>rtance could be reached by
    May 26 on election procedures
    and the structure of the self-
    governing administrative council
    for the West Bank and Gaza
    Strip.
    He conceded, however, that he
    saw no possibility of progress o".
    the major issues: the scope of the
    administrative council's
    authority, security and the
    question of East Jerusalem. But
    i he said he opposed a freeze on
    settlements for the duration of
    the autonomy talks which has
    been proposed by the U.S.
    THE OFFICIALS were ap-
    parently reacting to the state-
    ment by U.S. Special Ambas-
    sador Sol Linowitz that unless
    Israel is more malleable and there
    is substantial progress by May
    26, the U.S. would not be able to
    prevent its European Economic
    Community (EEC) allies from
    going ahead with their initiative
    to alter UN Security Council
    Resolution 242.
    The EEC countries are ex-
    pected to press for an amendment
    that would change the status of
    the Palestinians from refugees to
    that of a political entity.
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    63;
    Role Recalled
    Continued from Page 4
    into decline, and the oil of Arabia
    came to be coveted in ever
    greater degree, as Hitler's
    weapon genocide rocked
    that part of the world continuing
    to care, the unrest of Jews and
    Arabs festered until the gangrene
    of terrorism lodged and exploded
    in troubled Palestine.
    IN THE END, with the Arabs
    rejecting partition and out-
    numbered but unyielding Jews
    fighting for their lives and for a
    state waiting to be born, Bethell
    reasons England might have
    fared better had she never em-
    barked on her Palestinian
    governance. Britain failed to
    master the Sisyphean task of
    solving the conflict in Palestine,
    he concludes.
    Britain failed. But embattled
    Jewry triumphed. And now when
    Lord Carrington is urging
    England on to recognition of the
    PLO and European capitals are
    slaking their thirst for oil by
    trying to undermine the Camp
    David agreements, Bethell's
    authentic account of the 1935-48
    struggle lights up the history of a
    bloody period.
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    rage
    14
    ^O^STlnriAuin and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
    Friday, May 2, 1980
    JWV Stone In South Fla
    Jewish War Veterans of the
    United States of America, De-
    partment of Florida invites the
    public to hear Harris B. Stone,
    national commander, Sunday,
    May 11 at 10 a.m. at the Konover
    Hotel, 5445 Collins Ave., Miami
    Beach. Stone will speak on Israel
    and Today's Crises.
    Harris B. Stone, Director of
    the Research and Development
    Plans Division, Office of the
    Chief of Naval Operations, was
    elected National Commander of
    the Jewish War Veterans of the
    USA for the year 1979-1980.
    Born in New York City, Stone
    has earned degrees in Electrical
    Engineering and Industrial Eco-
    nomics from Massachusetts
    Institute of Technology. He
    entered federal employment in
    1953 as an electronics engineer at
    the Electronic Warfare Center in
    New Jersey, and has also been
    associated with the Office of
    Naval Research in Washington,
    D.C., the Army Security Agency
    Operational Center and Elec-
    tronic Warfare Department at
    Fort Huachuca, Ariz., and Signal
    Corps at Fort Monmouth, N.J.
    Stone's varied 30-year govern-
    ment career has included assign-
    '
    ^
    WElfflfo m CAMP AMD....
    HOME OF PEACE, WWf AND
    FRIENDSHIP
    t)gMfr nM*>**
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    M& FLORIST
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    Order your Mother's Day
    arrangements now
    221M. umvmirr mm. pimbroki pink
    (in new Plaza currently; under construction.
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    Dry Plain Bondtoper Copies up toaBIG WxIT
    When you ni to copy FAST copy BIG copy RELIABIV wtwn you
    have to copy on the tun and can I afford to mew around wilt) chemcats or
    gat into a papa' ja-n your cop*- ahould be me Royfai Bond Copier 11S
    Trie Royfai Bond Copwr 11S detvers cop m a cho.ee of 6 tun up io
    a BiG 11 > 17 Vou gal dry cope* of conialarn quaMy at laal as you
    need them And you 9*1 rekabte parformanca from a Mraighr and Mfa
    papar path nons safer, which a* Bui akmnaan pa par tarns
    Coll
    AMERICAN PHOTOCOPY
    EQUIPMENT CO.
