The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00246

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
wJewiSi
WiaMfi
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 10 Number 8
Hollywood, Florida Friday, April 18,1980
f rd ShochU
Price 35 Cents
Women's Division Campaign
Surpasses 1979 Total
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division 1980 campaign efforts
on behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
has surpassed the 1979 campaign
total of $825,000, according to
Delia Rosenberg, campaign vice
president.
The 1980 Women's Division
campaign is currently at
875.000. Mrs. Rosenberg said.
The response from the women
n our community has been over-
whelming. New programs and
increased organization of the
Women's Division structure have
been established," Mrs. Rosen-
berg explained. "Pledges are
coming in at a promising level of
increase, and we expect to add
$75,000 more to our 1980 cam-
paign.
"Since the beginning of the
1980 campaign, the Women's
Division has shown a card for
card increase of 31 percent."
Mrs. Rosenberg also credits
the addition of the Shomrai pin
and the cooperation of this year's
category chairmen as a reason for
the success. Another major
Pv
Delia Rosenberg
reason for the success is at-
tributed to the beach area, under
the direction of Nancy Brizel and
Jo Ann Katz, and Metropolitan
areas coordinated by Audrey
Meline and Emerald Hills area
coordinated by Beverly Shapiro.
Yom Yisrael Chai!
By JOYCE NEWMAN, JFSB President
For centuries, because of pogroms Jews fled from one
country to aoothar. The Holocausts'of history have shown the
doors of the world's nations closed to Jews, forcing us into work
camps, concentration camps and ultimately death camps.
Then in 1948 the United Nations formed the legal Jewish
Homeland. Israel's doors are open to all Jews regardless of
health, wealth or ability to contribute to her nation's welfare.
Yet, 32 years later, that little piece of land still struggles for
legitimacy among the nations of the world. The United Nations
still condemns her, the Arabs still threaten her and even the
United States questions her.
We, the Diaspora Jews, are her strongest and perhaps only
true ally. Through our work, our faith and our money we must
fight unending so that Israel will Uve. We must, along with
insuring Israel's safety, insure the quality of life for all Jews.
I The quality of our giving will reflect the quality of life we are
I able to provide to Jews throughout the world.
Israel must be secure. Never again will we be the "wandering
1 Jews." Your Federation the Jewish Federation of South
I Broward is totally committed to the goals that Israel will live
with peace and security. Yom Yisrael Chai!
Hills Dinner-Dance Set
Final plans have been made for
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward Koach Division's
second annual Hills Dinner-
Dance. The event is scheduled for
Saturday, April 19, at the
Emerald Hills Country Club,
according to Larry Hunter, Hills
dinner-dance chairman.
The dinner-dance, being held
on behalf of the 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund, will feature "Together We
Grow," a special multi-media
youth presentation produced in
Emerald Hills, Hollywood Hills
and Israel. The nationally ac-
claimed production was directed
and written by Janie Berman,
Beverly Shapiro and Haviva
Shull.
Making plans for the "Youth Salute to Israel Independence Day" are seated from left Phyllis Corenthal,
Rabbi Ben Romer, Rabbi Bennett Greenspon, Rabbi Robert Frazin and Karen Kaminsky. Standing from
left are Judy Glazer, Dr. Ira Sheier, Steve Lecker, Yossi Nets, Shirley Cohen, Leslie Wassennan and Nili
Kimelman.
Youth Salutes Israel April 20
Lillian Bass will be mistress of
ceremonies for the talent show,
which will feature representatives
from the Community Day School
at Temple Beth Shalom, Gimmel
Chapter of B'nai B'rith Girls and
temples Beth Shalom, Solel,
Sinai, Beth El and Israel of
Miramar.
A "Youth Salute to Israel
Independence Day" will take
place Sunday, April 20, begin-
ning at 3 p.m. at Young Circle in
Hollywood, according to Steve
Lecker^ director of the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida.
The event is being coordinated
by the Hollywood Jewish
Community Center, under the
direction of Lecker. "We look
forward to a program which will
offer something for everyone in
South Broward. Though the
accent is on youth, the presen-
tations at the event are
something everyone can enjoy,"
Lecker explained.
The Community Relations
Committee and the Israel
Information Desk of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
and local South Broward
congregations are participating
in the planning of the event.
The program begins at 3 p.m.
with merchandise exhibits,
games, a youth art exhibit, folk
dancing and food booths.
Performances by
groups and the
local youth
American
Balalaika Company will begin at
5 p.m. in the Band Shell area at
Young Circle.
Local entertainer and humorist
An art show is being coor-
dinated by Shirley Conn of
Temple Beth Shalom and Carol
Kaminsky of Temple Solel1-
Categories are set up by age
groups to encourage par-
ticipation.
The program is free of charge
and open to the public.
JFSB to Honor Campaign Leadership
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward will honor its
1980 campaign leadership,
Sunday, April 27, for their work
in this year's Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign, according to Bertram
H. Mock, campaign awards
chairman.
Special award presentations
will be made to these workers and
volunteers at 10 a.m. on that day
at the Hallandale Jewish Center,
explained Mock.
Guest speaker will be Jerome
Gleekel, who will gave a Middle
East Assessment and Update.
Gleekel has long been active in
matters affecting Israel. His
interest in Jewish settlement
there predates the formation of
the State.
He was educated at Columbia
University, where he earned a
political science degree that
involved substantial components
of Middle East study.
Gleekel travels frequently to
Israel and recently returned from
a visit there where he met with
people from all walks of life,
including government officials.
He is a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee and
its Middle East and Foreign
Jewry sub-committee.
1!
I
Missions to Israel Announced
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward has released
dates for all 1980-81 Missions to
Israel.
A Mission is more than a trip
abroad, more than a packaged
"tour;" a Mission is a journey to
the very heart of the Jewish
people.
The Family Mission is set for
Aug. 5-15. This Mission is the
richest source for teaching your
children the spirit and challenge
of Israel and what it means in the
continuity of the Jewish people.
The Prime Minister's Mission,
set for Aug. 24-29, is a unique
experience which includes in-
depth meetings with Israel's
Prime Minister.
The President's Mission,
scheduled for Oct. 5-10, features
special programming, which
includes meetings with the
President's of Israel.
The Community Mission is set
for Oct. 16-26. This Mission is a
comprehensive sightseeing and
study of the Jewish State from
the Golan Heights in the North
to the Negev Desert in the South.
The Community Mission offers
ists participants optional ex-
tensions to Egypt, Israel and
Europe. The price of the Com-
munity Mission to Israel is $999
per person.
All Missions include round-trip
air transportation, five star
deluxe hotels and meals.
For information on the Jewish
Federation of South Broward
Missions, contact Diane at the
Federation office.

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Pnday Apr. -_^
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JFSB Marks 37 Years of Service
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UriHay. April 18, 1960
TheJewi8h Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Pge3
Beth Shalom to Honor Mayor Keating
On a recent trip to Jerusalem with Rabbi Morton Malavsky, right,
Mayor David Keating (left) met with Prime Minister Menachem
Begin.
Temple Beth Shalom and the
Israel Bond Organization will
present Hollywood's Mayor
David Keating with Israel's City
of Peace Award, at the annual
Temple Beth Shalom Israel
Dinner of State to be held at 7
p.m., on Sunday, May 4, at the
temple.
According to Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Mayor Keating has
been active in community affairs
since coming to South Florida 32
years ago. "Mayor Keating has
been a strong supporter of Israel
and the local Jewish community
and richly deserves recognition
as a friend of the Jewish State,"
the rabbi noted.
Mayor Keating has served
Hollywood continuously since
1961 as city commissioner, vice
mayor and is currently serving
his fifth term as mayor. He
recently visited Israel with Rabbi
Malavsky and had a special
meeting with Prime Minister
Menachem Begin.
Mayor Keating has been
named "Citizen of the Year" by
Hollywood Sunshine Lodge of
B'nai B'rith and has been cited
by the Herzl Lodge, the Chai
Lodge and Hillcreat Lodge. He is
a founding chairman of the
Inter faith Council of South
Broward, a director of the Florida
League of Cities and is a member
of the Broward County Criminal
Justice Planning Council.
Chairmen of the Israel Dinner
of State are Judge Mel and
Commissioner Nicki Grossman ot
Hollywood. Judge Grossman sits
on the Circuit Court, and Mrs.
Grossman serves on the
Hollywood Commission. They
are involved in civic affairs as
well as ORT, B'nai B'rith and
other Jewish groups.
Special guest at the dinner will
be Zvi Brosh, Israel's Minister of
Information at the Israel
Embassy in Washington.
Gordon Lcland
Master Piano Craftsman
Tuning Repairs Rebuilding
8411N.W.15CI. 432-7247
20 yr. member
Piano Technicians Guild
New Meaning to Passover
By STANLEY A.
SPATZ, M.D.
1 have celebrated the Passover
Seder twice every year for as long
as I can remember. First, as a
small child, I recited the Mah
Nishtanah for my parents and
then grew tired and restless well
Ix-fore the final strains of Chad
Gadyah. Later, when I was older,
1 would help with the reading of
the long Hebrew passages,
understanding pretty much the
story of how God saved the
Jewish people after 400 years of
slavery in Egypt. Now, with my
own children, I conduct the Seder
and try to explain to them the
significance of the Exodus and
'the meaning of freedom.
Last night, the first night of
I'csach, we sat down at our Seder
table, beautifully set with fine
china and elegant silver, and
flowers as always. The Seder
plate displayed all the holiday
symbols and the matzos were
under their traditional dover
as always. I leaned back on my
pillow and my family glowed
around me: all was as always.
'4ut last night Alia was there.
ALLA IS in the third grade at
the Hillel Day School with my
older daughter, but I had never
met her before. She is in this
country only nine months, yet
she has learned to speak English
and can read Hebrew already. At
the Seder table she looked
beautiful her pretty face
scrubbed clean and her blue eyes
opened wide and sparkling. Her
parents sat opposite her; they
seemed proud of their daughter's
eager participation in the Seder.
although they understood very
little of what went on. Alia and
her parents had never been to a
Seder before!
Alia is from Leningrad. When
she was very young she learned
in school that there were many
bad people called Jews. Her
parents tried to explain to her
that she and her family were
Jews, but she was not sure what
that meant: in Russia there was
not much to hold on to as a Jew.
Under State policy, Jews are
systematically deprived of their
history, their language, their
synagogues, their religious
observances. That Alla's parents
had never fasted on Yom Kippur,
never sat in a sukkah, never
danced and sang on Simchat
Torah, never celebrated Shavuot
or lit Chanukah candles was not
unusual. That they managed to
retain their identity as Jews in
the fact of Russian anti-Semitism
is a tribute to the strength and
indestructibility of their people's
spirit.
As an active worker in the
"Soviet Jewry movement," I
know how hard it is to leave the
Soviet Union. I know how an
application for an exit visa brings
additional persecution: how one
loses one's job; how one's
children are harassed at school;
how many are followed, beaten,
and arrested. I know the num-
bers: the 51.000 Jews who were
able to leave Russia in 1979, the
350,000 still awaiting visas, the
two million more afraid even to
ask to leave. I know the names of
the Refuseniks, denied per-
mission to emigrate, and the
Prisoners of Conscience, still
suffering in exile or labor camps.
SO I knew the story that Alla's
parents told me. But last night
the story was more real, more
personal than ever before. I
shared with them the difficult
decision to leave home and the
pain of separation from family.
But, on this night of Passover, I
also shared with them the joy and
beauty of freedom.
In Alla's halting English and
Hebrew, I heard the sound of a
young girl in a new land, given a
new start, given a new chance to
be all that she could be. In her
bright eyes I saw the hope of a
new life and a new light of
freedom for those who remain
enslaved.
On Passover we celebrate the
Exodus as if we ourselves have
been freed from bondage. For
Alia and her parents this first
Seder was indeed a celebration of
their own, very real, Exodus, and
in their celebration they have
given us a deeper appreciation of
freedom and a new meaning to
Passover.

