The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
13 v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred Shochet
Place of Publication:
Hollywood, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hollywood (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Broward County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Hollywood

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Nov. 13, 1970)-v. 13, no. 22 (Oct. 28, 1983).
Numbering Peculiarities:
Numbering in masthead and publisher's statements conflict: Dec. 24, 1971 called no. 3 in masthead and no. 4 in publisher's statement; July 21, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Aug. 3, 1972 called no. 19 in masthead and no. 18 in publisher's statement; Feb. 2, 1972 called no. 2 in masthead and no. 3 in publisher's statement; Apr. 26, 1974 called no. 9 in masthead and no. 8 in publisher's statement; Aug. 2, 1974 called no. 5 in masthead and no. 15 in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Aug. 4, 1972 called also v. 2, no. 19, and May 10, 1974 called also v. 4, no. 9, repeating numbering of previous issues.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44512277
lccn - sn 00229541
ocm44512277
System ID:
AA00014307:00235

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward


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Full Text
wJewisti Floridiam
and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Volume 9 Number 23
Hollywood, Florida Friday, November 16,1979
C f ta Snochti
Price 35 Cents
Vanik to Speak at Human Rights Plea
Congressman Charles A.
Vanik, (D-Ohio) will be the
featured speaker at the 1979
Human Rights Plea for Soviet
Jewry. The event will take place
Sunday, Dec. 9, at Temple Beth
1400 N. 46th
Shalom, 1400 N. 46th Ave.,
Hollywood, according to "Sam"
Sagenkahn, Human Rights Plea
for Soviet Jewry chairman.
^
Mrs. Sagenkahn, commented,
We are very pleased to have a
Speaker who has been as closely
dtntified with the cause of
Soviet Jews as Congressman
Vanik. He has long been a
champion of the reghts of Soviet
Jews and has been linked with
landmark legislation, the
Jackson-Vanik Amendment,
which has insured a constant flow
of Jews from the Soviet Union."
Having served in Congress
since 1954, Congressman Vanik
is no stranger to Washington. In
addition to his work with the
Jackson-Vanik Amendment, he is
a member of the House, Wage
and Means Committee where he
has led efforts for tax reform. He
is also a member of the Joint
Committee on Taxation by virtue
of his seniority in the committee.
He served as chairman of the
Oversight Committee of the
*"> Hi
Wage and Means Committee
reviewing the administration of
Social Security, Medicare and
supplemental security income
programs as well as the ad-
ministration of the Internal
Revenue Service.
The annual "Human Rights
Plea on Behalf of Soviet Jewry"
is sponsored by the Soviet Jewry
Committee of the Community
Relations Committee of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward. This year the co-
convenors of the Plea are the
members of Women's American
ORT.
Commenting on the
Rights Plea, Dr. Stan Spatz
chairman of the Soviet Jewry
Committee said, "Last year more
than 750 people came to the
Human Rights Plea for Soviet
Jewry. We are hoping for an even
larger turnout this year. The
plight of Soviet Jews is getting
nationwide attention, and by
focusing on their plight, we feel
even greater numbers will be
given their freedom."
The public is invited to attend
the 1979 Human Rights Plea for
Soviet Jewry. There is no ad-
mission charge, and refreshments
will be served.
Charles Vanik
Human
Hollybrook Workers Recognized
More than 60 Hollybrook
residents gathered recently at a
breakfast to offer their
congratulations, appreciation
and recognition to workers of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward's 1979 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Campaign workers received
certificates from 1979 Hollybrook
chairman Dr. Alex Goldenberg.
Guest speakers at the break-
fast were Lewis E. Conn, past
president of the Federation and
J)r. Joe Stein, 1980 Hollybrook
, M. vhairman.
Stein appealed to the group to
help meet the needs of Israel and
their fellow Jews in South
Broward by giving generously of
their time and money.
Hollybrook residents con-
tributed more than $60,000 to the
1979 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign. Stein set the 1980 goal at
$100,000. Related photos, page 9.
Workshop to Focus
on Women Power*
Standing from left are Roland Baxt, Lester Weil,
guest speaker; Dr. Joe Stein, chairman, Sylvia Stein, dinner chair-'
man; Jackie Levine and George Finneman, co-chairman. Seated from
left are Moe Marcus, Evelyn and Harry Goldstein, breakfast chair-
men; and Many a W easier, cash chairman.
The Women's Division of the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward will participate in a
workshop on "Woman Power -- A
Look at You and Your Poten-
tial," Wednesday, Nov. 28, 9:30
a.m. to noon at the Federation
office, 2719 Hollywood
Boulevard, according to Florence
Roth, vice president, leadership
development.
Joyce Newman, president, who
was trained in leadership
development at the Wharton
School of Business, will serve as
discussion leader, Mrs. Roth
explained.
The Leadership Development
committee includes Judee
Barron, Janie Berman, Joan
Gross, Joan Raticoff, Beverly
Florence Roth
Shapiro and Shane Wolf. Esther
Gordon is Women's Division
president.
First Jewish Woman Is Accepted
For Army Chaplaincy Program
Reserve Now for Community Day
Kochelle Koenig, Community
Day chairman, has announced
that there are a very limited
amount of reservations left for
the Dec. 13 event. Community
Day, featuring guest speakers
Bella Abzug, former
congresswoman, and Dr. Ruth
Gruber, author and foreign
correspondent, will be held at the
Diplomat Hotel and is sponsored
jfty the Jewish Federation of
^outh Broward Women's
Division.
Community Day brings all the
Jewish women of South Broward
together for a day of fun.

education and intellectual
stimulation, Mrs. Koenig said.
More than 1,000 women are
expected to attend. The program
begins promptly at 9:30 a.m. and
continues through 2:30 p.m.
Lunch will be served.
For additional information,
contact the Jewish Federation of
South Broward.
PHILADELPHIA (JTA> --
The Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College said that one of its
students had been accepted as
the first Jewish woman chaplain
candidate by the United States
Army.
The college said Bonnie J.
Koppell of Brooklyn had been
accepted as a chaplain candidate
after completing a six-week
program in the Army chaplain
officer's basic course, shich trains
clergy to become army chaplains.
College officials said Ms.
Koppell now has the rank of
second lieutenant in the Army
Reserves.
She was one of three women
and 105 men who attended the
program during the summer. The
other two women were from the
Presbyterian Church and the
United Church of Christ.
A fourth-year student at the
Reconstructionist seminary, she
received her BA degree from
Brandeis University.
RocheUe Koenig
Political Priorities
for Jewish Women
The Jewish Federation of
South Broward Women's
Division Career Women's Council
will participate in a panel
discussion on "Political Priorities
'or Jewish Women," Thursday,
Nov. 29, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Federation office, 2719
Hollywood Boulevard, according
to Nancy Atkin and Elaine
Fleisher, chairwomen.
Panel participants include
Miette Burnatein, Broward
County Circuit Court Judge;
Fran Gross, Broward County
Commissioner; Nicki Grossman,
Hollywood City Com-
missioner; and Ruth Shack Dade
County Commissioner. The
moderator for the evening is
Linda Brickman, Southeast
Florida representative for Sen.
Richard Stone.
Career Women interested in
this event should contact the
Jewish Federation of South
Broward for further details.
Members of the South Broward Jewish community recently departed on a 10-day journey into the
heritage as part of the Jewish Federation of South Broward's annual Community Mission to Israel. The
87 residents met with top Israeli government and Jewish Agency officials. They also visited new settle
menu, schools and senior adult homes, financed in part by the Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund campaign. Ed and Mary Gottlieb were Mission chairmen.


Paw 14
Page 2.
The Jewish Fbridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,1979
Buildings Organize 1980 CJAIEF Campaign
Residents of several Hollywood and Hallandale
Beach condominiums have held organizational meetings
recently to make plans for their participation in the
Jewish Federation of South Broward's 1980 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
Standing from left are Parker Plaza residents Ralph FeMman,
building chairman; Judge Joseph Deutach, Fannie Schifrin, host; and
Lou Daniels. Seated from left are Melvin and Lucille Baer, Rhona
Miller and Betty Neft.
From left are Trafalgar I residents Steve Marlowe, chairman; Murray
Oremland, co-chairman, Rosalie Oremkuid, co-chairman; and Al
Goldberg, co-chairman.
From left are Galahad North resident* Martin Haspel and Sol Singer,
ckainaaa.
Seated from left are Malaga Towara resident* Honey Liff and Frank
sSfaT SUnding frostTtoft-a Betty Soloadx, Otto Stieber. Hallandale
Beach chairman; Gert Sdsorek, Malaga Towers chairman; and Sunny
Soil*.
Seated from left are Sea Air Towers residents Herman Gilman and
Abe Mallet, co-chairmen. Standing from left are George Schneiderman
and Irving Fife, co-chairmen.
B'nai B'rith
Elects Weinstein
Norman Weinstein B'nai
B'rith leader, has been elected
president of the Past President*
Club of B'nai B'rith. He succeeds
Circuit Court Judge Milton
Friedman in that office.
Weinstein is also president of
the Florida State Association of
B'nai B'rith Lodges with 20,000
members throughout the state
and is a past president of
Hallandale Lodge B'nai B'rith.
He will be installed in December.
White Elephant Sale
Temple Sinai Sisterhood
Hollywood is having its an
White Elephant Sale on Sunday,
Dec. 9 and Monday, Dec. 10.
UJA Conference Slated for Dec. 6
MIMt-H
NEW YORK The leadership
of the national United Jewish
Appeal issued a call for a
demonstration of Jewish unity
and solidarity at the UJA 1980
National Conference in New
York, Dec. 6-8.
A Time To Be Together" is
the theme of the annual event,
proclaimed by UJA National
Chairman Irwin S. Field in an
invitation to American Jewish
community leaders to join in
celebrating freedom, honoring
courage, understanding the
challenges and opportunities of
the decisive decade ahead and, in
the face of the divisive pressures
in the world today, planning the
largest peace-year campaign in
our history."
The conference keynote ad-
dress, a comprehensive
presentation on the human
impact of the current
negotiations for peace in the
Middle East, will be given by
former Israel Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan at the opening
luncheon in the New York Hilton
on Thursday, Dec. 6.
MAJOR conference honors will
go to Henry Ford. Jacobo
Timer man and Boris Penson.
Ford will receive the first UJA
Humanitarian Award in
recognition of his years of
support for the people of Israel
and friendship for the United
Jewish Appeal. The 1979 David
Ben-Gurion Award will be
presented to Timer-man, the
Argentinian Jewish editor freed
earlier this month after years of
imprisonment and house arrest.
A public tribute to Penson,
recently released Prisoner of
Conscience, will highlight a rally
in support of the Soviet Jewish
freedom movement on Friday,
Dec. 7, in A very Fisher Hall at
Lincoln Center.
A Friday morning plenary
meeting at the Hilton will feature
an overview by Jewish Agency
treasurer Akiva Lewinsky of the
vastly increased human needs to
be met by Agency programs in
1980 with the help of UJA
Federation campaign funds. The
Agency's rising responsibility for
crucial absorption, resettlement
and Project Renewal
rehabilitation services in Israel,
according to Field, is a major
factor in creating a national UJA
1980 goal calling for a 20 percent
increase in regular pledges, plus
an all-out additional effort for
Project Renewal.
Meeting the regular campaign
goal, he indicated, is also crucial
MIMJf
to sustaining and expanding the
local services of communities
faced with inflationary costs
while trying to resettle twice the
number of Soviet Jewish emigres
as they welcomed last year.
A comprehensive series of
seminars, workshops and
community consultations is
scheduled throughout the three-
day conference period. "They are
designed7." the UJA leader said,
"to prepare our communities
thoroughly for converting the
unified spirit of this solidarity
conference into decisive unified
action in the 1980 campaign and
through the decade of the
Eighties."
1
ri
For generations
a symbol of
Jewish tradition.
At Riverside,our reputation is based
upon our assurance of service that fulfills
the high standards evoked by Jewish
tradition.
Today, each of Riverside's chapels
serving Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties is staffed only by Riverside
people who understand Jewish tradition
and honor it.
And in that tradition we serve every
family, regardless of financial
circumstance.
Miami Beach/ Miami/ North Miami Beach: 531-1151
Hollywood: 920-1010
Ft.Lauderdale(Sunrise): 584-6060
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Five chapels serving the New York Metropolitan Area.
[^Riverside
Memorial Chapftl, inc I Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol of Jewish tradition
Kenneth M. Kay / ArthurGrossberg/ Joseph Rubin
1 i i i i.i
h mm
,


