The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00239

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewislh Floridlam
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
10 Number 1
Hollywood. Florida Friday, January 11,1980
Frsi>ocii Price 35 Cents
Mer Opens Campaign
With Cocktail Party
Mer opened its annual campaign on behalf of the
Federation of South Broward's 1980 Combined
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund, with a Premier
Cocktail Party at the home of Jacob and Bronka
raub.
L
| left are boats Jacob and Bronka Weintranb, Zvi Kolitz, guest
; Evelyn and Otto Stieber, Hallandale Beach chairman.
More photos page 9.
W-
X5T
kah Adel
rothy Lipson
Nellie Shanler
Hillcrest Women
View PLO Film
[The Hillcrest Women's
pvision of the Jewish Federation
South Rroward was the first
kdience in South Broward to
few the film "PLO." The film
fes shown at the training session
lid at the Hillcrest Country
|ub on Jan. 7.
|The Israeli-produced film was
^de in response to an anti-
onist film funded by the United
tions titled "Palestinians Do
ve Rights." The film "PLO"
*s presented to the United
tions to be viewed and was
a banned from the UN before
could be shown.
The training session for the
1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign was well attended, ac-
cording to the chairwomen,
Hannah Adel, Gloria Hess,
Dorothy Lipson and Nellie
Shanler, and they are looking for-
ward to the Hillcrest Women's
Division Luncheon on Jan. 28.
The luncheon, which cul-
minates the Hillcrest Women's
campaign, will be held at the
Hillcrest Country Club. The
chairwomen announced that the
1980 goal for the Hillcrest women
is SI50,000.
Youngest Knesset Member
To Keynote Shomrai Event
Israel's youngest Knesset
member, Ehud Olmert, will be
the keynote speaker at the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's annual Shomrai
dinner-dance. Saturday, Jan. 19,
at the Diplomat Country Club,
according to Shomrai cochairmen
Otto Stieber and Dr. Joel
Schneider.
"We have been busy preparing
for this annual $5,000 minimum
commitment event, which is held
in support of the Federation's
1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign," noted Stieber and
Schneider.
Arrangements chairmen Merle
Schneider and Evelyn Stieber
have been coordinating their
efforts with the hostess chair-
man, Bertha Goldberg, for the
gala event.
The Shomrai committee
working under the direction of
Stieber and Schneider are Dr.
Norman Atkin, Dr. Howard
Barron, Joseph Bloom, Lewis E.
Cohn, Albert Finch, Allen
Gordon, Sydney Holtzman.
Herbert Kravitz, Jack Saltzman,
Nat Sedley, Irving Serwitz, Dr.
Saul Singer and Milton
Winograd.
"Mr. Olmert will put into
proper perspective the
philosophies of Prime Minister
Continued on Page 10
Ehud Olmert
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Galahad South Women's
Division Kicks Off
Campaign With Luncheon
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward will open its campaign
with the fourth annual Galahad
South Luncheon, Thursday, Jan.
17. 11:30 a.m. at Valle's Steak
House in Hallandale, according
to Delia Rosenberg, vice presi-
dent, campaign.
More than 100 women are
expected to attend the $100
minimum commitment event,
which will feature guest speaker
Israel Amitai, television producer
and director, author, lecturer and
journalist. Also on the agenda for
the luncheon is a fashion show by
Doris Bee.
"This is the perfect building to
kick off our Women's Division
campaign on the Beach. The
women of Galahad South plan
early and with little help, they
prepare a beautiful affair, noted
Mrs. Rosenberg.
She added that this is the first
time the Galahad South women
have held their luncheon out of
the building. Last year, they
raised $13,650 for the Fed-
eration's campaign.
Chairpersons are Ethel Endler,
Ernestine Germain and Ida
Rakoff.
Floor captains are Gertrude
Aein, Ida Altman, Ruth Atkins,
Clara Baum, Harriet Biembaum,
Bertha Ebner, Lillian Epstein,
Gertrude Freilicher. Eleanor
Goldberg. Mildred Gratz, Irene
Holtzman, Susan Hurwitz,
Gertrude Jacobs, Goldie Kramer,
Jennie Lever.
Also, Hilda Lavinsky, Anne
Passes, Selma Pestcoe, Anne
Primakow, Estelle Ratner,
Isabelle Riemer, Sally Rosen,
Hilde Rosenberg. Phyllis Schot-
land. Gertrude Schulman.
Frances Walcoff and Bertha Zirn.
Nancy Brizel and Jo Ann Katz
are Beach coordinators.
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::
Susan Singer
Dr. Singer
Former U.S. Envoy to Iran
To Speak at $1,000 Dinner
Former U.S. Ambassador to
Iran William H. Sullivan will be
the guest speaker at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
1980 Pacesetters Dinner-Dance,
Saturday. Feb. 16 at the
Diplomat Hotel, according to Dr.
Saul and Susan Singer,
Pacesetters chairmen.
The $1,000 minimum com-
mitment event is expected to be
the largest fund-raising event for
the Federation's 1980 campaign.
Ambassador Sullivan ex-
perienced and will report on the
rapid disintegration of the Shah's
rule, the dramatic sweep of the
Islamic revolution and the
drastic alteration of the strategic
balance in the oil-producing
S
I
heartland of the Middle East, as
the pro-Israel government of the
Shah was replaced by the Anti-
Zionist regime of Ayatollah
Khomeini.
For further information,
contact the campaign depart-
ment of the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 11,1980
Participants at a recent meeting of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward's Leadership Development program are, seated in front from
left, Gerald and Ellen Oreenspoon, Avia and Dr. David Sachs. Seated
in back from left are Edward Webb, Dr. Jerald and Hedia Cantor, Dr.
Mylea and Regine Krieger. The Leadership Development program is
staffed by Federation executive director Sumner G. Kaye.

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From left are Steve and Holly Fr aids tern, hosts; guest speaker. and Milton Heller,
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From left are Milton Heller, Sumner and Dina Kaye, Judy Fields, Dr.
Robert and Marlene Heller, Dr. Joel and Irene Spatter.
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Holly brook Campaign Opens
Hollybrook will officially open
its campaign on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund with a Premier
Gifts cocktail party Sunday, Jan.
19, at 5 p.m., according to Dr. Joe
Stein, chairman.
Hosting the $500 minimum
commitment event are Harry and
Raisie Karp, Building 13,
Apartment 110.
Hollybrook's annual campaign
dinner is scheduled for Sunday,
Feb. 24.
Committee members include
George Finneman, co-chairman;
Harry and Evelyn Goldstein,
breakfast chairmen; Gerry
Gilbert, breakfast co-chairman;
Roland Baxt and Jackie Levine,
advisory; Dr. Alex Goldenberg
and Lester Weil, honorary
chairmen; Many a Wessler, cash
chairman; Joe Rose, publicity;
Esther Marcus, Sylvia Stein,
Manya Wessler, dinner chair-
men; Jackie Levine and Rhea
Krieger, advance gifts.
Phase chairmen include Jackie
Levine I, Oscar Edelman, Phil
Gershen and Fran Rosen II,
Ethel Chasen and Murray Solash
- Ill, Harry Goldstein IV,
George Finneman, Fred Ivers
and Myron Grabish V, Hy
Roberts Towers.
Malaga Towers Opens Campaign
j
The Premier Gifts Division of
Malaga Towers will open its
annual campaign on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
I Fund, Sunday, Jan. 20, at 4 p.m.
The campaign opening event
I will be a Premier Gifts Cocktail
Party hosted by Jean and Max
Lander.
Malaga Towers co-chairmen
are Max Lander and Gertrude
Scisorek. The Premier Gifts
Committee includes Eunice and
Jack Finkle, Leah and David
Gold, Bertha Goldberg, Irving
and Bertha Grebin, Doreen and
Sam Katkin, Jean and Max
Lander, Honey and Henry Liff,
Pauline Kinzler.
Also, Jean and Herbert Ros-
kind, Edith and Saul Schmidt,
Teas and Ernest Schwarz, Ger-
trude Scisorek, Sonny and Frank
Soifer, Betty Solandz, Sylvia
Strauss, Vi and Rodney Upright.
Golden Surf Women Plan Mini Brunch
The Golden Surf Women's
Division of the Jewish Federation
of South Broward has planned a
"Mini Brunch," Wednesday.
Jan. 23, at 10:30 a.m.
Chairmen Gert Lazier and
Freda Rosen say they are looking
forward to their fellow neighbors
making their moral and financial
commitments to the Federation's
1980 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign.
"Our guest speaker will be
Larry Smith, state represen-
tative, and participant on the
1980 Community Mission to
Israel," noted Mrs. Lazier and
Mrs. Rosen.
The hostess committee in-
cludes Ruth Arshen, Isabel
Baker, Lillian Breach, Jean
Cayne, Ethel Cohn, Estelle
Deutsch and Minetta Friedland.
Also, Rhoda Grinberg, Rose
Lubin, Martha Prenner, Mary
Stander, Annabelle Weisberg,
Bess Wislerand Minna Wittner.
Women's Shomrai Set for Jan. 31
The Shomrai Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward Women's Division will
hold its annual Shomrai Lun-
cheon, Thursday, Jan. 31, at the
home of Marge Saltzman.
Hostesses Marge Saltzman
and Dina Sedley expect 40 to
attend the $5,000 minimum
commitment event. All the
women present will be eligible to
wear the Women's Division
Shomrai Lion Pin, which is now a
Fairways Riviera
Fairways Riviera will hold its
annual breakfast on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund on Tuesday,
Jan. 22, in the social hall.
Chairman is Murray Feuerstein;
co-chairmen are Ruth Feuerstein,
Henry Klee, Bill Schwartz. Mae
Wiener and Hyman Wyman.
Annual Breakfast
Hallandale Jewish Center will
hold its annual breakfast in honor
of president Alfred Newman,
Sunday, Jan. 20. at 9:30 a.m. The
event is held in support of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund. Guest speaker
is Ehud Olmert.
AJ Congress
Art Auction
On Jan. 20 at 7:30 p.m. the
Entebbe Chapter of American
Jewish Congress will hold an Art
Auction at the Emerald Hills
Country Club. The chairwomen
are Lil Feinberg, Judy Schwartz
and Alice Ehrlich.
part of the campaign in South
Broward.
The speaker will be J. Frederic
Blitstein, an authority on the
Middle East.
The Shomrai Committee
members working on the event
Annette Deakter, Bertha
are
Goldberg, Eleanor Katz, Jo Ann
Katz, Lilyan Mandel, Joyce
Newman, Marilyn Ponn, Susan
Singer and Mary Zinn.
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Families expect more
from
Riverside.
Moreservice.
Riverside now has seven chapels to serve the
Jewish communities of Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties. But, more convenience is only one of the reasons
why since 1935, Riverside has been the standard by which
people compare funeral service.
At Riverside, families are served by the largest
Jewish staff of any funeral director in Florida. They are
people with a genuine understanding of families' needs,
regardless of financial circumstances.
At Riverside, families find total dedication
to Jewish tradition. And economical help in arranging
service between Florida and New York, or anywhere else
in the world.
Families expect more from Riverside.
We're trying to live up to that trust.