    Onty Authorrad .Dtatarjn Dads County
    Dads 621 5961
    retard 463-3338
    Pakn: 832-4744
    the National Resolutions Com-
    mittee, three years as Chairman
    of the National Board of Inquiry,
    Chairman of the National
    Foreign Affairs Committee,
    Chairman of the JWV Task
    Forces on the Future and on
    Fiscal Concerns, National Supply
    Officer, National Civil Rights
    Officer and member of the
    National Constitution and By-
    Laws Committee. Stone is a life
    member associated with the
    Robert L. Cohen Post 689.
    A veteran of World War II and
    the Korean conflict, Stone rose
    through the enlisted ranks to
    Harris B. Stone
    ments in the areas of manage-
    ment, engineering and science
    associated with the fields of elec-
    tronic warfare, intelligence,
    command and control, com-
    munications, anti-submarine
    warfare, anti-air warfare, long
    range planning, operations
    research, and the mechanical,
    chemical and physical sciences.
    His efforts as manager of the
    Navy"s marine mammal program
    have been acclaimed by the
    media.
    On Oct. 23, 1978, Stone was
    awarded the U.S. Navy's highest
    honor the Distinguished
    Civilian Service Award. He was
    cited by the Secretary of the
    Navy for "exceptionally
    meritorious achievements and
    leadership in developing a
    successful method for planning
    the Navy Research and Develop-
    ment Program and for superior
    performance throughout the
    years ... in the highest tradition
    Df the United States Navy."
    A man of versatile talents,
    Harris B. Stone is listed in Who's
    Who in Engineering, Who's Who
    In the Federal Government and
    American Men of Science.
    Stone was elected National
    Commander of the Jewish War
    Veterans of the USA at the
    organization's 84th annual con-
    vention held in San Diego, Calif.
    He has served the Jewish War
    Veterans with distinction for
    many years, as Vice Chairman of
    the National Executive Com-
    mittee, National Public Affairs
    Officer, Chairman of the National
    Board of Inquiry, Commander of
    the 4th Region, member of the
    National Policy Committee and
    ten years as a National Executive
    Committeeman. He is Past Com-
    mander and Quartermaster of
    Post 589 Arlington and Past De-
    partment Commander of the Dis-
    trict of Columbia. He has also
    served two years as Chairman of
    the National Personnel Com-
    mittee, ten vears as Chairman of

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    Commissioned Officer status.
    Active in the Jewish com-
    munity, Stone is past president
    of Arlington-Fairfax Jewish Con-
    gregation. He has been married
    for 31 years to the former Ray
    Masin of New York City. The
    Stones are the parents of Steven
    and Richard, and reside in Fair-
    fax County, Va.
    Stone will also be appearing
    Friday, May 2 at 8:16 p.m. at
    Temple Beth Torah in N. Miami
    Beach; Wednesday, May 7 at the
    Tiger Bay Club at noon; and
    Saturday, May 10 at 10:30 a.m.
    at Temple Beth Shalom.
    Commissioner and Mrs. Sam Waterman received Israel's
    Generation Award recognizing their efforts to help build the
    economy of Israel through participation in the Israel Bonds
    Program. The award was presented at the Fairways Roy ale
    Night in Israel by Freemont Gordon at right.
    WILLIAM RICHMAN. M.D.. P. A.
    IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE RELOCATION OF HI8 OFFICE
    FOR THE PRACTICE OF
    FAMILY MEDICINE
    TO
    EMERALD HILLS PROFESSIONAL PARK
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    (305)989-0300
    The author of Holocaust
    returns with a fabulous
    Jewish family saga.
    With this powerful story of a
    remarkable Jewish family.
    Gerald Green returns to the
    Brooklyn scene he depicted
    so vividly in The Lost Angry
    Man.
    Spanning the years 1910 to
    1960, The Chains chronicles
    the rise of the Chain family
    from its immigrant founding
    father Jake Chain, a wagon
    driver who uses his cast-iron
    fists to protect striking gar-
    ment workers, to lake's Ivy
    League grandson, Martin,
    who endows a magnificent
    medical center. Alongside
    the Chains in their time of
    trouble is Dr. Samuel Abel-
    man, that lovable cur-
    mudgeon from The Last
    Angry Man.