1979
Friday, November 16,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 3
H| Young Leaders Meet With
in
nai
ted
(its
ids
ton
of
of
WO
ate
of
ith.
le
Professer of Jewish History \Reform Judiasm is Freedom of Choice
lay.
h
}
Tracing Your Heritage" was the topic of discussion at a recent
Jewish Federation of South Broward Leadership Development
meeting at the home of Gary and Lynn Fisher. Guest speaker was
Arthur Kurzweil, who is a professor of Jewish History at Queens
College in New York. Kurzweil specializes in geneaology. From left are
Sumner G. Kaye, executive director; Kurzweil and Larry Wiener,
chairman, leadership development.
From left
Webb, Dr
are Barbara Tobias, Ben Tobias, Dr. Barbara Rothstein, Ed
, Richard and Elayne Topolsld.
ByAMYWILPON
"The essence of Reform
Judaism is freedom of choice and
being able to make a good
decision based on that choice,"
said Rabbi Ben Romer, assistant
rabbi at Temple Beth El. "In
Reform Judaism there is no
power of decree, just one of
persuasion."
In a recent interview, Romer
said he would like to see the
Reform movement grow in moral
and active strength.
"There needs to be a stronger
working relationship between
congregations in Hollywood and
the Jewish Federation of South
Broward," Romer said. "Too
many people have the attitude
that 'I've paid my Jewish dues so
now I'm Jewish', but it just
doesn't work like that."
MIDWESTERN congregants
are more apt to remain with one
congregation throughout
generations, Romer said. There is
a definite East Coast syndrome
here, where children become a
Bar-Bat Mitzvah and then
families disaffiliate with the
synagogue.
Entebbe AJC
Announces Events
The board of the Entebbe
Chapter of American Jewish
Congress held a meeting at the
home of Selma Shapiro in
Emerald Hills on Oct. 22.
Front from left are Robert and Peggy Brin, Anne and Dr. Julian
Herman. Rear from left are Rick and Jackie Barnett.
r
From left are Lynn Fisher, Arthur Kurzweil and Gary Fisher.
If you need it
for your home
zkvutdtt
Housewares Hardware Paint Locksmith
Palio/Dmette Furniture Bath/Closet Shop
Oinncrware Lighting Gifts
FREE GIFT WRAPPING / WE DELIVER
Open Daily 8 am 6 pm. Mon & Fri til 9 pm. Sundays 12 5
100 c
Plans were finalized for the
presentation of the Habimah
Players on Sunday, Nov. 18 at 8
p.m. at Temple Beth Shalom in
Hollywood. Sylvia Cohn in
Hillcrest at 961-4462 and Bea
Kreines in Emerald Hills at 966-
8733 can be called for reser-
vations.
Next meeting will be held on
Dec. 10 at 3800 N. Hills, Dr.
Emerald Hills, at 11:30. A mini
lunch will be served.
Arrangements were also made
to hold an Art Auction on Jan. 20
at the Emerald Hills Country
Club.
Technion
Sets Lunch
The South Broward Chapter of
the American Society for
TECHNION will hold its Paid-
Up Membership Luncheon on
Monday, Nov. 19, at 12:30 p.m.
at Galahad North, 3001 South
Ocean Drive, Hollywood.
Irving Mushlin, managing
director of the Dade-Monroe
Lung Association, will speak on
"Clean Air and its Relationship
to Health." A question and
answer period will follow.
Shabbos
Fri. Eve Sat All
Bat-Bar
Mitzvahs
-lineal

taitrasis.ala
aft tnt Ssbbtft
MIT aUtlllCI
"UTrClfATIO* tit tnt
A Oasis I
THE NEW
TUMMLERS
MIKE FIELDS
742-4614
Hw* also furnish music foil
Your Evening Affsira
Rabbi Romer
"It's very frustrating to see
such religious irresponsibility on
the part of the parents," Romer
said. "The solution is to have
exciting programs so the children
in our congregation don't want to
leave. Synagogues must make
learning worthwhile, otherwise
there is just no point in it."
The goal for Temple Beth El's
religious school is to make caring,
concerned Jews who are informed
about Judaism, Romer said.
They should then take their
information and combine it with
experience to make a decision on
how to live as good Jews.
Romer feels Beth El's religious
school of 200 students is viewed
as a congregation within a
congregation.
"WE TRY to involve students
with the teaching aspect as well
as the learning aspect of religious
school," Romer said. "These
students are exposed to the whole
of synagogue life."
Beth El is an active, involved
congregation with more than 300
members attending services on
any given Friday night, Romer
said.
"Much of this temple's growth
is due to the excellent leadership
of Rabbi Samuel Jaffe," Romer
added. "He has done a wonderful
job leading this synagogue.
"There is a definite need for
South Broward to have more and
better programming," Romer
said. "Stronger community
relations could make this area the
best in the southeast in terms of
Jewish lifestyle."
South Broward residents met recently with Shanl Ramati, former
Israeli Ambassador to Japan, to hear the latest Mideast update. The
event was sponsored by the Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Maiion Salter
Post Hosts Shopping Cemer
4525 Sheridan St.. Hollywood. Flo
Phone 961 6V96
Jewish ownership
makes the difference.
There are several funeral chapels in South Florida who present
themselves as serving members of the Jewish faith. But thev lack
one very important feature: I hey are not Jewish mined
At Menorah Chapels, we firmly believe that Jewish ownership is
a prime consideration Those who practice the Jewish faith can
best observe its religious traditions and precepts at a time as
significant as the death of a loved one.
Menorah Chapels are Broward Count v s oldest, established
funeral chapels. And that makes the difference.
THE OLDEST JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
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833-0887 742-6000 861-7301
With chapels in Sunrise, Decrfield Beach A Margate.
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Page*
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16.1979
Jewish Floridian

*r rx -W ?
ndSHOFAR OF GREATER HOLLYWOOD
Hollywood Office *36 S Federal Hwy.. Suite Ms. Dsnls. Fl* SJ004
Telephone t20-018 ____ -
?D SHi5lliTh, Executive Edlto
Editor snd rtWM^ F|wMW ^ .,, The MM
Of The MereMneHse Advertised In in Columns
Published Bl Weekly
Second Class Postage Paid at Danla. Fla tVeMO.
%, frKl SMCWI
Federation officers: President, Joyce Newman; Vice Presidents: Allen Gordon,
Moms Hornsteln; Secretary. Joel Schneider. M.D.; Treasurer, Jo Ann Kati;
Executive Director, Sumner G. Kaye. Submit material for publication to Marcy
Schackne. Public Relations Director; or Leslie Horn. Assistant Public Relations
Director.
The Jewish Floridian has absorbed the Jewish Unity and the Jewish We.fc.ty
Member o< the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Seven Arts Feature Syndicate. Worn.
wide News Service. National Editorial Association, American Association of
English-Jewish Newspapers, and the Florida Fress Association.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (local area) One YearS7.S0. Out of Town Upon Bequest
Jimmy as 'JC a Near-Winner
Friday, November 16,1979
Volume 9
26 HESHVAN 5740
Number 23
An Award to Col. Qaddafi
A Black studies program at Washington State
University has managed to reach all the way
overseas and to present an award to Libya's Col.
Qaddafi.
Even in the legerdemain of Araby, the Colonel is
considered a nut a dangerous nut without peer in
that part of the world now that Uganda's Idi Amin
Dada is gone from the scene.
We will watch with interest to see just how
members of the American Black community respond
to the WSU Black studies program award. It will say
something about just where the community is going.
If the 1960's in the U.S. was a period marked by
Black revolution, the final days of 1979 will be
recorded in our history as the year that American
Blacks came of political age when Blacks finally
said that they are as entitled as anyone else to voice
their views not just on domestic concerns, but on
foreign affairs as well.
Surely, they have that right. But does the furor
they have made since the resignation of Andrew
Young as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations
mean they have gone from a period of revolution into
the mainstream?
Or into an enthusiastic but muddled ex-
perimentation with revolution and terrorism abroad?
What Blacks have always wanted, and always
deserved by their own testaments, was an assist into
the upward mobility of middle class America. But
giving an award to Col. Qaddafi hardly exemplifies
that. For this reason, we shall be watching.
A Shoddy Double Bill
Liberal Party leader Pierre Trudeau, who lost the
election to Joe Clark, has been trying to make
political hay out of the situation. Trudeau doesn't
want to move Canada's Embassy, to Jerusalem, but
believes that Clark's promise shows his lack of
knowledge about foreign affairs.
But Trudeau has also been behaving rather
shoddily of late. He said in an interview with a
Toronto newspaper that Canadian Jews might be
encouraging anti-Semitism by their pressure for the
Embassy move and for anti-boycott legislation.
Trudeau's remarks can be seen as nothing less than a
threat to the Jewish community.
Defense Committee Seeks
New Site for Gush Emunim
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM-lJTA,- The
Cabinet empowered the
Ministerial Defense Committee
to find another site for the Gush
Emunim settlement of Elon
Moreh. But the two principal
supporters of the Gush,
Agriculture Minister Ariel
Sharon and Education Minister
Zevulun Hammer, dissented
angrily and fear was expressed in
some circles that this might
encourage the settlers to resist
forcibly when the army carries
out the Supreme Court's Oct. 22
order to dismantle the settlement
in 30 days
The Cabinet majority made it
clear that the government will
abide by the high court's ruling
that Elon Moreh was established
illegally on seized Arab lands and
must be removed. But the issue
has aroused intense emotions.
Sharon, a member of the
Ministerial Defense Committee,
declared that he would have no
part in the effort to find an
alternative site for Elon Moreh.
ACCORDING to an Israel
Radio report, Sharon stalked out
of the Cabinet room when
Defense Minister Ezer Weizman
began a lengthy presentation of
his views that the settlement
question must be dealt with in
the broader context of the overall
peace process. After the session.
Hammer, a leader of the National
Religious Party, said he was
"dissatisfied" that the Cabinet
has deferred a showdown on the
settlement issue.
The debate over future set-
tlement policy in light of the
Supreme Court's Elon Moreh
decision reached no conclusions.
It will be resumed at another
session within 10 days, the
Cabinet announced.
THE CRISIS over Elon Moreh
developed when the Supreme
Court flatly rejected the
government's claim that the
settlement was necessary for
security purposes.
AS AN editor who occasionally
is also called upon to write a
headline for one news story or
another, I am particularly
sensitive to the length of the
names of those people who are
the everyday fare of the
professional headline-writer.
A headline-writer's lot is sheer
frustration resulting from his
never-ending search for ways to
fit the names of our leading lights
into a two-or even four-column
spread, let alone that most lonely
of newspaper items, the single-
column story.
THE PROBLEM is not simply
to come up with any old way, but
a way that is essentially
respectable, by which I mean
suitable to the stellar status of
the personality involved. And
also to come up with a way that is
occasionally even funny, not to
mention punny that technique
by which the headline-writer
demonstrates his otherwise
hidden intellectual capability.
Take the French president.
Jean-Bedel
a headline-
Mindlin
Valery discard d'Estaing. What
can a headline-writer do with a
mouthful like that? This is an
important issue especially now
that this Gallic prince of pomp
and preciousness has fallen from
his personal pinnacle into the be-
jewelled slime native to most
other politicians, who wallow in it
as a matter of course.
When the news broke that this
most pure soul had accepted a 30-
carat tray of diamonds as a gift
from the now-deposed Central
African Emperor
Bokassa, what was
writer to do?
HE COULD only do what
everyone else had been doing up
until then call him Giscard.
Still, that has 7 characters in it
for a "head count" of 6.5 units,
since the "i" in discard's name
only takes up half the space of
the others, and that's a lot of
characters.
Really, all that can be done
with Giscard is to mention it
without saying why, since there
would be no more space left, not
that the imperious d'Estaing
would mind. Any part of him, he
reasons, and especially his name,
speaks for itself; it needs no con-
ditions attached, the Bokassa
flap notwithstanding.
But for the frustrated headline-
writer, the problem remains. Hej
k
JOININQ THE CHORJJS
r.masty
is not a politician, and must moveT l$f> f
forward. Now Valery, as an V
alternative, has only 6 charac-
ters, for a count of 5.5, because
the "i," like the "i," is also only
half a unit. But how are you
going to call the president of
France Valery, even in a headline,
just to save one full unit? It's not
fitting: Quai d'Orsay would go
berserk.
TO MAKE the problem more
domestic, in effect to bring it
down from the Gallic clouds of
splendor unbefitting a decent
democratic American, take Zbig-
niew Brzezinski. Under the most
correct of circumstances, that
name would hardly fit into any-
thing, let alone even the whole
width of an ordinary newspaper
page.
But precisely because we are
decent democratic Americans, no
one has taken offense since the
day that the headline-writers first
devised Zbig to get around the
lamentable length of the National
Security Adviser's name. And if
Brzezinski has, he isn't to my
knowledge saying anything
about it, particularly since Zbig
is without a doubt preferable to
Brz, which made an uncommonly
quick appearance and dis-
appearance from the front pages
of the press immediately as he
was appointed to his present
Continued on Page 13
Jewish Anxieties in Quebec
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Henri Rochefort's mot celebre
about the French empire under
Napoleon III: "France counts
forty million subjects beside all
the subjects of discontent," hold
true for Quebec these days.
Late next spring or in early
summer, six million Quebecers
80 percent of them French-speak-
ing Catholics will be called
upon to vote on whether or not
they are in favor of a new
relationship between Quebec and
English Canada based on a vague
formula of Sovereignty-Associa-
tion.
The question has yet to be
formulated officially by govern-
ment and opposition but what-
ever its formulation a "yes" will
definitely pave the way for the
creation of an independent
Quebec and, as a logical con-
sequence, the dismantling of
Canada.
ONCE THE Canadian
province most populated by
Jews, Quebec still has a
population of over 100,000 Jews.
The referendum looming on the
horizon has created uneasiness
verging on anguish among a
majority of Jews living in this
province.
Since the Parti Quebecois came
to power in 1976, several
thousand Jews some say the
figure is between 6-10,000
mostly young, dynamic, univer-
sity graduates as well as owners
of small and medium business,
have silently moved over the
border to Ontario and farther
west. But the majority, some
109,000, are still here waiting for
the other shoe to fall.
The government of Premier
Rene Levesque, fully aware that
the overwhelming majority of
Jews will vote against the policy
of sovereignty-association, has
tried hard to reassure the Jewish
public of its "good intentions."
Recently, the proposed 20 par-
cent cut in subsidies for the
Jewish day schools (the pretext
invoked was that not enough
French was taught in Jewish day
schools) was frozen.
WORD IS being spread by the
government that the State of
Israel is positively perceived even
though moves are made towards
Arab countries by the same
officials with an eye to Arab
investments in Quebec. This
ambiguous policy has sown mis-
trust among Jews.
Nonetheless, the PQ govern-
ment affirms to all and sundry
that nothing will happen to
Jewish interests and business
should, one day, Quebecers vote
for separation from the rest of
Canada-
Parallel to the government's
reassurances, a spate of articles
has recently been published in
which the Jewish community
whose "leadership lacks the
courage of adapting itself to the
new historical values and seems *
unable to take the necessary V
risks," has been cast as villain. In
other words, the leadership of
Quebec Jewry is not acting in
accordance with the "new trend"
when it should be aligning itself
to the independence orientation.
WHOEVER the enthusiastic
proponents of alignment with the
"new trend" are, they seem to
forget the built-in auspicious
nature of the Jewish people
whenever faced with sudden
political change. Nationalistic or
revolutionary upheavals have
always been as a source of
worries and uncertainties by the
Jewish people. And the break-up
of Canada under any formula
represents a major worry for
Quebec Jews. With a tradition of
more than two centuries of
existence in Quebec, the Jewish
community remembers well the
extreme difficulties enountered in *
its daily contact with both *
French-Catholic and Anglo-
Protestant communities.
With the exception of a few
intellectuals who were treated as
traitors who sold their souls to*
the Jews, the Gentiles openly
showed their hostility to Jews in
Continued on Page 12-A