HOLLYWOOD:2230 Hollywood Boulevard
Call:920-1010
Other chapels In North Broward.North Miami Beach.Miami Beach,
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Five chaoels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
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For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition.
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The Jewish Floridian and Sho far of Greater Holly wood
Page 3
b
Area Institutions Celebrate Chanukah
>
Rabbi Harold Richter
All of the 13 institutions
serviced by the chaplaincy of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward celebrated Chanukah.
Chanukah services were
conducted by Rabbi Harold
Richter. the chaplain of JFSB, at
Dania Nursing Home; with the
Religious School students of
Temple Sinai at Golf crest
Nursing Home; the Youth
Groups of Temple Solel and the
Grand People of Temple Solel at
Hollywood Hills Nursing Home;
Beth Shalom Day School at
Washington Manor and the Hillel
Day School at Hallandale
Rehabilitation Center.
There were also four services
conducted by the Chapliancy
Service at the South Florida
State Hospital with Rabbi
Richter, assisted by Irving and
Lillian Belson at the Geriatric
Service. Refreshments were
provided by the Aviva and
Quodomain Chapters of Women's
B'nai B'rith at that service.
Rabbi Richter also conducted
services for the Children's
Division of the State Hospital,
where 40 children attended.
Refreshments at that service
were provided by the Optimist
Club of South Broward.
A service and celebration was
also held for the general patients
which about 100 people of the
State Hospital attended. Songs
were led by the Young Judea
Chapter meeting at Temple Israel
of Miramar. Refreshments were
served by the Hilkrest and
Hallandale Chapters of Women's
B'nai B'rith. Chanukah gifts
were distributed by Ben Gurion
Lodge of B'nai B'rith.
In addition, Rabbi Richter also
gave a service for the Hamilton
and Gulf Wards of the State
Hospital, where some of the
patients had been quarantined.
Other services were conducted by
the chaplain at the Jewish
Community Center's Day Care
Center at Temple Sinai and the
Broward Correctional
Institution, where he was
assisted by Sarah Brackis.
All of the South Broward
hospitals, Jewish patients, as
well as those at the Biscayne
Medical Center, received
Chanukah pamphlets with the
blessings, prayers and hymns of
Chanukah. All of the dietary
departments were encouraged to
serve Chanukah delicacies.
Midrasha Begins Winter Term
, +
Contemporary Literature,
Beginning Hebrew, Modern
Jewish History, Yiddish for
Yiddish Lovers, Jewish Music
Styles and Personalities are
examples of the 19 courses being
offered in the South Broward's
Midrasha Winter Term. The
eight week semester started this
week.
With the combined resources
of six sponsoring institutions, the
Midrasha is able to avoid
duplication of courses and
provide a more varied and ex-
tensive program than would be
possible at each separate
location.
The participating institutions
are: Temple Beth Emet, Temple
Beth Shalom, Temple in the
Pines, Temple Israel of Miramar,
Young Israel of Hollywood Fort
Lauderdale, the Hollywood
Jewish Community Center and
Participante at a recant Coastal Waterway movie fond-raising event
re from left,Mrs. Zars Kaplan, chairman; Mm. Rhon. Millar, guest
speaker; sad William Kaplan, chairman. The event was held on behalf
of the Jewiah Federation of South Broward'. 1960 Combined Jewish
Appeal Israel Emergency Fund campaign.
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the Central Agency for Jewish
Education. All classes are open to
the entire community.
Students who teach in any of
the South Broward Hebrew Day,
Afternoon, or Sunday Schools are
welcome to join the Midrasha free
of charge.
The classes, which meet in the
mornings and evenings from
Sunday through Thursday, are
taught by area rabbis,
educational directors and master
teachers in as variety of fields. In
addition ot classes in History,
Language and Jewish
Philosophy, the Midrasha is also
offering classes in Israeli Folk
Dancing, Jewish Crafts and
Hebrew Calligraphy.
Students in any of the
Midrasha classes may participate
in the "("haver" program
designed to recognize the efforts
of those adults who wish to
pursue Judaic learning on a
continuous basis. Upon com-
pletion of the selection of courses
of 36 credits, a certificate in
Jewish Studies is granted.
To receive a schedule of
classes, a catalog describing
courses, and registration in-
formation, call Joy Kahn, at the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education,
. A Chanukah party, sponsored by the Jewish Federation of Sooth
Broward's Chaplaincy program, was held at Washington Manor
Nursing Home to celebrate "the festival of lights." Students at
Temple Beth Shalom Day School helped the residents of the nursing
home celebrate the holiday. From left are Mamie Shapiro, Irene
Ingloeraen, Agnea McClurg, Daniel Oavsie, Ragi Wolff, Ellen Fields
and Marcy Diamond. ________^^
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Phone 961 -6996
Light tlje candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
THE OLDEST JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
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Call or write for your Yahrzeit Calendar t:
6800 West Oakland Park Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33313
742-6000
In Dade. call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE DEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate


SCJ
ieJewist
iian anc
irofUreater Holly wooc
Friday. January 11, 1980
A Complex Argument
There is a growing tendency in American
organizational life to strike out against those
Russian Jews who opt out of going to Israel once
they leave the Soviet Union. The argument goes
something like this: No one has a right to tell Jews
where they shall live. On the other hand, Russian
Jews who prefer America to Israel should not be
given financial assistance to get here or once they
arrive.
We understand the nature of the argument.
Why should Jewish philanthropic funds be used
against Israel's most urgent need, aliya? We un-
derstand it, but we do not necessarily agree.
For one thing, such an approach puts Israel in
the position of being a punitive agency. Israel is not
a penal colony; to place the country in that light is to
demean one of the most vital democracies in the
world and the privilege of being an Israeli citizen.
For another, it places in question American
I Jewish concerns in the cause of human freedoms
I elsewhere. How can we rationalize our efforts in
I behalf of, say, the Cambodians and their settlement
| here if we deny the same Jewish philanthropic
f assistance to Russian Jews?
No Easy Answers
Another facet of this terribly complex question
is the issue raised that our assistance to Russian
Jews who opt out of their Israeli visas only assists
these Jews to become non-Jews once they arrive on
our shores. The tragic fallacy here is that the Jewish
experience in America is necessarily assimilationist
in nature. Equally shortsighted is the automatic con-
clusion that the Jewish experience in Israel is neces-
sarily binding to a Jewish continuum.
The facts are just the opposite. There are
assimiliationist tendencies in both countries, as well
as there are lives steeped in rich Jewish experience,
depending of course upon individual convictions.
In either case, it seems not only hollow but even
punitive to "legislate" our view of just whic.i Jews
shall live where, particularly when these American
organizational tendencies are precisely that
American.
Those who would legislate in the comfort of their
American experience ought at least to examine their
hearts in terms of their own responsibility of aliya.
A Long-Needed Move
The United Nations General Assembly finally
did something constructive. In the closing days of
the 34th General Assembly, after years of delay on
acting against international terrorism, the Assembly
adopted a convention outlawing the taking of
hostages.
The convention adopted by consensus last
month was first proposed by West Germany three
years ago. The Iranian crisis apparently had some-
thing to do with this lack of opposition to the
resolution, as diplomats realized that they, too, can
be targets of terrorism, despite diplomatic im-
munity.
The new convention compels nations who sign it
either to prosecute hostage-takers or to send them
back to the country of nationality to stand trial. A
hostage-taker is defined as anyone who seizes
another to compel a state or government
organization to take some act. This no doubt covers
the terrorist activities of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
"Jewish Floridian
andSHOFAR OF OR EATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office .38 S Federal Hwy Suite 208, Danla. Fla M0O4
Telephone 1104018
MAIN OFFICE and PLANT ISO NE 8th St Miami. Fla JSl S2 Phone J7J-4609
FREDSHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET
Editor and Publisher _____ ExecuUve Editor
The Jewish Floridian Don Not Guarantee The Kashruth
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Columns
Publlahed Biweekly
Second Claaa Poetace Paid at Danla. Fia. 884500
frKlSfochtl
Federation officer* Prealdent. Joyce Newman; Vice Prealdenta: Allen Gordon
Moaea Hornateln; Secretary. Joel Schneider. M.D.; Treaeurer, Jo Ann Kate'
Executive Director, Sumner G. Kaye. Submit material for publication to Marcv
Schackne, Public Relation* Director; or Lealle Horn. Aaalitant Public Relauoiu
Director. I
The Jewish Floridian hat absorb** the Jewuh Unity and the Jewiiti We.'hiy
Member of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Sevan Arts Feature Syndicate. Warn,
wide News Service. National Editorial Association, American Association oi
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Press Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) On* YearS7.S0. Out of Town Upon R*qu*st.
UN: A Fantasy for the 1980's
THIS IS a fantasy for the new
decade of the 1980s. The facts
are these:
Long after the news was out
that the "students" holding the
hostages in the U.S. Embassy in
Teheran are not students at all.
but terrorists trained by the
Palestinian Liberation Organiza-
tion instead. Secretary of State
Vance in the final weeks of 1979
wa still welcoming the proffered
assistance of Yasir Arafat to
intercede in the hostages" behalf.
This was not the first time that
Arafat had been at the source of
international mayhem only to
appear moments later as "dis-
interested negotiator" in the
cause of a humanitarian reso-
lution of the mayhem.
FOR THOSE who do no more
Leo
Mindlin
than read a good newspaper, it
will be recalled that Arafat had
staged the very same per-
formance in Cyprus and then in
Turkey long before his Teheran
gesture. And if this recollection
fails to ring a bell, there is
Arafat's statement in Teheran
sJTO
immediately after the Khomeini
takeover at the beginning of the
last year of the decade of the
1970's about the western im-
perialist dogs, the Christian
infidels and the racist Zionists
who would soon be getting theirs
too.
Didn't Vance and President
Carter know? Didn't they under
stand that you can not harbor
sentiments such as these at the
same time that you offer yourself
as "disinterested negotiator" for
the lives of 53 Americans? The
likelihood is that they did. But
also the likelihood is that, in their
dealings with the Arabs, as in the
case of everybody else, the im-
pulse has been to dismiss the
known political and religious
patterns of Arab behavior as
Zionist propaganda.
Well, now they know. And if
they are not yet convinced about
Arafat and his PLO, surely they
are convinced about the anti-
westernism of the Third World in
general.
PRESIDENT Carter's efforts
at the United Nations during the
last week of 1979 finally gave him
a good dose of what Israel has
been suffering there for years.
The brutal reality is that the
United Nations is a battlefield for
the explosive exercise of growing
Moslem power against the in-
dustrialized nations.
The struggle there is not
against Israel and Zionism. That
would be too parochial, too
miniature a campaign for the
Third World to be waging. Until
now, Israel and Zionism have
been mere surrogates for the
much larger war and the far
vaster stake.
Furthermore, the UN has
afforded the Soviet Union the
opportunity to side with the
Third World at brutal expense to
the industrialized nations and at
no expense to itself.
THIS IS not to say that the
Continued on Page 13-
Question: After Begin, What?
Friday. January 11,1980
Volume 10
22 TEVETH 6740
Number 1
HAIFA The constant
discussions here with respect to
Menachem Begin's possible
successor as Prime Minister have
their basis in various and often
conflicting motives. There are
those in the opposition who are
interested in shaking the boat,
and feel that every reflection on
Begin s health or ability to
govern, will weaken the present,
Government. And there are those
who are just as intent on
maintaining Likud supremacy,
but feel that it is wise to have an
agreed-upon successor available
just in case Begin should step
down.