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Third Annual Florida Regional
Young Leadership Conference
"Jewish Futures
It's Time !or Self-Investment"
Friday, May 2 through Sunday, May 4
at the
Dodgertown Conf ernce Center
Vero Beach, Florida
Scholar-1 n-Residence
Dennis Prager
Keynote Speakers ...
Director Brandeis-Bardin Institute
Renowned author. Eight Questions
People Ask About Judaism,-Scholar
Lecturer, National VJ A Young
Leadership Cabinet Member
Morris Amitay
Executive Director of the American
Israeli Public Affairs Committee,
Washington, lie
. Bobi Klotz
National Chairman UJA Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet
Sponsored by United Jewish Appeal
Young Leadership Cabinet
Region IV
and
Young Women's Leadership Cabinet
Region IV
For further information please contact your local Federation

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?***
The Jewish Plondian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday. April 18.
"1Jewish Floridian
MMSHOFAR OF OBEATEt MOLLYWOOO
HoUjtkxJ Offwe .MS Federal H>7 Suite M Dama Fla IM4
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MAIN OFFICE and PLANT iXNEMnSt Miami Fla S Phone IT]-***
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Editor and Publianer Exeeuu E drlof
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o Ti* MarcHai i+vwmm mi in i
PuoU*ed Bi Weekly
Second Claaa Poetaj* Paid at Danla Fla
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Federation officer! Preanient Joyce Newman Vice r~iealm Allen Gordon.
ttmm Horaatein Secretary Joel Schneider MD. Treaaurer Jo Ann KaU
ExecuOre Director Sumner G Kajre Submit material (or pubUoaaon to Marcy
Scr-ackn* Public Relations Director or LeaUe Horn Aaeutant PUbUc ReiaOona
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ISJSTZ^SSm TeU^.f*K l*mc.*~m~* *2S22T1E5iXS\
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Eff i.tk-jewM Newieaeeo and *e Fna BYast MMHB
subscription bates .MtMarart BW *"! W) I Hill
Friday. April 16. I960
Volume 10
2 IYAR 5740
Number 8
:-x-:-x-:-:-:-:-:v:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-x-:-:-:-:-x
:: I
I Cut Out The Twitching f
x I
The State Department made a valid point when I
| it said that United States foreign policy wfl] not
:j: change as a result of Sen. Edward Kennedy's upset I
% victory over President Carter in the New York
p Democratic Presidential primary Mar. 25.
:: v
If each post-election analysis were to create an I
g involuntary reflex on what we do. we'd be twitching ::
| every- week.'' State Department spokesman Hodding |
Carter told reporters the day after the New York I
'< vote. I
I i
But the real message that the Carter ad- I
| mmistratjon s foreign policy establishment should |
I get from the New York vote is that there has been too (
I m"ch "twitching in the State Department and the 1
::: V\ hite House.
Sure. New York Jews were expressing their g
I anger at the U.S. vote in the United Nations %
:j: Security Council Mar. 1 for an anti-Israel resolution ?
despite the President's repudiation of the vote two
j:::: days later. But Jews like others were also upset by
x the inability of the administration to deal with in-
| flation. and many said this was their chief reason for
I voting for Kennedy or sitting out the election.
x
When it came to the UN vote, many saw this a
I a signal that U.S. policy was shifting in the Middle
g East toward a definite pro-Arab tilt. The Carter
g administration has spared no effort in trying to
g change this perception.
I But what the President or Vice President Walter
g Mondale or Mrs Rosalynn Carter says one dav is
I contradicted the next by a statement from Secret'iry
g of State Vance or some other State Depart ient
g official. This transmission of confusing signa not
I only occurs on the Arab-Israeli conflict but in Other
I areas of foreign policy dealings with the Soviet
I Union, Iran. Cuba and elsewhere.
::
|
g What Jews and all Americans want is a clear,
I consistent policy, not twitching.
&:-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X<-X-X-XvX;X-X-X-X-X-X-X<
I
I
Dayenu'
Peace Now Demonstrators
Chant Demand for Begin
To Quit as Premier
TEL AVIV (JTA) One of the sections read in
the Passover Haggadah is Dayenu, which can be trans-
lated as "we are content" or "we had enough." The Peace
Now movement took the second meaning here in at-
tempting to form a Dayenu Chain from Haifa to the
Presidential residence in Jerusalem calling for Prime
Minister Menachem Begin s resignation.
SEVERAL THOUSAND persons lined the 100-mile
route from Haifa to Jerusalem carrying such signs as
"Begin, Go to the President" (to offer his resignation),
"We have had enough of you." and "Don't Miss the
Peace."
Peace Now leaders issued a statement charging that
Begin was following a policy that would lead to "per-
petual war." But some Likud leaders said the demon-
stration was a threat to democracy. They said a govern-
ment resigns because it loses a vote in the Knesset, not
because of demonstrators along a highway.
HIAS Marks Centennial
The Hebrew Immigrant Aid
Society (HIASl. supported in
part by the Jewish Federation of
South Breward 1960 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emer-
gency Fund, marked 100 yean of
rescue and resettlement service
for more than 4 million Jewish
men. women and children at a
Centennial Dinner held March 23
at the Waldorf Astoria in Sew
York City
The dinner, which was at-
tended by over 300 world Jewish
leaders, government officials,
leaders of voluntary agencies and
other in\-ite Max M Fisher Stuart E Eizen-
stat. Assistant to the President
for Domestic Affairs and Policy,
was the principal speaker
Eizenstat stated. HIAS has
been a modem Moses for the
Jewish people in bondage,
helping people reach a land of
freedom and land of opportunity.
You have made America a nation
of nations.
"HIAS has also recognized
that freedom is indivisible and
that its loss by some threatens its
loss to all. so your work in
helping resettle Indochinese
refugees is particularly meaning-
ful. This year alone, your agency
will receive and place 6,000 Indo-
Chinese refugees throughout the
United States. This is a par-
ticularly challenging time for
you. as well as our country. Last
year more than 50.000 visas were
issued to Soviet Jews, four times
the number that were issued in
1976. While this places an
enormous burden on you. I know
you join me in praying, despite
the crisis in Afghanistan, that
this flow will continue .,
"On the eve of Pesach. let me
wish you another 100 years of
success A great American once
said, eternal vigilance is the price
of liberty. Eternal vigilance is
also the price we as Jews must
pay in what we know to be a still
hostile world. It is the price
HIAS pays every day. every
week, every month, every year in
helping our brothers and sisters
and helping people of other
nationalities and races, reach
freedom's shores.''
Ambassador Victor Palmieri.
the United States coordinator of
Refugee Affairs, spoke of his
recent experience with Russian
immigrants:
"IN MY first personal, face-to-
face contact with the im-
migration of Soviet Jewry, and to
be among these people and to see
what they can contribute to our
society: not only in terms of their
intellect, not only terms of their
skills, but in terms of their com-
passion, what they had been
through, what they would teach
their children and what their
children would teach ours. I say
to you HIAS send us more,
send us all you can."
Edwin Shapiro, president of
HIAS, delivering his presen-
tation remarks to Fisher, said, "I
found a quote months ago Max,
that impressed me tremendously.
The quote is that of Mark Twain,
a man who has perhaps been
accepted as the most authentic
voice of the American people. I
read it. I liked it. and I read it
again and I thought of you and I
kept it all this time.
"Mark Twain said, 'In all the
ages, other peoples have sprung
up and held their torch high for a
time but it burned out. And they
sit in twilight now or have
vanished. But the Jewish people
are now what they always were,
exhibiting no decadence, no
infirmities and no slowing of
energies.'
"Max. you represent within
our Jewish family, the per-
sonification of what Mark
Twain's evaluation was of ail the
Jewish people
FISHER, industrialist, philan-
thropist and humanitarian,
presently serves as chairman of
At the HIAS Centennial Dinner are (left to right!. Harry M.
Friedman, vice president-administration and finance; Edwin
Shapiro, president of HIAS; Max M. Fisher, guest of honor and
recipient of "HIAS Liberty Award" and Gaynor I. Jacobaon.
executive vice president of HIAS.
wherever the migrant
1880-1980

w
\
0
^
HIASB^
fe\

Stuart E. Eizenstat. Assistant to the President lor Deomestic
Affairs and Policy, was the principal speaker as he addresses the
audience at the HIAS Centennial Dinner.
the board of governors of the
Jewish Agency for Israel. He has
held the offices of general chair-
man of the United Jewish
Appeal, chairman of the board of
United Israel Appeal, president
of the Council of Jewish
Federations and honorary chair-
man of the National Executive
Council of the American Jewish
Committee.
In accepting the Liberty
Award. Fisher stated, "There is
no difference between any Jewish
leader, because what is our sacred
cause? First, to save every Jew
that we possibly can and to bring
him to a homeland where he may
live in peace and dignity. Our
second cause is to save for the
generations of the future our
great Jewish tradition which has
lived so long, and third, to see
that the State of Israel is streng-
thened and becomes a light to the
world, a model to what a true,
great democracy is.
The Centennial Dinner's ac-
tivities also included a presen-
tation by Gaynor I. Jacobson.
executive vice president of
HIAS. in paying tribute to Nobel
Laureates. Dr. Rosalyn S. Yalow
and Dr. Amo A. Penzias for their
superior contribution in the field
of medicine and physics
respectively.
"Dr. Yaknrs roots go back to
the melting pot of Jewish im-
migration," Jacobson said in his
introductory remarks, alluding to
her upbringing on the Lower
East Side of New York City.
UPON HIS presentation to Dr.
Penzias, Jacobson stated, "Dr.
Penzias learned at an early age,
before he was old enough to go to
school, what it meant to be a
refugee. He and his family were
deported from Munich, Germany,
his birthplace, to Poland during
the Nazi era. For millions of
Jews, the next step was a concen-
tration camp, but fortunately his
family was able to make its way
to England. From there they
migrated to the United States in
1940."
A special presentation was
made by Blanche Ross, on behalf
of the United Jewish Appeal
Federation Joint Campaign of
Greater New York, to Edwin
Shapiro, on the occasion of the
HIAS Centennial.
Michael H. Steinhardt
presided as dinner chairman,
with Rabbi Wolfe Kelman, exec-
utive vice president. Rabbinical
Assembly of America, delivering
the invocation and Alexander
Peskanov, a pianist, as the
featured guest artist.
HIAS is a beneficiary of the
United Jewish Appeal, the UJA-
Federation of Greater New York
and Jewish Federations across
the country.