Friday, November 16.1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 5
v.
A Letter to Pope John Paul II

The article entitled "Do we
have a Friend at the Vatican?" in
the October iasue of The Star
portrayed Pope John Paul II as a
man whoae struggles against
tyranny sharpened his regard tor
liberty and human dignity.
Acting on that assumption I
wrote a letter to the Pope and
hoped that a reply would be
forthcoming. Three months have
now elapsed since this letter was
sent to the Vatican. I would have
preferred to publish my letter
together with the Pope's reply,
but I now doubt if there will be an
answer. Nevertheless, I am
hopeful that the letter to the
Vatican will have some beneficial
effect in the interest of Eretz
Israel.
Pope John Paul II, Vatican City,
Rome, Italy
Your Excellency,
Your recent courageous visit to
Poland has enboldened me to
seek your help for that tiny,
heroic country-Israel.
After 30 strife-torn years,
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
has finally acquiesced to Israel's
pleas for peace. However, most of
Israel's other neighbors are still
planning the destruction of that
country and the annihilation of
its citizens.
Your Excellency, you as the
very popular leader of millions,
have tremendous power for good.
At every opportunity you have
advocated peace and human
dignity. On one occasion you
have proclaimed that: "Man
cannot be destroyed; it is not
permitted to humiliate him; it is
not permitted to hate him." And
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you praised all those who help to
make "the life of human
beings...more human."
I therefore beseech you to help
the State of Israel in its
desparate struggle to exist to
remain a haven for those Jews
who are denied basic human and
religious rights by some
governments.
IT TOOK 2,000 years of prayer
and suffering before the Jews
regained their ancient homeland.
During those two millennia the
Jews had been at the mercy of
their host countries. And history
records how unkind some of those
hosts became. The history of the
Jewish Diaspora is replete with
incidents of expulsions, ghet-
toization, brutalization, and
pogroms. In our own lifetime we
have witnessed the slaughter of
millions of human beings whose
only guilt was that they were
Jews.
Many thousands of these
martyrs might have been alive
today if the State of Israel had
been in existence during the
mournful holocaust period. As
long as Israel shall exist, Jews
will have a safe haven from
tyrannical oppression. Never
again should there be a repetition
of that shameful incident when a
boatful of Jewish refugees was
denied permission to land by
every civilized country, including
the United States. This
callousness contributed to the
deaths of most of those refugees
in Germany's death-camps.
Your Excellency, I am certain
that you were aware of the above
facts before I put them on paper.
I am however emphasizing the
crucial importance of Israel's
existence to world Jewry. I
implore you to actively foster
good relations between the
Vatican and Israel; to foster a
better understanding by the
millions of Roman Catholics of
our urgent need for a stable and
viable Israel.
Understanding should replace
hatred and the cancer of anti-
Semitism. Whatever reasons that
have been exploited for punishing
Jews should be declared null and
void. The Bible limits punish-
ment unto the third generation.
Then why should not the 2,000
years of discrimination and
violence be sufficient punishment
to expiate for any sin-real or
contrived?
WHAT SIN did I, as a six-
year-old, commit that I was
treated as a pariah in my native
city of Lomza? My great sin was
that I was born to Jewish parents
in Poland, a Christian country,
and not in Israel. My Christian
peers, my hosts, who had been
weaned on anti-Jewish folk
legends, were indeed outspoken
in their feelings towards me and
my classmates. They jeered us as
we made our way home from
heder and would shout "Jew-
boys, get to Palestine!". And
that admonition was usually
reinforced with a fusillade of
stones.
It seems ironic now, that these
callow youths were aware that
Palestine was where the Jews
belonged, but supposedly
knowledgeable statesmen en-
deavor to rewrite history in order
to deny the Jews their homeland.
My family and I were very
fortunate when we left Poland in
1920. But my father's brothers
were not that lucky. The only
other Nagurka to remain alive
after the Holocaust is a grandson
on my uncle who was rescued by
a Polish family and raised in the
Catholic religion.
My experience with the in-
dignity of anti-Semitism is
hardly unique. Almost all Jews in
Central Europe were, and in some
countries still are, at the mercy of
the worst elements of their host-
country. Without Israel's open-
door policy, Jews would once
again be without a safe haven.
YOUR EXCELLENCY. I
write to you because you too have
experienced adversity. You too
have maintained your religious
belief despite the risk it entailed.
Due to these experiences you
have espoused and preached the
importance of human dignity and
adherence to the principle of
human rights.
Because you advocate these
rights, I have faith that you
empathize with my people and
that you will champion our cause.
We need your helpl
. And for your help, I bless yeni
with a blessing from our liturgy:
May God grant you a life of
peace, of good, of blessing, of
bodily vigor. May He grant you a
life in which the love of the Law
and the awe of Heaven shall
sustain you; a life in which the
desires of your heart shall be
fulfilled for good. Amen.
Sincerely,
MILTON NAGURKA
' '
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Pnm> 14
PageQ
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16.1979
Hebrew Day School News
At the Hebrew Day School of
Fort Lauderdale, it is believed
that Judaism is best taught to
children by example, not by
preachment, and through the
experiential.
The pre-kindergarten and
kindergarten department are
involved in a foods unit of study.
In addition to the usual
"tasting" of various foods, the
children visited a supermarket
where they saw various foods,
how they were kept, and were
told how they arrived at the
supermarket.
The children especially enjoyed
leaning about bread and how it
was baked. As a result of their
trip, the teachers integrated the
general studies topic into part of
the Judaic curriculum.
The pre-kindergarten and
kindergarten children all par-
ticipated in the making of challah
for their weekly Kabbalat
Shabbat program. As well as
baking challah. the children
learned songs in music classes
about challah, customs
surrounding the making of
challah, and, recited the ap-
propriate blessings before eating
their challah.
Mrs. Fran Merenstein, director
of the Hebrew Day School, is
involved in a project of
establishing a library at the
school. In the past years, the
children have participated in a
monthly library program through
the Broward County system.
This year the children are visiting
the Plantation Library.
In response to the growing
needs of the children for their
own library, Mrs. Merenstein has
arranged for a room to be utilized
as a basic library. In conjunction
with Mrs. Shirley Wolfe,
educational resource center
director of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education in Miami, the
formal setup of the library has
begun.
Special attention is being given
to the Judaic portion of the
library. Under a Library Fund
which was established several
years aro bv Mr. and Mrs. Carl
Marder and Mr. and Mrs. David
Jackowitz in memory of Mr. and
Mrs Louis Shapiro, many books
have been purchased. This
continuing fund will serve as the
source of other book purchases
this year.
Parents and friends of the
Hebrew Day School are being
asked to contribute to the
Hebrew Day School Library
Fund to insure its success. Mrs.
Wolfe has suggested that monies
for books be donated in honor of
birthdays, other sim chas, as
well as in memoriam. Call the
school office to receive more
information about the School
Library Fund program.
The fourth and fifth grade
classes of the Hebrew Day School
are planning a challenging
learning experience in November.
The groups are going to attend
the Newfound Harbor Marine
Institute (NHMI) at Seacamp on
Big Pine Key.
The children are scheduled to
attend this camp from Wed-
nesday. Nov. 28 through Friday,
Nov. 30. The children arrive by
lunch on Wednesday and leave
for school on Friday after 1:30.
All meals will be dairy.
MHM1 programs have been
introducing people to the tropical
environments of the Lower
Florida Keys since 1966. As a
private non-profit, scientific and
educational organization, the
Institute is the only full-service
marine education center in the
Florida Keys providing meals,
lodging, laboratory and library
facilities, boat trips and
professional instruction.
Mrs. Annie Mitchell, the
children "s teacher, and Sheldon
Polish and Martin Kurtz, parents
of fifth graders, will be
chaperoning the fourth and fifth
Israel Frees First
I Group of Prisoners
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel has freed the first group of
Arab prisoners in northern Sinai,
honoring an agreement reached
between Premier Menachem
Begin and President Anwar
Sadat at their summit meeting in
Haifa last month. A second
group will be released shortly. All
will be deported to Egypt.
Israeli authorities stressed
that the majority of the prisoners
were serving sentences for
criminal offenses and the few who
were jailed for membership in
terrorst organizations had not
participated directly in terrorist
acts.
THIS POINT was made to
forestall the flood of criticism
that greeted the release of a large
number of convicted terrorists
earlier this year in exchange for a
single Israeli soldier held by
terrorists in I^ebanon.
It was learned, meanwhile,
that an Israeli army team will
soon begin a search in the
Egyptian held zones of western
Sinai for the remains of Yom
Kippur War soldiers still listed as
missing.
grade students. NHMI will
provide instructors for the
children.
The Seacamp program is but
one example of the extended
classroom learning environment
of the Hebrew Day School
program.
Mizrachi Women
A membership luncheon was to
be held on Thursday, Nov. 15 for
paid-up and prospective members
of Tamara Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women in the
Recreation Room of Galahad III,
2901 So. Ocean Drive, Hollywood
at noon.
A musical program was to be
presented, featuring three artists.
More Boat People
Arrive in Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's small population of
Vietnamese refugees boat
people was doubled with the
arrival of 197 more refugees
approved by the government for
settlement here.
The newcomers landed at Ben-
Gurion Airport in a night from
Athens. Most had been confined
to refugee camps in Singapore
and Hong Kong. A number were
picked up at sea by the Israeli
containership Zim Sydney.
A leader of the new group
thanked the Israeli people, the
government and Prime Minister
Menachem Begin in particular for
admitting them. The group was
taken to the absorption center at
Shderoth where they will rest and
receive instruction in basic
Hebrew. Later they will be
directed to various parts of the
country where housing and jobs
are available.
Israel's policy of helping the
Vietnamese refugees has been
beneficial to the country. They
have earned a good reputation as
workers and have many job
offers. The refugees include many
highly qualified doctors,
engineers, technicians and pilots.
STATE OF
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Corporation Toil Free teoo) 221-4838