It is also no secret that Begin
has been faced with revolt from
within. The extremists, those
who feel he has betrayed his own
nationalist principles and
capitulated to the Egyptians,
have already withdrawn and
formed their own party, Hatehiah
(Revival). On the other hand,
some of his colleagues consider
him still too extremist, and are
surreptitiously conniving to have
him edged out of office. In this
they are of course receiving
indirect encouragement from the
Labor opposition.
IT IS open talk that the
chairman of the Jewish Agency,
Aryeh Dulzin, is the master mind
behind the internal efforts to
unseat Begin. Dulzin presents
himself as the spokesman of
world Jewry, and implies that
those overseas who supply the
funds are also against Begin.
This kind of pressure is seriously
resented here, and the Jewish
Agency chairman's latest effort
to engineer what has been called (
Carl
Alpert
a Putsch exploded in his face.
The problem of an eventual
successor still exists. The most
popular prospect spoken of at the
moment is Ezer Weizman,
present Minister of Defense.
Every straw poll puts him at the
very head of the list of potential
successors. He has personal
charm, enjoys splendid relations
with the Egyptian leadership,
hr>.s an excellent military
background, is convivial and
possessed of a strong sense of
humor, a quality lacking in most
Israeli leaders.
However, some who have
observed him closely for many
years are disturbed by a certain
boyish attitude that he has never
outgrown. He is said to be im-
pulsive and to make snap
decisions. He deals with matters
lightly. His defenders maintain
that his perpetual optimism and
his sense of humor give a
misleading impression of his true
character.
THERE ARE also ideological
difficulties. In contrast to Begin,
and the still dominant hawkish
Herut group in the Likud,
Weizman is considered a dove.
Not a dove like Abba Eban or
others on the left, but relatively
moderate in his attitude toward
settlement in areas of Judea and
Samaria and toward definition of
autonomy. He might be called a
"dawk".
Still, a political machine is
always concerned for its own
survival. In the event of Begin's
exit from the stage, for any
reason, there is no one in the
entire Likud constellation, who
commands widespread popular
appeal except Weizman. One can
run through the list of names of
the various Cabinet members -
competent, devoted, intelligent
men most of them but none yet
of the calibre one expects in a
Prime Minister. It takes years of
exposure to the public in position
of responsibility to develop the
image and the qualities that
attract public support.
The Likud people have had
such exposure for only two years,
and are poor in "personalities."
They have not had the op-
portunity to develop names like
those in which the Labor op-
position is so rich'. Names like
Shimon Peres, Yigal Allon,
Yitzhak Rabin. Abba Eban,
Chaim Herzog and others reflect
many years of public service
during which these men have
built up a reservoir of public faith
and confidence.
Hence, if it has its eyes fixed
on the elections to be held some
two years from now, Likud would
appear to have no choice other
than Weizman to lead its ticket in
the competition for electorate
support. At the same time, it can
not be denied that other factors -
economic, military and political -
also have a way of influencing
voter decisions.

s


Friday. January 11, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and ShofaroGreater Hollywood
Page 5
Warns Maslow
Arab Influence in the U.S. Growing
Arab influence in the United
States takes five major forms,
according to Will Maslow, former
executive director of the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress.
Maslow addressed a recent
meeting of the community
relations committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
In reviewing Arab influence in
the United States, Maslow
pointed out five major areas of
concern:
Oil The political and eco-
nomic power of oil in the United
States is now a well-known fact.
Construction Countries
such as Saudi Arabia will be
spending hundreds of billions of
California in
restrictions.
rejecting Arab
Maslow also used the example
of Arab influence in trying to
sway the re-election of U.S. Sen.
Frank Church of Idaho. He feels
this "breach of the democratic
process is a serious case against
Arab nations."
On the positive side, Maslow
felt that the Arabs seeing the
United States as a financially
stable country, consequently are
willing to invest dollars here and
deposit huge sums in United
States financial institutions.
This becomes a leverage for the
United States, due to the ability
of the President to freeze foreign
funds, as during the current
Iranian crisis.
Maslow was brought to the
Community Relations Committee
meeting through efforts of Sylvia
Hagler, president of the Entebbe
chapter of the American Jewish
Congress.
The American Jewish
Congress is one of eleven national
agencies whose local chapters are
represented on the community
relations committee of the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
Leading the community
relations committee are Nat
Pritcher, chairman. Elaine
Pittell, co-chairman and Dr. Ira
Sheier, director.
Will Maslow (left), former
executive director of the Amer-
ican Jewish Congress, and
Nathan Pritcher, chairman of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's community relations
committee.
dollars on building entire cities.
The construction industry,
^bidding on multi-billion dollar
^contracts, could and does exert
ils influence.
Money How much money,
nobody knows, although it is
estimated that there is already
$12 billion in government
securities and $22 billion in
deposits in the United States.
Talent The Arab coun-
i ries are buying some of the most
{prominent and talented people in
ihe United States.
University Chairs Arab
countries are donating large
sums of money to universities to
endow departments and chairs
and then place untenable restric-
tions on the universities. For-
tunately, most universities are
following the lead of Georgetown
and the University of Southern
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 11,1980
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum
To Be Doppelt Lecturer
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
national interreligious affairs
director of the American Jewish
Committee, will be the guest
speaker at the seventh annual
Charles Doppelt Memorial
Lecture, Sunday, Jan. 20, in
Temple Beth El, Hollywood, at 8
p.m.
His topic will be: "The New
Decade: At The Crossroads."
Rabbi Tanenbaum has been a
leader in interreligious relations
and social justice movements
-.-tv,<*-**.....^. ":..;"!' .; :':'^:v'.'''
during the past 25 years.
A modern historian, writing
recently in Commentary
magazine, characterized Rabbi
Tanenbaum as "the leading
figure among Jewish ecu-
menists" in fields of inter-
religious relations and social
justice.
In a cover story entitled "The
Ten Most Powerful Rabbis,"
New York magazine (Jan. 22,
1979) described Rabbi Tanen-
baum as "the foremost
_'-:. ;-: ._' ;".'.: .1. "* ';.
South Qkowand
Qpottiqk a
by Rochelle Koenig I
Dr. Norman and Natalie Bluth know how to entertain
elegantly. The occasion Dr. Harvey and Barbara Peretz' 25th
anniversary. The three Peretz boys joined in the happy evening.
Son Steven is a University of Chicago Law School student,
David, a junior at Duke University, and Andrew is a Nova High
Debate champ.
When the family gets together it's like a dental convention.
Norman's brother is also dentist Jordan Bluth and with wife
Judy helped celebrate. Barbara and Natalie are dental
hygienists, and Natalie's daughter Sherrie is now studying at
the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Hygiene.
Barbara's parents Manny and Stella Bluth, were beaming with
happiness. Stella displayed her outstanding culinary skills,
"Fang" flips for her pastries, especially for her applie pie and
strudel. Harvey's long time partner Dr. Mort Balick and wife
Pat talked about their trip to Canada and the freezing weather.
Friendly Frank Firpo photographed the fun. His wife Esther
commented that people say she resembles me. Is she com-
plaining?
Everyone ooed and aahed as Harvey and Barbara opened
their lovely gifts. "I used to think 25th anniversary parties were
for old people," Barbara remarked. Family and close friends
shared a beautiful evening.
Rose Greenberg never thought that she could be surprised for
her birthday twice! First daughter Jackie Seidenberg and
grandchildren Alicia and Albert arrived unexpectedly from New
York. That's a surprise when you do not expect houseguests and
haven't grocery shopped for company that is staying for two
weeks. Daughter Florence Roeenthal planned everything
perfectly and celebrated Rose's birthday with the biggest
surprise of all a party for over 60 friends and relatives.
Grandsons Leigh, a law student at the University of Florida,
and Danny, on vacation from USC helped tend bar. Grand-
children Stuart and Nancy also greeted guests. Friends and
neighbors from Carriage Hills were there Al and Irene
Winston and Mac Ormansky from Hallandale, girlhood
friends Nat and Syd Palmer from Galahad. Sam and Belle
Bloom field and Stella Lieberman. Neighbors of Florence and
husband Dr. Alfred Rosenthal dropped by to express good
wishes. I met Dr. Samuel and Minnie Shaprio. He was
Florence's childhood pediatrician in Yonkers. It was a simcha of
love, joy and happiness honoring a very special woman.
The Hills Chapter of Brandeis University National Women's
Committee held an illuminating workshop on "How to Design
and Light for Art, Artifacts, and Collections in The Home and
Office." Founding member Lillian Barber, nationally known
interior decorator and award winning lighting designer,
presented slides and demonstrated the latest techniques and
equipment. Sylvia Gardner publicity chairwoman, modestly
reports that everyone is now an expert!
Congratulation to Ken Hoffman, son of Sheldon Hoffman and
Irma Hoffman for being selected for listing in "Who's Who
among students in American Colleges and Universities." .
Joel Kellner. son of Dr.Howard and Sandy Kellner, accepted for
early admission ut the University of Pennsylvania ... Die
Fisher, son of Usher Fisher, as he graduates from the University
of Florida Law School. Saw Fred and Irma Stein enjoying the
holidays with their beautiful daughter, son-in-law and grand-
children. Also Harry and Edna Schwartzman entertaining their
delightful family at Emerald Hills Country Club.
The Florida State Theatre was filled to capacity for the annual
Champagne Movie Benefit for The Starting Place, recently
named a Broward County United Way Agency, The Starting
Place is a comprehensive mental health facility primarily for
young people. Sheldon Shaffer is director, and Dr. Arthur
Stillman. president. The Starting Place Award was presented to
County Commissioner Jack Moss for his dedication to youth.
Special recognition was given to treasurer Joan Raticoff, Esther
Gordon, Dianne Shaffer and super ticket salesman Sam
Courtney. Bob Kuechenberg of the Miami Dolphins, guest
speaker, advised everyone to "Tackle the problem head on,"
referring to drugs. Young Dolfans asked exciting sports
questions like "Can I have your autograph?
Saw Janie Berman and Aaron and Martha Schecter sitting with
the Dr. Mlton GradHora, Shelly and Marilyn Garaon with Fred
and Lorraine Greene. Also enjoying the movie preview were Dr.
Mithail and Lila Demet and Dr. Mflt and Carolyn Caster. The
bubbling champagne kept flowing and to go with it popcorn.
ecumenical leader in the world
today."
Recently Rabbi Tanenbaum
served as consultant to the NBC-
TV nine-hour drama "The
Holocaust," and earlier was con-
sultant to the NBC-TV special
"Jeus of Nazareth."
he was appointed by President
Carter to serve on the Advisory
Committee of the President's
Commission on the Holocaust
and as co-chairman with Senator
John Danford for the National
Holocaust observances.
Rabbi Tanenbaum has lectured
at major universities, seminaries,
religious and educational bodies
in the U.S., Europe and Israel
and at numerous national and
international conferences.
In May 1976, he was appointed
to serve a chairman of the
Jewish-Christian Relations Com-
mission of the New York Board of
Rabbis, which is comprised of
1,000 orthodox, conservative and
reform rabbis, and is one of the
oldest and largest rabbinic
organizations of its kind in the
world.