Friday. April 18, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
UJA Campaign Maintains High Level
NEW YORK Community
mobilization behind the United
Jewish Appeal"s "Eighty Days in
1980" is mounting as intensive
campaign completion programs
near their midway point, ac-
cording to a statement issued by
UJA National Chairman Irwin S.
Field.
"The response has been deeply
gratifying," said Field, who
Issued the call for a nationwide
acceleration of
mid-February.
campaigning in
"A wide variety of creative and
innovative programs is being
carried out throughout the
country. Community campaigns
are continuing to reach more
people more quickly and ef-
fectively than at any time since
the Yom Kippur War. Pledges
are coming in at an encouraging
level of increase, and great
progress is being made toward
achieving our national goal."
The UJA goal for the 1980
campaign is for an overall in-
crease of $100 million beyond the
1979 total of some $480 million.
Since its inception, the current
campaign has reported pledges
significantly ahead of the last
campaign. Maintaining the
traditionally high early rate of
Federation Allocate $31.8
Million to Education
NEW YORK Federation in
the United States and Canada
allocated over $31.8 million to
Jewish educational institutions
and services in 1978, according to
the Council of Jewish
Federation's latest annual survey
of Federation allocations to
Jewish education.
Funds expened for Jewish
education by 109 surveyed
I .derations rose 48 percent from
1974 to 1978, while allocations for
all local purposes (exclusive of
United Way grants) increased 44
percent during that time.
Locally, the Jewish Federation
dl South Hroward through its
education committee, supports
the Centeral Agency for Jewish
Kducation, day school
scholarships, High School In
Israel and the Hillel Foundations
of Florida. In 1976, the total
allocation was $72,800 to 1979
when the local allocation grew to,
(263,940 representing a 24
percent increase.
Nationally, when 1978 is
compared with 1977, a continuing
pattern of growth for Jewish
education is disclosed with a 13
percent increase in Federation
financial support. In 1978,
Jewish education' received ap-
proximately 24 percent of all
monies expended by Federations
for local pruposes.
Among large cities. New
York's expenditures for
education grew to almost $5
million in 1978, an increase of
over 70 percent from the
preceding year. Chicago and
Toronto allotted well over $2
million each; Baltimore. Boston.
Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles
and Philadelphia allocated $1-2
million for Jewish education.
Day schools received over 48
percent of total Federation
allocations to Jewish education in
1978.
CJF Preisdent, Mort L.
Mandel of Cleveland pointed out
that the results of this latest
survey demonstrate the con-
tinuing strong commitment of
Federations to many areas, our
Federations are upholding their
support for Jewish education. It
is our conviction that the future
vitality of the North American
Jewish community depends on
the degree to which we are able to
capture the imaginations of our
young people with creative,
educational programs," Mandel
stated. "Along with other
-. organizations and institutions
funding Jewish education, and
with the support of parnets, we
hope to continue meeting the
requirements of this vital service
area."
HI lie Katz, chairperson of the
Education Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward, echoed Mandel's
comments. "The 24 percent
increase in JFSB funds to Jewish
education represents the com-
mitment to this vital service.
This four year growth pattern
vindicates that South Broward can
be assured of a strong and
vibrant future."
Ellie continued, "We are very
proud of the services provided
through CAJE. its staff and its
director, Gene Greenzweig.
Locally, Dr. Diana Reisman
provides necessary support
services to our South Broward
congregational schools. In ad-
dition, a wide range of other
services are available such as
meeting the needs of special
students, the Midrasha program,
post-confirmation classes, etc."
fundraising through the winter
months, according to veteran
campaigners, is an un-
precedented development.
FIELD pointed to the per-
sistence of close cooperation
between the leadership of UJA
and the Council of Jewish
F'ederations (CJF) as an im-
portant contributing factor in the
campaign's ongoing success. The
fact that the national total will
exceed half a billion dollars for
the first time in a year without
war in the Middle East, he
stated, indicates a growing
perception of need and maturity
of purpose in the American
Jewish community.
"As the winter phase of our
Eighty Days in 1980' ends," he
observed, "communities are
Stack Favors Social
Security Increases
Congressman Edward J. Stack
(D-Fort Lauderdale). joined with
several of his colleagues on the
Select Committee on Aging,
including Chairman Claude
Pepper, in sponsoring a House
resolution affirming that "this
year's cost of living increase in
Social Security benefits under
Section 216(1) of the Social
Security Act should be allowed to
occur as scheduled, effective June
1. 1980."
The effect of such an action
would be to establish the cost of
living adjustment in June at a
minimum of 13 percent inflation
rate the country experienced in
1979.
Stack noted, "The budget
cutting fever that now exists in
the Congress has evoked
discussion of proposals to reduce
the cost of living adjustment for
Social Security recipients and to
deny them an increase that would
keep up with the rate of inflation.
That is totally unacceptable, and
would unfairly penalize those in
our society who are already hit
the hardest by inflation."
Under current law. Social
Security recipients are provided
with an annual cost of living
increase when the Consumer
Price Index increases by more
than 3 percent from the previous
year. F'or example, the 1979 cost
of living increase was 9.9 percent.
The President's Fiscal Year 1981
budget, as submitted to the
Congress in January, providesfor
a 13 percent cost of living in-
crease in June. However, the
massive budget cuts presently
being considered in the Congress
have generated proposals to cut
back on expenditures for the
Social Security program.
Stack concluded, "The un-
derlying reason for providing
cost of living increases for Social
Security recipients is to permit
them to recoup losses suffered by
inflation. In 1979, the inflation
rate was 13.4 percent. It violates
the basic principles of the Social
Security System to deny retired
Americans these benefits they
deserve."
Light tt\e candle
and remember?
Menorah Chapels, to preserve
the traditions of our faith,
wishes to offer a gift of re-
membrance. A Yahrzeit
Calendar in the name of the
departed and a Yearly Re-
minder of the Yahrzeit
observance date. A part of
our religious life, now and
through the ages.
CALL OR WRITE FOR YOUR
YAHRZEIT CALENDAR AT:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade. call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME, DATE AND TIME OF
DEATH OF THE DEPARTED
IIRKHINtAUMMOl C
STANITWIV.SCMIOISMK&'SOIOXO*.
W"0i'l CHAM IS
tot.O"
iil alUMiai cmamis
And serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Chapels also in Dterf isld Besch and Margate
Th oldest Jewish owned chapels in Broward County.
instituting a full range of
imaginative spring programs,
reaching out to their total
constituencies in April while
celebrating Passover, remem-
baring the martyred of our time
on Yom Hashoa, and observing
Israel Independence Day."
The "Eighty Days in 1980"
program began with the UJA
National Shabbat at sundown on
Feb. 15 and will continue through
Sunday. May 4, the date of the
UJA National Walk-AThon.
In reaffirming their deter-
mination to secure the present
while providing for the future,"
Field noted, "community
leadership has pledged to con-
tinue 1980 campaigning until
maximum attainable results are
achieved."
Savings StorS
with Unbeatable Rates f
WEEKLY SPECIAL
182 Day Money Market Certificate
Minimum Deposit $10,000. Simple Interest.
ASK FOR THIS WEEK'S RATE
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-DAILY SPECIALS,
6 Savings Certificates
with $100 Minimum Deposit
Interest Compounded Dairy
ANNUAL RAT(
TERM
8 YEARS
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30 MONTHS
19 MONTHS
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ANNUAL YIELD
B.33%
The Handy-Dandy-ln-and-Out
PASSBOOK ACCOUNT
5.50% per year yields 5.65%
Earns interest from day of deposit to day of withdrawal.
Saving Certificates subject to substantial interest penalty lor early
/ithdrawal Renewals subiect to change m annual rate and effective yield
150 minimum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
SAIBATH SERVICES FROM TEMPLE ISRAEL
FRIDAY NIGHTS AT 1:00PM en WTMI
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Brousht to you by:
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AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF FLORIDA
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CON VINIlMI OFFICES MftVIHG OU IN FIOMDA
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JACK D GCXOON. President ARTHUR H COUtSHON. Chairman of the Board