Friday, November 16, 1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Holly woo I
Page!
Vatican Urged tb
Recognize Israel
.- /


NEW YORK (JTA) A
panel of interfaith leaders,
authors and academicians
meeting for three days in New
Orleans issued a statement
urging "recognition of the State
of Israel by the Vatican, the
posthumous excommunication of
Adolf Hitler by the Catholic
Church, and the emphasis on the
essential Jewishness of
Christianity by the Christian
Church," it was reported here by
Jacques Torczyner, chairman of
the Herzl Institute, who was a
member of the panel.
"Our group of Protestant,
Catholic and Jewish authorities
on relations between Christians
and Jews in the United States
discussed the Holocaust and its
impact on both Jews and
Christians," Torczyner added.
He said the speakers agreed that
Israel "must not be regarded as a
result of the Holocaust but rather
as a response to that tragedy.
Israel was seen as a sign that the
world's Jews refused to accept
the idea that death would have
the final word."
The panel, which included
Rabbi Solomon Bernards,
director of the interreligious
department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, Dr. Harry Cargas,
professor of world literature at
Webster College in St. Louis,
Mo., Prof. Alice Eckardt,
professor of religion at Lehigh
University, Dr. David Sidorsky,
professor of philosophy at
Columbia University, and Dr.
William Zuidema of The
Netherlands, also insisted that
the legitimacy of Israel's
existence is not open to question.
No other government is faced
with a similar challenge, the
panel emphasized.
Sister (Catherine Hargrove of
Manhattanville College in New
York said that an annual "in-
terfaith think-tank dialogue"
would be established, Torczyner
reported.
In Amsterdam
Move to Stymie Arab Boycott
AMSTERDAM -
(JTA) Responding to
pressure from Parliament
and public opinion, The
Netherlands government
has adopted six measures
aimed against the Arab
boycott which must be
implemented within one
year. The Parliament ended
its debate on the boycott
and its impact on the Dutch
economy.
The first three measures
i require an alteration of present
law. They are: prohibition of any
form of discrimination against
Jewish-owned businesses in
transactions with Arab states;
companies and other institutions
may not issue statements about
the religion of their employees;
mandatory disclosure of all
boycott requests received by
companies.

ll'I.IIV.
ii:<.'I'.aiiii;i<
i'ii|.r.v|B"i|.|ii ir.va
'a^BiiMii-r.roiRii>i i |.r.rB\
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COMPANIES complying with
such requests will be named
publicly, and Parliament will be
advised once a year which
companies have been named;
second and third degree boycotts
are prohibited. A concessionaire,
for example, may not
discriminate against other Dutch
companies on the Arab blacklist.
Also prohibited is the
legalization of signatures on
boycott documents by chambers
of commerce or the Foreign
Ministry. In addition, a special
body will be created to receive
complaints about Arab boycott
requests and to dispense advice.
finally, Parliament has
determined that negative cer-
tificates of origin are contrary to
normal business practice. The
government is expected shortly
to institute measures to prevent
the issuance of such certificates
although there will not be an
immediate legal prohibition
THE MATTER of the Arab
boycott and its effects in Holland
was raised last year by Dr.
Ronny Naftaniel of the Center for
Information and Documentation
on Israel in his book titled The
Arab Boycott in the Netherlands,
published in February, 1978. The
book aroused public indignation.
Meanwhile, the government
has promised to strike out a
clause in the insurance conditions
of The Nederlandse Crediet
Verzekering Maatschappij
asking companies to adhere to
Arab boycott requests.
'My Son Drives
a Berwick'
Gertrude Herman, star of the
Berwick Chevrolet commercials,
will present "Awake and Sing,"
Thursday, Nov. 29 at the Holly-
wood Jewish Community Center,
2838 Hollywood Boulevard.
The one-woman dramatic per-
formance is a story by Clifford
Odets about a Jewish family in
the 1930's.
The program is open to the
public.
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Page 14
Page
The Jewish Floridian and Shqfarpf Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,1979
Golden Announces CAJE Dinner Honoree
Alfred Golden, president of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education of the Greater Miami
JewishFederation, recently
announced that Mrs. Adolph
(Helene) Berger will be the
honoree of the CAJE dinner to be
held in the Friedland Ballroom,
Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach
on March 20,1980.
Golden, who has recently
recovered from a serious illness,
is again actively involved in
planning with the CAJE. He1
stated that he looks forward to
working "with a profound sense
of responsibility, together with a
willingness that is shared with
the entire Executive Committee
and board of directors, to meet
the formidable challenges that1
faced Jewish education in the
South Florida community in the
months and years ahead.
"We are especially fortunate in
having a highly capable and
committed professional staff
under the direction of Gene
Greenzweig, CAJE executive
director, as well as growth and
development under the guidance
of Mrs. Helene Berger, our out-
going president, and honoree for
the upcoming dinner," he added.
Golden has been a long-time
community leader having served
on the board of directors of the
ADL to Honor Bert Brown
Bert S. Brown, president of
B'nai B'rith District No. 5, which
extends from Baltimore to Key
West, will receive the Torch of
Liberty Award from the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, according to Joseph
lYrlstfin, co-chairman of the
event, and a national com-
missioner of the Anti-Defamation
League.
The occasion at which the
award will be presented is the
'".ixth Annual ADL Breakfast,
sponsored by the South Broward
Region of B'nai B'rith to be held
Sunday, Nov. 18, at 9 a.m., at the
Hallandale Jewish Center. The
featured guest speaker will be
Richard Essen, attorney and a
member of the ADL National
Commission and chairman of the
ADL Florida Regional Board.
Bert Brown, a CPA, has been
deeply involved with B'nai B'rith
and other communal, civic and
philanthropic organizations since
his youth in McKeesport, Pa. He
has served as president of the
State Association of B'nai B'rith.
UJA National
Conference in
New York
On Dec. 6 to 8, the American Jewish community will gather
in New York at the 1980 UJA National Conference to address
the challenges and opportunities of the 1980 campaign and the
decade ahead.
You are warmly invited to join with the leadership of the
United Jewish Appeal and our Federation leadership from
throughout the country in a wide-ranging exploration of the
great issues before us as we take our lifeline campaigns into the
Eighties.
Former Israel Foreign Minister Moahe Dayan will share
with us his special insights into the developing peace process.
We will have the welcome opportunity to greet Jacobo
Timerman, recently freed after his long and heroic struggle for
freedom. Boris Penson and other released Prisoners of Con-
science will come before us as living symbols of the Soviet
Jewish freedom movement, and as reminders of the magnitude
of the liberation still to be achieved.
Jewish Agency chairman Leon A. Dulzin and treasurer
Akiva Lewinsky will reveal the dimensions of the task before us
in meeting increasing needs and fulfilling the promise of
renewal.
And we will have the special opportunity of honoring Henry
Ford, as a fellow American who has stood solidly with us,
contributing to the unified strength with which we enter this
decisive decade.
I look forward to sharing these outstanding Jewish ex-
periences with you in New York on Dec. 6 to 8.
IRWIN S. FIELD
UJA National Chairman
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CMctoNlSwiHtiH
INCLUDES
Strictly Kosher Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner With AM The
Trimmtafs. 2 Meals Batty, 3 On Sabbath Plus Entertainment.
Ft* Hotel Facames Activities.
THANKSGIVING DINNER ONLY *9?,
tai
a member of the board of gover-
nors of B'nai B'rith International
and national chairman of the
Covenant Club. He is on the
advisory board of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the
Hillel Foundation. He is a retired
lieutenant commander in the
United States Naval Reserve.
Brown is married to the former
JoAnne Moses and they have
three children.
Serving as co-chairman of the
breakfast is William Littman,
long a leader in organizational
functions. Associate chairmen
an Maurice Berkowitz, Ben
Goldberg, William Leichter and
Max Shapiro. Arthur Rubin is
treasurer.
The Anti-Defamation League
has been in the vanguard of the
fight against bigotry and dis-
crimination of all people since
1913. It has 27 national offices,
offices in Israel and France, and
correspondents throughout
South America. Arthur N. Teitel-
baum, ADL's southern area
director, and an authority on
community and human relations,
will give a special commentary.
Because the function was a
sellout last year, and the capacity
of the Hallandale .Jewish Center
is limited, I'erlstein urges anyone
interested in attending to contact
the ADL office in Miami or any
B'nai B'rith Lodge in South
Broward as early as possible for
tickets.
Jewish Federations of Greater
Miami and Greater Ft.
Lauderdale, and as national vice
chairman of the Council on
College Youth and Faculty of the
CouncU of Jewish Welfare
Federations.
He has compiled a
distinguished record of service in
B'nai B'rith, having been a
national commissioner of the
Anti-Defamation League, former
national commissioner of the
Hillel Foundations, and both
founder and first president of the
Dade Community Board for
Hillel and the Florida foundation
for Hillel.
He has served as an officer and
is on the boards of a number of
synagogues in both Dade and
Broward Counties.
Golden stressed that "there
will be very focused goals for
which to strive. Chief among
them will be the establishment of
a Community Day High School;
the strengthening of inter-agency
planning and programming- in all
phases of Jewish education; the
full certification of Day School
general and Judiac faculties; the
examination of approaches to
graduate Judiac studies in the
community; the coordination of
educational services throughout
all of Dade and Broward Counties
and the exploration of
cooperative planning for Jewish
education on a state-wide basis;
the increase services to day
schools; and the broadening of
the pilot programs of the
Department of Special Education
for the learning disabled and the
mentally retarded.
"Above all else," Golden
concluded, "perhaps the most
dynamic factor in the entire
community is the supportive
attitude for Jewish education of
the lay and professional
leadership of Federation, which
realizes that the continuation and
enhancement of Jewish life in our
community depends to a large
degree on how this agency for-
mulates, implements, and
reaches the goals of life-long,
community-wide Jewish
education."
Thi Aif Conditioned
KOSHER
WJilTS XOUSC HOTEL
You'll be a V.I.P. at
the WHITE HOUSE
3 Kosher Meals Daily
"300 It, Pnv Beach Pool
Entertainment
TV in All Rooms
Giant Screen Color TV "Daily Maid Service
Social Director 'Daily Synagogue Services
24 Hour Phone Service Mashgiach on Premises
SPECIAL YEARLY RATES
Live in a Modern Oceanfront Hotel Beautiful Air
Conditioned Rooms*Card & Hobby Rooms eMovies
Games & Crafts Beauty Salon
For Reserva'
PHONE MIAMIBKACH
ON THE OCEAN AT 15th ST MIAMI BEACH. ELA 331M
Owner Mgrnt
Baumrind, Ehrenreich
1-531-6483
Managed Supervised by Rabbi Gimpel Orimland
1-538-7811
Your tzimmis just wouldn't be the same without
Sun-Maid* Raisins. And your compote wouldn't be
complete without Blue Ribbon or Old Orchard Figs, for
over half a century our wholesome kosher fruits have
been a Jewish cooking tradition.
We dry them the traditional way, too. Naturally,
the sun. So the natural sweetness you enjoyed as a child
still tastes the same today. And isn't that what
tradition is all about?
Certified by Rabbi Dr. J H. Ralba8
in
/
>
OSun-Meid Owwmof California, l79


Friday, November 16,1979
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Page 9
Socialists Approve