The Annual Charles Doppelt
Lecture series was established by
Mrs. Charles Doppelt and her
daughter and son-in-law, Shirley
and Jim Brenner, as a living
memorial to Mr. Doppelt, a
founder and benefactor of Temple
Beth El.
Its purpose is to bring.an-
nually to Temple Beth El out-
standing Jewish scholars, his-
torians and writers for a cultural
evening which is open to the
community. These lectures add
an important dimension to the
Temple program.
Although there is no charge,
admission will be by ticket only,
which is available through the
Temple office. The public is
invited.
Participants at a recent Carriage Hills educational meeting are, from
left. Rose Leskin, Betty Lebin, Florida State Rep. Lawrence J. Smith,
guest speaker, and Rita Robbins. The purpose of the meeting was to
inform the residents of Carriage Hills what the Jewish Federation of
South Broward does and the agencies it supports with the funds that
are raised.
Jewish Film Series
Continues at Center
The Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center,
North Miami Beach, will feature
the film "Lies My Father Told
Me" on Sunday, Jan. 13, 8 p.m.
in the Katz Auditorium.
This is the third film scheduled
in the series of "Classic Films On
The Jewish Experience."
The movie revolves around a
young boy in the Jewish ghetto
of Montreal, his love for his
grandfather, and the turmoils of
his parents.
Future films will be shown the
second Sunday evening of the
month. There is no charge for the
film series to JCC members, $2 to
non-members.
For additional information and
a calendar of up-coming films,
contact Cynthia Klein, Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center cultural arts associate.
Service to the Blind Program
of Temple Beth El Sisterhood will
bunwfll by Sisterhood's petite
luncheon card party to be held in
the Tobin Auditorium of the
Temple, Hollywood, on Tuesday,
Jan. 29 at noon. The public is
invited to attend.
Sisterhood's Braille services
provide study and test materials
for students at Nova Elementary
and Middle Schools, as well as for
students throughout Florida.
Blind adults benefit by the trans-
cription of career and technical
manuals.
The group also provides library
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Blind People Aided
By Sisterhood Project
books to the Jewish Braille Insti-
tute of America. The Braille
tindery group works under the
ch.iirmunship of Mrs. Milton
I'oi inan, with Mrs. Abraham
ll.ilpcui in charge of the tape
recording of books for the Nova
schools,
Mrs. Caryl Feldman, founder
of Sisterhood's "Service to the
Blind," is now coordinator and
Braille chairman of volunteers for
the project.
for tickets and reservations
coll Mrs. Herschell Cohn, Mrs.
Jack Finn, or the Temple office.
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Friday, January 11,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
'age 7
r
Beth El Concert
The Brotherhood of Temple
Beth El will present in concert
Ginetta La Biani, coloratura, and
Harry Sandier, violinist, on
Tuesday, Feb. 5, in the Tobin
Auditorium of the Temple,
Hollywood, at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available at the
Temple and at the door. Refresh-
ments will be served. The public
is invited.
Ginetta La Bianca holds the
"world record" as the youngest
opera star in history.
At the age of 15, she made two
extraordinary debuts. Her first
was as Gilda in "Rigoletto," at
Velletri; less than two months
later, she sang the role of Rosina
in "The Barber of Seville" at the
famous Teatro dell'Opera in
Rome, with a cast of Italy's finest
singers.
Her success in both operas was
sensational. Ms. Bianca won first
prize in the seventh international
competition for opera singers in
Milan. She also won a Ford
Foundation Grant for
professional opera singers.
Harold Sandier is best known
for his playing of the fiery
Hungarian and Roumanian
gypsy music. He was also lead
violinist of many Broadway
shows.
Sandier is an elegant showman
with superb technique and a most
polished technician who plays
with the ease of a genius. He has
performed in concert halls, hotels
and supper clubs throughout the
world.
Centers' Winter Programs
In-person registration for the
winter semester programs of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida branches is as
| follows:
Michael Ann Russell Jwish
Community Center, 18900 N. E.
25th Avenue, North Miami
Beach. Registration for members
only begins Monday, Jan. 14, and
Tuesday, Jan. 16. Non-member
registration begins Wednesday,
Jan. 16, and Thursday, Jan. 17.
m-person registration available
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Hollywood Jewish Com-
munity Center, 2838 Hollywood
Blvd., Hollywood. Registration
for both members and non-
members begins the week of Jan.
14. In-person registration
available from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
For detailed information
regarding programs and
membership, contact any branch
of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
Hallandale Symphony Concert Set
Hallandale Cultural Arts, Inc.
(formerly Hallandale Civic
Center Fund, Inc.) will present
its tenth anniversary concert on
Web. 17 at 8 p.m. at Diplomat
Hotel. This event also celebrates
the fifth anniversary of
Hallandale Symphony Orchestra,
conducted by Laurence Siegel
and produced by cultural director
Florence Rose.
Dmitry Sitkovetsky, young
multi-award winning violinist
who recently captured first place
in Vienna's Fritz Kreisler
International Competition, will
be soloist. He emigrated from
Russia after a career in the Soviet
Union from 1961 to 1977 as
soloist with orchestras in
Moscow, Leningrad, and other
Soviet cities, as well as in a recent
extensive European tour.
Giuseppe Campora,
Metropolitan and La Scala Opera
tenor, will be the vocal soloist.
A champagne reception
follow the concert.
will
- Temple Solel Schedules Bazaar
Shabbat worship service will
begin at 8:15 p.m., Friday, Jan.
11, at Temple Solel. Rabbi Robert
P. Frazin will conduct the ser-
vice, and Cantor Michael Kyrr
will chant the liturgical portion of
the service.
A symposium will be held
during the Oneg Shabbat.
Speaker, Gary Eisenberg, will
discuss "Jewish fouth and the
Cults." A clinical therapist,
Eisenberg, has lectured widely on
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FRED JOSSI
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Fine Entertainment
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tne subject of cults and
missionary movements and has
conducted deprogramming and
therapy for ex-cult members. He
is also Southeastern regional
college coordinator for Union of
American Hebrew
Congregations.
The Oneg Shabbat following
the service will be sponsored by
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Fine in
honor of their son David, and Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Rubin in honor
of their son Alan.
Shabbat morning worship
service will begin at 10:30 a.m.,
Saturday, Jan. 11. During this
service, David A. Fine and Alan
S. Rubin will be called to the
Torah to become B'nai Mitzvah.
Alan is in the seventh grade at
Beth Shalom Day School and in
the seventh grade of the Abe and
Grace Durbin School of Living
Judaism. He is a member of
Temple Solel's Junior Youth
Group and is interested in
science.
David is in the seventh grade
at Attucks Middle School and in
the seventh grade of the Abe and
Grace Durbin School of Living
Judaism.
Forum Scheduled
A Mental Health Forum,
dealing with ways of coping with
our rapidly changing society, will
be held on Monday, Jan. 21, at
Hollywood Hills High School
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The Forum is co-sponsored by
the Hollywood Section, National
Council of Jewish Women and
the Mental Health Association of
Broward County. The afternoon
session will begin with a guest
speaker and the film "Learning
to Cope," narrated by Cliff
Holier (son. followed by a
question and answer session.
Let Delta help
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Delta is
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you are


The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 11, I960
Courses Are Offered For Jewish Teachers
The Central Agency for Jewish
Education has announced the
offering of seven courses, as part
of its Institute for Jewish
Studies: Jewish Teachers
Institute.
The series of courses is
designed for all teachers, but
specifically for those who are in
need of fulfilling study require-
ments towards attaining a
temporary or Hebrew teachers
license, or temporary or con-
tinuing early childhood educators
licnse.
Courses may be taken for those
wishing professional growth
credit, or by teachers or
knowledgeable adults seeking to
enhance their Jewish knowledge
or professional skills.
The course offerings include:
At the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, 4200 Biscayne
Blvd.:
The Five Megillot. taught by
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro of Beth
Israel Congregation, 8:30-10 p.m.
At Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood, 1400 N. 46 Ave.:
Methods of Teaching in the
Jewish School, taught by Jerome
Hershon. former associate
director of the Board of Jewish
Education, Washington, DC, on
Tuesdays from 7:30-9 p.m.
At Beth Torah Congregation,
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd., N.
Miami Beach:
American Jewish History,
taught by Abraham J. Gittelson,
associate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
from 8:30-10 p.m.
The Development of Jewish
Law, taught by Rabbi Menachem
Raab, director of day school
department, Central Agency for
Jewish Education, from 7-8:30
p.m. on Wednesdays.
News in Review
Rabbis Contact Ayatollah
NEW YORK The Union of
Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada has sent a
cable to the Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini urging him "as a deep
believer in religious ethics" to
"immediately free the 50
Americans held hostage" in
Teheran, "thereby alleviating the
pain and suffering of both the
hostages and their respective
families."
The cable, signed by Rabbi
Moshe Feinstein, president of the
organization, and Rabbi Simcha
Elberg, chairman of its ad-
ministrative committee, noted:
"The Union of Orthodox Rabbis
ot U.S.A. and Canada, the oldest
and most authoritative rabbinic
organization in the Western
Hemisphere, is a non-partisan,
non-political body. We are
strictly a religious organization
which has been established to
ensure that our people, the
Jewish nation, follow the in-
struction given to her by our
Holy Torah."
JERUSALEM Rabbi
Abraham Hirshberg of Mexico
has flown to Teheran and hopes
to be allowed to conduct services
for the Jews who are among the
American hostages held in the
U.S. Embassy.
Hirshberg told Kol Yisrael
radio in a telephone interview
from Teheran that he was in
touch with the Iranian
authorities who "invited" him to
Teheran and who would deter-
mine precisely when he would go
to the Embassy. He said he did
not know how many of the
hostages were Jewish. Four
Christian clergymen were allowed
to conduct lengthy services for
the hostages on Christmas Eve.
Kol Yisrael said Hirshberg,
born in Poland and formerly a
rabbi in Chicago and Montreal,
reached Iran "via Jordan and
Syria."
NEW YORK Funeral
services were held Dec. 25 for
Asher Penn, an author and
former city editor of The Jewish
Daily Forward, who died at
Mount Sinai Hospital at the age
of 71. Bom in Gaisin, in the
Ukraine, Penn arrived in the
United States in 1935 by way of
Cuba where in 1932 he founded
and edited Cuba's first Jewish
weekly, Havaner Lebn. His
father, Sholem Pennes, who was
prominent in Cuba's Jewish
community, had brought his
family to that country in 1924.
Before joining the Forward in
1963, Penn was the news and city
editor for the Yiddish-language
paper, The Day-Jewish Journal,
where he also functioned as the
paper's United Nations
correspondent.
NEW YORK About 250
persons attended a ceremony
placing a new menorah on a
synagogue in the Riverdale
section of The Bronx, N.Y., in
response to the vandalism of two
outdoor Chanukah menorahs
Dec. 23.
Rabbi Avraham Weiss, of the
Hebrew Institute of Riverdale,
said a menorah on the roof of the
synagogue, which is now being
built, was "thrown over the roof"
Sunday night and "splattered"
onto the street. He said a second
outdoor menorah two blocks
away was thrown onto the nearby
Henry Hudson Parkway.