    Peopled with strong char-
    acters you care deeply about
    and brilliantly recreating the
    turbulent decades since the
    turn of the century, The
    Chains will hold you
    enthralled from the very first
    page.
    "Bursting with vitality,
    vivid characters...a passion-
    ate, violent stdry, streetwise
    and rich in authentic detail,
    a lesson In Social history,
    delivered from the barrel of
    a gunand it grips at every
    point.''Publishers Weekly.
    A Literary Guild Alternate
    Selection.
    THE CHAINS
    A novel by Gerald Green
    $11 95 wherever books are sold
    SEAVIEW BOOKS
    Distributed by Harper a How
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    i-ridav; May g
    1980
    TheJewUh Fioridian and Shofar of Greater"
    Beth El Congregational Meeting
    The annual congregational
    Beeting and election of officers
    |aIU| hoard of trustees of Temple
    IBeth El will be held Sunday, May
    |l at 7:30 p.m. in the Tobin
    lAuditorium of the temple.
    Hrief reports will be presented
    |by Dr. Samuel Z. Jaffe, spiritual
    leader of the temple; President
    Milton H. Jacobs; and Executive
    Director Sydney D. Kronish.
    Entertainment will feature the
    continental singer, Tony Spataro
    in his first appearance in this
    area. This meeting is for mem-
    bers only. Refreshments will be
    served.
    Federation Bus Tour for ORT
    The Jewish Federation of
    louth Broward Women's
    division will sponsor a bus tour
    i Federation-supported agencies
    |or members of Women's
    American ORT.
    The event is scheduled to take
    place on Thursday, May 15.
    For additional information,
    contact the Federation office.
    I
    'Tribute to a Vision'

    ii
    -m
    -
    y.
    38
    Temple Solel celebrates its Tenth Anniversary May 1980. 1
    Those who took an active part in its first four years prior to :?
    building of the synagogue, view it with a sense of much emotion 5
    and nostalgia. The tots of yesteryear are now our teenagers. ::
    Listen dear people as here we retell
    The history of Temple Solel
    I low the Durbins once had a dream
    To share with others in a religious theme.
    They wished that in Hollywood there would be
    A Reform-Liberal Temple for you and for me
    So they enlisted the aid of family and friend
    Soon 35 families worked towards this end.
    Each contract stipulated when a house
    \!ie did sell
    1 hereby pledge membership to Temple Solel."
    Shabbat Services were in Beth Shalom and in schools
    < hi hard wooden benches, with no back as a rule
    Very soon it was unanimously agreed
    There must be a Rabbi to serve one's spiritual need
    So they pursued this quest and who should it be
    Rabbi Frazin "man of a story!"
    In Emerald Hills a trailer was placed
    And later moved to another place
    Across the road on Sheridan Street
    Was the office where workers would meet.
    High Holy Day Services were held in Hillcrest
    And the Cantor engaged was one of the best
    While all through this turmoil Rabbi was there
    "Have Torah will travel and render a prayer "
    His car was piled high and served as a carriage
    % To transport Religion to a funeral or marriage.
    v: As time passed on it was plain to see
    | Where the trailer was our Temple should be
    I A mortgage was obtained we bought the lot
    | Our House of Worship will be on this spot
    v Newsmen photographers politicians came
    * To our ground-breaking ceremonies where we staked our claim.
    x Fund-raising events were held everywhere
    j: Even ponies were rented for a Purim affair
    :J: But this project was short-run when it became clear
    P The cleaning-up process didn't elicit a cheer.
    |g We climbed wobbly steps to get inside the trailer
    g One who complained was a justified waiter
    :j:j Skirted mud holes when it continued to pour
    1 uahlul we made it inside the door.
    1
    i
    Time passed the Temple couldn't open its doors
    Weeds were abundant where blueprints showed floors
    Merchandise was sold from the closet room floor "
    Bumping one's head was part of the chore.