*j
More Initiatives With PLO
^
By EDWIN F.YTAN
LISBON (JTA) The
Bureau of the Socialist Inter-
national has empowered its
president, former West German
Chancellor Willy Brandt, and its
vice president, Austrian
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky, to
continue maintaining "contacts"
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The Bureau, on which 20
Socialist Parties are represented,
did not consider, however,
granting the PLO any official
status as an observer or in any
other capacity. Israeli Labor
Party Chairman Shimon Peres
said after the two-day session
that he was "satisfied" with the
results.
THE BUREAU took these
decisions after a two-hour debate
during which no formal
resolutions were presented, and
no votes were taken. Brandt told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that practically all the
delegations supported "the
principle" of his and Kreisky's
meeting with Arafat last July in
Vienna.
The only delegations which
objected, Brandt and Kreisky
said, were the Israelis and that of
Ireland. The Dutch and several
others objected, to the way in
which the meeting was arranged
and its form. Israeli sources said
the Bureau has promised that
any future contacts with the PLO
will take place only after Israel
has been given due notice in
advance.
Both Brandt and Kreisky told
the JTA that the PLO has not
applied for observer status nor
are there any plans for further
Temple Beth El Events
Shabbat Services will be held
Friday at 8:15 p.m. at Temple
Ileth El. Rabbi Ben A. Romer
will speak on "The God of
Abraham and the God of Isaac."
Pulpit honors will be accorded
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Rocker in
honor of the Bar Mitzvah of their
son Lawrence. Mrs. Rocker will
bless the Sabbath tapers. The
onug shabbat and flowers will be
sponsored by the celebrants.
Lawrence Rocker attends
\inerkan Heritage School, where
l is a student in the seventh
grade. He participates in base-
* ball, soccer and swimming. On
Saturday at 11 a.m., Lawrence
ivill conduct the worship service
and read from iheTorah.
In observance of ORT's
i nit nnial year, the Oceanview
Park, Hallmark and Three Island
chapters, Hallandale, will be
given recognition during Shabbat
Services.
Brotherhood's initial program
will present Judge Morton L.
Abram, Sunday, Nov. 18, at 8
p.m., in the Tobin Auditorium of
the temple, 1351 S. 14th Ave.,-
Hollywood, who will review So
Help Me God by Herbert Tarr,
the author of The Conversion of
Chaplain Cohen and Heaven
Help Us. The public is invited.
Intermediate Hebrew is set for
Monday. 9:15 a.m. Beginners'
Hebrew. Tuesday, 9:15 a.m. The
special series on "Israel and
Reform Judaism." conducted by
Rubbi Romer, will be held
Tuesday. 7:30p.m.
contacts with Arafat or any of its
other representatives. Socialist
sources said that the PLO "has
not applied because they know
that their application would not
stand a chance to be granted."
BRANDT TOLD the con-
ference that both he and Kreisky
"are convinced that the
Palestinians now want self-
determination without the
elimination or destruction of the
State of Israel.
Brandt said that in his view
"the two sides (Israel and the
PLO) will have to take each other
into consideration" if a com-
prehensive peace agreement is to
be reached. He added that "the
peace process is impossible
without PLO participation."
Kreisky, who arrived earlier
from the U.S., where he met
President Carter and addressed
the UN General Assembly, took a
far more moderate line than at
the previous Socialist meeting
held last July in Stockholm.
Kreisky spoke for less than two
minutes pleading with the
delegates to support "a just and
lasting solution" in the Middle
East. He also said that such a
solution must be reached with
full Palestinian participation in
the negotiations.
What a lunch!
TETLEYTEA
IN THE GLASS
CORNED BEEF
ON THE RYE
Your thirst will tell you-
iced Tetley Tea is iced tea
at its best. Because Tetley
stands up to ice. Its flavor
just won't melt! Tetley is
made with tiny tea leaves
'or big flavor. Deep rich
color, too. Since Tetley
'tarts out stronger it lasts
longer. No wonder the fa-
vorite in Jewish homes has
been Tetley since 1875-now
beginning a second century!
K on the purlutge menns certified Ko*her
_ ACENTURYOLD TRADITION
From left are George Finneman, Dr. Joe Stein and Dr. Alex
Goldenberg, 1979 chairman.
Holly brook workers discuss the 1980 CJA-IEF campaign prior to the
start of the breakfast.
CHEX
\vi\Kl T IVII^
FOR NOSHERS AND NIBBLERS
This is one of the world's tastiest inven-
tions. Chex Party Mix keeps the hands
husy, the mouth busy and the body
happy... because besides being good to
eat, the crunchy Chex cereals are good
for you. They're great company at card
parties, kid parties, get-togethers, for
when friends drop in, and for a late snack,
too. Chex Party Mix. IT'S A MECHAYEH'
CHEX PARTY MIX RECIPE
!4 cup butter ot margarine
1 % Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
1 % tsp. seasoned salt
2 cups Rice Chex cereal
2 cups Com Chex* cereal
2 cups Wheat Chex* cereal
2 cups Bran Chex* cereal
1 cup salted mixed nuts.
Preheat oven to 250. Heat butter in
13x9x2-inch baking pan in oven until
melted. Remove. Stir in Worcester-
shire sauce and seasoned salt. Add
Chex and nuts. Mix until all pieces
are coated. Heat in oven 1 hour.
Stir every 15 minutes. Spread on
absorbent paper to cool. May be
stored in the freezer. Makes about
9 cups.
Certified Kosher
K
CR PCo 1979
13C
OFF
On your purchase of any size package
Wheat, Corn, Rice or Bran Chex*cereals.
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MSMtMM 1 .ninii mcm w Liiiinn7rfTi aIm\
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can M wiin m mm maiio
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COMlSTIW WIM THIS! TIMJ CMSIITUTES IMU0 0 MAY IM Au COUPONS SuWtiTtfD
FoamxMrnm
jDR"M''p,"c",,, ,9?9 ..
iJC tOJ Ch-h >m* *m 30. ISM ?16/*X?16 15V
^eeenin>^asken.waeBee^e*eBeBeBeBeBBentBaa)e4Bs>ajeis^


Pageip
*=
i. i i......
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,.1979
-r
Project Renewal on the March in Tel Aviv
A recent comprehensive |
sociological survey indicates that
Project Renewal has brought
activity, hope and readiness for
change into poor quarters of Tel
Aviv. The survey, prepared by
Prof. Dan Soen and H. Hirsh,
profiles a number of Tel Aviv
quarters in some detail.
The section known as "Tel
Aviv-Jaffa 4" was settled mostly
by people who came as im-
migrants in the 1950's and lived
in various Maabarot or
dilapidated Arab houses nearby.
When they were relocated in Tel
Aviv-Jaffa 4 in the 60's, their
previous dwellings were mostly
destroyed. The transfers were
neither planned nor orderly. The
moment a house was ready and
free, families were put into them
without any socio-cultural
considerations.
The conclusion of the survey
makers is that the quality of life
in this quarter, which may be
low, is not so much the result of
its physical structure but rather
of the human relations within
this quarter. The population
numbers about 3,500 and one-
third of them are elderly. There
are many youths in the quarter as
well, and large numbers do not go
to schools. Services and
programs for both groups are key
elements in the social planning
for its Project Renewal effort.
THE OBJECTIVES for
rehabilitating the quarter are: to
involve and motivate inhabitants
to participate in its development;
to give women an active role in
the rehabilitation work; tc
combat delinquency.and to
prevent "positive famines" from
leaving the quarter by en-
couraging them to stay.
The architects dealing with the
physical rehabilitation of the
quarter are concentrating on
structural improvements, area
development and more ef-
fectivelevel of maintenance of all
public buildings and gardens.
At the same time the level of
resident involvement is en-
couraging. Family meetings,
group meetings and meetings of
inhabitants of each house unit are
helping to create social care for
needy families, new youth
programs and services for the
aged. There is a special plan to
enhance pre-school education and
to increase sports facilities and
opportunities for youth. The
overall aim is to achieve social
integration through physical
rehabilitation and creating a
positive, contributory attitude
among the inhabitants.
This is also the direction being
One Killed in Bomb Explosion
By YITZHAK SH ARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) About
200 passengers narrowly escaped
injury Nov. 1 when the
locomotive of a train from Haifa
struck a bomb on the Yarkon
River bridge just north of Tel
Aviv. The train sustained minor
damage and, although the tracks
were damaged, it was able to
reach the Tel Aviv railroad
terminal.
The incident was the second
On Hunger Strike
Kishinev Refusniks
NEW YORK (JTS) Two leading Kishinev
refusniks began a five-day hunger strike which they
threaten to repeat at the beginning of every month until
their exit visas are approved, the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry reported.
ALEKSANDR KHOZIN, 32, and Vladimir
Tsukerman, 32, sent a letter of appeal to Soviet President
Leonid Brezhnev asking that their exit visas be granted.
Report Reveals
They said they wish to be reunited with their families in
Israel and will continue their hunger strikes until their
visas are approved.
Khozin and his wife, Nina, and their son first applied
to emigrate in June, 1977 but have been refused due to his
past military service. Tsukerman first applied to emigrate
to Israel in 1974. His wife, Faina, and young son,
Aleksandr, emigrated to Israel in May, 1978. He was fired
from his job this past May and now fears that parasitism
charges will be brought against him.
terrorist attack on the Haifa-Tel
Aviv railway line that week and
the second terrorist bombing in
Tel Aviv Nov. 1. One man was
killed when a bomb exploded in
an office building near the central
bus terminal here. He was not
immediately identified.
Police said the terrorists
planted their bomb on the 40-
meter long railroad bridge about
30 feet from its supporting
struts, at a point 12 meters above
the water. It detonated on impact
with the forward wheels of the
locomotive. Railroad employes
maintain a constant check of the
line.
The bridge had been inspected
earlier that afternoon and
nothing was found. Police believe
the bomb was planted after dark,
shortly before the train ap-
proached.
Earlier, a Haifa-to Tel Aviv
train was halted by a bomb
explosion on the tracks near
Netanya. There were no injuries.
The passengers continued their
journey by bus.
The bombing near the bus
terminal found police, fire
fighters and first aid teams close
by. They had been rushed to a
courthouse near the bus station
in response to a bomb threat that
proved to be a false alarm. When
the explosion occurred they
began immediately to extricate
workers and clerks struggling to
get out of the building which was
enveloped in thick smoke. The
dead man was discovered under
debris.
taken in another poor quarter of
Tel Aviv called Neveh-Sharett.
Neveh-Sharett is actually a
conglomerate of two or three
quarters shich developed in-
dependently.
IT TOOK shape during the
years 1953-1954 as a solution for
the problems of the inhabitants
of the Maabara Yad-Hamaavir.
As the years went by, Neveh-
Sharett grew and absorbed more
and more inhabitants. Today the
quarter has as many as 7,000
inhabitants who live in extremely
congested housing conditions,
much more so than in most poor
quarters.
The apartments are small (50)
square meters only). Most of the
buildings and yards are
neglected, and there are no public
gardens. The minimal size of the
apartments, the physical con-
ditions of the quarter, and the
fact that most of the inhabitants
belong to the weak socio-
economic groups of the
population resulted in a negative
self-image and insupportive
environment. A counterforce has
been the influx of immigrants
from Russia and the West with
academic education, as well as
scores of young couples who tried
to give the whole quarter a
positive image.
The first attempts of
rehabilitation three years ago
began to attack the housing
problems of the largest families
and to attract young couples into
the quarter. Originally slow in
pace, progress has recently been
quickened through Project
Renewal. At present, large
families are vacating small
apartments for young couples,
with or without children, and are
being transferred to new and
bigger apartments.
The Committee of the
Inhabitants of the Quarter, who
are cooperating in the
rehabilitation work, feel that this
work must be speeded up even
more. While the physical transfer
plan is being completed, elements
of rehabilitative social planning
will be put into effect.
THERE HAS been some
organized, voluntary social work
already, with initial signs of
progress. In an interim-report
submitted by women community
workers, who are active in the
quarter, it is stated:
"In the past, most inhabitants
did not have confidence in us.
They treated us with an attitude
of doubt and even distrust. But
the wall of incredibility has been
broken down gradually, and the
inhabitants are showing more
and more readiness for
cooperation."
.;
Turnaround in a Development
Town
Ruth and Saadia Maximon are
newcomers from the United
States. Saadia is an expert on
graphics, and also writes
children's stories. Ruth lectures
in special education. They did not
settle in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv,
Haifa or any other urban center.
They came instead to a once
infamous development town,
Migdal Haemek. They are part of
a new human wave which has
rolled into Migdal Haemek and
helped create a startling tur-
naround in the town.
Like the Maximons, most of
the settlers in Migdal Haemek
are middle class people from the
West. A large number have come
from France. There are now
14,300 inhabitants in Migdal
Haemek, over a territory of 7,200
dunams. It is on the road from
Haifa to Nazaret, on the border of
the lower Galil, 280 meters above
sea level. The landscape is
beautiful and so now is the
quality of life there.
THERE WAS a time, however -
as recently as two years ago -
when Migdal Haemek was known
as a dangerous and largely
lawless place, for drug pushers
and users. Today, Migdal
Haemek is an entirely renewed
town, clean and beautiful, with
well-developed services and
almost no delinquents here at all.
In recent months, 15 of the
criminals were put in prison, four
left town and the rest tried to find
another place for their activities.
In 1972, there were 55
delinquents in Migdal Haemek.
In 1978 the level, when crime
among youth declined 50 percent
in Israel as a whole, Migdal
Haemek led the way. A police
station was established there and
the policemen were experienced
soldiers released from the Army
who had joined the police.
The newcomers who have come
into the town recently from the
West have created a healthy
population mix with Soviet Jews,
young couples and old-timers.
The leaders of the town are proud
of the industrial base which has
been developed in the town.
There are 89 enterprises and
plants, with 2,300 workers, 60
percent of whom are residents of
the town. There is a great need
for additional manpower, and
there are plans to develop
scientific and technological
enterprises.
The textile plant, Nilit, em-
ploys 500 workers and recently
began to turn a profit. The
president of Nilit is an Italian-
Jewish newcomer who is very
active in community life and says
that his ambition is to turn the
town into a small "Switzerland"
in Israel.
<<
"aM The Jewish National Fund The World Over
a*-_9 ^y^'ls 1 mourns the passing of
i A M Moses Hornstein
^^H ^^p The Great Humanitarian and Philanthropist Who has helped make this world a better place For the Jewish people and all Mankind,
r a mtMt Dr. Irving Lehrm Chairman JNF Foundatio an Hon. Moshe Rivlin World Chairman a Keren Kayemeth Leisrael Jerusalem Rabbi Wm. Berkowitz Dr. Samuel I. Cohen Hon.ZevW Koean President Executive V. P. President JNF of America JNF of America JNF Southern Region