Weiss said it was decided to
place a new menorah on the
synagogue as "a statement of
strength and conviction."
JERUSALEM Some 6,200
housing units will be built in the
administered territories within
the next year, the Ministerial
Settlement Committee of Israel
decided in Jerusalem. The
decision is subject to budgetary
approval by the Treasury which
is expected in a meeting between
Finance Minister Yigal Hurwitz,
Agriculture Minister Ariel
Sharon and Construction and
Housing Minister David Levy.
Only Raanan Weitz, co-
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Settlement Department, and
Justice Minister Shmuel Tamir
voted against the plan. Weitz
argued that very little
preparatory work was done
regarding the financial aspects.
Fairways Royale
Fairways Royale will hold its
annual breakfast on behalf of the
Jewish Federation of South
Hroward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund, Sunday, Jan. 13,10 a.m. in
the social hall. Guest speaker is
Gideon Peleg. The honoree is
Milton Presser, and the chairman
is Erwin Gold.
South Broward
Technion Women
The South Broward Chapter of
the American Society for
Technion, Women's Division, will
hold its next meeting on Monday,
Jan. 21, at noon at Galahad
North, 3001 South Ocean Drive,
Hollywood.
Billie Hyman will present "A
Living Biography of Mary Todd
Lincoln." Refreshments will be
served.
At the Central Agency for
Jewish Education:
Traditional Themes in Modern *
Jewish Poetry, taught by Dr.
Yehuda Shamir, professor,
Judaic studies, University of
Miami, on Sunday from 7-8:30
p.m.
At the Central Agency for
Jewish Education:
The American Jewish Class-
room, taught by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
staff, on Sundays from 7-8:30
p.m.
At the Central Agency for
Jewish Education:
The Modern Hebrew Short
Story, taught by Dr. Yehuda
Shamir, on Sundays from 8:30-10
p.m.
Cost of one course is $25. If
i.iking two or more courses the
cost is $20 per course. Checks are
to be made out to the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Registration will take place at the
opening session of each of the
classes.
Classes begin on Tuesdays,
Jun.8; on Wednesdays, Jan 9;
and on Sundays, Jan. 13.
For more information call
Miles P. Bunder at the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
576-4030 in Dade and 925-6244 in
Broward.
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Friday, January 11,1980
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
La Mer Opens Campaign
With Cocktail Party
'
Family Mission Dates Set for August
The dates for the Jewish
Federation of South Broward's
second annual Family Mission to
Israel have been set for Aug. 5-
15, according to Missions chair-
man, Dr. Bob Pittell.
"We are looking forward to
this mission being even more
successful than our first," said
Dr. Pittell. "Last year, we had 80
participants plus the sellout of
our Community Mission. The
' Federation has always had a
successful missions program and
the addition of the Family
Mission was an enhancement to
the program.
"We have already received
some deposits for space on the
Aug. 5 departure," he said.
For reservations and in-
formation, contact the Campaign
Department at the Jewish
Federation of South Broward.
From left are Dr. Ray and Nada Scalettar, Rose and Sol Ross, Pearl
Ann Marco, Gueaie and Paul Novak.
*>
Dr. Bob Pittell
From left are Mary and Victor Specter, Lenore Weber, Shirley and
William Edehnan, LB and Lou Klemberg.
i
I have tuned pianos for moat of
world's great
Steinway & Baldwin Artists
P
iano
Tuning
Repairing
Rebuilding
GORDON LELAND
MEMBER P.T.G
PHONE: 432 7247
From left an Otto Stieber, Nathan and Shirley Finkelatein, Hy
and Bertha Mmdfch, Sarah and Ben H.Solondi.
From left are Daniel and June Wagner, Ella and George Kahn and Lee
Franklin.
Having a
Cousins' Club?
Don't forget to invite
the great taste of
Maxwell House
Coffee.
Maxwell House" Coffee has that rich.
satisfying taste, brewed to be
remembered. Serve it with
sable and whitetish salad
or whatever the Cousins'
Club enjoys noshing.
Smart Cousins' Club
hostesses have
been serving it
tor over hall
a century.

PASSOVER
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present the Diplomat Hotel Hollywood, Florida
for this year's celebration.
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Page
10\
The Jewish Floridian andShofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, January 11,1980
Temple Sinai Sets Plans
For Shabbat Services
Friday evening services at
Temple Sinai of Hollywood will
begin at 8 p.m. in the main sanc-
tuary with Rabbi Seymour
Friedman officiating and Cantor
Naftaly A. Linkovsky chanting
the liturgy.
In celebration of Cantor and
Mrs. Linkovsky's 37th wedding
anniversary, the cantor's son,
Cantor Samuel Linkovsky of
Temple B'nai Israel of Phila-
delphia, Pa., will join with his
father in the chanting of litur-
gical songs and will also par-
ticipate in Saturday morning
services on Jan. 19.
The pulpit flowers for the I
evening will be sponsored by Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Ponn in honor of
the Cantor and Mrs. Linkovsky's
wedding anniversary.
The blessing of the Sabbath
candles will be recited by Mrs.
Linkovsky and Cantor Samuel
Linkovsky and his wife, Alia, will
open the Ark.
There will also be the con-
secration of Class Aleph
students, which will include the
following youngsters:
Kevin, son of Mr. and Mrs. John
A clams Jeffrey, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Adolph Azeman. Ivan, son of Mr. and
Mrs. l^aurence Blerfass. Jennifer,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Cohen.
Candace, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Kdelman. Benjy. son of Mr.
and Mrs. Geron Kramer. David, son of
Ms. Kellce Lederer. Jennifer, daughter
of Mrs. Jeannle Nerenburg. Lyssa,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Nyer.
Steven, son of Mr. and Mrs. William
Kesnick. Jason, son of Allan Schooler.
Audrey, daughter of Dr. and Mrs.
William Sherman. Jason, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Gerald Cole. Adam, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey Turner. Heather, daughter
<>( Mr and Mrs. David White. Andrew,
sun of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Wlnn.
As part of the monthly family
Shabbat service and its ongoing
generation recognition program,
Temple Sinai will honor the
Ronald Rosen family as three-
generation members of the
Temple.
Ronald and Lynn Rosen have
been members for 11 years.
Lynn's parents, Harry and Ruth
Scherman, were members of the
congregation since 1947, when
Temple Sinai was still located on
Polk St., inHollvwooH.
During that period of time,
Mrs. Scherman led a Young
Judea Group. Lynn and her sister
Barbara attended religious school
of Temple Sinai.
Lynn became bat mitzvah,
confirmed and married by Rabbi
Da. id Shapiro. Ronald Rosen is a
member of the board of governors
at Temple Sinai. They have two
young sons, Matthew and Evan,
who now attend the religious
school at Temple Sinai.
Other families who will be
recognized in the future are:
Mi and Mrs. Norman Platt. Mr. and
Mrs. MaxChlra, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Lefkow, Mr. and Mri. Gary Ginsberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Mogllowltz. Dr. and
Mrs. ltobert Plltell. Dr. and Mrs. Alfred
ItosenUial. Mr. and Mrs. Julius Ramo.
Mr. and Mrs. Irving London, and Mr.
and Mi.-. Marvin Gottlieb.
These families will be recog-
nized at the monthly family
Shabbat services in future
months.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman,
Temple Sinai spiritual leader, will
have special presentations at
these services.
American Savings Distributes Pins
Over 100,000 American Flag
lapel pins will be distributed to
the public by American Savings
and Loan Association of Florida
during its American Pride Cam-
paign now beginning at 32 Amer-
ican Savings branch offices
throughout five Florida counties.
"American Savings Gives You
Something Money Can't Buy
Pride" is the theme of the new
campaign introduced by the
Association. The advertisements,
on radio and in newspapers, will
emphasize the entire concept of
Americanism stressing strength
and freedom for all Americans.
In announcing the new
Americanism promotion, Barry
D. Siegel. vice president of
American Savings, reiterated
American Savings' longstanding
commitment to the American
ideal and invited the public at
laree to come to any American
Savings office for a free flag pin.
American Savings has 32
savings offices located through-
out Florida. The Association has
12 Dade County offices located in
Miami, Miami Beach, Bay
Harbor Islands, Coral Gables,
Kendall, North Miami and North
Miami Beach. Thirteen Broward
County officies are located in
Deerfield Beach, Fort Lauder-
dale, Hallandale, Hollywood,
Lauderhill, Margate, Pembroke
Lakes, Plantation, Pompano
Beach, Sunrise and Tamarac. In
Palm Beach County, the offices
are located in Boca Raton, Delray
Beach and West Palm Beach.
The Association has one office in
Port Charlotte in Charlotte
County and one in Venice in
Sarasota County.
FOOT FACTS
ON TAPE
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Information
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F1 Bunions
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Youngest Knesset Member
To Keynote Shomrai Event
Continued from Page 1
Begin. He will give some insight
to us as American Jews some of
the reasons Mr. Begin has in
making the compromises that he
has made. It is quite possible
that Mr. Olmert has the prime
minister's seat in his political
future," commented Stieber and
Schneider.
Reservations are still being
accepted. For more information,
call the campaign department at
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
SUMMIT
THE SUMMIT CAMP
A coed camping proc/am in i!s 12th season lor
children jnd teens ages 7-17 featuring mature
start, excellent physical facilities, struclured
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SUMMIT PROGRAMS
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offering in 1980:
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for mor0 Inforrputon write:
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Tel: (212) 355-7900
PLAN TODAY FOR
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-


Friday, January 11,1980
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 11
Israeli Tour Guide
risits South Broward
The Jewish Federation of South Broward has developed a
lissions program which has been described by those across the
ountry as "one of the best." The planning of the Missions to Israel,
e they community or family, is done in the United States. The
Executing of these Missions is done, of course, in Israel.
A vital part of executing these Missions to be thoroughly suc-
cessful is the guide. One of these guides has come to be well known to
the participants of South Broward missions. He is Zvi Gerstel, one of
he most knowledgeable guides in Israel. He took time out of his busy
chedule and came to the United States recently and visited in South
Jroward, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Phil Levin, the Federation's
ICombined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign chair
Iman, with participants of past missions.
From left are Bobble Levin, Zvi Gerstel and Dr. Phil Levin.
^ ^IB 1 w 1 &l *:
/fW'~; =J- ^
rj>Mrf JimmM
^i...
*v
iWrxr-'^MH
r^l a^P^ *sw~"9fl
- / 1 Ssfl
From left are Dr. Israel Budasoff, Jo Ann Katz and Dina Kaye.
From left Smith. are Sheila Smith, Avfa Sachs, Sherri Kerzner and Larry
..,'-"' ;7f*' ':"-'-'. 1 rf 'jyfipJ:'"'"Wy i
^B frT
f ?
1 I-'4 t i^y etSiL-
1
Silent No More
CHANUKAH GREETINGS
FROM USSR
Soviet activists in Moscow
sent the following Chanukah
message to Israeli President
Navon and Jews the world over:
"Accept our heartiest greet-
ings on the occasion of
Chanukah, the festival of
liberation and consecration. Let
each of us look into his own soul,
as the Hasmonaim did, and he
will find a tiny light from a tiny
oil lamp. Let this light continue
to illuminate our existence as it
did through the generations in
the past giving us fortitude,
goodness and faith."