*i
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 18 io,
A mom of humor is a*
essential to a marriage aa love
and caring. The Broward County
Medical Auxiliary held a
dynamic symposium on
"Sexuality and Self Image" with
Dr. Sol Gordon as keynote
speaker. Just ask anyone who
was lucky enough to attend. It
was fantastic a laugh a minute!
Dr. Gordon's remarks, besides
being mirth provoking, taught an
important message children
must learn values so that they
can make up their minds based
on knowledge rather than
ignorance.
Harriet Packer, Eleanor Sobel.
Betsy Krant and Selma Hopen
planned an informative,
meaningful program for more
than 300 concerned parents and
educators. Charlotte Fixel, busy
county BCMA President, was
impressed with the turnout and
the quality program. Among the
community and educational
leaders attending were Mara
Guilianti. NCJW: Sue Gunz-
berger. county commission on
Status of Women: Barbara
Kopelman. South Broward Bar
Auxiliary: Shelly Mandelbaum
and Myra Simon. Nova Middle
School Advisory Board. Special
praise for extraordinary service
was given to Diane Bergheim and
Cathy Hoffeld. Some of the
Soutk Qhcrnxd
fipotftgfe *
by Rochelle Koenig-
hardworking hostesses
responsible for the overflow
crowd at Emerald Hills Country
Club were Mend Ehrenatein.
Ellen Greenapoon, Eleanor
Goldberg, Sherri Beraznik. Ann
Lane, Patti Perl man. Sue Martin,
Geri Riskin. Susan Speicher and
Linda Weiasman. As an added
treat the committee enjoyed an
evening cocktail reception with
Dr. Gordon at the home of Dr.
Goodarz and Carrie Saketoo.
This is one program that should
have been filmed It was out-
standing.
Another Passover has passed
by South Broward households
W8Rj busy preparing for Seders,
guests arriving for the holiday,
and students coming south for
their spring vacation. Our
magnificent climate makes us
the obvious haven for north-
erners seeking a break from the
long cold winter.
Members of the Jewish Federation of South Broward Leader-
ship Development Committee met recently at the home of
Summer and Dina Kaye. From left are Dr. Allan and Judy
Fields. Larry Weiner. leadership development chairman; Abb'v
Weiner, Dina Kaye and Summer Kaye. JFSB executive director.
From left are Karen and Rabbi Ben Romer, and Martha and
loveph Weinberg.
FOR THE
DAYTIME MAYVIN
aaw ^i*< r*>-
0*
'
\N
KL
SWISS KNIGHT
mm
KTWT.jMtt.
&>
t
AND THE
NIGHTTIME NOSHER.
One of the proudest products to come from Switz-
erland, Swiss Knight cheese has long been a favor-
ite in Jewish households. Not only because of its
taste and qualitybut also because of its versatil-
ity. Balabustas continually discover new and differ-
ent ways to serve these delicious wedges. Perfect
for decorative hors d'oeuvres, garnished with
smoked salmon and olives, or speared on a tooth-
pick with a chunk of fruit. And it also provides a
high protein snack for children. On the other hand,
with the nighttime noshers, the use remains the
same. Grab one or two wedges and run!
IMPORTED BY THE NESTLE COMPANY
CHEESE DIVISION
100 Bloomingdale Road,White Plains, NY 10605
Ted and Joyce Newman en- .
joyed a typical family Seder
which included daughter Beth,
sons Jeffrey and Glenn, and an
aunt and uncle with their children
and grandchildren from up north.
Similarly. Dr. Mike and Lila
Demet shared the holiday with
their family.
Dr. Alfred and Florence
Rosentha) with daughter Nancy,
sons Leigh, Danny, and Stuart
made their own community
Seder. Invited were Dr. Phil,
Bobbie, Jennifer, Mark, and
Scott Levin. Also Lil Levin. Jake
and Bea Mogilowitz. Judy. Meg
and Betty Glazer and Dr. George
and Gladys Sussman (Judy's
parents). Barbara and Amie
Roberts. Florence's mother Rose
Greenberg and even Florence's
hairstylist Diana from The Hair
Connection."
For the second Seder. Dr. Phil
and Bobbie Levin again gathered
, their family together and invited
Sherman and Jo Ann Katz, Bob
and Shane Wolf, Ted. Joyce and
Jeff Newman.
Dr. Bob. Mimi. Jodi and David
Sabra held the largest family
Seder in my neighborhood 29
family guests in all! Mimi must
have shopped and cooked for
days. Included were Mimi's
mother Julia Yankow, Bob's
parents Ben and Mary Sabra.
Mimi's sister and brother-in-law
Phyllis and Seymour Levin with
Michael and Jamie. Also Bruce.
Susan and young Justin Yankow,
the Oscar Levins. Pauline Zuck-
man. Bob's brother Ed, and
sister Brenda and her two
children from Washington. D.C.
To recuperate. Hob and Mimi
went to Fort Pierce for the next
weekend.
Another large family Seder
was enjoyed bj Andy. Brenda.
Jeffrej and Jennifer Greenman
The Rashevaky and Greeman
dans numbered 26 guests, and
Brenda had been out of town
until the Sunday night before
Passover.
In Kmerald Hills. Larry and
Jane Glick enjoyed a holiday
visit from their daughter, son-in-
law and two grandsons.
Fred and Irma Stein visited
their lovely family for Passover
in New York.
Alex and Ethel Avidan spent
Passover in Newton. Mass. with
their children and four grand-
children.
Aaron and Sally Liebenthals'
dauther, son-in-law and adorable
grandson came south for the
holiday. Their daughter, who had
been in the theater and their son-
in-law, a former cantor, now
operate a school of music in New
York, the West 78th St. Theatre
Lab.
"Fang" and I had 17 relatives
at our Seder but, as usual, the
maid didn't show up to do the
dishes.
Sera Ottenstein was missed
around the Federation building
when she took a much deserved
trip to visit her daughter and
grandchildren in San Francisco
. Dr. Al and Bev Shapiro
relaxed in Puerto Rico Allen
and Esther Gordon celebrated
their 25th wedding anniversary
in Acapulco, Mexico. They also
dropped in to visit daughter
Robin in Houston. Tex. Well-
known attorneys Shelly
Schlesinger and Jay Simons and
wives Bobbe and Nancy flew the
Atlantic to London and toured
Fngland. Shelly and Bobbe
celebrated their silver wedding
anniversary Dr. David and
Helen (ilassman with children
Michael and Rebecca visited
Norfolk. Va. Alan and
Adricnne Flake were niertained
in honor of their lHth anniversary
at a dinner party hosted by Dr.
Alan and Hazel Greenberg.
Dr. Joseph and Selma Hopen
traveled to see son Craig in
Atlanta and to a wedding in
Birmingham, Ala.
Congratulations to Stuart Hopen
who recently passed the Florida
Bar Exam Myron an Charlotte Brodie and son David
enjoyed a cruise on the South-
ward to Cozumel and Ocho Rios
Myron was the chaplain con-
ducting the Seders for the special
Passover cruise Joe and Lois
Biegelson are back from Aspen
seeing daughter Jill off for the
weekend to Emory in Atlanta .
Congratulations to Dr. Phil and
Bobbie Levin for son Scott being
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS- LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
named "Teenager of the Month"
by the Plantation Elks Chib.
Maael Tov to Ed sad MariN,
Kaplan on the engagement of
their son Philip to Roee Seidma.
from Norwich, Conn. Philip tt
entering his last year at Tufa
Dental School, and Rose attends
Northeastern University School
of Nursing in Boston. Marilyn
and Ed had met 26 years ago in
Boston when Marilyn was a
student at Brandeis and Ed
attended Boston U.
Parents of the Month are Elliot
and Judy Kleiman who will
accompany as chaperones Nova
High teacher Rhoda Radow and
her 50 students of the European
Campus Class for a six week
study tour of Europe. I hope thev
can keep up with the kids
Pompano Racetrack was the
scene of an unusual parts hosted
by Dick and Elayne Rubin.
Guests had been Invited to a
night al the Trotters, hnving
received all the necessary
paraphanalia entrance
tickets, programs, pencils and
even tip sheets. Dining first at
the Top of the Park were ISillie
Abeles. Adele Levine, David and
Minerva Davis, Raymond and
Marion Torin, Carl and Marilyn
Sable. More racing fans were
Peter and Lee I.onn, Jerome and
Judy Press, Ed and Bea Lane,
Lester and Bea Saal, Lee and
Arlene Zuckor. At this affair
everybody was a winner!
Lots of fun for those at tending
the Wednesday night Yiddish
film series (with English sub-
titles) at thfi__ Michael-Ann
Russell JCC. Don't miss it See
stars life Molly Picon and .Moishe
Oysher!
776-6272
IOWARD
laren a
ACKAGING
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Friday, April 18, 1980
_________The Jewish Flaridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

Page 7
JCC Events Announced
The Hollywood Jewish
Community Center, in
cooperation' with the Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
will exhibit pieces of sculpture by
Jacob Sheiniuk as a memorial to
Shtetl Life.