    The same people were taxed aa a room was completed
    Slowly but surely funds were being depleted
    The Youth Lounge was being hammi red above
    Donations of furniture expressions of love.
    The membership kept growing more retirees joined
    That was when the Grand People was born
    At Hada Farm we held our first seminar
    .When Doc said "not 'elders Grand People' you are."
    Is it true can it be 'tis that memorable day
    The first Temple Bar Mitzvah is On its way
    The President's son will cease being a boy
    This is in truth a Congregational joy 1
    Midst plastic and rubble one gingerly stepped
    Lest one sprain an ankle or soil a new dress.
    More time passes on the sacred moment is nigh
    1974 four long years have passed by
    (Those are the days one who remembers holds dear)
    The High Holy Days of that eventful year!
    The men are still working 'till the very last minute
    Will the Ark Doors meet up one's spine runs a shiver.
    Jlush dusk is upon us Rosh Hashona is here
    lugh auspicious portals enter our peers.
    the Ark Doors are opened all is serene
    *eople of Vision 'tis not but a dream!
    Lillian Mandel
    Book Review
    Lots of Bagels
    Bagels! Bagels! and More
    Bagels! is a new hard-cover cook-
    book that reveals the "hole"
    mystique of the bagel! Publisher
    Rand McNally describes it as, "A
    saga of good eating with recipes,
    legend and lore."
    Most of the 128 pages are
    devoted to recipes and serving
    suggestions.
    "A History Full of Holes" is a
    chapter that depicts the
    geneology of the- bagel; begin-
    ning as far back as 1610 in
    Cracow, Poland, where the bagel
    was thought to have magical
    powers, to how the modern
    technology of freezing today by
    Lender's Bagel Bakery has made
    the bagel an international food.
    Bagels I Bagels! and More
    Bagels! is a book filled with
    whimsical illustration and
    stories, and useful information.
    Rabbi Klein on TV
    Sunday, May 4, at 8:30 a.m.,
    Rabbi Dr. Carl Klein will host the
    "Still Small Voice" program on
    Channel 7. Participants with
    Rabbi Klein will be Betty
    Auerbach, Dorthy Lenz, Pauline
    Leonard and Ethel Rosenbloom.
    CAJE Rabbi
    Attends
    Conferences
    Rabbi Menachem Raab,
    director of the day school
    department, will be representing
    the CAJE at the quarterly
    conference of the Florida
    Association of Academic Non-
    Public Schools, which will be held
    on April 30 in Tallahassee.
    Rabbi Menachem Raab will
    also be attending the annual
    convention of the National
    Council of Hebrew Day School
    Principals of Torah U'Mesorah
    on April 23-27 in Fallsburgh,
    New York. Among the
    discussions for the convention
    will be the role bf the educator as
    we enter the 1980's.
    Religious
    Directory
    NORTH BROWARD
    TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Ojk"
    land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
    Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
    A. Neu
    TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
    Drive. Reform (44)
    TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
    57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
    Zimmerman. (44-A)
    MIRAMAR
    TEMPLE ISRAEL. 4920 SW 35th St.
    Conservative. Rabbi Paol Plotkin.
    Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
    PEMBROKE PINES
    TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
    School, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
    Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
    TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
    Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
    Bernard P. Shoter.
    PLANTATION
    PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
    TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
    J.Harr. (64)
    RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA-
    GOGUE. 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
    HALLANOALE
    HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
    NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
    Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
    ziger. (12)
    NORTH MIAMI BEACH
    SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
    18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
    Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
    Shuttles. (37)
    HOLLYWOOD
    TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
    Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
    Landman. (47B)
    TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
    Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
    Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
    EMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
    ' St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
    Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
    TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
    Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
    man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
    Cantor Naf taly A. Linkovsky. (65)
    TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St
    Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
    Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
    Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
    YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
    FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
    . Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshr
    Bomzer. (52)
    Leaders of the Israel Bonds Organization in South Broward gathered
    to hear Prime Minister Begin address their group via special telephone
    hook-up during his recent trip to Washington. Begin called for in-
    creased support of the Jewish State through the Bonds program, so
    that development can continue in the Negev region. Seated at the
    phone is Nat Sedley and standing, from left, are Irving Serwitz and
    Jules Freilich.