Signed by: A. Shvartsman, M.
Berenfeld, E. Tsyrlin, Y. Rakh-
lenko, A. Gurevich, R. Feldman,
L. Volvovsky, P. Abramovich, V.
Prestin, H. Yelinson, S. Gorelik,
M. I.vovsky, I. Essas, E.
Dubianskaya, I. Minkin, V.
Cherkassky, M. Kovner, B.
Kogomolny, I. Gorodetsky, E.
Yakir, M. Kremen, M. Lifshitz
M. Nudler, B. Okuneva, O. Men
deleev, Y. Kosharovsky.
SHARANSKY'S EYESIGHT
IMPROVES
The head of the Ministry of
Health of the Interior Ministry
replied to Ida Milgrom's letter
requesting that her son, Anatoly
Sharansky, be transferred to a
hospital for a medical
examination. He wrote, "We
would like to notify you that your
son, Anatoly Sharansky, was
examined in November by three
specialists, a neurologist, op-
tician and a general physician
who came to the conclusion that
he is suffering from asthenopia of
the eye muscles. Sharansky
admits improvement in his sight,
he works and reads while using
glasses. He has not complained
about the medical treatment."
Signed: Deputy Department
Head Klancich.
In a letter which reached his
relatives in Moscow on Dec. 3,
Anatoly Sharansky confirms
both the medical examination
and the improvement in his sight.
He also said that the doctors
recommended eye exercises for
him and prescribed vitamins Bl
andC12.
CHANUKAH IN KISHINEV
In Kishinev, on the eve of
Chanukah, 18 Jewish activists
took part in another seminar on
Jewish history. Refusenik Aaron
Munblit, an engineer, delivered a
lecture on the continuing battle
between Judaism and Hellenism
since ancient times.
During the holiday, 30 people
attended a Chanukah party at
Leonid Vainshteen's home. The
party attracted not only Jewish
activists but Jewish youth in-
terested in capturing their Jewish
roots.
Along with the festive holiday
celebrations, two Kishinev
refuseniks, Vladimir Tsukerman
and Aleksandr Khozin, were
planning to hold a third hunger
strike. They are protesting the
refusal of their exit visas. Both
refuseniks staged their first
hunger strike on Nov. 1 and have
vowed to continue doing so at the
beginning of every month until
they are permitted to join their
families in Israel.
IDA NUDEL RESOLUTION
A resolution urging the Soviet
Union to allow Jewish POC Ida
Nudel to emigrate was passed by
the Senate on Dec. 21 with 33 co-
sponsors. The identical resolution
was passed by the House of
Representatives on Nov. 13. The
resolution was introduced by
Rep. Edward Stack (I)., Fla.),
Sens. Harrison A. Williams, Jr.
(D., N.J.) and Charles Percy (R.,
111.), the second-ranking Repub-
lican of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee. Speaking
on behalf of Ida Nudel, before the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, Percy noted the NCSJ's
"exemplary work" in its efforts
to help the "guardian angel"
I emigrate to Israel.
MEDIA
Long-term Moscow refusenik
Mikhail Kremen has put together
a special publication, "The Year
of the Child Moscow Style."
Published in London in Decem-
ber by the Women's Campaign
for Soviet Jewry, it consists of
photos of 50 children of Soviet
Jewish refuseniks and activists.
A SALUTETO
IDA NUDEL
"Salute to Ida Nudel," a 10-
minute dramatization on tape of
Ida Nudel's life, has been
prepared in honor of the ob-
servance of Human Rights Day.
The tape, which will be dis-
tributed by the NCSJ, is
available for $10 from Press
Service.
NOW THEY
ARE FREE. .
Arrived in Israel: Dmitry
Akivison, Vinnitsa: Mark Belen-
kov, Moscow: Dmitry Ber-
shadsky, Lvov; Nisim Eliashvili,
Georgia; Moisey Grinbaum,
Leningrad; Matitiagu Istak-
harov, Kuba; Solomon Loifman,
Kaunas; Elena Mamontlivaya,
Kishinev; Levi Mikhailov,
Derbent; Khizgil Naftaliev, Der-
bentsky Rayon; Yakov Shvarts-
man, Kishinev; Aleksandr Vais,
Beregove.
Left the USSR: Boris
Davidov, Leningrad; Maya
Kliashkevich, Minsk; Boris
Fradkin, Leningrad: Efim
Frimerman, Kiev; Valery
Frumkin, Dnepropetrovsk;
Rotislav Galitsky, Leningrad;
Lev Gleiberg, Moscow; Ilia Gol-
braikh, Leningrad; Perets Gold-
makher, Chernovtsy; Artur
Gumennik, Gomel; Efraim
Gusman, Kalinigrad, and Semion
Iliashev, Rostov.
From left are Jay
Ekwasdiki-
, Smmner Kaye, Valerie
Paul Suaaman,
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aNowawMfcsto

9


Page
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly wood
Friday. January 11. 1980
C ults and the Vulnerability
Of Our Jewish Youngsters
Th' following is the first of a
three part series on an increasing
problem in South Broward:
Cults The series is excerpted
from an article in the fall issue of
the Pedagogic Reporter," a
publication of the American
Association for Jewish
Education, by Sandy Andron.
Let us begin with the premise
that our Jewish youth are found
in the many cults which plague
our country today, in far dispro-
portionate numbers to our actual
population.
The figure is alarming. From
the lowest estimates of 12-15
percent to the exaggerated
figures of 60-70 percent in such
groups as the Unification
Church, Krishna and the Divine
Light Mission, the figure repre-
sents a staggering loss of our
teens to movements which may
one day soon rival intermarriage
and assimilation as threats to
Judaism.
AND LEAST YOU think I am
an alarmist, let me assure you
that personal contacts with ex-
cult members and parents of
teens who have been lured away
by the cults have assured me that
the rosters on weekend conclaves
reads like the attendance at a
men's club breakfast at your local
B'nai B'rith lodge.
On the other side of the picture
we find that in examination of the
target population of the cults,
with the exception of the Jones-
towns and some South American
"Voodoo-like'' cults who
proselytyze the blacks and some
impoverished socio-economic
have-nots, it is the middle and
upper classes which seem to be
the most vulnerable to the
magnetic attraction of the cults.
It is hypothesized that the
lower economic factions are
Religious
Directory
NORTH BROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Rabbi
Phillip A. Labowitz. Cantor Maurice
A. Neu
TEMPLE BETH ORR. 2151 Riverside
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. (44 A)
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd.. Hollywood. Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TION. 400 S. Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
J. Harr. t64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE.7473NW4thSt. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, PhD. Cantor Jacob Dan
/tiger ,12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE.
18801 NE 22nd Ave Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes (37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. (47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM. 4601 Arthur
St. Conservative Rabbi Morton
Malavsky. Cantor Irving Gold. (46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative Rabbi Seymour Fried
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro.
Cantor Naf taly A. Linkovsky. (65)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood. Fla. 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P. Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road. Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomzer. (52)
generally more streetwise and
can recognize a hustler or come-
on. They know that "there are no
free lunches."
AS CONCERNED Jewish
adults and educators then, we
have four questions which we
must address in order to focus on
both the problem and its possible
solutions. They are:
0 Are the cults actively
recruiting our teens?
0 If so, why should the cults
make a special effort to attract
our youth?
0 What makes the Jewish teen
more vulnerable than the other
teens?
0 And finally, what can be
done to combat the problem?
In response to the first
question, the' answer is a
resounding "Yes!"
From all the studies which
have been done, we find a focus
on middle and upper middle-class
white youth almost everywhere
we look.
(Let us not forget that the
street corner spokesmen of the
anti-establishment movements of
the 60's were articulate, if
somewhat confused, advocates of
their causes. They were gifted,
most of them, dissatisfied, angry
individuals who were capable of
drawing peer group crowds.)
The most highly sought-after
age group is the 18-26 bracket
and as concerned adults we are all
well aware of the extremes that
peer-pressure can exert.
The lonely, the unhappy, the
confused, the anxious, the youth
in transition all turn to their
peers for acceptance, for support,
for solutions, for guidance and
counsel, and for social moorings.
The highly trained, supportive,
"at-peace-withhimself" cult mis-
sionary is there like the proverb-
ial spider with his web to ensnare
the unsuspecting, hungry,
searching teenage "fly."
Is it any surprise then that our
teens are the ones sought tor.
recruited and trained in the
nypnotic techniques which
enlarge the cults' numbers,
enrich the cult coffers, and
demoralize the broken families of
the cult inductees.
YOU CAN SEE the cult
position you say, but our
brightest kids, what about them?
How and why are they so easily
taken in?
A look at nearly any list of
characteristics of the bright
students immediately reveals the
achilles heel of the gifted teen.
We are told that the gifted
youth is one who often is naive in
receptivity, has a liking for
structure and order, has intel-
lectual curiosity, has empathy for
others, is often self-critical, has
need for emotional support, is
attracted to the mysterious, is
willing to take chances and risks,
is honest in his search for truth,
is basically adventurous, is not
always on and on and on.
And let us not forget that the
teen is a youth "in transition"
between child and adult. The
teenager is often the loneliest
person in town.
WHO. THEN, iw going to be
more susceptible to the loving,
accepting, inviting, challenging,
dare-to-bedifferent Siren's call of
the cults? I dare say youth are
walking prey.
This being the case then, what
should our approach be to
combat the effects of these
predators who would, in cap-
turing our children, draw our
very blood?
The answer to this question is
both simple and complex at the
same time.
On the simple side it is obvious
that we can't have our religious
education focusing on areas of
study which exclude ethics and
personal committments to
Judaism
It is further obvious that anti-
culture flourishes in a vacuum
Littman To Be Feted
At Beth El Dinner
William Littman, Jewish
communal leader, will receive
Israel's Peace Award at an Israel
Dinner of State, to be held at
Temple Beth El in Hollywood on
Sunday evening, Jan. 13. Lit-
tman will be recognized for his
extraordinary leadership in the
South Broward Jewish com-
munity and for his support of the
economic development of the
stale of Israel.
Littman is chairman of the
board of governors of the
Broward County Israel Bonds
Organization.
The announcement of the
award was made by Robert Baer,
who is past president of Temple
Beth El and chairman of the
Littman tribute dinner. Baer
lauded Littman, saying that "he
has had a long and distinguished
career in Jewish communal
service and philanthropy and has
spent countless hours working
diligently for the betterment of
Jewish life."
The highlights of Littman's
participation in Jewish circles
include executive committee
member of the Society of Fellows
of the Anti Defamation League;
executive board of B'nai B'rith of
South Florida; board of trustees,
Jewish Federation of South
Broward; National Cabinet,
State of Israel Bonds; executive
committee, American Friends of
the Hebrew University and board
member of Temple Beth El.
Littman has received many
awards and honors recognizing
William Littman
his exemplary service, including
the Land of the Bible Award
presented by the United Jewish
Appeal and the Entebbe
Medallion and the Eleanor
Roosevelt Humanitarian Award
presented by the Israel Bonds
Organization.
Robert Mayer Evans,
broadcast journalist and Mid-
east expert, will be guest speaker
at the dinner. A foreign
correspondent and former bureau
chief for CBS in Moscow, Evans
has covered major news events
around the world.