Shtetls, or small villages,
existed for generations in Poland,
White Russia, Lithuania,
Hungary and Austria. Within
these close knit communities,
Jewish culture, values and
traditions flourished. Every
shtetl dweller was part of an
extended family that embraced
the entire population of the
village.
With the invasion of Hitler's
armies during World War II,
these shtetls, and this way of life
disappeared completely, and the
survivors dispersed to countries
all over the world.
Sheiniuk. who lives his first 18
years in a shtetl in Wilna,
Poland, has memorialized the
friends and neighbors of his
youth in wood, plastic and metal
sculptures. His works give future
generations a glimpse of a way of
life that has ceased to exist.
The exhibit will be on display
at the Jewish Federation of
South Broward, Hollywood from
April 12 to May 2. Hours are
from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Mondays through Fridays.
Special arrangements for groups
can be arranged by calling Judy
Glazer.
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
branch of the Jewish Community
Park Place Supports CJA-IEF
PLO Speaks With
Usual Forked Tongue
VIENNA (JTA) The
Palestine Liberation
Organization has spoken with
two faces. PLO chief Yasir Arafat
was quoted in a newspaper in-
terview here as saying that he
has no intention of destroying
anything, presumably including
Israel. But the PLO's No. 2 man,
Sali Khalaf, speaking in Abu
Dhabi, called for a military
alliance of the Arab states and
Palestinian! to confront Israel.
In the interview in Die Presse,
Arafat said, "I don't have the
intention to kill anybody or
destroy anything." According to
observers here, even such a vague
disclaimer marks a change, since
Arafat avoided such statements
during his visit to Vienna last
year and on all other occasions.
He had praise for Chancellor
Bruno Kreisky's Middle East
views and said he planned to
meet with Kreisky here again in
the near future.
ARAFAT'S REMARKS,
however, appeared calculated to
reassure the Austrian govern-
ment that it had acted correctly
when it extended recognition to a
PLO representative in Vienna
earlier this month.
Khalaf, who spoke to
Palestinians in Abu Dhabi, said a
military alliance between Iraq,
Syria. Palestinians and Lebanese
leftists against Israel would
"enable the Palestinian people to
fulfill its fighting objectives in
Palestine."
According to Die Presse,
Arafat said that King Hussein of
Jordan supported a Palestinian
state. "I am ready to accept a
special relation between Jordan
and the Palestinian state," he
said, but did not elaborate.
Centers of South Florida,
presents a rare performance by
three Russian artists, Sunday,
April 20 8 p.m. in the Katz
Auditorium.
The program will spotlight
newly arrived residents Marita
Klione, pianist; Lidiya Freyman.
mezzo-soprano; and Ariel, who
will sing in English, Hebrew,
Yiddish, Russian and Italian.
Tickets are available at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, North
Miami Beach. For information
contact Cynthia Klein, creative
arts associate.
The Senior Adult Department
of the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
North Miami Beach, presents a
Sunday morning coffee and
discussion hour, Sunday, April
20 at 10 a.m. to noon in the Katz
Auditorium.
The topic for the morning will
be "Rights and Responsibilities
of Condominium Owners and
Management." Col. Erwin
Widmann, president of the
Condominium Owners
Association, will be the guest
speaker.
For additional information,
contact Stephanie Engelberg,
Michael-Ann Russell JCC senior
adult program coordinator.
Park Place residents gathered at a brunch recently to support the
Jewish Federation of South Broward 1980 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. From left are Reseea Schachter,
Goldie Finkle, Harold and Ethel Miller, Irving and Ruth Pross
and Toby Sills.
From left are Gertrude and Harold Nestler, Norman Cogen,
Asher Nairn, Miriam Cogen, Libby Lehrman, Herb and Edith
Guild. Not pictured are Abe Schachter and Lou and Lee Fine.
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Mp'ivat Luncheons twanged)
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D
te<
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 18,1980
Poland Stop on UJA Mission Enlightening
K.
re
sv
I*
The following is one of a two-
part series on United Jewish
Appeal staff member Judith
Manelis' visit to Poland as part
of a UJA-sponsored American
Jewish Press Association mission
to Eastern Europe and Israel.
The article appears by per-
mission of "The Jewish News of
Metropolitan New Jersey."
By JUDITH MANELIS
I am home now, away from the
destruction and the redemption. I
feel transformed as I knew I
would, but so totally that I find it
hard to assimilate all that I feel.
Fifteen days together in our
small tightly knit group of 18
our Chai Group. Fifteen days of
feeling my Jewishness as never
before. Fifteen days that created
a closeness so meaningful and
profound that the swiftness of
the separation at Kennedy
Airport left me shaken.
My return to roy own family,
my own home, my own universe
has been painful. I am like ar
astronaut re-entering the earth's
orbit from outer space. Last
night I felt hurt forcibly cut
off from a group of individuals
who had become my family and
my world.
It noW 4 a.m., and I am sitting
in my office at home trying to
sort out all that I have felt during
these 15 days. Faces, so many
faces pass before my eyes, faces
etched into my mind and con-
sciousness.
I SEE Pinchas, caretaker of
Warsaw's Jewish cemetery,
wiping away a tear as he waved
good-by to our departing group. I
see Mr. Jakubowicz, president of
the Jewish Community of
Cracow, with his gentle humor
standing in the Remo Synagogue
of Cracow explaining the history
of the synagogue and joking
easily amid the living dead. I see
the young Jewish student
preparing for Poland's Yiddish
theater in a class made up almost
entirely of Gentiles. How ironic
to see non-Jews carrying on the
decades-old tradition of Yiddish
theater in Poland because no
Jews remain to give it life.
I see Mr. Krupka of the Jewish
Historical Institute of Warsaw
standing with dignity amid boxes
and boxes of Jewish indentitv
cards and the records of
destroyed Jewish communities
throughout Poland and other
lands, speaking calmly and
simply about the research being
done on the Holocaust. Here
Jews are attempting to preserve
the memory of Jewish life in
Europe before the Nazi
cataclysm.
But it is another war. a war
against time, for the researchers
are middle-aged and old. And
soon there will be no Jew left in
Poland to research and
remember.
The building was cold, very
cold. I don't know if it was
simply the lack of heart or the
emotional coldness that I felt, the
chill of knowing that I stood in a
room surrounded by the remains
of some four million Jews of
Poland and surrounding areas.
I see the face of the man who
guided us into the Warsaw
synagogue. the onlv one
Paying Tribute to the Warsaw Ghetto Revolt: Members of the
American Jewish Press Association Mission visit the small memorial
to the freedom fighters of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising. The memorial
is surrounded by modern apartment buildings with no trace of the
destruction that razed the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II.
Visit to Gezia Cemetery: Pinchas Szeaitzer, last member of the Hebra
Kadisha (burial society) of Waisaw. and his son care for the 500,000
some odd graves in the famous Gezia Cemetery of Warsaw. At the end
of the cemetery is a mass grave of thousands of victims from the
Warsaw Ghetto.
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who was the first American
scientist to win a Nobel Prize?
A: Albert Abraham Michelson.
Born in Prussia in 1852, Michelson
came to America as a youngster with
his parents. After graduating from
the U.S. Naval Academy in 1873.
and serving several years as an of-
ficer, he changed careers and began
teaching and experimenting. His
work in helping to measure the
speed of light won him the Nobel
Prize in 1907the first American
scientist to be so honored!
A NOT SO RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and
affection is to 'open the house' when
mishpocha, guests or friends drop
in. Out comes the fine food and,
invariably, J&B Rare Scotch. And
why not?J&B is a clean, light
scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving
the best. And because of its great
taste, J&B commands a high level
of elegance... at home or at your
most important simchas.
And that's a fact!
,
n
RARE
SCOTCH
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of
th.
bu
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The Prune Juke
SeK-Imprrjvement
Plaa
t$anjtund.Eatwdl-balanced
batojb****- &** Sowweet,
the 100% pure natural fruit juice. It
contains iron and potassium and
vitamin B2. And it tastes good.
Remember, any improvement you
makel4,0, SUNSWEET*
thi
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foi
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Friday, April 18,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
4
remaining from the 300
synagogues and Shtibelackh
.m ijrnM synagogues) that once
Tgf jfbod in Warsaw. Was it my
imagination or did the sunken
eyes and heavily lined face tell me
the story of his suffering?
AND JEWISH children ... I
did not see one Jewish child in
Poland.
I was angry in Warsaw. I was
very angry. How dare they
rebuild that city the
buildings on Twarda and Mila
Street where the Warsaw Ghetto
fJrice stood. How dare they use
'*c names of Jewish martyrs and
writers on their street signs. How
dare they cover over everything
so nicely to make it seem that we
never lived there at all. Give us a
monument and a couple of street
sitfns and everything will be all
right. Snuff out the lives of over
one and a half million Jewish
children and adults and call it
urban renewal.
I jogged in the snows of
Wersaw. And as I ran down the
street along the park, I reaf-
' firmed my own life. I am alive, I
thought. I am breathing. I am
running. You didn't get me
Nazis, although you burned
my uncles and aunts in the
synagogues of Lithuania and
shot my cousins to death in the
dark pit of Babi Yar.
We took the plane to Cracow.
It was funny getting a ride to the
airplane sitting only a few yards
away from the terminal. We all
laughed as we would at many
points along the way, at silly,
nonsensical things. We created
humor as we stood on the brink of
destruction. And we were afraid
for ourselves amid the horror and
stench of death. But we never
spoke of ourselves then. Only
-JjiKrir.r did some of us express the
thought that it could have been
us. our children, our parents.
Cracow is a beautiful city. Yes,
let us walk its streets and visit its
landmarks. Let us see the
university that tried to .hard to
exclude Jews, the university
whose few Jewish students were
tormented and reviled. The city
of Cracow was not destroyed by
the Nazis, our guide said. Its
buildings were left intact, its
Lljpllsh culture spared. Only a
' ^ttle matter of the Jews, I
thought. They are gone now. But
the buildings are there, and
Polish culture moves along.
THE JEWS? Well, we have
this museum here, and this
synagogue there preserved
for the tourists and Jewish
visitors. You are welcome to
come and see it all, my friends.
We welcome you. You are an
ancient people. Add another relic
to your past. Another holy spot
to your list of holy places.
Another chapter of Kiddush Ha
Shem to your history books. You
Jews like to study and remember.
. We returned to the bus for the
dnv,- to Auschwitz and Birkenau.
t was snowing. We had
wakened to a white carpet
rading across the city of
racow. Pure white virgin snow
cover the blood of Poland?
possible.
The snow continued to fall
ughout the day. It gave us no
eepite as it blew against our
faces, thrashed our bodies,
narmeated the many layers of our
. Ajjbfthing. Even our bones were
iiled.
On to Auschwitz. We began
lo notice the signs, signs that
aid the word Oswiecim, the
olish equivalent for the German
Auschwitz. The final destination
or the final solution. The snow
ell. The bus labored on. Never a
single thought that the weather
might keep us from the
destination that we were heading
Rewards, the reason for our
oming. No words of complaint,
|>o concern for our own safety.
inly the sanctity of our mission
' mst >med us and the bus pushed
inward through the snow. These
vere blizzard conditions and we
new it. It didn't matter.
ANOTHER sign. We had
Krnved. There was a parking lot.
A parking lot? How very modern.
Auschwitz had become a major
tourist attraction.
The bus stopped. The license
plates reflected the diversity of
tourists who had come to see and
be educated. The driver parked.
By this time a quietness had
settled on our group of 18. There
was no room for jokes in this God
forsaken place.
We walked into the main
reception building. There was a
small restaurant and a souvenir
shop with postcards and
momentos. Of Auschwitz?
We walked down a long hall
and saw a sculpture. It was
frightening. A human form
impaled on a swastika, its body
broken and tormented.
WE WALKED towards the
camp itself. Looking up I saw a
familiar scene ... the barbed
wire fence, the watch tower, the
railroad tracks and the saying
over the entrance way, Arbeit
Macht Frei (Work Makes Man
Free). Why was everything so
familiar to me? Had I been here
before? Only in books and movies
and nightmares. But the scene
was always the same. I was
trapped in Susch-
witz hungry, naked, half-
crazed, near death. How very
strange it seemed now to be
walking through the entrance
way under the arch and into the
one nightmarish world of Ausch-
witz suddenly empty of its
victims, no longer a threat.
We entered the camp. There
was no gate to close behind us.
This was 1978. The Nazis were
gone. Groups of tourists passed
us in the open pathways between
the many rows of brick buildings
and in the pavilions themselves. I
looked at their faces. There were
many middleaged Polish adults
and some children. I searched the
faces of the adults. Did they
know? Where were they during
the years of Nazi brutality?
We trudged through the snow,
from one pavilion to another.
Here was all the evidence that
was needed what we had
come to see. The human hair. The
stacks of eye glasses. The shoes.
The piles of suitcases stacked
with abandon as the Jewish
bodies of men, women and
children had been stacked.
We looked at the suitcases of
Jews who had not yet lost all
hope suitcases of Jews who
thought they would be going
home. Suitcases with neatly
printed names, addresses and
destinations. But there was no
destination beyond Auschwitz
and Birkenau, Maidanek and
Bergen Belsen. Suitcases
representing some measure of
hope and faith in the human
spirit hope not yet burned to
ashes in the flames of the
crematorium or lost forever amid
the stacks of crumpled, twisted
bodies on the floor of the gas
chambers. Steiner, Goldberg,
Leventhal, Cohen, Rubinstein,
Lubinsky name after
familiar name. Dare I look too
closely? I might find my own
name there and the names of
friends and relatives. My suit-
case the suitcase of my
mother and father.
THE SNOW continued to fall
piling up higher and higher,
virgin snow the first snow
fall of the year. That was what
they had told us in Warsaw and
again in Cracow. We joked that
morning before we left. We had
brought the weather with us, we
said. The 18, the Chai group. But
the whiteness only added to the
horror of knowing that beneath
the very ground we walked were
buried Jewish bodies that we
walked on holy ground, that we
could have said kaddish on every
inch of soil in that damned place.
We were glad it was snowing.
Somehow the harshness of the
weather was fitting. We wanted
to feel the cold. We wanted to
struggle through the snow. We
wanted to suffer. It would never
make us one with the Jews of
Auschwitz. It would never allow
us to feel their pain, their sense of
desperation, their loneliness,
their death. Nothing would. But
it brought us closer to their
spirits.
We walked mechanically from
building to building. The groups
of Polish tourists always close
by, sometimes slightly ahead,
sometimes behind, sometimes
mixing with our group for just a
moment. They eyed us
suspiciously. We were obviously
foreigners. Did they also
recognize that we were Jews
come to see their shame?
THE JEWISH pavilion was
amockery. The exhibitions were
poorly kept. No English signs
were used. The audio-visual
displays were either not working
or the films skipped and were
difficult to see. The door was
opened just for us. Other
pavilions were open to the public.
On an average day when no
Jewish tourist visited Auschwitz,
the building would be closed. The
locked door seemed to say
Only Jews care how many Jews
died in Auschwitz. Only Jews are
interested in mourning for the
lives of other Jews.
At the end of our visit to
Auschwitz, we saw a propaganda
film on the Holocaust. The word
Jew was thrown in, almost as an
Entrance to Auschwitz: The group passes under the famous archway
of Auschwitz with its ironic quotation in German, "Arbeit Macht Frei
Work Makes Man Free."
afterthought ... as it to say,
"They too died here." They were
one of the many groups whose
bodies became rings of twirling
smoke rising up from the
chimneys of the crematoria. Only
one of the many groups whose
bodies froze in the harsh winters
of Poland. Only one of the many
groups who breathed in the
Zyclon B gas in the crowded gas
chambers. They too died here.
More than one and a half
million Jews met their deaths in
Auschwitz, but they "too" died
there.
Next! A visit to Birkenau,
where most of the destruction
took place.
J@Bbjyfc
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P--
Page 10
The Jewish Ploridian andShofar ofGreaterHollywood
Friday. April 18, 1980
B'nai B'rith Official to Address Conclave I Beth E1 Brotherhood Dance Set
Murry H. Shusterman,
Philadelphia attorney and an
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith, will be in Florida on
April 20 to address two Israel
Independence Day Celebrations
sponsored by the B'nai B'rith
Foundation of the United States.
The first function will be held
Sunday, April 20, at the
Americana Hotel at 9:30 a.m.
The second function will be a
luncheon at 12:30 at the Crystal
Lago Country Club in Pompano
Beach.
Murray H. Shusterman is the
international chairman of B'nai
B'riths Israel Commission. He
holds a J.D. degree from Temple
University School of Law, where
he has been a member of its
faculty, teaching corporate law.
He is a senior partner with the
firm of Fox, Rothschild, O'Brien
& Frankel. He is a former deputy
city solicitor of Philadelphia and
was counsel to the Commission
on Human Relations of
Philadelphia. He drafted the
provisions for the Commission on
Human Relations contained in
the Philadelphia Home Rule
Charter.
He is a member of the board of
the Federation of Jewish
Agencies of Greater Philadelphia
and serves on the Anti-
Murray Shusterman
Defamation League Advisory
Board of that city. He was
recently elected the Jewish
chairman of the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews of
Greater Philadelphia and is a
member of the national board of
that organization.
The Salute to Israel on Israel's
32nd Independence anniversary,
which falls on April 21, will honor
the Youth Services of B'nai
B'rith. and the men and women
who have become an integral part
of the support of that program.
Chairman of the committee is
Victor Glazer of Fort Lauderdale,
a member of B'nai B'riths
President's Club and a member of
the Florida Fund Raising
Cabinet. Samuel Sherwood of
Hollywood is the chairman of the
Florida Fund Raising Cabinet
which is sponsoring both fun-
ctions on behalf of the B'nai
B'rith Foundation and is also a
member of the President's Club.
The B'nai B'rith Foundation
raises funds to support the Youth
Services of B'nai B'rith which
include the B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations with a presence on
some 340 college campuses, and
the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization which is the world's
largest international Jewish
youth movement serving some
40,000 teenagers in the United
States, Canada and a dozen other
countries.
Brotherhood of Temple Beth
El was to install officers at a
dinner-dance on Thursday. April
17, at 6:30 p.m. in the Tobin
Auditorium of the temple.
Officers and board members
are: Jack Kuscher, president; Hy
Saber, executive vice president;
Wilhelm Meister, vice president;
Bernard Bernhardt, treasurer;
Jack Finn, financial secretary;
Dr. A. David Smith, secretary.
Board of directors: Frank
Borses, Dr. Louis Finkelstein.
Silas Gersmann, Leonard
Grandberg. Louis Sahm, William
Silberman, Sheldon Dickstein,
Dr. Irving Grebin, Julius Dunn,
Alvin Friedman. Louis Gold-
stein, Max Jacobson, Joseph
Shmelzer, lister Robinson, Jack
Wolff, Kdward Rose.
Ex-officio members of the
board: immediate past president,
William Schwartz, temple
president; Milton H. Jacobs; Dr.
Samuel Z. Jaffe; Ben A. Romer,
assistant rabbi; temple ad-
ministrator, Sydney D.Kronish.
Honorary members of the board:
Louis Davis, Harry Finer, Irving
Green, Milton H. Jacobs, Jack
Masket, Joel Moss, Harry
Prussack, Leo Salzstein, Owen
Lewis Wyman.
Dancing will be to music by
Lee Bergman and his orchestra.
iW s
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Making plans for the Leadership Development Council of the
Jewish Federation of South Broward Women's Division seminar
on "The Energy of Change" are the steering committee
members seated from left, Gerry Morrison, Joan Gross and
Audrey Klein. Standing from left are Florence Roth, vice
president leadership development; and Beverly Shapiro. The
pebgram, held April 15, was a discussion of "Why Energy Must
Be a Jewish Issue and What We Can Do About It."
BONDISBACK
the new
wmx
BOND
ooherw
DrufUnBondRferCcfiestploaaGtrxir
Whan you have to copy FAST copy BIG copy RELIABtV arhan you
have to copy on tfuj run and can t afford lo mm around win charmcars or
or imo a papar jam your coper anould bt tM Roytai Bond Coprar 115
t He Roy Bond Coprar 115 datvar* ccpm in a cnorce or 6 was up to
aBK>ii i 17 Vbu oat dry copes of conaanant QuaMy as raat at you
naad them And you eat lakabta partormanca from a rgr and sat*
papar pain nona sarer. rmcti But akmnatot papar tarns
Call
AMERICAN PHOTOCOPY
EQUIPMENT CO.
Orrfy Authortw) Deal* m Dadt County
Date 821S8I1 Wmmt: 463-3331 Pain: 832-4744
Pleasant company after the theatre is bered cup after cup, year after year.
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hot MaxVell House Coffee. Its rich, lifestyle for over half a centurv
satisfying taste is brewed to be remem-
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i-id* ^pril 18, 1960
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Lii i
TWA's Getaway Israel.
Eleven priceless days,
for as little as $377/
This year TWA offers 7 high quality, affordable tours to Israel.
For years, you've probably wanted to visit
Israel. This year you can turn the vacation you've
always dreamed of into the vacation you'll
always remember. With an unforgettable
TWA Getaway Israel tour.
TWA brings you all
the mystique, the beauty,
the vitality, the
excitement of Israel in 7
fascinating vacations. For
as little as $377* for 11
days, or $607* for 15
days, you can experience
the heart and soul of
Israel. From the Galilee in
the North to Jerusalem's
Wailing Wall to Massada
and the Dead Sea in the South.
TWA's Getaway Israel also features tours that
combine Israel with Rome, Athens, and Greek
Island cruises.
Quality tours at low prices.
And all the tours in TWA's Getaway Israel are
backed by the resources, the experience, and the
expertise that have made TWA Getaway
vacations America's number one tour program to
Europe and the Middle East. And that means
dependable service, low APEX air fares, choice
hotels, professional tour directors, superb
itineraries, and affordable tour prices.
This year, a visit to Israel can be more than a
dream. With a memorable, affordable Getaway
tour from TWA.
For your free copy of TWA's Getaway Israel
1980 brochure, just fill out the coupon below, or
call your travel agent or TWA.
Fter person, double occupancy, plus air fare
Please send me a copy of the new TWA Getaway"
Israel brochure.
I
'"I
Name
PV'M'|MMlllH IVP'
Address
I
City Stale
Mail this coupon to:
TRANS WORLD AIRLINES
PO. Box 930. Madison Square Station
ap
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NewYork. NY 10010
JF0418
You're going to like
I