    Members of the South Florida Builders and Allied Trades
    Division of the State of Israel Bonds Organization held then-
    annual Israel Dinner of State, when two of their colleagues were
    honored with the Lion of Judah Award. For their dedication and
    devotion to the economic survival of Israel, the award was
    presented to Philip Pearlman (left) and Arthur Lazarus (right).
    Mrs. Pearlman is second from left with Mrs. Lazarus.
    Residents of La Mer gathered for a Salute to Israel on behalf of
    the State of Israel Bonds Organization. They honored Mr. and
    Mrs. Abe Radelman (center) with Israel's City of Peace Award
    for their many years of dedication and work for the Jewish
    State. The presentation was made by Nat Nevins\(lert) and
    Sydney Jacobs.
    Levitt -1 Ii
    EINSTEIN
    memorial chapels
    HOU.YWOOO 1921 PmbTO Road 821-7200
    NORTH MIAMI 133S5W OiMWHwy 948-0315
    WEST PALM BEACH -Mn OtwchobM Bivd 689-8700
    4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA
    lempk 3etkl
    Wlemoiat
    CjazdtM*
    The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
    County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
    tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
    sonably priced.
    For information cell: 920-0225 or writs*
    i
    TEMPLE BETH EL
    1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOD. FLORIDA 33020
    rltmundmi literature *n the above.
    NAME* '___________________-----------
    ADDRESS:
    PHONE:


    Judaism Was a Magnet
    Sartre Defended Israel to His End
    By EDWIN EYTAN
    PARIS (JTA) -
    Jean-Paul Sartre, the
    French philosopher who
    dominated the Western in-
    tellectual world for several
    decades, died here at the
    age of 74. A humanist, a
    liberal and a political ac-
    tivist, he had always been
    keenly interested in
    Judaism and fought some
    of the battles in favor of
    persecuted Jews. In recent
    years, however. and
    especially since his trip to
    Israel on the eve of the Six-
    Day War. he also backed
    Palestinian demands for
    self-determination.
    There were three people at his
    bedside when he died as a result
    of pulmonary edema: his com-
    panion Simone de Beauvoir. his
    adopted daughter Arlette
    Elkhayam. and a close friend and
    favorite biographer. Liliane
    Siegal.
    The fact that two out of three,
    his daughter and Siegal. are Jews
    is symbolic of his lifelong pre-
    occupation some say obsession
    with the Jewish problem
    Sartre was a Protestant.
    DRAFTED INTO the French
    army in 1940 as a private, he
    spent several years as a POW in
    Germany. He eventually escaped
    with forged papers and joined the
    French resistance movement.
    While in the POW camp, he spent
    his time reading the works of
    German philosophers but also
    managed to obtain a first-hand
    knowledge of Nazism and its
    methods.
    Shortly after the war. in 1946.
    he published Thoughts on the
    Jeuish Problem which he later
    summed up by quoting the Black
    American writer Richard Wright
    who said. "There is no Black
    problem in the States. There is a
    white one."
    According to Sartre, the same
    applied to Jews. It was not they
    who were a problem but those
    who were against them. In his
    Egypt's Jerusalem Rule
    Causes Concern in Israel
    Torah Scrolls
    Restored
    NEW YORK (JTAI Two
    congregations in Memphis. Tenn
    are trying to restore four Torah
    scrolls found in a river afta
    burglaries at the synagogues.
    The four were among six stolen
    from Anshei Sp hard-Beth El
    Emeth (Orthodox) and Beth
    Sholom Synagogue (Con-
    servative! late Jan. 26 or earU
    Jan. 27.
    In a telephone interview with
    the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
    Allen Israel, vice president of
    Beth Sholom. said the Torahs
    were recovered in the Wolf River
    in Memphis, after a hunter
    discovered one of them in the
    water. A search of the area ted to
    the discovery of the other three
    and a part of a fifth.