If .: r

- .


Jewish Education and YOU
and that if we fill the vacuum
there will be no necessity for a
teen to search elsewhere for
answers. This is the key.
Are we taking our kids to the
synagogue or sending them
there? When Hebrew school and
Little League conflict, where are
our priorities? Which one gets
cancelled?
DO WE RECOGNIZE the teen
years as critical transition years
aware that a body is weakest in a
state of transition? Incidentally,
when was the last time you
hugged your teenl
These are the complex
questions.
To many of the above
questions the cults can say,
"yes" and our kids are turning to
them in droves. The anomaly is
that they are offering many of the
rifht things for all the wrong
reasons with disastrous results
for Judaism.
When accompanied by solid
Jewish experience at home and in
school, we can answer "yes,"
then we will be on the right road
to neutralizing the effects of the
cults. We haven't the luxury of
time.
To be continued in the Jan. 25
issue of The Jewish Floridain.
Hallandale Jewish Center
The Hallandale Jewish Cen-
ter's Friday services, Jan. 4. at 8
p.m., will be led by Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, with Cantor Jacob
Danziger chanting the liturgy,
assisted by the temple choir
conducted by Alan Chester.
The rabbi will speak on "The
Characterization of a People." An
Oneg Shabbat will follow the
services.
Saturday, Jan. 5. at 8:45 a.m.,
the rabbi will speak on "The
Cycles of History."
Saturday afternoon Minchah
will be at 5 p.m. to be followed bv
Temple Solel
Services
Temple Solel, 5100 Sheridan
St. in Hollywood, is having its
big yearl Baraaz.
New merchandise of all kinds,
clothes, bric-a-brac, books and
household items will be sold.
The event will be held in
Temple Solel. The dates are as
follows: Saturday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m.-
11 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 10, 12:30
p.m.-8 p.m.; and Monday, Feb.
11, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Admission is free. There will be
refreshments. For further in-
formation, call Pam Goldberg.
a class on the weekly portion of
the Bible, conducted by Rabbi
Klein.
Weekday services are mor-
nings at 8:30 a.m. and afternoons
at 5 p.m.
Adult classes on Monday, Jan.
7 are: 10 a.m., elementary
Hebrew, intermediate Hebrew,
and Shabbath prayers; 7 p.m.,
Tulmud class; 8 p.m., Jewish
personalities.
Wednesday, Jan. 9. 10 a.m.,
beginners Hebrew, advanced
Hebrew.
Thursday, Jan. 10, 7 p.m.,
Bible class.
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jay, January 11, 1980
The Jewish Floridian and ,
ir of Greater Holly woot
o Nimlliu
UN: A Fantasy for the 1980's
Continued from Page 4
lird World nations are unaware
[the terrible price you pay for
Iviet friendship. Afghanistan
Us this story explicitly. But
liat the UN arena has afforded
j Third World nations is ideo-
gical support from Moscow at
.eat political advantage to
loscow and at no cost to itself.
Third World is not
ighanistan only. There is, for
fam pie, Vietnam that in the end
alls its own shots.
What we must come to reckon
Lith is that both Russia and the
Third World are the only power
Llocs that enjoy any advantage
Is a consequence of the existence
kf the United Nations
Organization. This includes the
)PEC nations, the robber baron
Conglomerates, many of which
would have no real political
ntegrity except for the UN.
So far as Russia is concerned,
[what we must come to reckon
Jwith is that Russia and tfw
ISoviet Union are nor
[synonymous. Russia is merely
[the pivotal Communist state
[power in a -confederation of
captive multi-ethnic states, many
of which would prefer to be in-
dependent of Russia and its
Soviet Union hegemony many
of which frankly fear cultural
genocide at the hands of the
Soviets.
FURTHERMORE, while
Russia is essentially a western
I power clamoring for techno-
I logical equivalency with the west,
other of the Soviet states run the
gamut from outright Oriental to
Middle Eastern and Moslem
whose interests are about aa far
removed from this Russian
ambition as are their ethnic roots.
What the Soviet Union has
been able to do in the United
Nations arena better than it
', '''would be able to do outside of it is
to maintain a balance between
these two seemingly contra-
dictory objectives.
It enjoys its base of power over
these subjugated states, par-
ticularly since all too many of
them at the UN have the
cosmetic appearance of indepen-
dent nationhood with indepen-
dent voting rights in essence,
the UN thus serving as official
sanctification of enforced Soviet
dominion over others. At the
same time, the Soviet Union
scrambles for technological
ascendancy. Reckoned in these
terms, the UN gives it the op-
portunity to exploit the best of
two worlds.
SO MUCH for the facts. Here
is the fantasy for the new decade
of the 1980's:
Now that we in America, as a
consequence of Iran, are perhaps
for the first time inaugurated into
the meaning of the UN as a
growing tactical weapon against
western civilization, it will strike
us to remove ourselves from it
indeed, to consider having the
UN remove itself from our midst.
Opponents of this viewpoint
will argue that the Soviet Union
would immediately offer itself as
the new site for a successor
"world peace organization," thus
leaving us on the periphery of
international exchange. But that
is highly unlikely, given that the
UN in New York today is one of
the most complex intramural
espionage agencies on the face of
the earth, which the Soviets
would surely not want in the
shadow of the Kremlin.
Similarly, it is inconceivable
that any of the western indus-
trialized nations, including
Japan, will move in to fill the
breach. Once stripped of its
Camelot costume and seen for
what it is in the U.S.. no one else,
with the possible exception of
ever-meddlesome France, will
care to supply the UN with a new
wardrobe.
AS FOR the Third World, it
will be unable to proffer the
prestige necessary for such a
stage and disinclined to supply
the funds. Furthermore, were
these not sufficient reasons for
the Third World to keep hands
off, there is always the
question of the incestuous real-
politik such a new United
Nations location would surely
pose. There, the Third World
would be performing only for
itself and therefore without the
international theatrical effect
that is its primary objective.
Given a successor body to the
present United Nations under
any circumstances, the shakeup
will force a reorganization of
member nations according to
more realistic power patterns
than presently exist, the power
patterns laid down after World
War II, and this will be bound to
work against the Soviet Union,
*hich can be relied upon to
struggle to retain its old position
of primacy against Third World
clamorings for a greater share of
it.
This will force Russia, not the
Soviet Union but Russia, to make
a choice between its role as a
western nation, and all that that
implies to the Third World, and
as the pseudo-paternalistic linch-
pin in the larger Moslem-Oriental
complex of the Soviet system.
WHAT ALL of this will mean
is a scramble for Third World re-
alignment. At "worst," it will
mean no successor organization,
leaving the Third World isolated
from its warfare arena in New
York, and the Soviet Union
without a stage on which to
produce its endless self-aggran-
dizing scenarios.
What does this fantasy for the
1980's also envision? It foresees a
basic struggle against such a
possibility by the continuing
western civil libertarian bleat in
the suicidal cause of humanity
suicidal because the Soviets and
the Third World have only
contempt for what the civil liber-
tarians talk about anyway.
The fantasy has staged a
rebuttal to the bleat in which it
contrasts the Soviet Union's
constant threat to veto United
Nations sanctions against Iran as
a means of gaining the freedom of
the American hostages with the
Soviet Union's invasion of
Afghanistan.
THE FANTASY takes delight
in the notion that not even a civil
libertarian will be able to argue
himself out of that political
contradiction.
But then, this is all only
fantasy.
r
Torn
your
eyes
to .
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riday, January 11.1980
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater
srael Bonds Events Slated
OLYMPUS
Jlympus will hold its annual
ate of Israel Bonds Salute to
Irael Breakfast. Sunday, Jan.
T at 10:30 a.m., in the Olympus
)0 Social Hall. Israel's
eneration Award will be pre-
Inted to the Olympus B'nai
Irith Lodge. Olympus B'nai
Irith Women and Olympus
ladassah.
The three groups will be
cognized for their deep commit-
ent and ongoing concern for the
conomic development of the
fetate of Israel.
Humorist Emil Cohen will be
the featured entertainer. Chair-
in of the event is Emanuel M.
Zohea. Co-chairmen are David
erlin and Jules Brenner.
COASTAL WATERWAY
Nettie Horch will receive
(Israel's Generation Award at the
Coastal Waterway Night in
Israel on Monday, Jan. 14, at
7:30 p.m.
Mrs. Horch was fine arts chair-
man for the National Council of
Jewish Women and became
nationally known as the
executive director of the Master
Institute of United Arts and
Riverside Museum in New York
City. She is honorary advisor to
the Hollywood Art Museum and
is active with the Broward
County Art Association. Along
with her husband. Louis, she
assembled more than 750 pieces
of art which were presented to
Brandeis University and known
as the Nettie and Louis Horch
Collection.
Prof. Gideon Peleg, a political
scientist and Mideast expert,
will address the gathering. Sol
Hecht and Florence Hurwitz are
co-chairpersons.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Novick
HEMISPHERES
Hemispheres B'nai B'rith
Lodge No. 2861 will sponsor its
:;&y6X^^^
5
!
A
ASK ABE
ByABEHALPERN
(Last of a series of eight columns)
v In addition to the first seven scrolls which are
Snow located in the Shrine of the Book in
Jerusalem, described in Parts Three and Four of
this series, additional scrolls, thousands of
i|: fragments, potsherds and other material have
:| been found and are constantly being studied.
Some of them are located in the Shrine of the
' Book and many others are located in other places.
SOne of the most interesting documents is the
:: Copper Scroll.
! "In March, 1962, two mysterious scrolls of
$ copper were found, one on top of the other, in one
xof the Dead Sea caves. They were evidently so
:: brittle with oxidation that it was thought un-
j: desirable to try to unroll them.
:; "But the characters had been incised so deeply
::: that it was possible in reverse to make out the
::uppermost layer ... Dr. H. Wright Baker,
: professor of mechanical engineering, contrived a
x small circular saw which, cutting between the
:': characters, sliced the scroll into strips that could
:;:be laid 9ide by side and read." (Israel and the
: Dead Sea Scrolls, by Edmund Wilson, p. 280)
:: "It appears that the scroll contains a long list
vnf hiding places of treasures to the amount of
i-isome six thousand gold and silver talents.
v Assuming that the weight of a talent in those
:: days was about twenty-four kilos, some idea may
i:i be gleaned of the value of the treasures.
:: "The list mentions some sixty places spread all
! over Palestine, from Hebron in the south to
:: Mount Gerizim in the north, and possibly even
: further north. Most of the places are centered
:: around Jerusalem, mainly around the Temple and
8 the Kidron Valley. According to the scrolls, the
:: treasures were hidden in wells, in tombs and near
: conspicuous objects, such as trees and springs
K .
jjj "We cannot yet know with certainty what
ij: those treasures mean or by whom they were
hidden. Some scholars believe the list to be
if: imaginary; others believe it to be a list of the
\ Temple's treasures, hidden about the time of the
' siege.