Pa-
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 18,1980
The Family on the go saves every SB
day of the week off Pantry Pride
PRICES A OFFERS GOOD THURS., APR. 17 thru WED., APR. 23
AT ILL STORES IN DADE, BROWARD A MONROE COUNTIES
COME A PICK JUST WHAT YOU DESIRE
FROM OUR LOOSE FRESN PRODUCE
'pxetA "SaAed tyuuU
YOUR FOOD
STAMPS CO
FURTHER AT
PANTRY PRIDE
PANTRY PRIDE
BUY ONE, GET ONE,
Rye 2
Bread
16 OZ
PKGS.
95
FOR BAKING or FRIES
U.S. HI-GENUINE IDAHO
Potatoes 5. 89
MITIIS CINNAMON ONION O. ""N N ""'
Cheese Bread 2 SSSt'l*
OOIOIN TOP COCONUT OR
Dutch Apple Pies *S 99c
A 4 C ITALIAN SPOUTTS Ot
Onion Rolls 5! 75*
VIIVII C.IMI
Glazed Donufs St 59*
PAITV TTMI ICID
Angel Food Ring Jg $139
AD.II S JIWISH TI Ol
Pumpernickel !S 59*
AUNT IANNV IOUND PICAN Ot -
I.UIT O HOI I 1 49
inc A pgs
REDEEM ONE OR All COUPONS WITH
THE SAME $7 ORDER OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES AND
FREE COUPON ITEMS
FREE COUPON
UY ONI
Al IICUIAt MICI
Oil ONE
16 OZ. BOTTLE
1fou "PicA 'pram Out &64 T>c4-/UeUf
U.S. #i-INDIAN RIVER WHITE ^^
Grapefruit 5t*1
THINSKIN JUICY-FLORIDA
Oranges 10 99
U.S. (MALI PURPOSE SWEET-MUD
Yellow 1Q0 Green AQC
Onions _,B I 3F_ Peppers HIJ
Strawberry
jfajtH *? PANTRY PRIDE
FROZEN
Broccoli
Spears
or
Cauliflower
2 ^ 89
NEW YORK FROZEN
Garlic Bread
99*
99<
&894
FREE =
:. BOTTLE
S WISK LIQUID -
- DETERGENT S
I imii ONI IHI III WIIH IHIS COUPON AND AN BH
adoiiionai ; otoit o moh o othii ptoouCTs
IXCIUOINC CIGAtfTTIS AND 'III COUPON ITfMS
COUPON GOOD THUIS API IfthruWIO API JJ
ONI COUPON HI PltSON
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMI
FREE COUPON
I LB
IOAF
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PANTIY PIIOI *0;iN
Waffles 3
U ONI
IGUIAt PIICI
GIT ONE
FREE =
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s-oz
o>
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ICI CtlAM
turn $ 1 99
.....................on I
Bars
LARGE or SMALL CURD
SEALTEST
COTTAGE
CHEESE
CLOROX
S BLEACH
LIMIT ONI FHIi JUG WITH THIS COUPON AND AN
ADDITIONAL %? OIDII Ol MOtl Of OTHH PIOOUOS
INCLUDING C'GAHTTIS AND rill COUPCN HIMS
COUPON GOOD THUIS API 17 thru WIO API 33
ONI COUPON Pll PIISON
U.S. CHOICE-FRESH VALLEY
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FREE COUPON
UY ONI
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GIT ONI
FREEz
PANTRY PRIDE COLORED
AMERICAN
SINGLES
12 OZ
PKG.
$129
1
ASSORTED FLAVORS
BREYER'S
YOGURT
BNLS. UNDERBLADE STEAK *2.29lb.
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S HUNT'S S
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LIMIT ONI Mil CAN WITH THIS COUPON AND AN
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INCLUDING CIGAIITTIS AND Fill COUPON HIMS
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*1
19
PANTRY PRIDE
CREAM
CHEESE
OZ
PKG
69
PANTRY PRIDE ASSORTED
PARTY PAK
MEAT SLICES
I IB
PKG
$189
1
Seivice-'Deli 'DtftOAtttuitt
HANSEL t GRETEL-LOAF
Pickle A Pimento
99*
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FREE COUPON
UVONI
Al IICUIAt PIICI
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AT STORES WITH SERVICE DELI COUNTERS
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OSCAI MATH
Bologna M;i' 98
MOUSI Of tAllOtD (LOW IN CMOU5TIIOII
17 OZ CAN
HALF'
BAR-B-QUE
Chickens
$j19
LB
FINAL 2 WEEKS
TO SHE TOUR BOLD REOISTER WES FOR
FREEm
COOKWARE
Sahara Design Porcelain Clad
SilverStone Q^
"*'*" W rwww THU1
Turkey Bologna ....M.tt' 59*
PAU1T LOAF
Sweet Munchee H:.' M09
IISHIr MAM
Potato Salad 69*
OUR PRICE FREEZE
CONTINUES...
In order to iav
you more on your
food bill, wo have
frozon tho price
on hundreds of
Pontry Pride brand products.
SLIBBY'S FRUIT 5
S COCKTAIL S
1IMI1 ONI PHI CAN WITH IHIS COUPON NO AN RBB
AOOIIIONAI 17 OtOII Ot MOII Ol OtMIt PtOOUCTS
IXCIUOINC CIGAtllTIS ANO fill COUPON IIIMS
COUPON GOOD IHUtS API Wlh.uWIO API 11
ONI COUPON Pit PIISON
I........
NABISCO
REGULAR OR DIET
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16 OZ
N.R.
BUS.
1
99
Nilla
Wafers
85*
i
12-OZ.
BOX
MAKES AS MUCH AS ONE FULL POUND OF GROUND COFFEE
Pantry Pride-Flaked IS^
NON-STICK
COFFEE
Coffee.
7& KiUmaUi*
* PIUS SALES TAX
COOKWARE
GOLD REGISTER TAPES
WILL NOT DE ISSUED
AFTER WED., APRIL 30, 1980
13-OZ.
BAG
DETERGENT
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BOX
$119
1