ly, November 16,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
rage 11
Soutfc Qhowand
fipbtliqk n
by Rochelle Koenig
Thanks to the many women who graciously contributed
rious hours and their lovely penmanship to addressing in-
utions for Community Day on Dec. 13. Your sore fingers,
3ts, or arms should feel better now because of the fabulous
jnse we have received. With speakers Bella Abzug and Ruth
iber, it looks like no one wants to miss Community Day.
kervations for this exciting program are nearly closed! Ladies
yt wait to reply.
Bea Mogilowitt worked tirelessly on the envelopes. Jean
^ger also helped prior to her trip to Toledo, Ohio. Jean at-
fled the Bar Mitzvah of a greatnephew. This talented young
|i had made his own talis last summer while at Camp Ramah
panada.
For the senior citizens, Selma Hopen has established an
Ifective Grandparenting Program" with the senior adults of
I Jewish Community Center and the children of Temple Beth
llom Pre-School. Cooperating with Rabbi Morton Malavsky
^Temple Beth Shalom and Shirley Cohen, director of the
rsery school and kindergarten, Selma skillfully devised a plan
ihare creativity. This stimulating program has made senior
lens realize that they are needed and useful in the develop-
It of our children. The children were able to share learning
eriences with their new grandparents. Reports from ob-
[rers Ellie Katz, Eleanor Sobel and Diane Bergheim were
Bt enthusiastic.
Programming of this type reminds me of my late father,
il Levine, and also Selma's late mother, Maze! Goodman, who
uplifted the meaning of being vital and creative grand-
ents in the family and in the community. I am sure that
iy senior adults would like to become involved in such a
)gram.
Our Jewish women continue to be active in securing enrich-
it programs for public schools. Nancy Ehrlich cleverly
iged a dramatization of the Story Time Theatre for the
}dents at Nova Middle School. Nancy invited drama coach
ae Justice to perform and delight the youngsters with
icational and innovative entertainment.
Simone Dunn recently loaned some of her art deco collection
|the Hollywood Art and Culture Center exhibit. Simone owns
beautiful Salon D'Antiques in Dania. This past summer
none and hustand Dr. Seymour Dunn traveled with the Dr.
ider Stolovea touring from the Alaskan border south into
exico.
Dr. Irving and Charlotte Fixel visited New Orleans
bently. Charlotte has a busy schedule as president of the
toward County Medical Association Auxiliary, the largest
|xiliary in Florida.
And still more traveling physicians Dr. Tom and Joan
Jenberg visited Israel. "It was fabulous," said Joan. "You
>uld see what they accomplished in just 30 years. So why does
it take a year to build a road from Hollywood to Fort Lauder-
dale?" .
Dr. Howard and Dnfaria Berman and Dr. Harry and Sharon
Simon vacationed at the Club Med in Eleuthera.
This is the time for high school seniors to investigate
colleges and universities. Our young men and women decide
what they like and anxiously await the decision of the college of
their choice. Actually, the parents are anxious. The students
take the matter in stride. Visiting the New England schools were
Estelle Podis with daughter Lisa, Dr. Phil Levin and Scott, Dr.
Sam and Audrey Meline with daughter Debbie, Dr. Saul and
Susan Singer with Sharon, who afterward flew to the midwest.
Dr. Howard Kellner took son Joel to Pennsylvania.
Shelly Schlesinger is chairman of the board of Broward
Community College. He recently was master of ceremonies at
the gala evening celebrating the grand opening of Bailey Hall,
the magnificent new theater built on the BCC campus for the
performing arts. Shelly and wife Bobbe attended the black tie
event with local and state dignitaries.
The rain ended just in time for Dr. Mark Forrest and his
guests to surprise his lovely wife Susan for her birthday. Every-
one met at the 46th Avenue and Stirling Road Shopping Plaza
and proceeded together to a special magnificent chartered yacht
at Bahia Mar yacht basin in Fort Lauderdale. Dinner and cock-
tails were served on board, and music could be heard as the
guests stood on the top deck beneath the star-filled skies.
Among those cruising to Deerfield Beach and sharing Susan's
birthday were the Doctors and Mines. Louis Joblove, Norman
Bluth, Harvey Peretz, Norman Landman, Perry Seider, Richard
Pyne, Bob Blank, Steve Greenberg, Peter Keller, Howard
Kellner, Jerry Fish man and the Mort Ba licks. It looked like an
American Dental Association cruising convention.
Dr. Fred and Reggie Bushkin were also birthday celebrants.
Dr. Nel and Debbie Beinhaker hosted the surprise party. Dr.
Saul and Susan Singer and Dr. Stoyan and Tobene Rosenthal
were among those who enjoyed the fun evening.
While many of my friends are hesitant about admitting to
having birthdays, popular Phyllis Siff celebrated her birthday
not once, but three times. Fearless Phyllis partied through two
luncheons and one dinner. Once with the Natalies Bluth and
Joblove and Sandy Kellner. Then with Barbara Roberts, Judy
Glazer, Florence Rosenthal (before her trip to new York and the
United Synagogue Convention at the Concord Hotel). Mimi
Sabra (before her trip to Fort Pierce) and myself. Dinner was
with her husband Dr. Wally Siff and sons Larry, Robert and
Danny. Son Steven is at the University of Miami Law School,
son Alan attends Stanford University and daughter Nina is a
senior at the University of South Florida.
Besides her many duties as board secretary of Temple
Sinai, Rose Cohn warmly greets the congregants at the Friday
night services Congratulations to Drs. Ah/in and Tamara
Cohen on the Bar Mitzvah of their son Stephan and to Dr.
Michael and Barbara Desky on the Bar Mitzvah of their son
Mark. Bar Mitzvah congratulations to Glenn Platt, son of
Steven and Paula Platt. Grandparents are the Irving Stocksers
and Norman and Pauline Platt. Also celebrating the occasion are
the Kenneth Platts and the Marshall Platts and great-grand-
mother Rose Platt.
Best of luck to Nat and Florence Harris, recently named
sales representatives for Hillcrest. Busy gal Florence has also
been chosen fundraiser for maintenance and training for
Women's American ORT.
Goldstein
Feinsmith
Ms. Alicia Goldstein of Holly-
wood, daughter of Louis Gold-
stein, Hollywood, and the late
Mrs. Sylvia Goldstein, was
married Sunday, Nov. 18, Temple
Beth-El, Hollywood, to Paul L.
Feinsmith, Chicago, 111., son of
Cantor and Mrs. Sydney W.
Feinsmith of North Miami
Huach. The ceremony was per-
formed by llabbi Samuel Z Jaffe
of Temple Beth El and the
groom's father, Cantor Feinsmith
"I Sky Lake Synagogue. North
Miami.
Ms. Goldstein, who attended
the University of Florida, is an
insurance agent with the Pruden-
tial Insurance Company of
America. Mr. Feinsmith. who
graduated from the University of
Pennsylvania and New York
University School of Law, is vice
president of administration, sec-
retary, general counsel and a
director of the Elgin and Wal-
tham Watch Company, a sub-
sidiary of Katy Industries. He is
also a trustee of the American
Watch Association.
The couple will reside in
Chicago and Hollywood.
I OLATT KC
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Pace 14
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,1979
Subjects of Discontent
Growing Jewish Anxieties in Quebec
Continued from Page 4-
all matters pertaining to public
affairs and, specifically, in the
domain of public education for
Jewish children.
In 1903, after years of
agonizing debates, the Protes-
tant school board admitted
Jewish pupils to their schools
"to combat an anomaly and
repair an injustice." Eminent
personalities like Judge Howard
and Anglican Bishop Rev. John
Craig Farthing publicly ex-
pressed their fear that "contact
with their children is dangerous
to our children."
DECEPTION after deception
befell the Jewish community with
high taxes for the instruction of
Jewish children, no hiring of
-Jewish teachers and the sub-
mission of Jewish children to
lectures from the New Testament
for the purpose of indoctrination.
No Jewish child was admitted
to French-Catholic schools. A
spirit of hatred and mistrust was
sown in the minds of the French
pupils such as the one which
appears in the Exercise Francois,
Livre de 1'elfve:
"One would have to be blind
not to recognize in the over-
whelming misfortunes which
have befallen the Jewish nation
the divine vengeance wreaked on
the murderers of the Saviour and
punishing by unexampled
calamities the crime which is
unprecedented."
THE BOOK was printed by
the Clercs of St. Viateur and
approved for use by the Catholic
Committee of Public Instruction.
It was widely used in Quebec
schools.
The "quiet revolution" of the
early '60s has swept away much
of the clerically inspired anti-
Semitic feelings and replaced it
with a solid wall of self-defense
which reflected the idea of a
besieged French minority within
Canada. Gradually the idea that
no compromise is possible with
the English majority and that the
sole solution is an association
based on two sovereignties
English and French in a par-
titioned Canada, gained popular
For more Information write
Hadassah BequMls
50 West 58th Street
New York. N.Y. 10019
Tel: (212) 355-7900
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ity in Quebec and finally brought
to power the Parti Quebecois.
In private talks and on various
occasions, Premier Levesque
reminds his Jewish listeners that
their fathers and grandfathers
the Jewish peddlers of the begin-
ning of the century earned
their language and their first
dollar from French farmers to
whom they sold their wares while
all the other doors were closed for
them in English business and
institutions. But the present
generation of Quebec Jews, two-
thirds of them university
graduates and well-traveled,
mobile and higly politicized,
think otherwise.
THEY FEAR that a separate
Quebec will mean a looser contact
with the Jews of the rest of
Canada and with Jewish brethren
in the U.S. True, sizeable
francophone (French-speaking)
minority among Quebec Jews
who made their immigration to
Canada from North African
countries after the '50's, incline
towards the acceptance of an
independent Quebec; but they
too are worried by the negative
impact such a move might have
on their businesses and
traditions.
The Jews have a deep
mistrust of revolutions of
national character or otherwise
which might force them to live in
an enclave, like Quebec, instead
of a big country like Canada.
They perceive the rise of Que-
bec nationalism as a decline
of liberalism with its corollary
impediments to free trade and
unhindered possibilities to reach
the American market. Examples
abound of small countries obliged
to raise tariff walls and other
measures to drastically defend
their immediate interests.
Psychologically. Jews are dis-
inclined to live in a small country
remembering that they felt better
and more secure in Austro-
llungary, France and Britain
than in little countries like
Lithuania, Latvia. Estonia,
Poland and Hungary.
JEWS WHO fled Europe
under the steady flow of
nationalistic winds which turned
into the Nazi hurricane, are