"Until the scroll is fully published it would be
rash to jump to conclusions. But it is not ex-
cluded that here we have a list of the treasures of
the sect, a list hidden by one of its members,
Kasibly the treasurer, before their escape, and
ten into a copper sheet in the hope of finding it
on their eventual return." (The Message of the
Scrolls, by Yigael Yadin, pp. 168,169)
According to Edmund Wilson, the expedition
undertaken by John Allegro to locate some of the
treasures had failed to find anything of im-
portance. Only a few coins and some pieces of
pottery were located. (Israel and the Dead Sea
Scrolls, pp. 280-286.)
Moat scholars agree that one of the most in-
teresting references in the Dead Sea Scrolls is to
the 'Teacher of Righteousness'' (Hebrew: Moreh
HaTsedek) and "The Wicked Priest," mentioned
primarily in the Habbakuk Commentary
(Hebrew: Pesher Habbakuk)
"As has already been noted, every book of the
Old Testament canon, with the possible exception
of Esther, was represented by manuscript
J material in the caves at Qumran; and numerous
sk
be
By Abe Halpern
commentaries on various books of the Old;
Testament have been found there.
"Both the books of Moses and those of the j
Prophets were studied day and night in order to j
understand the true meaning of these works, j
Members of the community at Qumran were:
steeped in the Scriptures, for there they learned
how God wanted them to live, and what He had in
mind for the future.
"The Habakkuk Commentary states that God :|:
has made known all the mysteries of the words of S
His servants the prophets' to the Teacher of x
Righteousness (VII.3-5). In other words, the|;::
interpretation of Scripture was in the hands of the jjj
leader of the community, who had special insight H
into its meaning." (The Qumran community, Itstfi
History and Scrolls, by Charles T. Fritsch, p. 74) jg
According to the authoritative Encyclopaedia 5
Judaica: "While the history of the sect and theg
development of its ideas are unknown, someg
details are extant about the founder of the sect (or ::
one of its first leaders). He is known principally g
from the Pesher on Habakkuk, as "The Teacher of ft;
Righteousness.' The attempts to identify him
with some historical person known from another ::
source have proved unsuccessful. He figures both S
as the spiritual leader who guides his followers in 5
the path of truth and as the social leader who g
contends with the ruler in Judea, 'the Wicked :::j
Priest.' (vo. 5, col. 1417,1418)
Finally, "Any attempt at this stage of research
to identify the Dead Sea sect with any other sect I
of the time is more to be based on assumptions ;K
than on facts.
In the last centuries before the destruction of 9
the Temple, there were more different persecuted:?
sects and groups than in any other period in the ?:
history of Judaism. ::
But this is just what gives prime significance to 8
the Dead Sea Scrolls; they were written during a |
decisive period in the history of the Jewish :g
people, and on the eve of the birth of Christianity. ':.
For the first time today we have comprehensive :|:
documents including Biblical books, codes of a
sect and contemporary literary products which S
shed new and important light on the problems of $:
Biblical texts, of the Hebrew and Aramaic S
languages, and on the beliefs and organization of S
one of the moat astonishing religious sects that
ever existed.
"Research on the scrolls is still in its initial
stages. ..
"The tense drama of the discovery and
acquisition of the serous, the high excitement of
their deciphering, the sudden opening of a
comparatively tiny window on to the fife and
customs of a remarkable group of people who had
been lost to history such is the story of the
Dead Sea Scrolls up to now.
"It is far from over. The fruits of continued
research on these scrolls will long affect the entire
pattern of our knowledge and thought about the
books of the Bible, and about the people who
shaped their lives to their study." (The Message
of the Scrolls, by Yigael Yadin, pp. 188,189)
Editor's note:
Please send all questions to:
ASK ABE
e / e Jewish Federation of South broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33009
Nettie Horch
annual Night in Israel on
Thursday, Jan. 17, at 8 p.m., in
the Hemispheres Auditorium.
Lila Brecker, Jewish com-
munal leader, will receive the
Israel Generation Award for her
many years of activity in Jewish
circles.
Mrs. Brecker has served as
chairman of several Israel Bonds
campaigns and has been active
for the UJA. She is president of
Hemispheres B'nai B'rith and
serves on the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward.
Entertainment will be provided
by humorist Emil Cohen. The
event is also sponsored by
Hemispheres B nai B'rith
Women.
Honorary chairman is William
Littman, and general chairman is
Harry A. Cohen. Four co-chair-
men are Judge David Malbin,
Harry Slavitt, Ethel Gould and
Stanley Kingsley.
PLAZA TOWERS
Plaza Towers will hold a double
celebration, Night for Israel, on
Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 8 p.m., in
the Recreation Building. The
Israel Generation Award of the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion, will be presented dually to
Rose Greenberg 'and Mr. and
Mrs. Ray Novick.
Mrs. Greenberg is a member of
the Israel Bonds Prime Ministers
Club and was one of 80 South
Florida women to receive the

LOa Brecker
Golda Meir Tribute Medallion.
She is a founder of the Hebrew
University Hadassah Medical
Center and has been named an
Israel Bonds Woman of Valor
and Woman of the Year of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University -
Novick is a founder and trustee
of the Lincolnwood Jewish
Congregation in Illinois. He is a
member of B'nai B'rith and of
numerous other Jewish philan-
thropies. Mrs. Novick is a mem-
ber of Hadassah and B'nai B'rith.
The Night for Israel is -
sponsored by the Plaza Towers
Israel Bonds Committee;
Maxwell Taraza is chairman. Co-
chairmen are Joseph and Irm-
gard Deutsch, Emanuel and
Dorothy Prouse and Irving and
Ruth Suss.
GUILDFORD PLAZA
The Guildford Plaza will hold
its annual Night in Israel on
Wednesday, Jan. 23 at 8 p.m., in
the Recreation Room, when Rose
and Israel Somach will receive
the Israel Generation Scroll in
recognition of their devoted
service to numerous Jewish
philanthropic and service
organizations and to the eco-
nomic support of the State of
Israel.
Special guest will be Tom
Cohen, Jewish communal leader
in New York and in Broward
County. The event is sponsored
by the Guildford Plaza Israel
Bonds Committee. ________.
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3 BHAST QTRS W IACKS O LiC QTtS W tACKS.J OI11IT PKGS
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FRESH VALLEY BEEF LOIN
Sirloin Steak Si m = 4-BAR PACK
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LB.
IVORY SOAP
limit ONI 'til PKG WITH THtt COUPON ANO AN
ADDITIONAL \i OIDII Ot MORI OF OTHf R PROOUOt
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euroNt
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GIT ONI
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U-PICK FROM A LOOM DIS4HAY
U S NO 1 INDIAN livil WHITI
Grapefruit 5
ITOIINOU1I OP NUTMTION FiOHD
Carrots
u PICK 'POM A LOOM Diiri a.
U.S. NO I All PURPOtl
Yellow Onions ..
'OP QUALITY CAKPOPNIA tUNKIST
Lemons 8 .~o89c
u S FANCY iwil' IATINO
ID DILiClO'Jl IN
f|49
.... tUNCH
AMI 1
IIZI
2.:o39
18e
EASY TO PEEL-GOOD EATING
Temple Oranges
SNAPPY FLAVORSALAD SIZE
Firm Ripe
Tomatoes
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Macaroni & Cheese |
DINNER s
IIMIT ONI Ptll ion WITH THIS COUPON ANO AN
AOOITIONAl 17 OIOII Ol MOM OP OTMII PIOOUCTI
KCIUOINO CIGAIITTII ANO Pill COUPON HIMl
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ONI COUPON Pll PIIION
miimmmm
I FRII COUPON
Apples ...
PIISHIY cut
Pom-Poms.......mm
MINU'I MAID IIOZtM
Orange Juice 2
STOUFFIR \ FROZIN FCINCH BIIAO
Pepperoni Pizza' .
Km FROZIN AIROSOt
Whipped Topping
All PAUL'S PtOIlN
Onion Rings.............W,
PANTIr IIIDI IIOZIN
AllOITIO
Pot Pies 3 .'K.
e-OI
CANS
t Ol
CAN
99<
89*
69*
1
DELICIOUS NUTRITIOUS
Bananas .19
fhmcA Auut S*U!
U.S. NO. 1-MAINE
Potatoes
$|39
15
IAG
10-LB. BAG 98-
5 LB BAG 69'
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Breyers
Ice Cream
HALF
GALLON
SNOW CHOP FtOZIN fUUIT IEVEIAGE
iioz. QQ(
Five Alive
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ONE ROLL OF 110. 126 or 135
KODAK FILM
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FILM REVELtrlHfi SERVICE
OIL MONTI TILLOW CLING
Peaches iSSLSStTT*
u suiur -^ ^,ss*j
Peas........................2'95'
MNfCA
Apple Sauce 4*2.'99<
PANYIY PIIOI
Mayonnaise "X $ 1 19
Tea'Bags oJISo*!09
CAINAHON INSTANT
Dry Milk AV,%2"
MItNZ MO O
Ketchup ".?i,99
WllNPICTANt
Lysol Spray iSff-l*
sopTNPtiTTY aisortir
BATH
Tissue 4:r;99*
49*
99*
85*
29*
PANTRY PRIDE
Blue Detergent
FOR
CLEANER
LAUNDRY
FRISKIES ASSORTED FLAVORS
Cat Food 3 vs 85*
lU'ONI b JJMW
on oni inOlB
4S-OZ. BOTTLE REGULAR
SENECA =
S APPLE JUICE S
LIMIT ONI FRII ITl WITH THIS COUPON ANO AN
ADDITIONAL OtOH OR MORI OF OTHfl PRODUCTS
IXCLUDING CIOARITTI5 ANO 'Ml COUPON ITIMl
COUPON GOOD THUR4 JAN 10 THRU AID JAN '4
ONI COUPON PIR PftlON
IIIIIIIIIII1IIIIHJ
III Mil AttOint >lAvon
Yogurt 3 *1W
PANII I .1101
Cream Cheese Jf.' 69*
"' in ouaihh
Margarine..........................it. 59*
P N : r PI ioi coi Olio A MUX AN UMUI
Cheese Food $129
PAMTBV PR ioi *
Crescent Rolls iSi 59*
ANNS
All Beef Franks JL $1**
AMIIKAN .OtHII AUMMI SAlAMI O*
Bologna.................__3 $1n
OtCJU MATH M1AI Ot
Beef Bologna ^ 99*
oniA iaciai
Tissue ...........
0U MONTI pihiippii
Juice
hunt* HMINM
Tomatoes..
HUNTS TOMATO
Paste____
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t-oi.
... CAN
t**eW <^ PANTRY PRIOf
IM% WHOlt WHEAT
Bread 2
AUTUJ
Breads.-??"'
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95'
V99*
59*
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ONLY AT STOHS WITH SltVICI COUNIItS
MI AT CHf ISE SUCID TO OtDit
JACK PAC U.t.O.A. CMOKI tkA
Roast leehr"
69*
MRS
m W NATHMAl
Franks or Knocks'^.1 $1"
A
BREAKSTONE
REGULAR CALIFORNIA OR LOW FAT
Cottage Cheese
Macaroni Salad
lonjUNt
Baby Swiss_____
Corned Beef__
paiht mn
Munchee Loaf
ot man wmmm awtiun
Sliced Swiss___
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PANTRY PRIDE ASSORTED PARTY PAK
Sliced Meats
MS.
PKG.
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ITNB
TO UMPT RSttROBm MOM SRM TO MAUB. NOT I


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