_ WI RiSIRVE TMI RIGHT TO LIMIT CHJANTmiS. NONE SOLO TO DEALERS NOT RISPO~NSJUE toT
TYPOORAPMKAl ERRORS


18. 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Jage
lobal Lifeline
The Joint Distribution Committee
loint Distribution
celebrating its 66th
, provides a wide
f health, welfare,
and rehabilitation
jr Jewish migrants and
Irs in need around the
3, the largest portion,
\l percent, of JDC's
Iras allocated for trans-
services. Of the total
Million budget, S20.8
fill be spent on Soviet
ern European Jews in
ad Rome. In 1980, with
increased Soviet
in, the need and the cost
fen greater.
major IDC global
i provide:
alive programming in
the aged, the han-
pre-school children and
[life-giving support for
[Jewish communities in
\si;i and Africa;
of the world-wide
training programs of
Jthe Organization for
filitation through
ed highlights of the JDC
program include:
h The JDC in
^ion with local agencies,
a variety of health,
>n and social services for
the handicapped and
advantaged, and the
| of personnel for Israel's
expanding social
is. It searches out unmet
ad helps to develop and
I programs to meet them.
major activities include:
the aged, child care,
for the physically and
ill, services for the
aped, manpower training
development of com-
|center programs.
iu ion. JDC continues to
re than 160 yeshivot in
well as refugee rabbis,
Support religious research
alarship programs.
ih: Reception of tran-
Its arriving in Vienna
Soviet Union and other
European countries.
I who wish to resettle
Israel (mainly in the
States) are referred to
ir care and maintenance.
[main in Vienna for several
More moving to Rome.
|: Reception and care of
ligrants in Rome. Soviet
)ming to the United States
fait an average of four
for completion of visas
ligration processing in
ad those en route to other
les even longer. In
Ition with ORT, JDC runs
I school for children and
in English and Hebrew
II age groups. The
ers are introduced to
history, religion and
kn through movies, lec-
debates and open
Mis. Teachers have been
in from Israel, the
States, Sweden and
ef in Transit" (RIT):
ince through special
is to Eastern European
aainly in the USSR, in the
lof cash vouchers, relief
as, medical supplies, etc.
aania: The Jewish
lation of Rumania is
|ted at about 50,000 per-
Tie majority of whom are 65
ver-the survivors of con-
lion camps. The JDC
aiding about 14,000
includes welfare grants,
parcels, clothing
distribution, a meals-on-wheels
program and other services for
the aged. A modern new home
was opened in 1979. Close to
.5.000 persons receive monthly
cash grants ranging from $8 to
$56.
France: Primarily an allocation
to the Fonds Social Juif Unifie
(FSJU), the recognized central
welfare organization. The FSJU
and its scores of associated
member agencies, maintain a
wide range of social welfare,
health, educational and cultural
programs serving both the
settled population and new
refugees. The population of
French Jewry has quadrupled to
700,000 since the end of World
War II, a growth attributable
almost entirely to the massive
Technion Women
The South Broward Chapter of
the American Sopiety for
Technion, Women's Division, will
hold its next meeting on Monday,
April 21, at noon, at Galahad
North, Hollywood.
influx of refugees and French
nationals from Arab countries in
North Africa and the Middle
East.
Through the Upheaval in Iran:
The JDC office remained open
throughout the demonstrations
in Iran and JDC staff members
were on duty providing whatever
help was needed both in Tehran
and in the provinces. The
situation remains tense. The
Jews are considered to be in no
more or less danger than other
sections of the Iranian
population, but they must remain
alert for chances that mav affect
Absentee Ballots
For all residents heading north
for the summer, Supervisor of
Elections Jane Carroll issues a
reminder about absentee ballots.
Any registered voter who will
be away during the September or
October primaries or during the
November general election
should request an absentee ballot
now by writing the Supervisor of
Elections Office, Broward
County Courthourse, Room 170,
Fort Lauderdale.
their position and their welfare.
The World Over: In addition to
these highlight programs and
services provided to Jewish
communities which however
dwindling are still numbered
in the tens of thousands the
JDC lifeline reaches out to tiny
Jewish population clusters in
many remote areas.
In India, as an example, 8,000
Jews primarily the destitute
aged and schoolchildren, in-
cluding ORT students are
being served by J DC-supported
health and welfare programs.
For The
Nurse You Need
if, NOW!
KM CbiCAl
Jcrviccs Imc
Call 963-3320
RNs, LPNs, Aides
Carefully selected lor high
standard of professional
skill and genuine human
concern for the patient.
A single call arranges four
exact needs for care.
ON CALL 24 HOURS
Marion Saltei
PosJ Haste Shopping Center
4525 Sher.don St.. Hollywood, Flo
Phone 961-6990
LIGHTS H mg. "let". O.B rug nicotine. LIGHT I00Y Tl mg "tir". 0.9 mg.nicotine. v. per ogerette. FTC Report DEC. 79


nweH
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April 18, I960
Temple Solel Celebrates 10th Anniversary
In honor of Temple Solel's 10th
anniversary, a special Shabbat
Worship Service will take place
on May 23 at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
Robert P. Frazin will conduct the
worship service. Cantor Michael
Kyrr will chant the liturgical
portion of the service.
The Temple Youth Group
plans a dance for the evening of
May 24, and culminating in the
anniversary weekend will be the
Temple Picnic at T-Y Park on
Memorial Day.
Sisterhood Donor Luncheon
will take place at the Emerald
Hills Country Club on May 8.
The theme of the program is
"Ten Years of Sisterhood."
Brotherhood breakfast meeting
will be held on Sunday morning,
May 11.
The Youth Group of Temple
Solel will host the Southeast
Federation of Temple Youth,
President's Workshop on the
weekend of May 2. A special
Shabbat Morning Worship
Service will begin at 9:45 a.m.,
May 3. Members of Temple
Solel's Youth Group will par-
ticipate in this worship service.
During May, the following will
be called to the Torah to become
B'nai Mitzvah: David G luck man,
John Reisman, David Skavronek,
Steven Stroll, Larry Bluth, Bruce
Oren, Susan Kessler, and Robert
Among the participants at a tribute to the Golden Chain of Yiddish
Culture during the 14th annual Histadrut Economic Conference for
Israel were (from left) Dr. Sol Stein, national president of the Israel
Histadrut Foundation, which sponsored the four-day conference;
Morris Fisher, Max Gleiberman, and Dr. Morton Malavsky, rabbi of
Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood, a national board member of the
Histadrut Foundation and chairman of its activities in Broward
County.
HAVE YOUR
BLOOD PRESSURE
CHECKED
YOU CAN'T TELL IF YOU HAVE HIGH
BLOOD PRESSURE BECAUSE YOU DON'T
FEEL SICK.
ONE IN SIX ADULTS HAS
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE BUT HALF
OF THEM DON'T KNOW IT!
IT CAN BE CONTROLLED!
WHY RISK DAMAGING YOUR BODY?
COME IN AND HAVE A FR BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK.
MONDAY FRIDAY 1-5 P.M.
SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 1 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY-JUST WALK IN.
COMMUNITY MEDICAL CENTER
2455 Hollywood Blvd. Hollywood
BROWARD -2I-777H ______________ DAOC M4-712S '
Gross.
Confirmation service will beld
on Sunday evening, May 18. The
following confirmands will
participate in the service:
Rebecca Ames, Joseph Brown,
Andy Cooper, Brett Fleet, Marcie
Gellman, Adam Goodman. Marci
Hank in, Lori Keystone, Jeffrey
Kronengold, Randy Kalik. Donna
Martin. Marc Mishkoff, Jeffrey
Molin, Lynda Multer, Michele
Rissman, Sherna Rosendrof,
Wendy Ross, Jeffrey Sandier,
Brian Sugerman and Cherie
Welton.
ResidAts of Clifton Towers celebrated a "Night in Israel" in
cooperation with the Israel Bond Organization. Ruth Schwartz,
secontffrom left, received the Israel Generation Award for her many
years of outstanding support for Israel's economic growth and for her
dedication to the Jewish community. The award was presented by
(from toft) Abe Slifka. Abe Melter and Sylvan Solomon.
\i \l > 'wfe "f *TPl^B
I
1 T 1 ^m ^^m^
k *:;/; BSf