    THE TORAHS still had their
    coverings but the silver or-
    naments were apparently taken
    by the thieves. Israel said Three
    of the Torahs were from Beth
    Sholom and the other form
    Anshei Sphard. Each synagogue
    still has one Torah mining
    Rabbi Edmund Winter, of
    Beth Sholom. told the JTA that
    the two synagogues are trying to
    dry out the scrolls. He said the
    parchment is brittle, and some of
    the ink has run. He said once the
    Torahs are dry they wil] be
    examined by a halachic expert
    there, although he believed
    eventually they will have to be
    brought to New York to be
    checked.
    book, Sartre went one step
    further claiming that a Jew if
    someone considered as such by
    anti-Semites.
    SARTRE'S INTEREST with
    everything concerning Jews
    continued. In most of his books
    or plays, the Jewish theme was
    somewhere present even if only
    hinted at. By the late 1950s, his
    interest spread to Israel. He
    backed Israel to the hilt, and
    even after his visit to Israel in
    early 1967 he supported Israel s
    preemptive strike. "Each country
    has the right to defend itself in
    the way it thinks best suitable."
    he told friends at the time.
    He denounced Soviet anti-
    Semitism in spite of his leftist
    leanings. Throughout the years
    both Sartre and de Beauvoir were
    active in all campaigns on behalf
    of persecuted Jews whether in the
    Soviet Union. Syria or Ethiopia.
    A few years ago. while already
    half-blind and plagued by various
    serious diseases, he was still
    always ready to personally
    demonstrate in favor of human
    and Jewish rights wherever they
    might be in danger.
    Simultaneously, and some say
    paradoxically, Sartre drew nearer
    to the Palestinian cause. A
    special 400-page issue of his
    review, Modern Times, devoted
    to the Israeli-Arab conflict,
    presented a bright image of Israel
    but also pleaded for Palestinian
    rights.
    IN RECENT years, while
    avoiding public statements on
    this subject he privately told
    friends and admirers that Israel
    should recognize Palestinian
    rights to self-determination.
    During these last few years.
    Sartre regularly met with Arab
    intellectuals but also kept in
    contact with many Jews and
    many Zionists. A prolific writer
    of novels, plays, cinema scripts,
    philosophic essays and news-
    paper articles. Sartre was best
    known as the father of Existen-
    tialism a fame which he
    abhored and which he always
    stressed had nothing in common
    with his actual teachings.
    He also loathed public honors
    and recognition and in 1964
    turned down the Nobel Prize for
    literature.
    By GIL SEDAN
    JERUSALEM (JTA)
    Israel has taken a "very
    serious" view of the reso-
    lution adopted by the
    Egyptian parliament de-
    claring East Jerusalem to
    be part of the West Bank.
    Political sources here said it
    did not contribute to the
    peace process and could
    jeopardize the autonomy
    talks.
    The resolution, adopted unani-
    mously by the People's Council in
    Cairo, called for the participation
    by East Jerusalem residents in
    the elections for an adminis-
    trative council that would be the
    self-governing authority on the
    West Bank under the autonomy
    plan. It also proposed that the
    council have its seat in East
    Jerusalem. It declared "null and
    void" all measures taken by
    Israel to change the demographic
    composition of East Jerusalem
    which it annexed in 1967.
    PRIME MINISTER Menchem
    Begin was reportedly consulting
    with Foreign Minister Yitzhak
    Shamir on an appropriate re-
    action to the Egyptian
    resolution. One proposal is
    unanimous statement by the
    Knesset, supported by the
    coalition and opposition factions
    reaffirming the status of Jeru'. .
    salem as ah undivided city and I
    the capital of Israel. S
    Labor Party chairman ShimonT
    Peres sharply criticized the
    Egyptian action. He said it
    contradicted the Camp David
    accords and that he could not
    understand why such a resolution
    was initiated by the Egyptians
    on the eve of President Anwar
    Sadat's trip to Washington to
    meet with President Carter and
    Begin's meeting with Carter.
    The Egyptian motivation w^.*1
    a source of speculation. So J
    Israeli circles saw it as an at-
    tempt to bring the Bubject 0f
    Jerusalem's future statu.-. into
    the autonomy talks through the
    "back door." Israel has made it
    clear that it will not discuss
    Jerusalem in any context.
    Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
    That Cigarette Smoking is Orgerous to Your Health.


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