developing a defensive position
when it comes to adapting them-
selves to Quebec nationalism.
The handful of Jews who accuse
Jewish leadership of shirking its
responsibilities "by refusing to
express their confidence in the
goodwill of the francophone
majority'' are addressing a skep-
tical audience.
While Jews have participated
in Quebec political life since the
'20's beginning with their
Montreal deputy in the Quebec
National Assembly, the late
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last Liberal government they
did so conscious of the fact that
the Liberal framework was
defending their traditions and
interests.
The charities of the Pollacks,
Bronfman and Lande families are
a good measure of Jewish
generosity towards, the province
of their adoption.
ACCORDING to the official
statistics, 36 percent of the
Jewish population of Quebec was
bilingual and there is no doubt
that with good education Jews
will become 100 percent pro-
ficient in French, a fact unheard
of within other ethnic com-
munities.
When it comes to "taking
risks" the leadership is aware
that among educated Jews they
would raise a storm of protest to
the independence cause. When
French-Canadians, some with
deep roots in Quebec, quite a
number of them university pro-
fessors and illustrious surgeons,
quit the province because "they
have socialist medicine," why
should someone think that their
Jewish colleagues would think
otherwise?
WITH ALL the propaganda
and full page ads in the French
press (paid for by Arab countries)
and despite the great number oi
Arab students in Quebec, the
terrorist cause has found no great
support among the Francophone
majority. However, there is no
insurance against a revival of
anti-Semitism in any country.
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pa*
ay, November 16,1979
The Jewish Fhridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 13
,eo Mindlin
Jimmy as JC a Near-Winner
-r
>
Continued from Page 4
and the problem first
feed-
is not so much that the press
I embarrassed by Brz as that
only costs half a unit more
gets around the nasty im-
Bion that Brz makes that it is
^ct a typographical error at
or, at worst, that you are
ing your throat when you
J"ILL, a National Security
ser is one thing, but a
|ident of the United States is
i another. Would it be fitting
I say Zbig for Zbigniew
zinski were he President?
is not an academic question
[>e dismissed lightly because
ezinski is not native-born and
can't run for the office. No, the
jblcm it poses goes back a long
|: it has plagued the head line-
ar from the very beginning of
profession.
jr a while there, headline-
i'rs simply avoided protocol,
alone being either cute or
i-rly proper, when it came to
pdential names. Remember
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
reduced to a neat FDR? It
Is no particular skill to see
] space-saving that was.
lis was followed by HST for
ry Truman, and Truman
Keif certainly knew a thing or
[ alxiut saving space, since his
lie initial was S and stood for
king, his rationale for in
|ng that it not be followed by
eriod (one-half a unit all by
10.
THE case of Dwight Eisen-
ver, a mouthful if ever I saw
\, the headline-writers simply
led him Ike for a grandslam
}ce-saving 2.5 units. But then
initial-craze returned with
for President Kennedy; and
\n Hubert Horatio Humphrey,
nough he never made it to the
kite House, was honored by the
kdlme-writers with an HHH.
All of this, as you may have
guessed, bears on the upcoming
presidential campaign. President
Carter has fared fairly well by
simply being called Carter, which
costs 5.5 units in the headline-
writing world of counting charac-
ters. After all, what can you call
him Jimmy? With its two
"m's," Jimmy also works out to a
symmetrical 5.5., an "m" being
one of those pesky characters
that is fat enough to charge 1.5
units for its use, a whole half-unit
more than most others.
But how is one to call a
President of the United States
Jimmy? Take, say, Jimmy
Madison. It just doesn't seem
fitting.
THE EMERGING problem
should be clear to anyone who is
politically perceptive. Sen.
Kennedy is just going to be plain
old Ted for three counts to the
headline-writer as opposed to 5.5
for the incumbent, Jimmy or
Carter.
Anybody can see that since
headline-writers will have an
easier time to fit Ted into a head-
line, stories about him will appear
more frequently and reports
about Teds escapade at Chappa-
quiddick will finally die in a
flutter of exhaustion. Who wants
the bother of struggling over
head-count for place-names
either?
George Bush is a splendid
candidate, with but four units to
his last name, and in a pinch
George can be abbreviated to
Geo. for a count of 3.5 (don't
forget the period), a saving of a
whole half-unit. Clearly, this
makes Bush preferable as a
contender over Sen. Howard
Baker, who has just foolishly
announced his candidacy with
nary a thought that he's a full
five units.
ON THE other hand, Baker
won't have to suffer anything as
obscene as being metamorphosed
into, say, Howie by the headline-
writer's art because that, too, is
five units and hardly as dis-
tinguished as Baker. Further-
more, if he makes it, he will have
a definite advantage over Jimmy
or Carter, either way, by a whole
half-unit again.
California's Ronald Reagan is
definitely out of the running,
with 6 units in Reagan and 5.5 in
Ronald. Were it considered
respectable to call him Ron (3
units) that would be an entirely
different matter. It could even
excuse his performance in King's
How.
As for Gov. Brown, he has 5.5
units in his last name, a "w"
being another one of those fatties
costing an extra half-unit, but
Jerry only has 5, both of which
pretty much put him in Jimmy
Carter's category, give or take a
half-unit here or there, and so
who wins between them won't
matter much, not in the nation's
city rooms anyway.
BUT CAREFUL political
analysis leans toward the battle
between Carter and Ted as the
ultimate struggle, at least in the
'nominations phase, and my
inside sources tell me that the
President is preparing a secret
memo to the nation's headline-
writers revealing to them how
they can save a full unit in head-
count over Ted and still maintain
proper presidential decorum.
It will be okay to refer to the
President in their headlines, once
the campaign gets going, simply
as JC.
This will mean that the GOP's
Connally-come-lately has a dis-
tinct advantage over all the other
nominees. He can be called JC,
too, and now one will know
whom the headline-writers are
talking about. And that's about
as divine as anyone can hope to
get.
Soviet Jewry Update
Moscow. March 12,1979
|r Marcia, Elliot, Heidi and
indi,
h received your two letters.
Please excuse our long delay in
answering your letters.
We hope your family is well.
As you know, our son Igor has
been living in Jerusalem for
I Action Letter
|On behalf of: Ioaif Mendelevich
Prisoner-of Conscience in Christopol Prison
In solitary confinement for insisting on wearing his yarmulke
nd refusing to eat soup with pork gristle.
|Protest to:
Boris Shumilin
Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs
Ul.OgariovaS
Moscow. USSR
/rite to:
Natalia Rozenshtein
(friend of Iosif Mendelevich)
Hutlerova 2a/tl Apt. 69
Moscow, 117485. USSR
Adopt-A-Family
IFOR 31 CENTS YOU CAN ADOPT A RUSSIAN FAMILY. If
lyou would like additional information, fill out and return the
[coupon below and we will contact you by phone.
[name
PHONE
| ADDRESS
Return coupon to the Jewish Federation of South Broward,
Adopt-A-Family,
Florida 33020.
2719 Hollywood Boulevard. Hollywood,
almost two years and we miss
him. He studies at the University
of Jerusalem in the Department
of Psychology. We sometimes
hear from him. We are sure our
son will be very glad to get a
birthday greeting from you. His
birthday will be on the 18th of
March. Here is his address:
Jerusalem, Ramot, 39Vi55.
We have no news about our
visa, but we hope everything will
finish happily. As you know,
1979 is the International Year of
the Child. We believe all children
and their parents -have to be
happy, this year in particular.
Thus, all separated families
should be united: our family,
among others, too.
If you can, please send us a
photo of your family. We should
be glad to see your ceramic
things. It is very interesting.
Today is Purim. Our best
wishes to you and your children
on Purim and Pesach.
We wish you good health and
happiness. We hope to hear from
you very soon Please pass our
regards and greetings on Pesach
to the Rifkins and the Feltons
who are living in Florida, too. We
wrote to them, but did not receive
letters from them. Their ad-
dresses are: Evelyn Rifkin, 2150
San Souci Boulevard, Apartment
No. 203, North Miami, Florida,
33181 and Walter Felton, 408
NW 68th Ave., Apartment No.
309, Plantation, Florida, 33317.
Best Wishes.
Isolds and
Vladimir Tufeld
Israel to
-r-
The Government of Israel has
decided to extend medical and
humanitarian aid to the Cam-
bodian refugees, whose plight is
arousing increasing sympathy
throughout the world. The
Government of Israel is one of
the first to embark upon a
humanitarian aid program in
response to the situation of the
Cambodian refugees.
According to the Israel
government's decision, an in-
terministerial committee com-
posed of representatives of the
Prime Minister's Office, the
Ministries of Foreign Affairs,
Health. Labor, Social Welfare,
and El Al Airlines, has been
established in order to coordinate
activities connected with the
speedy dispatch of aid to the
refugees.
As a first step, medical sup-
plies and equipment will be sent
to the field clinics which are
presently located along the Thai-
Cambodian border and where a
proposed 15-man Israeli
volunteer medical team will be
working.
As Israel has no diplomatic
relations with Cambodia, its aid
will reach the refugees through
Thailand. The Embassy of Israel
in Bangkok is cooperating with
the Thai Red Cross and the Thai
Prime Minister's Office
ambodians
channeling the aid to its
destination.
In addition to the Israel
government's offer of aid, or-
dinary citizens like Abe Nathan,
an Israeli known for his in-
volvement in humanitarian
causes are showing their concern
for the refugees. Nathan is
already in Thailand, where he has
launched activities aimed at
alleviating the plight of the
refugees by distributing food
supplies. Nathan's actions are
enjoying wide support among the
Israeli public and have earned the
praises of the Thai government.
It will be recalled that the first
decision of the present Israeli
government, upon taking office
in June 1977, was to offer asylum
to 66 Vietnamese refugees. Later
in January 1979, a further 101
"Boat-People" of Southeast Asia
were rehabilitated and absorbed
in Israel. Furthermore, in June
1979, Prime Minister Menachem
Begin appealed to heads of state
to follow the decision of the
Israeli government by accepting
a number of Indochinese
refugees, relative to the sire of
their territory and population.
Recently, 197 refugees from
Indochina reached the shores of
Israel and were welcomed as new
inhabitants of the town of Sderot.
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I