*

%k


** '* ** "Ik di
Members of David Ben-Gurion Culture Club met recently to prepare Passover packages for residents of
local nursing homes and hospitals. The program was coordinated by Rabbi Harold Richter, chaplain of
the Jewish Federation of South Broward. From left are Zern Schwartz, Dr. Harry Breslow, chairman;
Aaron Kamahi, William Broder, Rabbi Richter, David Greene, Louis Dunoff, Joe Neulinger and Phil
Seltzer.
^ '
I
He'd give him one of his kidneys, if he could. Both
of Joey'shave failed. Unfortunately, willing relatives
don't always have kidneys that will match.
So Joey waits.
A kidney machine can buy precious time. But the
longer kids like Joey have to wait for real kidneys, the
more their growth and development are stunted.
And living with a kidney machine-hours and hours
several days a week-is living only half a life. It's emo-
tionally and socially crippling. It's very expensive.
There are thousands of children and adults whose
i
only chance for a full, normal life is a donated kidney.
Their odds for a suitable match improve every time
someone signs and carries a donor card.
To be an organ donor is a decision you should
make for yourself. What would you do if Joey were
your child?
For more information, ask your local kidney
foundation. And for a free boowet about all kinds of
anatomical gifts of life (including a nationally rec- '
ognized uniform donor card), write Liberty National,
Dept. K.
PO BOXM12
UFE INSURANCE COMPAm
-SWMNGHAM WJUSAM*


rU 18, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and Skofar of Greater Hollywood
iets Frown on Helsinki Commission
.AANCISCO' The
Lion has consistently
permit the Helsinki
-n to check its com-
fch the requirements of
nki Agreement, said
Oliver, director and
Duncil of the Com-
I on Security and
kn in Europe.
speaking recently at a
neeting sponsored by
i Welfare Federation of
cisco, Marin County
Peninsula, emphasized
III of the Helsinki
which "guarantees
Lion of families,
In in humanitarian
jetween signatory
land freedom of speech,
[conscience, belief and
tated that as early as
[USSR denied visas to
Commission members who had
organized a 16-country tour to
check on human rights.
Laurel Gould, chairperson of
the Soviet Jewry Commission of
Greater Easy Bay's Community
Relations Council, attended the
luncheon and reported on Oliver's
address in a recent issue of the
East Bay Jewish Observer.
She noted that Oliver par-
ticularly emphasized the fact that
the Soviets do not maintain
frequent contact with the
Commission and it is therefore
forced to rely on up-to-date in-
formation channeled through the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ) and other
organizations monitoring ac-
tivities in the Soviet Union.
Broward Zionist District to Meet
>T FACTS
IN TAPE
Foot Health
Information
Tour Problems
To listen,
lest by Number
3unlons
Hall Problems
its-Calluses
Heel Pain
krch Pain
kin Problems
arts Injuries
circulation Problems
Call
961-0440
Cirty
tTHURB.KORBEl
ret- fees* North IWg.
i mo S. Ott.n Drrv.
kllondaU 451-5 155
Kfar Silver Night will be the
feature of the Broward Zionist
District's meeting on April 23 at
7:30 p.m. at Temple Beth-El,
Hollywood.
Slides will be shown of the
activities at Kfar Silver. Also
Religious
Directory
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A. Neu.
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Pa',1 Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wichelewskl. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730Sterling
Rd., Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
1 PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
J. Harr. (64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 81h Ave. Conervative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. (12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph p. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
, TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave.
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
EMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. ,461
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried-
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naftaly A. Linkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE 3291 Stirling
1 Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer. (52)
featured will be Don Bohl, deacon
of the Good News Church of Fort
Lauderdale. Bohl, an ardent
.Zionist, will show slides of his
recent trip through Israel. G. Ben
Levinson will chair the meeting.
All are welcome.
Ima Deligtisch, center, received Israel's Generation Award at
recent "Night for Israel" celebrated at the Presidential Towers in
Hollywood. She was recognized for her many years of active par-
ticipation in the Israel Bonds Program and other Jewish philanthropic
organizations. The award was presented by Evelyn Richman (left) and
Anne Wildstein.
Students of Hillel Community Day School recently led a model Seder for residents of Hallandale
Rehabilitation Center. This event was arranged by the Jewish Federation of South Broward Chaplaincy
Service, under the direction of Rabbi Harold Richter.
fcEVITT -WWEINSTEIN
memorial chapels
HOLLYWOOO 1931 PtmbfOM Rod 8217200
NORTH MIAMI 1MS5 W Out* Mwy 9484)315
WEST PALM BEACH S411 0MCho Blvd 689-8700
iJT.--------
I GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
7emp6e 3etkt
Wematfat
Gatdtus
Jewish cemetery in Broward
Peaceful surroundings, beau-
, perpetual care, rea-
| priced.
Mien call: 920-1225 or write*
_iiwriol"
\ S. Mth AVE. HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 93020
nd mm literature en tlw
PHONE:
Gutterman Musicant
Kreitzman
Jewish Funeral Directors
Since 1892
In conjunction with
Gary H. Arnold
and Sheldon J. Grundwag
Announce the opening of.
Sinai Memorial Chapel
5980 West Oakland Park Boulevard
at the Lauderhill/Sunrise border
opposite Inverrary.
Public inspection invited
Gutterman Musicant Kreitzman
Arnold & Grundwag
Sinai Memorial Chapel
East Coast Location
5980 West Oakland Park Boulevard. Lauderhill, Florida 33313
Broward County: (305) 742-0700 Dade County: 1-864-4400
West Coast Location
4100 16th Street North. St Petersburg. Florida 33703 (813) 521-2444


"c
The Jewish Floridian and Shofdr of Greater Hollywood
Friday, April ig.i
Silent No More
Refusals Increase;
Permissions Decrease
Hadassah Annual Donor Luncheon Held
MOSCOW In the first three
weeks of February, 18 known
Soviet Jews were granted per-
missions to leave the Soviet
Union. Conversely, about 70
refusals were received. According
to Jewish activists, there are an
estimated 800 refuseniks waiting
for exit permits in this city.
RIGA The OVIR in this city
is accepting applications from
anyone who receives a letter of
invitation (visov) from a relative
in Israel, regardless of the degree
of kinship. Once the prescribed
application is handed over to the
OVIR, however, the applicant is
told that only invitations from
first degree relatives will be
honored.
KIEV Jewish activists
report tha each week ap-
proximately six Jews receive
permission to leave. On the
other hand, they report, an
average of 100 people receive
refusals. The activists note that
because of tighter emigration
restrictions, fewer people are
applying to leave, invariably
resulting in a steady decrease in
the number of refusals issued by
the OVIR. They estimate that
there are approximately 3,000
refuseniks living in this city.
NEWS BRIEFS
MOSCOW Iosif Begun's
wife, Alia Drugova, recently
returned from Siberia where she
visited her husband in exile. Alia
reports that Iosif is well and
sends his heartfelt gratitude to
those who have faithfully written
to him.
MOSCOW Since last
November, promises by Boris
Shumilin to grant exit permits to
certain members of the Moscow
Women's Group, have not been
honored. According to Jewish
activists in Moscow, Shumilin's
lack of compliance is yet another
indication that his word is vir-
tually meaningless.
MOSCOW On March 12,
Dmitri Shchiglik was warned by
Moscow police to find a job or
face charges of "parasitism." A
mechanical engineer, Shchiglik
formerly worked on repairs of
fro
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ships engaged in weather
research. In April 1979, he went
on strike notifying his employer
and the Supreme Soviet that he
will not work until he receives a
valid explanation for not
receiving an exit permit.
KIEV IvanOleinik, who has
been detained in Leukyanov
Prison since March 13, has been
officially tried for "hooliganism,"
a more serious charge than the
traditional charge of "petty
hooliganism." If he is found
guilty, he faces a maximum
sentence of one year in a labor
camp.
Flea Market Set
On Saturday, May 10,
Memorial Hospital's Employee
Activities Committee will hold
it's first annual flea market in the
parking lot behind the main
building.
All local synagogue, church
and civic groups are invited to
join in this money-making
venture.
Make your reservations early
by calling Nancy Connell at the
hospital.
On Wednesday. April 16, the
Southwest Broward Chapter of
Hadassah held its third annual
donor luncheon at Emerald Hills
Country Club.
Guests of the chapter were
Mrs. Kitty Shaprow, Founder in
Israel who sponsored a
laboratory for Cardiology
Research at Hadassah University
Hospital in memory of her son.
Donald, and Mr. and Mrs.
Benjamin Spencer, Founders in
Israel who sponsored a classroom
in the Aleen and Lawrence
Schacht Hadassah Day Care
Nursery at Hadassah University
Hospital in memory of their
parents Tillie and Moe Cohen and
Sarah and Isaac Spilkowitz.
Mrs. Esther Cannon, Florida
Mid-Coast Region president of
Hadassah, presented certificates
to the founders and brought
greetings from the Region.
Mrs. Elaine Ellish, a National
Hadassah vice president was
guest speaker. Mrs. Ellish is a
past president of the Lower New
York State Region. She was a
delegate to the 28th World
Zionist Congress and has been to
Israel many times. She and her
husband Morton are also
Founders of the Hadassah
Hebrew University Medical
Center.
Participating Groups of the
Chapter were Eleanor Roosevelt
Beth El Sisterhood Donor Luncheon
"Sisterhood in Action" is the
theme for the April 22 donor
luncheon of Temple Beth El
Sisterhood. The event begins at
noon in the Garden Room of the
Turnberry Isle Country Club,
Miami.
All proceeds from the project
will benefit Sisterhood programs
which include special events for
the religious school, services to
the blind, and state and national
projects.
A program featuring Laynee
Gould will highlight the af-
ternoon.
Mrs. Harold Ratner is
chairperson, with Mrs. Samuel L.
Sezzin, co-chairperson. Com-
mittee members include Mrs.
Anna Wolfe, donor gift chairman
with Mrs. Jeanette Rauch; Mrs.
Bernard price, donor credits;
Mrs. William Schwartz, donor
entertainment. For reservations,
call Mrs. Sezzin. The public is
invited.
Elaine Ellish
of Carriage Hills, H'Atid
Henrietta Szold of Miran
Park Place of Pembroke l.alj
and Tel Chai of Hollybrook.
Rita Sherman is pr. identl
the chapter, and Ethel Siejf
chapter, fund-raising v|
president, was chairman of ]
day.
Introducing
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