Page 14
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,1979
Hallandale Mayor Up for Bonds Honor HoUybrook to Fete
I Myron Grabisches
Hallandale Mayor Artll. Canon
has been selected to receive the
Israel Peace Award at the annual
Hallandale Jewish Center Salute
to Israel which is held in
cooperation with the State of
Israel Bonds Organization.
The event is scheduled for
Sunday, Nov. 25, at 9 a.m. in the
Social Hall of the Hallandale
Jewish Center. According to
Commissioner Sam Waterman,
chairman of the Salute to Israel,
"Canon was picked to receive the
'coveted honor because of his
many years of dedicated service
and devotion to the economic
development of Israel and his
work on behalf of the local Jewish
community."
Mayor Canon, a former stock-
broker-investment counselor, was
one of the founders of the
Hallandale United Citizens, a
member of B'nai B'rith, the
Broward County Human
Relations Committee and a board
JDC Official Retires
The retirement of Murray Kass
as public relations director of the
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee was
announced this week by Ralph I.
Goldman, JDC executive vice
president.
Kass has been on the JDC
public relations staff for over
twenty years, the last 10 as
director, he added. He retired
officially as of Oct. 31, and is
volunteering his services for the
annual meeting.
"Murray Kass has been a very
dedicated, hard working, devoted
and valued staff member,"
Goldman said, "and has well
earned his graduation into the
ranks of the leisure class. We
shall miss him, but we hope to
continue to benefit from his
experience and expertise on
special projects."
Kass has been in Jewish
communal service for over 35
years during which he was
associated with the American
Jewish Congress, the Brooklyn
Jewish Community Council, the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and the Council of
Jewish Federations as well as the
JDC.
Asked what his retirement
plans were, Kass replied: "Some
writing, reading, photography,
study, travel, repairs around the
house, dieting and resting."
Aquarius Honors Goldbergs
Residents of Aquarius will
meet Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 8
p.m. in the Cascade Room for
their annual Night for Israel
when they will present the Israel
City of Peace Award to Bernard
and Olga Goldberger.
Held under the auspices of the
State of Israel Bonds
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Organization, the Night for Israel
is a joyous event, usually enjoyed
by all residents, according to
chairman of the evening Julius
Freilich.
The Goldbergers will be
recognized for their several
decades of tireless work on behalf
of the economic development of
the State of Israel through the
Israel Bonds Program. Gold-
berger is a member of B'nai
B'rith Presidents Club, and Mrs.
Goldberger is a Life Member of
Hadassah. They have been
honored for their work by the
United Jewish Appeal and have
been participants in the activities
of the Cancer Fund and the
Hebrew Home for the Aged in
Riverdale, NY. They are
members of Temple Sinai in
Hollywood.
Special guest at the event will
be Larry Dorn, the humorist and
raconteur. The Aquarius Night
for Israel is being sponsored by
the David Ben-Gurion B'nai
B'rith Lodge and the Golda Meir
Hadassah. Co-chairmen are
Shirley Green, Rose Kern, Sam
Ackerman. Morris Lasden and
Sam Wiletsky.
Gary a. Yanowltz, D.D.s.
General Dentistry
Announces New Hours:
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wed: 8:30am 5pm sat 8: JO am- 2 pm
Tnurs: 1 15 pm 8 pm
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Phone 966-6352 for appointment
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Myron and Florence Grabisch
of HoUybrook Golf and Tennis
Condominium will receive the
Israel Generation Award at a
Night for Israel to be held at the
HoUybrook Club House at 8 p.m.
on Sunday, Dec. 2.
The Night for Israel is
sponsored by the HoUybrook
Israel Bonds Committee with
Jack Sterling as chairman and
Harry Goldstein, co-chairman.
According to Sterling, the
Grabisches wUl be recognized for
their continued support for Israel
and the local Jewish community
and for the work they have done >
for both over a period of years.
Grabisch is a member of B'nai
B'rith Century Club and was
honored by the Israel Bonds
Organization in New York. He is
a member of the Juvenile Fur-
niture Dealers Division. Mrs.
Grabisch is a member of
HoUybrook ORT and was an
officer at her New York Chapter.
The guest speaker at the Night
for Israel will be Tom Cohen,
Jewish communal leader in
Broward County.
Mayor Canon
member of the Hallandale Jewish
Center.
He has devoted time to work
with the Israel Bonds campaigns
in Hallandale, as well as for the
United Jewish Appeal. A former
city commissioner and vice
muyor, he was elected Hallandale
Mayor in March 1979.
Special guest at the Salute to
Israel will be Rabbi Carl Klein,
spiritual leader of the Hallandale
Jewish Center.
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Friday, November 16,1979
The Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Page 15
jUU ^bc
By Abe II a I pern
(Fourth of a series)
In the last column (Jewish Floridian and
Shofar, Nov. 2, page 15> I gave brief descriptions
of three of the first seven Dead Sea Scrolls now
located in the Shrine of the Book in Jerusalem.
9 The complete Isiah Scroll containing all
chapters from Chapters 1 through 66, identified
as MS 2.
The incomplete Isiah Scroll, identified as MS
1.
0 The Habakkuk Commentary.
Following are brief descriptions of the other
four scrolls.
t "THE SCROLL OF THE THANKS-
GIVING HYMNS stands between those scrolls
which contain Biblical books, or interpretations of
Biblical books, and those which deal with the code
of the sect .
"On the contents of the scroll, here is what
Prof. Sukenik, the first to handle it, wrote: 'The
Thanksgiving Scroll is a collection of songs,
expressing the views and feelings of one of the
members of the sect whose writings were dis-
covered in the Dead Sea Genizah (manuscript
repository). Imitating the style of the Psalms, the
songs express thanks for the acts of kindness God
has performed for their author. Since the great
majority begin with the phrase I thank Thee, 0
God, I have called the entire group the Thanks-
giving Scroll .
" 'Most of the hymns strike a distinctive
personal note. Of particular interest from this
viewpoint is the long chapter in column 4, in
which the author refers to himself as a man who
hoped for special revelations from God and who,
despite his opponents, had many followers
flocking to him to listen to his teachings. A
possible inference is that the author was the
Teacher of Righteousness .' {The Message of
the Scrolls by Higael Yadin, pp. 105,106)
MANUAL OF DISCIPLINE. "The first
page of this scroll makes reference to the
principles of their faith which, in brief, are rules of
behavior in accordance with the laws of God,
given through Moses and through all His ser-
vants the prophets'; that is: 'to love all that He
has chosen and to hate all that He has rejected: to
keep away from all evil and to adhere to all good
deeds: to do truth and righteousness and justice
in the land, and not to walk any longer according
to the stubbornness of a guilty heart and eyes of
fornication, doing all evil .'
"The code proceeds to explain that the
members are required to contribute to the com-
munity 'all their knowledge and strength and
wealth into the Yahad (literally: the together or
community) of God.' They must thus contribute
everything they have. The sequence of these con-
tributions is interesting knowledge, strength
and wealth: that is, from the relatively permanent
to the transitory .
"The Commentary on Habakkuk and the
Thanksgiving Scroll tells us clearly that these
writers, who were busy interpreting the holy
scriptures in their own special way, were people
who had serious complaints against the
inhabitants of Jerusalem and their priests, and
that their Teacher of Righteousness was per-
secuted and had been compelled to flee from the
Wicket Priest. ." (ibid pp. 113.114,115). -
"THE WAR SCROLL U ... a hitherto un-
known book, and there is none like it either
Jewish or Christian, in the literature ot the time of
the Second Temple or in the period following. Nor
>s there any work like it among the sect's own
books, (ibid p. 128)
"This scroll was written by the Essenes who
called themselves the Children of Light and all
their enemies they called the Children of Dark-
ness. Especially their main enemy the Kitites,
The excavations of Khirbat Qumran on the north-
western shore of the Dead Sea. It is believed that
this was a village of the Essenes Sect who created
the library of the many scrolls found in the nearby
caves. (Photo by Abe Alpern)
whom scholars believe to be in fact the Romans
who occupied the country at that time.
"In this scroll they say, that in the end of days,
the Children of Light who have been scattered
across other nations will return to Jerusalem. At
that time there will be a great war the eschato-
logical war, the final war between the Children
of Light and the Children of Darkness. At the end
it says there will be seven battles. Three times the
Children of Darkness will win, three times the
Children of Light will win. In the seventh battle
the great hand of God will help the Children of
Light, and they will be victorious and so peace
will descend upon earth." (from tape commentary
by Yigael Yadin, dated 1974)
THE SCROLL OF THE APOCRYPHAL
GENESIS. The four scrolls bought by Yigael
Yadin in the United States "included one which
was so fragile that its unrolling presented many
severe problems.
"When that scroll reached America, a fragment
of one of its first pages somehow became
detached, and thus it was revealed that unlike
the other scrolls it was written not in Hebrew
but in Aramaic. John C. Trever, who perused the
fragment, succeeded in deciphering on it the name
of Lantech .(This led scholars to believe that it
was a copy of the well-known Lantech Scroll.)
"Fortunately, its inner part was well preserved,
and, when opened, astonished us: the scroll was
not the Lamech Scroll at all. Instead it was an
Aramaic document related to the Book of
Genesis, interwoven with various stories, most of
them based on stories from Genesis, but with
additional details and hitherto unknown
names .
"The last few inner pages of the scroll deal with
Genesis XII, XIII, XIV and XV. All are written
in the first person by Abraham. Chapter XII has,
among others, an interesting description of how
Sarai (or Sara) was taken by the King of Egypt,
and adds many absorbing details about Sara's
beauty which are lacking in the Old Testament."
(The Message of the Scrolls by Yigael Yadin, pp.
144,145)
In the next column I will summarize the sig-
nificance of the Dead Sea Scrolls to Jewish
history and culture.
(To be continued)
Editor's note:
Please send ell questions to:
ASK ABE
co Jewish Federation of South Broward
2719 Hollywood Blvd.
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Col Itzhaki Lectures in Hollywood
On Tuesday evening, Oct. 30,
fhe South Broward Jewish
[community heard Col. Itzhak
Uzhaki, a Biblical archaeologist,
n educator and a sixth
generation sabra, deliver an
"formative and stimulating
ture at Temple Beth Shalom of
lollywood. He succeeded in
ummunicating to the audience
original insights on two
Biblical heroes: Moses and
Joshua.
To Col. Itzhaki these
characters are very human. The
Bible does not hide their foibles
and failures. Their aspirations
and moral strivings are depicted
in a very human framework. The
lecturer gave his audience a new
perspective on the Bible, as a
reservoir of moral philosophy.
history and magnificent
literature.
This was the second com-
munity lecture to be sponsored
by the South Broward Midrasha
during the 1979-80 program. The
Midrasha is presently in the first
semester of the season. Watch for
announcements of the opening of
the second semester and future
lectures.
Temple Sinai News
Mort Kushner, President of I
Temple Sinai of Hollywood,
announces the delegates who
represented the temple at the
United Synagogue of America
Biennial Convention in New York
this week.
The delegates were led by Dr.
and Mrs. Alfred Rosenthal (Dr.
Rosenthal is the first vice-
president of the temple, and Mrs.
Rosenthal is the chairman of the
Education Committee): Rabbi
and Mrs. Seymour Friedman, (he
is spiritual leader of the tem-
pi.land Marlene Lusskin,
member of the board of governors
and chairman of the Youth
Commission from the Southeast
Region of the United Synagogue.
Also attending the convention
were Ina Wachman, past
president of Temple Sinai
Sisterhood, and Morton
Grebelsky, Southern Council vice
president of United Synagogue,
Southeast Region.
More than 2,000 delegates were
present, representing over 800
congregations throughout the
United States, Canada and South
America.
On Sunday evening, Nov. 18,
the Chaverim group will meet at
the home of Dr. and Mrs. Al
Rosenthal. Speaker for the
meeting will be Shoshannah
Spec tor.
Ms. Spector was born in Israel
and taught at the Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami for 20
years. She also taught Hebrew at
Grossinger's Hotel for seven
summers and published the
following books for children: The
Seder That Almost Wasn't, The
Five Young Heroes of Israel, and
her latest book is. The
Miraculous rescue-Entebbe.
Rabbi Seymour Friedman
announces a special College
Youth Night to take place on
Friday, Nov. 23, at Temple Sinai.
Participating in the Sabbath
bituariEH
GOODMAN
William. 74. a resident of Hallandale
until two months ago, died Nov. 4 In
Detroit. Mich. He was a pharmacist.
Born in Ambridge. Pa., he had been
living In Southfield. Mich., with his only
surviving child, a daughter. Mrs. Sonla
Dash. Also surviving are two slaters and
two grandchildren. His wife Mary died
recently In Hallandale Mr. Ooodman
was burled Nov. 5 from Hebrew
Memrlal Chapel In Oak Park, Mich.
Friends may contact Mrs. Oaah at 16860
New Hampshire, Southfield. Mich
48075.
Evening Services will be students
from colleges and universities
throughout the state of Florida
who will be participating in a
panel discussion, "Tradition -
College; Friend or Foe."
A wine and cheese reception
will be held immediately after the
services for the college students
to get together in order to plan
future events.
One of these events will be the
Annual College Brunch which
will take place on Dec. 26 at 11:30
a.m.
Rabbi Friedman invites all
college students throughout the
community to participate.
Religious
Directory
NORTHBROWARD
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL. 7100 W. Oak
land Park Blvd. Conservative. Inpbi
Phillip A LabPWltl. Cantor Maurice
A. Neu
2151 Riverside
TEMPLE BETH ORR.
Drive. Reform (44)
TAMARAC JEWISH CENTER. 9106
57th St. Conservative. Rabbi Israel
Zimmerman. <44 A)
MIRAMAR
TEMPLE ISRAEL. 6920 SW 35th St.
Conservative. Rabbi Paul Plotkin.
Cantor Joseph Wichelewski. (48)
PEMBROKE PINES
TEMPLE BETH EMET. Pines Middle
School, 200 NW Douglas Rd., Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Bennet Greenspon.
TEMPLE IN THE PINES. 9730 Sterling
Rd.. Hollywood Conservative. Rabbi
Bernard P. Shoter.
PLANTATION
PLANTATION JEWISH CONGREGA
TlON 400 S Nob Hill Rd. Rabbi Sheon
J Harr ,64)
RECONSTRUCTIONIST SYNA
GOGUE 7473 NW 4th St. (69)
HALLANDALE
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER. 416
NE 8th Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Dr.
Carl Klein, Ph.D. Cantor Jacob Dan
ziger. ,12)
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
SINAI TEMPLE OF NORTH DADE
18801 NE 22nd Ave. Reform. Rabbi
Ralph P. Kongsley. Cantor Irving
Shulkes. ,37)
HOLLYWOOD
TEMPLE BETH AHM. 310 SW 62nd
Ave. Conservative. Rabbi Max
Landman. ,47B)
TEMPLE BETH EL. 1351 S. 14th Ave
Reform. Rabbi Samuel Jaffe.
Assistant Rabbi Ben Romer. (45)
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM 4601 Arthur
St Conservative. Rabbi Morton
Maldvsky. Cantor Irving Gold ,46)
TEMPLE SINAI 1201 Johnson St.
Conservative. Rabbi Seymour Fried
man. Rabbi Emeritus David Shapiro
Cantor Naftaly A. Linkovsky. 165)
TEMPLE SOLEL. 5100 Sheridan St.
Hollywood, Fla 33021. Liberal
Reform. Rabbi Robert P Frazin.
Cantor Michael Kyrr. (47C)
YOUNG ISRAEL OF HOLLYWOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. 3291 Stirling
Road Orthodox. Rabbi Moshe
Bomier. ,52)
L
EVITT-
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
1921 Pembroke Rd.
Hollywood. Ha
921-7200
13585 W. Dixie Hwy.
Norm Miami. Ha.
949-6515
5411 w Okeechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach. Fla.
689-6700________

4900 GRIFFIN ROAD. HOLLYWOOO, FLORIDA
Vempte 3aki
Wemotial
Cjatdttu
The all-Jewish cemetery in Broward
County. Peaceful surroundings, beau-
tifully landscaped, perpetual care, rea-
sonably priced.
For information call: 920-8225 or wrrfaj
TEMPLE BETH EL
1351 S. 14th AVE. HOLLYWOOO. FLORIDA 3302*0
Pleat* mm* m literature on the I
NAME. _________________
ADDRESS: _____________
. PHONEi
" ......:.....,
*.- .- jmm
*.va*rt-'..


PaaeU
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian and S ho far of Greater Hollywood
Friday, November 16,1979

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